WorldWideScience

Sample records for as low as reasonably achievable

  1. Reactor emergency preparedness: lifesaving or as low as reasonable achievable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    An emergency is defined as an unforseen combination of circumstances or the resultant state that calls for immediate action. Although not explicitly indicated, the implication is that the action is intended to protect life, limb and or property from extreme peril. For the most part, the kind and extent of the emergency planning required under current regulations of the USNRC do not appear to be so much related to emergencies (within the above definition) as they do toward the reduction of the off-site radiation doses from uncontrolled releases during reactor accident conditions to as low as reasonably achievable levels. Not only do the latter appear to be of questionable cost-effectiveness, but in their extent and complexity beyond normal disaster planning they may in fact be counter productive to optimum public safety.

  2. Methodology for making environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Speer, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    An overall evaluation concept for use in making differential cost-benefit analyses in environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations is being implemented by Rockwell Hanford Operations. This evaluation includes consideration of seven categories: (1) capital costs; (2) operating costs; (3) state of the art; (4) safety; (5) accident or upset consequences; (6) reliability, operability, and maintainability; and (7) decommissionability. Appropriate weighting factors for each of these categories are under development so that ALARA determinations can be made by comparing scores of alternative proposals for facility design, operations, and upgrade. This method of evaluation circumvents the traditional basis of a stated monetary sum per person-rem of dose commitment. This alternative was generated by advice from legal counsel who advised against formally pursuing this avenue of approach to ALARA for environmental and occupational dose commitments.

  3. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  4. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Computer Security: SAHARA - Security As High As Reasonably Achievable

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    History has shown us time and again that our computer systems, computing services and control systems have digital security deficiencies. Too often we deploy stop-gap solutions and improvised hacks, or we just accept that it is too late to change things.    In my opinion, this blatantly contradicts the professionalism we show in our daily work. Other priorities and time pressure force us to ignore security or to consider it too late to do anything… but we can do better. Just look at how “safety” is dealt with at CERN! “ALARA” (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is the objective set by the CERN HSE group when considering our individual radiological exposure. Following this paradigm, and shifting it from CERN safety to CERN computer security, would give us “SAHARA”: “Security As High As Reasonably Achievable”. In other words, all possible computer security measures must be applied, so long as ...

  6. Maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for dental personnel operating portable hand-held x-ray equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGiff, Thomas J; Danforth, Robert A; Herschaft, Edward E

    2012-08-01

    Clinical experience indicates that newly available portable hand-held x-ray units provide advantages compared to traditional fixed properly installed and operated x-ray units in dental radiography. However, concern that hand-held x-ray units produce higher operator doses than fixed x-ray units has caused regulatory agencies to mandate requirements for use of hand-held units that go beyond those recommended by the manufacturer and can discourage the use of this technology. To assess the need for additional requirements, a hand-held x-ray unit and a pair of manikins were used to measure the dose to a simulated operator under two conditions: exposures made according to the manufacturer's recommendations and exposures made according to manufacturer's recommendation except for the removal of the x-ray unit's protective backscatter shield. Dose to the simulated operator was determined using an array of personal dosimeters and a pair of pressurized ion chambers. The results indicate that the dose to an operator of this equipment will be less than 0.6 mSv y⁻¹ if the device is used according to the manufacturer's recommendations. This suggests that doses to properly trained operators of well-designed, hand-held dental x-ray units will be below 1.0 mSv y⁻¹ (2% of the annual occupational dose limit) even if additional no additional operational requirements are established by regulatory agencies. This level of annual dose is similar to those reported as typical dental personnel using fixed x-ray units and appears to satisfy the ALARA principal for this class of occupational exposures.

  7. Assessment as Evidential Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Joanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Principles of evidential reasoning have often been discussed in the context of educational and psychological measurement with respect to construct validity and validity arguments. More recently, Mislevy proposed the metaphor of assessment as an evidentiary argument about students' learning and abilities given their…

  8. Learning Through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Childern as Tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vernon L.; Feldman, Robert S.

    Low-achieving fifth-grade children either taught a third grader or studied alone for a series of daily sessions. At the end of the two-week period, the low-achievers' performance was significantly better in the tutoring condition than in the studying condition. This showed a reversal in the direction from the initial difference between conditions.…

  9. Learning through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Children as Tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.; Allen, Vernon L.

    Recent evidence suggests that the use of children acting as tutors for their peers may prove beneficial to the tutor as well as to the tutee. There is now abundant, unsubstantiated anecdotal evidence, and some controlled experimental work, which suggests that the tutor benefits greatly from his involvement in teaching. The enactment of the role of…

  10. Proportional Reasoning as Essential Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Shelley; Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an aspect of a large research and development project that aimed to promote middle years school teachers' understanding and awareness of the pervasiveness of proportional reasoning as integral to numeracy. Teacher survey data of proportional reasoning across the curriculum were mapped on to a rich model of numeracy. Results…

  11. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Bergwerff, Catharina E.; Heiser, Willem J.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working memory and dynamic measures of analogical…

  12. Leader as achiever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  13. Clinical reasoning as social deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I will challenge the individualistic model of clinical reasoning. I will argue that sometimes clinical practice is rather machine-like, and information is called to mind and weighed, but the clinician is not just calculating how to use particular means to reach fixed ends. Often...

  14. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Leadership of Kuwaiti High and Low Achieving 11th Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnabhan, Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Leadership components (L) of high school students in the state of Kuwait. The possibility of predicting each leadership component via emotional intelligence components was investigated for high and low achievers. A sample of 11th grade students from Kuwaiti…

  15. Noncontact photoacoustic imaging achieved by using a low-coherence interferometer as the acoustic detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Chunhui; Wang, Ruikang K

    2011-10-15

    We report on a noncontact photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique in which a low-coherence interferometer [(LCI), optical coherence tomography (OCT) hardware] is utilized as the acoustic detector. A synchronization approach is used to lock the LCI system at its highly sensitive region for photoacoustic detection. The technique is experimentally verified by the imaging of a scattering phantom embedded with hairs and the blood vessels within a mouse ear in vitro. The system's axial and lateral resolutions are evaluated at 60 and 30 μm, respectively. The experimental results indicate that PAI in a noncontact detection mode is possible with high resolution and high bandwidth. The proposed approach lends itself to a natural integration of PAI with OCT, rather than a combination of two separate and independent systems.

  16. Abstract spatial reasoning as an autistic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jennifer L; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2013-01-01

    Autistic individuals typically excel on spatial tests that measure abstract reasoning, such as the Block Design subtest on intelligence test batteries and the Raven's Progressive Matrices nonverbal test of intelligence. Such well-replicated findings suggest that abstract spatial processing is a relative and perhaps absolute strength of autistic individuals. However, previous studies have not systematically varied reasoning level--concrete vs. abstract--and test domain--spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal, which the current study did. Autistic participants (N = 72) and non-autistic participants (N = 72) completed a battery of 12 tests that varied by reasoning level (concrete vs. abstract) and domain (spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal). Autistic participants outperformed non-autistic participants on abstract spatial tests. Non-autistic participants did not outperform autistic participants on any of the three domains (spatial, numerical, and verbal) or at either of the two reasoning levels (concrete and abstract), suggesting similarity in abilities between autistic and non-autistic individuals, with abstract spatial reasoning as an autistic strength.

  17. Abstract spatial reasoning as an autistic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Stevenson

    Full Text Available Autistic individuals typically excel on spatial tests that measure abstract reasoning, such as the Block Design subtest on intelligence test batteries and the Raven's Progressive Matrices nonverbal test of intelligence. Such well-replicated findings suggest that abstract spatial processing is a relative and perhaps absolute strength of autistic individuals. However, previous studies have not systematically varied reasoning level--concrete vs. abstract--and test domain--spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal, which the current study did. Autistic participants (N = 72 and non-autistic participants (N = 72 completed a battery of 12 tests that varied by reasoning level (concrete vs. abstract and domain (spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal. Autistic participants outperformed non-autistic participants on abstract spatial tests. Non-autistic participants did not outperform autistic participants on any of the three domains (spatial, numerical, and verbal or at either of the two reasoning levels (concrete and abstract, suggesting similarity in abilities between autistic and non-autistic individuals, with abstract spatial reasoning as an autistic strength.

  18. Variations of Reasoning in Equal Sharing of Children Who Experience Low Achievement in Mathematics: Competence in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hunt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For children with persistent mathematics difficulties, research and practice espouses that an altered kind of mathematics instruction is necessary due to sustained performance differences. Yet, a critical issue in mathematics education rests in the question of why research locates the problem within these children. In this paper, we challenge a longstanding assumption about the type of mathematics children with low achievement in mathematics “need” along with how these children are positioned in terms of mathematical thinking and reasoning. Our aim in this work is to identify ways of reasoning evident in the partitioning activity of 43 fifth-grade children as they solved equal sharing situations independent of instruction over ten sessions. Results reveal three themes of reasoning that show a resemblance between these children’s reasoning and existing frameworks of reasoning in equal sharing problems found in prior research among children who did not show low achievement in mathematics. We discuss the results in terms of the problem of a continued conceptualization of low achieving students’ need for specific kinds of teaching and learning experiences and/or detached instructional experiences in school. We advocate for an increase in research that examines how teachers can support participation of these children in mathematics classrooms such that children might develop powerful mathematics conceptions.

  19. Linguistic knowledge, fluency and metacognitive knowledge as components of reading comprehension in adolescent low achievers: differences between monolinguals and bilinguals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.J.W.; Van Gelderen, Amos; Van Steensel, Roel; Van Schooten, Erik; Hulstijn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigate the role of linguistic knowledge, fluency and meta-cognitive knowledge in Dutch reading comprehension of monolingual and bilingual adolescent academic low achievers in the Netherlands. Results show that these components are substantially associated with reading comprehen

  20. Reasoning about Minimal Belief and Negation as Failure

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, R

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the problem of reasoning in the propositional fragment of MBNF, the logic of minimal belief and negation as failure introduced by Lifschitz, which can be considered as a unifying framework for several nonmonotonic formalisms, including default logic, autoepistemic logic, circumscription, epistemic queries, and logic programming. We characterize the complexity and provide algorithms for reasoning in propositional MBNF. In particular, we show that entailment in propositional MBNF lies at the third level of the polynomial hierarchy, hence it is harder than reasoning in all the above mentioned propositional formalisms for nonmonotonic reasoning. We also prove the exact correspondence between negation as failure in MBNF and negative introspection in Moore's autoepistemic logic.

  1. [Shared governance and reasonableness as ethical contributions to health policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Alcaraz, Ana M; Calvo-Rigual, Fernando; Siurana-Aparisi, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Health is one of the fundamental human rights. Recognizing it as a right means that the State has an obligation to ensure a minimum level of opportunities is maintained, and to restore it when lost. This minimum level may not be covered in periods of economic crisis, such as the one we are currently experiencing.Managed care, focused on economic questions, emerged after the crisis of 1973 in order to help make clinical decisions based on economic factors. In practice, the result of managed care was to turn economic cost control into an end in itself while forgetting about equity; something for which it has been challenged from an ethical perspective. Since then, many authors have attempted to reconcile efficiency and equity in health management, but the debate remains open.In this article, and basing our approach on the theories of P. Ruger and Norman Daniels, we argue that shared health governance and accountability for reasonableness can offer significant ethical contributions in the process of achieving an efficient and fair health system. In the model we propose, citizens, professionals and health institutions all play an active role in capacity building in the field of health. These capacities are related to healthy lifestyles, accessible and transparent information, the promotion of self-care, the acquisition of knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes, leadership based on values and co-responsibility to achieve set goals in a reasonable way. If we develop these capacities, we will have used the current economic crisis as an opportunity for improving ethical practice in the field of health.

  2. The Impact of Asynchronous Computer-Assisted Language Learning Approaches on English as a Foreign Language High and Low Achievers' Vocabulary Retention and Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, Bahman; Moosavinia, Seyyed Rahim; Kavari, Kamal Ebrahimi; Asgari, Parviz; Hydarei, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the impact of asynchronous computer-assisted language learning (CALL) approaches on high and low achievers' vocabulary retention and recall of English as foreign language learners. Fifty participants were assigned into two homogeneous groups. Both groups covered eight expository passages, which included "Select readings:…

  3. Using Analogy to Improve Abstract Conditional Reasoning in Adolescents: Not as Easy as It Looks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, Henry; Doyon, Celine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract reasoning refers to the ability to reason logically with premises that do not allow reference to knowledge about the real world. This form of reasoning is complex and difficult, and at the same time, it is critical for understanding science and mathematics. Two studies examined the use of analogy as a method to bridge reasoning with…

  4. Gender as a predictor for academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Lestari

    2012-07-01

    penting profesionalisme, keberhasilan akademik mahasiswa   Abstract   Background: Professionalism is central to maintaining public’s trust in medical profession. Building professionalism during their study time in medical education is possible method to equip students with core attributes of professional behavior of doctor. However, the professional practice might influence not only their future job, but also their recent performance as students. This study aimed to identify the correlation between students’ demographic factors and core attributes of professionalism related to good grade point average achievement. Methods: Fourth year students of Faculty of Medicine Universitas Islam Sultan Agung Islamic in Semarang Indonesia took part in this cross sectional study. The core attributes of professionalism were assessed using short inventory “Assessment of Medical Student Professionalism”, which was developed by some experts using Delphi method. The students’ grade point average (GPA data were collected from the Information Technology Unit of the faculty. Analysis data using Cox-regression with constant time. Results: A total amount of 207 (out of 240 students participated in this study. Our final model indicates that none of the core attributes professionalism which predicts good grade point average (GPA achievement. Female than male students had 35% increased to be good GPA achievement [adjusted relative risk (RRa = 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.05-1.74]. Conclusion: Female but none of the core attribute of professionalism students was noted to increase academic grade point average. (Health Science Indones 2010; 1: 43 - 50

  5. Social science as a tool in developing scientific thinking skills in underserved, low-achieving urban students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Elizabeth; Kuhn, Deanna

    2016-03-01

    Engagement in purposeful problem solving involving social science content was sufficient to develop a key set of inquiry skills in low-performing middle school students from an academically and economically disadvantaged urban public school population, with this skill transferring to a more traditional written scientific thinking assessment instrument 3weeks later. Students only observing their peers' activity or not participating at all failed to show these gains. Implications are addressed with regard to the mastery of scientific thinking skills among academically disadvantaged students. Also addressed are the efficacy of problem-based learning and the limits of observational learning.

