WorldWideScience

Sample records for as recycling process

  1. Continental moisture recycling as a Poisson process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Goessling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available On their journey across large land masses, water molecules experience a number of precipitation-evaporation cycles (recycling events. We derive analytically the frequency distributions of recycling events for the water molecules contained in a given air parcel. Given the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, continental moisture recycling is shown to develop either into a Poisson distribution or a geometric distribution. We distinguish two cases: in case (A recycling events are counted since the water molecules were last advected across the ocean-land boundary. In case (B recycling events are counted since the water molecules were last evaporated from the ocean. For case B we show by means of a simple scale analysis that, given the conditions on Earth, realistic frequency distributions may be regarded as a mixture of a Poisson distribution and a geometric distribution. By contrast, in case A the Poisson distribution generally appears as a reasonable approximation. This conclusion is consistent with the simulation results of an earlier study where an atmospheric general circulation model equipped with water vapor tracers was used. Our results demonstrate that continental moisture recycling can be interpreted as a Poisson process.

  2. The siderulgical process as way of recycling plastic residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Diez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of new recycling ways to allow therecovery of plastics from municipal wastes is of greatinterest in order to keep as many options open,especially when the co-processing with raw materialscan be performed in consolidate industrial processes.In this context, integrated steel plants can beconsidered as an option for those wastes withtechnical limitations for conventional mechanicalrecycling. The combination of the blast furnace routeand coke plant in the steel industry provide a wayto expand feedstock recycling with severalenvironmental benefits such as saving fossil fuels,reducing landfill of the wastes and reducing solidparticles, SO2 and CO2 emissions. This paper is anattempt to compile some relevant advances in theserecycling routes.

  3. The proof of the pudding: urban recycling in North America as a process of ecological modernisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinberg, A.

    2003-01-01

    This essay analyses the history of the development of municipal recycling in the United States between 1970 and 1996 as a case of Ecological Modernisation. Using the framework of Ecological Modernisation Theory (EMT), the essay examines the predecessor institutions to modern recycling, showing how e

  4. Comminution and sizing processes of concrete block waste as recycled aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, P C C; Ulsen, C; Pereira, F A; Quattrone, M; Angulo, S C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the environmental impact of construction and demolition waste (CDW), recycling is mandatory. It is also important that recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) are used in concrete to meet market demands. In the literature, the influence of RCAs on concrete has been investigated, but very limited studies have been conducted on how the origin of concrete waste and comminution processes influence RCA characteristics. This paper aims to investigate the influence of three different comminution and sizing processes (simple screening, crushing and grinding) on the composition, shape and porosity characteristics of RCA obtained from concrete block waste. Crushing and grinding implies a reduction of RCA porosity. However, due to the presence of coarse quartz rounded river pebbles in the original concrete block mixtures, the shape characteristics deteriorated. A large amount of powder (<0.15 mm) without detectable anhydrous cement was also generated. PMID:26168872

  5. Comminution and sizing processes of concrete block waste as recycled aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, P C C; Ulsen, C; Pereira, F A; Quattrone, M; Angulo, S C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the environmental impact of construction and demolition waste (CDW), recycling is mandatory. It is also important that recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) are used in concrete to meet market demands. In the literature, the influence of RCAs on concrete has been investigated, but very limited studies have been conducted on how the origin of concrete waste and comminution processes influence RCA characteristics. This paper aims to investigate the influence of three different comminution and sizing processes (simple screening, crushing and grinding) on the composition, shape and porosity characteristics of RCA obtained from concrete block waste. Crushing and grinding implies a reduction of RCA porosity. However, due to the presence of coarse quartz rounded river pebbles in the original concrete block mixtures, the shape characteristics deteriorated. A large amount of powder (<0.15 mm) without detectable anhydrous cement was also generated.

  6. Development of tailored ceramic microstructures using recycled marble processing residue as pore-former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domopoulou, A.; Spiliotis, X.; Charalampides, G.; Baklavaridis, A.; Papapolymerou, G.; Karayannis, V.

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of marble processing residue is significant since marble processing constitutes an important industrial sector. Therefore, the sustainable management and the valorisation, in an economically profitable manner, of this industrial by-product should be considered. In this work, the potential use of marble residue as pore-former into clayey mixtures for the production of lightweight, porous and thermal insulating ceramics is investigated. Four samples consisting of clayey ceramic body incorporating up to 50 wt.% fine marble residue powder were produced. The final ceramic products were produced upon firing (sintering) at 950oC. Porosity and thermal conductivity measurements were carried out in order to assess the thermal insulating behavior of the produced sintered ceramics. The porosity of the sintered ceramics increases substantially by increasing the marble residue admixture loading. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in thermal conductivity. Consequently, the marble residue can be successfully employed as pore-forming agent, in order to improve the insulating behavior of the ceramic materials.

  7. CHALLENGES FOR PROCESS INDUSTRIES IN RECYCLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lothar Reh

    2006-01-01

    Increasing population and individual wealth have led to a higher demand for energy and raw material resources as well as for steady improvement of processing technology in view of efficient use of resources and avoiding emissions in production and recycling processes. Present situation and future trend of recycling processing are discussed by examples from the aluminium and steel industries, recycling of cars and post-consumer municipal recovery.The importance of more intense observance of thermodynamic laws and of a 4E strategy "Economy, Energy, Environment and Education" is outlined.

  8. Effect of Radiation Processing as an Integral Part of Safe Recycling Kitchen Waste for Poultry Feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen wastes are relevant as a source of organic matter (i.e. protein, carbohydrate, minerals, and vitamins). Several microorganisms break down organic matter into methane, carbon dioxide, and other organic compounds containing sulfur and halogens. Kitchen wastes are valuable whereas they are too hazardous to be rejected into the environment without any attempt to recover and recycle them in a valuable form. Recycling kitchen waste as a feedstuff could have a considerable effect on reducing costs and solving some disposal problems. Treated such wastes with ionizing radiation can make an important contribution to minimize the risk of pathogens and the emission of greenhouse gases. The study was undertaken with two hundred and thirty kitchen waste samples collected from different restaurants in Cairo, Egypt. Effect of radiation treatment at 10 kGy on crude protein, amino acids profile, available lysine and the in-vitro digestibility of kitchen waste protein have been studied. The results suggest that radiation pasteurization of dried kitchen waste has a beneficial effect on recycling of such waste and permits waste to be included in poultry ration without any health hazard and nutritional problem. (author)

  9. Recycling as moral behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    It is argued in this paper that in the affluent, industrial societies, environmental behaviours like recycling are typically classified within ""the domain of morality"" in people's minds. Intentions regarding these types of behaviours are not ba a thorough - conscious or unconscious - calculation...... of Reasoned Action (TRA) with regard to understanding recycling behaviour. Further, examples of misleading policy conclusions are discussed suggested that within the framework of cognitive psychology, Schwartz's model of altruistic behaviour offers a more satisfying starting point for understanding recycling...

  10. Survey of metallurgical recycling processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemsler, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    In the year 2000, the US will consume about 3.2 x 10/sup 15/ Btu to produce the seven major nonferrous metals Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Mg, and Ti. Of this amount, 82% will be used in the production of Al. It is projected that 0.6 x 10/sup 15/ Btu will be saved by the recycle of secondary metals. Major opportunities for increasing the extent of recycle and thereby increasing the energy savings are discussed. An inherent feature in the energistics of recycle is that physical processes such as magnetic separation, density separations, melting, and in some instances vaporization are far less energy intensive than are chemical processes associated with dissolution and electrowinning. It is in the domain of scrap of complex composition and physical form, difficult to handle by existing technology, that opportunities exist for new chemical recycle technology. Recycle of scrap metal of adequate grade is currently achieved through pyrometallurgical processes which, in many cases, are not very energy intensive as compared with hydrometallurgical processes. Preliminary flowsheets are presented for the recovery of value metals from batteries considered for use in vehicular propulsion and load leveling applications. The battery types examined are lead/acid, nickel/zinc, nickel/iron, zinc/chlorine, lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide, and sodium/sulfur. A flow sheet has been outlined for an integrated hydrometallurgical process to treat low-grade copper scrap. A fully integrated hydrometallurgical process is outlined, and costs and energy consumption are derived, for recovering zinc metal from electric furnace flue dusts. Costs and energy are high and the process does not appear to warrant development at this time. Improvement in the recycle of magnesium is associated primarily with improved recycle in the Al industry where Mg is an important alloy additive. Ni and Ti recycle are associated with improved collection and sorting of stainless steel and specialty alloys.

  11. Process to recycle shredder residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  12. Recycling process assessment of mechanical recycling of printed circuit board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Jun-qi; LIU Zhi-feng; LIU Guang-fu; WANG Shu-wang; HUANG Hai-hong

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment index system was established. The mechanical recycling process of printed circuit board was evaluated according to the comprehensive evaluation index system using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process. A process assessment software system of mechanical recycling was established to evaluate different recy cling technologies. And the software system was developed in the environment of VB 6.0 and Access 2000.

  13. The quality of the recovered matrix material as an element of assessment of effectiveness of the composite recycling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nagolska

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal composites are ever more readily used as structural materials, due to their properties. Therefore, in spite of their difficult processing, their use constantly grows (e.g. SGL Carbon Poland S.A.. In consequence, the amount of their wastes grows too. Since the social pressure aimed at improving the quality of environment has recently intensified and the significance of the technologies enabling recovery of secondary materials has increased, the interest in recycling of metal composites also grew, irrespective of all the difficulties related thereto.One of the groups of metal composites includes the composites with saturated reinforcement. They may be recycled only with the method of components separation. The simplest way for this consists in choosing an appropriate environment in which the recycling occurs so as to enable free outflow of melted matrix from capillaries of the porous reinforcing profile. As an effectiveness measure of the process not only the yield of the melted metal but also its quality should be considered. The paper presents results of the studies on recycling of a group of composite materials with saturated reinforcement of various structures and chemical compositions. The environments including salt mixtures chosen for the considered composites reinforced with pressed fibre profiles satisfy the first and the most important quantity criterion. i.e. allow for achieving the required metal yield. For the composite of the highest yield level the quality of melted metal was analyzed which showed that the environment selected this way meets also another criterion that enables obtaining high quality alloys, thus allowing for their direct use in the process of reinforcing the composite casts. On the other hand, in the case of the composites reinforced with sinters the first criterion has not been met and, therefore, the metal quality in this case has not been assessed.

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “INTERSEROH Step 1” used to recycle polypropylene cratesfor use as food contact material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF provides a scientific opinion dealing with the safety evaluation of the recycling process “INTERSEROH Step 1” with the EC register number RECYC069. The process recycles pre-washed damaged food contact re-usable polypropylene crates (RPC which have been used in a closed and controlled product loop into new recycled polypropylene crates. Through this process, cleaned damaged crates are firstly ground into flakes, which are further blended with virgin polypropylene (PP or used up to 100% to manufacture new recycled crates. The Panel considered that repeated grinding and injection moulding of PP crates which is part of the recycling process, under conditions described by the applicant, is not of safety concern. The Panel concluded that the input of the process “INTERSEROH Step 1” originates from a product loop which is in a closed and controlled chain designed to ensure that only materials and articles which have been intended for food contact are used and that any contamination can be ruled out when run under the conditions described by the applicant. The recycling process “INTERSEROH Step 1” is therefore able to produce recycled PP suitable for manufacturing PP crates intended to be used in contact with whole fruits and vegetables as requested by the applicant.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION AND PROCESSING OF SCALES FROM THE MECHANICAL DESCALING OF CARBON STEELS FOR RECYCLING AS COATING PIGMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson de Oliveira Fraga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The large volume of solid wastes generated as scales in Steel Mills accounts to circa 1% to 2% of the total steel production and has led to studies aiming the recycling of scales, usually resulting in products of low added value. In this study, scales from the mechanical descaling of SAE 1045 steel were characterized by SEM and by quantitative X-Ray diffraction (Rietveld method, as well as by differential thermal analysis, aiming to develop its pretreatment for the further use as lamellar pigments in anticorrosive coatings of high added value. Aspect ratios between 1:50 and 1:100 were obtained by the processing of scales, which allows the replacement of other micaceous iron oxides.

  16. Feasibility study of recycling cephalosporin C fermentation dregs using co-composting process with activated sludge as co-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yao; Wen, Qinxue; Zhang, Shihua; Yang, Lian

    2016-09-01

    Composting is a potential alternative for cephalosporin C fermentation dregs (CCFDs) compared with incineration process or landfill because of its advantage of recovering nutrients. In this research, CCFDs and activated sludge (AS) were co-composted to analyze the feasibility of recycling the nutrients in CCFDs. A pilot-scale aerobic composting system with an auto-control system was used in this research, and the maturity and security of the compost product were evaluated. The temperature of the composting mixtures was maintained above 55°C for more than 3 days during the composting, indicating that co-composting of CCFDs and AS could reach the compost maturity standard, and the seeds germination index (GI) increased from 17.61% to 68.93% by the end of the composting process (28 days). However, the degradation rate of cephalosporin C (CPC) was only 6.58% during the composting process. Monitoring the quality of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the composts showed that the log copy of blaTEM in the composts increased from 2.15 in the initial phase to 6.37 after 28 days. Long-term investigation of CPC degradation and ARGs variation was conducted for the composts; CPC could still be detected after the maturity phases. A removal efficiency of 49.10% could be achieved in 110 days, while the log copy of ARGs increased to 7.93. Although a higher GI value (>80.00%) was observed, the risk of recycling the CCFDs compost product into land is still high. PMID:26828961

  17. Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Goode, Kieran; Sexton, Aidan; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Every year about 1.5 billion tyres are discarded worldwide representing a large amount of solid waste, but also a largely untapped source of raw materials. The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel scrap tyre recycling process which uses molten zinc as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this media to separate the solids products (i.e. steel and rCB) in a sink-float separation at an operating temperature of 450-470 °C. This methodology involved: •construction of the laboratory scale batch reactor,•separation of floating rCB from the zinc,•recovery of the steel from the bottom of the reactor following pyrolysis. PMID:27274458

  18. Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Goode, Kieran; Sexton, Aidan; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Every year about 1.5 billion tyres are discarded worldwide representing a large amount of solid waste, but also a largely untapped source of raw materials. The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel scrap tyre recycling process which uses molten zinc as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this media to separate the solids products (i.e. steel and rCB) in a sink-float separation at an operating temperature of 450-470 °C. This methodology involved: •construction of the laboratory scale batch reactor,•separation of floating rCB from the zinc,•recovery of the steel from the bottom of the reactor following pyrolysis.

  19. Claus recycle with double combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bishtawi, Ribhi; Haimour, No' man [University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2004-12-15

    A new modification is developed on conventional Claus process to increase the overall sulfur recovery as well as to decrease the costs. The modification combines both oxygen enrichment and recycling. The process is simulated and studied for various N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratios with and without using SURE double combustion technique. The predictions show that using pure oxygen in combustion, condensing water vapor in a condenser following the first sulfur condenser and recycling the effluent gas to combine it with fresh acid gas feed leads to large savings in the production cost and to a clean environment. However, it leads to a high adiabatic flame temperature which exceeds the maximum allowable temperature of the furnace material of construction as well as its refractory. To avoid these effects, it is necessary to use SURE double combustion technique. The oxygen flow rate to the first combustion stage should not exceed 78% O{sub 2}.

  20. A biotechnological process for treatment and recycling poultry wastes manure as a feed ingredient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Jalil, M.H. [Faculty of Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco). Biology Dept.; Hassan II Inst. of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, Rabat-Instituts (Morocco); Faid, M. [Hassan II Inst. of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, Rabat-Instituts (Morocco); Elyachioui, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2001-07-01

    Poultry wastes manure was diluted by adding the same amount of water 50-50 (w/v). They were then mixed with 10% molasses. The mixture was inoculated with a starter culture of Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus acidolactici, and incubated at 30{sup o}C for 10 days. Changes in nutritional quality and biochemical properties (pH, total nitrogen, total volatile nitrogen, non protein nitrogen, carbohydrates and ash) were determined for the raw and the transformed product. In parallel, microbiological analyses, including standard plant count, enterobacteria and enterococci, were performed. Results indicated that the product obtained from the wastes fermentation showed low counts of enterobacteria and enterococci. Chemical determinations showed a net decrease of the pH to around 4.0 and the growth curve of the lactic acid bacteria showed the success of the acidification process. The total nitrogen was conserved in the product and the total volatile nitrogen was totally eliminated. The product was used for substituting some protein sources in a conventional formula used in laying feeding of three lots. Two formulae containing, respectively, 20% and 40% of the product was compared to the control (0%). The food consumption and laying performances were monitored for 30 days. The nutritional test indicted that the incorporation of the poultry manure silage of up to 40% gave laying performances similar to those obtained with the conventional formula. These results show that it is possible to transform poultry manure by controlled fermentation and that the product has an added value as a feed ingredient. (Author)

  1. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd, E-mail: nowack@empa.ch

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO{sub 2}, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  2. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs

  3. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1992-08-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  4. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  5. Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbl, Daniel G.; Lee, Bernard S.; Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Lam, Henry W.

    1976-07-06

    In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

  6. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “INTERSEROH Step 2” used to recycle polypropylene crates for use as food contact material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process “INTERSEROH Step 2”, EU register number RECYC070. The process recycles pre-washed damaged food contact re-usable polypropylene crates (RPC or parts of crates which have been used in a closed and controlled product loop into new recycled crates. Through this process, pre-washed damaged RPC and parts of crates are ground into flakes. The flakes are compounded, extruded into pellets then used up to 100 % for the production of new recycled PP crates by injection moulding. The Panel considered that repeated grinding and injection moulding of PP crates which is part of the recycling process, under conditions described by the applicant, is not of safety concern. The Panel concluded that the input of the process “INTERSEROH Step 2” originates from a product loop which is in a closed and controlled chain designed to ensure that only materials and articles which have been intended for food contact are used and that any contamination can be ruled out when run under the conditions described by the applicant. The recycling process “INTERSEROH Step 2” is therefore able to produce recycled PP suitable for manufacturing PP crates intended to be used in contact with whole fruits and vegetables at room temperature or below.

  7. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Given a large flow rate of CRT glass ∼10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. ► The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. ► Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. ► Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. ► Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  8. Recycling as Habitual Behavior: The Impact of Habit on Household Waste Recycling Behavior in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Achapan Ittiravivongs

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to permit a better understanding of factors influencing recycling behavior of Thai households in a habitual perspective. The study applied theory of interpersonal as critical framework and investigated the role of habit on recycling involvement of 381 samples in Bangkok. The outcomes indicated that recycling behavior was significantly predicted by recycling intention, habit, recycling ability, facility condition, and adequacy of recycling information, in order of strength. ...

  9. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “CO.N.I.P.” used to recycle polypropylene and polyethylene crates for use as food contact material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process “CO.N.I.P.”, EC register number RECYC040. The process recycles single use food contact polypropylene (PP and high-density polyethylene (HDPE crates which have been used in a closed and controlled product loop into new recycled crates. Through this process, single use crates are firstly ground into flakes which may be used as such or further processed by extrusion or densification into granules. Recycled flakes or granules are used with or without blending with PP or HDPE offcuts or scrap to manufacture new recycled PP and HDPE crates by injection moulding. The Panel concluded that the input of the process “CO.N.I.P.” originates from a product loop which is in a closed and controlled chain ensuring that only materials and articles which have been intended for food contact are used and that any contamination can be ruled out when run under the conditions described by the applicant. The recycling process “CO.N.I.P.” is therefore able to produce recycled PP and HDPE suitable for manufacturing PP and HDPE crates intended to be used in contact with whole fruits and vegetables at room temperature or below as requested by the applicant.

  10. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “Schoeller Arca Systems”, used to recycle polypropylene and high-density polyethylene crates for use as food contact material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process “Schoeller Arca Systems”, EC register number RECYC075. The process recycles damaged food contact re-usable polypropylene (PP and high-density polyethylene (HDPE crates which have been used in a closed and controlled product loop into new recycled crates. Through this process, damaged crates are firstly ground into flakes which are further blended with virgin PP or HDPE or used at 100 % to manufacture new recycled PP and HDPE crates. The CEF Panel concluded that the input of the process “Schoeller Arca Systems” originates from a product loop which is in a closed and controlled chain ensuring that only materials and articles which have been intended for food contact are used and that any contamination can be ruled out when run under the conditions described by the applicant. The Panel considered that the repeated grinding and injection moulding of PP and HDPE crates, which is part of the recycling process, under conditions described by the applicant, is not of safety concern. Therefore the recycling process “Schoeller Arca Systems” is able to produce recycled PP and HDPE suitable for manufacturing crates intended to be used in contact at room temperature or below with meat, whole fruits and vegetables as requested by the applicant.

  11. Supercritical Water Process for the Chemical Recycling of Waste Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Motonobu

    2010-11-01

    The development of chemical recycling of waste plastics by decomposition reactions in sub- and supercritical water is reviewed. Decomposition reactions proceed rapidly and selectively using supercritical fluids compared to conventional processes. Condensation polymerization plastics such as PET, nylon, and polyurethane, are relatively easily depolymerized to their monomers in supercritical water. The monomer components are recovered in high yield. Addition polymerization plastics such as phenol resin, epoxy resin, and polyethylene, are also decomposed to monomer components with or without catalysts. Recycling process of fiber reinforced plastics has been studied. Pilot scale or commercial scale plants have been developed and are operating with sub- and supercritical fluids.

  12. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  13. Processes and Technologies for the Recycling of Spent Fluorescent Lamps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujawski Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing industrial application of rare earth metals led to great interest in the new technologies for the recycling and recovery of REEs from diverse sources. This work reviews the various methods for the recycling of spent fluorescent lamps. The spent fluorescent lamps are potential source of important rare earth elements (REEs such as: yttrium, terbium, europium, lanthanum and cerium. The characteristics of REEs properties and construction of typical fl uorescent lamps is described. The work compares also current technologies which can be utilized for an efficient recovery of REEs from phosphors powders coming from spent fluorescent lamps. The work is especially focused on the hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. It was concluded that hydrometallurgical processes are especially useful for the recovery of REEs from spent fluorescent lamps. Moreover, the methods used for recycling of REEs are identical or very similar to those utilized for the raw ores processing.

  14. Recycling heritage: on a Catalan-Spanish process

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Fuentes, Josep Maria

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the definition of heritage as a process (Ashworth 1997, 2008) and on the understanding of heritage as the result of a Bourdieuian field of heritage production (Di Giovine, 2009) this paper proposes to review heritage-making processes according to Bourdieu’s model of the field of cultural production with the purpose of improving our knowledge of the processes involved in making, transforming and recycling heritage. Then, using this model an analysis will be made of the case...

  15. Integrated recycling technology as a candidate for best available techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nowosielski

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this article the integrated recycling technology and the integrated recycling technology model as afuture candidate for best available techniques (BAT are presented.Design/methodology/approach: The paper shows one of the procedures for selection a determinant ofemission standards – BAT, which are a basis of BAT reference documents (BREFs.Findings: The works relating to the emission standards stating according to best available techniques should havemore and more meaning for all Member States and for Poland also. One of these activities is search of the best integratedrecycling technology which allows to neutralize the definite part of waste in the most effective and simplest way.Research limitations/implications: To protect the environment it is necessary a continuous adjusting to BATrequirements. It is always possible to find the better, effective or cheaper methods of the environment protection(e.g. the integrated recycling technology model proposed.Practical implications: The implementation of the IPPC Directive requirements makes possible thetechnological processes realization with full protect of the environment. It refers to the recycling technologies too.Therefore, it is necessary to find the best integrated recycling technology which guarantees total waste reduction.Originality/value: In this paper paid attention to the problem of the integrated recycling technologies. Theproposed integrated recycling technology model is not only ecologically and technically practicable but alsogenerates small costs.

  16. Leaching Behavior of Al, Co and W from the Al-Alloying Treated WC-Co Tool as a New Recycling Process for WC Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeryeong Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Al-alloying treated tungsten carbide (WC-Co tool was subjected to grinding using a jaw crusher and planetary mill followed by three wet chemical treatment steps to establish an effective recycling process for WC scraps, especially those generated as bulky and hard scrap. This alloyed WC tool was readily ground to a powder of 1 mm or less and divided into two portions that were 150 µm in size. The wet chemical treatments enabled us to recover W to 69.44% from the under-sized 150 µm and also obtain WC powders from the over-sized 150 µm with a high purity of 98.9% or more.

  17. Feasibility of Target Material Recycling as Waste Management Alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management include disposal in repositories, recycling, or clearance from regulatory control, following a reasonable cooling period. This paper concerns the feasibility of recycling the heavy-ion-beam targets, in particular the hohlraum wall materials that include, for example, Au/Gd, Au, W, Pb, Hg, Ta, Pb/Ta/Cs, Hg/W/Cs, Pb/Hf, Hf, solid Kr, and solid Xe. The choice between target material disposal and recycling depends on the amount of waste generated relative to the nuclear island, the strategy to solve the recycling problem, and the impact of the additional cost and complexity of the recycling process on the overall machine. A detailed flow diagram for the elements of the recycling process was developed to analyze two extreme activation cases: (a) one-shot use and then disposal in a repository and (b) recycling continuously during plant life without removal of transmutation products. Metrics for comparing the two scenarios included waste level, dose to recycling equipment, additional cost, and design complexity. Comparing the two approaches indicated a preference for the one-shot scenario as it generates 1 m3/yr of extremely low-level waste (Class A) and offers attractive design and economics features. Recycling reduces the target waste stream by a factor of 10 or more but introduces additional issues. It may produce high-level waste, requires remote handling, adds radioactive storage facilities, and increases the cost and complexity of the plant. The inventory analysis indicated that the heavy-ion-beam (HIB) target materials represent a very small waste stream compared to that of the nuclear island (<1% of the total waste). This means recycling is not a 'must' requirement for IFE-HIB power plants unless the target materials have cost and/or resource problems (e.g., Au and Gd). In this

  18. Fate of antibiotics during municipal water recycling treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Minh, N; Khan, S J; Drewes, J E; Stuetz, R M

    2010-08-01

    Municipal water recycling processes are potential human and environmental exposure routes for low concentrations of persistent antibiotics. While the implications of such exposure scenarios are unknown, concerns have been raised regarding the possibility that continuous discharge of antibiotics to the environment may facilitate the development or proliferation of resistant strains of bacteria. As potable and non-potable water recycling schemes are continuously developed, it is imperative to improve our understanding of the fate of antibiotics during conventional and advanced wastewater treatment processes leading to high-quality water reclamation. This review collates existing knowledge with the aim of providing new insight to the influence of a wide range of treatment processes to the ultimate fate of antibiotics during conventional and advanced wastewater treatment. Although conventional biological wastewater treatment processes are effective for the removal of some antibiotics, many have been reported to occur at 10-1000 ng L(-1) concentrations in secondary treated effluents. These include beta-lactams, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Tertiary and advanced treatment processes may be required to fully manage environmental and human exposure to these contaminants in water recycling schemes. The effectiveness of a range of processes including tertiary media filtration, ozonation, chlorination, UV irradiation, activated carbon adsorption, and NF/RO filtration has been reviewed and, where possible, semi-quantitative estimations of antibiotics removals have been provided.

  19. Rubber Recycling: Chemistry, Processing, and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myhre, M.; Saiwari, S.; Dierkes, W.K.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    For both environmental and economic reasons, there is broad interest in recycling rubber and in the continued development of recycling technologies. The use of postindustrial materials is a fairly well-established and documented business. Much effort over the past decade has been put into dealing wi

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “Petra Polimeri” used to recycle polypropylene trays and insert trays for use as food contact material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process “Petra Polimeri”, EC register number RECYC089. The process recycles polypropylene (PP trays and inserts trays which have been used for the transport, storage and display of whole, fresh fruits and vegetables at room temperature or below. Trays are returned by consumers and collected in specific containers at the point of sale and insert trays originate from a closed loop of distributors. After collection, trays and insert trays are sorted separately. Through this process, sorted trays and/or insert trays are ground into flakes, which are washed, dried and extruded into granules. This recycled material is used up to 30 % with virgin PP to manufacture new trays and insert trays intended for transport, storage and display of whole, fresh fruits and vegetables. The Panel considered the specific use of the recycled trays and insert trays and the management of the input material as a critical process step. The Panel concluded that exposure of consumers to potential contaminants is unlikely and that the recycled PP obtained from the process Petra Polimeri is not of safety concern when i made with collected trays from specific containers at the point of sale along with a communication and/or insert trays from the retailer, trays and insert trays being collected and sorted separately; the sorting being positive and manual, and leading to more than 99.9 % PP trays and insert trays, and when ii intended to be used up to 30 % with virgin PP to manufacture new recycled trays and/or insert trays for contact with whole, fresh fruits and vegetables at room temperature or below.

  1. Recycling of the Granite Quarries and Municipal Incinerator Wastes for the Processing of New Materials as Porcelainized Stoneware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Crespo, M. S.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s started in the ceramic sector the material conception of porcelainized stoneware, a product with versatile and modern characteristics similar to those of the natural stone, depicting improved properties to the marble and granite. Porcelanized stoneware is a compact ceramic material, very hard and homogeneous, generally not fully vitreous (unglazed in its surface, obtained by fast firing from compositions enriched in kaolinite, which contain a large quantity of fluxes. The raw materials for body are a mixture that contains an adequate relationship of kaolinitic clays, feldspars and quartz. Such material is characterized by its low or almost zero porosity, being adequated to sustain heavy and high traffic intensity for uses in and outside of buildings with wide range of aspects, desings and colors. By considering the chemistry and mineralogical composition of the granite and incinerator wastes, this paper describes their use in the processing of construction materials, specifically, in a new type of stoneware flooring and covering materials. According to the most of the physical and mechanical properties here determined, these "Modified Porcelainized Stoneware" (MPS materials are close to the conventional porcelainized stoneware and glass ceramics products.

    Hacia la década de los años 80 se inicia en el sector cerámico la concepción del gres porcelánico, material de características modernas y versátiles semejantes a las de la piedra natural, pero que incluso supera en utilidad y prestaciones al mármol y al granito. El gres porcelánico es un material cerámico compacto, muy duro y homogéneo, no vidriado en su superficie, obtenido por cocción rápida de composiciones ricas en caolinita y una gran cantidad de fundentes; es decir, de una mezcla cerámica que contiene una relación adecuada de arcillas de tipo caolinítico, feldespatos y cuarzo. Dicho material se caracteriza por su baja o casi nula porosidad; es ideal

  2. Consumer recycling: An ethical decision-making process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Culiberg, Barbara; Bajde, Domen

    2013-01-01

    approaching it as an ethical decision-making process. Our study takes a more holistic approach and integrates the recycling literature with business ethics theory in order to develop a conceptual model of ethical decision making involved in recycling. The model is based on Jones' issue-contingent model...... using structural equation modelling. The results of our study confirmed the relationships between three key facets of ethical decision making: moral recognition, moral judgment and moral intention. Higher levels of moral recognition were found to lead to more positive moral judgments, which in turn...... and its key concept, that is, moral intensity, which we extend by adding altruism as an important personality trait that influences pro-social behaviour. The data were collected from a sample of 367 adult consumers, representative of the Slovenian population by gender and age. The hypotheses were tested...

  3. Recycling process of casting molds applying to precision castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drajewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present work relates to investigations about the possibility of recycling and producing sinters from ceramic molds. These molds are applied for producing precise single crystal casts of nickel based superalloys to elements witch are applied to the hot section of aircraft jet engines.Design/methodology/approach: The processes of milling were carried out using the vibratory mill Herzog HSM 100H and the planetary grinder Pulverisette 7 - Fritsch Company. The measurements of all kinds of powders were conducted by using of the Kamika IPS U Analyzer and Malvern Nanosizer-ZS. To the purpose of analysis of the chemical composition an X-ray microanalysis technique was applied with the dispersion of the energy (EDS using of Thermo and Noran equipment. Findings: On the basis of examinations carried out on the powders before and after processes of milling and after processes of pressing and sintering of powders, it is possible to state that technological processes of reuse and further applying of used molds are possible. Processes of pressing were conducted applying different amounts of powders. Powders were pressed both without the addition as well as with the addition of modifiers which were added to basic powder in appropriate amounts. It was found that processes of pressing and sintering in both cases showed good results. Surfaces of pressed and sintered tablets were smooth and not-delaminated as well as did not shell.Research limitations/implications: Results will be used for future researches among others concerning the research on mechanical and thermal properties.Practical implications: Waste products and their reuse, recycling and especially consolidation of dangerous and hazardous compounds including of ceramic materials from foundry industry, will have an important place in the future on account of problems with their recycling and the storage.Originality/value: Researches on new possibilities of the application and properties of

  4. A closed loop process for recycling spent lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Eric; Sa, Qina; Apelian, Diran; Wang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    As lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries continue to increase their market share, recycling Li-ion batteries will become mandatory due to limited resources. We have previously demonstrated a new low temperature methodology to separate and synthesize cathode materials from mixed cathode materials. In this study we take used Li-ion batteries from a recycling source and recover active cathode materials, copper, steel, etc. To accomplish this the batteries are shredded and processed to separate the steel, copper and cathode materials; the cathode materials are then leached into solution; the concentrations of nickel, manganese and cobalt ions are adjusted so NixMnyCoz(OH)2 is precipitated. The precipitated product can then be reacted with lithium carbonate to form LiNixMnyCozO2. The results show that the developed recycling process is practical with high recovery efficiencies (∼90%), and 1 ton of Li-ion batteries has the potential to generate 5013 profit margin based on materials balance.

  5. Optimization of biodiesel production process using recycled vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Yarely

    Petro diesel toxic emissions and its limited resources have created an interest for the development of new energy resources, such as biodiesel. Biodiesel is traditionally produced by a transesterification reaction between vegetable oil and an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. However, this process is slow and expensive due to the high cost of raw materials. Low costs feedstock oils such as recycled and animal fats are available but they cannot be transesterified with alkaline catalysts due to high content of free fatty acids, which can lead to undesirable reactions such as saponification. In this study, we reduce free fatty acids content by using an acid pre-treatment. We compare sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and ptoluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) to pre-treat recycled vegetable oil. PTSA removes water after 60 minutes of treatment at room temperature or within 15 minutes at 50°C. The pretreatment was followed by a transesterification reaction using alkaline catalyst. To minimize costs and accelerate reaction, the pretreatment and transesterification reaction of recycle vegetable oil was conducted at atmospheric pressure in a microwave oven. Biodiesel was characterized using a GC-MS method.

  6. Processing and Validation of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates at Semi-Industrial Scale as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bugnicourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A biopolymer coating for plastic films was formulated based on whey protein, and its potential to replace current synthetic oxygen barrier layers used in food packaging such as ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH was tested. The whey-coating application was performed at semi-industrial scale. High barrier to oxygen with transmission rate down to ranges of 1 cm3 (STP m−2 d−1 bar−1 at and 50% relative humidity (r.h. but interesting humidity barrier down to ranges of 3 g m−2 d−1 (both normalized to 100 μm thickness were reached, outperforming most existing biopolymers. Coated films were validated for storing various food products showing that the shelf life and sensory attributes were maintained similar to reference packaging films while complying with food safety regulations. The developed whey coating could be enzymatically removed within 2 hours and is therefore compatible with plastic recycling operations to allow multilayer films to become recyclable by separating the other combined layers. A life cycle assessment was performed showing a significant reduction in the environmental impact of the packaging thanks in particular to the possibility of recycling materials as opposed to incinerating those containing EVOH or polyamide (PA, but due to the use of biosourced raw materials.

  7. Economic considerations of battery recycling based on the Recytec process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Pierre

    The Recytec process is successfully operated on a continuous industrial base since autumn 1994. All the products are regularly re-used without any problems and environmental limits are fully respected. The European Community Battery Directive is valid since many years and only a few countries like Switzerland and The Netherlands have implemented it in national guidelines. In the meantime, battery producers have accepted the necessity of the recycling of mercury-free batteries in order to prevent the contamination of municipal waste streams by other heavy metals, such as zinc and cadmium. Recycling processes like the Recytec process are considered by the battery producers as highly expensive and they are looking for cheaper alternatives. Steel works are confronted with a market change and have to produce less quantities of better quality steels with more stringent environmental limits. The electric arc furnace (EAF), one of the chosen battery destruction techniques, is producing 20% of the European steel. Even if the battery mixes contain only mercury-free batteries, the residual mercury content and the zinc concentration will be too high to insure a good steel quality, if all collected batteries will be fed in EAF. In Waelz kilns (production of zinc oxide concentrates for zinc producers) the situation is the same with regard to the residual mercury concentration and environmental limits. Sorting technologies for the separation of battery mixes into the different battery chemistries will presently fail because the re-users of these sorted mercury-free batteries are not able to accept raw waste batteries but they are interested in some fractions of them. This means that in any case pretreatment is an unavoidable step before selective reclamation of waste batteries. The Recytec process is the low-cost partner in a global strategy for battery recycling. This process is very flexible and will be able to follow, with slight and inexpensive adaptations of the equipment

  8. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick W; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line J

    2016-01-01

    An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results into a generalized

  9. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick W; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line J

    2016-01-01

    An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results into a generalized

  10. Recycling of cellulases in a continuous process for production of bioethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haven, Mai Østergaard

    The focus of the work presented in this thesis is recycling of commercial enzymes in a continuous process for production of bioethanol from biomass. To get a deeper understanding of the factors affecting the potential for enzyme recycling, the interactions between enzymes and biomass, the adsorpt......The focus of the work presented in this thesis is recycling of commercial enzymes in a continuous process for production of bioethanol from biomass. To get a deeper understanding of the factors affecting the potential for enzyme recycling, the interactions between enzymes and biomass......, the adsorption and desorption as well as stability and recovery of activity was investigated. More knowledge on these factors have enabled a process adapted for enzyme recycling. The driver being that enzyme consumption remains a major cost when producing bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. Unlike previous...

  11. SERBIA: A NEW PROCESS FOR WASTE RUBBER AND PLASTIC RECYCLING

    OpenAIRE

    Ozren Ocic; Larisa Kurcubic; Rade Vorkapic; Biljana Jovanovic

    2010-01-01

    This paper intends to describe a new technological process for waste rubber and plastic recycling up to the commercial components in safe environmental friendly way. Researches and all relevant technical-technological data related to this process are checked at constructed pilot plant. The future construction of these units for waste rubber and plastic recycling will allow interested parties to achieve the environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency.

  12. PRETREATMENT AND FRACTIONATION OF CORN STOVER BY AMMONIA RECYCLE PERCOLATION PROCESS. (R831645)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn stover was pretreated with aqueous ammonia in a flow-through column reactor,a process termed as Ammonia Recycle Percolation (ARP). The aqueous ammonia causesswelling and efficient delignification of biomass at high temperatures. The ARPprocess solubilizes abou...

  13. Advanced processes for minor actinides recycling: studies towards potential industrialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2006, a new act on sustainable management of radioactive waste was voted by the French parliament with a national plan on radioactive materials and radioactive waste management (PNG-MDR). Concerning partitioning and transmutation, the program is connected to 4. generation reactors, in which transmutation of minor actinides could be operated. In this frame, the next important milestone is 2012, with the assessment of the possible transmutation roads, which are either homogeneous recycling of the minor actinides in the whole reactor fleet, with a low content of M.A (∼3%) in all fuel assemblies, or heterogeneous recycling of the minor actinides in about one third of the reactor park, with a higher content of M.A. (∼20%) in dedicated targets dispatched in the periphery of the reactor. Advanced processes for the recycling of minor actinides are being developed to address the challenges of these various management options. An important part of the program consists in getting closer to process implementation conditions. The processes based on liquid-liquid extraction benefit from the experience gained by operating the PUREX process at the La Hague plant. In the field of extracting apparatus, a large experience is available. In the field of extracting apparatus, a large experience is already available. Nevertheless, the processes present specificities which have to be considered more precisely. They have been classified in the following fields: - Evolution of the simulation codes, including phenomenological representations: with such a simulation tool, it will be possible to assess operating tolerances, lead sensitivity studies and calculate transient states; - Definition of the implementation conditions in continuous contactors (such as pulse columns), according to the extractant physico-chemical characteristics; - Scale-up of new extractants, such as malonamides used in the DIAMEX process, facing purity specifications and costs estimation; - Solvent clean

  14. Current and Prospective Li-Ion Battery Recycling and Recovery Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, Joseph; Gratz, Eric; Zheng, Zhangfeng; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Mengyuan; Apelian, Diran; Wang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The lithium ion (Li-ion) battery industry has been growing exponentially since its initial inception in the late 20th century. As battery materials evolve, the applications for Li-ion batteries have become even more diverse. To date, the main source of Li-ion battery use varies from consumer portable electronics to electric/hybrid electric vehicles. However, even with the continued rise of Li-ion battery development and commercialization, the recycling industry is lagging; approximately 95% of Li-ion batteries are landfilled instead of recycled upon reaching end of life. Industrialized recycling processes are limited and only capable of recovering secondary raw materials, not suitable for direct reuse in new batteries. Most technologies are also reliant on high concentrations of cobalt to be profitable, and intense battery sortation is necessary prior to processing. For this reason, it is critical that a new recycling process be commercialized that is capable of recovering more valuable materials at a higher efficiency. A new technology has been developed by the researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute which is capable of recovering LiNi x Mn y Co z O2 cathode material from a hydrometallurgical process, making the recycling system as a whole more economically viable. By implementing a flexible recycling system that is closed-loop, recycling of Li-ion batteries will become more prevalent saving millions of pounds of batteries from entering the waste stream each year.

  15. Current and Prospective Li-Ion Battery Recycling and Recovery Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, Joseph; Gratz, Eric; Zheng, Zhangfeng; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Mengyuan; Apelian, Diran; Wang, Yan

    2016-10-01

    The lithium ion (Li-ion) battery industry has been growing exponentially since its initial inception in the late 20th century. As battery materials evolve, the applications for Li-ion batteries have become even more diverse. To date, the main source of Li-ion battery use varies from consumer portable electronics to electric/hybrid electric vehicles. However, even with the continued rise of Li-ion battery development and commercialization, the recycling industry is lagging; approximately 95% of Li-ion batteries are landfilled instead of recycled upon reaching end of life. Industrialized recycling processes are limited and only capable of recovering secondary raw materials, not suitable for direct reuse in new batteries. Most technologies are also reliant on high concentrations of cobalt to be profitable, and intense battery sortation is necessary prior to processing. For this reason, it is critical that a new recycling process be commercialized that is capable of recovering more valuable materials at a higher efficiency. A new technology has been developed by the researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute which is capable of recovering LiNi x Mn y Co z O2 cathode material from a hydrometallurgical process, making the recycling system as a whole more economically viable. By implementing a flexible recycling system that is closed-loop, recycling of Li-ion batteries will become more prevalent saving millions of pounds of batteries from entering the waste stream each year.

  16. Process for the production of ultrahigh purity silane with recycle from separation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Tri- and dichlorosilanes formed by hydrogenation in the course of the reaction of metallurgical silicon, hydrogen and recycle silicon tetrachloride are employed as feed into a separation column arrangement of sequential separation columns and redistribution reactors which processes the feed into ultrahigh purity silane and recycle silicon tetrachloride. A slip stream is removed from the bottom of two sequential columns and added to the recycle silicon tetrachloride process stream causing impurities in the slip streams to be subjected to reactions in the hydrogenation step whereby waste materials can be formed and readily separated.

  17. Modelling production processes in a vehicle recycling plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Vladimir; Dimitrijevic, Branka

    2012-09-01

    The European Directive on end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) fundamentally changed the business philosophy of the European vehicle recycling system, which was exclusively profit-oriented. As the dominant participants of this system, vehicle recycling plants (VRPs) are especially affected by its implementation. For VRPs to successfully respond to the prescribed eco-efficiency quotas, investment will be needed to procure modern sorting equipment as well as to achieve full transformation of their production process. However, before VRPs decide to make this very important investment decision, it is necessary to determine the adequacy of such a decision in detail. Consequently, the following questions become unavoidable: Can modernly equipped VRPs conduct profitable business? Are eco-efficiency quotas actually attainable? How will the new changes in vehicle design influence VRPs? To provide answers to these essential questions, a production planning model of a modernly equipped VRP was first developed and then tested extensively using real data. Based on the answers provided by the proposed model testing analysis it was concluded that VRP transformation is not only necessary but completely justified and that the final success of the ELV Directive is realistic.

  18. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  19. A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric S. Peterson; Jessica Trudeau; Bill Cleary; Michael Hackett; William A. Greene

    2003-04-01

    An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

  20. A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trudeau, J. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Cleary, B. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Hackett, M. [Metaldyne, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States); Greene, W. A. [SpinTek FIltrations, LLC, Los Alamitos, CA (United States)

    2003-04-30

    An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20-25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

  1. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  2. Recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) for direct food contact applications: challenge test of an inline recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, R; Welle, F

    2002-05-01

    Of all the plastics used for packaging, due to its low diffusivity and chemical inertness, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is one of the favoured candidate plastics for closed-loop recycling for new packaging applications. In the work reported here, a PET-recycling process was investigated with respect to its cleaning efficiency and compliance of the PET recyclate with food law. The key technology of the investigated PET-recycling process to remove contaminants consists of a predecontamination-extruder combination. At the end of the recycling process, there is either a pelletizing system or downstream equipment to produce preforms or flat sheets. Therefore, the process has two process options, an inline production of PET preforms and a batch option producing PET pellets. In the case of possible misuse of PET bottles by the consumer, the inline process produces higher concentrations in the bottle wall of the recyclate containing preforms. Owing to the dilution of the PET output material by large amounts of uncontaminated PET, the batch option is the less critical process in terms of consumer protection. Regarding an appropriate testing procedure for the evaluation of a bottle-to-bottle recycling process, both process options have their own specific requirements with respect to the design of a challenge test. A novel challenge test approach to the inline mode of a recycling process is presented here.

  3. Optimisation of the steel plant dust recycling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Darius-Alexandru; Hepuť, Teodor; Puťan, Vasile

    2016-06-01

    The widespread use of oxygen in the EAF steel-making process led to the increase of furnace productivity and reduction of specific energy consumption. Following the increase of the metal bath temperature, the brown smoke exhaust process is intensified, which requires mandatory gas treatment. The steel plant dust resulting from the treatment of waste gases is a manufacturing waste which must be recycled in the steel plant. Due to the fineness of the waste, when conducting the researches we processed it through pelletization. The processing of this waste aims not only its granulometric composition, but also the chemical composition (mainly the zinc content). After processing the data, we choose the optimal waste recycling technology based on the resistance of pellets and final content of zinc.

  4. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in indoor air during waste TV recycling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Air in the workshops was seriously contaminated by TV recycling activities. • PBDEs profiles and levels varied with particulate matters and different workshops. • Equilibrium between gas-particle partitioning was disrupted by recycling process. • The highest occupational exposure concentrations occurred during heating process. - Abstract: Recycling process for waste TV sets mainly consists of dismantling, printed wiring board (PWB) heating, PWB recycling, and plastic crushing in formal recycling plant. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) contained in waste TV sets are released to indoor air. Air samples at 4 different workshops were collected to measure the PBDEs concentrations in both gaseous and particulate phases. The mean concentrations of ∑PBDEs in indoor air were in the range of 6780–2,280,000 pg/m3. The highest concentration in gaseous phase (291,000 pg/m3) was detected in the PWB heating workshop. The ∑12PBDEs concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10 at the 4 workshops ranged in 6.8–6670 μg/g and 32.6–6790 μg/g, respectively. The gas-particle partitioning of PBDEs was disrupted as PBDEs were continuously released during the recycling processes. Occupational exposure assessment showed that only the exposure concentration of BDE-47 (0.118 μg/kg/day) through inhalation in the PWB heating workshop for workers without facemask exceeded the reference dose (0.1 μg/kg/day), posing a health hazard to workers. All the results demonstrated that recycling of TV sets was an important source of PBDEs emission, and PBDEs emission pollution was related to the composition of TV sets, interior dust, and recycling process

  5. Recycling of mill scale in sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation deals with the effect of replacing some amount of Baharia high barite iron ore concentrate by mill scale waste which was characterized by high iron oxide content on the parameters of the sintering process., and investigation the effect of different amount of coke breeze added on sintering process parameters when using 5% mill scale waste with 95% iron ore concentrate. The results of this work show that, replacement of iron ore concentrate with mill scale increases the amount of ready made sinter, sinter strength and productivity of the sinter machine and productivity at blast furnace yard. Also, the increase of coke breeze leads to an increase the ready made sinter and productivity of the sintering machine at blast furnace yard. The productivity of the sintering machine after 5% decreased slightly due to the decrease of vertical velocity.

  6. Various types of polyurethanes in the process of Chemical Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Beckmann, Silke; Herzog, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Increasing raw material costs and more stringent regulations have led to more pressure to develop customer-oriented recycling processes for polyurethanes. Furthermore, waste disposal runs into increasing costs for the producers while old methods of disposal are prohibited legally, both in the US and Europe. One way to solve this problem is to develop a well-suited process and plant for a customer specialised procedure to re-use the waste material obtained for each type of polyurethane product...

  7. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-08-21

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs.

  8. Recycling high density tungsten alloy powder by oxidization-reduction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆森; 陈立宝; 贺跃辉; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    The processes of directly recycling high density tungsten alloy by oxidation-reduction technique were investigated. The particle size of recycled powder is fine, and the shape of powder particle is regular when the final reduction temperature is 850℃, in which the average size of the tungsten alloy particles reduced is about 1.5μm. The average size of the alloy particles increase to 6μm and 9μm when increasing the reduction temperature to 900℃ and 950℃, respectively. However, if the reduction temperature is higher than 900℃, the surface feature of powder is complicated. Increasing reduction temperature from 900℃ to 950℃, the content of oxygen of recycled powder decreases from 0.2314% to 0.1700%, and powder particles grow slightly. It has been also found that the chemical composition of the recycled alloy powder is the same as the initial powder.

  9. Water recycle treatment system for use in metal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, D.E.; Dando, T.J.

    1976-08-10

    A water recycle treatment system is described comprising two main treatment sub-systems for treatment of contaminated water from a plurality of concentrated solutions and rinse baths to separate out the impurities therein. A first sub-system treats less concentrated solutions used for the rinse baths by channeling the flow therefrom to a first neutralizing tank which provides for pH control to produce a mixed output solution having a substantially constant pH factor, which is filtered to remove gross particles, the filtered solution being cooled in a holding tank and passed through a reverse osmosis process and carbon bed to produce clean water. The second sub-system treats highly concentrated solutions obtained from a plurality of chemical processes, mixes them in a second neutralizing tank which is utilized to produce a substantially constant pH output, which is fed to an evaporator to precipitate the metals and salts in sludge and also forms a water vapor output. The reverse osmosis waste is fed back into the second neutralizing tank and processed as noted above.

  10. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Garach; Mónica López; Francisco Agrela; Javier Ordóñez; Javier Alegre; José Antonio Moya

    2015-01-01

    Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new ceme...

  11. Simulation of cutting process in the cable recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Luo, Zhen; Song, Kailei; Ao, Sansan; Wang, Rui

    2011-05-01

    The utilization of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment is a hot spot in environmental protection field presently and the resource utilization of cable wastes is an important subject. An enormous amount of electrical cable is disposed of as scrap each year. In order to recycle the valuable copper wires, cable granulator technique is used widely. However, one of the shortcomings of this technique is it has serious tool wear. In order to better understand the reason for tool wear, this paper simulates the stress and strain distribution in the cutting tool and copper during the cutting process in cable granulator by finite element method. The result shows that a tensile stress region, which is the main reason for blade tipping, appeared in the upper blade. Besides, the tensile stress in the right side of upper blade is higher than that in the left side. Therefore, in order to extend the life of cutter, we suggest using different materials in different stress zone to manufacture cutting tool. After the cutter was worn out, the right side of the blade can be renovated using material with well tensile performance through overlaying welding, as well as the left side of the blade can be renovated by material with high red hardness, high wear resistance, and high compression strength through overlaying welding. This method can reduce the consumption of precious metals and raise the utilization rate of materials.

  12. Using vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing for recycling waste printed circuit boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constant growth in generation of waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) poses a huge disposal problem because they consist of a heterogeneous mixture of organic and metallic chemicals as well as glass fiber. Also the presence of heavy metals, such as Pb and Cd turns this scrap into hazardous waste. Therefore, recycling of WPCB is an important subject not only from the recovery of valuable materials but also from the treatment of waste. The aim of this study was to present a recycling process without negative impact to the environment as an alternative for recycling WPCB. In this work, a process technology containing vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing was employed to recycle WPCB. At the first stage of this work, the WPCB was pyrolyzed under vacuum in a self-made batch pilot-scale fixed bed reactor to recycle organic resins contained in the WPCB. By vacuum pyrolysis the organic matter was decomposed to gases and liquids which could be used as fuels or chemical material resources, however, the inorganic WPCB matter was left unaltered as solid residues. At the second stage, the residues obtained at the first stage were investigated to separate and recover the copper through mechanical processing such as crushing, screening, and gravity separation. The copper grade of 99.50% with recovery of 99.86% based on the whole WPCB was obtained. And the glass fiber could be obtained by calcinations in a muffle furnace at 600 deg. C for 10 min. This study had demonstrated the feasibility of vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing for recycling WPCB.

  13. Estimated costs of implementation of membrane processes for on-site greywater recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeau, P; Hourlier, F; Bulteau, G; Massé, A; Jaouen, P; Gérente, C; Faur, C; Le Cloirec, P

    2011-01-01

    Greywater reuse inside buildings is a possible way to preserve water resources and face up to water scarcity. This study is focused on a technical-economic analysis of greywater treatment by a direct nanofiltration (NF) process or by a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) for on-site recycling. The aim of this paper is to analyse the cost of recycled water for two different configurations (50 and 500 inhabitants) in order to demonstrate the relevance of the implementation of membrane processes for greywater recycling, depending on the production capacity of the equipment and the price of drinking water. The first step was to define a method to access the description of the cost of producing recycled water. The direct costs were defined as a sum of fixed costs due to equipment, maintenance and depreciation, and variable costs generated by chemical products and electricity consumptions. They were estimated from an experimental approach and from data found in literature, enabling operating conditions for greywater recycling to be determined. The cost of treated water by a SMBR unit with a processing capacity of 500 persons is close to 4.40 euros m(-3), while the cost is 4.81 euros m(-3) with a NF process running in the same conditions. These costs are similar to the price of drinking water in some European countries.

  14. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  15. Optimization of the recycling process of precipitation barren solution in a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaline leaching process was adopted to recover uranium from ores in a uranium mine, and high concentration uranium solution, which would be later used in precipitation, was obtained after ion-exchange and elution steps. The eluting agent consisted of NaCl and NaHCO3. Though precipitation barren solution contained as high as 80 g/L Na2CO3, it still can not be recycled due to presence of high Cl- concentration So, both elution and precipitation processes were optimized in order to control the Cl- concentration in the precipitation barren solution to the recyclable concentration range. Because the precipitation barren solution can be recycled by optimization, the agent consumption was lowered and the discharge of waste water was reduced. (authors)

  16. Precipitation recycling as a mechanism for ecoclimatological stability through local and non-local interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Francina

    This study is the first to analyze the mechanisms that drive precipitation recycling variability at the daily to intraseasonal timescale. A new Dynamic Precipitation Recycling model is developed which, unlike previous models, includes the moisture storage term in the equation of conservation of atmospheric moisture. As shown using scaling analysis, the moisture storage term is non-negligible at small time scales, so the new model enables us to analyze precipitation recycling variability at shorter timescales than traditional models. The daily to intraseasonal analysis enables us to uncover key relationships between recycling and the moisture and energy fluxes. In the second phase of this work, a spatiotemporal analysis of daily precipitation recycling is performed over two regions of North America: the Midwestern United States, and the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) region. These regions were chosen because they present contrasting land-atmosphere interactions. Different physical mechanisms drive precipitation recycling in each region. In the Midwestern United States, evapotranspiration is not significantly affected by soil moisture anomalies, and there is a high recycling ratio during periods of reduced total precipitation. The reason is that, during periods of drier atmospheric conditions, transpiration will continue to provide moisture to the overlying atmosphere and contribute to total rainfall. Consequently, precipitation recycling variability in not driven by changes in evapotranspiration. Precipitable water, sensible heat and moisture fluxes are the main drivers of recycling variability in the Midwest. However, the drier soil moisture conditions over the NAMS region limit evapotranspiration, which will drive recycling variability. In this region, evapotranspiration becomes an important contribution to precipitation after Monsoon onset when total precipitation and evapotranspiration are highest. The precipitation recycling process in the NAMS region

  17. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Garach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new cement hydrated particles was observed, and pozzolanic reactions were discovered by electronon microscopy in these novel materials. The properties of recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates suggest that these recycled materials can be used in unbound road layers to improve their mechanical behaviour in the long term.

  18. Reading as functional coordination: not recycling but a novel synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eLachmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Functional Coordination approach describes the processes involved in learning to read as a form of procedural learning in which pre-existing skills, mainly from the visual and auditory domain, are (1 recruited, (2 modified and (3 coordinated to create the procedures for reading text, which form the basis of subsequent (4 automatization. In this context, we discuss evidence relating to the emerging prevalence of analytic processing in letter perception. We argue that the process of learning to read does not have to lead to a loss of perceptual skill as consequence of a cultural recycling; learning to read just leads to a novel synthesis of functions, which are coordinated for reading and then automatized as a package over several years. Developmental dyslexia is explained within this framework as a Functional Coordination Deficit (Lachmann, 2002, since the coordination level is assumed to be most liable to manifest deficiencies. This is because, at this level, the greatest degree of fine tuning of complex functions is required. Thus, developmental dyslexia is not seen as a consequence of a deficient automatization per se, but of automatization of abnormally developed functional coordination.

  19. The Application of Mineral Processing Techniques to the Scrap Recycling Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Koermer, Scott Carl

    2015-01-01

    The scrap metal recycling industry is a growing industry that plays an important role in the sustainability of a large global metal supply. Unfortunately, recycling lacks many standards, and test procedures in place for mineral processing. These standards and practices, if used in recycling, could aid recyclers in determining and achieving optimal separations for their plant.. New regulations for scrap imports into China make it difficult to obtain the metal recoveries that have been achie...

  20. Study of Aramid Fiber/Polychloroprene Recycling Process by Thermal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Dabkiewicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aramid fiber is an important polymer applied as reinforcement in high-performance composites, which, due its exceptional properties, becomes an excellent impact absorption material. It has been broadly utilized in aeronautic industry and ballistic protection. In aircrafts, it is mainly used in secondary structures, such as fairings, floor panels, and bullet proof structures in helicopters, whereas, in ballistic protection industry, it is applied in automotive armor and bullet proof vest. Under environmental perspective, it is worrying the development and application of composites, which generate proportional discards of these materials, whether originated from manufacturing process, spare parts or end of life cycle. High-performance composite materials like those using aramid fiber are generally difficult to recycle due to their properties and the difficulty for the separation of the components, making their recycling economically unviable. From the characteristics of composite materials and environmental viewpoint, this paper presents a new aramid fiber recycling process. The main objective of this research was to study different recycling methods in aramid fibers/Neoprene® composites. To promote the Neoprene® degradation, it was used a pyrolysis oven with controlled atmosphere and CO 2 injection. For the degraded separation, it was designed a mechanical washing machine in which the most degraded separation occurred. To complete the materials separation, it was employed a manual cleaning process, and, at least to prove the efficacy of the process, it was applied a tensile test in the yarns.

  1. Innovative process routes for a high-quality concrete recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Y; Bru, K; Touze, S; Lemoign, A; Poirier, J E; Ruffie, G; Bonnaudin, F; Von Der Weid, F

    2013-06-01

    This study presents alternative methods for the processing of concrete waste. The mechanical stresses needed for the embrittlement of the mortar matrix and further selective crushing of concrete were generated by either electric impulses or microwaves heating. Tests were carried out on lab-made concrete samples representative of concrete waste from concrete mixer trucks and on concrete waste collected on a French demolition site. The results obtained so far show that both techniques can be used to weaken concrete samples and to enhance aggregate selective liberation (that is the production of cement paste-free aggregates) during crushing and grinding. Electric pulses treatment seems to appear more efficient, more robust and less energy consuming (1-3 kWh t(-1)) than microwave treatment (10-40 kWh t(-1)) but it can only be applied on samples in water leading to a major drawback for recycling aggregates or cement paste in the cement production process. PMID:23490359

  2. Fines extracted from recycled concrete as alternative raw material for Portland clinker production

    OpenAIRE

    Schoon, Joris; De Buysser, Klaartje

    2014-01-01

    The use of recycled aggregates in concrete has an important impact on the final quality. They have their influence on the durability and strength development of the final concrete [1]. To upgrade recycled concrete aggregates, the attached mortar on the aggregates has to be cleaned away as much as possible which will generate low grade recycled sand. Valorising this low grade sand is crucial for the success of upgrading recycled concrete aggregates. To increase the quality of recycled sands, t...

  3. Recycle PET再生涤纶机织面料的染整工艺探讨%Discussion on Dyeing Process of Recycle PET recycled Polyester Woven Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛以强; 李峻

    2015-01-01

    介绍Recycle PET再生涤纶面料在未来的能源利用和循环经济发展中的前景,着重实验并探讨再生涤纶机织面料的前处理和染色工艺,对其前处理精练退浆剂、分散染料等选择提出有效的实验方法,本文提出一些改善再生涤纶面料在染整过程中的染色均匀性、布面平整、批差等问题,为再生涤纶面料的染整开发提供了一定的实践经验。%Introduce Recycle PET recycled polyester fabric in the future prospects of energy use and economic development cycle, focusing experiment and explore renewable pretreatment and dyeing polyester woven fabric, and propose effective pretreatment scouring desizing agent, disperse dyes and other options for its experimental methods, this paper presents some improvements recycled polyester fabric dyeing process in dyeing uniformity, fabric formation, batch and poor, for the development of recycled polyester fabric dyeing and provide some practical experience.

  4. Valorizing recycled paper sludge by a bioethanol production process with cellulase recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Daniel; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of cellulase recycling in the scope of bioethanol production from recycled paper sludge (RPS), an inexpensive byproduct with around 39% of carbohydrates, is analyzed. RPS was easily converted and fermented by enzymes and cells, respectively. Final enzyme partition between solid and liquid phases was investigated, the solid-bound enzymes being efficiently recovered by alkaline washing. RPS hydrolysis and fermentation was conducted over four rounds, recycling the cellulases present in both fractions. A great overall enzyme stability was observed: 71, 64 and 100% of the initial Cel7A, Cel7B and β-glucosidase activities, respectively, were recovered. Even with only 30% of fresh enzymes added on the subsequent rounds, solid conversions of 92, 83 and 71% were achieved for the round 2, 3 and 4, respectively. This strategy enabled an enzyme saving around 53-60%, while can equally contribute to a 40% reduction in RPS disposal costs. PMID:27289054

  5. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by Kd measurements with SuperLigregsign 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section

  6. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz, E-mail: tomaz.zagar@gen-energija.s [GEN energija, d.o.o., Cesta 4. julija 42, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bursic, Ales; Spiler, Joze [GEN energija, d.o.o., Cesta 4. julija 42, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Kim, Dana; Chiguer, Mustapha; David, Gilles; Gillet, Philippe [AREVA, 33 rue La Fayette, 75009 Paris (France)

    2011-04-15

    The paper presents recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy with specific focus on the Slovenia. GEN energija is an independent supplier of integral and competitive electricity for Slovenia. In response to growing energy needs, GEN has conducted several feasibility and installation studies of a new nuclear power plant in Slovenia. With sustainable development, the environment, and public acceptance in mind, GEN conducted a study with AREVA concerning the options for the management of its' new plant's used nuclear fuel. After a brief reminder of global political and economic context, solutions for used nuclear fuel management using current technologies are presented in the study as well as an economic assessment of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The paper evaluates and proposes practical solutions for mid-term issues on used nuclear fuel management strategies. Different scenarios for used nuclear fuel management are presented, where used nuclear fuel recycling (as MOX, for mixed oxide fuel, and ERU, for enriched reprocessed uranium) are considered. The study concludes that closing the nuclear fuel cycle will allow Slovenia to have a supplementary fuel supply for its new reactor via recycling, while reducing the radiotoxicity, thermal output, and volume of its wastes for final disposal, reducing uncertainties, gaining public acceptance, and allowing time for capitalization on investments for final disposal.

  7. Recycled construction debris as an aggregates. Production of concrete blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, J. G. G.; Bauer, E.; Sposto, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of recycled construction and demolition debris as aggregate for the construction of concrete blocks to be used in sealing masonry. Initial studies addressed the definition of parameters used in the mix of conventional materials (traditionally used in the production of concrete blocks), involving cylindrical test specimens (100x200 mm), molded with the help of a vibratory table. In addition to these definitions, and based on the mixes showing the best results, a new...

  8. Environmental risk related to specific processes during scrap computer recycling and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Shi, Pixing; Shan, Hongshan; Xie, Yijun

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to achieve a better understanding of the generation of toxic chemicals related to specific processes in scrap computer recycling and disposal, such as thermal recycling of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and the landfilling or dumping of cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Tube furnace pyrolysis was carried out to simulate different thermal treatment conditions for the identification of the by-products and potential environmental risk from thermal recycling ofPCBs. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a column test were used to study the leaching characteristics of lead from waste CRT glass, which is one of the most important environmental concerns arising from the disposal of e-waste. The results indicate that more attention should be paid to the benzene series when recycling PCBs under thermal conditions, especially for workers without any personal protection equipment. The impact of immersion on the leaching of lead from CRT leaded glass was more effective than the impact of washing only by acid rain. Thus when waste leaded glass has to be stored for some reason, the storage facility should be dry. PMID:23437653

  9. Environmental risk related to specific processes during scrap computer recycling and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Shi, Pixing; Shan, Hongshan; Xie, Yijun

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to achieve a better understanding of the generation of toxic chemicals related to specific processes in scrap computer recycling and disposal, such as thermal recycling of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and the landfilling or dumping of cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Tube furnace pyrolysis was carried out to simulate different thermal treatment conditions for the identification of the by-products and potential environmental risk from thermal recycling ofPCBs. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a column test were used to study the leaching characteristics of lead from waste CRT glass, which is one of the most important environmental concerns arising from the disposal of e-waste. The results indicate that more attention should be paid to the benzene series when recycling PCBs under thermal conditions, especially for workers without any personal protection equipment. The impact of immersion on the leaching of lead from CRT leaded glass was more effective than the impact of washing only by acid rain. Thus when waste leaded glass has to be stored for some reason, the storage facility should be dry.

  10. Solvent recyclability in a multistep direct liquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Direct liquefaction research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has, for a number of years, concentrated on developing a direct liquefaction process specifically for low-rank coals (LRCs) through the use of hydrogen-donating solvents and solvents similar to coal-derived liquids, the water/gas shift reaction, and lower-severity reaction conditions. The underlying assumption of all of the research was that advantage could be taken of the reactivity and specific qualities of LRCs to produce a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble material that might be easier to upgrade than the soluble residuum produced during direct liquefaction of high-rank coals. A multistep approach was taken to produce the THF-soluble material, consisting of (1) preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, (2) solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and (3) polishing to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrotreatment step. The results of the EERC`s research indicated that additional studies to develop this process more fully were justified. Two areas were targeted for further research: (1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and (2) determination of the minimum severity required for hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The current project was funded to investigate these two areas.

  11. Relative Contributions of the Weak, Main, and Fission-recycling r-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibagaki, S.; Kajino, T.; Mathews, G. J.; Chiba, S.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a persistent conundrum in attempts to model the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Although the locations of the abundance peaks near nuclear mass numbers 130 and 195 identify an environment of rapid neutron capture near closed nuclear shells, the abundances of elements just above and below those peaks are often underproduced by more than an order of magnitude in model calculations. At the same time, there is a debate in the literature as to what degree the r-process elements are produced in supernovae or the mergers of binary neutron stars. In this paper we propose a novel solution to both problems. We demonstrate that the underproduction of nuclides above and below the r-process peaks in main or weak r-process models (like magnetohydrodynamic jets or neutrino-driven winds in core-collapse supernovae) can be supplemented via fission fragment distributions from the recycling of material in a neutron-rich environment such as that encountered in neutron star mergers (NSMs). In this paradigm, the abundance peaks themselves are well reproduced by a moderately neutron-rich, main r-process environment such as that encountered in the magnetohydrodynamical jets in supernovae supplemented with a high-entropy, weakly neutron-rich environment such as that encountered in the neutrino-driven-wind model to produce the lighter r-process isotopes. Moreover, we show that the relative contributions to the r-process abundances in both the solar system and metal-poor stars from the weak, main, and fission-recycling environments required by this proposal are consistent with estimates of the relative Galactic event rates of core-collapse supernovae for the weak and main r-process and NSMs for the fission-recycling r-process.

  12. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walker, T. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  13. Development of processes for zircaloy chips recycling by electric arc furnace remelting and powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PWR reactors employ, as nuclear fuel, UO2 pellets with Zircaloy clad. In the fabrication of fuel element parts, machining chips from the alloys are generated. As the Zircaloy chips cannot be discarded as ordinary metallic waste, the recycling of this material is important for the Brazilian Nuclear Policy, which targets the reprocess of Zircaloy residues for economic and environmental aspects. This work presents two methods developed in order to recycle Zircaloy chips. In one of the methods, Zircaloy machining chips were refused using an electric-arc furnace to obtain small laboratory ingots. The second one uses powder metallurgy techniques, where the chips were submitted to hydriding process and the resulting material was milled, isostatically pressed and vacuum sintered. The ingots were heat-treated by vacuum annealing. The microstructures resulting from both processing methods were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical composition, crystal phases and hardness were also determined. The results showed that the composition of recycled Zircaloy comply with the chemical specifications and presented adequate microstructure for nuclear use. The good results of the powder metallurgy method suggest the possibility of producing small parts, like cladding end-caps, using near net shape sintering. (author)

  14. Recycling Waste Bakelite As A Carbon Resource In Ironmaking

    OpenAIRE

    James Ransford Dankwah; Emmanuel Baawuah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bakelite is a 3-dimensional cross-linked network structured thermosetting polymer which is difficult to recycle after use. However it contains high levels of carbon and CaCO3 that can be recovered for use as reductant and fluxing agent in ironmaking. In this work we report the use of post-consumer bakelite as reductant for the production of metallic iron from iron oxide in a horizontal tube furnace through the composite pellet approach.Gas emission studies were conducted by pyrolysin...

  15. Performance of Recycled Asphalt Pavement as Coarse Aggregate in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelis O. OKAFOR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycled asphalt pavement (RAP is the reclaimed and reprocessed pavement material containing asphalt and aggregate. Most RAP is recycled back into pavements, and as a result there is a general lack of data pertaining to the mechanical properties for RAP in other possible applications such as Portland cement concrete. In the present study, some mechanical properties of Portland cement concrete containing RAP as coarse aggregate were investigated in the laboratory. Six concrete mixes of widely differing water/cement ratios and mix proportions were made using RAP as coarse aggregate. The properties tested include the physical properties of the RAP aggregate, the compressive and flexural strengths of the concrete. These properties were compared with those of similar concretes made with natural gravel aggregate. Results of the tests suggest that the strength of concrete made from RAP is dependent on the bond strength of the “asphalt-mortar” (asphalt binder-sand-filler matrix coatings on the aggregates and may not produce concrete with compressive strength above 25 MPa. However, for middle and low strength concrete, the material was found to compare favorably with natural gravel aggregate.

  16. Technical assessment of processes to enable recycling of low-level contaminated metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulations of metal waste exhibiting low levels of radioactivity (LLCMW) have become a national burden, both financially and environmentally. Much of this metal could be considered as a resource. The Department of Energy was assigned the task of inventorying and classifying LLCMW, identifying potential applications, and applying and/or developing the technology necessary to enable recycling. One application for recycled LLCMW is high-quality canisters for permanent repository storage of high-level waste (HLW). As many as 80,000 canisters will be needed by 2035. Much of the technology needed to decontaminate LLCMW has already been developed, but no integrated process has been described, even on a pilot scale, for recycling LLCMW into HLW canisters. This report reviews practices for removal of radionuclides and for producing low carbon stainless steel. Contaminants that readily form oxides may be reduced to below de minimis levels and combined with a slag. Most of the radioactivity remaining in the ingot is concentrated in the inclusions. Radionuclides that chemically resemble the elements that comprise stainless steel can not be removed effectively. Slag compositions, current melting practices, and canister fabrication techniques were reviewed

  17. Technical and economical assessment of formic acid to recycle phosphorus from pig slurry by a combined acidification-precipitation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumer, M-L; Picard, S; Saint-Cast, P; Dabert, P

    2010-08-15

    Dissolution by acidification followed by a liquid/solid separation and precipitation of phosphorus from the liquid phase is one possibility to recycle phosphorus from livestock effluents. To avoid increase of effluent salinity by using mineral acids in the recycling process, the efficiency of two organic acids, formic and acetic acid, in dissolving the mineral phosphorus from piggery wastewater was compared. The amount of formic acid needed to dissolve the phosphorus was reduced three fold, compared to acetic acid. The amount of magnesium oxide needed for further precipitation was decreased by two with formic acid. Neither the carbon load nor the effluent salinity was significantly increased by using formic acid. An economical comparison was performed for the chemical recycling process (mineral fertilizer) vs. centrifugation (organic fertilizer) considering the centrifugation and the mineral fertilizers sold in the market. After optimisation of the process, the product could be economically competitive with mineral fertilizer as superphosphate in less than 10 years. PMID:20471746

  18. EVALUATION OF SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTAL EFFICIENCY ON RECYCLING OF CONSTRUCTION SLUDGES AS GROUND MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inazumi, Shinya; Ohtsu, Hiroyasu; Isoda, Takayuki; Shigematsu, Yuji

    Although waste recycling has been promoted in response to increasing environmental awareness in Japan, its marketability is being questioned due to the recycling cost. The ultimate goal of waste recycling is to reduce the environmental load. In this paper, we examined the evaluation method for social environmental efficiency to socially evaluate waste recycling, by incorporating environmental load as an environmental cost in addition to the direct cost. Specifically, by applying sensitivity analysis and Monte-Carlo Simulation, we conducted the social environmental efficiency evaluation including consideration of uncertainties, because waste recycling involves various uncertain elements. As a result, we were able to quantitatively evaluate the social environmental significance of construction sludge recycling while focusing on the particular construction sludge with a lower recycling rate.

  19. Tire Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  20. Enhanced phosphorus removal in the DAF process by flotation scum recycling for advanced treatment of municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong-Heui; Lee, Ki-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    To remove phosphorus (P) from municipal wastewater, various types of advanced treatment processes are being actively applied. However, there is commonly a space limit in municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTPs). For that reason, the dissolved air flotation (DAF), which is well known for small space and flexible application process, is preferred as an additive process to enhance the removal of P. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of flotation scum recycling for effective P removal from a MWTP using a DAF pilot plant over 1 year. The average increases in the removal efficiencies due to flotation scum recycling were 22.6% for total phosphorus (T-P) and 18.3% for PO4-P. A higher removal efficiency of T-P was induced by recycling the flotation scum because a significant amount of Al components remained in the flotation scum. The increase in T-P removal efficiency, due to the recycling of flotation scum, shifted from the boundary of the stoichiometric precipitate to the equilibrium control region. Flotation scum recycling may contribute to improving the quality of treated water and reducing treatment costs by minimizing the coagulant dosage required.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of foaming process with chain extended recycled PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental study of a thermoplastic polymer foaming process is presented. Industrial scraps of PET were used for the production of foamed sheets. The process was performed by making use of a chemical blowing agent (CBA in the extrusion process. Due to the low intrinsic viscosity of the recycled PET, a chain extender was also used in order to increase the molecular weight of the polymer matrix. Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA and Hydrocerol CT 534 were chosen as chain extender and CBA, respectively. The reactive extrusion and foaming were performed in a two step process. Rheological characterization was carried out on PET samples previously treated with PMDA, as well as the morphological study was performed to define the cellular structure of the foams produced. Moreover, in order to predict the morphology of the foam, a non isothermal model was developed by taking into account both mass transfer phenomenon and viscous forces effect. Model results were compared with experimental data obtained analyzing the foamed samples. The model was validated in relation to working conditions, chemical blowing agent percentage and initial rheological properties of recycled polymer. A pretty good agreement between experimental and calculated data was achieved.

  2. Novel Remanufacturing Process of Recycled Polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE)/GF Laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Z.; Ghita, O. R.; Johnston, P.; Evans, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the PTFE/GF laminate and PTFE PCB manufacturers are under considerable pressure to address the recycling issues due to Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive, shortage of landfill capacity and cost of disposal. This study is proposing a novel manufacture method for reuse of the mechanical ground PTFE/Glass fibre (GF) laminate and production of the first reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate proposed here consists of a layer of recycled sub-sheet, additional layers of PTFE and PTFE coated glass cloth, also covered by copper foils. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate showed good dielectric properties. Therefore, there is potential to use the mechanical ground PTFE/GF laminate powder to produce reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate, for use in high frequencies PCB applications.

  3. A novel cleaner production process of citric acid by recycling its treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel cleaner production process of citric acid was proposed to completely solve the problem of wastewater management in citric acid industry. In the process, wastewater from citric acid fermentation was used to produce methane through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent was further treated with air stripping and electrodialysis before recycled as process water for the later citric acid fermentation. This proposed process was performed for 10 batches and the average citric acid production in recycling batches was 142.4±2.1g/L which was comparable to that with tap water (141.6g/L). Anaerobic digestion was also efficient and stable in operation. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 95.1±1.2% and methane yield approached to 297.7±19.8mL/g TCODremoved. In conclusion, this novel process minimized the wastewater discharge and achieved the cleaner production in citric acid industry.

  4. Mineral processing techniques for recycling investment casting shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Nilsen, David N.; Dahlin, David C.; Hunt, Alton H.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy used materials characterization and minerals beneficiation methods to separate and beneficially modify spent investment-mold components to identify recycling opportunities and minimize environmentally sensitive wastes. The physical and chemical characteristics of the shell materials were determined and used to guide bench-scale research to separate reusable components by mineral-beneficiation techniques. Successfully concentrated shell materials were evaluated for possible use in new markets.

  5. Recycled construction debris as an aggregates. Production of concrete blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa, J. G. G.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the use of recycled construction and demolition debris as aggregate for the construction of concrete blocks to be used in sealing masonry. Initial studies addressed the definition of parameters used in the mix of conventional materials (traditionally used in the production of concrete blocks, involving cylindrical test specimens (100x200 mm, molded with the help of a vibratory table. In addition to these definitions, and based on the mixes showing the best results, a new granulometric range was established, against which the granulometry of the recycled aggregates was adjusted. After the initial studies, concrete blocks were molded with the following dimensions: 100x190x390 mm. Studies have determined the behavior of aggregates in relation to mold humidity specific mass, water absorption, and compression resistance in view of the percentage of recycled debris that composes the total aggregate. For the most part, results suggest that construction and demolition debris can potentially be used in the production of concrete blocks, as well as in other pre-molded artefacts.

    El objetivo de esta investigación es contribuir en la producción de bloques de hormigón para muros de albañilería mediante el aprovechamiento de áridos provenientes del reciclaje de residuos de la construcción civil. Los estudios preliminares tuvieron inicio con la definición de los parámetros de mezcla para los materiales convencionales (tradicionalmente utilizados en la construcción de bloques de hormigón, donde se emplearon probetas cilíndricas (100x200 mm, moldeadas con la ayuda de una mesa vibratoria. Cumplidas estas definiciones, se estableció un rango granulométrico a partir de las composiciones de mejores resultados, donde se buscó ajustar la granulometría de los áridos reciclados. Concluidos los estudios preliminares, se moldearon los bloques de hormigón con dimensiones (100x190x390 mm. Los estudios presentan como resultado el

  6. Recycling of water from manufacturing of asbestos/cement panels and pipes. Monograph; Fabrication de panneaux et tuyaux en amiante-ciment avec recyclage des eaux de process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-07-15

    The company manufactures asbestos-cement panels and pipes and recycles the water used in the process. The asbestos and the cement are mixed in water. The resulting mixture is placed on a cloth rolling at high speed, is drained and forms a thin layer that serves as a base for the panels and pipes. The water drained off in both processes is decanted twice. The residue from the first decanting is recycled; that from the second is also recycled in the low pollution process, while it is discharged in the standard process.

  7. Recycling of iron foundry sand and glass waste as raw material for production of whiteware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Saulo R; Vicenzi, Juliane; Guerino, Kareline; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the production feasibility of triaxial whiteware using sand from cast iron moulds as a raw material instead of silica, and recycled glass in place of feldspar. Formulations were prepared using sand, glass waste, and white-firing clay such that only 50% of the composition was virgin material (clay). The ceramic bodies were formed by pressing and fired at different temperatures (between 1100 and 1300 degrees C). Specimens were characterized in terms of green density prior to firing; and their flexural strength, linear shrinkage, and water absorption were measured after firing. The microstructure was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Possible environmental impacts of this recycling process were also evaluated, through solubility and leaching tests, according to Brazilian standards. Gaseous emissions during the firing process were also analysed. The results showed that it is possible to produce triaxial ceramics by using such alternative raw materials. PMID:16496871

  8. Quantifying pretreatment degradation compounds in solution and accumulated by cells during solids and yeast recycling in the Rapid Bioconversion with Integrated recycling Technology process using AFEX™ corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarks, Cory; Higbee, Alan; Piotrowski, Jeff; Xue, Saisi; Coon, Joshua J; Sato, Trey K; Jin, Mingjie; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    Effects of degradation products (low molecular weight compounds produced during pretreatment) on the microbes used in the RaBIT (Rapid Bioconversion with Integrated recycling Technology) process that reduces enzyme usage up to 40% by efficient enzyme recycling were studied. Chemical genomic profiling was performed, showing no yeast response differences in hydrolysates produced during RaBIT enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrations of degradation products in solution were quantified after different enzymatic hydrolysis cycles and fermentation cycles. Intracellular degradation product concentrations were also measured following fermentation. Degradation product concentrations in hydrolysate did not change between RaBIT enzymatic hydrolysis cycles; the cell population retained its ability to oxidize/reduce (detoxify) aldehydes over five RaBIT fermentation cycles; and degradation products accumulated within or on the cells as RaBIT fermentation cycles increased. Synthetic hydrolysate was used to confirm that pretreatment degradation products are the sole cause of decreased xylose consumption during RaBIT fermentations.

  9. Biomass recycle as a means to improve the energy efficiency of CELSS algal culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Algal cultures can be very rapid and efficient means to generate biomass and regenerate the atmosphere for closed environmental life support systems. However, as in the case of most higher plants, a significant fraction of the biomass produced by most algae cannot be directly converted to a useful food product by standard food technology procedures. This waste biomass will serve as an energy drain on the overall system unless it can be efficiently recycled without a significant loss of its energy content. Experiments are reported in which cultures of the alga Scenedesmus obliquus were grown in the light and at the expense of an added carbon source, which either replaced or supplemented the actinic light. As part of these experiments, hydrolyzed waste biomass from these same algae were tested to determine whether the algae themselves could be made part of the biological recycling process. Results indicate that hydrolyzed algal (and plant) biomass can serve as carbon and energy sources for the growth of these algae, suggesting that the efficiency of the closed system could be significantly improved using this recycling process.

  10. Removal of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in a water recycling process using reverse osmosis systems

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rifai, Jawad H.; Khabbaz, Hadi; Schaefer, Andrea I.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed investigation was carried out to evaluate the occurrence, persistence and fate of a range of micropollutants at different processing points at a full-scale water recycling plant (WRP) in Queensland, Australia. The WRP, which combines an advanced water treatment plant (AWTP) with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), produces high quality recycled water for industrial users. The concentrations of 11 pharmaceuticals from various therapeutic categories and two endocrine disrupting chem...

  11. Removal of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in water recycling process using reverse osmosis systems

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rifai, Jawad H.; Khabbazb, Hadi; Schäfer, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    A detailed investigation was carried out to evaluate the occurrence, persistence and fate of a range of micropollutants at different processing points at a full-scale water recycling plant (WRP) in Queensland, Australia. The WRP, which combines an advanced water treatment plant (AWTP) with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), produces high quality recycled water for industrial users. The concentrations of 11 pharmaceuticals from various therapeutic categories and two endocrine dis...

  12. Recycling of the #5 polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Marino

    2012-08-10

    Polypropylene (PP) is a widely used plastic with consumer applications ranging from food packaging to automotive parts, including car battery casings. To differentiate it from other recyclable plastics, it is designated as #5. Here, the factors contributing to PP recycling rates are briefly reviewed. Considerations include collection and separation efficiency, processing chemistry, and market dynamics for the products derived from recyclates. PMID:22879510

  13. Evaluation of a recycling process for printed circuit board by physical separation and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Ono, Hiroyuki; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Yamaguchi, Kunihiko

    2014-07-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) from discarded personal computer (PC) and hard disk drive were crushed by explosion in water or mechanical comminution in order to disintegrate the attached parts. More parts were stripped from PCB of PC, composed of epoxy resin; than from PCB of household appliance, composed of phenol resin. In an attempt to raise the copper grade of PCB by removing other components, a carbonization treatment was investigated. The crushed PCB without surface-mounted parts was carbonized under a nitrogen atmosphere at 873-1073 K. After screening, the char was classified by size into oversized pieces, undersized pieces and powder. The copper foil and glass fiber pieces were liberated and collected in undersized fraction. The copper foil was liberated easily from glass fiber by stamping treatment. As one of the mounted parts, the multi-layered ceramic capacitors (MLCCs), which contain nickel, were carbonized at 873 K. The magnetic separation is carried out at a lower magnetic field strength of 0.1T and then at 0.8 T. In the +0.5mm size fraction the nickel grade in magnetic product was increased from 0.16% to 6.7% and the nickel recovery is 74%. The other useful mounted parts are tantalum capacitors. The tantalum capacitors were collected from mounted parts. The tantalum-sintered bodies were separated from molded resins by heat treatment at 723-773 K in air atmosphere and screening of 0.5mm. Silica was removed and 70% of tantalum grade was obtained after more than 823K heating and separation. Next, the evaluation of Cu recycling in PCB is estimated. Energy consumption of new process increased and the treatment cost becomes 3 times higher comparing the conventional process, while the environmental burden of new process decreased comparing conventional process. The nickel recovery process in fine ground particles increased energy and energy cost comparing those of the conventional process. However, the environmental burden decreased than the conventional

  14. Optimization of the ethanol recycling reflux extraction process for saponins using a design space approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingchu Gong

    Full Text Available A solvent recycling reflux extraction process for Panax notoginseng was optimized using a design space approach to improve the batch-to-batch consistency of the extract. Saponin yields, total saponin purity, and pigment yield were defined as the process critical quality attributes (CQAs. Ethanol content, extraction time, and the ratio of the recycling ethanol flow rate and initial solvent volume in the extraction tank (RES were identified as the critical process parameters (CPPs via quantitative risk assessment. Box-Behnken design experiments were performed. Quadratic models between CPPs and process CQAs were developed, with determination coefficients higher than 0.88. As the ethanol concentration decreases, saponin yields first increase and then decrease. A longer extraction time leads to higher yields of the ginsenosides Rb1 and Rd. The total saponin purity increases as the ethanol concentration increases. The pigment yield increases as the ethanol concentration decreases or extraction time increases. The design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with an acceptable probability of 0.90. Normal operation ranges to attain process CQA criteria with a probability of more than 0.914 are recommended as follows: ethanol content of 79-82%, extraction time of 6.1-7.1 h, and RES of 0.039-0.040 min-1. Most of the results of the verification experiments agreed well with the predictions. The verification experiment results showed that the selection of proper operating ethanol content, extraction time, and RES within the design space can ensure that the CQA criteria are met.

  15. Spark Plasma Sintering As a Solid-State Recycling Technique: The Case of Aluminum Alloy Scrap Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Paraskevas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, “meltless” recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS is proposed in this paper as a novel solid-state recycling technique. The objective is two-fold: (I to prove the technical feasibility of this approach; and (II to characterize the recycled samples. Aluminum (Al alloy scrap was selected to demonstrate the SPS effectiveness in producing fully-dense samples. For this purpose, Al alloy scrap in the form of machining chips was cold pre-compacted and sintered bellow the solidus temperature at 490 °C, under elevated pressure of 200 MPa. The dynamic scrap compaction, combined with electric current-based joule heating, achieved partial fracture of the stable surface oxides, desorption of the entrapped gases and activated the metallic surfaces, resulting in efficient solid-state chip welding eliminating residual porosity. The microhardness, the texture, the mechanical properties, the microstructure and the density of the recycled specimens have been investigated. An X-ray computed tomography (CT analysis confirmed the density measurements, revealing a void-less bulk material with homogeneously distributed intermetallic compounds and oxides. The oxide content of the chips incorporated within the recycled material slightly increases its elastic properties. Finally, a thermal distribution simulation of the process in different segments illustrates the improved energy efficiency of this approach.

  16. Reliability Analysis of III-V Solar Cells Grown on Recycled GaAs Substrates and an Electroplated Nickel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Hua Horng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study involved analyzing the reliability of two types of III-V solar cells: (1 III-V solar cells grown on new and recycled gallium arsenide (GaAs substrates and (2 the III-V solar cells transferred onto an electroplated nickel (Ni substrate as III-V thin-film solar cells by using a cross-shaped pattern epitaxial lift-off (CPELO process. The III-V solar cells were grown on new and recycled GaAs substrates to evaluate the reliability of the substrate. The recycled GaAs substrate was fabricated by using the CPELO process. The performance of the solar cells grown on the recycled GaAs substrate was affected by the uneven surface morphology of the recycled GaAs substrate, which caused the propagation of these dislocations into the subsequently grown active layer of the solar cell. The III-V solar cells were transferred onto an electroplated Ni substrate, which was also fabricated by using CPELO technology. The degradation of the III-V thin-film solar cell after conducting a thermal shock test could have been caused by microcracks or microvoids in the active layer or interface of the heterojunction, which resulted in the reduction of the external quantum efficiency response and the increase of recombination loss.

  17. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  18. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  19. Recycling Waste Bakelite As A Carbon Resource In Ironmaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ransford Dankwah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bakelite is a 3-dimensional cross-linked network structured thermosetting polymer which is difficult to recycle after use. However it contains high levels of carbon and CaCO3 that can be recovered for use as reductant and fluxing agent in ironmaking. In this work we report the use of post-consumer bakelite as reductant for the production of metallic iron from iron oxide in a horizontal tube furnace through the composite pellet approach.Gas emission studies were conducted by pyrolysing raw bakelite at different temperatures within the temperature range 1200-1600 C in a horizontal tube furnace. Following thiscomposite pellets were then formed from mixtures of iron oxide and post-consumer bakelite.The iron oxide-bakelite composites were heated from room temperature to 1200 C and then between 1200-1600 C in a continuous stream of pure argon and the off gas was analysed continuously using an infrared IR gas analyser. Elemental analyses of samples of the reduced metal were performed chemically for its oxygen content using a LECO oxygennitrogen analyser. The extent of reduction after ten minutes was determined from the oxygen content. Gas emission studies revealed the emission of large volumes of the reductant gases CO and CH4along with CO2.It is further demonstrated that post-consumer bakelite is effective at reducing iron oxide to produce metallic iron.

  20. Hanford recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

  1. Recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) for reliable and low inventory processing of highly tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detritiation of highly tritiated water by liquid phase catalytic exchange needs dilution of the feed with water to tritium concentrations suitable for catalyst and safety rules and to assure flow rates large enough for wetting the catalyst. Dilution by recycling detritiated water from within the exchange process has three advantages: the amount and concentration of the water for dilution is controlled within the exchange process, there is no additional water load to processes located downstream RACE, and the ratio of gas to liquid flow rates in the exchange column could be adjusted by using several recycles differing in amount and concentration to avoid an excessively large number of theoretical separation stages. In this paper, the flexibility of the recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) and its effect on the cryogenic distillation are demonstrated for the detritiation of the highly tritiated water from a tritium breeding blanket

  2. UTILIZATION OF SCRAP PREPREG WASTES AS A REINFORCEMENT IN A WHOLLY RECYCLED PLASTIC - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Miller proposes to utilize scrap prepreg waste as a reinforcement in recycled polyethylene. By reinforcing recycled plastics such as polyethylene with scrap prepreg and suitable binders, an economical useful product can be obtained. At the same time, this innovation ...

  3. The European experience in safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civil nuclear programs in the European Union member states have from their onset included fuel recycling as an option. The EURATOM Treaty gives to the European Commission the obligation to apply safeguards controls to all civil Nuclear Material in the European Union, and to facilitate the implementation of IAEA safeguards. The European Commission (EURATOM) has thus gained years of experience in safeguarding reprocessing plants, Pu storages, and MOX fuel fabrication plants and is currently participating in the development of approaches and measures for safeguarding long term repositories. The aim of this paper is to present the regulator's views and experience on safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores, which is based on the following principles: -) Early involvement of the control organizations in the design of the safeguards measures to be developed for a plant (currently referred to as Safeguards by Design); -) Early definition of a safeguards strategy including key measurement points; -) The design and development of plant specific Safeguards equipment, including an on site laboratory for sample analysis; -) The development by the operator of an appropriate Nuclear Material accountancy system to facilitate their declaration obligations; -) The introduction of an inspection regime allowing comprehensive controls under the restrictions imposed by financial and Human Resources limitations; -) Optimization of the inspection effort by using unattended measuring stations, containment and surveillance systems and secure remote transmission of data to the regulator's headquarters. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  4. Process for the recycling of alkaline and zinc-carbon spent batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferella, Francesco; De Michelis, Ida; Vegliò, Francesco

    In this paper a recycling process for the recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries is proposed. Laboratory tests are performed to obtain a purified pregnant solution from which metallic zinc (purity 99.6%) can be recovered by electrolysis; manganese is recovered as a mixture of oxides by roasting of solid residue coming from the leaching stage. Nearly 99% of zinc and 20% of manganese are extracted after 3 h, at 80 °C with 10% w/v pulp density and 1.5 M sulphuric acid concentration. The leach liquor is purified by a selective precipitation of iron, whereas metallic impurities, such as copper, nickel and cadmium are removed by cementation with zinc powder. The solid residue of leaching is roasted for 30 min at 900 °C, removing graphite completely and obtaining a mixture of Mn 3O 4 and Mn 2O 3 with 70% grade of Mn. After that a technical-economic assessment is carried out for a recycling plant with a feed capacity of 5000 t y -1 of only alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries. This analysis shows the economic feasibility of that plant, supposing a battery price surcharge of 0.5 € kg -1, with a return on investment of 34.5%, gross margin of 35.8% and around 3 years payback time.

  5. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

    2009-02-20

    A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

  6. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gug, JeongIn, E-mail: Jeongin_gug@student.uml.edu; Cacciola, David, E-mail: david_cacciola@student.uml.edu; Sobkowicz, Margaret J., E-mail: Margaret_sobkowiczkline@uml.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  7. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  8. PRIMUS(reg sign): a new process for the recycling of by-products and the prereduction of iron ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieden, R.; Hansmann, T.; Monai, J.; Roth, J.L.; Solvi, M.; Engel, R.

    2000-07-01

    For years, the iron and steel industry has been in search of new processes for an efficient production of virgin steel as well as for the recycling of its byproducts, especially for those containing zinc. Considering these objectives, Paul Wurth S.A. has developed a process using the multiple-hearth furnace, and coal fines as the reductant and main energy source. A trial plant with a capacity of about 2 t/h was built and has been operated for about one year at the ProfilArbed Belva site, Luxembourg. This paper reports on the trial campaigns carried out for recycling by-products such as steelmaking sludges, dusts and scale, as well as for reducing iron ore fines, both of which have given most promising results. 12 figs.

  9. Wastewater treatment technologies and water recycling in mining and mineral extraction processes – a literature survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kivi, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to consider the possibilities in reasonable and efficient water usage and high water recycling rate in mining and mineral processing industry. Wastewater treatment technologies for different mineral industry wastewaters are described and the basic chemistry behind the processes explained. The thesis also describes the reasons for water use in mineral extraction processes, the wastes formed in the processing of ore and minerals, the common reagents used in mineral proc...