  6. Including Deontic Reasoning as Fundamental to Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Henry M.; Miller, Joan G.

    2008-01-01

    While recognizing major contributions of the contemporary theory-of-mind framework, we identify conceptual and cultural gaps with respect to its inattention to deontic considerations. The framework has tended to portray behavior as purely self-directed, thereby neglecting everyday reasoners' understanding of behavior as normatively based. However,…

  7. Using optimal combination of teaching-learning methods (open book assignment and group tutorials) as revision exercises to improve learning outcome in low achievers in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Medha; Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Suryapriya, R; Ragul, Anithasri; Yuvaraj, B; Revathy, G; Priyadarssini, M

    2016-07-01

    Graduate medical students of India are taught Biochemistry by didactic lectures and they hardly get any opportunity to clarify their doubts and reinforce the concepts which they learn in these lectures. We used a combination of teaching-learning (T-L) methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) to study their efficacy in improving the learning outcome. About 143 graduate medical students were classified into low (75%: group 3, n = 46) achievers, based on their internal assessment marks. After the regular teaching module on the topics "Vitamins and Enzymology", all the students attempted an open book assignment without peer consultation. Then all the students participated in group tutorials. The effects on the groups were evaluated by pre and posttests at the end of each phase, with the same set of MCQs. Gain from group tutorials and overall gain was significantly higher in the low achievers, compared to other groups. High and medium achievers obtained more gain from open book assignment, than group tutorials. The overall gain was significantly higher than the gain obtained from open book assignment or group tutorials, in all three groups. All the three groups retained the gain even after 1 week of the exercise. Hence, optimal use of novel T-L methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) as revision exercises help in strengthening concepts in Biochemistry in this oft neglected group of low achievers in graduate medical education. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):321-325, 2016.

  8. Deductive way of reasoning about the internet AS level topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D´avid Szab´o; Attila K˝or¨osi; J´ozsef B´ır´o; Andr´as Guly´as

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding about the AS level topology of the Internet is based on measurements and inductive-type models which set up rules describing the behavior (node and edge dynamics) of the individual ASes and generalize the consequences of these individual actions for the complete AS ecosystem using induction. In this paper we suggest a third, deductive approach in which we have premises for the whole AS system and the consequences of these premises are determined through deductive reasoning. We show that such a deductive approach can give complementary insights into the topological properties of the AS graph. While inductive models can mostly reflect high level statistics (e.g., degree distribution, clustering, diameter), deductive reasoning can identify omnipresent subgraphs and peering likelihood. We also propose a model, called YEAS, incorporating our deductive analytical findings that produces topologies contain both traditional and novel metrics for the AS level Internet.

  9. Assessment of Scientific Reasoning as an Institutional Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    expertise in the outcome domain. Student achievement of the Scientific Reasoning and Principles of Science was assessed in the 2012-13 academic year by... understanding of the Nature of Science, and (b) the Lawson scores between the sophomore and junior years. Student understanding of the Nature of Science did...in presenting the Nature of Science, and coordination among basic sciences course directors to align efforts to teach scientific reasoning.

  10. Low-temperature synthesis to achieve high critical current density and avoid a reaction layer in SmFeAsO1-x F x superconducting tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianjun; Lin, He; Yuan, Pusheng; Zhang, Xianping; Yao, Chao; Wang, Dongliang; Dong, Chiheng; Ma, Yanwei; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    A low-temperature (300-500 °C) heat treatment process under ambient pressure or uniaxial pressure was performed on Sn-added SmFeAsO1-x F x superconducting tapes fabricated by the ex situ powder-in-tube method. A highest transport critical current density (J c) of 3.95 × 104 A cm-2 (at 4.2 K and self-field) was achieved by this process. The low-temperature process allows tapes to endure much longer heat treatment without J c degradation than the high-temperature method. Microscopic analysis also revealed that this method could obtain a clear boundary without a reaction layer or interdiffusion between a superconducting core and sheath metal.

  11. Deductive way of reasoning about the internet AS level topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávid, Szabó; Attila, Kőrösi; József, Bíró; András, Gulyás

    2015-11-01

    Our current understanding about the AS level topology of the Internet is based on measurements and inductive-type models which set up rules describing the behavior (node and edge dynamics) of the individual ASes and generalize the consequences of these individual actions for the complete AS ecosystem using induction. In this paper we suggest a third, deductive approach in which we have premises for the whole AS system and the consequences of these premises are determined through deductive reasoning. We show that such a deductive approach can give complementary insights into the topological properties of the AS graph. While inductive models can mostly reflect high level statistics (e.g., degree distribution, clustering, diameter), deductive reasoning can identify omnipresent subgraphs and peering likelihood. We also propose a model, called YEAS, incorporating our deductive analytical findings that produces topologies contain both traditional and novel metrics for the AS level Internet. Project supported by Ericsson and partially supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (Grant No. OTKA 108947).

  12. Non-Verbal Reasoning Ability and Academic Achievement as Moderators of the Relation between Adverse Life Events and Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Early Adolescence: The Importance of Moderator and Outcome Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to model the functional form of the effect of contextual risk (number of adverse life events) on emotional and behavioural problems in early adolescence, and to test how intelligence and academic achievement compare as moderators of this effect. The effect of number of adverse life events on emotional and behavioural…

  13. Rhyme as reason in commercial and social advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkuková, Petra; Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the rhyme-as-reason effect on new artificially created advertising slogans. Rhymes and non-rhymes were in Experiment 1 and 2 compared in a between-subjects design and in Experiment 3 in a within-subjects design. The quality of the form and content of the slogans was always evaluated by separate groups. In Experiment 1, we found a strong preference for rhyming slogans as opposed to their non-rhyming counterparts. Rhymes were rated as more likeable, more original, easier to remember, more suitable for campaigns, more persuasive and more trustworthy. In Experiment 2, social advertising messages were evaluated favorably in both rhyming and non-rhyming versions. However, when participants directly compared rhymes and non-rhymes on the same scale (Experiment 3), the difference between commercial and social advertising disappeared and for all slogans rhymes were clearly preferred to non-rhymes in terms of both form and content. A detailed analysis revealed that the rhymes scoring high on formal aspects were also favored in the questionnaire investigating content aspects.

  14. The interpretation of proverbs by elderly with high, medium and low educational level: Abstract reasoning as an aspect of executive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Bianchi de Oliveira Wachholz

    Full Text Available Abstract It is now known that cognitive functions tend to decline with age. Executive functions (EF are among the first abilities to decline with aging. A subcomponent of the EF is abstract reasoning. The Test of Proverbs is an instrument that can be used to evaluate the capacity of abstract reasoning. Objective: To examine the association of performance in interpretation of proverbs, with education and with episodic memory and EF tasks. Methods: A total of 67 individuals aged between 60 and 75 years were evaluated, and divided into three categories of education: 1-4 years, 5-8 years, and 9 or more years of schooling. The instruments used were a sociodemographic questionnaire (gender, age, marital status, education, income, previous occupation, current occupation and health perception, the Mini Mental State Examination, Brief Cognitive Screening Battery; Geriatric Depression Scale; Forward and Backward Digit Span (WAIS-III, and the Test of Proverbs. Results: A high impact of education was seen on the interpretation of proverbs, with lower performance among the elderly with less education. A significant association between performance on the Test of Proverbs and scores on the MMSE, GDS, and verbal fluency tests was found. There was a modest association with incidental memory. Conclusions: The capacity to interpret proverbs is strongly associated with education and with performance on other EF tasks.

  15. Linguistic Knowledge, Fluency and Meta-Cognitive Knowledge as Components of Reading Comprehension in Adolescent Low Achievers: Differences between Monolinguals and Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapman, Mirjam; van Gelderen, Amos; van Steensel, Roel; van Schooten, Erik; Hulstijn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigate the role of linguistic knowledge, fluency and meta-cognitive knowledge in Dutch reading comprehension of monolingual and bilingual adolescent academic low achievers in the Netherlands. Results show that these components are substantially associated with reading comprehension. However, their role appears to be different…

  16. Enriching the Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between…

  17. Counter Examples as Starting Points for Reasoning and Sense Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a classroom activity with college sophomores in a methods-of-proof course in which students reasoned about absolute value inequalities. The course was designed to meet the needs of both mathematics majors and secondary school mathematics teaching majors early in their college studies. Asked to "fix" a false…

  18. Developing Systems of Notation as a Trace of Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillema, Erik; Hackenberg, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we engage in a thought experiment about how students might notate their reasoning for composing fractions multiplicatively (taking a fraction of a fraction and determining its size in relation to the whole). In the thought experiment we differentiate between two levels of a fraction composition scheme, which have been identified in…

  19. Proportional reasoning as a key to numeracy across the curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    -day workshops in Queensland and four full-day workshops in South Australia). Between workshops, teachers designed and trialled teaching approaches and learning experiences in their classrooms to target their students’ identified proportional reasoning learning needs and capabilities. Data were collected from...... teachers through feedback sessions, surveys, interviews, and practical presentations. Data were collected on student learning outcomes through interviews, diagnostic instruments, and classroom observations. The initial findings revealed that students and teachers had relatively poor proportional reasoning...... skills and teachers tended to rely on algorithmic approaches rather than focusing on conceptual development. These findings informed the design of an ongoing professional development program and the collaboration between teachers and researchers led to the development of a range of evidence...

  20. L2 Teacher Characteristics as Predictors of Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ramin; Allvar, Nabi Karimi

    2010-01-01

    There is a substantial research base, mainly in mainstream education, acknowledging that teachers have a great impact on student achievement. However, as far as we know, little if any empirical evidence exists to enable us to determine which set of English as a foreign language (EFL) teacher characteristics correlates with positive student…

  1. Reasoning as we read: establishing the probability of causal conditionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Matthew; Stewart, Andrew J; Connell, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Indicative conditionals of the form if p then q (e.g., if student tuition fees rise, then applications for university places will fall) invite consideration of a hypothetical event (e.g., tuition fees rising) and of one of its possible consequences (e.g., applications falling). Since a rise in tuition fees is an uncertain event with equally uncertain consequences, a reader may believe the statement to a greater or lesser extent. As a conditional is read, the earliest point at which this probabilistic evaluation can take place is as the consequent clause is wrapped up (e.g., as the critical word fall is read in the example above). Wrap-up processing occurs at the end of the clause, as it is evaluated and integrated into the evolving discourse representation. Five sources of probability may plausibly influence the evaluation of a conditional as it is wrapped up; these are P(p), P(q), P(pq), P(q|p), and P(not-p or q). A total of 128 conditionals were constructed, with these probabilities calculated for each item in a pretest. The conditionals were then embedded in vignettes and read by 36 participants on a word-by-word basis. Using linear mixed-effects modeling, we found that wrap-up reading times were predicted by pretest ratings of P(p) and P(q|p). There was no influence of P(q), P(pq), or P(not-p or q) on wrap-up reading times. Our findings are consistent with the suppositional theory of conditionals proposed by Evans and Over (2004) but do not support the mental-models theory advanced by Johnson-Laird and Byrne (2002).

  2. What Characterises High Achieving Students’ Mathematical Reasoning?

    OpenAIRE

    Haavold, Per Øystein

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates high achieving students’ mathematical reasoning when given an unfamiliar trigonometric equation. The findings indicate that the students’ way of thinking is strongly linked with imitative reasoning and only when they received some form of guidance, were they able to display flexible and creative mathematical reasoning.