  10. Poultry feather wastes recycling possibility as soil nutrient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Mézes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry feathers are produced in large amounts as a waste in poultry slaughterhouses. Only 60-70% of the poultry slaughterhouse products are edible for human being. This means more million tons annually worldwide (Papadopoulus et al., 1986; Williams et al., 1991; Hegedűs et al., 1998. The keratin-content of feather can be difficulty digested, so physical, chemical and/or biological pre-treatment are needed in practice, which have to be set according to the utilization method. Feather was enzymatic degraded, and then fermented in separated bioreactors. The anaerobic bioreactor system (4 digesters with 6 litre volume was controlled by ACE SCADA software running on Linux platforms. Pot scale seed germination tests were established to suggest the quantity of digested slurry to be utilized. The chosen test plants were lettuce (Lactuca sativa. In case of reproduction test Student’s t-test was applied to examine significant differences between the root lengths of the control and the treated plant species. In case of pot seed germination variance analysis with Tukey B’s and Duncan test was applied to examine significant differences between the root lengths of plants, grown on different treatments. The effect of treatments on germination ability of the plant species was expressed in the percentage of the controls. According to Student’s t-test significant difference was found between root lengths of different treatments. Based on variance analysis with Tukey B’s and Duncan tests could be detected a significant difference between the treatments. Utilization of the fermented material reduces the use of fertilizers and because of its large moisture content it reduces the watering costs. Recycle of the slaughterhouse feather and different agricultural wastes and by-products can solve three main problems: disposal of harmful materials, producing of renewable energy and soil nutrient, measuring reflectance at the certain spectral range, which can

  11. Proliferation resistance assessments during the design phase of a recycling facility as a means of reducing proliferation risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, M.A.; Grape, S.; Haekansson, A.; Jacobsson Svaerd, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University: Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    The sustainability criterion for Gen IV nuclear energy systems inherently presumes the availability of efficient fuel recycling capabilities. One area for research on advanced fuel recycling concerns safeguards aspects of this type of facilities. Since a recycling facility may be considered as sensitive from a non-proliferation perspective, it is important to address these issues early in the design process, according to the principle of Safeguards By Design. Presented in this paper is a mode of procedure, where assessments of the proliferation resistance (PR) of a recycling facility for fast reactor fuel have been performed so as to identify the weakest barriers to proliferation of nuclear material. Two supplementing established methodologies have been applied; TOPS (Technological Opportunities to increase Proliferation resistance of nuclear power Systems) and PR-PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection evaluation methodology). The chosen fuel recycling facility belongs to a small Gen IV lead-cooled fast reactor system that is under study in Sweden. A schematic design of the recycling facility, where actinides are separated using solvent extraction, has been examined. The PR assessment methodologies make it possible to pinpoint areas in which the facility can be improved in order to reduce the risk of diversion. The initial facility design may then be slightly modified and/or safeguards measures may be introduced to reduce the total identified proliferation risk. After each modification of design and/or safeguards implementation, a new PR assessment of the revised system can then be carried out. This way, each modification can be evaluated and new ways to further enhance the proliferation resistance can be identified. This type of iterative procedure may support Safeguards By Design in the planning of new recycling plants and other nuclear facilities. (authors)

  12. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of coffee wet wastewater: Effect of recycle on anaerobic process performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yans Guardia Puebla; Suyén Rodríguez Pérez; Yennys Cuscó Varona; Janet Jiménez Hernández; Víctor Sánchez Girón

    2014-01-01

    The present work shows the results of the two-phase anaerobic digestion assessment for the treatment of coffee wet wastewater. The effect of recycle on the anaerobic digestion process was studied. Twooverall organic loading rate (OLR) values of 4,2 and 5,7 kgCOD·m -3 ·d -1 , with same overall hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 21,5 h was evaluated.In a two-phase system wereapplied two recycle rate of 0,4 and 1,0, of the effluent of an UASB-UAF methanogenic hybrid reactor towards an UASB acidog...

  13. Preparation of 2,6-diisopropylnaphthalene with recycled process of isomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hua Tian; Gui Li Zhao; Hong Min Jia; Ben Li; Wei Qi Hu

    2008-01-01

    2,6-Diisopropylnaphthalene (2,6-DIPN),as the precursor of important monomer 2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid,was prepared by hydroisopropylation of refined naphthalene with propene over shape-selective catalyst.Naphthalene conversion of 92% and 2,6-DIPN selectivity of 64% were obtained.Static melt crystallization was applied to separate and purify 2,6-DIPN from its isomers,resulted in a product purity of ≥99%.The other isomers were converted into monoisopropylnaphthalene,which also reacted with propcne to form 2,6-DIPN.A recycled process including hydroisopropylation,separation and transalkylation was established,the yield of 2,6-DIPN based on naphthalene could be doubled by one cycle operation.

  14. The recycle of depleted uranium waste products by a hydrometallurgical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Metals, Inc. has developed a process for recycling uranium scrap materials into high quality metal. The process involves the dissolution of scrap metal in an aqueous solution of 2.4 N HCI and 0.16 N HBF4, followed by precipitation of UF4 through the addition of HF. The precipitated green salt is Filtered, washed, dried, and heat treated after which it is suitable for reduction to metal. The product and the process are referred to as Hydromet, since it is a hydrometallurgical approach to producing green salt. Conventionally, green salt is produced by a pyrometallurgical technique. The steps of the process are described and results presented for derbies produced using Hydromet green salt. With proper process selection and appropriate heat treatment, green salt produced by Hydromet is fully equivalent to pyrometallurgical green salt. Hydromet green salt can be reduced to metal using the identical process used for pyromet green salt. Good quality, well-formed derbies can be readily produced. (author)

  15. Modeling Recycling Asphalt Pavement Processing Technologies in Asphalt Mixing Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Simonas Tamaliūnas; Henrikas Sivilevičius

    2011-01-01

    The article presents reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) processing technologies and equipment models used in the asphalt mixing plant (AMP). The schematic model indicating all possible ways to process RAP in AMP is shown. The model calculating the needed temperature of mineral materials used for heating RAP is given and an example of such calculation is provided.Article in Lithuanian

  16. Pretreatment of lignocellulose with biological acid recycling (the Biosulfurol process)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, van J.; Hazewinkel, O.; Bakker, R.R.C.

    2006-01-01

    A biomass pretreatment process is being developed based on contacting lignocellulosic biomass with 70% sulfuric acid and subsequent hydrolysis by adding water. In this process, the hydrolysate can be fermented yielding ethanol, while the sulfuric acid is partly recovered by anion-selective membranes

  17. Triple Recycling Processes Impact Systemic and Local Bioavailability of Orally Administered Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peimin; Zhu, Lijun; Luo, Feifei; Lu, Linlin; Li, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xinchun; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-05-01

    Triple recycling (i.e., enterohepatic, enteric and local recycling) plays a central role in governing the disposition of phenolics such as flavonoids, resulting in low systemic bioavailability but higher gut bioavailability and longer than expected apparent half-life. The present study aims to investigate the coexistence of these recycling schemes using model bioactive flavonoid tilianin and a four-site perfused rat intestinal model in the presence or absence of a lactase phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) inhibitor gluconolactone and/or a glucuronidase inhibitor saccharolactone. The result showed that tilianin could be metabolized into tilianin glucuronide, acacetin, and acacetin glucuronide, which are excreted into the bile and luminal perfusate (highest in the duodenum and lowest in the colon). Gluconolactone (20 mM) significantly reduced the absorption of tilianin and the enteric and biliary excretion of acacetin glucuronide. Saccharolactone (0.1 mM) alone or in combination of gluconolactone also remarkably reduced the biliary and intestinal excretion of acacetin glucuronide. Acacetin glucuronides from bile or perfusate were rapidly hydrolyzed by bacterial β-glucuronidases to acacetin, enabling enterohepatic and enteric recycling. Moreover, saccharolactone-sensitive tilianin disposition and glucuronide deconjugation, which was more active in the small intestine than the colon, points to the small intestinal origin of the deconjugation enzyme and supports the presence of local recycling scheme. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated triple recycling of a bioactive phenolic (i.e., a model flavonoid), and this recycling may have an impact on the site and duration of polyphenols pharmacokinetics in vivo.

  18. Evaluation of a recycling process for printed circuit board by physical separation and heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The parts mounted on printed circuit board (PCB) were liberated by underwater explosion and mechanical crushing. • The crushed PCB without surface-mounted parts was carbonized under inert atmosphere at 873 K to recover copper. • The multi-layered ceramic capacitors including nickel was carbonized at 873 K to recover nickel by the magnetic separation. • The tantalum powders were recovered from the molded resins by heat treatment at 723 and 823 K in air atmosphere and screening. • Energy and treatment cost of new process increased, however, the environmental burden decreased comparing conventional one. - Abstract: Printed circuit boards (PCBs) from discarded personal computer (PC) and hard disk drive were crushed by explosion in water or mechanical comminution in order to disintegrate the attached parts. More parts were stripped from PCB of PC, composed of epoxy resin; than from PCB of household appliance, composed of phenol resin. In an attempt to raise the copper grade of PCB by removing other components, a carbonization treatment was investigated. The crushed PCB without surface-mounted parts was carbonized under a nitrogen atmosphere at 873–1073 K. After screening, the char was classified by size into oversized pieces, undersized pieces and powder. The copper foil and glass fiber pieces were liberated and collected in undersized fraction. The copper foil was liberated easily from glass fiber by stamping treatment. As one of the mounted parts, the multi-layered ceramic capacitors (MLCCs), which contain nickel, were carbonized at 873 K. The magnetic separation is carried out at a lower magnetic field strength of 0.1 T and then at 0.8 T. In the +0.5 mm size fraction the nickel grade in magnetic product was increased from 0.16% to 6.7% and the nickel recovery is 74%. The other useful mounted parts are tantalum capacitors. The tantalum capacitors were collected from mounted parts. The tantalum-sintered bodies were separated from molded resins

  19. Relative contributions of the weak, main and fission-recycling r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Shibagaki, S; Mathews, G J; Chiba, S; Nishimura, S; Lorusso, G

    2015-01-01

    There has been a persistent conundrum in attempts to model the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements by rapid neutron capture (the $r$-process). Although the location of the abundance peaks near nuclear mass numbers 130 and 195 identify an environment of rapid neutron capture near closed nuclear shells, the abundances of elements just above and below those peaks are often underproduced by more than an order of magnitude in model calculations. At the same time there is a debate in the literature as to what degree the $r$-process elements are produced in supernovae or the mergers of binary neutron stars. In this paper we propose a novel solution to both problems. We demonstrate that the underproduction of elements above and below the $r$-process peaks characteristic in the main or weak $r$-process events (like magnetohydrodynamic jets or neutrino-driven winds in core-collapse supernovae) can be supplemented via fission fragment distributions from the recycling of material in a neutron-rich environment such as that ...

  20. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudowe, Ralf [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program and Health Physics Dept.; Roman, Audrey [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program; Dailey, Ashlee [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program; Go, Elaine [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program

    2013-07-18

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular, new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time- and labor-intensive, and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is required and/or large number of samples need to be analyzed. To address this issue we are currently investigating radiochemical separation methods based on extraction chromatography that have been specifically optimized for the analysis of process stream samples. The influence of potential interferences present in the process samples as well as mass loading, flow rate and resin performance is being studied. In addition, the potential to automate these procedures utilizing a robotic platform is evaluated. Initial studies have been carried out using the commercially available DGA resin. This resin shows an affinity for Am, Pu, U, and Th and is also exhibiting signs of a possible synergistic effects in the presence of iron.

  1. Preliminary Study on the Performance and Interaction of Recycling Hydrolytic-Aerobic Combined Process of High Concentration Starch Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清彪; 廖鑫凯; 吴志旺; 邓旭; 黄益丽; 卢英华; 孙道华; 洪铭媛; 王琳

    2004-01-01

    A new recycling hydrolytic-aerobic combined process was developed to treat the high concentration organic wastewater. Simulated wastewater containing 10 g·L-1 starch with a CODcr value of 10000 mg·L-1 wasused. At first, the hydrolytic degradation and aerobic degradation process were examined in two batch reactors, respectively. In the stand-alone hydrolytic process, starch in the wastewater almost disappeared after 11 h treatment, but CODCr remained as high as 5803mg·L-1 after two days. In the aerobic process, the biodegradation rate of starch was much slower during the first 11 h than that in the hydrolytic process, although the CODCr removal efficiency reached 89.6% and more than 90% starch could be degraded after 37.5 h. To determine the interaction effects of the two processes, a series of hydrolytic-aerobic combinations were examined in details. Hydrolytic process played an important role in the whole recycle combination process as it could improve the biodegradability of the high concentration starch wastewater. However, from the other experiments, the negative effect of hydrolytic acidification was found in the hydrolytic-aerobic combination, which suggested that the aerobic microorganisms needed time to adapt themselves to the acidic environment. The effect of the degrading time, which was spent in the hydrolytic and aerobic unit, and the number of circulations, with which the wastewater went through the two units were investigated. It was found that a recycle combination of 6 h hydrolytic process with 12 h aerobic process was highly effective and potentially economical, in which the final removal efficiency of CODcr and efficiency of starch degradation reached 94.1% and 98.8%, respectively.

  2. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of coffee wet wastewater: Effect of recycle on anaerobic process performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yans Guardia Puebla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work shows the results of the two-phase anaerobic digestion assessment for the treatment of coffee wet wastewater. The effect of recycle on the anaerobic digestion process was studied. Twooverall organic loading rate (OLR values of 4,2 and 5,7 kgCOD·m -3 ·d -1 , with same overall hydraulic retention time (HRT of 21,5 h was evaluated.In a two-phase system wereapplied two recycle rate of 0,4 and 1,0, of the effluent of an UASB-UAF methanogenic hybrid reactor towards an UASB acidogenic reactor. In the anaerobic system with a recycle rate of 1,0 the total chemical oxygen demand (COD removal was 90%. The introduction of the recycle decreased the concentration of total volatile fatty acids (VFA, but it did not affect their composition, suggesting that the degradation pattern did not change. The presence of the acidogenic reactor in the two-phase system improved the stability of the anaerobic digestion process and increased the efficiency of methanogenic digester.

  3. An electrochemical process for the recycling of tungsten carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the development of a number of designs for electrochemical cells, and the subsequent construction and operation of a vibrating-plate cell capable of oxidizing 15 kilograms of tungsten carbide a day to a crude tungstic acid precipitate, with similtaneous recovery of cobalt metal on the cathode. The effects on the process of the reagent concentration, temperature, current density, and cathode material are discussed

  4. New insights into polyurethane biodegradation and realistic prospects for the development of a sustainable waste recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregut, Mickael; Bedas, M; Durand, M-J; Thouand, G

    2013-12-01

    Polyurethanes are polymeric plastics that were first used as substitutes for traditional polymers suspected to release volatile organic hazardous substances. The limitless conformations and formulations of polyurethanes enabled their use in a wide variety of applications. Because approximately 10 Mt of polyurethanes is produced each year, environmental concern over their considerable contribution to landfill waste accumulation appeared in the 1990s. To date, no recycling processes allow for the efficient reuse of polyurethane waste due to their high resistance to (a)biotic disturbances. To find alternatives to systematic accumulation or incineration of polyurethanes, a bibliographic analysis was performed on major scientific advances in the polyurethane (bio)degradation field to identify opportunities for the development of new technologies to recondition this material. Until polymers exhibiting oxo- or hydro-biodegradative traits are generated, conventional polyurethanes that are known to be only slightly biodegradable are of great concern. The research focused on polyurethane biodegradation highlights recent attempts to reprocess conventional industrial polyurethanes via microbial or enzymatic degradation. This review describes several wonderful opportunities for the establishment of new processes for polyurethane recycling. Meeting these new challenges could lead to the development of sustainable management processes involving polymer recycling or reuse as environmentally safe options for industries. The ability to upgrade polyurethane wastes to chemical compounds with a higher added value would be especially attractive.

  5. Recycling cellulases for cellulosic ethanol production at industrial relevant conditions: potential and temperature dependency at high solid processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindedam, Jane; Haven, Mai Østergaard; Chylenski, Piotr; Jørgensen, Henning; Felby, Claus

    2013-11-01

    Different versions of two commercial cellulases were tested for their recyclability of enzymatic activity at high dry matter processes (12% or 25% DM). Recyclability was assessed by measuring remaining enzyme activity in fermentation broth and the ability of enzymes to hydrolyse fresh, pretreated wheat straw. Industrial conditions were used to study the impact of hydrolysis temperature (40 or 50°C) and residence time on recyclability. Enzyme recycling at 12% DM indicated that hydrolysis at 50°C, though ideal for ethanol yield, should be kept short or carried out at lower temperature to preserve enzymatic activity. Best results for enzyme recycling at 25% DM was 59% and 41% of original enzyme load for a Celluclast:Novozyme188 mixture and a modern cellulase preparation, respectively. However, issues with stability of enzymes and their strong adsorption to residual solids still pose a challenge for applicable methods in enzyme recycling.

  6. Recycling of electric arc furnace (EAF dust for use in steel making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alencastro de Araújo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The EAF dust is listed as hazardous waste from specific source, K061, according to ABNT 10004:2004 and constitutes one of the major problems of electrical steel plant. This work suggests recycling of the EAF dust by sintering of a composite, pre-cast agglomerate (PCA consisting of EAF dust agglomerate to coke particles, mill scale and ceramic fluorite into pellets. The work was divided into three stages, in the first stage the technical viability of using only solid waste industrial to produce a PCA was observed, in the second phase, the main effects between the components of the PCA to obtain the optimal formulation was tested. In the third phase the intensity of the variables, coke and fluorite ceramics, for removing zinc of PCA was checked. Every stage was chemically analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and X-ray diffraction. The first two stages of the production PCA were carried out in a pilot plant sintering downstream and the third phase in a pilot plant upstream. As a result of the process two by-products were obtained, the pre-cast agglomerated, PCA, with total iron content exceeding 70%, object of the process of sintering and zinc dust, containing more than 50% zinc resulting from volatilization of this metal during the sintering process and collected by bag filter. In addition, approximately 90% of lead and cadmium contained in the initial EAF dust was extracted.

  7. Recycling of lipid-extracted hydrolysate as nitrogen supplementation for production of thraustochytrid biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-08-01

    Efficient resource usage is important for cost-effective microalgae production, where the incorporation of waste streams and recycled water into the process has great potential. This study builds upon emerging research on nutrient recycling in thraustochytrid production, where waste streams are recovered after lipid extraction and recycled into future cultures. This research investigates the nitrogen flux of recycled hydrolysate derived from enzymatic lipid extraction of thraustochytrid biomass. Results indicated the proteinaceous content of the recycled hydrolysate can offset the need to supply fresh nitrogen in a secondary culture, without detrimental impact upon the produced biomass. The treatment employing the recycled hydrolysate with no nitrogen addition accumulated 14.86 g L(-1) of biomass in 141 h with 43.3 % (w/w) lipid content compared to the control which had 9.26 g L(-1) and 46.9 % (w/w), respectively. This improved nutrient efficiency and wastewater recovery represents considerable potential for enhanced resource efficiency of commercial thraustochytrid production. PMID:27155854

  8. Kevlar based nanofibrous particles as robust, effective and recyclable absorbents for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chuanxiong; Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Cheng, Chong; Ma, Lang; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-11-15

    Developing robust and recyclable absorbents for water purification is of great demand to control water pollution and to provide sustainable water resources. Herein, for the first time, we reported the fabrication of Kevlar nanofiber (KNF) based composite particles for water purification. Both the KNF and KNF-carbon nanotube composite particles can be produced in large-scale by automatic injection of casting solution into ethanol. The resulted nanofibrous particles showed high adsorption capacities towards various pollutants, including metal ions, phenylic compounds and various dyes. Meanwhile, the adsorption process towards dyes was found to fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, while the adsorption speed was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Furthermore, the adsorption capacities of the nanofibrous particles could be easily recovered by washing with ethanol. In general, the KNF based particles integrate the advantages of easy production, robust and effective adsorption performances, as well as good recyclability, which can be used as robust absorbents to remove toxic molecules and forward the application of absorbents in water purification.

  9. Investigating In Situ Properties of Recycled Asphalt Pavement with Foamed Asphalt as Base Stabilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Antonis Kaltsounis; Vasilis Papavasiliou; Andreas Loizos; Christina Plati

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to conduct a comprehensive field experiment for the in situ assessment of in-depth recycled asphalt pavement using foamed asphalt as a stabilization treatment for base works. For this purpose Nondestructive Testing (NDT) data collected using the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) along a foamed asphalt recycled pavement section was thoroughly analysed. Critical issues including the stabilized material curing and the con...

  10. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As soon as the civil nuclear power age got underway, it became unthinkable to imagine generating nuclear electricity without recycling nuclear materials. In every country where this form of energy was being developed, construction programs involved not only power plants, but also fuel cycle facilities, notably dedicated to recovering and recycling nuclear material. Today, the nuclear renaissance coupled with growing concerns about energy security and public acceptance will provide a trigger for European nuclear countries to look back on three decades of Recycling used nuclear fuel excellent track record. In addition, back-end policy is more and more one of the major topics that nuclear countries and utilities have to face when managing existing as well as a new nuclear power plant. 'What will be done with the used fuel' is a key question, especially in terms of public acceptance. Countries that have previously postponed this topic now have to rethink the best solution for complete sustainable nuclear power. With several decades of experience and excellent feedback recycling has reached a maturity throughout all its supply chain and therefore constitutes the best response. The outcome is outstanding performance in reactors of recycled fuels and a robust, economical and optimized solution to ultimate waste management, in other words: - Recycling allows to significantly reduce the volume and toxicity of the ultimate waste to be interim stored and disposed of while enhancing proliferation resistance, - Recycling features competitive and predictable economics, - Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel supports the sustainable development of nuclear power allowing mitigating supply risks. All this helps to increase public support towards nuclear energy and insure the sustainable development of nuclear energy here and now. (authors)

  11. Recycling of Glass Wastes in Latvia - Its Application as Cement Substitute in Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P

    2014-01-01

    The rate of treated waste glass within the last 10 years has risen up to 25% due to improved waste glass collecting system in Latvia, however the glass waste recycling infrastructure is still up to date issue due to absence of local recycling companies. Application of glass wastes as cement substitute has significant effect on the properties of concrete making it eco-friendly construction material with several benefits like: decrease of accumulated glass wastes in landfills, the reduction of ...

  12. Radionuclide separation and processing for recycle or disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is sponsoring research and development on advanced radiochemical separations, at a modest level, with the long-term goals of reducing the volume of deep geologic repository-disposed waste and the toxicity of low-level waste disposed as cement grout in a near-surface vault. This will help reduce overall environmental risks and the cost of waste management. (author)

  13. Comparative Study on Mechanical Properties between Pure and Recycled Polypropylenes

    OpenAIRE

    Ariadne L. Juwono; Bernadeth Jong Hiong Jun

    2010-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is one type of thermoplastics that is widely used in our daily activities. A combination of the high demand and the easiness of recycling process, the recycled PP has been generally applied. In this study, the structure and the mechanical properties of the as-received PPs, recycled PPs, and commercial recycled PPs were compared, especially for cloth hanger application. DSC test results showed that recycling process did not cause a significant change to the material's meltin...

  14. Investigating In Situ Properties of Recycled Asphalt Pavement with Foamed Asphalt as Base Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Plati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to conduct a comprehensive field experiment for the in situ assessment of in-depth recycled asphalt pavement using foamed asphalt as a stabilization treatment for base works. For this purpose Nondestructive Testing (NDT data collected using the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR along a foamed asphalt recycled pavement section was thoroughly analysed. Critical issues including the stabilized material curing and the contribution of the asphalt layers to the structural properties of the in-depth recycled pavement are discussed. In addition, recommendations concerning the improvement of the structural condition of the in-depth recycled pavement are developed based on this practical approach of investigation using NDT.

  15. ON THE BLACK LIQUOR AND RECYCLE COOKING OF AS-AQ STRAW PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiqiang Shi; Beihai He; Bingyue Liu

    2004-01-01

    Thick black liquor, thin black liquor and solid state sodium hydroxide are added to the liquor treated by sulfur dioxide, then the blended liquor is used to recycle cooking of straw pulp. The black liquor,separated liquor and pulp of every cycles are analyzed respectively. Result shows that the content of lignin and organism in recycle black liquor and separated liquor increases faster in the first three cycles and then continues to increase slowly till four or five times, after that it trends to a stable state. The main organism separated from waste liquor of AS-AQ treated by sulfur dioxide is alkali-lignin,above 50% of total lignin in black liquor. The yield of pulp made from recycle cooking is steady, the hardness of pulp has a great improvement with recycle cooking. The brightness of pulp reduces correspondingly before bleaching, and after bleaching the brightness of pulp is relatively high and steady at the same sodium hypo chlorite dosage.

  16. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Planetary Nebulae as Green Galactic Citizens

    CERN Document Server

    Kwitter, K B

    2011-01-01

    We review gas-phase abundances in PNe and describe their dual utility as archives of original progenitor metallicity via the alpha elements, as well as sources of processed material from nucleosynthesis during the star's evolution, i.e., C, N, and s-process elements. We describe the analysis of PN spectra to derive abundances and discuss the discrepancies that arise from different choices at each step. Abundance results for the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds from various groups of investigators are presented; the observational results are compared with theoretical predictions of AGB stellar yields. Finally, we suggest areas where more work is needed to improve our abilities to determine abundances in PNe.

  17. An experimental study of NO sub x recycle in the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    NO{sub x} recycle is one part of the NOXSO process. In this process, 90% of the acid pollutants (NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}) can be removed simultaneously by adsorption on the surface of a PO sorbent material. The sorbent is subsequently regenerated by heating and contacting the hot sorbent with a reducing gas followed by steam. The NO{sub x} is removed in the heating process, and the SO{sub 2} is removed by the chemical reaction of the reducing gas and steam. The NO {sub x} stream produced is returned to the combustion process with combustion air, which is called the NO{sub x} recycle. The NO{sub x} is reduced in the flame to N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0, and CO{sub 2}. NO{sub x} recycle will be implemented at the full-scale commercial demonstration plant at Niles. The concept of NO{sub x} recycle has been tested previously at DOE-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) using a 500 lb/hr coal combustor used for the 3/4 MW tests and also using a tunnel furnace capable of being fired with a variety of fuels including gas, fuel oil, coal, and coal-water mixtures. The results were very promising and demonstrated the destruction of NO{sub x} compounds when fed to the combustion system. The data also indicate that the extent of NO{sub x} reduction is determined by the location of the NO{sub x} injection and the combustor design. This current project is pilot-scale testing of NO{sub x} destruction mechanisms and to help with the implementation at the Niles station.

  18. Recycling of Plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    , good strength and long durability. Recycling of plastic waste from production is well-established, while recycling of postconsumer plastic waste still is in its infancy. This chapter describes briefly how plastic is produced and how waste plastic is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements...... and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of plastic recycling....

  19. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walker, T. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, S. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  20. Recycling Trends in the Plastics Manufacturing and Recycling Companies in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, D. A.; Abidin, A.; Azhari, C. H.

    This study presents the findings from a study on the consumption of recycled materials and recycling practices in the plastics manufacturing industry and recycling companies in Malaysia. The findings were obtained from a survey conducted in twenty plastic manufacturing companies and detailed case studies in three recycling companies. The survey conducted in the plastic manufacturing companies` shows that the consumption rate for poly-olefins (PP and PE) is the highest among the resin types and the industrial sector that consumes the most plastic materials is the electrical and electronics sector. The consumption of recycled materials is high among the local manufacturing companies (80%) which are largely due to cost savings; about 20% of these companies conducted in-house recycling. The study has also shown that the medium scale industry consumes the most recycled materials as compared to the large and small scale industry. The rate of disposal for plastic materials in the local industry is approximately 5%. The detailed case studies conducted in the recycling companies have successfully identified the main processes involved in plastic recycling namely manual sorting, cleaning, drying, meshing/pelletising and packaging. These recycling companies obtained recycled materials from various sources including industrial scrap, dumping sites, local producers as well as imported sources. Pricing of recycled materials were based on classification according to grade and quality of the recycled materials. The study has reflected the extent of in-house recycling trends in the local plastic manufacturing companies and their dependency on the supply from the local recycling companies.

  1. The application of constant recycle solids concentration in activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotan-Dura, F M; Yang, P Y

    1976-02-01

    The applicability of the model derived by Ramanathan and Gaudy (Biotechnol. Bioeng., 11, 207, (1969)) for completely mixed activated sludge treatment holding the recycle solids concentration as a system constant was investigated using an actual industrial organic wastewater. Short-term experiments were conducted at various dilution rates (1/8, 1/6, 1/4, 1/2, 1/1.5 hr-1) for two recycle solids concentration values (5000 and 7000 mg/liter). The influent substrate concentration was maintained at 1000 mg/liter COD and the hydraulic recycle ratio- alpha, was kept at 0.3. It was found that for bottling plant (Pepsi Cola) wastewaters, a steady state with respect to reactor biological solids and effluent COD, at different dilution rates, could be attained, lending experimental evidence to the assumption that a steady state could be reached in developing the model and also affecting the applicability of the model in industrial organic wastewater. The reactor biological solids and effluent COD calculated from the model closely agreed with the observed values at dilution rates lower than 0.5 hr-1. Operation at dilution rates higher than 0.5 hr-1 will washout the biological solids from the reactor and the recycle substrate concentration will be apparent if the concentration of XR were not increased. PMID:1252608

  2. Recycling Jorf Lasfar fly ash as an additive to cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadi A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recycling fly ash is a good example of valorization of waste. It gives a solution the environmental problem by avoiding land filling, and reducing CO2 emission in the atmosphere. In this work we studied the physical-chemical characteristics of Jorf Lasfar fly ash. The parameters investigated were particle size, density, specific surface Blaine, chemical and mineralogical compositions. The techniques used are scanning electronic microscope (SEM, transmission electronic microscope (TEM, X-rays fluorescence (XRF, X-rays diffraction (XRD and atomic spectrometry emission coupled with inductive plasma ICP. We also conducted a study on the mechanical behavior of type CPJ45 cements produced from a combined grinding of clinker, limestone and gypsum. The substitution of a portion of the clinker by different percentages of fly ash was conducted. We noticed that the compression and bending resistances for these mixtures went through a maximum at 28 days with the addition of 7% (by mass of ash. This result showed that the mineral and chemical compositions of this ash conferred a Pozzoulanic power to the cement studied.

  3. Processing, characterization and modeling of recycled polypropylene/glass fibre/wood flour composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polypropylene (PP) is one of the most common thermoplastic materials in the world. There is a need to recycle the large amount of this used material. To overcome the environmental problems, related to the polymer waste, PP was recycled and used as a matrix material in different composites that can be used in high value applications. In this paper, composites made of recycled polypropylene (RPP) reinforced by glass fibres and/or wood flour of the palm tree were prepared, characterized and modeled. The mechanical and thermal properties of these recycled polymer matrix composites (RPMCs) were measured experimentally and modeled theoretically. The mechanical properties included tensile modulus, tensile strength and hardness, whereas thermal properties included thermal stability, melting and crystallinity percentage content were studied. In addition we applied the functionally graded materials concept, the elastic finite element analysis of a layered functionally graded pressurized pipe, which is one of the practical industrial applications, was accomplished in order to have some insight on the performance of such RPMCs. The results reveal that the desired mechanical and thermal properties met the requirements of a wide range of practical applications which can be attained by adding the considered fillers. Also, the proper selection of the layers of the pressurized pipe, which was made of RPMCs, led to decrease of the induced stresses and accordingly increased the operational safety. - Highlights: • Recycled polymer matrix composites were prepared with wood flour and glass fibre. • Finite elemental analysis was used for the analysis of layered functionally graded pressurized pipe. • Glass fibres acted as nucleating agents that increased crystallinity % and improved thermal stability. • Mechanical, thermal properties of RPP were improved by wood and glass fibre

  4. Development of recycling process of oxygen isotope used in a PET cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, 18O is produced by a cold distillation of NO (Nitric Oxide) or a fractional distillation of water. These processes, however, are technically complicated and costly so as to limit the production of 18O. Especially, the demand for 18O-enriched water (>90%) used as a target in a PET cyclotron for the production of the β-emitting radioisotope pharmaceutical [18F]-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) is expanding significantly. Hence, it is required to re-use the used target water as much as possible. In order to recycle the used target water, there are three prerequisites: (a) to purify the organic and inorganic impurities contaminated during the 18F-FDG production loop, (b) to analyze the concentration of oxygen isotopes in the purified water, and (c) to re-enrich the 18O isotope in the target water diluted during the purification process. We used UV irradiation process to oxidize and purify the organic impurities in the water. For the development of a compact target water 18O re-enrichment system, the 18O isotope separation characteristics of MD(Membrane Distillation) were investigated. The 18O isotopic water permeation and separation characteristics of a hydrophobic PTFE membrane multi-stage air-gap and direct-contact combined MD system were evaluated. Permeation fluxes were measured by weighing the collected membrane-permeated water vapor. Finally, 18O/16O and 17O/16O of the water samples were analyzed by a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) with 4% precisions

  5. Sustainability of bioethanol production from wheat with recycled residues as evaluated by Emergy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, F.; Bastianoni, S.; Østergård, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    , were considered. Material and energy flows were assessed to evaluate the bioethanol yield, the production efficiency in terms of Emergy used compared to energy produced (transformity), and the environmental load (ELR) in terms of use of non-renewable resources. These three indicators varied among......An Emergy assessment study of 24 bioethanol production scenarios was carried out for the comparison of bioethanol production using winter wheat grains and/or straw as feedstock and conversion technologies based on starch (1st generation) and/or lignocellulose (2nd generation). An integrated biomass...... utilization system (IBUS) was used for combining the two kinds of feedstock. The crop was cultivated under four combinations of Danish soil conditions (sand or sandy loam) and crop managements (organic or conventional). For each of the production processes, two scenarios, with or without recycling of residues...

  6. Boric acid as cost-effective and recyclable catalyst for trimethylsilyl protection and deprotection of alcohols and phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostami, Amin; Akradi, Jamal; Ahmad-Jangi, Firoz, E-mail: a_rostami372@yahoo.co [University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Science. Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Boric acid has been used as a green, selective and recyclable catalyst for trimethysilylation of alcohols and phenols using hexamethyldisilazane in acetonitrile. Deprotection of trimethylsilyl ethers to their parent alcohols and phenols was also achieved using this catalyst in water at room temperature. The salient features of this methodology are cheap processing, mild acidity conditions, excellent yields of products and easy availability of the catalyst. (author)

  7. "2sDR": Process Development of a Sustainable Way to Recycle Steel Mill Dusts in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösler, Gernot; Pichler, Christoph; Antrekowitsch, Jürgen; Wegscheider, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Significant amounts of electric arc furnace dust originating from steel production are recycled every year by the Waelz process, despite the fact that this type of process has several disadvantages. One alternative method would be the recovery of very high-quality ZnO as well as iron and even chromium in the two-step dust recycling process, which was invented to treat special waste for the recovery of heavy metal-containing residues. The big advantage of that process is that various types of residues, especially dusts, can be treated in an oxidizing first step for cleaning, with a subsequent reducing step for the metal recovery. After the treatment, three different fractions—dust, slag, and an iron alloy, can be used without any limitations. This study focuses on the development of the process along with some thermodynamic considerations. Moreover, a final overview of mass balances of an experiment performed in a 100-kg top blowing rotary converter with further developments is provided.

  8. Recycling of spent nickel-cadmium batteries based on bioleaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only 1-2 percent of discarded dry batteries are recovered in China. It is necessary to find an economic and environmentally friendly process to recycle dry batteries in this developing country. Bioleaching is one of the few techniques applicable for the recovery of the toxic metals from hazardous spent batteries. Its principle is the microbial production of sulphuric acid and simultaneous leaching of metals. In this study, a system consisting of a bioreactor, settling tank and leaching reactor was developed to leach metals from nickel-cadmium batteries. Indigenous thiobacilli, proliferated by using nutritive elements in sewage sludge and elemental sulphur as substrates, was employed in the bioreactor to produce sulphuric acid. The overflow from the bioreactor was conducted into the settling tank. The supernatant in the settling tank was conducted into the leaching reactor, which contained the anode and cathodic electrodes obtained from nickel-cadmium batteries. The results showed that this system was valid to leach metals from nickel-cadmium batteries, and that the sludge drained from the bottom of the settling tank could satisfy the requirements of environmental protection agencies regarding agricultural use

  9. Recycling as a strategy against rare earth element criticality: a systemic evaluation of the potential yield of NdFeB magnet recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Jelle H; Kleijn, René; Yang, Yongxiang

    2013-09-17

    End-of-life recycling is promoted by OECD countries as a promising strategy in the current global supply crisis surrounding rare earth elements (REEs) so that dependence on China, the dominant supplier, can be decreased. So far the feasibility and potential yield of REE recycling has not been systematically evaluated. This paper estimates the annual waste flows of neodymium and dysprosium from permanent magnets, the main deployment of these critical REEs, during the 2011-2030 period. The estimates focus on three key permanent magnet waste flows: wind turbines, hybrid and electric vehicles, and hard disk drives (HDDs) in personal computers (PCs). This is a good indication of the end-of-life recycling of neodymium and dysprosium maximum potential yield. Results show that for some time to come, waste flows from permanent magnets will remain small relative to the rapidly growing global REE demand. Policymakers therefore need to be aware that during the next decade recycling is unlikely to substantially contribute to global REE supply security. In the long term, waste flows will increase sharply and will meet a substantial part of the total demand for these metals. Future REE recycling efforts should, therefore, focus on the development of recycling technology and infrastructure.

  10. Gamma hazards and risk associated with NORM in sediment from amang processing recycling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amang processing is an important downstream activity of tin mining noted for technologically enhancing naturally occurring radioactive materials. A study was carried out to determine the gamma radiation hazards associated with amang processing with special reference to the sediment accumulated in amang processing ponds. Twenty eight sediment samples from two amang processing plants employing the recycling close water management system were collected and analyzed. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in sediments were measured using gamma spectrometry analysis, with a Hyper Pure Ge-Li detector coupled to a Multi Channel Analyzer detector system. The range of mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were between 40.94 - 189.58 Bq kg-1, 104.90 - 516.17 Bq kg-1 and 74.8-848.0 Bq/ kg respectively. The maximum activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K recorded were higher than Malaysia average and the worlds natural highest. Gamma Radiation Representative Level Index, Iγr associated with these levels of activity concentrations of radionuclide in sediments, warrants an immediate attention from the regulatory authorities. The contribution of amang processing and the use of recycling close water management system in enhancing potential environmental radiological risk are discussed. (author)

  11. VLCC大型油轮绿色拆船工艺方案%Green Ship-recycling Process of VLCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭帅; 高峰; 李雪明; 林光明

    2014-01-01

    基于绿色拆船理念,以大连船舶重工集团钢业有限公司VLCC拆船项目“NEW VICTORY”号为研究对象,以已经生效的《欧盟(EU)1257/2013船舶回收法规》为准则,提出一种VLCC绿色拆船工艺方案。方案按照法规要求做出了船舶有害材料(IHM)清单,考虑了拆解过程中稳性变化对剩余船体的影响,制定了三条拆解原则,用PATRAN软件对拆解剩余船体结构进行了有限元分析,制定了安全拆解顺序,达到了环境污染小,码头拆解不倾覆、不折断,剩余船体顺利进坞拆解的预期效果。%It proposes a green dismantling process scheme based on EU 1257/2013 Ship Recycling Convention, which has entered into force. Taking New Victory as the study object, which is the ship-recycling project of Dalian Shipbuilding Industry, Ship Recycling Co., Ltd., it considers the stability in the dismantling process which affects the remaining hull, develops three dismantling principles, finishes finite element analysis of the remaining hull with PATRAN, determines the hanging position of the sub-block and develops a detailed dismantling order. It causes less pollution of the environment. The process realizes the expected effect that the ship is not be overthrow or broke in the pier dismantling process and the remaining hull is smoothly dismantled.

  12. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  13. Treatment of wastewater from a low-temperature carbonization process industry through biological and chemical oxidation processes for recycle/reuse: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, R; Bagchi, S; Urewar, C; Gupta, D; Nandy, T

    2010-01-01

    Low-temperature carbonization (LTC) of coal generates highly complex wastewater warranting stringent treatment. Developing a techno-economically viable treatment facility for such wastewaters is a challenging task. The paper discusses a case study pertaining to an existing non-performing effluent treatment plant (ETP). The existing ETP comprising an ammonia stripper followed by a single stage biological oxidation was unable to treat 1,050 m(3)/d of effluent as per the stipulated discharge norms. The treated effluent from the existing ETP was characterized with high concentrations of ammonia (75-345 mg N/l), COD (313-1,422 mg/l) and cyanide (0.5-4 mg/l). Studies were undertaken to facilitate recycling/reuse of the treated effluent within the plant. A second stage biooxidation process was investigated at pilot scale for the treatment of the effluent from the ETP. This was further subjected to tertiary treatment with 0.5% dose of 4% hypochlorite which resulted in effluent with pH: 6.6-6.8, COD: 73-121 mg/l, and BOD(5):recycle and reuse. Thus, a modified treatment scheme comprising ammonia pre-stripping followed by two-stage biooxidation process and a chemical oxidation step with hypochlorite at tertiary stage was proposed for recycle/reuse of LTC wastewater.

  14. Exploration of polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in forward osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2012-03-01

    The development of the forward osmosis (FO) process has been constrained by the slow development of appropriate draw solutions. Two significant concerns related to draw solutions are the draw solute leakage and intensiveenergy requirement in recycling draw solutes after the FO process. FO would be much attractive if there is no draw solute leakage and the recycle of draw solutes is easy and economic. In this study, polyelectrolytes of a series of polyacrylic acid sodium salts (PAA-Na), were explored as draw solutes in the FO process. The characteristics of high solubility in water and flexibility in structural configuration ensure the suitability of PAA-Na as draw solutes and their relative ease in recycle through pressure-driven membrane processes. The high water flux with insignificant salt leakage in the FO process and the high salt rejection in recycle processes reveal the superiority of PAA-Na to conventional ionic salts, such as NaCl, when comparing their FO performance via the same membranes. The repeatable performance of PAA-Na after recycle indicates the absence of any aggregation problems. The overall performance demonstrates that polyelectrolytes of PAA-Na series are promising as draw solutes, and the new concept of using polyelectrolytes as draw solutes in FO processes is applicable. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “Holfeld Diamat” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process Holfeld Diamat (EC register number RECYC076 which is based on the Diamat ® technology. The input of the process is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, post-consumer washed and dried PET flakes are mixed up to 50 % with virgin PET flakes before being heated in a crystallisation reactor (step 2 and extruded under vacuum into sheets (step 3. After having examined the challenge tests provided, the Panel concluded that the decontamination in the two consecutive extruders step 3 is the critical step for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are the temperature, the pressure and the residence time. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.15 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for toddlers. Therefore, the recycled PET obtained from the process Holfeld Diamat intended for the manufacture of recycled thermoformed trays and containers made with up to 50 % recycled post-consumer PET and intended for contact for long term storage at room temperature with all types of foodstuffs except packaged water is not considered of safety concern.

  16. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “RPC Cobelplast” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process RPC Cobelplast (EU register No RECYC099 which is based on the Bandera® technology. The input of the process is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, post-consumer washed and dried PET flakes are mixed with typically 50 % virgin PET flakes before being extruded under vacuum into sheets. Having examined the challenge tests provided, the Panel concluded that the decontamination in the extruder under vacuum degassing is the critical step for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are temperature, pressure and residence time. The operating parameters of this step in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore, the recycled PET obtained from the process RPC Cobelplast intended for the manufacture of recycled thermoformed trays and containers made with up to 100 % recycled post-consumer PET and intended for contact for long term storage at room temperature with all types of foodstuffs is not considered of safety concern.

  17. Characterization of Iron and Steel Industry Slags to be Recycled under Ecological Aspects as a Recycling Concept for Waste Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recycling and final disposal of different types of industrial waste play an important role in decreasing environmental pollution all over the world. Three different solid waste slags from steel industries situated in the Helwan area (Cairo-Egypt), namely blast furnace slags, oxygen converter slags arc furnace slags were studied. The morphology of the collected slag powders was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface characteristics of the slag powders were measured through nitrogen gas adsorption and application of the BET equation at 77 K. The thermal behaviour of the slag powders was studied with the help of differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry(TG)> Due to the presence of some changes in the DTA base lines, possibly as a result of phase transformations, X-ray diffraction was applied to identify these phases. The sintering behaviour of the compact slag powders after isostatic pressing was evaluated using dilatometry. The sintering and melting temperature of the studied samples were determined using heating microscopy. The effect of changing sintering temperature and of applying different isostatic pressures on the density and porosity of the slag powder compacts was investigated

  18. Potential of a Hydrometallurgical Recycling Process for Catalysts to Cover the Demand for Critical Metals, Like PGMs and Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    The metals from the platinum group are used in many different industries, for example dental, jewelry, and chemicals. Nevertheless, the most important use is based on their catalytic properties. Approximately 50% of platinum and palladium are used as automotive and industrial catalysts. In case of rhodium, an even higher percentage (around 80-90%) is used as an alloying element in the active layer of different catalysts. The high required amount of 300-900 kg of treated ore to obtain approximately 1 g of PGM is responsible for the high prices. On average, the contents in the ore of Pt and Pd are 5-10 times higher than Rh and Ru and around 50 times higher than Ir and Os. Additionally, the regional limitation of ore bodies leads to a strong dependence on mainly South Africa and Russia as PGM suppliers. Based on the strong discrepancy in supply and demand of PGM's around the world, recycling of catalysts is mandatory and meaningful from the ecological and economical point of view. Based on the high prices of PGM, the industry is forced to improve the efficiency of catalysts, which is done by improving the wash coat technology. By using rare-earth elements, like cerium oxide, the surface can be increased and the ability to supply oxygen is secured. As a side effect, cerium as an additional critical element is introduced into the recycling circuit of catalytic converters, forming a further valuable component and forming a major challenge for common pyrometallurgical converter recycling. Therefore, this article introduces a hydrometallurgical process, developed together with Railly&Hill Inc., for PGM as well as cerium recovery from catalytic converters.

  19. Recycling of copper tailings as an additive in cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Onuaguluchi, Obinna; EREN, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Increasing demands for copper and copper allied products have made the processing of low grade ores with high volume waste output unavoidable. Presently, billions of tons of copper tailings can be found in major copper producing countries. The impact of copper tailings at 0%, 5% and 10% addition level by mass of cement on the fresh and hardened properties of mortars were determined. Results showed that dry copper tailings affect mixture consistency negatively. However, the use of pre-wetted t...

  20. Recycling of quarry waste as part of sustainable aggregate production: Norwegian and Italian point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonella Dino, Giovanna; Willy Danielsen, Svein; Chiappino, Claudia; Primavori, Piero; Engelsen, Christian John

    2016-04-01

    Resource preservation is one of the main challenges in Europe, together with waste management and recycling; recently several researchers are interested in the recovering of critical raw materials and secondary raw materials from landfill. Aggregate supply, even if it is not "critical" sensus stricto (s.s.), is one of the European priorities (low value but high volume needs). On the other side, the management of quarry waste , mainly from dimension stones, but also as fines from aggregate crushing, is still a matter of concern. Such materials are managed in different ways both locally and nationwide, and often they are landfilled, because of an unclear legislation and a general lack of data. Most of time the local authorities adopt the maximum precaution principle or the enterprises find it little profitable to recover them, so that the sustainable recycling of such material is not valued. Several studies have shown, depending on the material specific characteristics, the viability of recycling quarry waste into new raw materials used in glass and ceramic industries, precast concrete production, infrastructures etc. (Loudes et al. 2012, Dino&Marian 2015, Bozzola et al 2012, Dino et al. 2012, etc.). Thus, aggregate production may be one of the profitable ways to use quarry waste and is falling under the priority of EU (aggregate supply). Positive economic and environmental effects are likely to be achieved by systematic recycling of quarry waste planned by industries (industrial planning) and public authorities (national and local planning of aggregate exploitation). Today, the recycling level varies to a great extent and systematic recovery is not common among European Countries. In Italy and Norway no significant incentives on recycling or systematic approaches for local aggregate exploitation exist. The environmental consequences can be overexploitation of the natural resources, land take for the landfills, environmental contamination and landscape alteration by

  1. Application of Recycled Concrete Aggregates Containing Waste Glass Powder/Suspension and Bottom Ash as a Cement Component in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P

    2013-01-01

    The growing environmental concerns and the increasing scarcity of landfills encourage the recycling of industrial wastes and adopting environmentally friendly practices by rational usage of natural resources. The production of concrete with recycled aggregate and reduced cement volume is the most desirable form of achieving a closed life cycle as an ecological constructional material. This paper describes results of a study undertaken to examine the influence of recycled aggregates obta...

  2. Development of NOx recycle process for practical use at reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the NOx recycle process using the vacuum pressure swing adsorption method reported previously, development experiments were carried out. Among such experiments were the removal of volatile ruthenium tetroxide from the off-gas, 23-month operation of a bench-scale apparatus and 100-day operation of a pilot plant 1/5 the size of actual scale. After evaluation of the results for operability and durability of components under acidic conditions, this process was concluded applicable to an actual plant. Compared to the conventional NOx production method using chemical reaction, it has the great advantage of-reducing largely low-level radioactive and non-radioactive sodium nitrate waste. With this conclusion, the procedure to install the process at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant has been commenced. (author)

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DUST GENERATED IN THE RECYCLING PROCESS OF THE ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gonçalves Rizz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD is a solid waste generated by the production of steel through the Electric Arc Furnace. This waste is labeled dangerous, which motivates studies aiming its recycling. Experiments were made to study a pyrometallurgical process for the recycling of the dust, using the insertion of dust briquettes in molten pig iron in three temperatures. In the briquettes, there were made additions of calcium fluoride in four different concentrations. This paper has the objective to characterize the dust that results from this process, verifying the influence of the temperature and the concentration of calcium fluoride in the briquette in the morphology and chemical composition of the new dust, determining the optimal conditions for the recovery of the zinc content of the dust. This newly generated dust was analyzed in an Scanning Electronic Microscope, used to capture micrographs and chemical composition by EDS. The micrographs show that the temperature and the calcium fluoride concentration interfere in the way the dust particles agglomerate. Chemical analysis points that the higher zinc recuperation occurrs in the experiments at 1500°C with 7% addition of calcium fluoride.