  3. Digital Games as Tools for Stimulating and Assessing Reasoning Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Bottino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers some thoughts on the use of educational digital logic games. Specifically refers to a number of research experiments conducted by ITD-CNR, which have highlighted the significant potential of digital games to help develop and/or consolidation of logical thinking and reasoning skills in students of primary and secondary school level. It offers a brief overview of four research experiences carried out by multidisciplinary teams coordinated by ITD-CNR since the early 2000s These experiences have highlighted the high potential of digital games to develop and strengthen logical thinking skills and have shown the positive impact of their use even on school performance. Verificare e stimolare le abilità di ragionamento con i giochi digitaliQuesto contributo propone alcune riflessioni sull’uso educativo dei giochi logici digitali. In particolare fa riferimento ad alcune esperienze di ricerca condotte dall’Istituto di Tecnologie Didattiche - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (ITD-CNR che hanno evidenziato le interessanti potenzialità dei giochi digitali per contribuire allo sviluppo e/o al consolidamento del pensiero logico e delle abilità di ragionamento in studenti di scuola primaria e secondaria di primo grado. Si propone un breve excursus su quattro esperienze di ricerca svolte da equipe multidisciplinari coordinate da ITD-CNR a partire dai primi anni Duemila. Tali esperienze hanno messo in luce l’alto potenziale dei giochi digitali per sviluppare e potenziare abilità di pensiero logico ed hanno evidenziato il positivo impatto del loro uso anche sul rendimento scolastico.

  4. Free choice permission as resource-sensitive reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Barker

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Free choice permission is a long-standing puzzle in deontic logic and in natural language semantics. It involves what appears to be a conjunctive use of "or": from "You may eat an apple or a pear", we can infer that "You may eat an apple" and that "You may eat a pear" -- though not that "You may eat an apple and a pear". Following Lokhorst (1997, I argue that because permission is a limited resource, a resource-sensitive logic such as Girard's Linear Logic is better suited to modeling permission talk than, say, classical logic. A resource-sensitive approach enables the semantics to track not only that permission has been granted and what sort of permission it is (i.e., permission to eat apples versus permission to eat pears, but also how much permission has been granted, i.e., whether there is enough permission to eat two pieces of fruit or only one. The account here is primarily semantic (as opposed to pragmatic, with no special modes of composition or special pragmatic rules. The paper includes an introduction to Linear Logic. doi:10.3765/sp.3.10 BibTeX info

  5. Philosophical Reflections made explicit as a Tool for Mathematical Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sune; Andresen, Mette

    2009-01-01

        A new construct, ‘multidiciplinarity', is prescribed in the curricula of Danish Upper Secondary Schools by governmental regulations since 2006. Multidisciplinarity offers a good chance to introduce philosophical tools or methods in mathematics with the aim to improve the students' learning...... of both subjects, and to study the students' reactions and signs of progressive mathematizing. Based on realistic mathematics education (RME) which is rooted in Hans Freudenthal's idea of mathematics as a human activity, we decided to centre our work on the concept of reflection and to build a model...... for making students reflections in the mathematics class explicit to themselves. In our paper, we present a combination of two stratifications of reflections which were developed recently in works by other authors. The paper outlines our model and exemplifies its use on the teaching of mathematical models...

  6. Personality Traits as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrtnik-Vitulic, Helena; Zupancic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    The study examined the predictive value of adolescents' personality trait ratings by different groups of informants in explaining academic achievement [grade point average (GPA)] while controlling for students' sex and their mothers' education. The Inventory of Child/Adolescent Individual Differences was employed as a measure of students'…

  7. Parenting Style as a Moderator for Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Zahari; Low, Suet Fin; Lau, Poh Li

    2012-01-01

    Parenting styles have always been a crucial factor in influencing all aspects of a person's development. The purpose of this study is to test the structural equation model of academic achievement among the students using parenting styles as a moderator. The sample comprised 493 students from eight schools. Parenting styles are determined using the…

  8. [Dentistry students' reasons for choosing dentistry as a career in Damascus University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashlah, A M

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional questionnaire survey assessed the motives for choosing dentist as a profession among dentistry students at Damascus University, Syrian Arab Republic. A total of 408 undergraduate students (233 males and 175 females) aged 18-23 years were selected randomly from students in the second, third and fourth years of dentistry study. They completed a questionnaire that enquired about their reasons for studying dentistry as well as their sociodemographic characteristics. The number of admissions in females had increased over the 3 years. Most parents of the students were university-educated. The main motivation for choosing dentistry was as a means to achieve personal goals, including getting a good job abroad, having financial independence, and attaining a good reputation. There were significant differences between the sexes with regard to the reasons for choosing dentistry.

  9. Parenting Style as a Moderator for Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Zahari; Low, Suet Fin; Lau, Poh Li

    2012-08-01

    Parenting styles have always been a crucial factor in influencing all aspects of a person's development. The purpose of this study is to test the structural equation model of academic achievement among the students using parenting styles as a moderator. The sample comprised 493 students from eight schools. Parenting styles are determined using the Parental Authority Questionnaire (Buri in J Pers Assess 57:110-119, 1991). Academic achievement is measured based on the students' performance in the Lower Secondary Assessment. Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling. Results demonstrated that model of authoritative and model of authoritarian fit the data of this study well. Both authoritative and authoritarian parenting styles are the most common practice of the parents. Parenting styles have been found to be a moderator of this study. The results indicated that parenting styles moderated the effect of academic self-concept on academic achievement. The impact of academic self-concept on academic achievement is found to be greater for the authoritative than the authoritarian parenting style.

  10. Temperament-based learning styles as moderators of academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, C B; Oakland, T

    1997-01-01

    Considerable interest in applications of temperament theory has led to proposals of four temperament-related learning styles. The hypothesis that achievement is higher when instructional strategies utilize methods consistent with students' preferred learning styles was tested using 417 seventh graders, the majority of whom were from minority and low SES families. The hypothesis was not supported; instead, student achievement was significantly higher with instructional strategies designed to promote personalized learning. The need to extend temperament-based learning styles by considering additional qualities that are important to learning is discussed.

  11. Effects of collaboration and inquiry on reasoning and achievement in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jamie Lee

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of two collaborative grouping strategies and two instructional methods in terms of gains in reasoning ability and achievement in college biology. In order to do so, a quasi-experimental study was performed in which students were placed in one of four treatment conditions: heterogeneous grouping within inquiry instruction, homogeneous grouping within inquiry instruction, heterogeneous grouping within non-inquiry instruction, and homogeneous grouping within non-inquiry instruction. Students were placed in groups based on initial reasoning level. Reasoning levels and achievement gains were assessed at the end of the study. Results showed that within non-inquiry instruction, heterogeneous mean group scores were higher in both reasoning and achievement than homogeneous groups. In contrast, within inquiry instruction, homogeneous mean group scores were higher in both reasoning and achievement. Inquiry instruction, as a whole, significantly outperformed non-inquiry instruction in the development of reasoning ability. Within inquiry instruction, low-ability students had significantly greater reasoning gains when grouped homogeneously. These results support Piaget's developmental theory and contradict Vygotsky's developmental theory. These results also suggest that the success of one grouping strategy over another is highly dependent upon the nature of instruction, which may be a cause for such conflicting views on grouping strategies within the educational literature. In addition, inquiry instruction led to students having greater confidence in their reasoning ability as well as a more positive attitude toward collaboration. Instructional implications are discussed.

  12. Children's Reasoning as Collective Social Action through Problem Solving in Grade 2/3 Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Research on young children's reasoning show the complex relationships of knowledge, theories, and evidence in their decision-making and problem solving. Most of the research on children's reasoning skills has been done in individualized and formal research settings, not collective classroom environments where children often engage in learning and reasoning together to solve classroom problems. This study posits children's reasoning as a collective social activity that can occur in science classrooms. The study examined how children process their reasoning within the context of Grade 2/3 science classrooms and how the process of collectivity emerges from classroom interactions and dialogue between children as they attempt to solve their classroom problems. The study findings suggest that children's reasoning involves active evaluation of theories and evidence through collective problem solving, with consensus being developed through dialogical reasoning.

  13. Reasoning Words as Linguistic Features of Exploratory Talk: Classroom Use and What It Can Tell Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Maureen; Kong, Yiren

    2017-01-01

    Reasoning words are linguistic features associated with classroom exploratory talk as students talk-to-learn, explore ideas, and probe each other's thinking. This study extends established research on use of reasoning words to a fourth- to fifth-grade literature-based English language learning context. We examined frequency and patterning of…

  14. Educating for Civic Engagement: Public Achievement as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Bernadette Christine

    Over the last four decades there is evidence that citizens are less civically engaged, have less trust in each other and governmental institutions, and are less prepared to participate in deliberative and civic processes. This research studies the importance of acquiring deliberative and civic skills and behaviors as an integral part of civic engagement and developing educational and learning strategies to impart those skills and behaviors in an educational environment. This research uses a civic action program called Public Achievement (PA) as a case study to investigate if participating in a civic and deliberative focused program enables participants to continue to use the skills and behaviors learned in PA in non-PA activities. The research study was focused by a literature review of philosophical frameworks, educational history in the United States, and educational theory. The literature review and examples of learning civic skills and behaviors in secondary and higher educational institutions are examined to frame the analysis of PA. Based on the literature review and the design of PA, constructs and a survey instrument were developed to test the hypothesis that students who participate in PA will be more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors than students who did not participate in PA. The research was conducted with two schools in rural Missouri, two schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and two schools in St. Paul, Minnesota. The study results show that students who participated in PA were not more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors, and in many cases, non-PA students exhibited civic skills and behaviors more often. The findings revealed that there are programmatic, organizational, and societal barriers that may impede the effectiveness of PA. The findings suggest that implementation of civic engagement programs may be more effective when the effort is supported and reinforced by and across all parts of the organization, organizational

  15. Reconnection production-consumption: change to achieve food and nutritional security, as well as rural development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Rodríguez-González

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the importance of changing the conventional food system to achieve food and nutritional security, as well as rural development. This text was divided into three sections. In the first one, the conventional food system and its consequences were characterized, showing the need for a change that seeks the integration of social, environmental, and health dimensions. The second part addressed the interventions related to the food supply system made by the Government, which are fundamental to achieve food and nutrition security, as well as to promote development processes in rural areas. Finally, the experience of Brazil’s National School Feeding Programme was presented. That program links food produced by small producers with the National School Feeding Program, allowing the reconnection of production and consumers through institutional markets. That link created incentives for food and nutrition security of small farmers and, at the same time, improved the availability of higher- quality food for vulnerable populations and promotedeating patterns that allow the preservation of food culture.

  16. Lean Production as Promoter of Thinkers to Achieve Companies' Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Anabela C.; Dinis-Carvalho, Jose; Sousa, Rui M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the lean production paradigm as promoter of workers' creativity and thinking potential, and recognize this human potential as a fundamental asset for companies' growth and success, being a major factor to face the disturbing and unpredictable needs of current markets, providing companies with the necessary…

  17. Extremely low density self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Guojun Liu; Zhanguo Li; Mei Li; Xiaohua Wang

    2008-01-01

    The self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with extremely low density of 8×106 cm-2 are achieved using higher growth temperature and lower InAs coverage by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOVCD). As a result of micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL), for extremely low density of 8×106 cm-2 InAs QDs in the micro-PL measurements at 10 K, only one emission peak has been achieved. It is believed that the InAs QDs have a good potential to realize single photon sources.

  18. Personality as a moderator of context effects on academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A.A.J.; Kuyper, H.; Lubbers, M.J; Van der Werf, M.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether personality moderates group influence of classmates on academic achievement and whether these so-called context effects can be attributed to peer pressure. The sample consisted of 2498 students in their first year of Dutch secondary education. The data were analyzed by a two-

  19. Personality as a Moderator of Context Effects on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, A. A. Jolijn; Kuyper, Hans; Lubbers, Miranda J.; Van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether personality moderates group influence of classmates on academic achievement and whether these so-called context effects can be attributed to peer pressure. The sample consisted of 2498 students in their first year of Dutch secondary education. The data were analyzed by a two-level (students within classes) analysis,…

  20. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-01-01

    Background Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. Methods The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted ...

  1. An Analysis of High School Mathematics Achievement and English Language Arts Achievement as Predictors of Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Science assessments require students to read and comprehend questions and to solve mathematical problems. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the following variables can be used to predict science achievement: English language arts achievement, mathematics achievement, socioeconomic status (SES), limited English proficiency (LEP)…

  2. Limited Health Knowledge as a Reason for Non-Use of Four Common Complementary Health Practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Burke

    Full Text Available Complementary health practices are an important element of health/healthcare seeking behavior among adults in the United States. Reasons for use include medical need, prevention and wellness promotion, and cultural relevance. Survey studies published over the past several decades have provided important information on the use of complementary health practices, such as acupuncture and yoga. A review of the literature, however, reveals an absence of studies looking specifically at who does not use these approaches, and why not.To explore this issue two samples were created using data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey Complementary and Alternative Medicine supplement. Of particular interest was the relationship between lack of health knowledge, as a reason for non-use, and key independent variables. The first sample was comprised of individuals who had never used any of four common complementary health practices -- acupuncture, chiropractic, natural products, and yoga. The second was a subset of those same non-users who had also reported low back pain, the most frequently cited health concern related to use of complementary therapies.A hypothesized association between lack of health knowledge, lower educational attainment, and other key socioeconomic indicators was supported in the findings. Although it was hypothesized that low back pain would be associated with greater information seeking, regardless of level of education, that hypothesis was not supported.Lack of knowledge was found to affect utilization of common complementary health practices, regardless of the potentially motivating presence of back pain. Disparities in the utilization of complementary medicine, related to educational attainment and other socioeconomic factors, may negatively affect quality of care for many Americans. Creative approaches are needed to help reduce inequities in understanding and improve access to care for underserved populations.

  3. Tele-centres as a way of achieving universal access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Anyimadu, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The success of tele-centres in Ghana is discussed. The tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. The tele-centres can also contribute more directly to the supply of non-commercial...

  4. "Grasp of Practice" as a Reasoning Resource for Inquiry and Nature of Science Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article articulates how a "grasp of practice" serves as a reasoning resource for inquiry and citizenship abilities associated with nature of science (NOS) understanding. Theoretically, this resource is elaborated through an overlapping concern with "practice" in two literatures, science studies and psychology of learning, bringing attention…

  5. Psychological Trauma as a Reason for Computer Game Addiction among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskenbay, Fariza; Tolegenova, Aliya; Kalymbetova, Elmira; Chung, Man Cheung; Faizullina, Aida; Jakupov, Maksat

    2016-01-01

    This study explores psychological trauma as a reason for computer game addiction among adolescents. The findings of this study show that there is a connection between psychological trauma and computer game addiction. Some psychologists note that the main cause of any type of addiction derives from psychological trauma, and that finding such…

  6. Management accountants as business partners : An empirical analysis based on the theory of reasoned action

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Sebastian; Barbara E. Weißenberger; Kabst, Rüdiger; Wehner, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Business practice and literature frequently advocate more business oriented roles for management accountants. The aim of this study is to examine reasons for management accountants to act as business partners and to analyze corresponding performance effects. More specifically, two research questions are investigated: (i) why do management accountants act as business partners, and (ii) are business oriented management accountants beneficial to organizations? To answer these research questio...

  7. Spinal manipulation as a valid treatment for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, L F

    1996-03-01

    The practice of chiropractic has been regulated in the State of Delaware since 1937. Since that time, the battle lines in the state between medicine and chiropractic have been drawn. This war has existed on both the political and clinical fronts, and although it has always been believed by the chiropractic profession that once the "scientific evidence" of the benefit of chiropractic was proven, the war would end. This has not occurred to the extent believed. Even with its 1980 victory over the AMA, chiropractic has still been unable to achieve full acceptance as a clinical discipline among other professions. Many hospitals in this country have opened their doors to DCs. This by and large, has solely been for economic reasons and not as a recognition of the clinical benefit of manipulation. There is, however, a growing population of primary care physicians and researchers suggesting the benefit of manipulation for low back pain as well as suggesting that increased cooperation between MDs and DCs could be of extreme benefit to the patient population at large. This group continues to be in the minority. However, with increased knowledge of the benefits of spinal manipulation and the scientific evidence that now exists to support its efficacy, it is now believed that this interprofessional referral pattern will increase. In addition, many managed care programs now require primary care physicians to determine the necessity for referral to a chiropractor, thus causing a need for the primary physician to have some knowledge of spinal manipulation. This paper is presented to inform the physician community of Delaware of some of the evidence pointing to the efficacy of spinal manipulation as a treatment for low back pain.

  8. Limited Health Knowledge as a Reason for Non-Use of Four Common Complementary Health Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Burke; Nahin, Richard L.; Stussman, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complementary health practices are an important element of health/healthcare seeking behavior among adults in the United States. Reasons for use include medical need, prevention and wellness promotion, and cultural relevance. Survey studies published over the past several decades have provided important information on the use of complementary health practices, such as acupuncture and yoga. A review of the literature, however, reveals an absence of studies looking specifically at wh...

  9. A framework for providing telecommuting as a reasonable accommodation: some considerations on a comparative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Shelley; Weiss, Sally; Moon, Nathan W; Baker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Telecommuting, whether full time, part time, or over short periods when the need arises, can be an important accommodation for employees with disabilities. Indeed, telecommuting may be the only form of accommodation that offers employees whose disabilities fluctuate a means to stay consistently and gainfully employed. This article describes one employer's experience in considering a request for telecommuting as a reasonable accommodation for a particular employee. Drawing on real-life examples, both positive and negative, this article provides a win/win framework for decision-making that can help employers evaluate the use of telecommuting as a possible accommodation and facilitates open and ongoing communication between employer and employee.

  10. Does Early Algebraic Reasoning Differ as a Function of Students' Difficulty with Calculations versus Word Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sarah R; Fuchs, Lynn S

    2014-08-01

    According to national mathematics standards, algebra instruction should begin at kindergarten and continue through elementary school. Most often, teachers address algebra in the elementary grades with problems related to solving equations or understanding functions. With 789 2(nd)- grade students, we administered (a) measures of calculations and word problems in the fall and (b) an assessment of pre-algebraic reasoning, with items that assessed solving equations and functions, in the spring. Based on the calculation and word-problem measures, we placed 148 students into 1 of 4 difficulty status categories: typically performing, calculation difficulty, word-problem difficulty, or difficulty with calculations and word problems. Analyses of variance were conducted on the 148 students; path analytic mediation analyses were conducted on the larger sample of 789 students. Across analyses, results corroborated the finding that word-problem difficulty is more strongly associated with difficulty with pre-algebraic reasoning. As an indicator of later algebra difficulty, word-problem difficulty may be a more useful predictor than calculation difficulty, and students with word-problem difficulty may require a different level of algebraic reasoning intervention than students with calculation difficulty.

  11. Teacher Trainers as Action Researchers: Scrutinizing the Reasons for Student Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Emel; Çelik Korkmaz, Sule

    2015-01-01

    This action research aims to identify the teacher trainees' attributions for their failure, their locus of control and their achievement goals as a result of high failure rate in "Teaching English to Young Learners" course at a large state university in Turkey. For this purpose, qualitative and quantitative data were gathered via an…

  12. Fuzzy Reasoning as a Base for Collision Avoidance Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    tanja brcko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the generally high qualifications of seafarers, many maritime accidents are caused by human error; such accidents include capsizing, collision, and fire, and often result in pollution. Enough concern has been generated that researchers around the world have developed the study of the human factor into an independent scientific discipline. A great deal of progress has been made, particularly in the area of artificial intelligence. But since total autonomy is not yet expedient, the decision support systems based on soft computing are proposed to support human navigators and VTS operators in times of crisis as well as during the execution of everyday tasks as a means of reducing risk levels.This paper considers a decision support system based on fuzzy logic integrated into an existing bridge collision avoidance system. The main goal is to determine the appropriate course of avoidance, using fuzzy reasoning.

  13. Learning about causes from people and about people as causes: probabilistic models and social causal reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchsbaum, Daphna; Seiver, Elizabeth; Bridgers, Sophie; Gopnik, Alison

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge children face is uncovering the causal structure of the world around them. Previous research on children's causal inference has demonstrated their ability to learn about causal relationships in the physical environment using probabilistic evidence. However, children must also learn about causal relationships in the social environment, including discovering the causes of other people's behavior, and understanding the causal relationships between others' goal-directed actions and the outcomes of those actions. In this chapter, we argue that social reasoning and causal reasoning are deeply linked, both in the real world and in children's minds. Children use both types of information together and in fact reason about both physical and social causation in fundamentally similar ways. We suggest that children jointly construct and update causal theories about their social and physical environment and that this process is best captured by probabilistic models of cognition. We first present studies showing that adults are able to jointly infer causal structure and human action structure from videos of unsegmented human motion. Next, we describe how children use social information to make inferences about physical causes. We show that the pedagogical nature of a demonstrator influences children's choices of which actions to imitate from within a causal sequence and that this social information interacts with statistical causal evidence. We then discuss how children combine evidence from an informant's testimony and expressed confidence with evidence from their own causal observations to infer the efficacy of different potential causes. We also discuss how children use these same causal observations to make inferences about the knowledge state of the social informant. Finally, we suggest that psychological causation and attribution are part of the same causal system as physical causation. We present evidence that just as children use covariation between

  14. Semantic Matchmaking as Non-Monotonic Reasoning: A Description Logic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Di Noia, T; Donini, F M; 10.1613/jair.2153

    2011-01-01

    Matchmaking arises when supply and demand meet in an electronic marketplace, or when agents search for a web service to perform some task, or even when recruiting agencies match curricula and job profiles. In such open environments, the objective of a matchmaking process is to discover best available offers to a given request. We address the problem of matchmaking from a knowledge representation perspective, with a formalization based on Description Logics. We devise Concept Abduction and Concept Contraction as non-monotonic inferences in Description Logics suitable for modeling matchmaking in a logical framework, and prove some related complexity results. We also present reasonable algorithms for semantic matchmaking based on the devised inferences, and prove that they obey to some commonsense properties. Finally, we report on the implementation of the proposed matchmaking framework, which has been used both as a mediator in e-marketplaces and for semantic web services discovery.

  15. Islamic Modernists and Discourse on Reason as a Reconciliatory Argument between Islam and the Western Enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASMAHAN SALLAH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the debates on the relationship between Islam and reason during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. It argues that these debates were transnational but were largely influenced by similar debates in the Western tradition. It also affirms that modernists used discourse on reason to reconcile Islam with Western Enlightenment. The article illustrates the various mechanisms which Islamic modernists implemented to facilitate such reconciliation. These mechanisms include rationalization of miracles, contesting the concept of prophethood, and rejecting the scholarship of Islamic jurisprudence and theology. Based on writings by several Islamic modernists, such as their biographies of Prophet Muhammad, Quran commentaries, and magazine articles in different Islamic countries, I ascribe these mechanisms to a gap between logic and experimental thought, a gap which seeped into the mind of Islamic modernists under the influence of Western contemporary thinkers. While this discourse claims compatibility between Islam and Western Enlightenment, it also resists the binary of the sacred and the secular, a major legacy of the Western Enlightenment.

  16. Problems with change in R2 as applied to theory of reasoned action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafimow, David

    2004-12-01

    The paradigm of choice for theory of reasoned action research seems to depend largely on the notion of change in variance accounted for (DeltaR2) as new independent variables are added to a multiple regression equation. If adding a particular independent variable of interest increases the variance in the dependent variable that can be accounted for by the list of independent variables, then the research is deemed to be 'successful', and the researcher is considered to have made a convincing argument about the importance of the new variable. In contrast to this trend, I present arguments that suggest serious problems with the paradigm, and conclude that studies on attitude-behaviour relations would advance the field of psychology to a far greater extent if researchers abandoned it.

  17. THE PRINCIPLE OF REASONED SHAPE FORMING AS A BASIS FOR PLASTIC ADEQUACY OF DESIGN OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Vasilyevich Miroshnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the basic approaches to configuring the form in design. The authors analyze the main strategies of shape formation in modern design practices. The novelty of the subject is that the analysis is carried out in the context of the adequacy of the design of plastic objects. The essence of the problems outlined by the authors is inconsistency between the object’s semantics and its external form resulted from incorrect practices of shape formation. Consideration of strategies and tactics of configuration of forms is based on comparison of two principles of shape formation - intuitive and discursive. The aim of the authors is to identify the reasons and structural specificity of intuitive and discursive practices of shape formation in design and to show the priority of the discursive approach. Attention of the authors is focused on the differences of search algorithms and results of shaping which are characteristic for the principles under consideration. The arguments cited in the article determine the discursive strategy of form configuration as the most correct and efficient in terms of design engineering. In the process of analyzing the basic algorithms of shape formation, of topical importance is the concept of legitimacy of form as a definition of the most appropriate process and a results of the project research. The article gives the interpretation of legitimacy in terms of the project practices and design - education.

  18. Children's effortful control and academic achievement: do relational peer victimization and classroom participation operate as mediators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Swanson, Jodi; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Berger, Rebecca H

    2014-08-01

    Given that early academic achievement is related to numerous developmental outcomes, understanding processes that promote early success in school is important. This study was designed to clarify how students' (N=291; M age in fall of kindergarten=5.66 years, SD=0.39 year) effortful control, relational peer victimization, and classroom participation relate to achievement, as students progress from kindergarten to first grade. Effortful control and achievement were assessed in kindergarten, classroom participation and relational peer victimization were assessed in the fall of first grade, and achievement was reassessed in the spring of first grade. Classroom participation, but not relational peer victimization, mediated relations between effortful control and first grade standardized and teacher-rated achievement, controlling for kindergarten achievement. Findings suggest that aspects of classroom participation, such as the ability to work independently, may be useful targets of intervention for enhancing academic achievement in young children.

  19. Feasibility of Self-Reflection as a Tool to Balance Clinical Reasoning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Matthew; de Bruin, Anique B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians are believed to use two predominant reasoning strategies: system 1 based pattern recognition, and system 2 based analytical reasoning. Balancing these cognitive reasoning strategies is widely believed to reduce diagnostic error. However, clinicians approach different problems with different reasoning strategies. This study explores…

  20. The compleat lawyer--medical law as practical reasoning: doctrine, empiricism, and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Margot Brazier has modelled the relationship between legal scholarship and health care practice--an evidence-based approach to doing good in the real world through the application of the discipline of law. No ivory tower academic, but a good citizen. This paper explores the expression of her comprehensive contribution in an academic paper and a policy review. She has shown how law needs to take into account the realities of the clinic when considering the plausibility of various claims for the doctrine of informed consent. She has also demonstrated how discipline could be brought to bear on policy-making, where in the Surrogacy Review she prioritised empirical evidence over preconceptions: evidence-based policy not policy-based evidence as modern consultation documents too often elicit. Margot Brazier has also provided a role model for academic lawyers' contribution to the public good; not only through ensuring the proper administration of the law (as chair of the Animal Procedures Committee for the Home Office), but also in shaping a cathartic response to public concerns as Chair of the Retained Organ Commission. She did not set out to establish a grand theory of medical law, but rather has built an approach that has enriched its practice and has had a lasting impact on those working in the field. In her hands, law is a tool for improving the practice of health care. Efficient practice precedes the theory of it; methodologies presuppose the application of the methods, of the critical investigation of which they are the products. It was because Aristotle found himself and others reasoning now intelligently and now stupidly and it was because Izaak Walton found himself and others angling sometimes effectively and sometimes ineffectively that both were able to give their pupils the maxims and prescriptions of their arts.