  4. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  5. Classification of recycled asphalt (RA) material

    OpenAIRE

    Wendling, Louisette; DE LA ROCHE SAINT ANDRE, Chantal; Gaudefroy, Vincent; MARSAC, Paul; TEBALDI, Gabriele; DAVE, Eshan; HUGENER, Martin; BOCCI, Maurizio; Loizos, Andreas; JENKINS, Kim; MARRADI, Alessandro; Grilli, Andrea; GRAZIANI, Andrea; Pasetto, Marco; MURAYA, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Use of recycled asphalt pavements (RA) in pavement rehabilitation processes is continuously growing as recycling techniques, such as cold recycling (CR), are being utilized in increasing magnitude. The focus of this paper is on developing a state of the art and state of the practice summary of processes used for classification of RA. A variety of topics were explored through an exhaustive literature search, these include RAP production methods, definition of RA materials, stockpiling practice...

  6. ON THE BLACK LIQUOR AND RECYCLE COOKING OF AS-AQ STRAW PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaiqiangShi; BeihaiHe; BingyueLiu

    2004-01-01

    Thick black liquor, thin black liquor and solid state sodium hydroxide are added to the liquor treated by sulfur dioxide, then the blended liquor is used to recycle cooking of straw pulp. The black liquor, separated liquor and pulp of every cycles are analyzed respectively. Result shows that the content of lignin and organism in recycle black liquor and separated liquor increases faster in the first three cycles and then continues to increase slowly till four or five times, after that it trends to a stable state. The main organism separated fi'om waste liquor of AS-AQ treated by sulfur dioxide is alkali-lignin,above 50% of total lignin in black liquor. The yield of pulp made fi'om recycle cooking is steady, the hardness of pulp has a great improvement with recycle cooking. The brightness of pulp reduces correspondingly before bleaching, and after bleaching the brightness of pulp is relatively high and steady at the same sodium hypo chlorite dosage.

  7. Compressive and Tensile Capacity of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC with Glass as Supplement Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraya Hani Adnan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amount of construction waste is increased significantly over the years due to reconstruction and the demolition of old buildings. One of the major challenges of our present society is to protect the environment by recycling the existing construction waste. This study concerned on two types of variable in the production of concrete which are the utilization of coarse recycled aggregate and utilization of different supplement ratio of fine glass wastes to cement. To evaluate the viability of this study, an experimental work was performed in order to monitor the mechanical behavior of such concrete. The compression and splitting tensile strength of concrete were determined on this study. From the result, it is conclude that the utilization of recycled aggregate does not much affect in the uniaxial compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of concrete, for replacement ratio up to 25 %. However, the utilization of fine glass as supplement material to cement is increase the uniaxial compressive and splitting tensile strength of concrete, for supplement ratio up to 5 %. Thus, it can be stated that the optimum concrete mixture is the mixture of 25 % recycled aggregate and 5% glass.

  8. Comparison between existing recycle processes for composite materials - a study regarding microwave pyrolysis; Jaemfoerelse av befintliga aatervinningsprocesser foer kompositmaterial - en foerstudie gaellande mikrovaagspyrolys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Carina; Andreasson, Sune (Stena Metall AB (Sweden)); Skrifvars, Mikael; Aakesson, Dan (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate the possibilities to use recycled composites as energy recycling based on microwave pyrolysis and also to evaluate the microwave pyrolysis technique for the recycling of combined materials, such as composites. Composites can be recycled by mechanically grinding into a material which can be used as a filler in virgin composites. However, several earlier studies have showed that this will give a material with inferior quality, and there is presently no economical viable use of the recycled material. Composites can be incinerated together with other waste materials but the high content of inorganic material results in a material with low energy content. Composites typically contain 40-50 weight-% glass fibres, and in some cases be as high as 60-75 weight-%. Consequently, composites often end up at landfill sites and processes to recycle composites do not exit. Large volumes of composites are produced in Europe and these products will largely end up on landfill site after end-of-life as systems to recycle these products do not exist. These composites represent a large amount of energy which presently is not utilized. Processes and materials to produce composites are being developed continuously. This in addition to the need for light weight materials in the aerospace, windmills and automotive industry spurs the use of composites. It is therefore of outmost importance to develop processes to recycle of composites. Recycling of composites by the use of microwave pyrolysis has been studied in this project. Microwave pyrolysis is a process where the material is heated by microwave in an inert environment. The project has been focusing on the recycling of glass fibre reinforced composites as this type of composite makes the large volume of composites. Pyrolysis of glass fibre reinforce composites will result in two fractions - one oil fraction and one inorganic fraction. The oil fraction was analyzed with calorimetry and

  9. Effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristic evolutions of drinking water treatment sludge and its impact on coagulation property of sludge recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) are produced during the flocculation or flotation process. The recycling of DWTS is important for reducing and reclaiming the waste residues from drinking water treatment. To improve the coagulation step of the DWTS recycling process, power ultrasound was used as a pretreatment to disintegrate the DWTS and degrade or inactivate the constituents that are difficult to remove by coagulation. The effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristics of DWTS, including the extent of disintegration, variation in DWTS floc characteristics, and DWTS dewaterability, were investigated. The capacity of the recycling process to remove particulates and organic matter from low-turbidity surface water compared to a control treatment process without DWTS was subsequently evaluated. The coagulation mechanism was further investigated by analyzing the formation, breakage, and re-growth of re-coagulated flocs. Our results indicated that under the low energy density applied (0.03-0.033 W/mL) for less than 15 min at a frequency of 160 kHz, the level of organic solubilization was less elevated, which was evidenced by the lower release of proteins and polysaccharides and lower fluorescence intensities of humic- and protein-like substances. The applied ultrasound conditions had an adverse effect on the dewaterability of the DWTS. Ultrasound pretreatment had no significant impact on the pH or surface charge of the DWTS flocs, whereas particle size decreased slightly and the specific surface area was moderately increased. The pollution removal capacity decreased somewhat for the recycled sonicated DWTS treatment, which was primarily ascribed to organic solubilization rather than variability in the floc characteristics of sonicated DWTS. The main coagulation mechanism was floc sweeping and physical adsorption. The breakage process of the flocs formed by the recycling process displayed distinct irreversibility, and the flocs were

  10. Effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristic evolutions of drinking water treatment sludge and its impact on coagulation property of sludge recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) are produced during the flocculation or flotation process. The recycling of DWTS is important for reducing and reclaiming the waste residues from drinking water treatment. To improve the coagulation step of the DWTS recycling process, power ultrasound was used as a pretreatment to disintegrate the DWTS and degrade or inactivate the constituents that are difficult to remove by coagulation. The effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristics of DWTS, including the extent of disintegration, variation in DWTS floc characteristics, and DWTS dewaterability, were investigated. The capacity of the recycling process to remove particulates and organic matter from low-turbidity surface water compared to a control treatment process without DWTS was subsequently evaluated. The coagulation mechanism was further investigated by analyzing the formation, breakage, and re-growth of re-coagulated flocs. Our results indicated that under the low energy density applied (0.03-0.033 W/mL) for less than 15 min at a frequency of 160 kHz, the level of organic solubilization was less elevated, which was evidenced by the lower release of proteins and polysaccharides and lower fluorescence intensities of humic- and protein-like substances. The applied ultrasound conditions had an adverse effect on the dewaterability of the DWTS. Ultrasound pretreatment had no significant impact on the pH or surface charge of the DWTS flocs, whereas particle size decreased slightly and the specific surface area was moderately increased. The pollution removal capacity decreased somewhat for the recycled sonicated DWTS treatment, which was primarily ascribed to organic solubilization rather than variability in the floc characteristics of sonicated DWTS. The main coagulation mechanism was floc sweeping and physical adsorption. The breakage process of the flocs formed by the recycling process displayed distinct irreversibility, and the flocs were

  11. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility. PMID:20176466

  12. An assessment on the recycling opportunities of wastes emanating from scrap metal processing in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauthoor, Sumayya; Mohee, Romeela; Kowlesser, Prakash

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an assessment on the wastes namely slag, dust, mill scale and sludge resulting from scrap metal processing. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that there are various ways via which scrap metal processing wastes can be reused or recycled in other applications instead of simply diverting them to the landfill. These wastes are briefly described and an overview on the different areas of applications is presented. Based on the results obtained, the waste generation factor developed was 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced and it was reported that slag represents 72% of the total wastes emanating from the iron and steel industry in Mauritius. Finally the suitability of the different treatment and valorisation options in the context of Mauritius is examined.

  13. Recycled fishing nets as reinforcement of existing concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Nina Marie; Bonnerup, Amanda Helena; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of fishing nets are discarded every year polluting the oceans with plastic fibers on a global scale. Due to the big fishing industry in Greenland, an alternative use for discarded fishing nets would have a decreasing effect on the amount of marine litter in the Arctic. A use...... for discarded fishing nets could be as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites for near surface mounted reinforcement (NSMR). NSMR prolongs the lifetime of existing structures, and thus reduces the amount of materials transported to Greenland, reducing CO2-emission and expenses. The effect of NSMR FRP bars...

  14. Review of irradiated uranium recycling processes by non-aqueous method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recycling processes of irradiated uranium fuel by non aqueous method have been reviewed. The fluoride volatilization process is carried out by dissolving irradiated uranium fuel in BrF3 or CIF3 to produce UF6 volatile gas and PuF4 and fission products in fluoride form which are then separated by distillation. The chloride volatility process is used for U-Zr alloy fuel by using hydro chlorination process at temperature of 350-600oC to separate ZrCl4 volatile from UCI3 which is then dissolved and distilled. The processes which are carried out at high temperature are pyrochemical and pyrometallurgical. Development of fluorides volatility process for the separation of U-Pu from irradiated uranium fuel is fluidization technique. Oxidation and fluorination reaction can be carried out in a fluidized bed reactor. DUPIC process uses spent fuel of PWR which is directly pulverized into powder for Candu reactor fuel. The review shows that due to the advantage and simplicity, the pyrochemical and oxidation-reduction process can be developed in Indonesia to study the separation of U-Pu from fission products in the irradiated fuel. The fluidization technique can also be developed, but it needs a special facility to handle gaseous reagent. (author)

  15. PLA coated paper containing active inorganic nanoparticles: Material characterization and fate of nanoparticles in the paper recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Bussini, Daniele; Hortal, Mercedes; Elegir, Graziano; Mendes, Joana; Jordá Beneyto, Maria

    2016-06-01

    For paper and paperboard packaging, recyclability plays an important role in conserving the resources and reducing the environmental impacts. Therefore, when it comes to the nano-enabled paper packaging material, the recyclability issue should be properly addressed. This study represents our first report on the fate of nanomaterials in paper recycling process. The packaging material of concern is a PLA (Polylactic Acid) coated paper incorporating zinc oxide nanoparticles in the coating layer. The material was characterised and assessed in a lab-scale paper recycling line. The recyclability test was based on a method adapted from ATICELCA MC501-13, which enabled to recover over 99% of the solids material. The mass balance result indicates that 86-91% zinc oxide nanoparticles ended up in the rejected material stream, mostly embedded within the polymer coating; whereas 7-16% nanoparticles ended up in the accepted material stream. Besides, the tensile strength of the recycled handsheets suggests that the nano-enabled coating had no negative impacts on the recovered fibre quality. PMID:27036997

  16. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  17. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  18. 实木家具回收过程研究%A Research on Recycling Process of Solid Wood Furniture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊长; 黄圣游

    2016-01-01

    家具回收是绿色家具体系中的关键一环,实木家具的回收更是直接减少了资源的消耗。本文根据当前实木家具回收的一般方法,设计出实木家具的回收路径,建立了基于家具企业内部的回收模型,包括产品回收、零部件回收、材料回收、废弃物处理四个层次。对拆卸、零部件再加工、集成材加工、刨花板加工等主要回收过程进行了简要的介绍;分析了实木家具产品在拆卸、回收处理过程中效益评价的方法,探讨产品及其零部件信息对回收过程的影响,以便于在设计阶段就考虑到产品报废后的处理,提高产品的回收性能。%Furniture recycling is a key link in the system of green furniture, the recycling of solid wood furniture is to reduce the consumption of resources. According to the general methods of solid wood furniture recycling, this paper designed the recycling path of solid wood furniture, established the recycling model based on the interior of the furniture enterprise, which includes four levels of product recovery, component recycling, material recycling, and waste disposal. Briefly introduced the main recycling processes include disassembling, parts reprocessing, glulam production, particle board production, and so on. Analyzed the method of benefit evaluation in disassembling and recycling of solid wood furniture, investigated the effect of the product and its component information on the recycling process, so we can improve the product's recovery performance through considering the product scrap in the design phase.

  19. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  20. Pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis as a recycling method of waste CDs originating from polycarbonate and HIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis is a powerful method for recycling of WEEEs. • Liquid products obtained from the pyrolysis of PC or HIPS found in waste CDs are very different. • Mainly phenols are obtained from pyrolysis PC based wastes while aromatics from HIPS. • Use of MgO catalyst increases the amount of phenols from CD recycling compared to ZSM-5. • Use of MgO or ZSM-5 catalysts reduces the amount of styrene recovered from HIPS. - Abstract: Pyrolysis appears to be a promising recycling process since it could convert the disposed polymers to hydrocarbon based fuels or various useful chemicals. In the current study, two model polymers found in WEEEs, namely polycarbonate (PC) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and their counterparts found in waste commercial Compact Discs (CDs) were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor. Both, thermal pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of two catalytic materials (basic MgO and acidic ZSM-5 zeolite) was performed for all four types of polymers. Results have shown significant recovery of the monomers and valuable chemicals (phenols in the case of PC and aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of HIPS), while catalysts seem to decrease the selectivity towards the monomers and enhance the selectivity towards other desirable compounds

  1. Pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis as a recycling method of waste CDs originating from polycarbonate and HIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonakou, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogiannis, K.G.; Stephanidis, S.D. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Triantafyllidis, K.S. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Lappas, A.A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Achilias, D.S., E-mail: axilias@chem.auth.gr [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis is a powerful method for recycling of WEEEs. • Liquid products obtained from the pyrolysis of PC or HIPS found in waste CDs are very different. • Mainly phenols are obtained from pyrolysis PC based wastes while aromatics from HIPS. • Use of MgO catalyst increases the amount of phenols from CD recycling compared to ZSM-5. • Use of MgO or ZSM-5 catalysts reduces the amount of styrene recovered from HIPS. - Abstract: Pyrolysis appears to be a promising recycling process since it could convert the disposed polymers to hydrocarbon based fuels or various useful chemicals. In the current study, two model polymers found in WEEEs, namely polycarbonate (PC) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and their counterparts found in waste commercial Compact Discs (CDs) were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor. Both, thermal pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of two catalytic materials (basic MgO and acidic ZSM-5 zeolite) was performed for all four types of polymers. Results have shown significant recovery of the monomers and valuable chemicals (phenols in the case of PC and aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of HIPS), while catalysts seem to decrease the selectivity towards the monomers and enhance the selectivity towards other desirable compounds.

  2. Pilot-scale investigation of the robustness and efficiency of a copper-based treated wood wastes recycling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coudert, Lucie [INRS-ETE (Canada); Blais, Jean-François, E-mail: blaisjf@ete.inrs.ca [INRS-ETE (Canada); Mercier, Guy [INRS-ETE (Canada); Cooper, Paul [University of Toronto (Canada); Gastonguay, Louis [IREQ (Canada); Morris, Paul [FPInnovations (Canada); Janin, Amélie; Reynier, Nicolas [INRS-ETE (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A leaching process was studied for metals removal from CCA-treated wood wastes. • This decontamination process was studied at pilot scale (130-L reactor). • Removals up to 98% of As, 88% of Cr, and 96% of Cu were obtained from wood wastes. • The produced leachates can be treated by chemical precipitation. -- Abstract: The disposal of metal-bearing treated wood wastes is becoming an environmental challenge. An efficient recycling process based on sulfuric acid leaching has been developed to remove metals from copper-based treated wood chips (0 < x < 12 mm). The present study explored the performance and the robustness of this technology in removing metals from copper-based treated wood wastes at a pilot plant scale (130-L reactor tank). After 3× 2 h leaching steps followed by 3× 7 min rinsing steps, up to 97.5% of As, 87.9% of Cr, and 96.1% of Cu were removed from CCA-treated wood wastes with different initial metal loading (>7.3 kg m{sup −3}) and more than 94.5% of Cu was removed from ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood. The treatment of effluents by precipitation–coagulation was highly efficient; allowing removals more than 93% for the As, Cr, and Cu contained in the effluent. The economic analysis included operating costs, indirect costs and revenues related to remediated wood sales. The economic analysis concluded that CCA-treated wood wastes remediation can lead to a benefit of 53.7 US$ t{sup −1} or a cost of 35.5 US$ t{sup −1} and that ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood wastes recycling led to benefits ranging from 9.3 to 21.2 US$ t{sup −1}.

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process SOREPET GR based on EREMA Basic technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process SOREPET GR (EU register No RECYC073 which is based on the EREMA Basic technology. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles and containing no more than 5 % PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated in a continuous reactor under vacuum before being extruded. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the continuous reactor is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are temperature, pressure and residence time. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below the modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for infants and 0.15 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for toddlers. The Panel concluded that recycled PET obtained from the process is not of safety concern when used to manufacture articles intended for food contact materials applications in compliance with the conditions as specified in the conclusion of the opinion.

  4. Tailoring and recycling of deep eutectic solvents as sustainable and efficient extraction media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Lee, Min Sang; Nam, Min Woo; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Yan; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kwon, Sung Won; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-12-11

    The present study demonstrates that deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with the highest extractability can be designed by combining effective DES components from screening diverse DESs. The extraction of polar ginseng saponins from white ginseng was used as a way to demonstrate the tuneability as well as recyclability of DESs. A newly designed ternary DES (GPS-5) composed of glycerol, l-proline, and sucrose at 9:4:1 was used as a sustainable and efficient extraction medium. Based on the anti-tumor activity on HCT-116 cancer cells, it was confirmed that GPS-5 was merely an extraction solvent with no influence of the bioactivity of the ginsenosides extracted. Excellent recovery of the extracted saponins was easily achieved through solid-phase extraction (SPE). Recycling of the DES was accomplished by simple freeze-drying of the washed solutions from the SPE. The extraction efficiencies of the DESs recycled once, twice, and thrice were 92%, 85%, and 83% of that of the freshly synthesized solvent. PMID:26585205

  5. Nutrient recycling from bio-digestion waste as synthetic fertilizer substitutes: a field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Vaneeckhaute, Céline; Meers, Erik; Ghekiere, Greet; ACCOE Frederik; Michels, Evi; Tack, Filip

    2012-01-01

    In the transition from a fossil to a bio-based economy, it has become an important challenge to maximally recycle valuable nutrients that currently end up in waste streams. Nutrient resources are rapidly depleting. Significant amounts of fossil energy are used for the production of synthetic fertilizers, whereas costs for energy and fertilizers are increasing. In the meantime, biogas production through anaerobic digestion produces nutrient-rich digestates as a waste stream. In high-nutrient r...

  6. Recycling of the used automotive lubricating oil by ionizing radiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recycling process of the used mineral oils has been gaining a very important gap in the context of environmental protection. Among mineral oils from petroleum, the lubricating oils are not entirely consumed during their use; therefore, it is necessary to apply a treatment for recuperation seeking their reuse. Moreover, the environmental legislation of countries does not allow their discard in any type of soils, rivers, lakes, oceans or sewerage systems. The conventional treatment has shown certain difficulties in the recuperation process for used oils. The ionizing radiation process is renowned in the industrial effluents treatments due to its high efficiency in the degradation of organic compounds and in the removal of metals by the action of OH·, ·H and eaq radicals. In this work, used automotive lubricating oil was treated by the ionizing radiation process for metal removal and degradation of organic compounds. The samples were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy irradiation doses. Determination of the elements Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Mo, Nb, Cd, Sn, Ba, Bi and Pb, before and after the irradiation, was done by X-ray fluorescence technique and the organic profile was obtained by infrared spectroscopy

  7. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process "MKF-Ergis", used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process MKF-Ergis, EU register number RECYC021. The input for the process (step 1 is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 1 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. The washed and dried flakes are crystallised (step 2 and then extruded at high temperature under vacuum into films (step 3. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the crystallisation (step 2 and the extrusion (step 3 are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control their performance are well defined and are temperature, gas flow and residence time for the crystallisation and temperature, vacuum and residence time for the extrusion. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those used in the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern. Trays made of this recycled PET should not be used in microwave and conventional ovens.

  8. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “PETUK SSP” for production of recycled post-consumer PET for use in food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available

    This scientific opinion of EFSA deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process PETUK SSP, EC register number RECYC004. Through this process, washed PET flakes are dried, extruded into pellets then fed to a solid state polymerisation (SSP reactor where high temperature and long residence time are applied under vacuum. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the SSP is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of this critical step are the temperature, the pressure and the residence time. It was demonstrated, by means of the challenge test, that the recycling process under evaluation is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore, the Panel considered that the recycling process PETUK SSP is able to reduce any foreseeable accidental contamination of the post-consumer food contact PET to a concentration that does not give rise to concern for a risk to human health if:

    1. it is operated under conditions that are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test used to measure the decontamination efficiency of the processes and
    2. the input is washed and dried post-consumer PET flakes originating from materials and articles that have been manufactured in accordance with the Community legislation on food contact materials containing no more than 5% of PET from non-food consumer applications.

    The Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from the process PETUK SSP intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  9. Powering Tumor Metastasis with Recycled Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Mien-Chie; Yang, Riyao; Sun, Yutong

    2016-09-12

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) recycling is of critical importance for RTK signaling and cancer, yet the process is poorly understood. In this issue, Ye et al. identify GOLM1 as a cargo adaptor that drives hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis by promoting EGFR recycling and provide insights into how this process is regulated. PMID:27622330

  10. The effects of magmatic processes and crustal recycling on the molybdenum stable isotopic composition of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezard, Rachel; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hamelin, Cédric; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) stable isotopes hold great potential to investigate the processes involved in planetary formation and differentiation. However their use is currently hampered by the lack of understanding of the dominant controls driving mass-dependent fractionations at high temperature. Here we investigate the role of magmatic processes and mantle source heterogeneities on the Mo isotope composition of Mid-Ocean Ridges Basalts (MORBs) using samples from two contrasting ridge segments: (1) the extremely fast spreading Pacific-Antarctic (66-41°S) section devoid of plume influence and; (2) the slow spreading Mohns-Knipovich segment (77-71°N) intercepted by the Jan Mayen Plume (71°N). We show that significant variations in Mo stable isotope composition exist in MORBs with δ98/95Mo ranging from - 0.24 ‰ to + 0.15 ‰ (relative to NIST SRM3134). The absence of correlation between δ98/95Mo and indices of magma differentiation or partial melting suggests a negligible impact of these processes on the isotopic variations observed. On the other hand, the δ98/95Mo variations seem to be associated with changes in radiogenic isotope signatures and rare earth element ratios (e.g., (La/Sm)N), suggesting mantle source heterogeneities as a dominant factor for the δ98/95Mo variations amongst MORBs. The heaviest Mo isotope compositions correspond to the most enriched signatures, suggesting that recycled crustal components are isotopically heavy compared to the uncontaminated depleted mantle. The uncontaminated depleted mantle shows slightly sub-chondritic δ98/95Mo, which cannot be produced by core formation and, therefore, more likely result from extensive anterior partial melting of the mantle. Consequently, the primitive δ98/95Mo composition of the depleted mantle appears overprinted by the effects of both partial melting and crustal recycling.

  11. Synthesis of Core-Shell @@ Microspheres and Their Application as Recyclable Photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres through a wet-chemical approach. The Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 microspheres possess both ferromagnetic and photocatalytic properties. The TiO2 nanoparticles on the surfaces of microspheres can degrade organic dyes under the illumination of UV light. Furthermore, the microspheres are easily separated from the solution after the photocatalytic process due to the ferromagnetic Fe3O4 core. The photocatalysts can be recycled for further use with slightly lower photocatalytic efficiency.

  12. Development of adsorption process for NOx recycling in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of NOx, which is used in a reprocessing plant mainly as an oxidizing agent of Pu3+, eventually results in the formation of low-level radioactive sodium nitrate waste. Since NOx is generated by the reaction of sodium nitrite and nitric acid, non-radioactive sodium nitrate is also formed as a by-product. In order to reduce the amounts of radioactive and non-radioactive sodium nitrate wastes, a new method was examined to recover NOx for recycling from the off-gas of the denitrator of uranyl nitrate solution. Fundamental and consequent bench scale experiments showed that the vacuum pressure swing adsorption method, using combined silica-gel and clinoptilolite for water vapor removal and pentasil zeolite for NOx recovery, is applicable for this purpose. (author)

  13. Feasibility studies of actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy of actinide burnup in LMFBRs is being investigated as a waste management alternative to long term storage of high level nuclear waste. This strategy is being evaluated because many of the actinides in the waste from spent-fuel reprocessing have half-lives of thousands of years and an alternative to geological storage may be desired. From a radiological viewpoint, the actinides and their daughters dominate the waste hazard for decay times beyond about 400 years. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs may be an attractive alternative to geological storage because the actinides can be effectively transmuted to fission products which have significantly shorter half-lives. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs rather than LWRs is preferred because the ratio of fission reaction rate to capture reaction rate for the actinides is higher in an LMFBR, and an LMFBR is not so sensitive to the addition of the actinide isotopes. An actinide target assembly recycle scheme is evaluated to determine the effects of the actinides on the LMFBR performance, including local power peaking, breeding ratio, and fissile material requirements. Several schemes are evaluated to identify any major problems associated with reprocessing and fabrication of recycle actinide-containing assemblies. The overall efficiency of actinide burnout in LMFBRs is evaluated, and equilibrium cycle conditions are determined. It is concluded that actinide recycle in LMFBRs offers an attractive alternative to long term storage of the actinides, and does not significantly affect the performance of the host LMFBR. Assuming a 0.1 percent or less actinide loss during reprocessing, a 0.1 percent loss of less during fabrication, and proper recycle schemes, virtually all of the actinides produced by a fission reactor economy could be transmuted in fast reactors

  14. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-05-22

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  15. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  16. An assessment on the recycling opportunities of wastes emanating from scrap metal processing in Mauritius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauthoor, Sumayya, E-mail: sumayya.mauthoor@umail.uom.ac.mu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Mauritius, Réduit (Mauritius); Mohee, Romeela [Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, National Research Chair in Solid Waste Management, Mauritius Research Council (Mauritius); Kowlesser, Prakash [Solid Waste/Beach Management Unit, Ministry of Local Government and Outer Islands (Mauritius)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Scrap metal processing wastes. • Areas of applications for slag, electric arc furnace dust, mill scale and wastewater sludge. • Waste generation factor of 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced. • Waste management model. - Abstract: This paper presents an assessment on the wastes namely slag, dust, mill scale and sludge resulting from scrap metal processing. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that there are various ways via which scrap metal processing wastes can be reused or recycled in other applications instead of simply diverting them to the landfill. These wastes are briefly described and an overview on the different areas of applications is presented. Based on the results obtained, the waste generation factor developed was 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced and it was reported that slag represents 72% of the total wastes emanating from the iron and steel industry in Mauritius. Finally the suitability of the different treatment and valorisation options in the context of Mauritius is examined.

  17. Management options for recycling radioactive scrap metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmel, J.C.; MacKinney, J.; Bartlett, J.

    1997-02-01

    The feasibility and advantages of recycling radioactive scrap metals (RSM) have yet to be assessed, given the unique technical, regulatory, safety, and cost-benefit issues that have already been raised by a concerned recycling industry. As is known, this industry has been repeatedly involved with the accidental recycling of radioactive sources and, in some cases, with costly consequences. If recycling were deemed to be a viable option, it might have to be implemented with regulatory monitoring and controls. Its implementation may have to consider various and complex issues and address the requirements and concerns of distinctly different industries. There are three basic options for the recycling of such scraps. They are: (1) recycling through the existing network of metal-scrap dealers and brokers, (2) recycling directly and only with specific steelmills, or (3) recycling through regional processing centers. Under the first option, scrap dealers and brokers would receive material from RSM generators and determine at which steelmills such scraps would be recycled. For the second option, RSM generators would deal directly with selected steelmills under specific agreements. For the third option, generators would ship scraps only to regional centers for processing and shipment to participating steelmills. This paper addresses the potential advantages of each option, identifies the types of arrangements that would need to be secured among all parties, and attempts to assess the receptivity of the recycling industry to each option.

  18. Comparative Study on Mechanical Properties between Pure and Recycled Polypropylenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadne L. Juwono

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP is one type of thermoplastics that is widely used in our daily activities. A combination of the high demand and the easiness of recycling process, the recycled PP has been generally applied. In this study, the structure and the mechanical properties of the as-received PPs, recycled PPs, and commercial recycled PPs were compared, especially for cloth hanger application. DSC test results showed that recycling process did not cause a significant change to the material's melting point, which stayed in a range of 160-163 oC. Meanwhile, FTIR test results showed that the commercial recycled PPs contained of Polyethylene (PE, which was not found in the as-received and the recycled PPs. Tensile and hardness tests demonstrated that there were no significant differences between the as-received and recycled PPs. In contrast, tensile test results of the commercial recycled PPs showed that the tensile strength, Young modulus and strain-at-break were lower than those of the as-received PPs by 22.1%, 8.1% and 65.7% respectively. The hardness test results of the commercial recycled PPs showed that the recycling process had a little effect on the material's hardness. These facts were supported by SEM observation on the surface that the contour of the commercial recycled PPs was relatively flatter and had smaller grain size than those of the as-received PPs. This indicated that the commercial recycled PPs were more brittle compared to the recycled PPs. To conclude, the recycled PPs have similar properties to the as-received PPs so that recycled PPs are suitable to be applied as cloth hanger application.

  19. Recycling's technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zajdel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Environmental problems have been considered as serious situation in the construction. Waste management is pressing harder with alarming signal warning the industry. This paper discusses the potential impact of biodegradable materials on waste management in terms of landfill, incineration, recycle/reuse composting.Design/methodology/approach: This article reviewed the implementation of strategies of WEEE treatment and the recovery technologies of WEEE. It presented the current status of WEEE and corresponding responses adopted.Findings: The possibility of managing the growing amount of waste and used appliances and equipment according to the accessible literature was shown and the importance of one of the most popular method of waste neutralization (recycling was underlined.Practical implications: The recycling of WEEE is important to introduce and develop cost-effective and environmentally friendly WEEE recycling technologies. it is also necessary to arouse and enhance public awareness regarding environmental protection by publicity, education and so forth, in order to change their traditional viewpoint on the end-of-life electric appliances or cars.Originality/value: This article discusses how environmental science and technology can be applied to hazardous waste management to develop measures by which chemical wastes can be minimized, recycled, treated and disposed.

  20. Microbial carbon recycling - an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics - Part 1: A long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-10-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilization and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a 3-year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labelled glucose. The compound-specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined land use types, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose and mannose showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose and rhamnose were characterized by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition. This study indicates that recycling is one of the major processes explaining the high MRT observed for many SOM fractions and thus is crucial for understanding the

  1. Thermal recycling of plastic waste using pyrolysis-gasification process for energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbit, George Teke

    2012-04-04

    waste management organisations and disposal sites were conducted in various cities in the three case study countries. A resource-oriented manual sorting using the resource-recovery scavenging approach (RESA) simulating integration of scavenger's activities in waste sorting was conducted at BTU and Lagos. Major results obtained include: Characterization, quantification and classification of a dry sample of commingled MSW at Cottbus gave major waste fractions in order of decreasing abundance as 23.15% of residue waste, 19.75% of paper and cardboards, 17.80% of plastics, 14.63% of textiles and diapers, 10.06% of food waste and 9.55% of glass. An overall 33.21% of waste sample is compostable for manure, 52.2% usable as feedstock in the PG technology and 99.81% of total sample having a material or energy recovery potential. In Lagos, Nigeria main fractions were 29% of plastics, 36% of residue waste, 17% of soil/sand, 7% of paper with overall 41% usable as feedstock in PG technology, 39% compostable, 3% of recyclable (metal and glass). Sand can be recovered from the soil/sand fraction for construction. Excluding the sand/soil mixture, 83% of the total waste sample has potential for material and energy value. An appropriate technology that applies principles of pyrolysis and gasification to convert non-PVC plastic waste to energy was designed, constructed, tested and optimized with respect to: (i) Successful functioning with conversion of averagely 98.51% of input constituting of 82.78-98.21% of charcoal and 96.72-99.27% of plastic to heat energy (ii) Evaluation of socioeconomic and environmental impacts based on pyrolysis and exhaust gas and ash residue analysis showed absence of VOCs, heavy metals and pollutant organic and inorganic compounds; (iii) Safety and risk assessment to indoor pollution is very low; (iv) Assessment of the WTA and WTP indicated that 94% of respondents in Lagos, Nigeria and Porto Novo, Benin were willing to accept and pay for this technology

  2. Discovery as a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  3. Successful application of the Top-Layer-Sintering Process for recycling of ferrous residuals contaminated with organic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzel, J.; Pammer, O. [Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Linz (Austria); Trimmel, W. [Voest-Alpine Stahl Linz GmbH (Austria); Zellner, H. [Voest-Alpine Stahl Donawitz GmbH, Leoben-Donawitz (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    The value of by-products and residues from steel production processes stem from their metal content and their inherent heat of combustion. However, the organic contents of sludge, scale and of other ferrous residuals make it difficult to recycle them via the conventional sinter process due to low burning rates. Insufficient burning rates will increase the dust load, could harm the ESTP and is responsible for the formation of the blue haze. The Top-Layer-Sintering Process using a second ignition hood which ignites the second layer on top of the main sinterbed has opened an economical and ecologically clean way for returning waste materials to valuable blast furnace burden by sintering. In pot grate test series and semi industrial tests the process was optimized. An industrial recycling plant for treatment of organic containing residuals is now in operation.

  4. Functions as proofs as processes

    CERN Document Server

    Beffara, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a logical approach to the translation of functional calculi into concurrent process calculi. The starting point is a type system for the {\\pi}-calculus closely related to linear logic. Decompositions of intuitionistic and classical logics into this system provide type-preserving translations of the \\lambda- and \\lambda\\mu-calculus, both for call-by-name and call-by-value evaluation strategies. Previously known encodings of the \\lam-calculus are shown to correspond to particular cases of this logical embedding. The realisability interpretation of types in the \\pi-calculus provides systematic soundness arguments for these translations and allows for the definition of type-safe extensions of functional calculi.

  5. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  6. Recycling industrial architecture : the redefinition of the recycling principles in the context of sustainable architectural design

    OpenAIRE

    Šijaković, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the elucidation of the concept of architectural recycling as an environmentally sustainable alternative to demolition and preservation. More precisely, the research aim relates to the redefinition of recycling design principles in the context of the sustainable architectural design. The process of architectural recycling was placed in the context of a sustainable architectural design, as the global concept of sustainable development is imposed as a general context fo...

  7. Recycle of electrolytically dissolved struvite as an alternative to enhance phosphate and nitrogen recovery from swine wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, YingHao; Kumar, Sanjay [Department of Animal Life System, Kangwon National University, Hyoja 2, 192-1, Chunchon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, JungHoon; Kim, JaeHwan [National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Suwon 441-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, JeongDae [Department of Animal Life System, Kangwon National University, Hyoja 2, 192-1, Chunchon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ra, ChangSix, E-mail: changsix@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Animal Life System, Kangwon National University, Hyoja 2, 192-1, Chunchon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The struvite dissolution was enhanced with increased NaCl concentration and electric voltage; however 0.06% NaCl and 7 V was considered optimum. {yields} Reaction time of 1.5 h found to be suitable for struvite dissolution and complete NH{sub 4}-N removal. {yields} Struvite dissolution increases with increased struvite amount, but beyond 1.25 g/L of struvite a plateau was reached. {yields} The PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}P and NH{sub 4}-N removal percentage increases significantly (p < 0.01) with increased recycle ratio of dissolved struvite. - Abstract: Operational parameters such as electric voltage, NaCl, reaction time (RT) and initial struvite amount were optimized for struvite dissolution with a designed electrolysis reactor, and the effect of recycling the dissolved solution on the performance of struvite crystallization was also assessed. The electrolytic reactor was made of plexiglas having titanium plate coated with iridium oxide as anode (surface area: 400 cm{sup 2}) and stainless steel plates as cathodes. For reutilization of dissolved struvite, four runs were conducted with different recycle ratio of the solution. Optimum conditions for the electric voltage, NaCl, RT and initial struvite amount were 7 V, 0.06%, 1.5 h and 1.25 g/L, respectively. At the above optimized conditions, 49.17 mg/L phosphate (PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}P) was dissolved and ammonium-nitrogen (NH{sub 4}-N) got completely removed from the solution. When 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 moles of the dissolved struvite with respect to PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}P in swine wastewater were recycled along with 0.5 M magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}P removal was 63, 69, 71 and 79%, and NH{sub 4}-N was 9, 31, 40 and 53%, respectively. Hence, the performance of struvite formation process was proportionally increased. It is concluded that struvite can be re-dissolved by electrolysis and reused as a source of P and Mg.

  8. Integral Politics as Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Atlee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the definition proposed here, integral politics can be a process of integrating diverse perspectives into wholesome guidance for a community or society. Characteristics that follow from this definition have ramifications for understanding what such political processes involve. Politics becomes integral as it transcends partisan battle and nurtures generative conversation toward the common good. Problems, conflicts and crises become opportunities for new (or renewed social coherence. Conversational methodologies abound that can help citizen awareness temporarily expand during policy-making, thus helping raise society’s manifested developmental stage. Convening archetypal stakeholders or randomly selected citizens in conversations designed to engage the broader public enhances democratic legitimacy. With minimal issue- and candidate-advocacy, integral political leaders would develop society’s capacity to use integral conversational tools to improve its health, resilience, and collective intelligence. This both furthers and manifests evolution becoming conscious of itself.

  9. Research on the suitability of organosolv semi-chemical triticale fibers as reinforcement for recycled HDPE composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour-Eddine El Mansouri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to study the feasibility of incorporating organosolv semi-chemical triticale fibers as the reinforcing element in recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE. In the first step, triticale fibers were characterized in terms of chemical composition and compared with other biomass species (wheat, rye, softwood, and hardwood. Then, organosolv semi-chemical triticale fibers were prepared by the ethanolamine process. These fibers were characterized in terms of its yield, kappa number, fiber length/diameter ratio, fines, and viscosity; the obtained results were compared with those of eucalypt kraft pulp. In the second step, the prepared fibers were examined as a reinforcing element for recycled HDPE composites. Coupled and non-coupled HDPE composites were prepared and tested for tensile properties. Results showed that with the addition of the coupling agent maleated polyethylene (MAPE, the tensile properties of composites were significantly improved, as compared to non-coupled samples and the plain matrix. Furthermore, the influence of MAPE on the interfacial shear strength (IFSS was studied. The contributions of both fibers and matrix to the composite strength were also studied. This was possible by the use of a numerical iterative method based on the Bowyer-Bader and Kelly-Tyson equations.

  10. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the “Phoenix - LNOc” process used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process Phoenix – LNOc process (EU register number RECYC028. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET bottles and containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried flakes are grinded into small particle size powder, and then powder is compacted into pellets which fed into a reactor at high temperature under inert gas flow. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, the pulverisation, the compaction and the decontamination are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are well defined and are particle size for the pulverisation (step 2, time, pressure and pellet size for the compaction (step 3 and temperature, dry air flow and the residence time for the decontamination (step 4. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for infants and 0.15 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for toddlers. The Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process is not of safety concern when used to manufacture articles intended for food contact material applications in compliance with the conditions as specified in the conclusion of the opinion.

  11. Recycled High-Density Polyethylene and Rice Husk as a Wetted Pad in Evaporative Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitipong Soponpongpipat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The low cost and easy-to-find materials, for being used as wetted pad of evaporative cooling system, are necessary for agriculture. This study, thus, studied the evaporative cooling efficiency and pressure drop of recycled High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE and rice husk as a wetted pad in evaporative cooling system. Approach: The study was done by establishing the tested wetted pad with 25.4 and 50.8 mm of thickness. The velocity air flow through wetted pad was controlled at 1, 2 and 3 m sec−1 respectively. In addition, the dry bulb and wet bulb temperatures of inlet air were controlled at 30.1 ± 1.0°C and 23.2 ± 1.1°C, respectively. The commercial wetted pad was also tested in order to compare results with rice husk and recycled HDPE. Results: It was found that rice husk wetted pad gave the average saturation efficiency of 55.9 %, while HDPE gave the average saturation efficiency of 29.1%. However, the pressure drop across wetted pad of rice husk and recycled HDPE was significantly higher than that of commercial wetted pad. For the effect of air velocity on saturation efficiency and pressure drop, it was found that higher air velocity decreased saturation efficiency and increased pressure drop across wetted pad. Conclusion: Finally, the rice husk has a potential as wetted pad material. However, further study about optimum point between operation cost and materials cost of using rice husk wetted pad is needed.

  12. STUDY ON THE PYROLYSIS AND RECYCLING OF PVC WASTE AS AN ENERGY SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IntroductionIn China, the production of Poly (vinyl chloride)have reached 2 million tons in 1995, accounts forabout 33% of the total plastics market. PVC is themost common chlorinated plastic and accounts forabout half the chlorine in municipal solid waste. Themost obvious possibility of recycling of waste Plasticsas an enelgy source to Obtain fuel oil is pyrolysisl' (4].The Pyrolysis of chlorine containing polymers such asPVC has been studied extensively. Generally thethermal decomPOsition of PVC is a tWo ...

  13. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na2CO3, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na2CO3, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 20 g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching. - Highlights: • Simplest process for treatment of GaN an LED industry waste developed. • The process developed recovers gallium from waste LED waste dust. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga2O3 and GaN to NaGaO2 revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process reported. • Quantitative leaching of the GaN was achieved

  14. Análise do desempenho de sistema de controle de processos com reciclo = Performance analysis of the control system of recycle processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Mário de Matos Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade de economia de energia, as leis ambientais e a qualidade dos produtos tem exigido processos mais integrados. Uma forma de integração de processos é via reciclo de massa. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se a investigação da influência do reciclo demassa, no desempenho de diferentes estruturas de sistemas de controle e a sua relação com indicadores de controlabilidade e resiliência. Conclui-se que o reciclo e a estrutura influenciam no desempenho do sistema de controle e que esta influência pode ser previstapor indicadores de controlabilidade e resiliência.The need for greater energy savings, stringent environmental laws and product quality have all demanded better process integration. One path for process integration is through the mass recycle process. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mass recycle in the performance of different control system structures, and its relation with controllability and resiliency indicators. We conclude that both recycle and structure influence in theperformance of the control system, and this influence can be foreseen by controllability and resiliency indicators.

  15. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “Phoenix - ESPS”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process Phoenix – ESPS process (EU register No RECYC035. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles and containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried flakes are ground into small particle size powder, this powder is then fed into a reactor at high temperature under inert gas flow for decontamination. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the pulverisation and the decontamination are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are particle size for the pulverisation (step 2, temperature, dry air flow and residence time for the decontamination (step 3 and these are well defined. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those used in the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended to be used up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hot-fill is not considered of safety concern.

  16. Recycling of tailings from Korea Molybdenum Corporation as admixture for high-fluidity concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Moon Young; Choi, Yun Wang; Jeong, Jae Gwon

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an eco-friendly and a large recycling technique of flotation Tailings from korea (TK) from metal mines as construction materials such as admixtures for high-fluidity concrete (HFC). TK used in this study was obtained from the Korea Molybdenum Corporation in operation. TK was used as the alternative material to adjust flowability and viscosity of HFC in the form of powder agent which enables adjustment of concrete compressive strength. In this study, we have performed concrete rheological tests and concrete flowability tests to obtain the quality characteristics of TK for using as the admixture in producing HFC. The results indicated that the adequate mix ratio of cement to TK should be 8:2 (vol%). It is more effective to use the TK as admixture to control flowability, viscosity and strength of HFC than the normal concrete. It was found that TK could be recycled construction materials in bulk such as admixture for HFC, in terms of the economic and eco-friendly aspects. PMID:21113645

  17. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Segers, Marijke C; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and OWLS projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching $35 \\%$ and $19 \\%$, respectively, at $z=0$. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for $M_{\\ast} < 10^{10.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of AGB stars increases with time and towards galaxy centers. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by outflow...

  18. India's ship recycling trade-off

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worrell, E.; Athanasopoulou, V.

    2014-01-01

    The special nature of India's steel industry lends particular importance to ship recycling as a source of scrap. Ship recycling in upgraded 'green' facilities can substitute other 'dirty' ironmaking processes, resulting in energy savings and air pollutant emission reductions for the Indian steel sec

  19. Recycled Pulsars: Spins, Masses and Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Recycled pulsars are mainly characterized by their spin periods, B-fields and masses. All these quantities are affected by previous interactions with a companion star in a binary system. Therefore, we can use these quantities as fossil records and learn about binary evolution. Here, I briefly review the distribution of these observed quantities and summarize our current understanding of the pulsar recycling process.

  20. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  1. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “Aliplast Buhler B” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process Aliplast Buhler B (EU register number RECYC044. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated to the decontamination temperature and subsequently are further decontaminated in a continuous countercurrent reactor under high temperature and inert gas flow. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the third step, the decontamination in continuous countercurrent reactor for solid state polymerisation (SSP is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are the temperature, the inert gas flow and the residence time. The operating parameters of this step in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore, the recycled PET obtained from this process, intended to be used up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill, is not considered of safety concern.

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “RPET Nosinyec”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process RPET Nosinyec, EC register number RECYC082. The input of the process is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 5% of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried flakes are extruded into pellets, pre-crystallised then pre-crystallised pellets are fed into a reactor at high temperature under vacuum in which they are further crystallised and solid-state polymerised (SSP. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the extrusion and the decontamination in the batch SSP reactor are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are well defined and are the temperature, the pressure and the residence time both for the extrusion (step 2 and the SSP (step 4. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “Cumapol”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process Cumapol, EC register number RECYC085. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET articles mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded under vacuum and pelletised. The pellets are crystallised and solid state polymerised (SSP in a continuous reactor at high temperature under inert gas flow. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, the decontamination in the vented extruder (step 2 the crystallisation and pre-heating (step 3 and the decontamination in a continuous SSP reactor (step 4 are the critical steps for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are the temperature, the pressure and the residence time for the extrusion step 2, the temperature, the pressure, the gas flow and the residence time for crystallisation and pre-heating step 3 and the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time for the SSP step 4. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process "APPE Supercycle B" used to recycle PET for use in food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process APPE Supercycle B (EU register No RECYC065. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are further dried at high temperature, extruded under vacuum and pelletised. The pellets are crystallised and then solid state polymerised (SSP in a reactor at high temperature under vacuum. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the crystallisation (step 4 and the decontamination in the SSP reactor (step 5 are the critical steps for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control their performance are the temperature, pressure and residence time. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended to be used at up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  5. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “APPE supercycle CP” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process APPE Supercycle CP (EU register No RECYC066. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded under vacuum and pelletised (step 2. The pellets are crystallised at high temperature under vacuum (step 3 and further decontaminated in a solid state polymerisation reactor (SSP at high temperature under vacuum. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, the extrusion (step 2, the crystallisation (step 3 and the decontamination in the SSP reactor (step 4 are the critical steps for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control their performance are the temperature, the gas flow, the pressure and the residence time. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended to be used at up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  6. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “MOPET ®” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process MOPET ®, EC register number RECYC001. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET articles mainly bottles containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded in a twin-screw extruder to amorphous pellets before being crystallised and solid state polymerised in a batch reactor. After having examined the challenge tests provided, the Panel concluded that, although the extrusion (step 2 contributes significantly to the overall decontamination efficiency, the decontamination in the batch SSP reactor (step 3 is the critical step that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are the temperature, the pressure, the residence time and the inert gas flow. The operating parameters of this step in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  7. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process SOREPET, based on Buhler B technology, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process SOREPET (EU register No RECYC072. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated to the decontamination temperature and subsequently are further decontaminated in a continuous countercurrent reactor under high temperature and inter gas flow. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the third step, the decontamination in continuous countercurrent reactor for solid state polymerisation (SSP is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are the temperature, the inert gas flow and the residence time. The operating parameters of this step in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below the modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. The Panel concluded that recycled PET obtained from the process, intended to be used up to 100 % for manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all type of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hot fill, is not considered of safety concern.

  8. Industrial view on reprocessing and recycling as essential elements towards sustainable nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Nuclear energy's role in a sustainable energy future is increasingly embraced by various countries around the world. As a technologically mature, economic and safe energy conversion technology, nuclear energy provides also an important solution towards abating the unsustainable pressure on environment by our fossil-fuel driven economy. Today, there is significant deployment of nuclear power reactors especially in Asian countries, i.e. China and India, with a variety of newcomer countries already launched or planning in the construction of new nuclear power plants. While nuclear on itself may already contribute significantly to the sustainability of energy provision to the world, i.e. being a 'zero-greenhouse gas emission' energy conversion technology, the sustainability of the nuclear option is essentially defined by the intranuclear options aimed at reducing the use of non-renewable natural resources, by reducing further the waste arising and to assure economic and non-proliferating as well as safe operation of nuclear energy systems. Sustainability of the nuclear option is therefore primarily defined by the nuclear fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling playing an essential role to achieve such sustainability and this based on industrially proven practices. The paper addresses specifically, in more detail, the role of reprocessing and recycling in providing sustainable avenues from a resource and a waste management perspective. (authors)

  9. Contribution of image analysis to the definition of explosibility of fine particles resulting from waste recycling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gente, V.; La Marca, F.

    2007-09-01

    In waste recycling processes, the development of comminution technologies is one of the main actions to improve the quality of recycled products. This involves a rise in fine particles production, which could have some effects on explosibility properties of materials. This paper reports the results of experiments done to examine the explosibility of the fine particles resulting from waste recycling process. Tests have been conducted for the products derived from milling processes operated in different operative conditions. In particular, the comminution tests have been executed varying the milling temperature by refrigerant agents. The materials utilized in explosibility tests were different typologies of plastics coming from waste products (PET, ABS and PP), characterized by size lower than 1 mm. The results of explosibility tests, carried out by mean of a Hartmann Apparatus, have been compared with the data derived from image analysis procedure aimed to measure the morphological characteristics of particles. For each typology of material, the propensity to explode appears to be correlated not only to particle size, but also to morphological properties, linked to the operative condition of the milling process.

  10. Treatment of wastewater effluents from paper-recycling plants by coagulation process and optimization of treatment conditions with response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandi, Noushin; Younesi, Habibollah; Bahramifar, Nader

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a coagulation process was used to treat paper-recycling wastewater with alum coupled with poly aluminum chloride (PACl) as coagulants. The effect of each four factors, viz. the dosages of alum and PACl, pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD), on the treatment efficiency was investigated. The influence of these four parameters was described using response surface methodology under central composite design. The efficiency of reducing turbidity, COD and the sludge volume index (SVI) were considered the responses. The optimum conditions for high treatment efficiency of paper-recycling wastewater under experimental conditions were reached with numerical optimization of coagulant doses and pH, with 1,550 mg/l alum and 1,314 mg/l PACl and 9.5, respectively, where the values for reduction of 80.02 % in COD, 83.23 % in turbidity, and 140 ml/g in SVI were obtained.

  11. Continuous processing of recombinant proteins: Integration of inclusion body solubilization and refolding using simulated moving bed size exclusion chromatography with buffer recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhoefer, Martin; Sprinzl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-12-01

    An integrated process which combines continuous inclusion body dissolution with NaOH and continuous matrix-assisted refolding based on closed-loop simulated moving bed size exclusion chromatography was designed and experimentally evaluated at laboratory scale. Inclusion bodies from N(pro) fusion pep6His and N(pro) fusion MCP1 from high cell density fermentation were continuously dissolved with NaOH, filtered and mixed with concentrated refolding buffer prior to refolding by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This process enabled an isocratic operation of the simulated moving bed (SMB) system with a closed-loop set-up with refolding buffer as the desorbent buffer and buffer recycling by concentrating the raffinate using tangential flow filtration. With this continuous refolding process, we increased the refolding and cleavage yield of both model proteins by 10% compared to batch dilution refolding. Furthermore, more than 99% of the refolding buffer of the raffinate could be recycled which reduced the buffer consumption significantly. Based on the actual refolding data, we compared throughput, productivity, and buffer consumption between two batch dilution refolding processes - one using urea for IB dissolution, the other one using NaOH for IB dissolution - and our continuous refolding process. The higher complexity of the continuous refolding process was rewarded with higher throughput and productivity as well as significantly lower buffer consumption compared to the batch dilution refolding processes.

  12. Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

  13. Steady state recycling chromatography with solvent removal-effect of solvent removal constraints on process operation under ideal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Jani; Sainio, Tuomo

    2014-05-01

    Steady state recycling chromatography (SSR) offers a means to reduce eluent consumption and increase productivity in preparative and production scale chromatographic separations. Even better performance is obtained with an integrated process by coupling solvent removal unit to the chromatographic separation unit. Here a design method for SSR with an integrated solvent removal unit (SSR-SR) is presented. The method is more practical than previous work as the effect of physical constraints, such as solubility or viscosity, imposed on the amount of solvent removed is included. The method holds under ideal conditions for binary systems with competitive Langmuir isotherm model. The design equations allow calculation of the regions of feasible operating parameters when either the maximum concentrations in the solvent removal unit or of the solution fed into the chromatographic column is restricted. The method was applied to analyze the performance of different SSR-SR configurations in two case studies: the separation of mandelic acid enantiomers and the separation of EMD 53986 enantiomers. The benefits of SSR-SR are relatively small under ideal conditions but the design method developed here can give a good starting point for designing SSR-SR processes under non-ideal conditions. PMID:24685160

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “PKR”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process PKR, EC register number RECYC009. The input of the PKR is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, dried flakes are extruded into pellets which are then pre-crystallised before being fed to a batch solid state polymerization (SSP reactor where high temperature and long residence time are applied under vacuum. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the decontamination at SSP batch reactor is the critical step that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of this critical step are well defined and are the temperature, the pressure and the residence time. The operating parameters of this step in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill, is not considered of safety concern.

  15. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  16. Functional elastic hydrogel as recyclable membrane for the adsorption and degradation of methylene blue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Bao

    Full Text Available Developing the application of high-strength hydrogels has gained much attention in the fields of medical, pharmacy, and pollutant removal due to their versatility and stimulus-responsive properties. In this presentation, a high-strength freestanding elastic hydrogel membrane was constructed by clay nanosheets, N, N-dimethylacrylamide and 2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid for adsorption of methylene blue and heavy metal ions. The maximum values of elongation and Young's modulus for 0.5% AMPSNa hydrogel were 1901% and 949.4 kPa, respectively, much higher than those of traditional hydrogels. The adsorptions were confirmed to follow pseudo-second kinetic equation and Langmuir isotherm model fits the data well. The maximum adsorption capacity of hydrogel towards methylene blue was 434.8 mg g(-1. The hydrogel also exhibited higher separation selectivity to Pb(2+ than Cu(2+. The methylene blue adsorbed onto the hydrogel membrane can be photocatalytically degraded by Fenton agent and the hydrogel membrane could be recycled at least five times without obvious loss in mechanical properties. In conclusion, this presentation demonstrates a convenient strategy to prepare tough and elastic clay nanocomposite hydrogel, which can not only be applied as recyclable membrane for the photocatalytic degradation of organic dye, but also for the recovery of valuables.

  17. Recycling manure as cow bedding: Potential benefits and risks for UK dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Katharine A; Archer, Simon C; Breen, James E; Green, Martin J; Ohnstad, Ian C; Tuer, Sally; Bradley, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Material obtained from physical separation of slurry (recycled manure solids; RMS) has been used as bedding for dairy cows in dry climates in the US since the 1970s. Relatively recently, the technical ability to produce drier material has led to adoption of the practice in Europe under different climatic conditions. This review collates the evidence available on benefits and risks of using RMS bedding on dairy farms, with a European context in mind. There was less evidence than expected for anecdotal claims of improved cow comfort. Among animal health risks, only udder health has received appreciable attention. There are some circumstantial reports of difficulties of maintaining udder health on RMS, but no large scale or long term studies of effects on clinical and subclinical mastitis have been published. Existing reports do not give consistent evidence of inevitable problems, nor is there any information on clinical implications for other diseases. The scientific basis for guidelines on management of RMS bedding is limited. Decisions on optimum treatment and management may present conflicts between controls of different groups of organisms. There is no information on the influence that such 'recycling' of manure may have on pathogen virulence. The possibility of influence on genetic material conveying antimicrobial resistance is a concern, but little understood. Should UK or other non-US farmers adopt RMS, they are advised to do so with caution, apply the required strategies for risk mitigation, maintain strict hygiene of bed management and milking practices and closely monitor the effects on herd health. PMID:26388545

  18. Thermal recycling of plastic waste using pyrolysis-gasification process for energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbit, George Teke

    2012-04-04

    waste management organisations and disposal sites were conducted in various cities in the three case study countries. A resource-oriented manual sorting using the resource-recovery scavenging approach (RESA) simulating integration of scavenger's activities in waste sorting was conducted at BTU and Lagos. Major results obtained include: Characterization, quantification and classification of a dry sample of commingled MSW at Cottbus gave major waste fractions in order of decreasing abundance as 23.15% of residue waste, 19.75% of paper and cardboards, 17.80% of plastics, 14.63% of textiles and diapers, 10.06% of food waste and 9.55% of glass. An overall 33.21% of waste sample is compostable for manure, 52.2% usable as feedstock in the PG technology and 99.81% of total sample having a material or energy recovery potential. In Lagos, Nigeria main fractions were 29% of plastics, 36% of residue waste, 17% of soil/sand, 7% of paper with overall 41% usable as feedstock in PG technology, 39% compostable, 3% of recyclable (metal and glass). Sand can be recovered from the soil/sand fraction for construction. Excluding the sand/soil mixture, 83% of the total waste sample has potential for material and energy value. An appropriate technology that applies principles of pyrolysis and gasification to convert non-PVC plastic waste to energy was designed, constructed, tested and optimized with respect to: (i) Successful functioning with conversion of averagely 98.51% of input constituting of 82.78-98.21% of charcoal and 96.72-99.27% of plastic to heat energy (ii) Evaluation of socioeconomic and environmental impacts based on pyrolysis and exhaust gas and ash residue analysis showed absence of VOCs, heavy metals and pollutant organic and inorganic compounds; (iii) Safety and risk assessment to indoor pollution is very low; (iv) Assessment of the WTA and WTP indicated that 94% of respondents in Lagos, Nigeria and Porto Novo, Benin were willing to accept and pay for this technology

  19. Effect of tungsten concentration on growth of acetobacter xylinum as a promising agent for eco-friendly recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Halimatul, H. S.; Rosyid, N. H.; Effendi, D. B.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of tungsten (W) concentration on Acetobacter xylinum growth was studied. In the experimental procedure, concentration of W in the bacterial growth medium containing pineapple peels waste was varied from 0.5 to 50 ppm. To confirm the influence of W, the bacterial incubation process was carried out for 72 hours. Spectrophotometer analysis showed that the growth rate of Acetobacter xylinum decreased with increasing concentration of W. The result from fourier transform infra red analysis showed a slightly change on the absorption peak intensities and informing the interaction of W ion and bacteria cell. The result confirmed that Acetobacter xylinum was able to uptake W concentration up to 15 ppm, indicating that Acetobacter xylinum might act as a promising agent for eco-friendly recycling system.

  20. Membrane process treatment for greywater recycling: investigations on direct tubular nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourlier, F; Massé, A; Jaouen, P; Lakel, A; Gérente, C; Faur, C; Cloirec, P Le

    2010-01-01

    On-site greywater recycling and reuse is one of the main ways to reduce potable water requirement in urban areas. Direct membrane filtration is a promising technology to recycle greywater on-site. This study aimed at selecting a tubular nanofiltration (NF) membrane and its operating conditions in order to treat and reuse greywater in buildings. To do so, a synthetic greywater (SGW) was reconstituted in order to conduct experiments on a reproducible effluent. Then, three PCI NF membranes (AFC30, AFC40 and AFC80) having distinct molecular weight cut-offs were tested to recycle this SGW with a constant concentration at 25°C at two different transmembrane pressures (20 and 35 bar). The best results were obtained with AFC80 at 35 bar: the flux was close to 50 L m⁻²  h⁻¹, retentions of 95% for chemical oxygen demand and anionic surfactants were observed, and no Enterococcus were detected in the permeate. The performances of AFC80 were also evaluated on a real greywater: fluxes and retentions were similar to those observed on SGW. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of direct nanofiltration to recycle and reuse greywater.

  1. Progress towards a process for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric cells using a deep eutectic solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R.StJ. Foreman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction experiments relating to the recycling of the transition metals and lanthanides in nickel metal hydride cells are presented. The metal extraction is occurring from a deep eutectic solvent which is formed from chemicals suitable for use in food and related products. While it has been shown that the water content of the DES has a large effect on the extraction of transition metals by a mixture of chloride ionic liquid (Aliquat 336 and an aromatic solvent, the water content has a smaller effect on the solvent extraction of lanthanides with a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl hydrogen phosphate (DEHPA in a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbon. This study suggests that an industrial scale solvent extraction process for the recycling of metals from nickel hydride electrical cells will be feasible.

  2. Evaluation of sub-critical water as an extraction fluid for model contaminants from recycled PET for reuse as food packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Amélia S F; Agnelli, José A M; Manrich, Sati

    2010-04-01

    Recycling of plastics for food-contact packaging is an important issue and research into meaningful and cost-effective solutions is in progress. In this paper, the use of sub-critical water was evaluated as an alternative way of purifying poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) flakes for direct food contact applications. The effects of temperature, pressure and flow rate were assessed on the extraction efficiency of two of the most challenging classes of contaminants (toluene and benzophenone) from PET by sub-critical water using a first-order fractional experimental design. Extraction yield was quantified using GC/FID. The most important parameter was flow rate, indicating that the decrease in sub-critical water polarity with temperature was insufficient to eliminate partition effects. Temperature was also important, but only for the optimization of toluene extraction. These results may be explained by the poor solubility of higher molar mass compounds in sub-critical water compared to lower molar mass compounds under the same conditions, and the small decrease in dielectric constant with temperature under the experimental conditions evaluated. As cleaning efficiency is low and PET is very susceptible to hydrolysis, which limits the use of higher temperatures vis-à-vis physical recycling, the proposed extraction is unsuitable for a standalone super-clean process but may be a step in the process. PMID:20063227

  3. Metabolic Regulation as a Consequence of Anaerobic 5-Methylthioadenosine Recycling in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Justin A.; Sriram, Jaya; Chourey, Karuna; Ecker, Christopher D.; Sharma, Ritin; Wildenthal, John A.; Hettich, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodospirillum rubrum possesses a novel oxygen-independent, aerobic methionine salvage pathway (MSP) for recycling methionine from 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA), the MTA-isoprenoid shunt. This organism can also metabolize MTA as a sulfur source under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also function anaerobically as well. In this study, deep proteomics profiling, directed metabolite analysis, and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed metabolic changes in response to anaerobic growth on MTA versus sulfate as sole sulfur source. The abundance of protein levels associated with methionine transport, cell motility, and chemotaxis increased in the presence of MTA over that in the presence of sulfate. Purine salvage from MTA resulted primarily in hypoxanthine accumulation and a decrease in protein levels involved in GMP-to-AMP conversion to balance purine pools. Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) metabolic protein levels for lipid metabolism were lower in abundance, whereas poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis and storage were increased nearly 10-fold. The known R. rubrum aerobic MSP was also shown to be upregulated, to function anaerobically, and to recycle MTA. This suggested that other organisms with gene homologues for the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also possess a functioning anaerobic MSP. In support of our previous findings that ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is required for an apparently purely anaerobic MSP, RubisCO transcript and protein levels both increased in abundance by over 10-fold in cells grown anaerobically on MTA over those in cells grown on sulfate, resulting in increased intracellular RubisCO activity. These results reveal for the first time global metabolic responses as a consequence of anaerobic MTA metabolism compared to using sulfate as the sulfur source. PMID:27406564

  4. Machine coolant recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machining processes at the 272W Site Fabrication Services (SFS) produce a waste stream consisting of dirty machine coolant. During use the coolant becomes contaminated with metal chips from milling, and oil, dirt and solvents from the machining process. The mixture is designated as a Washington State dangerous waste with WP02 (persistence), D007 (chromium) and D008 (lead) waste codes. This process results in the generation of 13.5 m3 of hazardous waste per year with an annual cost for coolant replacement, waste management and waste disposal of approximately $137,000. To identify alternatives to this situation, ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH) North Environmental Services conducted a pollution prevention opportunity assessment (P20A) on the machining processes. A coolant recycler and sump sucker unit were selected as the most cost-effective waste reduction options. In December 1994, ICF KH received return on investment (ROI) funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to implement this option. The coolant recycling and the sump sucker units were purchased and installed in July 1995 at a total cost of $61,000. The sump sucker removes the dirty coolant from the fabrication machinery and filters it to remove shavings and sludge. The filtered coolant then is transferred to the coolant recycling system for further processing. The coolant recycling system reconditions the filtered coolant for use in the machining equipment, and mixes the concentrated coolant to the correct concentration. As a result of implementing this option, the annual generation of waste coolant was reduced by 12 m3. The annual cost savings exceed $119,000 with an ROI of 186%. Additional benefits include reduced coolant usage; improved tool life, wheel life, finish, size control, corrosion protection, and operator working conditions; increase machine open-quotes up-timeclose quotes; and reduced machine tool maintenance

  5. Evaluation of Recycle Grinding Performance in Flour Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlina Mustapa Kamal, Siti; Webb, Colin

    A typical flour milling process is a very linear operation that is almost entirely void of recycled streams where separate fractions from each operation go ahead as new streams to the next operation. In some cases, there are opportunities for combining some streams, for recycling particles that have been insufficiently broken to go back to the same roller mill. This study introduces this recycle concept in flour milling process at second break system. The recycle grinding assessment was made using a Satake STR-100 test roller mill. The recycle process was started after the second break system and the number of recycle grinding was up to 7 regrinds. The particle size distribution and ash analysis were produced to describe the behaviour of the recycle grinding performance. The material release was sifted on a range of sieves and the ash content was analysed using a laboratory furnace. The performance for each recycle stage was investigated. It was determined that it is possible for some coarse particles that contain only bran to keep being recycled in the recycle circuit. A purging operation was recommended to be included in the recycle system, to separate the unwanted particles.

  6. Continuous processing of recombinant proteins: integration of refolding and purification using simulated moving bed size-exclusion chromatography with buffer recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhoefer, Martin; Sprinzl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-04-11

    Continuous processing of recombinant proteins was accomplished by combining continuous matrix-assisted refolding and purification by tandem simulated moving bed (SMB) size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Recombinant proteins, N(pro) fusion proteins from inclusion bodies were dissolved with NaOH and refolded in the SMB system with a closed-loop set-up with refolding buffer as the desorbent buffer and buffer recycling of the refolding buffer of the raffinate by tangential flow filtration. For further purification of the refolded proteins, a second SMB operation also based on SEC was added. The whole system could be operated isocratically with refolding buffer as the desorbent buffer, and buffer recycling could also be applied in the purification step. Thus, a significant reduction in buffer consumption was achieved. The system was evaluated with two proteins, the N(pro) fusion pep6His and N(pro) fusion MCP-1. Refolding solution, which contained residual N(pro) fusion peptide, the cleaved autoprotease N(pro), and the cleaved target peptide was used as feed solution. Full separation of the cleaved target peptide from residual proteins was achieved at a purity and recovery in the raffinate and extract, respectively, of approximately 100%. In addition, more than 99% of the refolding buffer of the raffinate was recycled. A comparison of throughput, productivity, and buffer consumption of the integrated continuous process with two batch processes demonstrated that up to 60-fold higher throughput, up to 180-fold higher productivity, and at least 28-fold lower buffer consumption can be obtained by the integrated continuous process, which compensates for the higher complexity.

  7. Plasma exchange-based plasma recycling dialysis system as a potential platform for artificial liver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akimasa; Umehara, Yutaka; Umehara, Minoru; Hakamada, Kenichi; Narumi, Shunji; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Yoshihara, Shuichi; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2006-08-01

    We developed a plasma recycling dialysis (PRD) system based on plasma exchange (PE). In this system, rapid reduction of toxic substances and restitution of deficient essential substances are performed by PE, and subsequent blood purification is performed by dialysis between separated plasma recycled over a purification device and the patient's blood across the membrane of the plasma separator. This study was performed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of this system. Hyperbilirubinemia was induced by ligating the bile duct in pigs, and 7 days later, only PE for 2 h (group PE) or PE for 2 h followed by PRD for 6 h (group PE + PRD) was performed. The separated plasma was recycled over anion-exchange resin through the extra fiber space of the plasma separator. The safety and efficacy of this system were evaluated based on the values of hemodynamic and laboratory parameters. Transfer from PE to PRD was completed in a few minutes. The hemodynamic status and blood cells counts were stable and hemolysis was not observed during the procedure. In the PE + PRD group, the concentrations of total bile acids continuously decreased (pretreatment, 155.5 +/- 40.6 microM; 2 h [end of PE], 76.1 +/- 14.4 microM; 8 h [end of PRD], 25.8 +/- 9.1 microM) and the value was significantly lower than in the PE group after 6 h. The total bilirubin also continuously decreased during PRD (pretreatment, 55.3 +/- 11.5 microM; 2 h [end of PE], 33.8 +/- 8.4 microM; 8 h [end of PRD], 18.6 +/- 7.7 microM) and was significantly lower than in the PE group after 4 h. No significant change was observed in other laboratory values. This PE-based PRD system allowed a swift transfer from PE to sorbent-based blood purification. The safety of this system was demonstrated and the removal of toxic substances was significant. This study confirmed the clinical utility of this system as a platform for artificial liver support. PMID:16911318

  8. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass.

  9. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  10. Review of processes for the release of DOE real and non-real property for reuse and recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranek, N.L.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S.Y.; Blunt, D.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the underlying historical and regulatory framework supporting the concept of authorizing release for restricted or unrestricted reuse or recycle of real and non-real U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) properties containing residual radioactive material. Basic radiation protection principles as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection are reviewed, and international initiatives to investigate radiological clearance criteria are reported. Applicable requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Washington are discussed. Several processes that have been developed for establishing cleanup and release criteria for real and non-real DOE property containing residual radioactive material are presented. Examples of DOE real property for which radiological cleanup criteria were established to support unrestricted release are provided. Properties discussed include Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project sites, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites, the Shippingport decommissioning project, the south-middle and south-east vaults in the 317 area at Argonne National Laboratory, the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at DOE`s Savannah River Site, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, and the Weldon Spring site. Some examples of non-real property for which DOE sites have established criteria to support unrestricted release are also furnished. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Review of processes for the release of DOE real and non-real property for reuse and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the underlying historical and regulatory framework supporting the concept of authorizing release for restricted or unrestricted reuse or recycle of real and non-real U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) properties containing residual radioactive material. Basic radiation protection principles as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection are reviewed, and international initiatives to investigate radiological clearance criteria are reported. Applicable requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Washington are discussed. Several processes that have been developed for establishing cleanup and release criteria for real and non-real DOE property containing residual radioactive material are presented. Examples of DOE real property for which radiological cleanup criteria were established to support unrestricted release are provided. Properties discussed include Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project sites, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites, the Shippingport decommissioning project, the south-middle and south-east vaults in the 317 area at Argonne National Laboratory, the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at DOE's Savannah River Site, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, and the Weldon Spring site. Some examples of non-real property for which DOE sites have established criteria to support unrestricted release are also furnished. 10 figs., 4 tabs

  12. B-10 enriched boric acid, bromide, and heat as tracers of recycled groundwater flow near managed aquifer recharge operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. F.; Becker, T.; Johnson, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recycling wastewater for potable and nonpotable use by artificially recharging aquifers is a decades-old but increasingly popular practice. Natural attenuation processes in the subsurface, known as soil aquifer treatment (SAT), purify recycled water during recharge and subsequent groundwater flow. Travel time criteria are often used to regulate managed aquifer recharge (MAR) operations. California state draft regulations currently gives preference to groundwater tracers to quantify underground residence time, with a target retention time of >6 months from infiltration to drinking water extraction for surface spreading projects using tertiary treated wastewater (less time may be possible if full advanced treated water is utilized). In the past sulfur hexafluoride, a very strong greenhouse gas, has been the principle deliberate tracer for this work. However, its emission has recently become regulated in California and new tracers are needed. Here, two prospective tracers are evaluated: boron-10 (B-10), the least abundant boron isotope, and heat (with recharging water naturally warmed at the sewage treatment plants and in surface-spreading basins). An additional deliberate tracer, bromide (Br), which is a well-studied conservative tracer, was released as a control. Tracer injection occurred at the San Gabriel Spreading Grounds research test basin in Los Angeles County, CA, USA. The basin was constructed and characterized by the US Geological Survey in the mid-1990s. Recycled wastewater was piped directly to this basin at a known rate (about 1.5 m3/day). Down gradient from the test basin are nine high quality monitoring wells in a line that extends from the center of the basin to 150 m down gradient. All of the wells were equipped with temperature loggers that recorded groundwater temperatures every hour with an accuracy of one thousandth of a degree. The pre-experiment expected arrival times ranged from less than one day to six months. Arrival of Br was always

  13. Manufacturing and recycling of technology metals. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar volume contains 13 lectures concerning the geological availability, the trends of the technology, manufacturing and recycling process of technology metals such as Indium, Gallium, Selenium, Rhenium or the Rare Earths.

  14. Plasma exchange-based plasma recycling dialysis system as an artificial liver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Umehara, Yutaka; Umehara, Minoru; Nishimura, Akimasa; Narumi, Shunji; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Hakamada, Kenichi; Yoshihara, Syuichi; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2008-08-01

    We developed a plasma recycling dialysis (PRD) system based on plasma exchange (PE). In this system, rapid reduction of toxic substances and restitution of deficient essential substances are performed by PE and subsequent blood purification is performed by dialysis between separated plasma recycled over a purification device and the patient's blood across the membrane of a plasma separator. To demonstrate the safety and efficacy of this system, we used a pig model of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) and anion exchange resin, activated charcoal and hemodialysis for the purification device. FHF was induced by intraportal administration of alpha-amanitine (0.1 mg/kg) and lipopolysaccharides (1 microg/kg) in pigs. Three groups of animals were studied: group 1, diseased controls (N = 4); group 2, PE group (N = 4), 16 h after drug infusion the pigs underwent PE of approximately 1.2 L for 2 h; and group 3, PE + PRD group (N = 4), the pigs underwent PE followed by PRD for 6 h. The hemodynamic status of all animals was stable during the procedure. In group 3, the values of ammonia, total bile acid and total bilirubin continuously decreased and were significantly lower than those of the animals in group 2 24 h after the induction of FHF. The Fischer ratio was significantly higher than in group 2 after 24 h. Group 3 pigs maintained a higher level of consciousness and survived longer than group 2 pigs. Safety of this PE-based PRD system was demonstrated and the removal of toxic substances was significant. This study confirmed the clinical utility of this system as an artificial liver support. PMID:18789112

  15. Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Recycled Concrete Aggregate as Complete Replacement of Natural Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Osei, Daniel Yaw

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a report of an experimental investigation on the effect of complete replacement of natural aggregate by recycled concrete aggregate in the production of concrete on the compressive strength of concrete. Two sets of concrete mixtures of ratios 1:3:6, 1:2:4, 1:11/2:3, 1:1:2 by mass were cast using natural aggregates and recycled aggregates concrete respectively. The 28-day compressive strengths of 1:3:6, 1:2:4, 1:11/2:3, 1:1:2 concrete using recycled concrete aggregates were...

  16. A Survey on PET Recycling Problems in Qom City, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Gh Omrani, S Nasseri, A H Mahvi, Y Ghafuri

    2004-01-01

    Recycling process is developed in communities to decrease the volume of high solid wastes and prevent environmental pollution. Plastic is one of the most recyclable materials in municipal solid wastes (MSW) with a high rate of application during the last decades. PET (poly ethylene therphtalate) is one of the basic plastic compounds which are used in a variety of products such as textile fibers, bottles and other containers. Methods for PET recycling include mechanical and chemical processes ...

  17. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted

  18. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Salahuddin Asif; Iqbal Masood

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor....

  19. Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Silica Material Derived from a Monosilylated Grubbs-Hoveyda Ruthenium Carbene as a Recyclable Metathesis Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wong Chi Man

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a monosilylated Grubbs-Hoveyda ruthenium alkylidene complex is described, as well as the preparation and characterization of the corresponding material by sol-gel cogelification with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS and the assay of this recyclable supported catalyst in ring-closing diene and enyne metathesis reactions under thermal and microwave conditions.

  20. The Recycling of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Latex Coated Nylon 66

    OpenAIRE

    Wroe, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The Waste (England and Wales) Regulations encourage business to recycle their waste, as an alternative to landfill. This study has evaluated a number of processing techniques with respect to a difficult to recycle, technical textile, in order to develop recycling opportunities. Resorcinol formaldehyde latex (RFL) coated nylon 66 is a high performance fabric used as an interface to reinforce rubber products such as timing belts.The characteristics of the RFL coated woven fabric, assessed in co...

  1. Exploring metal recycling business in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soga, K. [DOWA Environmental Management Co., Ltd., Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2007-07-01

    Recycling activities related to the copper smelting process in China were discussed. Although China is a key player in terms of resource circulation in the world, the lack of proper recycling capabilities has hindered the growth of a recycling industry in China. A recycling network established by DOWA Environmental Management was established by contracting with Chinese smelters and refineries. This paper also provided details of recent recycling initiatives, metal scrap processes, industrial waste treatment processes, and soil remediation programs recently initiated in the country. The study concluded by suggesting that the trade of recycling materials must not remain one-sided between China and other developed countries. The high demand for natural resources in Brazil, Russia, India and China can be used as an incentive to increase recycling processes on a wider scale. A pilot project is now being planned by DOWA to establish an international network to collect and transfer used cellular phones to Japan for resource recovery. The company will research and evaluate feasible collection schemes for each participating country. The project may be expanded to include other products. 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Application of Decomposition Methodology to Solve Integrated Process Design and Controller Design Problems for Reactor-Separator-Recycle System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd.Hamid, Mohd-Kamaruddin; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) for a reactor-separator-recycle (RSR) system and evaluates a decomposition methodology to solve the IPDC problem. Accordingly, the IPDC problem is solved by decomposing it into four hierarchical stages: (i) pre......-analysis, (ii) design analysis, (iii) controller design analysis, and (iv) final selection and verification. The methodology makes use of thermodynamic-process insights and the reverse design approach to arrive at the final process-controller design decisions. The developed methodology is illustrated through...... the design of a RSR system involving consecutive reactions, A B -> C and shown to provide effective solutions that satisfy design, control and cost criteria. The advantage of the proposed methodology is that it is systematic, makes use of thermodynamic-process knowledge and provides valuable insights...

  3. USE OF GAC TECHNOLOGY AND TWO STAGE ION EXCHANGE TECHNIQUE FOR RECYCLING OF WASTEWATER IN TEXTILE WET PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PROF. MAHESH B. CHOUGULE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential natural resource for sustaining life and environment, which is always thought to be available in abundance and free gift of nature. Textile industries are one of the major consumers of water and disposing large volumes of effluent to the environment. The textile industry utilizes abundant water in dyeing and finishing processes. There is need to adopt economical practices for the use of water in textile industries. It has been estimated that 3.5 % of the total cost of running the industry is required for water utilization in textile industry. In India textile units are developed all over the country in the form of small industrial estates. Textiles are manufactured to perform a multitude of functions. They are produced to a range of specifications using avariety of fibers, resulting in a complex waste or effluent. Textile waste occurs in a variety of forms throughout production process. The surface water sources are limited and availability of water from them vary from year to year depending upon monsoon conditions. The underground water resources are also getting depleted with theincreasing amount of water drawn from them every year without adequate replenishments. Therefore, the cost of water is rising steeply and the textile mills, which need a large quantity of water, have started taking measures to conserve and recycling. This paper focuses on recycling of wastewater in textile wet processing with experimental analysis of GAC technology and two-stage ion exchange technology.

  4. Synthesis of α-aminonitriles using silica-bonded N-propylpiperazine sulfamic acid as a recyclable catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahere Rahi; Mojtaba Baghernejad; Khodabakhsh Niknam

    2012-01-01

    α-Aminonitriles were synthesized via a one-pot three-component condensation of aldehydes,amines,and trimethylsilyl cyanide using silica-bonded N-propylpiperazine sulfamic acid (SBPPSA) as a recyclable solid acid at room temperature.SBPPSA showed much the same efficiency when used in consecutive reaction runs.

  5. Ionic liquids as recyclable and separable reaction media in Rh-catalyzed decarbonylation of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malcho, Phillip; Garcia-Suarez, Eduardo J.; Riisager, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been applied as recyclable reaction media in the decarbonylation of aldehydes in the presence of a rhodium-phosphine complex catalyst. The performance of several new catalytic systems based on imidazolium-based ILs and [Rh(dppp)2]Cl (dppp: 1,3-diphenylphosphinopropane) were...

  6. Recycling Process of U3O8 Powder in MnO-Al2O3 Doped Large Grain UO2 Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various process variables on the powder properties of recycled U3O8 from MnO-Al2O3 doped large grain UO2 pellets and the effect of those recycled U3O8 powders on the sintered density and grain size of MnO-Al2O3 doped large grain UO2 pellets have been investigated. The evolution of morphology, size, and BET surface area of the recycled U3O8 powders according to the respective variation of the thermo-mechanical treatment variables of oxidation temperature, powder milling, and sequential cyclic heat treatment of oxidation and then reduction was examined. The correlation between the BET surface area of recycled U3O8 powder and the sintered pellet properties of MnO-Al2O3 doped pellets showed that the pellet density and grain size of doped pellets were increased and then saturated by increasing the BET surface area of the recycled U3O8 powder. The density and grain size of the pellets were maximized when the BET surface area of the recycled U3O8 powder was in the vicinity of 3m2/g. Among the process variables applied in this study, the cyclic heat treatment followed by low temperature oxidation was a potential process combination to obtain the sinter-active U3O8 powder

  7. Investigation of Ultrasonics as a tool for energy efficient recycling of Lactic acid from postconsumer PLA products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    The growing use of "ecofriendly," biodegradable polymers have created a need for a suitable recycling technique because, unlike petroleum derived plastics, their properties deteriorate during conventional recycling. These new techniques must be cost efficient and yield material properties same as virgin polymer. This research investigates the effectiveness of high-power ultrasonics as an efficient technique to recover lactic acid from postconsumer polylactic acid (PLA) products. Polylactic acid is a commercially available bioplastic derived from corn starch and/or sugar cane that is biorenewable and compostable (biodegradable). The various ongoing researches to recover lactic acid from PLA employ a common platform of high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) to effect polymer hydrolysis. The energy intensiveness of these HTHP processes prompted this work to investigate ultrasonics as an low energy alternative process to cause PLA depolymerization. The energy consumption and the time required for depolymerization were utilized as the metrics to quantify and compare depolymerization enhanced by ultrasonics with hot-bath technique. The coupled effect of catalysts concentration and different solvents, along with ultrasonic were studied based on preliminary trial results. In addition, the correlation between the rates of de-polymerization was analyzed for ultrasonic amplitude, treatment time, and catalyst concentration and types. The results indicate that depolymerization of PLA was largely effected by heating caused by ultrasonic-induced cavitations. Other effects of ultrasonics, namely cavitations and acoustic streaming, were shown to have minimal effects in enhancing depolymerization. In fact, thermal energy predominately affected the reaction kinetics; the heat introduced by conventional method (i.e., electrical heaters) was more efficient than ultrasonic heating in terms of energy (for depolymerization) per unit mass of PLA and depolymerizing time. The degree of

  8. Environmental performance and mechanical analysis of concrete containing recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and waste precast concrete as aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Savaş; Blankson, Marva Angela

    2014-01-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating 100% recycled aggregates, either waste precast concrete or waste asphalt planning, as replacements for virgin aggregates in structural concrete and to determine the mechanical and environmental performance of concrete containing these aggregates. Four different types of concrete mixtures were designed with the same total water cement ratio (w/c=0.74) either by using natural aggregate as reference or by totally replacing the natural aggregate with recycled material. Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) was used as a mineral addition (35%) in all mixtures. The test results showed that it is possible to obtain satisfactory performance for strength characteristics of concrete containing recycled aggregates, if these aggregates are sourced from old precast concrete. However, from the perspective of the mechanical properties, the test results indicated that concrete with RAP aggregate cannot be used for structural applications. In terms of leaching, the results also showed that the environmental behaviour of the recycled aggregate concrete is similar to that of the natural aggregate concrete. PMID:24316812

  9. Challenges of metal recycling and an international covenant as possible instrument of a globally extended producer responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilts, Hennning; Bringezu, Stefan; Bleischwitz, Raimund; Lucas, Rainer; Wittmer, Dominic

    2011-09-01

    As illustrated by the case studies of end-of-life vehicles and waste electric and electronic equipment, the approach of an extended producer responsibility is undermined by the exports of used and waste products. This fact causes severe deficits regarding circular flows, especially of critical raw materials such as platinum group metals. With regard to global recycling there seems to be a responsibility gap which leads somehow to open ends of waste flows and a loss or down-cycling of potential secondary resources. Existing product-orientated extended producer responsibility (EPR) approaches with mass-based recycling quotas do not create adequate incentives to supply waste materials containing precious metals to a high-quality recycling and should be amended by aspects of a material stewardship. The paper analyses incentive effects on EPR for the mentioned product groups and metals, resulting from existing regulations in Germany. It develops a proposal for an international covenant on metal recycling as a policy instrument for a governance-oriented framework to initiate systemic innovations along the complete value chain taking into account product group- and resource group-specific aspects on different spatial levels. It aims at the effective implementation of a central idea of EPR, the transition of a waste regime still focusing on safe disposal towards a sustainable management of resources for the complete lifecycle of products. PMID:21771872

  10. Nanoparticles as recyclable catalysts: the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Didier; Lu, Feng; Aranzaes, Jaime Ruiz

    2005-12-01

    Interest in catalysis by metal nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing dramatically, as reflected by the large number of publications in the last five years. This field, "semi-heterogeneous catalysis", is at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and progress has been made in the efficiency and selectivity of reactions and recovery and recyclability of the catalytic materials. Usually NP catalysts are prepared from a metal salt, a reducing agent, and a stabilizer and are supported on an oxide, charcoal, or a zeolite. Besides the polymers and oxides that used to be employed as standard, innovative stabilizers, media, and supports have appeared, such as dendrimers, specific ligands, ionic liquids, surfactants, membranes, carbon nanotubes, and a variety of oxides. Ligand-free procedures have provided remarkable results with extremely low metal loading. The Review presents the recent developments and the use of NP catalysis in organic synthesis, for example, in hydrogenation and C--C coupling reactions, and the heterogeneous oxidation of CO on gold NPs.

  11. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process. PMID:24816522

  12. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  13. Study on recycling of waste rubbers as medium components for hydroponic culture of rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Kuk; Lee, Hyung-Gyu; Jeong, Byoung-Ryong; Hwang, Seung-Jae [Gyeongsang National Univ., Kumi(Korea)

    2000-06-30

    Recently, the efficient disposal of the waste rubber is necessary due to increasing amount of the waste rubbers. In this paper, method of recycling waste rubbers as components of medium for hydroponic rose culture was suggested. We investigated growth of rose, and macro- and micro-elements, pH and EC of the media amended with waste rubber. In the beginning of culture, stress symptoms such as thin brittle stem and incipient wilting were observed, but they disappeared in a few weeks. Concentration of Zn{sup 2+} in media at flowering increased in proportion to contents of waste tire in the media. pH of media at flowering were in the range of 5.70 to 6.35. Rose growth in all media, except in waste rock wool mixed with EPDM powder at 9:3 ratio, was normal and equivalent to the control in terms of stem length, number of stems harvested and fresh weight. (author). 10 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  14. Rate-based modelling of combined SO2 removal and NH3 recycling integrated with an aqueous NH3-based CO2 capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A rigorous, rate-based model for an NH3–CO2–SO2–H2O system was developed. • Model predictions are in good agreement with pilot plant results. • >99.9% of SO2 was captured and >99.9% of slipped ammonia was reused. • The process is highly adaptable to the variations of SO2/NH3 level, temperatures. - Abstract: To reduce the costs of controlling emissions from coal-fired power stations, we propose an advanced and effective process of combined SO2 removal and NH3 recycling, which can be integrated with the aqueous NH3-based CO2 capture process to simultaneously achieve SO2 and CO2 removal, NH3 recycling and flue gas cooling in one process. A rigorous, rate-based model for an NH3–CO2–SO2–H2O system was developed and used to simulate the proposed process. The model was thermodynamically and kinetically validated by experimental results from the open literature and pilot-plant trials, respectively. Under typical flue gas conditions, the proposed process has SO2 removal and NH3 reuse efficiencies of >99.9%. The process is strongly adaptable to different scenarios such as high SO2 levels in flue gas, high NH3 levels from the CO2 absorber and high flue gas temperatures, and has a low energy requirement. Because the process simplifies flue gas desulphurisation and resolves the problems of NH3 loss and SO2 removal, it could significantly reduce the cost of CO2 and SO2 capture by aqueous NH3

  15. Influence of photon recycling effects in the operation and design of GaAs solar cells; Influencia del reciclaje de fotones en el funcionamiento y del diseno de las celulas solares de Arsenico de Galio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balenzategui Manzanares, J. L.

    2005-07-01

    Photon recycling (PR) is the process by which photons internally emitted in a semiconductor can be re-absorbed by the material, giving as result new electron-hole pairs. Although this process has been receiving some international research from the Sixties, because their effects revealed as relevant in certain devices and materials (as in gallium arsenide), its influence in the operation of solar cells has been scarcely considered in the past. Thus deposited it has been demonstrated that one of its major effects is an enhancement of the radiative carrier lifetine, photon recycling is not usually taken into account in photovoltaic, neither in device modelling and simulation, nor from the perspective of taking advantage of the phenomenon to improve the efficiency of solar cells. This work describes the results of our investigations in the field of photon recycling. (Author)

  16. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  17. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  18. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells. PMID:27211006

  19. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  20. Selective Dissolution of Halide Perovskites as a Step Towards Recycling Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-23

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  1. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing. PMID:19540649

  2. Field site leaching from recycled concrete aggregates applied as sub-base material in road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsen, Christian J; Wibetoe, Grethe; van der Sloot, Hans A; Lund, Walter; Petkovic, Gordana

    2012-06-15

    The release of major and trace elements from recycled concrete aggregates used in an asphalt covered road sub-base has been monitored for more than 4 years. A similar test field without an asphalt cover, directly exposed to air and rain, and an asphalt covered reference field with natural aggregates in the sub-base were also included in the study. It was found that the pH of the infiltration water from the road sub-base with asphalt covered concrete aggregates decreased from 12.6 to below pH 10 after 2.5 years of exposure, whereas this pH was reached within only one year for the uncovered field. Vertical temperature profiles established for the sub-base, could explain the measured infiltration during parts of the winter season. When the release of major and trace elements as function of field pH was compared with pH dependent release data measured in the laboratory, some similar pH trends were found. The field concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn were found to be low throughout the monitoring period. During two of the winter seasons, a concentration increase of Cr and Mo was observed, possibly due to the use of de-icing salt. The concentrations of the trace constituents did not exceed Norwegian acceptance criteria for ground water and surface water Class II. PMID:22554532

  3. FM dye photo-oxidation as a tool for monitoring membrane recycling in inner hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Kamin

    Full Text Available Styryl (FM dyes have been used for more than two decades to investigate exo- and endocytosis in conventional synapses. However, they are difficult to use in the inner hair cells of the auditory pathway (IHCs, as FM dyes appear to penetrate through mechanotransducer channels into the cytosol of IHCs, masking endocytotic uptake. To solve this problem we applied to IHCs the FM dye photo-oxidation technique, which renders the dyes into electron microscopy markers. Photo-oxidation allowed the unambiguous identification of labeled organelles, despite the presence of FM dye in the cytosol. This enabled us to describe the morphologies of several organelles that take up membrane in IHCs, both at rest and during stimulation. At rest, endosome-like organelles were detected in the region of the cuticular plate. Larger tubulo-cisternal organelles dominated the top and nuclear regions. Finally, the basal region, where the IHC active zones are located, contained few labeled organelles. Stimulation increased significantly membrane trafficking in the basal region, inducing the appearance of labeled vesicles and cistern-like organelles. The latter were replaced by small, synaptic-like vesicles during recovery after stimulation. In contrast, no changes in membrane trafficking were induced by stimulation in the cuticular plate region or in the top and nuclear regions. We conclude that synaptic vesicle recycling takes place mostly in the basal region of the IHCs. Other organelles participate in abundant constitutive membrane trafficking throughout the rest of the IHC volume.

  4. Recycling of plastic: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Fruergaard, Thilde; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Major greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to plastic waste recycling were evaluated with respect to three management alternatives: recycling of clean, single-type plastic, recycling of mixed/contaminated plastic, and use of plastic waste as fuel in industrial processes. Source-separated plastic...

  5. New biotechnological perspectives of a NADH oxidase variant from Thermus thermophilus HB27 as NAD+-recycling enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha-Martín Javier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of biotransformations that use nicotinamide recycling systems is exponentially growing. For this reason one of the current challenges in biocatalysis is to develop and optimize more simple and efficient cofactor recycling systems. One promising approach to regenerate NAD+ pools is the use of NADH-oxidases that reduce oxygen to hydrogen peroxide while oxidizing NADH to NAD+. This class of enzymes may be applied to asymmetric reduction of prochiral substrates in order to obtain enantiopure compounds. Results The NADH-oxidase (NOX presented here is a flavoenzyme which needs exogenous FAD or FMN to reach its maximum velocity. Interestingly, this enzyme is 6-fold hyperactivated by incubation at high temperatures (80°C under limiting concentrations of flavin cofactor, a change that remains stable even at low temperatures (37°C. The hyperactivated form presented a high specific activity (37.5 U/mg at low temperatures despite isolation from a thermophile source. Immobilization of NOX onto agarose activated with glyoxyl groups yielded the most stable enzyme preparation (6-fold more stable than the hyperactivated soluble enzyme. The immobilized derivative was able to be reactivated under physiological conditions after inactivation by high solvent concentrations. The inactivation/reactivation cycle could be repeated at least three times, recovering full NOX activity in all cases after the reactivation step. This immobilized catalyst is presented as a recycling partner for a thermophile alcohol dehydrogenase in order to perform the kinetic resolution secondary alcohols. Conclusion We have designed, developed and characterized a heterogeneous and robust biocatalyst which has been used as recycling partner in the kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethanol. The high stability along with its capability to be reactivated makes this biocatalyst highly re-useable for cofactor recycling in redox biotransformations.

  6. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  7. Recycling ground granulated blast furnace slag as cold bonded artificial aggregate partially used in self-compacting concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesoğlu, Mehmet; Güneyisi, Erhan; Mahmood, Swara Fuad; Öz, Hatice Öznur; Mermerdaş, Kasım

    2012-10-15

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), a by-product from iron industry, was recycled as artificial coarse aggregate through cold bonding pelletization process. The artificial slag aggregates (ASA) replaced partially the natural coarse aggregates in production of self-compacting concrete (SCC). Moreover, as being one of the most widely used mineral admixtures in concrete industry, fly ash (FA) was incorporated as a part of total binder content to impart desired fluidity to SCCs. A total of six concrete mixtures having various ASA replacement levels (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) were designed with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.32. Fresh properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) were observed through slump flow time, flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, and L-box filling height ratio. Compressive strength of hardened SCCs was also determined at 28 days of curing. It was observed that increasing the replacement level of ASA resulted in decrease in the amount of superplasticizer to achieve a constant slump flow diameter. Moreover, passing ability and viscosity of SCC's enhanced with increasing the amount of ASA in the concrete. The maximum compressive strength was achieved for the SCC having 60% ASA replacement. PMID:22951223

  8. Plastic Recycling Experiments in Materials Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to introduce a series of plastic recycling experiments to students in materials-related courses such as materials science, material technology and materials testing. With the plastic recycling experiments, students not only can learn the fundamentals of plastic processing and properties as in conventional materials courses, but also can be exposed to the issue of materials life cycle and the impact on society and environment.