  1. Foreign Language Learning Aptitudes, Attitudes, Attributions, and Achievement of Postsecondary Students Identified as Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Sherry K.; McCallum, R. Steve; Bell, Sherry Mee; Cochran, Jeff L.; Sawyer, Stephani Choate

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the aptitudes, attitudes, attributions, and achievement of undergraduates identified as gifted who were taking a beginning Spanish course, and compared these characteristics to undergraduates in the same cohort group who had not been identified as gifted. There were differences in the aptitudes, attitudes, and achievement of…

  2. Building on the Enriched Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Mastery Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Michou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two motivational theories – the Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory – have recently been combined to explain students’ motivation, making it possible to study the “what” and the “why” of learners’ achievement strivings. The present study built on this approach by (a investigating whether the distinction between autonomous or volitional and controlling or pressuring reasons can be meaningfully applied to the adoption of mastery-avoidance goals, (b investigating the concurrent and prospective relations between mastery-avoidance goals and their underlying reasons and learning strategies when mastery-approach goals and their underlying reasons were also considered, and by (c incorporating psychological need experiences as an explanatory variable in the relation between achievement motives (i.e., the motive to succeed and motive to avoid failure and both mastery goals and their underlying reasons. In two Turkish university students samples ('N' = 226, 'Mage '= 22.36; 'N' = 331, 'Mage '= 19.5, autonomous and controlling reasons appeared applicable to mastery-avoidance goals and regression and path analysis further showed that mastery-avoidance goals and their underlying autonomous reasons fail to predicted learning strategies over and above the pursuit of mastery-approach goals and their underlying reasons. Finally, need experiences were established as mediators between achievement motives and both mastery goals and their underlying reasons.

  3. `Grasp of Practice' as a Reasoning Resource for Inquiry and Nature of Science Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael

    2008-02-01

    This article articulates how a ‘grasp of practice’ serves as a reasoning resource for inquiry and citizenship abilities associated with nature of science (NOS) understanding. Theoretically, this resource is elaborated through an overlapping concern with ‘practice’ in two literatures, science studies and psychology of learning, bringing attention to two key roles in scientific practice, Critiquers and Constructors of claims. Empirically, this resource is made plausible by the results of an expert-novice study and a classroom study. In the expert-novice study, reactions of scientists and laypeople to science-related claims in the popular media were contrasted, underlining the appropriate ways scientists tend to Critique such claims. In the classroom study, sixth-grade students engaged in a 2-week ramp experiment, experiencing first hand the roles of Critiquers and Constructors of claims, and were subsequently assessed with a novel experimental task. Performances suggest that students had attained a grasp of practice, going well beyond mere execution of methods or procedures. These results challenge a common assumption that declarative knowledge best characterizes learning targets for supporting inquiry and NOS understanding.

  4. Deontic reasoning as a target of selection: reply to Astington and Dack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Denise Dellarosa

    2013-12-01

    In their discussion of young children's deontic reasoning performance, Astington and Dack (2013) made the following claims: (1) Children need more cues to elicit cogent social norm reasoning than adults require, namely, explicit reference to authority; (2) Deontic reasoning improves with age, and this is evidence against a nativist view; (3) All evolutionary explanations of deontic reasoning advantages require positing a ''domain-specific deontic reasoning module."; and (4) young children excel at deontic reasoning because it is easier. Here, I refute each claim. Instead, I argue that (1) Social norm reasoning is one type of deontic reasoning that has been the target of selective pressure; (2) Development does not preclude nativism; (3) Epistemic utterances make no greater processing demands than deontic utterances; and (4) both adult and child norm reasoning performance is strongly influenced by reference to or implication of authority.

  5. The Visual Aural Digit Span Test and Bender Gestalt Test as Predictors of Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Teresa C.; Smith, Billy L.

    1988-01-01

    Examined Visual Aural Digit Span Test (VADS) and Bender-Gestalt (BG) scores as predictors of Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised (WRAT-R) scores among 115 elementary school students referred for low academic achievement. Divided children into three age groups. Results suggest BG and VADS Test can be effective screening devices for young children…

  6. Using Garlic As A Far-Transfer Problem of Proportional And Probabilistic Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, N T

    2008-01-01

    The work describes a general problem, which emphasizes proportional reasoning and probabilistic reasoning skills in the context of planting garlic in a backyard garden. Along with practicing these reasoning skills in a context far-removed from the standard high school or college curriculum, our solution involves the development of a few relatively sophisticated statistical concepts, specifically histograms and confidence intervals.

  7. Fluid intellingence and spatial reasoning as predictors of pilot training performance in the South African Air Force (SAAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François de Kock

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Pilot selection is a form of high-stakes selection due to the massive costs of training, high trainee ability requirements and costly repercussions of poor selection decisions. This criterion-related validation study investigated the predictive ability of fluid intelligence and spatial reasoning in predicting three criteria of pilot training performance, using an accumulated sample of South African Air Force pilots (N = 108. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses with training grade achieved as criterion were performed for each of the phases of training, namely practical flight training, ground school training, and officers’ formative training. Multiple correlations of 0.35 (p < 0.01, 0.20 (p > 0.05 and 0.23 (p > 0.05 were obtained for flight, ground school and formative training results, respectively. Spatial ability had incremental validity over fluid intelligence for predicting flight training performance.

  8. Executive Function as a Mediator between SES and Academic Achievement throughout Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Gwendolyn M.; Farah, Martha J.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood socioeconomic status (SES), as measured by parental education and family income, is highly predictive of academic achievement, but little is known about how specific cognitive systems shape SES disparities in achievement outcomes. This study investigated the extent to which executive function (EF) mediated associations between parental…

  9. Academic self-concept as a predictor of achievement for a sample of elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M A; MacDonald, N T

    1990-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic self-concept scores of 122 children with their achievement in Grade 6 as compared to general self-concept and locus of control. Academic self-concept correlated significantly higher with teachers' grades and standardized measures of achievement than either general self-concept or locus of control. A multiple regression analysis also confirmed the potential usefulness of academic self-concept for predicting students' achievement. Academic self-concept may be a more useful construct in helping understand students' achievement than frequently administered measures of general self-concept.

  10. A New Look at the Old Problem of a Reasonable Expectation: The Reasonableness of Repeated Renewals of Fixed Term Contracts as Opposed to Indefinite Employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Gericke

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa, the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 (LRA regulates and protects the position of the employee who reasonably expects that a fixed-term contract will be renewed on the same or similar terms while the employer only offered to renew the contract on less favourable terms or in some instances was not prepared torenew the fixed-term contract at all. The LRA regards the latter conduct as a dismissal, as long as the employee can prove that the employer was responsible for creating the reasonable expectation of contractual renewal. In contrast to this position, the LRA does not regulate or protect the position of the employee whose fixed-term contract was repeatedly renewed on the same, similar or even improved terms, while the employer was in a position to offer the employee indefinite employment. The employer may even have created a reasonable expectation that repeated renewals would result in permanent employment. The exploitation and abuse of the fixed-term contract to the extent that an employee is deprived of employment security and the benefits linked to an employment relationship of indefinite duration have prompted a comparative investigation into this particular field of law.

  11. Spatial ability as a predictor of math achievement: the importance of sex and handedness patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M B; Pezaris, E; Nuttall, R L

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with major theories of handedness and brain organization, differential predictors for math achievement were found as a function of sex and handedness subgroups among eighth graders. Although there was no difference in absolute levels of performance as a function of either sex or handedness, predictive structures did differ. Regression analyses showed that spatial ability predicts math achievement for: (1) girls with anomalous dominance (non-right-handers and right-handers with non-right-handed relatives), and (2) all boys (independent of handedness group). In contrast, for the standard dominance girls who are right-handed with all right-handed relatives (considered strongly left-hemisphere dominant for language), spatial ability did not predict for math achievement. These findings occurred, even when scholastic aptitude and verbal achievement factors were controlled. It was concluded that further studies of sex differences in math achievement should consider subgroup differences within the sexes, based on handedness patterns.

  12. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie eRuffing; F.- Sophie eWach; Frank M. eSpinath; Roland eBrünken; Julia eKarbach

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by ...

  13. Improved swimming pool achieves higher reproducibility and sensitivity to effect of food components as ergogenic AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kengo; Yamada, Ayumi; Mita, Yukiko; Goto, Ayako; Ishimi, Tomoe; Mabuchi, Haruko; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru; Yasumoto, Kyoden

    2009-06-01

    A previously developed current swimming pool for mice has been used to evaluate many food components that enhance endurance exercise performance. In this article, to improve reproducibility, reliability and sensitivity of this assay system, we improved the spout part to generate a uniform current and divided the pool into six lanes to avoid physical interference between swimming mice. The stability of the current flow was assessed by measuring the surface current speed and water volume from the spout part. Maximum swimming times of ddY and BALB/c mice were measured to assess the reproducibility of the maximum swimming time. The improvement in sensitivity compared to the original equipment was estimated under three physiological conditions: low carbohydrate diet feeding, low blood hemoglobin level, and carbohydrate supplementation during exercise. The new spout part improved uniformity and quick adjustment of surface current, yielding an increase of workload in a stepwise manner during swimming. Exercise workload was increased in proportion to surface current speed, as evidenced by cadence of kicks and serum lactic acid levels. The improved swimming pool showed higher reproducibility of swimming time until fatigue (pswimming time was improved in the swimming pool. The improved swimming pool yielded higher sensitivity for low carbohydrate diet feeding (pswimming pool. The improvement of the swimming pool achieved higher sensitivity and reproducibility in assessing various diet and food components compared to the original swimming pool.

  14. Children's Reasoning as Collective Social Action through Problem Solving in Grade 2/3 Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Research on young children's reasoning show the complex relationships of knowledge, theories, and evidence in their decision-making and problem solving. Most of the research on children's reasoning skills has been done in individualized and formal research settings, not collective classroom environments where children often engage in learning and…

  15. The Debate Continues: Are There Gender Differences in Moral Reasoning as Defined by Kohlberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruess, Brian J.; Pearson, Frances C.

    2002-01-01

    Examines changes in moral reasoning among college students and seeks to determine whether there are gender differences in the process. Women scored higher than men on both Principled moral reasoning and Davison's moral index and graduating students scored higher than first-year students on Davison's moral index. Discusses whether Kohlberg's theory…

  16. Developing Students' Reasoning about Samples and Sampling Variability as a Path to Expert Statistical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Joan; Le, Laura; Zieffler, Andrew; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of developing students' reasoning about samples and sampling variability as a foundation for statistical thinking. Research on expert-novice thinking as well as statistical thinking is reviewed and compared. A case is made that statistical thinking is a type of expert thinking, and as such, research…

  17. Intelligence and Metacognition as Predictors of Foreign Language Achievement: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishghadam, Reza; Khajavy, Gholam Hassan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role of metacognition and intelligence in foreign language achievement on a sample of 143 Iranian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. Participants completed Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices as a measure of intelligence, and Metacognitive Awareness Inventory as a measure of metacognition. Learners' scores at…

  18. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffing, Stephanie; Wach, F-Sophie; Spinath, Frank M; Brünken, Roland; Karbach, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by correlation analyses. A set of t-tests was used to test for gender differences in learning strategies, whereas structural equation modeling as well as multi-group analyses were applied to investigate the incremental contribution of learning strategies for male and female students' academic performance. The sample consisted of 461 students (mean age = 21.2 years, SD = 3.2). Correlation analyses revealed that general cognitive ability as well as the learning strategies effort, attention, and learning environment were positively correlated with academic achievement. Gender differences were found in the reported application of many learning strategies. Importantly, the prediction of achievement in structural equation modeling revealed that only effort explained incremental variance (10%) over general cognitive ability. Results of multi-group analyses showed no gender differences in this prediction model. This finding provides further knowledge regarding gender differences in learning research and the specific role of learning strategies for academic achievement. The incremental assessment of learning strategy use as well as gender-differences in their predictive value contributes to the understanding and improvement of successful academic development.

  19. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eRuffing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by correlation analyses. A set of t-tests was used to test for gender differences in learning strategies, whereas structural equation modelling as well as multi-group analyses were applied to investigate the incremental contribution of learning strategies for male and female students’ academic performance. The sample consisted of 461 students (mean age=21.2 years, SD=3.2. Correlation analyses revealed that general cognitive ability as well as the learning strategies effort, attention, and learning environment were positively correlated with academic achievement. Gender differences were found in the reported application of many learning strategies. Importantly, the prediction of achievement in structural equation modeling revealed that only effort explained incremental variance (10% over general cognitive ability. Results of multi-group analyses showed no gender differences in this prediction model. This finding provides further knowledge regarding gender differences in learning research and the specific role of learning strategies for academic achievement. The incremental assessment of learning strategy use as well as gender-differences in their predictive value contributes to the understanding and improvement of successful academic development.