  9. Development of a Prototype Automated Sorting System for Plastic Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Wahab

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated sorting for plastic recyclables has been seen as the way forward in the plastic recycling industry. Automated sorting provides significant improvements in terms of efficiency and consistency in the sorting process. In the case of macro sorting, which is the most common type of automated sorting, efficiency is determined by the mechanical details of the material handling system as well as the detection system. This paper provides a review on the state of-the-art technologies that have been deployed by some of the recycling facilities abroad. The design and development of a cost effective prototype automated system for sorting plastic recyclables is proposed and discussed.

  10. Recycling agriculture wastes of ramie stalk as bioadsorbents for Cd(2+) removal: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Gong, X F; Zou, H L; Liu, C Y; Chen, C L; Zeng, X X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we exhibit the recycling of agriculture wastes of ramie stalk as bioadsorbents for Cd(2+) removal. Based on our experimental results, it is realized that Cd(2+) adsorption to ramie stalk is highly pH sensitive, indicating the adsorption is driven by surface complexation reaction. The high adsorption capacity of ramie stalk toward Cd(2+) (qm = 10.33 mg g(-1), 0.09 mol-Cd g(-1)), which corresponds to around 21.95% of active adsorption sites available of ramie stalk, is believed to be closely related to its high cellulose and lignin content. The inhomogeneous surface of ramie stalk due to the high cellulose and lignin content also accounts for the observation that the adsorption kinetic is described well by the pseudo second order kinetic model. Results from thermodynamic studies suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. All these properties demonstrate the potential of ramie stalk as a low cost bioadsorbent for the application of heavy metal removal.

  11. THE USE OF RECYCLED SOLID AUTOMOTIVE PAINT WASTES AS INGREDIENTS IN AUTOMOTIVE SEALANT PRODUCTS - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    About 75,000,000 lbs. of paint sludge is generated by the U.S. automotive industry each year. This type of waste (and similar streams in other industries) make a significant contribution to landfills. A proposed solution is to recycle the paint sludge into compounding ingredients...

  12. In-situ drift spectroscopy in a continuous recycle reactor: a versatile tool for catalytic process research

    OpenAIRE

    Highfield, J. G.; Prairie, M.; Renken, A.

    1991-01-01

    Diffuse Reflectance IR Fourier-Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is an increasingly popular technique in catalysis research as it permits in situ observation of the reactor bed in powd. or granular form. However, DRIFTS in its conventional form suffers from temp.-gradient problems. One soln. is to couple the DRIFTS cell with a continuous recycle flow system. The value of such an arrangement is illustrated via studies of the kinetics and mechanism of CO2 methanation over Ru/TiO2 under transient a...

  13. 湿法磷酸中碘的回收利用%Recycling of iodine from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨跃华; 罗如意

    2013-01-01

    With the aggravation of phosphate ore dilution, comprehensive utilization of low grade phosphate ore associated with a variety of valuable elements is paid more and more attention.The content of iodine in Yunnan phosphate ore is generally higher.Recovery of iodine from phosphate ore can be treated as one of the effective ways to solve the needs of iodine in China.There are many methods for recycling iodine resources.In allusion to different raw materials, several important iodine recycling methods were briefly discussed.Combining with the existing industrial production technology, recycling pathways of iodine from the wet-process phosphoric, including ' recovery of iodine from dilute phosphoric acid with air blowing technology' and 'recovery of iodine from fluosilicic acid with oxidation-extraction and ion exchange method'were mainly introduced.%随着磷矿贫化加剧,低品位磷矿中伴生的多种有价值元素的综合利用越来越引起重视.云南磷矿中碘含量普遍较高,从磷矿中回收碘资源可作为解决中国碘需求的有效途径之一.碘资源的回收利用方法较多,首先从不同原料出发,简单阐述了碘回收利用的几个重要的方法.结合现有的工业生产技术,重点叙述了湿法磷酸中碘的回收利用途径,主要包含了空气吹出吸收工艺从稀磷酸中回收碘的工艺技术和通过氧化萃取、离子交换的方法提取氟硅酸中碘的技术.

  14. An assessment and evaluation for recycle/reuse of contaminated process and metallurgical equipment at the DOE Rocky Flats Plant Site -- Building 865

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An economic analysis of the potential advantages of alternatives for recycling and reusing equipment now stored in Building 865 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado has been conducted. The inventory considered in this analysis consists primarily of metallurgical and process equipment used before January 1992, during development and production of nuclear weapons components at the site. The economic analysis consists of a thorough building inventory and cost comparisons for four equipment dispositions alternatives. The first is a baseline option of disposal at a Low Level Waste (LLW) landfill. The three alternatives investigated are metal recycling, reuse with the government sector, and release for unrestricted use. This report provides item-by-item estimates of value, disposal cost, and decontamination cost. The economic evaluation methods documented here, the simple cost comparisons presented, and the data provided as a supplement, should provide a foundation for D ampersand D decisions for Building 865, as well as for similar D ampersand D tasks at RFP and at other sites

  15. Recycling of plastics in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the waste management of post-consumer plastics in Germany and its potential to save fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions. Since most experience is available for packaging, the paper first gives an overview of the legislative background and the material flows for this sector. Then recycling and recovery processes for plastics waste from all sectors are assessed in terms of their contribution to energy saving and CO2 abatement. Practically all the options studied show a better performance than waste treatment in an average incinerator which has been chosen as the reference case. High ecological benefits can be achieved by mechanical recycling if virgin polymers are substituted. The paper then presents different scenarios for managing plastic waste in Germany in 1995: considerable savings can be made by strongly enhancing the efficiency of waste incinerators. Under these conditions the distribution of plastics waste among mechanical recycling, feedstock recycling and energy recovery has a comparatively mall impact on the overall results. The maximum savings amount to 74 PJ of energy, i.e, 9% of the chemical sector energy demand in 1995 and 7.0 Mt CO2, representing 13% of the sector's emissions. The assessment does not support a general recommendation of energy recovery due to the large difference between the German average and the best available municipal waste-to-energy facilities and also due to new technological developments in the field of mechanical recycling

  16. Analytical procedure for quantifying five compounds suspected as possible contaminants in recycled paper/paperboard for food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y S; Park, H J; Komolprasert, V

    2000-12-01

    Because contaminants in recycled paper intended for food packaging could be a risk to public health, analytical methods are needed to identify and quantify residues of concern in paper/paperboard. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration is considering development of a guidance document for testing levels of contaminants that might be retained through paper recycling processes. An analytical procedure was developed using paper spiked with suspected contaminants at concentrations of 1-50 ppm in the paper. Benzophenone, dimethyl phthalate, anthracene, methyl stearate, and pentachlorophenol were introduced by soaking the paper in a solution in acetone at 25 degrees C for 24 h; the paper was removed and dried by evaporating the solvent with nitrogen. The model contaminant residues were extracted from the paper using ultrasonication and quantified by GC with flame ionization and electron capture detectors. Recoveries from the spiked paper were 80-109% with a repeatability of +/-4%. The method was also used to analyze commercial recycled paperboard to validate its applicability. PMID:11141258

  17. Establishment of the roadmap for chlorination process development for zirconium recovery and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process development studies are being conducted to recover, purify, and reuse the zirconium (about 98.5% by mass) in used nuclear fuel (UNF) zirconium alloy cladding. Feasibility studies began in FY 2010 using empty cladding hulls that were left after fuel dissolution or after oxidation to a finely divided oxide powder (voloxidation). In FY 2012, two industrial teams (AREVA and Shaw-Westinghouse) were contracted by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) to provide technical assistance to the project. In FY 2013, the NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program requested development of a technology development roadmap to guide future work. The first step in the roadmap development was to assess the starting point, that is, the current state of the technology and the end goal. Based on previous test results, future work is to be focused on first using chlorine as the chlorinating agent and secondly on the use of a process design that utilizes a chlorination reactor and dual ZrCl4 product salt condensers. The likely need for a secondary purification step was recognized. Completion of feasibility testing required an experiment on the chemical decladding flowsheet option. This was done during April 2013. The roadmap for process development will continue through process chemistry optimization studies, the chlorinated reactor design configuration, product salt condensers, and the off-gas trapping of tritium or other volatile fission products from the off-gas stream. (authors)

  18. A Highly Efficient Method for Synthesis of Bisarylmethylidenes of Cyclic Ketones in [BMIm]Cl/NaOH System as New and Recyclable Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Javanshir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An ionic liquid 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazoliumchloride[BMIm]Cl/sodium hydroxide system, was employed as a catalyst for the fast and one-pot crossed aldol-condensation of various aromatic aldehydes and cyclic ketones, to produce a variety of substituted α,α'-bis(benzylidene-cycloalkanones under neat conditions. This process is simple, efficient and environmentally benign and proceeds in high yield and short reaction times. The ionic liquid can be recycled for subsequent reactions without any appreciable loss of efficiency.

  19. Proposal of recycling system for waste aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Š. Valenčík

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced work is focused on waste aluminum recycling process with objective to propose complex production system for recovering of aluminum and some aluminum alloys. Solution is supported by extended analysis concerning purpose, basis and system sequences for recyclation. Based on that, sources, possibilities and conditions for recycling are formed. This has been used in proposal of manufacturing system. The principle is the structural proposal of manufacturing system, which does not only differentiate the stage of aluminum melting process, but also related stages as gross separation, sizing, containerisation and batching, palletisation, stacking and some related operations. Production system respects technological specifications, requirements for rationalisation of manufacturing systems, technical and economical feasibility conditions and is considered in lower automation level. However production system solves complex problem of recycling of some types of aluminum, it improves flexibility, production, quality (melting by high enforcements and in protective atmosphere and extention of production (final products production.

  20. Recuperação de sílica-gel utilizando processos oxidativos avançados: uma alternativa simples e de baixo custo Silica gel recycling using and advanced oxidative process: a simple and low-cost alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio César Godinho Teixeira; Leda Mathias; Maria Cristina Canela

    2003-01-01

    Silica gel is widely used as adsorbent for isolating and purifying natural compounds. Intensive use and high cost make this process expensive and generate solid residues contaminated with many different organic compounds. In the present work a simple method for recycling silica was investigated, by using Advanced Oxidative Processes. Silica gel was treated with H2O2/solar light and compared with a sample treated by conventional methods (high temperature and oxidation with KMnO4). High tempera...

  1. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics - Part 2: A C3-C4 vegetation change field labelling experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-11-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilization within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30-year old labelling experiment after a wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilization by assessing differences in turnover dynamics between plant and microbial-derived sugars: while plant-derived sugars are only affected by stabilization processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilization and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (> 2 g cm-3; mineral)) of a silty loam under long-term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of neutral sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid. While apparent MRT of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugar carbon in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, MRT of the mainly plant-derived xylose were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial-derived sugars like galactose, rhamnose, fucose, indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics in

  2. Retirement as a Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Phil; Ford, Geoff; Hodkinson, Heather; Hawthorn, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon a major qualitative empirical research investigation in Great Britain to explore the relationships between retirement and learning. Though retirement is frequently viewed as an event leading to a life stage, our data show that it can perhaps be best understood as a lengthy process. This process begins well before actual…

  3. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelin, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best way to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission. (author)

  4. Recycling - Danish Waste Management Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romann, Anne Funch; Thøgersen, John; Husmer, Lis;

    The report challanges recycling as the only waste handling strategy. The tonnes of recycled materials should not be the only goal - it is essential to minimize the waste production and focus on eliminating hazardous materials.......The report challanges recycling as the only waste handling strategy. The tonnes of recycled materials should not be the only goal - it is essential to minimize the waste production and focus on eliminating hazardous materials....

  5. You're a "What"? Recycling Coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Recycling coordinators supervise curbside and dropoff recycling programs for municipal governments or private firms. Today, recycling is mandatory in many communities. And advancements in collection and processing methods have helped to increase the quantity of materials for which the recycling coordinator is responsible. In some communities,…

  6. INVESTIGATIONS ON RECYCLED CONCRETE AGGREGATE AND MSAND AS AGGREGATE REPLACEMENT IN CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, U; Karthick, B

    2015-01-01

    Gigantic numbers of building and destruction trashes are produced in emerging countries like India. The clearance of these trashes is serious problem because it requires huge space. The present work is to study the properties of concrete with replacement of 50% of nature sand by manufactured sand and coarse aggregates by different proportions with recycled concrete aggregates (RCA). A mix proportion for M20 grade concrete is derived with standards confirming to IS codes. RCA was p...

  7. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; LI, ZHEN; ZHU, KAI; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective...

  8. Integración Óptima en el Sistema de Reciclado de Aguas en Procesos Papeleros Optimal Integration of Water Recycling Systems in Paper Manufacturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M González

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se propone un novedoso modelo de programación no lineal que resuelve el problema de minimizar el consumo de agua fresca utilizada en el proceso papelero, obteniendo considerables reducciones del agua consumida y de los residuos vertidos. Se determina el grado de contaminación de los flujos a ser reciclados, así como la máxima composición de contaminante que pueden aceptar los diferentes equipos y en base a esto se identifica la máxima posibilidad de reciclado de flujo de residuales al proceso. Se modela matemáticamente el problema y se obtienen como respuesta el mínimo consumo de agua fresca, el caudal máximo de residual vertido, la masa de fibra en suspensión que puede ser recuperada y la cantidad de contaminante a ser removida en el proceso. Se concluye que el modelo utilizado, es una herramienta sistemática, potente y genérica y puede ser utilizada en cualquier proceso de reducción de residuosThis work proposes a novel non-linear programming model that solves the problem of minimizing fresh water consumption in the paper manufacturing process, as well as reducing waste release. The degree of pollution of the flows to be recycled and the maximum contaminant composition treatable by different equipment units are determined; on the basis of this data, the maximum amount of recycleable residual flow is determined. The problem is modeled mathematically, determining the minimum consumption of fresh water, the maximum flow of waste water, the mass of fiber in suspension which can be recuperated, and the amount of pollutant to be removed in the process. It is concluded that the model used is a powerful generic systematic tool which can be used in any process for the reduction of residues

  9. Water Recycling in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and, more importantly, experiences the most variable rainfall of all the continents on our planet. The vast majority of Australians live in large cities on the coast. Because wastewater treatments plants were all located near the coast, it was thought that large scale recycling would be problematic given the cost of infrastructure and pumping required to establish recycled water schemes. This all changed when Australia experienced a decade of record low rainfall and water utilities were given aggressive targets to increase the volume of water recycled. This resulted in recycled water being accepted as a legitimate source of water for non-drinking purposes in a diversified portfolio of water sources to mitigate climate risk. To ensure community support for recycled water, Australia lead the world in developing national guidelines for the various uses of recycled water to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. Australia now provides a great case study of the developments in maximizing water recycling opportunities from policy, regulatory and technological perspectives. This paper explores the evolution in thinking and how approaches to wastewater reuse has changed over the past 40 years from an effluent disposal issue to one of recognizing wastewater as a legitimate and valuable resource. Despite recycled water being a popular choice and being broadly embraced, the concept of indirect potable reuse schemes have lacked community and political support across Australia to date.

  10. What do we know about metal recycling rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T.E.; Allwood, J.; Birat, J.-P.; Buchert, M.; Hageluken, C.; Reck, B.K.; Sibley, S.F.; Sonnemann, G.

    2011-01-01

    The recycling of metals is widely viewed as a fruitful sustainability strategy, but little information is available on the degree to which recycling is actually taking place. This article provides an overview on the current knowledge of recycling rates for 60 metals. We propose various recycling metrics, discuss relevant aspects of recycling processes, and present current estimates on global end-of-life recycling rates (EOL-RR; i.e., the percentage of a metal in discards that is actually recycled), recycled content (RC), and old scrap ratios (OSRs; i.e., the share of old scrap in the total scrap flow). Because of increases in metal use over time and long metal in-use lifetimes, many RC values are low and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Because of relatively low efficiencies in the collection and processing of most discarded products, inherent limitations in recycling processes, and the fact that primary material is often relatively abundant and low-cost (which thereby keeps down the price of scrap), many EOL-RRs are very low: Only for 18 metals (silver, aluminum, gold, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, niobium, nickel, lead, palladium, platinum, rhenium, rhodium, tin, titanium, and zinc) is the EOL-RR above 50% at present. Only for niobium, lead, and ruthenium is the RC above 50%, although 16 metals are in the 25% to 50% range. Thirteen metals have an OSR greater than 50%. These estimates may be used in considerations of whether recycling efficiencies can be improved; which metric could best encourage improved effectiveness in recycling; and an improved understanding of the dependence of recycling on economics, technology, and other factors. ?? 2011 by Yale University.

  11. Co-melting technology in resource recycling of sludge derived from stone processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Shen-Chih; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2012-12-01

    Stone processing sludge (SPS) is a by-product of stone-processing wastewater treatment; it is suitable for use as a raw material for making artificial lightweight aggregates (ALWAs). In this study, boric acid was utilized as a flux to lower sintering temperature. The formation of the viscous glassy phase was observed by DTA curve and changes in XRD patterns. Experiments were conducted to find the optimal combination of sintering temperature, sintering time, and boric acid dosage to produce an ALWA of favorable characteristics in terms of water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, compressive strength and weight loss to satisfy Taiwan's regulatory requirements for construction and insulation materials. Optimal results gave a sintering temperature of 850 degrees C for 15 min at a boric acid dosage of 15% by weight of SPS. Results for ALWA favorable characteristics were: 0.21% (water absorption), 0.35% (apparent porosity), 1.67 g/cm3 (bulk density), 66.94 MPa (compressive strength), and less than 0.1% (weight loss). PMID:23362764

  12. Recycling and Activity Recovery of Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquid as Catalyst for Alkylation of Benzene with 1-Dodecene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔聪震; 李成岳

    2006-01-01

    Performances of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium aluminium chloride ([BMIM]Cl-AlCl3) ionic liquid as catalyst for the alkylation of benzene with long chain olefins were investigated in a continuous operation mode. A small pilot plant with continuous mixing-reacting-separating-recycling functions, equipped with a static mixer reactor, a tube packed with metal Al thread and a combined liquid-liquid settling phase separator, was introduced as an alternative. The results showed that the continuous fast mixing and separation of ionic liquid catalyst from reactant mixture could be synchronously accomplished within a wider flow rate ratio range of the recycling reaction mixture to the ionic liquid catalyst. The recycling of chloroaluminate ionic liquid was realized. ICP-AES detection results of Al content in the reactants proves that in-situ Al compensation to the reaction system may be an important choice to prolong the stable running time of moisture-sensitive ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl-AlCl3 when feedstock inevitably contains trace water. It suggests that the activity of chloroaluminate ionic liquid is recovered under the in-situ Al compensation operation.

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process APPE supercycle CP used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2014-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process APPE Supercycle CP (EU register No RECYC066). The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded under v...

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “RPET Nosinyec”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2012-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process RPET Nosinyec, EC register number RECYC082. The input of the process is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 5% of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried flakes are extruded into pellets, pre-crystallised then pre-crysta...

  15. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “Cumapol”, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process Cumapol, EC register number RECYC085. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET articles mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded under vacuum and p...

  16. EFFECT OF RECYCLE TIRE ISOLATOR AS EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE SYSTEM FOR LOW RISE BUILDINGS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOW WEI JIE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of Recycle Tire Isolator (RTI as earthquake resistance system for low rise buildings in Malaysia. Most of the earthquake’s victims are due to the collapse of poorly designed concrete and masonry buildings. Therefore, an economical but reliable RTI is introduced to solve the problem in most of the developing countries such as Malaysia. This study focuses on the effect of RTI-5 (5 layers RTI in protecting three stories buildings. The vertical displacement of RTI-5 was determined through static compression test. The maximum vertical displacement of RTI-5 was obtained when the specimen was monotonically loaded to failure. Finite element analysis was carried out by using ANSYS V16.0 to model the RTI-5 and the results obtained were compared to the experimental results. The dynamic stiffness and damping ratio of RTI-5 were investigated through dynamic test. The behaviour of various thickness of RTI were examined and compared with Rubber Bearing (RB and Scrap Tire Rubber Pad (STRP.Total displacement of three stories buildings on fixed base and on base isolation were determined. The results from static compression test and finite element analysis showed that RTI-5 could sustain a vertical load of 380 kN with vertical deformation of 12.5 mm. It has been verified by finite element analysis (FEA where both of the results achieved close agreement in terms of vertical deformation. RTI-5 and STRP have similar vertical stiffness due to the employment of same material in fabrication. However, rubber bearing is stiffer than RTI-5 due to the present of embedded steel plates. Besides, RTI-4 is stiffer than RTI-5 due to the number of layers are lesser in RTI-4. The results of dynamic test shown that RTI-5 has higher damping ratio than RTI-4. In overall, total deformation at the top floor of the three stories building is reduced by 83% via implementation of RTI in the base of the building. It has been proven

  17. Key technologies of layout design of recycling plants of waste refrigerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yi; LIU Zhi-feng; WANG Shu-wang; QI Yun-hui

    2005-01-01

    The present situations of waste refrigerators recycling and disposing were analyzed. Three key technologies of layout design of recycling plants of waste refrigerators were presented as follows: 1) establishment of recycling process of waste refrigerators; 2) the general plane layout of recycling plants; 3) the detailed layout of workshops of recycling plants. The focus of the three key technologies is to tackle the problem of the detailed layout ofworkshops of the recycling plants. By adopting Petri net, the model of logistics system of workshops was established and then optimized, and finally the detailed layout chart of recycling plants was gained. By adopting E-factory, the recycling plants were simulated. The results show that the method mentioned is effective.

  18. Pictet-Spengler condensation reactions catalyzed by a recyclable H~+-montmorillonite as a heterogeneous BrΦnsted acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic performance of different cation-exchanged montmorillonite clays has been investigated in the Pictet-Spengler C-C bond forming reaction.H+-Montmorillonite was found to be a very efficient and reusable catalyst for the endo cyclization of β-phenylethylamine derivatives with aldehydes under solvent-free conditions.In addition,an aqueous condensation version for the synthesis of tetrahydro-β-carbolines using the H+-montmorillonite catalyst has been developed.In these environmentally friendly processes,the use of organic solvents was avoided and the catalyst was recycled with maintenance of high catalytic activity.

  19. Sustainable Concrete with Recycled Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P

    2012-01-01

    Concretes produced with recycled aggregates are the subject of several papers recently published in the technical literature. Substitution of natural aggregates can be one of possibilities to take care of landfills and increase of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere in Latvia. Recycled aggregate is a valuable resource; value-added consumption of recycled aggregate, as replacement for virgin aggregate in concrete, can yield significant energy and environmental benefits. In present study recycled...

  20. Study on closed recycling regeneration process of FeCl3 waste etching solution and recovery of Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X. F.; Zhou, X. T.; Wang, R. X.; Zhai, D. H.; Ran, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    FeCl3 etching solution is widely used in etching processes due to its strong oxidation and corrosion properties. However, significant amounts of waste etching solution is produced, which pollutes the environment and wastes materials. Aiming to address problems related to the use of recycled FeCl3 waste etching solution containing Cu, the crystallization regeneration process in an enterprise was improved and the copper element was recovered in the form of copper chloride crystal. Based on the original process, a hydrocyclone was added to preseparate the slurry. By investigating the change of the inlet flow rate and separation efficiency of the hydrocyclone with inlet pressure under different concentrations, the optimal inlet pressure was determined to be approximately 0.25Mpa. Experimental results indicated that the workload of the centrifuge was reduced by approximately 80%, the average specific surface area of the copper chloride crystal was decreased by 50%, the production of copper chloride crystal byproducts after washing process was increased by approximately 20% and regeneration of FeCl3 waste etching solution was also realized.

  1. Ferlins Show Tissue-Specific Expression and Segregate as Plasma Membrane/Late Endosomal or Trans-Golgi/Recycling Ferlins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redpath, Gregory M I; Sophocleous, Reece A; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-03-01

    Ferlins are a family of transmembrane-anchored vesicle fusion proteins uniquely characterized by 5-7 tandem cytoplasmic C2 domains, Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding domains that regulate vesicle fusion in the synaptotagmin family. In humans, dysferlin mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) due to defective Ca(2+)-dependent, vesicle-mediated membrane repair and otoferlin mutations cause non-syndromic deafness due to defective Ca(2+)-triggered auditory neurotransmission. In this study, we describe the tissue-specific expression, subcellular localization and endocytic trafficking of the ferlin family. Studies of endosomal transit together with 3D-structured illumination microscopy reveals dysferlin and myoferlin are abundantly expressed at the PM and cycle to Rab7-positive late endosomes, supporting potential roles in the late-endosomal pathway. In contrast, Fer1L6 shows concentrated localization to a specific compartment of the trans-Golgi/recycling endosome, cycling rapidly between this compartment and the PM via Rab11 recycling endosomes. Otoferlin also shows trans-Golgi to PM cycling, with very low levels of PM otoferlin suggesting either brief PM residence, or rare incorporation of otoferlin molecules into the PM. Thus, type-I and type-II ferlins segregate as PM/late-endosomal or trans-Golgi/recycling ferlins, consistent with different ferlins mediating vesicle fusion events in specific subcellular locations.

  2. A hybrid froth flotation-filtration system as a pretreatment for oil sands tailings pond recycle water management: Bench- and pilot-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Kavithaa; Bromley, David; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-09-15

    Through sustainable water management, oil sands companies are working to reduce their reliance on fresh water by minimizing the amount of water required for their operations and by recycling water from tailings ponds. This study was the first pilot-scale testing of a hybrid technology consisting of froth flotation combined with filtration through precoated submerged stainless steel membranes used to treat recycle water from an oil sands facility. The results indicated that the most important factor affecting the performance of the hybrid system was the influent water quality. Any rise in the levels of suspended solids or total organic carbon of the feed water resulted in changes of chemical consumption rates, flux rates, and operating cycle durations. The selections of chemical type and dosing rates were critical in achieving optimal performance. In particular, the froth application rate heavily affected the overall recovery of the hybrid system as well as the performance of the flotation process. Optimum surfactant usage to generate froth (per liter of treated water) was 0.25 mL/L at approximately 2000 NTU of influent turbidity and 0.015 mL/L at approximately 200 NTU of influent turbidity. At the tested conditions, the optimal coagulant dose was 80 mg/L (as Al) at approximately 2000 NTU of influent turbidity and <40 mg/L (as Al) at approximately 200 NTU of influent turbidity. Precoat loading per unit membrane surface area tested during the pilot study was approximately 30 g/m(2). The results of this study indicated that this hybrid technology can potentially be considered as a pre-treatment step for reverse osmosis treatment of recycle water. PMID:26164269

  3. Recycling of solid wastes in Mexico City in livestock and agricultural production systems as a sustainable alternative

    OpenAIRE

    H. Losada; Cortes, J; Rivera, J.; Vargas, J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of solid organic wastes (manure and  fruit and vegetable refusals) as a way to recycle rubbish from peri-urban areas for the production of crops for local consumption, has been designated by some researchers as an alternate method to partially reduce city waste disposal problems as well as to generate employment and promote the consumption of local products. This model production has also been suggested as a closed system ideally suited for urban environments in order to reduce the us...

  4. Temperature Control in the Process of Hot In- place Recycling Construction%就地热再生施工过程中的温度控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹武安

    2012-01-01

    从热再生现场外界环境温度、加热温度、再生剂温度、新料温度及碾压温度五个方面,对就地热再生施工过程中现场温度控制要点进行阐述。。%In situ temperature control points in the process of hot in - place recycling construction are elabora- ted from five aspects of external environment temperature, heating temperature, temperature of regenerating agent, temperature of new material and roiling temperature of hot recycling site.

  5. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  6. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  7. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water.

  8. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water. PMID:25898079

  9. Fabrication of porous ceramic via recycling of glass with paper fiber as sacrificial fugitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarulzaman, N. A.; Hamidon, A.; Nor, M. A. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Recycled glass powder was added with ball clay and feldspar using ratio 90:5:5. The blend were mixed into different amount of paper fiber and cast into porous ceramic. Samples prepared with different compositions (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt % of paper fiber) were heat treated at constant temperature (750 °C) for an hour. Samples with high percentage of paper fiber gave the largest pore size in the ceramic body, meanwhile lower percentage of paper fiber produced ceramic body with smaller pore size.

  10. Nutrient recycling from biodigestion waste as synthetic fertilizer substitutes: a field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Vaneeckhaute, Céline; Meers, Erik; Ghekiere, Greet; ACCOE Frederik; Michels, Evi; Tack, Filip

    2012-01-01

    In the transition from a fossil to a bio-based economy, it has become an important challenge to maximally recycle valuable nutrients that currently end up in waste streams. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using bio-digestion waste derivatives instead of synthetic fertilizers and/or animal manure on soil and crop production. In a field trial, nutrient balances were assessed and the physico-chemical soil fertility and quality were evaluated. The biogas yield of the harvested...

  11. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process "MKF-Ergis", used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2014-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process MKF-Ergis, EU register number RECYC021. The input for the process (step 1) is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 1 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. The washed and dried flakes are crystallised (step 2) and then extruded at high temperature under ...

  12. Pre-treatment of ligno-cellulose with biological acid recycling (the Biosulfurol process)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, van J.W.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Bakker, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    A biomass pretreatment process is being developed based on contacting ligno-cellulosic biomass with 70% sulphuric acid and subsequent hydrolysis by adding water. In this process, the hydrolysate can be fermented yielding ethanol, while the sulphuric acid is partly recovered by anion-selective membra

  13. Cutting-tool recycling process with the zinc-melt method for obtaining thermal-spray feedstock powder (WC-Co): Postopek recikliranja orodij za rezanje z metodo taljenja v Zn za pridobivanje prahu WC-Co za termično nabrizgavanje:

    OpenAIRE

    Altuncu, Ekrem; Erdogan, Garip; Ozturk, Savas; Turk, Ahmet; Ustel, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Various recycling processes for WC-Co cermets from cutting tools, such as chemical modification, thermal modification, the cold-stream method and the electrochemical method have been investigated and some of them are actually employed in industry. However, these conventional methods have many problems to be solved and they are not always established technologies. Therefore, a more economical and high-efficiency recycling procedure needs to be developed. In this study we investigated the appli...

  14. The importance of recycling - Responsible recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    7 times the total emissions from Sweden are saved each year by the recycling industry. It reduces CO2 emissions and saves the environment. In fact it annually reduces global CO2 emissions by 500 million tons, which is more than what is being emitted by the world wide aviation industry. Recycling of iron and steel saves 74% energy and reduces water and air pollution by respectively 76% and 86%, compared to primary production. It provides new raw materials and contributes to save energy. There's no sense in producing goods in a permanent material like plastics, that's supposed to be used only once. It's a huge waste of resources. Today the recycling industry provides half of the world's raw materials and this figure is set to increase. It's about environmentally sound management of resources. It's about plain common sense. There has to be a political willingness to facilitate recycling in every way. And from a corporate perspective social responsibility is becoming an increasingly important competitive edge. This is also a communication issue, it has to be a fact that is well known to the market when a company is doing valuable environmental work. We also need a well functioning global market with easy to understand regulations to facilitate global trade. The global demand for recycled materials should influence their collection and use. Fraud and theft has also to be kept at bay which calls for a close collaboration between organizations such as The International Chamber of Commerce, The International Trade Council and the International Maritime Bureau of the commercial crime services. Increasing recycling is the only way to go if we want to minimize our effect on the environment. We have to remember that recycling is essential for the environment. An increase would be a tremendous help to reduce the green house effect. Increasing recycling is not rocket science. We know how to do it, we just have to decide to go through with it

  15. Noble metal recycling. Project 2: Optimization of discontinuous thermal processes (emission reduction). Final report; Edelmetallrecycling. Teilvorhaben 2: Weiterentwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik bei diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozessen (Emissionsminderung). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, G.; Berger, R.

    2000-10-01

    A batch operated incineration process, used for the recycling of precious metals is described in the report. The development of a new combined pyrolysis/oxidation Process is the main focus of the work. This new process has several remarkable advantages compared to traditionally used techniques. The optimisation of the process with a modern fuzzy based control technique is described in detail. The emissions of the process were reduced considerably applying the new process and the innovative control technique. Furthermore the layout of several components of the new process can be reduced in the future. The developed techniques can also be applied in other thermal processes, especially batch processes. Additionally the application of catalysts for PCDD/PCDF reduction in the flue gas upstream and downstream of the filter was investigated. Whereas the catalyst performed well, as expected, downstream of the filter, no acceptable operation was possible upstream of the filter. As the reheating downstream the filter is economically not feasible the application of catalysts is not applicable for the describe process. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit beschreibt einen diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozess, der zur Rueckgewinnung von Edelmetallen eingesetzt wird. Der Schwerpunkt der Arbeit liegt auf der Entwicklung eines neuartigen kombinierten Pyrolyse/Oxidations-Prozesses, der gegenueber den traditionell eingesetzten Anlagen grosse Vorteile aufweist. Die Optimierung dieses Prozesses mit Hilfe modernster Fuzzy-Regelungstechnik wird detailliert beschrieben. Mit dem neuen Verfahren und den innovativen Regelungstechniken konnten die Emissionen des Prozesses merklich gesenkt werden, ohne den Energiebedarf negativ zu beeinflussen. Ausserdem koennen zukuenftige Anlagen kleiner ausgelegt werden. Die entwickelten Verfahren koennen auch auf andere thermische Prozesse uebertragen werden. Weiterhin wurde der Einsatz von Katalysatoren zur PCDD/PCDF-Minderung im Rein- und Rohgas untersucht

  16. Process evaluation of use of high temperature gas-cooled reactors to an ironmaking system based on active carbon recycling energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing coking coal consumption and CO2 emissions by application of iACRES (ironmaking system based on active carbon recycling energy system) was investigated using process flow modeling to show effectiveness of HTGRs (high temperature gas-cooled reactors) adoption to iACRES. Two systems were evaluated: a SOEC (solid oxide electrolysis cell) system using CO2 electrolysis and a RWGS (reverse water-gas shift reaction) system using RWGS reaction with H2 produced by iodine-sulfur process. Both reduction of the coking coal consumption and CO2 emissions were greater in the RWGS system than those in the SOEC system. It was the reason of the result that excess H2 not consumed in the RWGS reaction was used as reducing agent in the blast furnace as well as CO. Heat balance in the HTGR, SOEC and RWGS modules were evaluated to clarify process components to be improved. Optimization of the SOEC temperature was desired to reduce Joule heat input for high efficiency operation of the SOEC system. Higher H2 production thermal efficiency in the IS process for the RWGS system is effective for more efficient HTGR heat utilization. The SOEC system was able to utilize HTGR heat to reduce CO2 emissions more efficiently by comparing CO2 emissions reduction per unit heat of the HTGR. (author)

  17. The Essence of a Recycling Economy:Circular Utilization of Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Demin

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the relationship between a recycling economy and sustainable development theory, this article puts forward the basic concept of a recycling economy as a dynamic economic operational model, and explains the four basic characteristics. It is stressed that the essential element of a recycling economy is the use of resources circularly.In the end, this article analyzes the phenomena of utilizing the recycling economy concept incorrectly,and sets forth a number of problems that should be noted during the process of developing a recycling economy in China.

  18. Recycling of actinides produced in LWR and FBR fuel cycles by applying pyrometallurgical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated pyrometallurgical technology will be applied on the fuel reprocessing of oxide and metal fuels and on the recovery of transuranium elements. The main processes consisted of electrorefining, reductive extraction and waste treatment. The oxides will be reduced to metals by using reductant agent prior to the application of electrorefining. The high level liquid waste coming from purex type of reprocessing of LWR fuels can be also treated in order to separate transuranium elements at the reduction extraction process. The salt waste treatment was evaluated on the methods of direct solidification by artificial rock and vitrification after electrolysis. The process flow was proposed based on the experimental results for the partitioning of transuranium elements from high level liquid waste. (author)

  19. Research on the New Process and Mechanism of Resource Recycling for Leaded Glass From Discarded CRT%废CRT含铅玻璃的资源化新工艺及机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新; 王鹏程; 胡彪; 刘阳; 韩文生; 万超

    2014-01-01

    本文提出了废CRT含铅玻璃资源化的新工艺,并对其工艺中的水玻璃熔块制备、水解、渣液分离、水溶液除铅等关键技术进行了机理分析,以实现废CRT含铅玻璃的高值资源化综合利用,具有显著的环境和经济效益。%This paper represents the new resource recycling process of waste Cathode Ray TubeLeaded glass. Mechanism analysis of key technologies is conducted, such as sodium silicate frit preparation, hydrolysis, slag liquid separation, lead removal from aqueous solution, and etc.. This new process can achieve high-value resource recycling comprehensive utilization for leaded glass from discarded CRT, and it has significant environmental and economic benefits.

  20. The Fernald Waste Recycling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motl, G.P.

    1993-10-26

    Recycling is considered a critical component of the waste disposition strategy at the Fernald Plant. It is estimated that 33 million cubic feet of waste will be generated during the Fernald cleanup. Recycling some portion of this waste will not only conserve natural resources and disposal volume but will, even more significantly, support the preservation of existing disposition options such as off-site disposal or on-site storage. Recognizing the strategic implications of recycling, this paper outlines the criteria used at Fernald to make recycle decisions and highlights several of Fernald`s current recycling initiatives.

  1. Testicular membrane lipid damage by complex mixture of leachate from municipal battery recycling site as indication of idiopathic male infertility in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, Jacob K; Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A

    2013-12-01

    Leachate from a municipal battery recycling site is a potent source of mixed-metal released into the environment. The present study investigated the degree at which mixed-metal exposure to the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) and to the Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site leachate (EOMABRL) affected the lipid membrane of the testes in in vitro experiment. The results showed elevated level of mixed-metals over the permissible levels in drinking water, as recommended by regulatory authorities. In the leachate samples, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a biomarker of lipid damage, was significantly (pmunicipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) was significantly (pmunicipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRL). The testicular lipid membrane capacity was compromised following treatment with leachate from the municipal battery recycling site, implicating mixed-metal exposure as the causative agent of testicular damage and male infertility.

  2. The Compressor Recycle System

    OpenAIRE

    Barstad, Bjørn Ove

    2010-01-01

    The compressor recycle system is the main focus of this thesis. When the mass flow through a compressor becomes too low, the compressor can plunge into surge. Surge is a term that is used for axisymmetric oscillation through a compressor and is highly unwanted. The recycle system feeds compressed gas back to the intake when the mass flow becomes too low, and thereby act as a safety system.A mathematical model of the recycle system is extended and simulated in SIMULINK. The mathematical model ...

  3. Vegetable fibres from agricultural residues as thermo-mechanical reinforcement in recycled polypropylene-based green foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardanuy, Mònica; Antunes, Marcelo; Velasco, José Ignacio

    2012-02-01

    Novel lightweight composite foams based on recycled polypropylene reinforced with cellulosic fibres obtained from agricultural residues were prepared and characterized. These composites, initially prepared by melt-mixing recycled polypropylene with variable fibre concentrations (10-25 wt.%), were foamed by high-pressure CO(2) dissolution, a clean process which avoids the use of chemical blowing agents. With the aim of studying the influence of the fibre characteristics on the resultant foams, two chemical treatments were applied to the barley straw in order to increase the α-cellulose content of the fibres. The chemical composition, morphology and thermal stability of the fibres and composites were analyzed. Results indicate that fibre chemical treatment and later foaming of the composites resulted in foams with characteristic closed-cell microcellular structures, their specific storage modulus significantly increasing due to the higher stiffness of the fibres. The addition of the fibres also resulted in an increase in the glass transition temperature of PP in both the solid composites and more significantly in the foams.

  4. Synthesis of Fe3O4/Pt Nanoparticles Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Their Use as Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongkun He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a facile approach to prepare Fe3O4/Pt nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with average size of 4∼5 nm were loaded on the surfaces of carboxyl groups functionalized CNTs via a high-temperature solution-phase hydrolysis method from the raw material of FeCl3. The synthesis process of magnetic CNTs is green and readily scalable. The loading amounts of Fe3O4 nanopartilces and the magnetizations of the resulting magnetic CNTs show good tunability. The Pt nanopaticles with average size of 2.5 nm were deposited on the magnetic CNTs through a solution-based method. It is demonstrated that the Fe3O4/Pt nanoparticles decorated CNTs have high catalytic activity in the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol and can be readily recycled by a magnet and reused in the next reactions with high efficiencies for at least fifteen successive cycles. The novel CNTs-supported magnetically recyclable catalysts are promising in heterogeneous catalysis applications.

  5. Leaching behavior of several zinc rich residues in a hydrometallurgical recycling process

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrosa, Fátima; Cabral, Marta; Nogueira, C. A.; Margarido, F.

    2009-01-01

    The leaching of metals contained in spent Zn-MnO2 batteries and electric arc furnace (EAF) dusts using sulfuric acid solutions was studied, in order to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous treatment of both wastes by a hydrometallurgical process. In both residues, a substantial quantity of zinc was solubilized (about 100% in batteries and 70-80% in EAF dusts) in diluted acid solutions and room temperature, corresponding to the reaction of zinc oxide species. Other species were more refrac...

  6. Silica-Bonded N-Propyl Diethylenetriamine Sulfamic Acid as a Recyclable Solid Acid Catalyst for the Synthesis of α-Aminonitriles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahere RAHI; Mojtaba BAGHERNEJAD; Khodabakhsh NIKNAM

    2012-01-01

    Silica-bonded N-propyl diethylenetriamine sulfamic acid (SBPDSA) is employed as a recyclable catalyst to synthesize α-aminonitriles.These syntheses involved one-pot condensation of an aldehyde,an amine,and trimethylsilyl cyanide under mild reaction conditions at room temperature.SBPDSA was recycled seven times in the condensation of benzaldehyde,aniline,and trimethylsilyl cyanide without reduction of its catalytic activity.

  7. Organization as Process of Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Vasquez, Consuelo; Cornelissen, Joep

    of a metonymy is Morgan’s image of ‘organization as flux and transformation’ – an idea that has inspired a larger body of research that is known today asprocess organization studies”. In this paper we suggest to draw on the neighboring metonymic image ‘organization as communication’ which not only presents...... or metonymies. Unlike metaphors, which involve a horizontal comparison between two concepts or terms from domains that are – at least initially – seen as distant from one another, metonymies rely upon a vertical exchange between a whole and its parts within the same domain of language use. One prominent example...

  8. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub-bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3. Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate.

    Siete áridos reciclados de residuos de construcción y demolición (RCD se han evaluado como zahorras para la construcción de sub-bases de carreteras. Los resultados muestran que los áridos reciclados de hormigón cumplen todas las especificaciones del Pliego de Prescripciones Técnicas Generales para Obras de Carreteras de España (PG-3 para su uso en capas estructurales (sub-base de las categorías de tráfico T3 y T4. Algunos áridos reciclados mixtos no cumplen por escaso margen algunas de las especificaciones, debido a un alto contenido de compuestos de azufre y a una menor resistencia a la fragmentación. El precribado de la fracción fina antes de la trituración de los RCD mixtos reduce el contenido de azufre total y mejora la calidad, por el contrario, el precribado de los RCD de hormigón no tiene ningún efecto sobre la calidad de los áridos reciclados. Los resultados se compararon con una zahorra artificial caliza como árido natural.

  9. The solid municipal waste recycling as the origin of the renewable source

    OpenAIRE

    Trajkova, Sofce; Krstev, Boris; Lazarov, Aleksandar; Krstev, Aleksandar; Golomeov, Blagoj; Golomeova, Mirjana; Danevski, Tome

    2012-01-01

    In the last two to three decades technological processes has been reported and increasing of the municipality waste with the amounts. The current state of treatment of municipility waste can qualify as irregular and untotal. To overcome this unacceptable situation, in this paper modern approach for effectively managing and reducing of the solid textile waste is presented.

  10. Recycling glass packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Delia DOMNICA; Leila BARDAªUC

    2015-01-01

    From the specialized literature it follows that glass packaging is not as used as other packages, but in some industries are highly needed. Following, two features of glass packaging will become important until 2017: the shape of the glass packaging and glass recycling prospects in Romania. The recycling of glass is referred to the fact that it saves energy, but also to be in compliance with the provisions indicating the allowable limit values for the quantities of lead and cadmium.

  11. Continuous high-temperature recycling of waste by the Thermoselect process; Unterbrechungsloses Hochtemperaturrecycling - Abfallveredelung durch Thermoselect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlberg, R. [Thermoselect Engineering S.r.l., Verbania (Italy)

    1998-09-01

    Based on the experience with the Thermoselect plant at Fondotoce, Italy (100 Mg/d), which was commissioned in 1992, a 225,000 Mg/a plant with three units (720 Mg/d) is being constructed at Karlsruhe, Germany. The plant is scheduled for commissioning in 1998. The contribution presents the product balance, the approved emission levels, and the energy uses envisaged for the Karlsruhe project. Final product quality data and energy yields illustrate the differences from conventional thermal processes. An ecobalance comparing the Thermoselect process with grate furnaces shows that water, soil and air pollution is much reduced by the new Termoselect process. Apart from high product quality, the plant also has the advantage of reduced dumping cost and no long-term ecological hazards. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Auf Basis der grosstechnischen Erfahrung mit einer seit 1992 in Fondotoce (Italien) betriebenen THERMOSELECT-Anlage (Kapazitaet 100 Mg/d), Restmuell umweltgerecht zu behandeln, wird 1998 der Aufbau einer 225.000 Mg/a-Anlage mit 3 Linien (720 Mg/d) in Karlsruhe (Deutschland) abgeschlossen. Die Produktebilanz und die genehmigten Emissionswerte sind in dem Artikel belegt. Gezeigt wird die fuer das Projekt Karlsruhe vorgesehene Energienutzung. Die Endprodduktqualitaeten und die Energieausbeute verdeutlichen die Unterschiede zu bisherigen konventionellen thermischen Verfahren. Eine erarbeitete Oekobilanz mit einem Vergleich von THERMOSELECT und Rostfeuerung zeigt die deutlich geringe Belastung der Umweltkompartimente Wasser, Boden und Luft durch das neue THERMOSELECT-Verfahren. Neben hohen Produktqualitaeten wird - verglichen mit traditionellen Techniken - ein deutlich verringerter Entsorgungspreis erreicht, wobei gleichzeitig oekologische Belastungen auszuschliessen sind. (orig./SR)

  12. Corrosion mechanisms downstream the nuclear cycle: from processing-recycling to transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author gives a detailed overview of his scientific and research activities in the field of material behaviour in environments met during the downstream part of the nuclear cycle. In the first part, he presents his works on material corrosion in concentrated and high temperature nitric acid, and more particularly on the phenomenon which governs this corrosion: the nitric acid reduction mechanism. In the second part, he reports researches performed within the frame of hybrid reactor development for the processing of future fuels. In both parts, he also discusses the perspectives for new researches and developments

  13. Recycling of nonmetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, E.B.; Kelly, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “MOPET-FLAKE” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process MOPET-FLAKE (EU register number RECYC038. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are being crystallised and solid state polymerised in a batch reactor. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the crystallisation and solid state polymerisation (step 2 is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are the temperature, the residence time, the pressure and the inert gas flow. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from this process intended to be used up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern. The trays made of the recycled PET are not intended to be used and should not be used either in microwave or in conventional oven.

  15. Sustainable efficient way for opioid peptide LVV-h7 preparation from enzymatic proteolysis in a microfluidic-based reaction-extraction process with solvent recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagli, Adil; Belhacene, Kalim; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Renato

    2016-05-01

    LVV-h7 (LVVYPWTQFR) is a bioactive peptide that can be obtained from blood as waste of food industry, more precisely from hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin. This opioid peptide belongs to the hemorphins family and have strong physiological effects that bring its use in pharmaceutics and various therapeutic treatments attractive, in particular for substituting its costly chemically synthetized analogous. Hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin generates a huge variety of peptides among whose LVV-h7 can be purified by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Herein, selective preparation of this peptide is proposed by a microfluidic-based continuous reaction-separation process. Hemoglobin hydrolysis in microreactor was firstly coupled to LVV-h7 LLE in octan-1-ol and then coupled to LVV-h7 back LLE in acidic water. This continuous process allowed to prepare pure LVV-h7, as confirmed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The microfluidic circuit also allowed octan-1-ol recycling in a closed loop, making this method more sustainable than similar biphasic batch process. PMID:26998857

  16. Concept of the plant for the BN-800 fast reactor fuel recycling with application of pyro-process and vibro-packing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Demidova, L.S.; Kormilitzyna, L.A.; Ishunin, V.S

    2000-07-01

    The conception of Plant was developed for MOX-fuel recycle at two BN-800 type fast reactors by pyrochemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF) and production of vibro-pac fuel pins and SA. INF production process and stages of pyrochemical reprocessing were analyzed. Starting materials were chosen. Characteristics of irradiated SA and requirements for finished products were defined. Volumes of production were estimated. Procedure of waste management was defined. The following description was made: (1) general flow sheet of fuel recycling and partial schemes of single reprocessing; (2) composition of production process equipment; (3) arrangement of production process equipment; (4) lay out of Plant building and engineering communications. Principle economical assessments were made for production under design. (authors)

  17. Using economic benefits for recycling in a separate collection centre managed as a "reverse supermarket": a sociological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Polito, Anna Rita

    2015-04-01

    Separate collection centres (SCCs), where citizens can deliver recyclable fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW), in an "urban mining" perspective, can be considered a sort of "reverse supermarket", where people can deliver their recyclables in order to either obtain a waste fee reduction or shopping vouchers. The latter is the case of Baronissi, a town of around 17,000 inhabitants in the Province of Salerno, in the Campania region of Italy. The principal aim of the study was to investigate by means of a sociological survey the relationship between citizens and the separate collection program, with particular emphasis on the role played by the SCC. The separate collection system was evaluated either good or very good by 95.8% of the sample, while 99.2% expressed a good or very good evaluation of the quality of the service inside the separate collection centre: SCC users acted as a community as highlighted by the negative response of the Chi-square test for independence. Respecting the environment prevailed over saving time, obtaining eco-points, or saving money as the main reason why people went to the SCC. The majority of the respondents agreed if only putrescibles and residue should be collected directly from their homes, while all the other materials should be collected exclusively at the SCC, allowing to save money for the management of the kerbside collection system with a consequent further waste fee reduction for the residents.