  20. Retrocausal Effects as a Consequence of Quantum Mechanics Refined to Accommodate the Principle of Sufficient Reason

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-05-10

    The principle of sufficient reason asserts that anything that happens does so for a reason: no definite state of affairs can come into being unless there is a sufficient reason why that particular thing should happen. This principle is usually attributed to Leibniz, although the first recorded Western philosopher to use it was Anaximander of Miletus. The demand that nature be rational, in the sense that it be compatible with the principle of sufficient reason, conflicts with a basic feature of contemporary orthodox physical theory, namely the notion that nature's response to the probing action of an observer is determined by pure chance, and hence on the basis of absolutely no reason at all. This appeal to pure chance can be deemed to have no rational fundamental place in reason-based Western science. It is argued here, on the basis of the other basic principles of quantum physics, that in a world that conforms to the principle of sufficient reason, the usual quantum statistical rules will naturally emerge at the pragmatic level, in cases where the reason behind nature's choice of response is unknown, but that the usual statistics can become biased in an empirically manifest way when the reason for the choice is empirically identifiable. It is shown here that if the statistical laws of quantum mechanics were to be biased in this way then the basically forward-in-time unfolding of empirical reality described by orthodox quantum mechanics would generate the appearances of backward-time-effects of the kind that have been reported in the scientific literature.

  1. An index of risk as a measure of biodiversity conservation achieved through land reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan; Price, Robbie; Stephens, R T Theo

    2008-02-01

    We measured the net progress of land reform in achieving a national policy goal for biodiversity conservation in the context of ongoing clearing of native vegetation and additions of land to a highly nonrepresentative (residual) reserve network, interior South Island, New Zealand. We used systematic conservation-planning approaches to develop a spatially explicit index of risk of biodiversity loss (RBL). The index incorporated information from national data sets that describe New Zealand's remaining indigenous land cover, legal protection, and land environments and modeled risk to biodiversity on the basis of stated assumptions about the effects of past habitat loss and legal protection. The index identified irreplaceable and vulnerable native habitats in lowland environments as the most at risk of biodiversity loss, and risk was correlated with the density of threatened plant records. To measure achievement, we used changes in the index that reflected gains made and opportunity costs incurred by legal protection and privatization. Application of the index to measure the difference made by land reform showed it had caused a net increase in the risk of biodiversity loss because most land vulnerable to habitat modification and rich in threatened plant species was privatized and land at least risk of biodiversity loss was protected. The application revealed that new high-elevation reserves did little to mitigate biodiversity decline, that privatization of low-elevation land further jeopardized the most vulnerable biodiversity in lowland native habitats, and that outcomes of land reform for biodiversity deteriorated over time. Further development of robust achievement measures is needed to encourage more accountable biodiversity conservation decisions.

  2. Reasons and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict and Work Alienation as one of Its Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abdolhossein Nabavi

    2014-11-01

    research expectations of social support role and its effects on work alienation. It appears that the effectiveness of social support can influence work alienation through expectations of work role, work ambiguity and work- family conflict. In other words, expectations of work role and work role ambiguity are effective on work alienation through family-work conflict. It is necessary to mention that there is a significant and reverse relationship between work control and work alienation. Organizational managers can have happy and satisfied personnel, who give their effective performance and show interest, loyalty and commitment to the organization, if they help them to make a balance between work and life. As the results indicate, establishing a balance between work and family is of great value. Achieving this end requires that managers select an approach in which employees' and organization’s interests could be synchronously considered. They should abandon traditional attitudes on the relationship between work and life. Therefore, in order to prevent the negative consequences of work-family conflict, which are sometimes irreparable, it is recommended that employees become familiar with scientific management of conflict, and be supported comprehensively by their family members and coworkers. Thus, they will have more freedom and flexibility, and minimum conflict will be seen in their work and family programs. On the other hand, it is necessary to improve and reform occupational laws and rules.

  3. Games, Game Flow, and Gender as They Affect Mathematics Achievement of Pupils in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aremu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Game flow experience in the use of games has the potential of determining whether games used for learning would achieve the desired goal of improved achievement. With a subject like Mathematics, it is vital to ensure that if game based strategies are to be used, the games must possess this very important construct. Furthermore, the games must be able to produce the flow experience in both males and females, so that the observed gender gap in the learning of the subject would not be further widened. It is therefore important to investigate the gender differences in a game based learning environment for a subject such as Mathematics. This is the purpose of this research. This research investigated games, game flow, and gender as they affect Mathematics achievement of pupils in Nigeria. Through the use of Achievement of Pupils in Fraction-concepts Test (APFT and Game Flow Questionnaire (GFQ, data were collected. The result was a significant difference in mathematics achievements of pupils exposed to game based strategy and those exposed to modified conventional method of teaching. However, there was no significant difference in game flow experiences, as well as in mathematics achievement of male and female pupils exposed to game based strategy.

  4. Hermeneutics of reason: the principle of common rationality as premise of understanding the Other(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Stelian Rusu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The central argument defended in this paper is made up of two interconnected statements: i that a minimally defined rationality is an anthropological constant, being shared by all conceivable human cultures; and ii that this “commonality of reason” constitutes the basis on which inter-cultural understanding is possible. In proving the first thesis (the universality of reason, the paper contrasts Western thought, epitomized in scientific reason, with non-Western thinking patterns, expressed by ethno-sciences, magic rituals, and other knowledge practices. The conclusion drawn from this comparison is that both modern scientific reason and non-literate peoples thought patterns are two “cognitive modes” sharing a strong structural similarity. Building on some loci classici of anthropological literature written by Malinowski, Evans-Pritchard, and Lévi-Strauss (among others, the paper argues that although modern Western science and indigenous knowledge(s share a common rational denominator, the two cognitive modes are nonetheless hierarchical, the former being epistemically superior to the latter thanks to its unique self-correcting methodology. The paper ends by arguing the case for the possibility of understanding the Other(s by way of reason, a possibility grounded on the commonality of reason between cultures.

  5. Protection as care: moral reasoning and moral orientation among ethnically and socioeconomically diverse older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study examined moral reasoning among ethnically and socioeconomically diverse older women based on the care and justice moral orientations reflecting theoretical frameworks developed by Carol Gilligan and Lawrence Kohlberg, respectively. A major gap in this area of research and theory development has been the lack of examination of moral reasoning in later life. This study addressed this gap by assessing socioeconomically and ethnically diverse older women's reasoning in response to ethical dilemmas showing conflict between autonomy, representative of Kohlberg's justice orientation, and protection, representative of Gilligan's care orientation. The dilemmas used in this study came from adult protective services (APS), the U.S. system that investigates and intervenes in cases of elder abuse and neglect. Subjects were 88 African American, Latina, and Caucasian women age 60 or over from varying socioeconomic status backgrounds who participated in eight focus groups. Overall, participants favored protection over autonomy in responding to the case scenarios. Their reasoning in responding to these dilemmas reflected an ethic of care and responsibility and a recognition of the limitations of autonomy. This reasoning is highly consistent with the care orientation. Variations in the overall ethic of care and responsibility based on ethnicity and SES also are discussed.

  6. A STUDY OF ADOLESCENTS’ ANXIETY AND ACHIEVEMENT IN ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Fadillah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating whether there is relationship between students’ anxiety and students’ achievement in English as a foreign language among adolescents at Sekolah Menengah Umum Negeri 1 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan. The sample was 152 students of sixteen and seventeen years old at second grade. The results indicate that the students’ anxiety in learning English as foreign language is at moderate level. There is no significant relationship between English language anxiety and students’ achievement in English as a foreign language as a whole. But a significant negative correlation between test anxiety and students’ achievement is indicated. And the difference of English language anxiety between male and female occurred on communication apprehension, it shows that female is more apprehensive than male in English communication but for overall anxiety, there is no difference in English language anxiety by gender at second grade in this school.

  7. Science achievement as an indicator of educational opportunity available in rural K--12 districts in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capehart, Cheryl Louise

    Purpose of the study. This study examined Rural K--12 Texas districts to investigate whether science achievement could serve as a gauge to measure the availability and quality of rigorous educational opportunities in Rural Texas districts. Procedure. A Case II criterion-group design was used; 2 groups of districts were selected based on their 3-year performances on the 8th grade Science Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS)---the statewide criterion-referenced test. The High Performing Group (HPG) was composed of 30 top performing districts; the Low Performing Group (LPG) was composed of 30 lowest performing districts. Data collection was limited to archived quantitative data from Texas Education Agency's open records. Achievement variables were percent passing (1) Science TASS, (2) Biology End-of-Course (EoC) test and (3) the composite passing all Reading, Writing, and Mathematics TAAS. Academic variables were percent participating in (1) advanced courses, (2) rigorous graduation programs, and (3) college entrance examinations. District quality indicators also included 3 budget variables: (1) average teacher salary, (2) per pupil instructional expenditure, (3) percent allocated for instructional leadership; and 4 staff variables: (1) percent teachers fully certified, (2) percent teachers with advanced degrees, (3) average years teacher experience, (4) average percent non-turnover of teachers. One score per variable was obtained for each district. The HPG and LPG were compared on each variable using the group means, standard deviations, standard errors of the mean, Levene's test for equality of variance, and a t test for equality of means with a 95% confidence level. The Pearson correlation with two-tailed significance calculated the relationship of each independent variable (budget and staff factors) to each dependent variable (performance measures). Science TASS and a Combined Science score (grand mean of Science TASS & Biology EoC passing rates) were

  8. What Counts as a Reasonable Adjustment? Dyslexic Students and the Concept of Fair Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on the construction of dyslexia in higher education and explores the nature of negotiations between students, lecturers and academic institutions over diagnosis, support and assessment. Disabled students are now entitled, under the terms of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA), to reasonable adjustments in assessment.…

  9. Using Errors as Springboards for Enhancing Mathematical Reasoning with Three Metacognitive Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarski, Bracha; Zoldan, Sarit

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined effects of 3 metacognitive approaches and 1 control group on mathematical reasoning, conceptual errors, and metacognitive knowledge. The metacognitive approaches were (a) diagnosing errors (DIA), (b) improvement via self-questioning (IMP), and (c) a combined approach (DIA+IMP). Controls (CONT) received no metacognitive…

  10. Reasons for Cannabis Use and Effects of Cannabis Use as Reported by Patients with Psychotic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Dekker; D.H. Linszen; L. de Haan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cannabis is one of the most commonly used substances in patients with a psychotic disorder and is associated with a higher risk of psychotic relapses. Identifying reasons for cannabis use and subjective effects in patients with psychotic disorders can provide insight into the functions o

  11. Analogical Reasoning as a Decision Support Principle for Weakly-Structured Marketing Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.P. Althuizen (Niek)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractMany marketing problems are weakly-structured. From the psychological literature, we know that analogical reasoning is an effective problem-solving method in weakly-structured decision situations. That is, when confronted with such a problem, one of the first things managers will natural

  12. Too Much Is as Bad as Too Little? Sources of the Intention-Achievement Gap in Sustainable Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daegyu Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior work on innovation has generally emphasized the importance of an organization’s exposure to external knowledge. This study, in contrast, redirects our attention toward conditions under which such exposure serves as constraints on organizational endeavors to achieve environmentally preferable innovation. We develop a two-stage model for sustainable innovation. A firm in the first stage explores a variety of alternatives and develops strategic intentions to address broader environmental concerns; thus, it may benefit from access to both diverse sources of external knowledge and network ties that enable an extensive search for new information. In the second stage, a firm exploits limited available options to achieve its strategic intentions. We suggest that dependence on external knowledge in the first stage makes the transition toward the second stage challenging, thereby reducing the probability that a firm’s strategic intentions for sustainability result in actual innovation outcomes. We test our theory using the 2014 Korean Innovation Survey. Our results show that diverse sources of external knowledge through rich network ties, albeit the positive main effects on innovation outcomes, negatively moderate the relationship between a firm’s intentions for environmental sustainability and its achievement of sustainable innovation. Several theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  13. Benefits of achieving vigorous as well as moderate physical activity recommendations: evidence from heart rate complexity and cardiac vagal modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Sandercock, Gavin; Vale, Susana; Silva, Pedro; Moreira, Carla; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in traditional heart rate variability measurements and heart rate complexity (sample entropy) in young adults grouped by objectively measured achievement of either moderate or both moderate and vigorous physical activity recommendations. Of 168 young adults tested (86 females, 82 males; age 20.5 ± 1.2 years), 119 achieved only recommendations for moderate physical activity (moderate group) and 49 achieved recommendations for both moderate and vigorous physical activity (vigorous group). Analysis of covariance controlling for sex, weekly minutes of moderate physical activity, and percentage of body fat was used to assess between-group differences in heart rate variability and heart rate complexity. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the group characteristics that best predicted high heart rate complexity and vagal indices of heart rate variability. The majority of the autonomic measures were higher (P heart rate complexity and higher heart rate variability. Young adults engaged in regular vigorous physical activity were more than twice as likely to have high heart rate complexity than those involved in predominantly moderate exercise. These findings suggest that vigorous physical activity is more closely associated with high heart rate complexity than moderate physical activity in young adults.