  18. Using economic benefits for recycling in a separate collection centre managed as a "reverse supermarket": a sociological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Polito, Anna Rita

    2015-04-01

    Separate collection centres (SCCs), where citizens can deliver recyclable fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW), in an "urban mining" perspective, can be considered a sort of "reverse supermarket", where people can deliver their recyclables in order to either obtain a waste fee reduction or shopping vouchers. The latter is the case of Baronissi, a town of around 17,000 inhabitants in the Province of Salerno, in the Campania region of Italy. The principal aim of the study was to investigate by means of a sociological survey the relationship between citizens and the separate collection program, with particular emphasis on the role played by the SCC. The separate collection system was evaluated either good or very good by 95.8% of the sample, while 99.2% expressed a good or very good evaluation of the quality of the service inside the separate collection centre: SCC users acted as a community as highlighted by the negative response of the Chi-square test for independence. Respecting the environment prevailed over saving time, obtaining eco-points, or saving money as the main reason why people went to the SCC. The majority of the respondents agreed if only putrescibles and residue should be collected directly from their homes, while all the other materials should be collected exclusively at the SCC, allowing to save money for the management of the kerbside collection system with a consequent further waste fee reduction for the residents. PMID:25681946

  19. Resrad-recycle: a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing radioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kassas, Bassel; Yu, Charley; Amish, John; LePoire, Dave; Chen, Shih-Yew; Williams, W A; Wallo, A; Peterson, H

    2004-11-01

    RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

  20. Planning as an Iterative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Activity planning for missions such as the Mars Exploration Rover mission presents many technical challenges, including oversubscription, consideration of time, concurrency, resources, preferences, and uncertainty. These challenges have all been addressed by the research community to varying degrees, but significant technical hurdles still remain. In addition, the integration of these capabilities into a single planning engine remains largely unaddressed. However, I argue that there is a deeper set of issues that needs to be considered namely the integration of planning into an iterative process that begins before the goals, objectives, and preferences are fully defined. This introduces a number of technical challenges for planning, including the ability to more naturally specify and utilize constraints on the planning process, the ability to generate multiple qualitatively different plans, and the ability to provide deep explanation of plans.

  1. EVALUATION AND APPLICATION OF THE INVASIVE WEED MIKANIA MICRANTHA AS AN ALTERNATIVE REINFORCEMENT IN RECYCLED HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Long Chen,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study Mikania micrantha particle (MP and fiber (MF were added to recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE for producing natural fiber (or particle reinforced plastic composites (NFRPC by the flat-platen pressing process. The results showed that the flexural strength and stiffness of NFRPC were significantly improved through incorporating M. micrantha particle and fiber. Higher aspect ratio of reinforcement displayed stronger mechanical properties. The vertical density profile in composites significantly influenced the mechanical properties of NFRPC. A conventional V-shaped profile and a uniform vertical density profile (homo-profile were observed in MP and MF based NFRPC, respectively. Additionally, with increasing lignocellulose content, a more uniform vertical density profile and higher wood screw holding strength were observed. These results indicate M. micrantha particle and fiber are excellent reinforcements for NFRPC applications.

  2. Comparative technoeconomic analysis of a softwood ethanol process featuring posthydrolysis sugars concentration operations and continuous fermentation with cell recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Steven J; Gurram, Raghu N; Menkhaus, Todd J; Gilcrease, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Economical production of second generation ethanol from Ponderosa pine is of interest due to widespread mountain pine beetle infestation in the western United States and Canada. The conversion process is limited by low glucose and high inhibitor concentrations resulting from conventional low-solids dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Inhibited fermentations require larger fermentors (due to reduced volumetric productivity) and low sugars lead to low ethanol titers, increasing distillation costs. In this work, multiple effect evaporation (MEE) and nanofiltration (NF) were evaluated to concentrate the hydrolysate from 30 g/l to 100, 150, or 200 g/l glucose. To ferment this high gravity, inhibitor containing stream, traditional batch fermentation was compared with continuous stirred tank fermentation (CSTF) and continuous fermentation with cell recycle (CSTF-CR). Equivalent annual operating cost (EAOC = amortized capital + yearly operating expenses) was used to compare these potential improvements for a local-scale 5 MGY ethanol production facility. Hydrolysate concentration via evaporation increased EAOC over the base process due to the capital and energy intensive nature of evaporating a very dilute sugar stream; however, concentration via NF decreased EAOC for several of the cases (by 2 to 15%). NF concentration to 100 g/l glucose with a CSTF-CR was the most economical option, reducing EAOC by $0.15 per gallon ethanol produced. Sensitivity analyses on NF options showed that EAOC improvement over the base case could still be realized for even higher solids removal requirements (up to two times higher centrifuge requirement for the best case) or decreased NF performance. PMID:25960402

  3. Comparative technoeconomic analysis of a softwood ethanol process featuring posthydrolysis sugars concentration operations and continuous fermentation with cell recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Steven J; Gurram, Raghu N; Menkhaus, Todd J; Gilcrease, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Economical production of second generation ethanol from Ponderosa pine is of interest due to widespread mountain pine beetle infestation in the western United States and Canada. The conversion process is limited by low glucose and high inhibitor concentrations resulting from conventional low-solids dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Inhibited fermentations require larger fermentors (due to reduced volumetric productivity) and low sugars lead to low ethanol titers, increasing distillation costs. In this work, multiple effect evaporation (MEE) and nanofiltration (NF) were evaluated to concentrate the hydrolysate from 30 g/l to 100, 150, or 200 g/l glucose. To ferment this high gravity, inhibitor containing stream, traditional batch fermentation was compared with continuous stirred tank fermentation (CSTF) and continuous fermentation with cell recycle (CSTF-CR). Equivalent annual operating cost (EAOC = amortized capital + yearly operating expenses) was used to compare these potential improvements for a local-scale 5 MGY ethanol production facility. Hydrolysate concentration via evaporation increased EAOC over the base process due to the capital and energy intensive nature of evaporating a very dilute sugar stream; however, concentration via NF decreased EAOC for several of the cases (by 2 to 15%). NF concentration to 100 g/l glucose with a CSTF-CR was the most economical option, reducing EAOC by $0.15 per gallon ethanol produced. Sensitivity analyses on NF options showed that EAOC improvement over the base case could still be realized for even higher solids removal requirements (up to two times higher centrifuge requirement for the best case) or decreased NF performance.

  4. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  5. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “PRT (recoSTAR PET-FG” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process PRT (recoSTAR PET-FG (EC register number RECYC050. The input of the process is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 5% of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through the process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated and crystallised in a continuous first reactor under inert gas flow then heated in a second continuous reactor under inert gas flow before being extruded into pellets. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the drying and crystallisation (step 2 and the drying of the crystallised flakes (step 3 are the critical steps for the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control their performance are well defined and are the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time. The operating parameters of these steps in the process are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge test. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from the process intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  6. Carrageenan-grafted magnetite nanoparticles as recyclable sorbents for dye removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efforts dedicated to improving water decontamination procedures have prompted the interest in the development of efficient, inexpensive, and reusable sorbents for the uptake of dye pollutants. In this work, novel sorbents consisting of carrageenan polysaccharides grafted to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared. κ- and ι-carrageenan were first chemically modified by carboxymethylation and then covalently attached via amide bond to the surface of aminated silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles, both steps monitored using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The kinetics and the equilibrium behavior of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) adsorption onto the carrageenan sorbents were investigated. ι-carrageenan sorbents displayed higher MB adsorption capacity that was ascribed to high content of sulfonate groups. Overall, the pseudo-second order equation provided a good description of the adsorption kinetics. The κ-carrageenan sorbents followed an unusual Z-type equilibrium adsorption isotherm whereas the isotherm of ι-carrageenan sorbents, although displaying a conventional shape, could not be successfully predicted by isotherm models commonly used. Noteworthy, both sorbents were long-term stable and could easily be recycled by simply rinsing with KCl aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of κ-carrageenan sorbents was 92 % in the first adsorption cycle and kept high (>80 %) even after six consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles

  7. Carrageenan-grafted magnetite nanoparticles as recyclable sorbents for dye removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L., E-mail: ana.luisa@ua.pt; Salgueiro, Ana M., E-mail: a38242@ua.pt; Creaney, Bianca, E-mail: bianca.creaney@gmail.com; Oliveira-Silva, Rui, E-mail: ruipedro.silva@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Chemistry, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Silva, Nuno J. O., E-mail: nunojoao@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Physics, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Trindade, Tito, E-mail: tito@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Department of Chemistry, CICECO, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    The efforts dedicated to improving water decontamination procedures have prompted the interest in the development of efficient, inexpensive, and reusable sorbents for the uptake of dye pollutants. In this work, novel sorbents consisting of carrageenan polysaccharides grafted to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared. κ- and ι-carrageenan were first chemically modified by carboxymethylation and then covalently attached via amide bond to the surface of aminated silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles, both steps monitored using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The kinetics and the equilibrium behavior of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) adsorption onto the carrageenan sorbents were investigated. ι-carrageenan sorbents displayed higher MB adsorption capacity that was ascribed to high content of sulfonate groups. Overall, the pseudo-second order equation provided a good description of the adsorption kinetics. The κ-carrageenan sorbents followed an unusual Z-type equilibrium adsorption isotherm whereas the isotherm of ι-carrageenan sorbents, although displaying a conventional shape, could not be successfully predicted by isotherm models commonly used. Noteworthy, both sorbents were long-term stable and could easily be recycled by simply rinsing with KCl aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of κ-carrageenan sorbents was 92 % in the first adsorption cycle and kept high (>80 %) even after six consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles.

  8. Heterogenized Bimetallic Pd-Pt-Fe3O4 Nanoflakes as Extremely Robust, Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts for Chemoselective Nitroarene Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Sangmoon; Song, Yeami; Kim, B Moon

    2016-06-15

    A very simple synthesis of bimetallic Pd-Pt-Fe3O4 nanoflake-shaped alloy nanoparticles (NPs) for cascade catalytic reactions such as dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane (AB) followed by the reduction of nitro compounds (R-NO2) to anilines or alkylamines (R-NH2) in methanol at ambient temperature is described. The Pd-Pt-Fe3O4 NPs were easily prepared via a solution phase hydrothermal method involving the simple one-pot coreduction of potassium tetrachloroplatinate (II) and palladium chloride (II) in polyvinylpyrrolidone with subsequent deposition on commercially available Fe3O4 NPs. The bimetallic Pd-Pt alloy NPs decorated on Fe3O4 NPs provide a unique synergistic effect for the catalysis of cascade dehydrogenation/reduction. Various nitroarene derivatives were reduced to anilines with very specific chemoselectivity in the presence of other reducible functional groups. The bimetallic Pd-Pt-Fe3O4 NPs provide a unique synergistic effect for the catalysis of cascade dehydrogenation/reduction. The nitro reduction proceeded in 5 min with nearly quantitative conversions and yields. Furthermore, the magnetically recyclable nanocatalysts were readily separated using an external magnet and reused up to 250 times without any loss of catalytic activity. A larger scale (10 mmol) reaction was also successfully performed with >99% yield. This efficient, recyclable Pd-Pt-Fe3O4 NPs system can therefore be repetitively utilized for the reduction of various nitro-containing compounds. PMID:27191706

  9. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the process “MOPET ®” used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling process MOPET ®, EC register number RECYC001. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET articles mainly bottles containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this process, washed and dried PET flakes are extruded in a twin-screw ext...

  10. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process FOOD RePET FGI. H., used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2014-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process FOOD RePET FGI. H., EU register No RECYC106. The input of the process is hot washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried flakes are fed into a reactor at high temperature, crystallised, ...

  11. Reactive Distillation and Air Stripping Processes for Water Recycling and Trace Contaminant Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Reactive distillation designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Reactive distillation integrates a reactor with a distillation column. A review of the literature in this field has revealed a variety of functional reactive columns in industry. Wastewater may be purified by a combination of a reactor and a distiller (e.g., the EWRS or VPCAR concepts) or, in principle, through a design which integrates the reactor with the distiller. A review of the literature in reactive distillation has identified some different designs in such combinations of reactor and distiller. An evaluation of reactive distillation and reactive air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  12. Waste paper for recycling: Overview and identification of potentially critical substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Eriksson, Eva; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Paper product manufacturing involves a variety of chemicals used either directly in paper and pulp production or in the conversion processes (i.e. printing, gluing) that follow. Due to economic and environmental initiatives, paper recycling rates continue to rise. In Europe, recycling has increas...... substances were identified as potentially critical (selected mineral oils, phthalates, phenols, parabens, as well as other groups of chemicals) in relation to paper recycling. It is recommended that these substances receive more attention in waste paper....

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on BUHLER C technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials “Buhler C” and “FENC”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes ‘’Buhler C’’ and “FENC’’ (EC register numbers RECYC037 and RECYC083 respectively which are based on the same BUHLER C technology. The decontamination efficiency of these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge tests. The input of the BUHLER C technology is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers containing no more than 5% of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this technology, washed and dried flakes are dried and extruded in a ring extruder into pellets which are further crystallised in a reactor then fed into the Solid State Polymerisation (SSP reactor. After having examined the challenge tests provided, the Panel concluded that the two steps, the drying and crystallisation step and the SSP step are the most critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the processes. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are well defined and are the temperature and the residence time for the drying and crystallisation, and the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time for SSP. The operating parameters of these steps in the processes are at least as severe as those obtained from the challenge tests. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling processes are able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from these processes intended for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  14. An experimental study of NO{sub x} recycle in the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    NO{sub x} recycle is one part of the NOXSO process. In this process, 90% of the acid pollutants (NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}) can be removed simultaneously by adsorption on the surface of a PO sorbent material. The sorbent is subsequently regenerated by heating and contacting the hot sorbent with a reducing gas followed by steam. The NO{sub x} is removed in the heating process, and the SO{sub 2} is removed by the chemical reaction of the reducing gas and steam. The NO {sub x} stream produced is returned to the combustion process with combustion air, which is called the NO{sub x} recycle. The NO{sub x} is reduced in the flame to N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0, and CO{sub 2}. NO{sub x} recycle will be implemented at the full-scale commercial demonstration plant at Niles. The concept of NO{sub x} recycle has been tested previously at DOE-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) using a 500 lb/hr coal combustor used for the 3/4 MW tests and also using a tunnel furnace capable of being fired with a variety of fuels including gas, fuel oil, coal, and coal-water mixtures. The results were very promising and demonstrated the destruction of NO{sub x} compounds when fed to the combustion system. The data also indicate that the extent of NO{sub x} reduction is determined by the location of the NO{sub x} injection and the combustor design. This current project is pilot-scale testing of NO{sub x} destruction mechanisms and to help with the implementation at the Niles station.

  15. Collection of Recyclables from Cubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wøhlk, Sanne; Bogh, Morten Bie; Mikkelsen, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Collection of recyclable materials is a major part of reverse logistics and an important issue in sustainable logistics. In this paper we consider a case study where paper and glass are collected from recycling cubes and transported to a treatment facility where it is processed for reuse. We...

  16. Water reuse: >90% water yield in MBR/RO through concentrate recycling and CO2 addition as scaling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, Adriano; Baenninger, Claudia; Foa, Paolo; Koepke, Stephan; Krauss, Martin; McArdell, Christa S; Rottermann, Karin; Wei, Yuansong; Zapata, Ana; Siegrist, Hansruedi

    2011-11-15

    Over 1.5 years continuous piloting of a municipal wastewater plant upgraded with a double membrane system (ca. 0.6 m(3) d(-1) of product water produced) have demonstrated the feasibility of achieving high water quality with a water yield of 90% by combining a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a submerged ultrafiltration membrane followed by a reverse osmosis membrane (RO). The novelty of the proposed treatment scheme consists of the appropriate conditioning of MBR effluent prior to the RO and in recycling the RO concentrates back to the biological unit. All the 15 pharmaceuticals measured in the influent municipal sewage were retained below 100 ng L(-1), a proposed quality parameter, and mostly below detection limits of 10 ng L(-1). The mass balance of the micropollutants shows that these are either degraded or discharged with the excess concentrate, while only minor quantities were found in the excess sludge. The micropollutant load in the concentrate can be significantly reduced by ozonation. A low treated water salinity (<10 mM inorganic salts; 280 ± 70 μS cm(-1)) also confirms that the resulting product has a high water quality. Solids precipitation and inorganic scaling are effectively mitigated by lowering the pH in the RO feed water with CO(2) conditioning, while the concentrate from the RO is recycled to the biological unit where CO(2) is stripped by aeration. This causes precipitation to occur in the bioreactor bulk, where it is much less of a process issue. SiO(2) is the sole exception. Equilibrium modeling of precipitation reactions confirms the effectiveness of this scaling-mitigation approach for CaCO(3) precipitation, calcium phosphate and sulfate minerals. PMID:21959090

  17. Recycling of blast furnace sludge by briquetting with starch binder: Waste gas from thermal treatment utilizable as a fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobíková, Klára; Plachá, Daniela; Motyka, Oldřich; Gabor, Roman; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Vallová, Silvie; Seidlerová, Jana

    2016-02-01

    Steel plants generate significant amounts of wastes such as sludge, slag, and dust. Blast furnace sludge is a fine-grained waste characterized as hazardous and affecting the environment negatively. Briquetting is one of the possible ways of recycling of this waste while the formed briquettes serve as a feed material to the blast furnace. Several binders, both organic and inorganic, had been assessed, however, only the solid product had been analysed. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of briquetting using commonly available laundry starch as a binder while evaluating the possible utilization of the waste gas originating from the thermal treatment of the briquettes. Briquettes (100g) were formed with the admixture of starch (UNIPRET) and their mechanical properties were analysed. Consequently, they were subjected to thermal treatment of 900, 1000 and 1100°C with retention period of 40min during which was the waste gas collected and its content analysed using gas chromatography. Dependency of the concentration of the compounds forming the waste gas on the temperature used was determined using Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation matrix. Starch was found to be a very good binder and reduction agent, it was confirmed that metallic iron was formed during the thermal treatment. Approximately 20l of waste gas was obtained from the treatment of one briquette; main compounds were methane and hydrogen rendering the waste gas utilizable as a fuel while the greatest yield was during the lowest temperatures. Preparation of blast furnace sludge briquettes using starch as a binder and their thermal treatment represents a suitable method for recycling of this type of metallurgical waste. Moreover, the composition of the resulting gas is favourable for its use as a fuel.

  18. Recycling of blast furnace sludge by briquetting with starch binder: Waste gas from thermal treatment utilizable as a fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobíková, Klára; Plachá, Daniela; Motyka, Oldřich; Gabor, Roman; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Vallová, Silvie; Seidlerová, Jana

    2016-02-01

    Steel plants generate significant amounts of wastes such as sludge, slag, and dust. Blast furnace sludge is a fine-grained waste characterized as hazardous and affecting the environment negatively. Briquetting is one of the possible ways of recycling of this waste while the formed briquettes serve as a feed material to the blast furnace. Several binders, both organic and inorganic, had been assessed, however, only the solid product had been analysed. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of briquetting using commonly available laundry starch as a binder while evaluating the possible utilization of the waste gas originating from the thermal treatment of the briquettes. Briquettes (100g) were formed with the admixture of starch (UNIPRET) and their mechanical properties were analysed. Consequently, they were subjected to thermal treatment of 900, 1000 and 1100°C with retention period of 40min during which was the waste gas collected and its content analysed using gas chromatography. Dependency of the concentration of the compounds forming the waste gas on the temperature used was determined using Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation matrix. Starch was found to be a very good binder and reduction agent, it was confirmed that metallic iron was formed during the thermal treatment. Approximately 20l of waste gas was obtained from the treatment of one briquette; main compounds were methane and hydrogen rendering the waste gas utilizable as a fuel while the greatest yield was during the lowest temperatures. Preparation of blast furnace sludge briquettes using starch as a binder and their thermal treatment represents a suitable method for recycling of this type of metallurgical waste. Moreover, the composition of the resulting gas is favourable for its use as a fuel. PMID:26684056

  19. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Adamson, D. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  20. Automation in electrical systems of nuclear fuel recycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the automation aspects in substation as well as other plant areas of a typical Nuclear Fuel Recycle Facility. Automation done at equipment level viz. HV/LV switchgear, Transformer etc. as well as system level viz. UPS system, Ventilation system etc. have been described. Automation in electrical systems of nuclear fuel recycle facilities have resulted in remote operation, reduction in manpower, better process control and increased throughput of the plant. (author)

  1. Study on Industrial Waste Materials as Coal Gangue Recycle Fe Deoxidized with High Grade from Steel Slag%利用工业废渣煤矸石高温还原回收钢渣中Fe的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨曜; 殷素红; 徐创霞; 毛海勇

    2015-01-01

    The steel slag contains 4% ~35% FeOx , ap-proximately 3% ~10% about Fe. More than 100 million tons steel slag is discharged every year. A large amount of Fe within slag has been loosed and without recycled. If we can deoxidize the FeOx and recycle Fe from steel slag, a large number of iron resources will be recycled and it has more significance than only improve cementitious activity of steel slag. This paper utilizes waste materials as adjusting material of coal gangue with deoxidi-zing ability, and chose hot stuffy technology processed high al-kalinity and low aluminum steel slag from Shaoguan Iron. In the lab, we melt samples in 1 500 ℃, deoxidize the FeOx and recy-cle Fe, and simulate water quenching process form slag struc-ture. Recycle the Fe from steel slag. The results show that: u-sing coal gangue and low-quality fly ash smelting steel slag de-oxidizing the FeOx and recycle Fe in high temperature is practica-ble. The Fe content with recycled iron from the sample of steel slag of Shaoguan Iron mixed with 25. 7% coal gangue is 82. 45%.%钢渣中含有4%~35%的FeOx ,换算为金属铁含量为3%~10%。我国每年钢渣排放量超过1亿t,大量的Fe随着钢渣流失而未得到回收利用。若能将这部分铁元素还原回收,能够回收到大量的铁资源,且比仅考虑提高钢渣胶凝活性将其用于建材行业的低附加值利用具有更重要的意义。本文利用工业废渣煤矸石作为还原材料,选取热焖工艺高碱度低铝质韶钢钢渣,在试验室1500℃下高温熔融还原回收Fe。研究结果表明:利用煤矸石熔融还原回收钢渣中的Fe是可行的,掺25.7%煤矸石试样还原回收粗铁的品位高达82.45%。

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process LPR based on EREMA Advanced and Colortronic SSP ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process LPR (EU register No RECYC061 which is based on the EREMA advanced and Colortronic SSP ® technologies. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles and containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated successively in two continuous reactors under vacuum before being extruded into pellets. After extrusion they are crystallised and solid state polymerized. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the four steps, the decontamination in two continuous reactors, extrusion, crystallisation and solid state polymerization are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are temperature, pressure, gas flow and residence time. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below the modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food derived from exposure scenario for infants and 0.15 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for toddlers. The Panel concluded that recycled PET obtained from LPR process is not of safety concern when used to manufacture articles intended for food contact materials applications in compliance with the conditions as specified in the conclusion of the opinion.

  3. Possibility of application of solid oxide electrolysis cell on a smart iron-making process based on an active carbon recycling energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction into carbon monoxide (CO) is required to establish a smart iron-making process based on an active carbon recycling energy system (iACRES). A disk-type solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) was prepared and examined experimentally for application to the CO2 reduction process in iACRES. A SOEC with a cathode|electrolyte|anode structure of Ni-YSZ|YSZ|La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ was fabricated. The electrolysis of carbon dioxide was conducted at 800-900°C. A current density of 107.1 mA cm-2 was measured between the cathode and anode at 900°C and at 2.52 V. The production rates of CO and O2 were in agreement with the theoretical values determined using Faraday's law. Evaluation of iACRES using the experimental results indicated that an estimated 0.73 high-temperature gas cooled reactor units as the primary energy source for CO2 reduction and a SOEC surface area of 0.098 km2 were required for the reduction of 30% CO2 in blast furnace gas emitted from a conventional blast furnace. (author)

  4. Speech parts as Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamenti, A F

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents evidence that six of the seven parts of speech occur in written text as Poisson processes, simple or recurring. The six major parts are nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions, with the interjection occurring too infrequently to support a model. The data consist of more than the first 5000 words of works by four major authors coded to label the parts of speech, as well as periods (sentence terminators). Sentence length is measured via the period and found to be normally distributed with no stochastic model identified for its occurrence. The models for all six speech parts but the noun significantly distinguish some pairs of authors and likewise for the joint use of all words types. Any one author is significantly distinguished from any other by at least one word type and sentence length very significantly distinguishes each from all others. The variety of word type use, measured by Shannon entropy, builds to about 90% of its maximum possible value. The rate constants for nouns are close to the fractions of maximum entropy achieved. This finding together with the stochastic models and the relations among them suggest that the noun may be a primitive organizer of written text.

  5. Tinplate recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linley, B.D.

    1977-05-01

    Present activities in the recycling of industrial tinplate waste, including melting and current practices in electrolytic and alkaline detinning, are reviewed. Present development work taking place in the fields of extraction of used tin cans from domestic refuse, and the preparation of those cans prior to detinning is described. The effect of advancing canmaking technology on the detinning industry are discussed.

  6. Optimization of a microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using recycled scrap metals as a cost-effective cathode material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Olivier; Tan, Zi; Shen, Yujia; Ng, How Y

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is still hindered by the prohibitive cost of cathode material, especially when platinum is used to catalyze oxygen reduction. In this study, recycled scrap metals could be used efficiently as cathode material in a specially-designed MFC. In terms of raw power, the scrap metals ranked as follows: W/Co > Cu/Ni > Inconel 718 > carpenter alloy; however, in terms of cost and long term stability, Inconel 718 was the preferred choice. Treatment performance--assessed on real and synthetic wastewater--was considerably improved either by filling the anode compartment with carbon granules or by operating the MFC in full-loop mode. The latter option allowed reaching 99.7% acetate removal while generating a maximum power of 36 W m(-3) at an acetate concentration of 2535 mg L(-1). Under these conditions, the energy produced by the system averaged 0.1 kWh m(-3) of wastewater treated.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel-Alumina Composites from Recycled Nickel Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Karayannis, V. G.; Moutsatsou, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    The recycling of metallic waste to create more valuable materials and their valorization into upgraded metal-based composites constitutes an important field of study. The composite industry nowadays considers environmental improvements as important as other properties of the materials. In the present paper, nickel powder was recycled from ferrous scrap, a low-cost and largely available material, by an effective hydrometallurgical recovery process. Then, this recycled powder was successfully u...

  8. Effect of recycling blast furnace flue dust as pellets on the sintering performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptian Iron and Steel Company generates a great amount of blast furnace flue dust. The recovery of metals and carbon from this flue dust becomes a very important demand due to the increase of the price of coke breeze and the decrease of the primary source of metals. At the same time, it make the environment more safe by decreasing pollution. Introducing these dust fines in the sintering process proves to be very harmful for different operating parameters. Thus, this study aims at investigating the production of pellets resulting from these fines, using molasses as organic binder and its application in sintering of iron ore. The sintering experiments were performed using flue dust as pellets as a substitute of coke breeze. The results revealed that, sintering properties such as inter strength increases with using the flue dust pellets, while productivity of both the sinter machine and sinter machine at blast furnace yard decreases. Also the vertical velocity of the sinter machine and the weight loss during the reduction of produced the sinter by hydrogen decrease.

  9. Development of a Prototype Automated Sorting System for Plastic Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Wahab; Hussain, A.; Scavino, E.; Mustafa, M.M.; Basri, H.

    2006-01-01

    Automated sorting for plastic recyclables has been seen as the way forward in the plastic recycling industry. Automated sorting provides significant improvements in terms of efficiency and consistency in the sorting process. In the case of macro sorting, which is the most common type of automated sorting, efficiency is determined by the mechanical details of the material handling system as well as the detection system. This paper provides a review on the state of-the-art technologies that hav...

  10. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O' Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  11. Water recycle as a must: decolorization of textile wastewaters by plant-associated fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegli, Stefania; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bonnanni, Marco; Bianchini, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    Textile dye effluents are among the most problematic pollutants because of their toxicity on several organisms and ecosystems. Low cost and ecocompatible bioremediation processes offer a promising alternative to the conventional and aspecific physico-chemical procedures adopted so far. Here, microorganisms resident on three real textile dyeing effluent were isolated, characterized, and tested for their decolorizing performances. Although able to survive on these real textile-dyeing wastewaters, they always showed a very low decolorizing activity. On the contrary, several plant-associated fungi (Bjerkandera adusta, Funalia trogii, Irpex lacteus, Pleurotus ostreatus, Trametes hirsuta, Trichoderma viride, and Aspergillus nidulans) were also assayed and demonstrated to be able both to survive and to decolorize to various extents the three effluents, used as such in liquid cultures. The decolorizing potential of these fungi was demonstrated to be influenced by nutrient availability and pH. Best performances were constantly obtained using B. adusta and A. nidulans, relying on two strongly different mechanisms for their decolorizing activities: degradation for B. adusta and biosorption for A. nidulans. Acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna showed a substantial reduction in toxicity of the three textile dyeing effluents when treated with B. adusta and A. nidulans, as suggested by mass spectrometric analysis as well.

  12. Assessing changes on poly(ethylene terephthalate) properties after recycling: Mechanical recycling in laboratory versus postconsumer recycled material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, María del Mar Castro, E-mail: quimcl02@udc.es [Grupo de Polímeros, Centro de Investigacións Tecnológicas (CIT), Departamento de Física, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidade de A Coruña, Campus de Ferrol, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Ares Pernas, Ana Isabel, E-mail: aares@udc.es [Grupo de Polímeros, Centro de Investigacións Tecnológicas (CIT), Departamento de Física, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidade de A Coruña, Campus de Ferrol, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Abad López, Ma José, E-mail: mjabad@udc.es [Grupo de Polímeros, Centro de Investigacións Tecnológicas (CIT), Departamento de Física, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidade de A Coruña, Campus de Ferrol, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); and others

    2014-10-15

    Keeping rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of virgin poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, is necessary to assure the quality of second-market applications. A comparative study of these properties has been undertaken in virgin, mechanical recycled and commercial recycled PET samples. Viscoelastic characterization was carried out by rheological measurements. Mechanical properties were estimated by tensile and Charpy impact strength tests. Thermal properties and crystallinity were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry and a deconvolution procedure was applied to study the population of the different crystals. Molecular conformational changes related to crystallinity values were studied by FTIR spectroscopy. Variations in average molecular weight were predicted from rheology. Besides, the presence-absence of linear and cyclic oligomeric species was measured by mass spectrometry techniques, as MALDI-TOF. Mechanical recycled PET undergoes a significant decline in rheological, mechanical and thermal properties upon increasing the number of reprocessing steps. This is due to the cleavage of the ester bonds with reduction in molar mass and raise in cyclic oligomeric species, in particular [GT{sub c}]{sub n} and [GT{sub c}]{sub n}-G type. Chain shortening plus enrichment in trans conformers favour the crystallization process which occurs earlier and faster with modification in crystal populations. Additional physicochemical steps are necessary to preserve the main benefits of PET. - Highlights: • Combination of multiple techniques to characterize the effects of recycling in PET. • Cleavage of ester bonds reduced viscosity, Mw, toughness in mechanical recycled PET. • Virgin, mechanical recycled and commercial recycled PET differ in crystal populations. • Cyclic oligomers [GT{sub c}]{sub n} and [GT{sub c}]{sub n}-G increase from the fourth extrusion cycle onwards.

  13. Assessing changes on poly(ethylene terephthalate) properties after recycling: Mechanical recycling in laboratory versus postconsumer recycled material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeping rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of virgin poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, is necessary to assure the quality of second-market applications. A comparative study of these properties has been undertaken in virgin, mechanical recycled and commercial recycled PET samples. Viscoelastic characterization was carried out by rheological measurements. Mechanical properties were estimated by tensile and Charpy impact strength tests. Thermal properties and crystallinity were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry and a deconvolution procedure was applied to study the population of the different crystals. Molecular conformational changes related to crystallinity values were studied by FTIR spectroscopy. Variations in average molecular weight were predicted from rheology. Besides, the presence-absence of linear and cyclic oligomeric species was measured by mass spectrometry techniques, as MALDI-TOF. Mechanical recycled PET undergoes a significant decline in rheological, mechanical and thermal properties upon increasing the number of reprocessing steps. This is due to the cleavage of the ester bonds with reduction in molar mass and raise in cyclic oligomeric species, in particular [GTc]n and [GTc]n-G type. Chain shortening plus enrichment in trans conformers favour the crystallization process which occurs earlier and faster with modification in crystal populations. Additional physicochemical steps are necessary to preserve the main benefits of PET. - Highlights: • Combination of multiple techniques to characterize the effects of recycling in PET. • Cleavage of ester bonds reduced viscosity, Mw, toughness in mechanical recycled PET. • Virgin, mechanical recycled and commercial recycled PET differ in crystal populations. • Cyclic oligomers [GTc]n and [GTc]n-G increase from the fourth extrusion cycle onwards

  14. Recycled aggregate concrete; an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sorato, Renan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor’s thesis was to investigate whether recycled materials can be incorporated into the production of concrete without compromising the compressive strength of the concrete produced. In order to shed light on the compressive strength of concrete made from recycled materials, the thesis reviewed studies in which waste materials are utilised as recycled aggregates in the composition of concrete and presented the results of this synthesis and analysis. It was found that som...

  15. Sustainability issues in circuit board recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Jens Brøbech; Alting, Leo; Baldo, Gian Luca

    1995-01-01

    The resource recovery and environmental impact issues of printed circuit board recycling by secondary copper smelters are discussed. Guidelines concerning material selection for circuit board manufacture and concerning the recycling processes are given to enhance recovery efficiency and to lower...... the impacts on the external environment from recycling...

  16. 40 CFR 141.76 - Recycle provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recycle provisions. 141.76 Section 141...) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.76 Recycle provisions. (a... recycle spent filter backwash water, thickener supernatant, or liquids from dewatering processes must...

  17. Magnetic TiO{sub 2}-graphene composite as a high-performance and recyclable platform for efficient photocatalytic removal of herbicides from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanhong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Gan [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Liu, Chengbin, E-mail: chem_cbliu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Luo, Shenglian, E-mail: sllou@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xu, Xiangli; Chen, Liang; Wang, Bogu [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A new magnetic TiO{sub 2}-graphene hybrid photocatalyst is prepared and acts as a high-performance and recyclable platform for efficient photocatalytic removal of herbicides from water. Highlights: ► A magnetically separable TiO{sub 2}-graphene photocatalyst is carefully designed. ► The catalyst exhibited almost 100% photocatalytic removal of 2,4-D from water. ► The photocatalyst is easily recovered with excellent reusability. ► After being laid aside for one year the catalyst still kept 95.6% removal of 2,4-D. ► 2,4-D in real wastewater could be efficiently removed. -- Abstract: A new photocatalyst, magnetic TiO{sub 2}-graphene, was designed and facilely produced by combining sol–gel and assembling processes. Taking advantages of graphene and TiO{sub 2}, the catalyst exhibited strong light absorption in the visible region and high adsorption capacity to organic pollutants, resulting in almost 100% photocatalytic removal efficiency of typical herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from water under simulated solar light irradiation, far higher than 33% on commercial P25. Toxicity assessment indicates the total decomposition of the original substrate. Furthermore, the catalyst can be rapidly recovered with highly stable photocatalytic performance. After 8 successive cycles, the removal efficiency of 2,4-D maintained 97.7%, and particularly, 99.1% 2,4-D removal efficiency came back at the ninth recycle when the catalyst was re-treated by ultrasonication. Moreover, even after being laid aside for one year the catalyst still kept the 2,4-D removal efficiency as high as 95.6%. For practical application, the photocatalytic also demonstrated high removal efficiencies of herbicide 2,4-D. The photocatalyst is a promising platform for removing herbicide pollutants from water.

  18. Reciclagem de fios e cabos elétricos - cabo paralelo Recycling of parallel wires using unit operations of mineral processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishene Christie Pinheiro Bezerra de Araújo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O descarte de produtos eletro-eletrônicos vem crescendo anualmente. Por esse motivo, necessita-se de reciclagem para que se evite o desperdício de recursos naturais não-renováveis. O objetivo desse trabalho é estudar a reciclagem dos cabos tipo cordão paralelo através de operações unitárias de tratamento de minérios. As seguintes operações unitárias foram testadas: moagem, separação granulométrica, separação em meio denso, separação eletrostática, atrição, bateamento e elutriação. Ao final desses processos, observou-se que as operações utilizadas obtiveram concentrados de cobre com baixo grau de contaminação. Observou-se que todas as técnicas precisam de uma outra técnica para complementá-las. Concluiu-se, ainda, que a moagem em moinho de facas com grelha de 3mm é necessária para se conseguir a total liberação dos materiais.The composition and discharge of eletro-electronic products is increasing year after year. To avoid the loss of non-renewable mineral resources and energy, the establishment of a recycling loop for such products is necessary. The goal of this work is to study the recycling of parallel wires using unit operations of mineral processing. The following unit operations were used: grinding, size separation, sink-and-float, electrostatic separation, scrubbing, panning and elutriation. One can observe a low contamination grade in the obtained copper. However, in all cases, a two step flow sheet must be used to completely separate plastics from copper. One can conclude that the total liberation of materials during grinding was reached when the final particle sizes were inferior to 3mm.

  19. Technology development for recycling of decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scenarios for recycling or self-disposal of concrete wastes was established according to the regulatory requirements for clearance settled up in overseas countries as well as our country. Through the radiological safety assessment for those scenarios, the exposure rate for the workers and the public was evaluated to come up with the clearance level of radioactive nuclides. On the basis of the results, the necessary condition of the process equipment for a volume reduction and self-disposal was suggested toward recycling in non-nuclear field and limited recycling in nuclear filed. In order to satisfy the clearance level suggested from the assessment of the scenarios for recycling of dismantled concrete wastes, the processes for thermal crushing and mechanical grinding were optimized through the experiments on the characteristics of the thermal and mechanical treatment of concrete wastes generated from the KRR and UCP. As a consequence, the process which can be reduced the radioactive concrete waste volume by about 70% was established. And also, not only the originative integrated thermal crushing equipment in which the concrete wastes were crushed simultaneously with the thermal treatment but also the rotated paddle type impact crushing equipment were developed. An optimized stabilization processes which have the conditions for manufacturing cemented waste form containing the maximum content of fine concrete waste resulting the minimization of increase in volume of cemented waste form was established

  20. Why recycle? A comparison of recycling motivations in four communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Joanne; Linn, Nancy; Burdge, Rabel J.

    1992-11-01

    Four Illinois communities with different sociode-mographic compositions and at various stages of planning for solid waste management were surveyed to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables and planning stages on the factors that motivate recycling behavior. A factor analysis of importance ratings of reasons for recycling and for not recycling yielded five factors interpreted as altruism, personal inconvenience, social influences, economic incentives, and household storage. The four communities were shown to be significantly different in multivariate analyses of the five motivational factors. However, attempts to explain these community differences with regression analyses, which predicted the motivational factors with dummy codes for planning stages, a measure of self-reported recycling behavior, and sociodemographic measures were unsatisfactory. Contrary to expectation, the solid waste management planning stages of the cities (curbside pickup, recycling dropoff center, and planning in progress) contributed only very slightly to the prediction of motivational factors for recycling. Community differences were better explained by different underlying motivational structures among the four communities. Altruistic reasons for recycling (e.g., conserving resources) composed the only factor which was similar across the four communities. This factor was also perceived to be the most important reason for recycling by respondents from all four communities. The results of the study supported the notion that convenient, voluntary recycling programs that rely on environmental concern and conscience for motivation are useful approaches to reducing waste.

  1. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “ILPA”, based on Starlinger Decon technology, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process ILPA (EU register No RECYC105 which is based on the Starlinger Decon technology. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles and trays, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this technology washed and dried PET flakes are pre-heated before being solid state polymerised (SSP in a continuous reactor at high temperature under vacuum and gas flow. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the pre-heating (step 2 and the decontamination in the continuous SSP reactor (step 3 are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control their performance are well defined and are the temperature, the pressure, the residence time and the gas flow for step 2 and 3. Under these conditions, it was demonstated that the recycling process under evaluation, is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore, the recycled PET obtained from this process intended to be used up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill, is not considered of safety concern.

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger IV+ ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials “Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available

    This scientific opinion of EFSA deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic (EC register numbers RECYC012, RECYC042, RECYC054, RECYC068 and RECYC080 respectively which are all based on the same STARLINGER IV+ ® technology. The decontamination efficiency of all these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. Through this technology, washed and dried post-consumer PET flakes are dried and crystallised in a reactor, then extruded under vacuum to provide pellets which are further crystallised in a second reactor. Crystallised pellets are then pre-heated in a third reactor and fed to the Solid State Polymerisation (SSP reactor. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, drying and crystallisation, extrusion and crystallisation and SSP are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the processes. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time for the drying and crystallisation step, the temperature, the pressure and the residence time for extrusion and crystallisation and SSP steps. It was demonstrated by means of the challenge test that the recycling processes under evaluation using a Starlinger IV+ ® technology are able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore  the Panel considered that the recycling processes Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic are able to reduce any foreseeable accidental contamination of the post-consumer food contact PET to a concentration that does not give rise to concern for a risk to human health  if:

    1. they are operated under conditions that are at least as severe as those obtained from  the challenge test used to measure the

    2. Development of a Lightweight Low-Carbon Footprint Concrete Containing Recycled Waste Materials

      OpenAIRE

      Talukdar, S.; Islam, S. T.; Banthia, N.

      2011-01-01

      Use of any recycled material helps to maintain a greener environment by keeping waste materials out of the landfills. Recycling practices also can decrease the environmental and economical impact of manufacturing the materials from virgin resources, which reduces the overall carbon footprint of industrial materials and processes. This study examined the use of waste materials such as crushed glass, ground tire rubber, and recycled aggregate in concrete. Compressive strength and elastic mod...

    3. Recycle HPLC: A Powerful Tool for the Purification of Natural Products

      OpenAIRE

      Jasmeen Sidana; Lokesh Kumar Joshi

      2013-01-01

      Natural compounds occur as various isomeric or closely related structures in biological matrices. These compounds are difficult to separate from the complex mixtures, and hence, the need for effective and innovative separation techniques arises. Recycle HPLC allows the recycling of sample, in part or full, and increases the separation efficiency of the process while keeping the peak dispersion to a minimum. Recycling in an HPLC system has been used in the isolation and purification of differe...

    4. Repairable Woven Carbon Fiber Composites with Full Recyclability Enabled by Malleable Polyimine Networks.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Taynton, Philip; Ni, Huagang; Zhu, Chengpu; Yu, Kai; Loob, Samuel; Jin, Yinghua; Qi, H Jerry; Zhang, Wei

      2016-04-20

      Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are prepared using catalyst-free malleable polyimine networks as binders. An energy neutral closed-loop recycling process has been developed, enabling recovery of 100% of the imine components and carbon fibers in their original form. Polyimine films made using >21% recycled content exhibit no loss of mechanical performance, therefore indicating all of the thermoset composite material can be recycled and reused for the same purpose.

    5. Use of Recycling Building Demolition waste As Coarse Aggregate in Hot Mix Asphalt

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Nabil I. Al- Sarrag* Hanaa Khaleel A Suham E. Saleh Al-Maliky

      2014-04-01

      Full Text Available At the recent years in Iraq, building demolition increase because of wars and the processes of destruction that lead to increase concrete waste, causing extreme pressure on the available land-filled sites that’s becomes a new challenge to local environment, in addition to south region from country poor from aggregate source.  So this study make as first evaluation to return use concrete aggregate for old and demolition building in concrete asphalt mix, the concrete aggregate obtained from building to live long more than 20 years after crash reinforcement concrete and sieving to get requirement granular particle to make locally asphalt mixture (Type IIIB depends on modified specification of State Commission of Roads and Bridges (2003 with percent (0,25,50,75,100% from weight of coarse aggregate.  Asphalt mixtures were tested by Marshall test, Indirect tensile strength test, and the loss of stability test.

    6. Waste material recycling: Assessment of contaminants limiting recycling

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Pivnenko, Kostyantyn

      . Figure 1 Schematic representation of generic material and chemical cycles for a defined geographical boundary (e.g., Europe). Chemical loss implies evaporation, degradation, migration, etc., as well as removal through material (re) processing. NIAS: Non-Intentionally Added Substances [1]. Following...... particularly relevant with respect to paper recycling. Potential sources for chemicals in paper were evaluated. Printing and conversion were identified as the most important steps in relation to paper cycle, but chemicals added non-intentionally (NIAS) in a variety of steps (Figure 1) may also play a role...

    7. Recycling of irradiated high-density polyethylene

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Radiation crosslinking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) is a well-recognized modification of improving basic material characteristics. This research paper deals with the utilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE (HDPEx) after the end of its lifetime. Powder of recycled HDPEx (irradiation dose 165 kGy) was used as a filler into powder of virgin low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in concentrations ranging from 10% to 60%. The effect of the filler on processability and mechanical behavior of the resulting mixtures was investigated. The results indicate that the processability, as well as mechanical behavior, highly depends on the amount of the filler. Melt flow index dropped from 13.7 to 0.8 g/10 min comparing the lowest and the highest concentration; however, the higher shear rate the lower difference between each concentration. Toughness and hardness, on the other hand, grew with increasing addition of the recycled HDPEx. Elastic modulus increased from 254 to 450 MPa and material hardness increased from 53 to 59 ShD. These results indicate resolving the problem of further recycling of irradiated polymer materials while taking advantage of the improved mechanical properties. - Highlights: • Utilization of recycled irradiated material as a filler is proposed. • LDPE/HDPEx mixtures were prepared in six concentrations. • Processability and mechanical behavior were investigated and compared. • Possible utilization of irradiated material after the end of its lifetime was proven

    8. In-Space Recycler Technology Demonstration

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hoyt, Rob; Werkheiser, NIKI; Kim, Tony

      2016-01-01

      In 2014, a 3D printer was installed and used successfully on the International Space Station (ISS), creating the first additively manufactured part in space. While additive manufacturing is a game changing technology for exploration missions, the process still requires raw feedstock material to fabricate parts. Without a recycling capability, a large supply of feedstock would need to be stored onboard, which negates the logistical benefits of these capabilities. Tethers Unlimited, Inc. (TUI), received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award to design and build the first In-space Recycler for demonstration aboard the ISS in 2017. To fully test this technology in microgravity, parts will be 3D printed, recycled into reusable filament, and then reprinted into new parts. Recycling scrap into printer filament is quite challenging in that a recycler must be able to handle a large variety of possible scrap configurations and densities. New challenges include: dealing with inevitable contamination of the scrap material, minimizing damage to the molecular structure of the plastic during reprocessing, managing a larger volume of hot liquid plastic, and exercising greater control over the cooling/resolidification of the material. TUI has developed an architecture that addresses these challenges by combining standard, proven technologies with novel, patented processes developed through this effort. Results show that the filament diameter achieved is more consistent than commercial filament, with only minimal degradation of material properties over recycling steps. In May 2016, TUI completed fabrication of a flight prototype, which will ultimately progress to the demonstration unit for the ISS as a testbed for future exploration missions. This capability will provide significant cost savings by reducing the launch mass and volume required for printer feedstock as well as reduce waste that must be stored or disposed.