  14. Examination of the Relationship Between Autonomy and English Achievement as Mediated by Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbandordinejad, Farhad; Ahmadabad, Roghayyeh Moradian

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the relationship between autonomy and English language achievement among third-grade high school students as mediated by foreign language classroom anxiety in a city in the north-west of Iran. A sample of 400 students (187 males, and 213 females) was assessed for their levels of autonomy and foreign language anxiety using the Autonomy Questionnaire and Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS), respectively. Participants' scores on their final English exam were also used as the measurement of their English achievement. The results of Pearson correlation revealed a strong correlation between learners' autonomy and their English achievement (r [Formula: see text] .406, n [Formula: see text] 400, [Formula: see text]). Also, foreign language classroom anxiety was found to be significantly and negatively correlated with English achievement (r [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text].472, n [Formula: see text] 400, [Formula: see text]). Hierarchical multiple regression was used to assess the ability of autonomy to predict language learning achievement, after controlling for the influence of anxiety. In sum, the results of hierarchical multiple regressions revealed that foreign language classroom anxiety significantly mediates the relationship between autonomy and English language achievement. Implications for both teachers and learners, and suggestions for further research are provided.

  15. Skills-demands compatibility as a determinant of flow experience in an inductive reasoning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefele, Ulrich; Raabe, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The skills-demands fit hypothesis of flow theory was examined. Based on the earlier finding that high demands in a game situation do not reduce the experience of flow, a cognitive task paradigm was used. The effect of skills-demands compatibility on the experience of flow but not of other, similar psychological states (i.e., concentration, negative and positive activation) was also investigated. Participants were 89 undergraduate students who worked on a number of inductive reasoning tasks in four successive trials with or without skills-demands compatibility. The results clearly supported the skills-demands fit hypothesis; concentration and activation were affected only by the tasks' difficulty. Inductive reasoning tasks are a useful tool for the experimental analysis of flow, and skills-demands compatibility is a significant and powerful condition of flow, but not of other, similar psychological states.

  16. Theories of reasoned action and planned behavior as models of condom use: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, D; Johnson, B T; Fishbein, M; Muellerleile, P A

    2001-01-01

    To examine how well the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior predict condom use, the authors synthesized 96 data sets (N = 22,594) containing associations between the models' key variables. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action's predictions, (a) condom use was related to intentions (weighted mean r. = .45), (b) intentions were based on attitudes (r. = .58) and subjective norms (r. = .39), and (c) attitudes were associated with behavioral beliefs (r. = .56) and norms were associated with normative beliefs (r. = .46). Consistent with the theory of planned behavior's predictions, perceived behavioral control was related to condom use intentions (r. = .45) and condom use (r. = .25), but in contrast to the theory, it did not contribute significantly to condom use. The strength of these associations, however, was influenced by the consideration of past behavior. Implications of these results for HIV prevention efforts are discussed.

  17. Does Early Algebraic Reasoning Differ as a Function of Students’ Difficulty with Calculations versus Word Problems?

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Sarah R.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2014-01-01

    According to national mathematics standards, algebra instruction should begin at kindergarten and continue through elementary school. Most often, teachers address algebra in the elementary grades with problems related to solving equations or understanding functions. With 789 2nd- grade students, we administered (a) measures of calculations and word problems in the fall and (b) an assessment of pre-algebraic reasoning, with items that assessed solving equations and functions, in the spring. Ba...

  18. Voices from Social Work Graduates in China: Reasons for Not Choosing Social Work as a Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shouchui; Cheung, Monit; Leung, Patrick; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have addressed turnover issues after being a social worker, this study identifies factors that may block initial entry to the profession. Using a semistructural interview method with 20 BSW graduates, the researchers transcribed the reasons for BSW graduates not entering a career in social work. Through element-centered content analysis, 76 reasons were sorted into nine categories: (1) income insufficient for basic needs, (2) unclear future, (3) no commitment to social work, (4) social work jobs could be taken by other professionals, (5) difficulties in actualizing proclaimed value, (6) personally unable to apply skills, (7) social exclusion due to nonresident status, (8) hard/stressful work, and (9) not supported by peers and family. Through person-centered content analysis, most respondents (90 percent) reported multiple reasons (M = 3.8) supporting their decision, offering their rational thought processes culminating in the decision not to enter social work. Recommendations for developing a national survey, engaging social workers in preparing BSW students for graduation, and modifying student admissions strategies are discussed.

  19. Anxiety and inattention as predictors of achievement in early elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grills-Taquechel, Amie E; Fletcher, Jack M; Vaughn, Sharon R; Denton, Carolyn A; Taylor, Pat

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relations among anxiety, inattention, and math/reading achievement, as well as the mediating/moderating role of inattention in the anxiety-achievement association both concurrently and longitudinally. Participants included 161 ethnically diverse children (aged 6-8) and their teachers. At the middle and end of first grade (approximately 5 months apart), students completed measures of anxiety and achievement while their teachers completed a measure of inattention. For the concurrent analyses, greater harm avoidance anxiety was associated with better attention, which was in turn related to better achievement. For the longitudinal analyses, mid-year inattention interacted with harm avoidance and separation anxiety to predict end of year reading fluency. For those rated as more attentive, greater separation anxiety symptoms were associated with decreased fluency performance while greater harm avoidance symptoms were associated with increased performance. Findings were discussed in terms of the importance of considering socioemotional variables in the study of children's academic achievement and the potential utility of early anxiety prevention/intervention programs, especially for children experiencing academic difficulties who also show internalizing behaviors.

  20. Of Pigs and Men: Understanding Students' Reasoning about the Use of Pigs as Donors for Xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Two important roles of education are to provide students with knowledge for their democratic participation in society and to provide knowledge for a future profession. In science education, students encounter values that may be in conflict with their worldview. Such conflicts may, for example, lead to constructive reflections as well as rejection…

  1. Professional Commitment, Ethical Reasoning, and the Belief in Regulatory Compliance as Perceived by Safety Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The awareness of ethical business practices is becoming a focal point in both the business world and academia. As cross-cultural growth expands due to globalization, the perception of ethical behavior invites increasing scrutiny as society witnesses the changing global community. This ever-changing environment of demographics and globalization of…

  2. Self-Efficacy, Goal Orientations and Learning Strategies as Mediators between Preceding and Subsequent Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Age

    2011-01-01

    High school grade point average (HSGPA), self-efficacy, goal orientations, learning strategies, and examination grade were measured in a sample of Norwegian undergraduate psychology students in order to investigate motives and strategies as mediators between preceding and subsequent academic achievement. Correlation analysis showed strong…

  3. The quality of education in the Netherlands, as expressed by achievement and attainment indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyten, Hans

    2011-01-01

    In Chapter 4 various kinds of currently available data are used to reach an overall evaluation of the quality of Dutch education (primary and secondary level). The conclusions are as follows: Dutch students consistently achieve scores on international assessments which are (far) above average in int

  4. Attitude and Motivation as Predictors of Academic Achievement of Students in Clothing and Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwameiye, B. E.; Osho, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated attitude and motivation as predictors of academic achievement of students in clothing and textiles. Three colleges of education in Edo and Delta States were randomly selected for use in this study. From each school, 40 students were selected from Year III using simple random technique yielding a total of 240 students. The…

  5. Examination of the Relationship between Autonomy and English Achievement as Mediated by Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbandordinejad, Farhad; Ahmadabad, Roghayyeh Moradian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between autonomy and English language achievement among third-grade high school students as mediated by foreign language classroom anxiety in a city in the north-west of Iran. A sample of 400 students (187 males, and 213 females) was assessed for their levels of autonomy and foreign language anxiety using…

  6. Educational Achievement as Defining Factor in Social Stratification in Contemporary Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenero, Manuel Jacinto Roblizo

    2013-01-01

    One especially relevant key theme in Sociology of Education is to what extent parents' cultural level has significant implications in students' educational achievement and, as a consequence, in the social mobility inherently linked to level of education and professional training. In order to investigate this aspect on current Spanish society, our…

  7. Emotional Intelligence and Gender as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Some University Students in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayombo, Grace A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated emotional intelligence (attending to emotion, positive expressivity and negative expressivity) and gender as predictors of academic achievement among 163 undergraduate psychology students in The University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill Campus, Barbados. Results revealed significant positive and negative correlations…

  8. Mathematics Achievement as a Function of within- and between-School Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Abdul Ghafar, Mohamed Najib

    2014-01-01

    Achievement in mathematics of eighth-grade students is modeled as a function of within-school, between-school and cross-country differences. The data were obtained from 217,728 students, within 7,216 secondary schools, in 48 countries, who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Multilevel analysis showed…

  9. Vocational Identity Achievement as a Mediator of Presence of Calling and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Andreas; Herrmann, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores what mechanism might be responsible for the reported link between presence of a calling in one's career and life satisfaction. It is proposed that vocational identity achievement acts as one important mediator of this relation and that the effects can be observed even when controlling for core self-evaluations (CSEs).…

  10. The Effects of Mathematics Anxiety on Matriculation Students as Related to Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Effandi; Nordin, Norazah Mohd

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of mathematics anxiety on matriculation students as related to motivation and achievement. Subjects included 88 students who were at the end of their second semester of study. Anxiety and motivation were measured using the Fennema-Sherman Math Anxiety Scale (MAS) and Effectance Motivation Scale (EMS)…

  11. The Effect of Family Processes on School Achievement as Moderated by Socioeconomic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Monica L.; Lee, Jungeun Olivia

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined a model of early school achievement in reading and math, as it varies by socioeconomic context, using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. A conceptual model was tested that included features of family stress, early parenting, and school readiness, through both a single-group…

  12. Quantum theory as plausible reasoning applied to data obtained by robust experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raedt, H; Katsnelson, M I; Michielsen, K

    2016-05-28

    We review recent work that employs the framework of logical inference to establish a bridge between data gathered through experiments and their objective description in terms of human-made concepts. It is shown that logical inference applied to experiments for which the observed events are independent and for which the frequency distribution of these events is robust with respect to small changes of the conditions under which the experiments are carried out yields, without introducing any concept of quantum theory, the quantum theoretical description in terms of the Schrödinger or the Pauli equation, the Stern-Gerlach or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments. The extraordinary descriptive power of quantum theory then follows from the fact that it is plausible reasoning, that is common sense, applied to reproducible and robust experimental data.

  13. Physical Activity as a Moderator of the Relationship between Aging and Inductive Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Alexandra; Gagnon, Christine; Bertsch, Jean

    2009-01-01

    A relatively universal observation in aging studies is that cognitive functions inevitably decline across the adult life span. More specifically, executive functions decline substantially with age, as do the frontal and prefrontal brain regions that support them. Indeed, these regions are subject to important neurological modifications with…

  14. Moral Development as the Personal Education of Feeling and Reason: From James to Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel; Okamoto, Carol M.

    2003-01-01

    This article traces the connection between William James's writings in "The Varieties of Religious Experience" and Jean Piaget's work on moral development through Piaget's early work on religious experience. James characterises religious experience as unlocking deep personal power that can sustain a "strenuous mood". These ideas impacted the early…

  15. Reasons for Errors Done by Belarusian Learners Learning Turkish as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tum, Gulden

    2012-01-01

    Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language (TFL) has gained importance recently and several studies are carried out in this field. Especially, learners of linguistically different communities (Byelorussian/Russian) are observed to make errors while learning Turkish. If making errors is an integral outcome in learning a TFL, then to what extent is it…

  16. Student motivation and achievement in learning English as a second language using Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti H. C. Chiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of a 3D virtual learning environment based on Second Life on student motivation and achievement in learning English as a second language. Twenty-one university students participate in this study, with the support of an English instructor. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ was used to evaluate students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy in Second Life. The pre-test and post-test were used to assess students’ learning achievement. The results showed that students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations in English learning in Second Life had a positive influence on their self-efficacy. In addition, students’ self-efficacy of English learning in Second Life was found to positively relate to their learning achievement. Moreover, students’ intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations were found to significantly influence their learning achievement via self-efficacy. In other words, instructors can utilize Second Life to enhance student motivation and achievement in English learning.

  17. State downsizing as a determinant of infant mortality and achievement of Millennium Development Goal 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Solís, Marco Antonio; Alvarez-Dardet Díaz, Carlos; Franco-Giraldo, Alvaro; Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the worldwide effect of state downsizing policies on achievement of U.N. Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) on infant mortality rates. In an ecological retrospective cohort study of 161 countries, from 1978 to 2002, the authors analyzed changes in government consumption (GC) as determining exposure to achievement of MDG4. Descriptive methods and a multiple logistic regression were applied to adjust for changes in gross domestic product, level of democracy, and income inequality. Excess infant mortality in the exposed countries, attributable to reductions in GC, was estimated. Fifty countries were found to have reduced GC, and 111 had increased GC. The gap in infant mortality rate between these groups of countries doubled in the study period. Non-achievement of MDG4 was associated with reductions in GC and increases in income inequality. The excess infant mortality attributable to GC reductions in the exposed countries from 1990 to 2002 was 4,473,348 deaths. The probability of achieving MDG4 seems to be seriously compromised for many countries because of reduced public sector expenditure during the last 25 years of the 20th century, in response to World Bank/International Monetary Fund Washington Consensus policies. This seeming contradiction between the goals of different U.N. branches may be undermining achievement of MDG4 and should be taken into account when developing future global governance policy.