    9. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Gaines, L L; Mintz, M M [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

      1994-03-01

      This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

    10. Dual-recycling channel management for WEEE with stochastic demand

      OpenAIRE

      Li, Chuanfa; Feng, Lipan; Wang, Xuehong

      2014-01-01

      More and more enterprises collecting e-wastes through the online recycling channel as the rapidly improving of the customer acceptance of the online recycling channel. And they are facing a problem, however, that they have to offer a higher price in the online recycling channel than the traditional recycling channel as well as reducing the searching cost by using the online recycling channel. Base on that, we incorporate a detailed consumer recycling channel choice model where the collection ...

    11. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

      Science.gov (United States)

      Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

      2014-02-01

      This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

    12. Irradiation emerges as processing alternative

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Anticipating that food irradiation may soon become an important addition to the many food processing techniques currently available, this article discusses many aspects of this process. Primarily, the benefits of irradiation for all foods include insect and bacterial control, increasing the potential to reduce incidences of food-borne illnesses, in addition to delaying the deterioration of fruits and vegetables. Currently approved uses of food irradiation in the U.S. and other countries, a summary of the proposed rule for wider application, and the labeling issue encompassed in the proposal are addressed. Additionally, the areas of great consumer concern--safety and public health implications, are talked about with the conclusion that food irradiation has been declared safe

    13. Indole cyanation via C-H bond activation under catalysis of Ru(Ⅲ)-exchanged NaY zeolite (RuY) as a recyclable catalyst

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      Alireza Khorshidi

      2012-01-01

      Selective 3-cyanation of indoles was achieved under heterogeneous catalysis of Ru(Ⅲ)-exchanged NaY zeolite (RuY) as a recyclable catalyst,in combination with K4[Fe(CN)6] as a nontoxic,slow cyanide releasing agent.Under the aforementioned conditions,good yields of the desired products were obtained.

    14. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

      2016-06-01

      Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio ( w/ c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/ c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

    15. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) sludge recycling unit

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The Guelph Utility Pole Company treats utility poles by immersion in pentachlorophenol (PCP) or by pressure treatment with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). The PCP treatment process involves a number of steps, each producing a certain amount of sludge and other wastes. In a plant upgrading program to improve processing and treatment of poles and to reduce and recycle waste, a PCP recovery unit was developed, first as an experimental pilot-scale unit and then as a full-scale unit. The PCP recovery unit is modular in design and can be modified to suit different requirements. In a recycling operation, the sludge is pumped through a preheat system (preheated by waste heat) and suspended solids are removed by a strainer. The sludge is then heated in a tank and at a predetermined temperature it begins to separate into its component parts: oil, steam, and solids. The steam condenses to water containing low amounts of light oil, and this water is pumped through an oil/water separator. The recovered oil is reused in the wood treatment process and the water is used in the CCA plant. The oil remaining in the tank is reused in PCP treatment and the solid waste, which includes small stones and wood particles, is removed and stored. By the third quarter of operation, the recovery unit was operating as designed, processing ca 10,000 gal of sludge. This sludge yielded 6,500 gal of water, 3,500 gal of oil, and ca 30 gal of solids. Introduction of the PCP sludge recycling system has eliminated long-term storage of PCP sludge and minimized costs of hazardous waste disposal. 4 figs

    16. Challenges and Alternatives to Plastics Recycling in the Automotive Sector

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Lindsay Miller

      2014-08-01

      Full Text Available Plastics are increasingly a preferred material choice in designing and developing complex, consumer products, such as automobiles, because they are mouldable, lightweight, and are often perceived to be highly recyclable materials. However, actually recycling the heterogeneous plastics used in such durable items is challenging, and presents very different scenarios to how simple products, such as water bottles, are recovered via curbside or container recycling initiatives. While the technology exists to recycle plastics, their feasibility to do so from high level consumer or industrial applications is bounded by technological and economical restraints. Obstacles include the lack of market for recyclates, and the lack of cost efficient recovery infrastructures or processes. Furthermore, there is a knowledge gap between manufacturers, consumers, and end-of-life facility operators. For these reasons, end-of-life plastics are more likely to end up down-cycled, or as shredder residue and then landfilled. This paper reviews these challenges and several alternatives to recycling plastics in order to broaden the mindset surrounding plastics recycling to improve their sustainability. The paper focuses on the automotive sector for examples, but discussion can be applied to a wide range of plastic components from similarly complex products.

    17. Recovering valuable metals from recycled photovoltaic modules.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yi, Youn Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Tran, Tam; Hong, Sung Kil; Kim, Myong Jun

      2014-07-01

      Recovering valuable metals such as Si, Ag, Cu, and Al has become a pressing issue as end-of-life photovoltaic modules need to be recycled in the near future to meet legislative requirements in most countries. Of major interest is the recovery and recycling of high-purity silicon (> 99.9%) for the production of wafers and semiconductors. The value of Si in crystalline-type photovoltaic modules is estimated to be -$95/kW at the 2012 metal price. At the current installed capacity of 30 GW/yr, the metal value in the PV modules represents valuable resources that should be recovered in the future. The recycling of end-of-life photovoltaic modules would supply > 88,000 and 207,000 tpa Si by 2040 and 2050, respectively. This represents more than 50% of the required Si for module fabrication. Experimental testwork on crystalline Si modules could recover a > 99.98%-grade Si product by HNO3/NaOH leaching to remove Al, Ag, and Ti and other metal ions from the doped Si. A further pyrometallurgical smelting at 1520 degrees C using CaO-CaF2-SiO2 slag mixture to scavenge the residual metals after acid leaching could finally produce > 99.998%-grade Si. A process based on HNO3/NaOH leaching and subsequent smelting is proposed for recycling Si from rejected or recycled photovoltaic modules. Implications: The photovoltaic industry is considering options of recycling PV modules to recover metals such as Si, Ag, Cu, Al, and others used in the manufacturing of the PV cells. This is to retain its "green" image and to comply with current legislations in several countries. An evaluation of potential resources made available from PV wastes and the technologies used for processing these materials is therefore of significant importance to the industry. Of interest are the costs of processing and the potential revenues gained from recycling, which should determine the viability of economic recycling of PV modules in the future.

    18. Desenvolvimento de processo de reciclagem de resíduos industriais de poliuretano e caracterização dos produtos obtidos Development of recycling process for industrial residues of polyurethane and the characterization of the products obtained

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Derval S. Rosa

      2003-01-01

      Full Text Available A busca pela qualidade oriunda do processo de globalização emergente tem despertado o interesse de indústrias em solucionar os problemas ambientais. Neste trabalho, é apresentado o processo de reciclagem mecânica de resíduos industriais de poliuretano, incorporado em diferentes proporções em resinas poliuretanas. O processo de reciclagem foi desenvolvido levando-se em consideração o efeito da temperatura durante o processamento e as diferentes proporções (massa de resina nova: massa de resíduo -> 1:4, 1:8, 1:12,5, 1:20 dos resíduos incorporados na mistura. Os produtos obtidos em diferentes proporções foram caracterizados por meio das propriedades mecânicas de resistência à tração, resistência à abrasão, determinação da dureza e microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV, com o objetivo de avaliar a viabilidade de possíveis aplicações dos produtos desenvolvidos. Os resultados mostraram que foi possível reciclar proporções de até 1:20 com propriedades de resistência à tração, resistência à perda por abrasão e dureza adequadas para aplicação em pisos de academia de ginástica e pistas de atletismo.The search for quality required in the globalization process has prompted industries to try and solve environmental problems. In this work, we present the mechanical recycling process of industrial polyurethane residues incorporated in different drifts in polyurethane resins. The recycling process was developed by considering conditions such as: effect of temperature in the process and the different proportions (mass of new resin: mass of residue -> 1:4, 1:8, 1:12.5, 1:20 of the residues incorporated in the mixture. The products obtained in different proportions were characterized by assessing their tensile stress properties, abrasion resistance, determination of hardness and using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The aim was to evaluate the viability of possible applications to the products originating from the

    19. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

      2016-02-01

      In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work.

  1. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work. PMID:26572520

  2. Water recycle as a must: decolorization of textile wastewaters by plant-associated fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Stefania Tegli; Matteo Cerboneschi; Massimo Corsi; Marco Bonnanni; Roberto Bianchini

    2014-01-01

    Textile dye effluents are among the most problematic pollutants because of their toxicity on several organisms and ecosystems. Low cost and ecocompatible bioremediation processes offer a promising alternative to the conventional and aspecific physico-chemical procedures adopted so far. Here, microorganisms resident on three real textile dyeing effluent were isolated, characterized, and tested for their decolorizing performances. Although able to survive on these real textile-dyeing wastewater...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF FINE RECYCLED AGGREGATES IN MORTAR

    OpenAIRE

    Feys, Charles; Joseph, Miquel; Boehme, Luc; Zhang, Yunlian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the influence of fine recycled concrete aggregates as replacement for sand in mortar and the use as cement replacement and filler is investigated. Mortar with fine recycled aggregates is examined on its mechanical and physical properties. The samples are also examined on a microscopic scale. The fine recycled concrete aggregates are made with one-year old concrete made in the laboratory. Fine recycled aggregates (FRCA) are added as a cement replacement (0 %, 10 %...

  4. Mechanical recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jirang; Forssberg, Eric

    2003-05-30

    The production of electric and electronic equipment (EEE) is one of the fastest growing areas. This development has resulted in an increase of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE). In view of the environmental problems involved in the management of WEEE, many counties and organizations have drafted national legislation to improve the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of such wastes so as to reduce disposal. Recycling of WEEE is an important subject not only from the point of waste treatment but also from the recovery of valuable materials.WEEE is diverse and complex, in terms of materials and components makeup as well as the original equipment's manufacturing processes. Characterization of this waste stream is of paramount importance for developing a cost-effective and environmentally friendly recycling system. In this paper, the physical and particle properties of WEEE are presented. Selective disassembly, targeting on singling out hazardous and/or valuable components, is an indispensable process in the practice of recycling of WEEE. Disassembly process planning and innovation of disassembly facilities are most active research areas. Mechanical/physical processing, based on the characterization of WEEE, provides an alternative means of recovering valuable materials. Mechanical processes, such as screening, shape separation, magnetic separation, Eddy current separation, electrostatic separation, and jigging have been widely utilized in recycling industry. However, recycling of WEEE is only beginning. For maximum separation of materials, WEEE should be shredded to small, even fine particles, generally below 5 or 10mm. Therefore, a discussion of mechanical separation processes for fine particles is highlighted in this paper. Consumer electronic equipment (brown goods), such as television sets, video recorders, are most common. It is very costly to perform manual dismantling of those products, due to the fact that brown goods contain very low

  5. Waste material recycling: Assessment of contaminants limiting recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn

    schemes and great potential for increase in recycling, respectively. The approach followed in the present work was developed and performed in four distinct steps. As step one, fractional composition of waste paper (30 fractions) and plastics (9 fractions) from households in Åbenrå municipality (Southern...... recycling has been recognised as a backbone of circular economy, with constant measures and initiatives being proposed in order to increase the recycling rates of materials being consumed. Material cycles are complex and dynamic systems where chemicals are added and removed in production, manufacturing......, consumption and waste management stages within a product’s lifecycle (Figure 1). Hence, waste materials contain potentially hazardous chemicals that are unwanted in the new products made of the recycled raw materials. So far, the presence of such chemicals in materials for recycling has not been...

  6. APT铜钼渣回收工艺过程及环境影响分析%Environmental Impacts of APT Copper Molybdenum Slag Recycling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙铭; 王嘉; 江英英; 杨林锋

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the introduction of molybdenum section of copper and molybdenum slag recycling business, raw materials, production processes, through a use of APT (ammonium paratungstate) quantitative analysis of waste gas, waste water, solid waste generation, proposed measures to mitigate the environmental impact. Copper and molybdenum slag recycling process of major air pollutants of S02 through the turbulent tower lye purification, can exhaust pollutants discharge standards; the production process of metal ions from wastewater by ion exchange column for recycling can be achieved wastewater discharge standards; all equipment noise to take the appropriate damping, noise reduction measures, the noise at boundary of the discharge standards; solid waste comprehensive utilization.%通过某利用APT(仲钨酸铵)除钼工段铜钼渣回收再利用企业的原料、生产工艺的介绍,定量地分析了废气、废水、固体废物的产生量,提出了减缓环境影响的措旅。铜钼渣回收利用过程产生的主要大气污染物是SO2,通过湍球塔碱液净化.可使废气污染物达标排放;生产过程产生的含金属离子废水通过离子交换柱进行回收利用,可做到废水达标排放;备设备噪声采取相应减震、减噪措施,厂界噪声可达标排放:固体废物可综合利用。

  7. Nano-sulfated zirconia as an efficient, recyclable and environmentally benign catalyst for one-pot three component synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas Zali; Arash Shokrolahi

    2012-01-01

    One pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols by reaction of aromatic aldehydes,2-naphthol and amide/urea using nano-sulfated zirconia as a catalyst is reported.The reaction was carried out under solvent-free conditions.The method gave good yields of amidoalkyl naphthols in short reaction time.The catalyst is recycled for five consecutive times without loss of activity.

  8. An environmentally benign three component one-pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols using H4SiW12O40 as a recyclable catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit R Supale; Gavisiddappa S Gokavi

    2010-03-01

    One pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthol by condensation of aromatic aldehydes, 2-naphthol and amide/urea using silicotungstic acid as a catalyst is reported. The reaction was carried out under solvent-free reaction conditions. The method gave good yields of amidoalkyl naphthols in short reaction time compared with previous methods. The catalyst is recycled for five consecutive times without loss of activity.

  9. Recycling cobalt from spent lithium ion battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong XIA; Xiao-qian XIE; Yao-wu SHI; Yong-ping LEI; Fu GUO

    2008-01-01

    Spent lithium ion battery is a useful resource of cobalt. In this paper, cobalt was recovered by a chemical process based upon the analysis of the structure and com-position of the lithium ion battery. X-ray diffraction results show that cobalt oxalate and cobaltous sulfate have been obtained in two different processes. Compared with the cobaltous oxalate process, the cobaltous sulfate process was characterized by less chemical substance input and a cobalt recovery rate of as much as 88%. A combination of these two processes in the recycling industry may win in the aspects of compact process and high recovery rate.

  10. Nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) as a support for recyclable catalysts in the development of sustainable methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Manoj B; Branco, Paula S; Varma, Rajender S

    2013-04-21

    Surface functionalization of nano-magnetic nanoparticles is a well-designed way to bridge the gap between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. The introduction of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a variety of solid matrices allows the combination of well-known procedures for catalyst heterogenization with techniques for magnetic separation. Magnetite is a well-known material, also known as ferrite (Fe3O4), and can be used as a versatile support for functionalization of metals, organocatalysts, N-heterocyclic carbenes, and chiral catalysts. It is used as a support for important homogeneous catalytically active metals such as Pd, Pt, Cu, Ni, Co, Ir, etc. to obtain stable and magnetically recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. Homogeneous organocatalysts can be successfully decorated with linkers/ligands on the surface of magnetite or alternatively the organocatalysts can be directly immobilized on the surface of magnetite. The functionalized magnetically retrievable catalysts or nanocatalysts that are increasingly being used in catalysis, green chemistry and pharmaceutically significant reactions are summarized in this review.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-08-15

    When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are

  12. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  13. PRODUCTION PROCESS AND APPLICATION OF CONSTRUCTION WASTE RECYCLED AGGREGATE%建筑垃圾再生骨料生产工艺及应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马刚平; 岳昌盛; 王荣; 刘慧慧; 孙丽蕊; 孟立滨

    2013-01-01

    The construction concrete waste can be reused as recycled aggregate after the treatment by an imported mobilized crushing-magnetic speration screening device,which can be applied in the field of concrete,dry-mixed mortar and road base materials etc.The products property had also been tested.The testing result shows that the recycled coarse aggregate can replace 50% of the natural coarse aggregate to make the recycled concrete,whose property can meet the product requirements.%采用进口移动式破碎-磁选-筛分设备,将混凝土类建筑垃圾加工成再生骨料,并掺入制备混凝土、干混砂浆、道路无机混合料.检测结果表明,再生制品性能可满足使用要求,再生骨料替代天然骨料比例可达到50%以上.

  14. Unprecedented alliance in preparation for electric vehicle battery recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.G. [Toxco Inc., Anaheim, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    As electric and hybrid vehicles gain a larger part of the automobile market, it is expected that large volumes of electric and hybrid vehicles lead, nickel, and lithium batteries will be required. To meet the demand, the largest recycler of lithium batteries in the world, Toxco Inc. formed an alliance with Kinsbursky Brothers Inc. (KBI). KBI is considered to be one of the most reputable and largest non-lithium battery management companies in the United States. The objective of the alliance is to offer a one-stop battery recycling service with direct recycling facilities, a single point for battery management and recycling. The elimination of the middle-man in the recycling process and the elimination of the redundant logistics are expected to yield cost savings, both for the companies and the customers. This recycling service is offered for all common and other battery types. A major benefit of the recycling program is found in the reduction of volumes of hazardous and/or reactive waste in incineration facilities or landfills. tabs., figs.

  15. Properties, Performance and Quality Control of Recycled MgO-C Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shouxin; YAO Jinfu; WANG Jing; YU Xingguo; YU Lingyan

    2008-01-01

    Properties, section structure and service results of recycled MgO-C bricks and new MgO-C bricks for la-dle slag line of Baosteel were analyzed and compared, and the measures of improving stability and quality of recycled MgO-C bricks were summarized. The results show that: ( 1 ) High quality recycled MgO - C materi-als can be produced by scientific, meticulous and strict management for every process such as dismantling fur-nace, selection, removing impurity and slag, stacking and homogenization; (2) Using high quality recycled materials and reasonable production technique, recycled MgO-C bricks with better properties and service efficien-cy than those of new MgO - C brick can be produced; (3) Service efficiency of recycled MgO-C bricks is good because of its high density, good oxidation resist-ance and reasonable structure.

  16. Science as a market process

    CERN Multimedia

    Walstead, A

    2002-01-01

    "This article is intended as a manifesto for an economic theory of scientific inquiry. My focus is not on traditional economic concerns about how societal resources are allocated to the funding of science and how scientific research contributes to technological advances and economic growth. Rather, my attention centers on using economic concepts to illuminate the conduct of scientific inquiry itself" (5 pages).

  17. Recycling of Paper and Cardboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Paper and cardboard are produced from pulp derived from plant fibers, primarily wood. Paper and cardboard is used for many different products, such as for packaging material, newsprint and advertisements. Most of these products have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of most...... waste. Recycling of paper and cardboard production waste and postconsumer waste has a long history in the pulp and paper industry. The recycled material now makes up more than half of the raw material used in European pulp and paper industry (ERPC, 2004). This chapter describes briefly how paper...... and cardboard are produced and how waste paper is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of paper recycling....

  18. Systematic photovoltaic waste recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitzsch, Wolfram; Loser, Ulrich [Loser Chemie GmbH, Langenweissbach (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    Indium, selenium, tellurium, gallium, molybdenum, cadmium and silicon are some of the major elements used in photovoltaic cells. Fully aware of the limited availability of these metals in future, recycling has been recognized as the most advisable end-of-life strategy to save these raw materials from turning into production wastes. On the other hand, statutory measures such as 'Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetz' (the German law encouraging closed-loop economy) aim to achieve a maximum quota of recycling and a minimum use of resources such as energy and raw materials. By the year of 2050, end-of-life photovoltaic panels are anticipated to amount to 9.57 million tons. Although we are not there yet, discussions on recycling have already started. We have to prepare for higher waste volumes expected in the coming years. But already today we need to solve some environmental problems like loss of conventional resources (e.g., glass) and rare metals. All of the known approaches for recycling photovoltaic semiconductor material seem economically and environmentally inefficient. In this paper, we report about reclaiming metals from scrap of thin film systems and associated photovoltaic manufacturing wastes like sandblasting dust and overspray. We also report one universal wet-chemical treatment for reclaiming the metals from CIS, CIGS or CdTe photovoltaic waste. Further, we discuss the application of our method to new PV systems, such as substrates other than glass (stainless steel, aluminum or plastic foil sheets) and alternative semiconductor alloys such as GaAs. (orig.)

  19. Continuous Fermentation of Clostridium tyrobutyricum with Partial Cell Recycle as a Long-Term Strategy for Butyric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar C. Clausen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In making alternative fuels from biomass feedstocks, the production of butyric acid is a key intermediate in the two-step production of butanol. The fermentation of glucose via Clostridium tyrobutyricum to butyric acid produces undesirable byproducts, including lactic acid and acetic acid, which significantly affect the butyric acid yield and productivity. This paper focuses on the production of butyric acid using Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a partial cell recycle mode to improve fermenter yield and productivity. Experiments with fermentation in batch, continuous culture and continuous culture with partial cell recycle by ultrafiltration were conducted. The results show that a continuous fermentation can be sustained for more than 120 days, which is the first reported long-term production of butyric acid in a continuous operation. Further, the results also show that partial cell recycle via membrane ultrafiltration has a great influence on the selectivity and productivity of butyric acid, with an increase in selectivity from ≈9% to 95% butyric acid with productivities as high as 1.13 g/Lh. Continuous fermentation with low dilution rate and high cell recycle ratio has been found to be desirable for optimum productivity and selectivity toward butyric acid and a comprehensive model explaining this phenomenon is given.

  20. Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus sp. RKY2 in a cell-recycle continuous fermentation using lignocellulosic hydrolyzates as inexpensive raw materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Young-Jung; Ryu, Hwa-Won

    2009-09-01

    Continuous lactic acid fermentations were conducted using lignocellulosic hydrolyzates and corn steep liquor as inexpensive raw materials. Lactic acid concentrations decreased with increases in the dilution rate, whereas the residual substrate concentrations increased. However, lactic acid yields were maintained at more than 0.90 g g(-1) over all cases experimented. The cell-recycle cultivation system exerted positive effects on fermentation efficiency, including volumetric productivity, which is attributable to the retention of cells in the bioreactor. The cell-recycle continuous fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates yielded a lactic acid productivity of 6.7 g l(-1) h(-1) for a dilution rate of 0.16 h(-1) using 30 g l(-1) of corn steep liquor and 1.5 g l(-1) of yeast extract as nutrients. The productivity (6.7 g l(-1) h(-1)) acquired by the cell-recycle continuous fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates was 1.6 times higher than the lactic acid productivity yielded in the continuous fermentation without cell-recycle system.

  1. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, S.M., E-mail: simon.eldridge@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, Bruxner Highway, Wollongbar, NSW 2477 (Australia); Chen, C.R. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Xu, Z.H. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Nelson, P.N. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870 (Australia); Boyd, S.E. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Meszaros, I. [Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia); Chan, K.Y. [Graduate School of Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  2. Transition metal (Fe, Co and Ni) oxide nanoparticles grafted graphitic carbon nitrides as efficient optical limiters and recyclable photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kishore; Kuriakose, Tintu; Philip, Reji; Park, Tae Joo

    2014-07-01

    A single-step pyrolysis assisted route towards the large scale fabrication of metal oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3, Co3O4 and NiO) ingrained in graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) is demonstrated. Urea, an abundantly available precursor, plays a dual role during the synthesis: while it acts as a reducing agent, it also gets converted to GCN. The formation of GCN and the in-situ growth and embedment of oxide nanoparticles are discussed on the basis of the experimental results. The wide absorption of the samples in the visible light region makes them suitable for nonlinear transmission and photocatalytic activity studies. Visible light photocatalytic activities of the samples are studied by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B dye. Optical limiting properties of the prepared samples are studied through the open aperture z-scan technique using 5 ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. The cost-efficient and time saving synthetic approach is complemented by the magnetic behaviour of the samples, which enables their use as recyclable photocatalyst and magnetically controllable optical limiters.

  3. Characterization of Recycled Polypropylene Composite Material Reinforced with Wood Flour using SEPS-g- MAH as Coupling Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acevedo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A composite material was formed using recycled polypropylene (PPr as matrix and wood flour of Andean oak (Quercus Humboldtti as reinforcing material. The adhesion between these components of different nature, was improved with an alkali treatment to wood flour and the coupling agent block copolymer of Styrene-Ethylene-Propylene-Styrene grafted with maleic anhydride (SEPS-g- MAH. Four types of composite were formulated, keeping constant the amount of wood flour respect to PPr and varying the percentage of SEPS-g-MAH in 0%, 3%, 5% and 7%. The compatibilizing effect of SEPS-g-MAH was evaluated by moisture absorption test, hardness test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA of each composite. The alkali treatment in the wood flour decreased the particle size and increased specific contact area. The water absorption decreased and some thermal properties improved at high content of coupling agent; however a clear trend was no significant between content of SEPS-g-MAH in the composites on the Shore D hardness and degradation temperatures.

  4. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state 13C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes

  5. In(OTf)3 as a powerful and recyclable catalyst for Pechmann condensation without solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahador Karami; Mahtab Kiani; Mohsen Ahmad Hoseini

    2014-01-01

    In(OTf)3 plays the role of a Lewis acid catalyst in the Pechmann condensation of phenols with β-ketoesters under solvent-free conditions to give coumarin derivatives. This novel and inexpensive method has advantages such as short reaction time, excellent product yields, and avoids the use of organic solvents in agreement with green chemistry principles. Catalyst loadings can be as low as 1 mol% to give high yields of the corresponding coumarins at 80 °C. The catalyst can be recovered after the reaction, and reused with only a slight decrease in the yield.

  6. Widespread tungsten isotope anomalies and W mobility in crustal and mantle rocks of the Eoarchean Saglek Block, northern Labrador, Canada: Implications for early Earth processes and W recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingao; Touboul, Mathieu; Ishikawa, Akira; Walker, Richard J.; Graham Pearson, D.

    2016-08-01

    Earth's mantle with regard to late accretionary processes. Although 182W anomalies can be erased via mixing in the convective mantle, recycling of 182W-rich crustal rocks into the mantle can produce new mantle sources with anomalous W isotopic compositions that can be tapped at much later times and, hence, this process should be considered as a mechanism for the generation of 182W-rich rocks at any subsequent time in Earth history.

  7. Thorium-U Recycle Facility (7930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thorium-U Recycle Facility (7930), along with the Transuranic Processing Facility (7920). comprise the Radiochemical Engineering Development Complex. 7930 is a...

  8. NiO(111) nanosheets as efficient and recyclable adsorbents for dye pollutant removal from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor single-crystalline polar NiO(111) nanosheets with well-defined hexagonal holes have been investigated for application in dye adsorption and combustion processes. With regard to adsorption technologies, high surface area metal oxides have an advantage over activated carbon in that the adsorbed species can be combusted and the adsorbent reused in the case of metal oxides while regeneration of activated carbon remains challenging and thus the adsorbent/adsorbate system must be disposed of. Here, three typical textile dyes, reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin red, were studied for removal from wastewater with two NiO systems and activated carbon. These studies revealed that the NiO(111) nanosheets exhibited much more favorable adsorptive properties than conventionally prepared nickel oxide powder (CP-NiO) obtained from thermal decomposition of nickel nitrate. The maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on NiO(111) nanosheets reached 30.4 mg g-1, 35.15 mg g-1 and 22 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid, respectively, while the maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on CP-NiO were only 8.4, 13.2 and 12 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid. To simulate the adsorption isotherm, two commonly employed models, the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms, were selected to explicate the interaction of the dye and NiO(111). The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model demonstrated better fit to experimental equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum predicted adsorption capacity was 36.1 mg g-1. In addition, adsorption kinetic data of NiO(111) followed a pseudo-second-order rate for congo red. These studies infer that NiO(111) nanosheets possess desirable properties for application in adsorption and combustion applications.

  9. NiO(111) nanosheets as efficient and recyclable adsorbents for dye pollutant removal from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi; Chen, Lifang; Hu, Juncheng; Richards, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Semiconductor single-crystalline polar NiO(111) nanosheets with well-defined hexagonal holes have been investigated for application in dye adsorption and combustion processes. With regard to adsorption technologies, high surface area metal oxides have an advantage over activated carbon in that the adsorbed species can be combusted and the adsorbent reused in the case of metal oxides while regeneration of activated carbon remains challenging and thus the adsorbent/adsorbate system must be disposed of. Here, three typical textile dyes, reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin red, were studied for removal from wastewater with two NiO systems and activated carbon. These studies revealed that the NiO(111) nanosheets exhibited much more favorable adsorptive properties than conventionally prepared nickel oxide powder (CP-NiO) obtained from thermal decomposition of nickel nitrate. The maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on NiO(111) nanosheets reached 30.4 mg g-1, 35.15 mg g-1 and 22 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid, respectively, while the maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on CP-NiO were only 8.4, 13.2 and 12 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid. To simulate the adsorption isotherm, two commonly employed models, the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms, were selected to explicate the interaction of the dye and NiO(111). The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model demonstrated better fit to experimental equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum predicted adsorption capacity was 36.1 mg g-1. In addition, adsorption kinetic data of NiO(111) followed a pseudo-second-order rate for congo red. These studies infer that NiO(111) nanosheets possess desirable properties for application in adsorption and combustion applications.

  10. Cross-Linked ZnO Nanowalls Immobilized onto Bamboo Surface and Their Use as Recyclable Photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunde Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel recyclable photocatalyst was fabricated by hydrothermal method to immobilize the cross-linked ZnO nanowalls on the bamboo surface. The resultant samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR techniques. FTIR spectra demonstrated that the cross-linked wurtzite ZnO nanowalls and bamboo surface were interconnected with each other by hydrogen bonds. Meanwhile, the cross-linked ZnO nanowalls modified bamboo (CZNB presented a superior photocatalytic ability and could be recycled at least 3 times with a photocatalytic efficiency up to 70%. The current research provides a new opportunity for the development of a portable and recycled biomass-based photocatalysts which can be an efficiently degraded pollutant solution and reused several times.

  11. Vehicle recycling regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smink, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The number of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) in the EU is increasing continously. Around 75 percent of an ELV are recyclable metals. The forecast growth in the number of ELVs calls for regulation that aims to minimise the environmental impact of a car. Using Denmark as an example, this article...

  12. Teaching Interactive Art Lessons with Recycled Waste Materials as Instructional Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Rita; Asante, Eric Appau; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia

    2016-01-01

    The study examines the use of waste materials as instructional resources in teaching and learning Art lessons. Primary, Junior and Senior High School Art teachers in Ghana mostly teach their lessons without instructional resources because the government is not able to provide materials to create the needed resources. The study therefore explored…

  13. Recovering recyclable materials from shredder residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Brockmeier, Norman F.

    1994-02-01

    Each year, about 11 million tons of metals are recovered in the United States from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75 percent of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material, known as shredder residue, amounts to about three million tons annually and is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This article discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. The status of the technology and the process economics are reviewed here.

  14. FM dye photo-oxidation as a tool for monitoring membrane recycling in inner hair cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Kamin; Revelo, Natalia H.; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    Styryl (FM) dyes have been used for more than two decades to investigate exo- and endocytosis in conventional synapses. However, they are difficult to use in the inner hair cells of the auditory pathway (IHCs), as FM dyes appear to penetrate through mechanotransducer channels into the cytosol of IHCs, masking endocytotic uptake. To solve this problem we applied to IHCs the FM dye photo-oxidation technique, which renders the dyes into electron microscopy markers. Photo-oxidation allowed the un...

  15. Recyclable fluorous cinchona alkaloid ester as a chiral promoter for asymmetric fluorination of β-ketoesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Yi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A fluorous cinchona alkaloid ester has been developed as a chiral promoter for the asymmetric fluorination of β-ketoesters. It has comparable reactivity and selectivity to the nonfluorous versions of cinchona alkaloids and can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture by simple fluorous solid-phase extraction (F-SPE and used for the next round of reaction without further purification.

  16. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-30

    Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  17. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-30

    Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production. PMID:21705136

  18. School Recycling Programs: A Handbook for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes some of the many recycling program options that schools can implement in their communities. It focuses on implementing actual recycling projects as a way of teaching the importance and benefits of recycling. The text examines the solid waste crisis and why Americans cannot continue to possess a disposable mentality. It…

  19. Development of a new pH-swing CO2 mineralization process with a recyclable reaction solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new CO2 mineral sequestration process using the pH swing of a weak base-strong acid solution was proposed. In this process, an alkaline-earth metal was extracted selectively from silicate waste material, such as steelmaking slag or waste concrete, in an acidic condition using a weak base-strong acid solution. The reacted solution containing alkaline-earth metal ions and a weak-base, behaves as a CO2 absorbent. The acidic extraction solution was regenerated from the basic absorbent solution by precipitating the alkaline-earth metal with CO2 as the carbonate. The thermodynamic analysis of this process shows that a series of reactions proceeds spontaneously and the overall reaction is exothermic. The feasibility of the proposed process was confirmed using steelmaking slag as a silicate material and ammonium chloride solution as a weak base-strong acid solution. It was confirmed that this series of reaction proceeds successfully under mild conditions. Calcium ions were extracted selectively from steelmaking slag using an ammonium chloride solution, and the reacted solution absorbed CO2 followed by the precipitation of CaCO3 at 80 deg. C. On the basis of these experimental analyses, the energy consumption of the proposed process was roughly estimated as 300 kWh/ton-CO2

  20. STRATEGIES TO RECYCLE ENZYMES AND THEIR IMPACT ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS FOR BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xue,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes still exhibit activities after hydrolysis of biomass according to previous studies. Recycling the enzymes and use them in subsequent hydrolysis cycles can further utilize their remaining activities. Previous studies have mainly discussed enzyme recycling processes up to three cycles, in which the processes did not reach steady state. Steady state investigation is essential for the guidance of the real life process. Four cycles of processing have usually been considered enough to bring the system to steady state in process engineering. In this work, hydrolysate was used as the source of recycled enzymes to fresh substrate for five cycles. Because a large amount of enzymes remained on the pulp, surfactant was introduced to recycle the enzymes that remained with the residue. Recycled hydrolysate from previous enzymatic hydrolysis usually carries a high concentration of sugars, which can inhibit the new round of hydrolysis. To remove sugar from the recycling stream, a wash with fresh buffer was performed. Sugars were removed, while enzymes still remain on the fresh substrates. Six recycling strategies were evaluated for enzyme recycling percentage and enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency with both green-liquor pretreated softwood and hardwood in this investigation. Hydrolysis efficiency increased by about 40% for softwood at 30 mg/g enzyme dosage and about 25% for hardwood at 7.5 mg/g when a washing stage was applied with addition of surfactant.

  1. Mechanical recycling of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritzer, Elmar; Heiderich, Gilmar

    2016-03-01

    This contribution examines possible material recycling of offcuts generated during the production of continuous-fiber-reinforced composite sheets. These sheets consist of a polyamide 6 matrix and glass fiber fabric. In the initial step, the offcut is shredded to obtain particles; following that, the particles are processed in a twin-screw process to produce fiber-reinforced plastic pellets with varying fiber contents. These pellets are intended for use in injection molding processes as a substitution for new raw materials. This investigation centers on the mechanical properties which can be achieved with the recycled material after both the twin-screw process and injection molding.

  2. Municipal solid waste recycling and the significance of informal sector in urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzner, Roland; Salhofer, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The informal sector is active in the collection, processing and trading of recyclable materials in urban China. Formal waste management organisations have established pilot schemes for source separation of recyclables, but this strategy is still in its infancy. The amounts of recyclables informally picked out of the municipal solid waste stream are unknown as informal waste workers do not record their activities. This article estimates the size and significance of the current informal recycling system with a focus on the collection of recyclables. A majority of the reviewed literature detects that official data is displaying mainly 'municipal solid waste collected and transported', whereas less information is available on 'real' waste generation rates at the source. Based on a literature review the variables, the 'number of informal waste workers involved in collection activities', the 'amounts collected daily per informal collector' and the 'number of working days' are used to estimate yearly recyclable amounts that are informally diverted from municipal solid waste. The results show an interval of approximately 0.56%-0.93% of the urban population or 3.3-5.6 million people involved in informal waste collection and recycling activities in urban China. This is the equivalent to estimated informal recycling rates of approximately 17-38 w/w% of the municipal solid waste generated. Despite some uncertainties in these assessments, it can be concluded that a significant share of recyclables is collected and processed by informal waste workers.

  3. Municipal solid waste recycling and the significance of informal sector in urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzner, Roland; Salhofer, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The informal sector is active in the collection, processing and trading of recyclable materials in urban China. Formal waste management organisations have established pilot schemes for source separation of recyclables, but this strategy is still in its infancy. The amounts of recyclables informally picked out of the municipal solid waste stream are unknown as informal waste workers do not record their activities. This article estimates the size and significance of the current informal recycling system with a focus on the collection of recyclables. A majority of the reviewed literature detects that official data is displaying mainly 'municipal solid waste collected and transported', whereas less information is available on 'real' waste generation rates at the source. Based on a literature review the variables, the 'number of informal waste workers involved in collection activities', the 'amounts collected daily per informal collector' and the 'number of working days' are used to estimate yearly recyclable amounts that are informally diverted from municipal solid waste. The results show an interval of approximately 0.56%-0.93% of the urban population or 3.3-5.6 million people involved in informal waste collection and recycling activities in urban China. This is the equivalent to estimated informal recycling rates of approximately 17-38 w/w% of the municipal solid waste generated. Despite some uncertainties in these assessments, it can be concluded that a significant share of recyclables is collected and processed by informal waste workers. PMID:25106535

  4. Utilization of rice husk ash as novel adsorbent: a judicious recycling of the colloidal agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2009-11-30

    Concern about environmental protection has aroused over the years from a global viewpoint. To date, the ever-increasing importance of biomass as the energy and material resources has lately been accounted by the rising prices for the crude petroleum oil. Rice husk ash, the most appropriate representative of the high ash biomass waste, is currently obtaining sufficient attraction, owning to its wide usefulness and potentiality in environmental conservation. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of the art review of the rice milling industry, its background studies, fundamental properties and industrial applications. Moreover, the key advance on the preparation of novel adsorbents, its major challenges together with the future expectation has been highlighted and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of rice husk ash in the field of adsorption science represents a viable and powerful tool, leading to the superior improvement of pollution control and environmental preservation. PMID:19836724

  5. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 1, Industrial solid waste processing municipal waste reduction/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarizes the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes. PMID:16600493

  7. Recycling power plant slag for use as aggregate in precast concrete components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orna Carmona, M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The need to eliminate waste generates costs. When considering the preservation of the environment, the minimization of the consumption of natural resources and energy savings criteria, the need and advisability of studying the feasibility of waste re-use seems clear. However, waste re-use depends on whether they are economically competitive. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the possible use of slag from a steam power station as aggregate in the manufacture of concrete. This study included the determination of the physical, chemical and thermal properties of the material, comparing the results to those required by the Spanish structural concrete code (EHE in determining their acceptance or rejection as a concrete component. The ultimate aim of the research was to determine the highest slag content that could be added to concrete without modifying its strength or durability, with a view to obtaining savings in the manufacture of precast structures.

    La necesidad de eliminar residuos genera gastos. Considerando criterios de conservación ambiental, minimización del consumo de recursos naturales y ahorro de energía parece claro la necesidad y conveniencia de estudiar la viabilidad del uso de residuos. Sin embargo la utilización de residuos depende de que sean competitivos económicamente. Por tanto el propósito de esta investigación es evaluar el posible uso de las escorias de fondo de una central térmica como áridos para la fabricación de hormigón. En este estudio se incluye la determinación de características físicas, químicas y térmicas y se han comparado los resultados a los requeridos por la EHE para determinar su aceptación o rechazo como componente de un hormigón. El objetivo final de la investigación responde a la utilización de hormigón con el máximo contenido en escorias sin modificar las condiciones de resistencia y durabilidad, consiguiendo un ahorro económico en la fabricación de estructuras

  8. Recycling of agroindustrial solid wastes as additives in brick manufacturing for development of sustainable construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisset Maritza Luna-Cañas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La acumulación de residuos sólidos agroindustriales no administ rados especialmente en los países en vías de desarrollo ha dado lugar a una creciente preocupación ambiental. El reciclaje de tales res iduos como un material de construcción sostenible parece ser un a solución viable no sólo al problema de la contaminación, sino también un a opción económica para diseñar edificios verdes. El presente t rabajo estudia la aplicación de varios residuos agroindustriales en la fabricación de ladrillos, que incluyen cáscara de cacao, aserr ín, cáscara de arroz y caña de azúcar. En primer lugar, se determinó la compos ición mineralógica y química de los residuos y del suelo arcill oso. A continuación, los ladrillos se fabricaron con diferentes cantid ades de residuos (5%, 10% y 20%. El efecto de la adición de es tos residuos en el comportamiento tecnológico del ladrillo se evaluó mediant e ensayos de resistencia a la compresión, resistencia a la flex ión y durabilidad. Con base en los resultados obtenidos, las cantidad es óptimas de residuos agroindustriales para obtener ladrillos fueron mezclando 10% de cáscara de cacao y 90% de suelo arcilloso. Est os porcentajes producen ladrillos cuyas propiedades mecánicas e ran adecuadas para su uso como materias primas secundarias en la pr oducción de ladrillos.

  9. Incorporation of N-doped TiO2 nanorods in regenerated cellulose thin films fabricated from recycled newspaper as a green portable photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; Salleh, W N W; Jaafar, Juhana; Ismail, A F; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Jamil, Siti Munira

    2015-11-20

    In this work, an environmental friendly RC/N-TiO2 nanocomposite thin film was designed as a green portable photocatalyst by utilizing recycled newspaper as sustainable cellulose resource. Investigations on the influence of N-doped TiO2 nanorods incorporation on the structural and morphological properties of RC/N-TiO2 nanocomposite thin film are presented. The resulting nanocomposite thin film was characterized by FESEM, AFM, FTIR, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, and XPS analysis. The results suggested that there was a remarkable compatibility between cellulose and N-doped TiO2 nanorods anchored onto the surface of the RC/N-TiO2 nanocomposite thin film. Under UV and visible irradiation, the RC/N-TiO2 nanocomposite thin film showed remarkable photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue solution with degradation percentage of 96% and 78.8%, respectively. It is crucial to note that the resulting portable photocatalyst produced via an environmental and green technique in its fabrication process has good potential in the field of water and wastewater treatment application.

  10. Hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate as a new recyclable solid base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Knoevenagel condensation between aromatic aldehydes and malononitrile, ethyl cyanoacetate or malonic acid with hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate in water is described. HAP–Cs2CO3 was found to be a highly active, stable and recyclable catalyst under the reaction conditions.

  11. Hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate as a new recyclable solid base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation in water

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Gupta; Rajive Gupta; Medha Anand

    2009-01-01

    The Knoevenagel condensation between aromatic aldehydes and malononitrile, ethyl cyanoacetate or malonic acid with hydroxyapatite supported caesium carbonate in water is described. HAP–Cs2CO3 was found to be a highly active, stable and recyclable catalyst under the reaction conditions.

  12. On-Farm Water Recycling as an Adaptation Strategy for Drained Agricultural Land in the Western Lake Erie Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    On-farm water recycling is in agricultural landscapes today, and a few examples exist in the Great Lakes region. They have been implemented primarily where both irrigation is needed for high value crops and groundwater is inadequate to provide the rates needed. Crop yield benefits of irrigation fr...

  13. 含再生材料的PC/PET无卤阻燃合金加工稳定性%Processing Stability of Recycled Materials PC/PET Alloy Containing Halogen-Free Flame Retardant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高磊; 李强; 李文强; 罗明华

    2016-01-01

    通过对再生聚对苯二甲酸乙二酯(PET–R)的多次挤出,研究了扩链对PET–R稳定性的影响。同时,也通过多次挤出和多次注塑的Regrind实验,研究了丙烯腈–苯乙烯塑料接枝甲基丙烯酸缩水甘油酯(AS-g-GMA)加入后再生聚碳酸酯(PC)/PET体系的相容性和稳定性,以及熔体流动速率和冲击强度的变化。通过11个月内的生产数据反映出,经过扩链和稳定化处理后的含再生材料的PC/PET无卤阻燃合金具有很好的加工稳定性。%The influence of chain extending on the stability of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET–R) was studied by multi-extrusion experiment. Meanwhile the changes of compatibility, stability, melt flow rate and impact strength of recycled polycarbonate (PC–R)/PET–R alloy after adding acrylonitrile-styrene grafted glycidyl methacrylate (AS-g-GMA) was discussed through multi-extrusion and multi-injection Regrind experiments. The production data of eleven months indicates that after the process of chain extending and stabilizing, the halogen-free flame retardant PC/PET alloy containing recycled materials has better stabilization.

  14. Possibilities for recycling cellulases after use in cotton processing: part I: Effects of end-product inhibition, thermal and mechanical deactivation, and cellulase depletion by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Helena; Bishop, David; Cavaco-Paul, Artur

    2002-04-01

    Preliminary recycling experiments with cellulase enzymes after cotton treatments at 50 degrees C showed that activity remaining in the treatment liquors was reduced by about 80% after five recycling steps. The potential problems of end-product inhibition, thermal and mechanical deactivation, and the loss of some components of the cellulase complex by preferential and or irreversible adsorption to cotton substrates were studied. End-product inhibition studies showed that the build-up of cellobiose and glucose would be expected to cause no more than 40% activity loss after five textile treatment cycles. Thermal and mechanical treatments of cellulases suggested that the enzymes start to be deactivated at 60 degrees C and agitation levels similar to those used in textile processing did not cause significant enzyme deactivation. Analysis of cellulase solutions, by fast protein liquid chromatography, before and after adsorption on cotton fabrics, suggested that the cellobiohydrolase II (Cel6A) content of the cellulase complex was reduced, relative to the other components, by preferential adsorption. This would lead to a marked reduction in activity after several treatment cycles and top-up with pure cellobiohydrolase II would be necessary unless this component is easily recoverable from the treated fabric.

  15. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). PMID:27021697

  16. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  17. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  18. Development of Agricultural Recycle Economy in Arid Areas of Hexi Corridor——A Case Study of Zhangye City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Taking Zhangye City as an example, the thesis analyzes the restricted factors of resources and environment confronted by the agriculture in arid area of Hexi Corridor: the first is the agricultural natural resources. The area of cultivated land decreases year by year, and there are sharp decrease of biological diversity as well as the shortage and waste of water resources; the second is the ecological environment. There are critical soil erosion, frequent natural disaster and outstanding agricultural area source pollution; the third is the rural economy. The agricultural structure still can not meet the need of agricultural development in recent years, and the proportion of agricultural product processing is low. It points out that implementation of agricultural recycle economy is the necessary choice of the agricultural development in Zhangye City. Developing recycle economy is conducive to improving ecological environment and realizing agricultural sustainable development; developing recycle economy can solve the agricultural area source pollution to much extent and protect rural environment; developing recycle economy is conducive to adjusting rural industrial structure, increasing job opportunities and increasing farmers’ income; developing recycle economy is conducive to elevating the international competitiveness of agricultural products. The thesis also has put forward the countermeasures of developing agricultural recycle economy in Zhangye City as follows: firstly, fostering the ambience of the development of agricultural recycle economy; secondly, forming the incentive mechanism of development of agricultural recycle economy; thirdly, broadening the investment channel of development of agricultural recycle economy; fourthly, perfecting socialized service system of agricultural recycle economy.

  19. Sulfuric Acid ([3-(3-Silicapropyl)sulfanyl]propyl)ester as a Recyclable Catalyst for the Synthesis of 4,4'-(Arylmethylene)bis(1H-pyrazol-5-ols)%Sulfuric Acid ([3-(3-Silicapropyl)sulfanyl]propyl)ester as a Recyclable Catalyst for the Synthesis of4,4'-(Arylmethylene)bis(1H-pyrazol-5-ols)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shekoofeh TAYEBI; Mojtaba BAGHERNEJAD; Dariush SABERI; Khodabakhsh NI KNAM

    2011-01-01

    Sulfuric acid ([3-(3-silicapropyl)sulfanyl]propyl)ester is employed as a recyclable catalyst for the condensation reaction between aromatic aldehydes and 3-methyl-l-phenyl-5-pyrazolone.This condensation reaction was performed in ethanol under refluxing conditions giving 4,4-alkylmethylene-bis(3-methyl-5-pyrazolones) in 74-90% yields.The heterogeneous catalyst was recycled and used in eleven runs for the reaction between benzaldehyde and 3-methyl-l-phenyl-5-pyrazolone without losing catalytic activity.

  20. The Next Generation Ecological Self Compacting Concrete with Glass Waste Powder as a Cement Component in Concrete and Recycled Concrete Aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P

    2013-01-01

    In the present study the performance characteristics (workability, compressive strength, frost resistance, permeability and temperature of hydration) of the ecological self compacting concrete with reduced cement content and with the next generation recycled concrete aggregates which are obtained from crashed concrete specimens with cement substitution at level of 30% with waste glass powder were investigated. Waste glass as powder ground to certain fineness accelerates beneficial chemical re...