  18. Defining as a Mathematical Activity: A Framework for Characterizing Progress from Informal to More Formal Ways of Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Michelle; Rasmussen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further the notion of defining as a mathematical activity by elaborating a framework that structures the role of defining in student progress from informal to more formal ways of reasoning. The framework is the result of a retrospective account of a significant learning experience that occurred in an undergraduate…

  19. Low and high achievers in math

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Steffen; Tonnesen, Pia Beck; Weng, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this session we will present the results of the preliminary analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data, which can be used to enhance the teaching of low and high mathematics achievers so as to increase their mathematical knowledge and confidence....

  20. Evolutionary science as a method to facilitate higher level thinking and reasoning in medical training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Joseph L.; Reiber, Chris; Thanukos, Anna; Hurtado, Magdalena; Wolpaw, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary science is indispensable for understanding biological processes. Effective medical treatment must be anchored in sound biology. However, currently the insights available from evolutionary science are not adequately incorporated in either pre-medical or medical school curricula. To illuminate how evolution may be helpful in these areas, examples in which the insights of evolutionary science are already improving medical treatment and ways in which evolutionary reasoning can be practiced in the context of medicine are provided. To facilitate the learning of evolutionary principles, concepts derived from evolutionary science that medical students and professionals should understand are outlined. These concepts are designed to be authoritative and at the same time easily accessible for anyone with the general biological knowledge of a first-year medical student. Thus, we conclude that medical practice informed by evolutionary principles will be more effective and lead to better patient outcomes. Furthermore, it is argued that evolutionary medicine complements general medical training because it provides an additional means by which medical students can practice the critical thinking skills that will be important in their future practice. We argue that core concepts from evolutionary science have the potential to improve critical thinking and facilitate more effective learning in medical training. PMID:27744353

  1. Haag's Theorem as a Reason to Reconsider Direct-Action Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, R E

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that the severe consequences of Haag's inconsistency theorem for relativistic quantum field theories can be successfully evaded in the direct-action approach. Some recent favorable comments of John Wheeler, often mistakenly presumed to have abandoned his own (and Feynman's) direct-action theory, together with the remarkable immunity of direct-action quantum electrodynamics to Haag's theorem, suggest that it may well be a good time to rehabilitate direct action theories. It is also noted that, as extra dividends, direct-action QED is immune to the self-energy problem of standard gauge field QED, and can also provide a solution to the problem of gauge arbitrariness.

  2. An exploratory study using a statistical approach as a platform for clinical reasoning in canine epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaşu, M; Packer, R M A; Cook, S; Solcan, G; Volk, H A

    2014-11-01

    Links between deficits identified on neurological examination, age of seizure onset and the presence of structural forebrain disease have often been postulated in dogs presenting with a history of seizures. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of such factors on the likelihood of structural or functional brain disease, via a thorough history taking process and interictal neurological examination. Four hundred and four dogs with seizures due to intracranial causes were included. Data including age, sex, neuter status, time until diagnosis, age of seizure onset in years, type of seizure, seizure symmetry, seizure severity, interictal neurological deficits, MRI changes and side effects associated with antiepileptic drugs were extracted from medical files. Two hundred and fifty-eight dogs were diagnosed with epilepsy of unknown origin (EUO), 11 with symmetrical structural lesions and 135 with asymmetrical structural lesions. Multinomial analysis demonstrated that dogs that were older at seizure onset were significantly more likely to have an asymmetrical structural lesion than EUO (OR 95% CI: 1.4-1.8). Dogs that had single seizures rather than cluster seizures were less likely to have asymmetrical structural lesions than dogs with EUO (OR 95% CI: 0.2-0.7). Dogs with abnormal neurological examinations were 16.5 times more likely to have asymmetrical structural lesions (OR 95% CI: 8.5-32.1) and 12.5 times more likely to have symmetrical structural lesions (OR 95% CI: 3.0-52.3) than EUO. These findings support the importance of considering interictal neurological deficits and seizure history in clinical reasoning.

  3. Students' Language Learning Strategy Use and Achievement in the Korean as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bokyung

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student strategy use and the development of proficiency in a Korean as a Foreign Language classroom. A total of 66 English native speakers learning Korean as a Foreign Language were administered the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), Version 5.1. Findings indicated a low positive…

  4. Listening to youth: Adolescents' reasons for substance use as a unique predictor of treatment response and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Sarah J; Kelly, John F

    2013-12-01

    National efforts have focused on improving adolescent substance use disorder (SUD) treatment outcomes, yet improvements remain modest. Because adolescents are noteworthy for heterogeneity in their clinical profiles, treatment might be enhanced by the identification of clinical subgroups for which interventions could be more effectively tailored. Some of these subgroups, such as those based on abstinence motivation, substance involvement, and psychiatric status are promising candidates. This study examined the unique predictive utility of adolescents' primary reason for alcohol and other drug use. Adolescent outpatients (N = 109; 27% female, aged 14-19) were assessed at treatment intake on their reason for substance use, as well as demographic, substance use, and clinical variables, and reassessed at 3, 6, and 12 months. Reason for use fell into two broad domains: using to enhance a positive state (positive reinforcement [PR]; 47% of youth) and using to cope with a negative state (negative reinforcement [NR]; 53% of youth). Compared with PR patients, NR patients were significantly more substance involved, reported more psychological distress, and had a more extensive treatment history. It is important to note that NR patients showed a significant treatment response, whereas PR patients showed no improvement. PR-NR status also uniquely predicted treatment response and outcome independent of a variety of other predictors, including abstinence motivation, self-efficacy, coping, and prior treatment. Adolescents' primary reason for substance use may provide unique clinical information that could inform treatment planning and patient-treatment matching.

  5. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction as a reason for the development of acetabular retroversion: a new theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Acetabular retroversion has been recently implicated as an important factor in the development of femoral acetabular impingement and hip osteoarthritis. The proper function of the hip joint requires that the anatomic features of the acetabulum and femoral head complement one another. In acetabular retroversion, the alignment of the acetabulum is altered where it opens in a posterolaterally instead of anterior direction. Changes in acetabular orientation can occur with alterations in pelvic tilt (anterior/posterior), and pelvic rotation (left/right). An overlooked problem that alters pelvic tilt and rotation, often seen by physical therapists, is sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A unique feature that develops in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) is asymmetry between the left and right innominate bones that can alter pelvic tilt and rotation. This article puts forth a theory suggesting that acetabular retroversion may be produced by sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

  6. Thunderstorms as probable reason of high background neutron fluxes on L<1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratolyubova-Tsulukidze, L.; Grachev, E.; Grigoryan, O.; Kunitsyn, V.; Kuzhevskiy, B.; Nechaev, O.; Usanova, M.

    In this paper we analyze the neutron emission observations made in the experiment onboard MIR orbital station (1991), ISS (2002) and Colibri-2002 satellite (2002) at the altitude of 400 km. The helium discharge detectors made it possible to detect neutrons with energies ranging from 0.25eV to 1.9MeV. The spatial distribution of high background neutron fluxes has a longitude dependence. These events have been observed at -200 ... 600 and 1350 ...1800 ...- 1350 longitudinal intervals. The most intensive fluxes near the geomagnetic equator were registered in the African region. They are not found to be associated with increases of proton fluxes (Ep >50MeV). As a statistical set, the events appear to coincide with the most active region of atmospheric weather. In this paper we assess the possibility that the occurrence of high background neutron fluxes in the African region is connected with lightning discharges. To observe neutron emission at the altitude of 400 km ~101 0 neutrons are required to be produced by lightning discharge. These theoretical predictions suggest cloud charge values of about 250-300 Coulomb.

  7. What Counts as "Truth" -- Reason Versus Emotion in Vaccine Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnookin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Vaccines are without question one of the most successful public health interventions the world has ever known. Despite this, for the past decade-and-a-half, industrialized countries around the world, from the United States to Germany and from Australia to Israel, have been confronted with specious panics about vaccine safety and efficacy, many of which center around claims that vaccines can cause autism. These fears can be traced to two events: a since-retracted paper published by a disgraced gastroenterologist claiming the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine was linked to a gut disease which, in turn, was linked to autism; and the United States's decision to remove a mercury-based preservative called thimerosal from standard pediatric vaccines in the late 1990s. The effects of these scares are being felt worldwide. Each year for the past several years, the US has had more measles outbreaks than at any time since the mid-1990s, a fact which is especially frightening given that the WHO declared measles eliminated from North America in 2000. In France, a nationwide measles outbreak has caused thousands of hospitalizations and a number of deaths. I will address several issues central to this topic: Given the overwhelming amount of evidence showing vaccines are safe and the total lack of evidence showing they cause autism, why do these fears persist, and what can be done to combat them? Has the public health establishment's response to these fears been sufficient? To what extent do concerns about vaccines function as proxies for more opaque concerns regarding modern-day health care? And finally, what is the effect of a lack of evidence-based research on the best way to combat misinformation?

  8. Fe-Mn substance in ocean as reason of regulation radionuclide pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavin, Alex; Martynov, Konstantin; Konstantinova, Lia

    2013-04-01

    Distribution of radionuclide in marine sediments as yet little studied [Choppin & Wong 1998]. The work mainly focused on effects of nuclear test fallout. In the works are examined isotopes of Pu - 238; Th - 232; U -234;238; Pu - 239,240,241; Am - 241; Np - 237; Cm -244 [Holm 1995]. It has been shown that seems to accumulate radionuclides in marine sediments. In particular, the importance attached to carbonate complexes (corals, etc.). But questions about the possibility of re-mobilization of radionuclide, forms their concentration, their participation in global geochemical cycles in the ocean, remain open. We believe a major factor controlling the distribution of heavy metals is the formation of ocean ferromanganese crusts and nodules hydrogenic at the bottom of the ocean and seamounts. It is likely that the process of formation of Fe-manganese hydrogenic can play a major role in the control of radioactive contamination in the oceanic sediment. At least for the U number of works on the subject [Sherman et al. 2008]. The high sensitivity of the Fe-manganese crust is known to the isotopic composition of lead [Loranger & Zayed 1994, Collen et al 2011]. Recent work [Wilkins etal 2006, Renshaw etal 2009] show a large role; Fe (III)-and Mn (IV)-reducing organisms that anaerobic bacteria in oxidation and therefore changes in mobility systems U and Pu. So much interest is data for sorption of radionuclide on hydroxides Fe and Mn. Unfortunately we are not aware of works on the subject. We have therefore taken their own experimental studies on sorption of radionuclide on natural Fe-Mn crusts (sample from Magellan seamount Pacific ocean) [Martynov et al 2012]. The results showed high sorption ability of material crusts for fixation of radionuclides: U-233, Np-237, Pu-238, Am-241. For all radionuclide experiment absorption has been reached already in the first hour it was 96.0% of total substance radionuclide absorbed from the solution, and after the first day it was reached

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome as a Reason for Active Management of Pulmonary Embolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Xie; Yong-Xiang Wei; Shuang Liu; Wei Zhang; Xiang-Feng Zhang; Jie Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) constitutes an independent factor for high warfarin dose for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).The aim of this study was to investigate whether the 6-month anticoagulation treatment by warfarin is enough for patients with PE complicated by OSAHS.Methods:We investigated 97 PE patients,32 of them had OSAHS and 65 non-OSAHS.Warfarin was administered for 6-month if no abnormal circumstances occurred.All patients were followed up for 18 months.Adverse events (AE) included death,major bleeding,hospitalization due to heart failure or pulmonary hypertension,and recurrence or aggravation of PE (including deep vein thrombosis).Recurrence rate of PE after warfarin cessation was compared between the two groups.Results:OSAHS patients required a significantly higher dose of warfarin than their non-OSAHS counterparts (4.73 mg vs.3.61 mg,P < 0.001).During warfarin treatment,no major bleeding and aggravation of PE occurred among OSAHS patients,and the rates of various AE were not significantly different between the OSAHS and non-OSAHS groups.PE recurrence was higher in OSAHS than non-OSAHS groups after withdrawal of warfarin (21.43% vs.6.78%,P =0.047).Compared with non-OSAHS patients,OSAHS group had lower international normalized ratio (INR) value but higher plasminogen on baseline and INR resumed to a relatively low level after warfarin discontinuation.Conclusions:OSAHS patients may present with hypercoagulation and relatively high-risk of recurrence of PE after cessation of 6-month warfarin treatment.

  10. Reasons for Low Levels of Interactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interactivity levels of online CSR communication are typically low. This study explores the reasons for the low levels of interactivity in the popular social media tool Twitter. An analysis of 41,864 Twitter messages (tweets) from the thirty most central corporate accounts in a CSR Twitter...

  11. Spatial Visualization as Mediating between Mathematics Learning Strategy and Mathematics Achievement among 8th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabab'h, Belal; Veloo, Arsaythamby

    2015-01-01

    Jordanian 8th grade students revealed low achievement in mathematics through four periods (1999, 2003, 2007 & 2011) of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). This study aimed to determine whether spatial visualization mediates the affect of Mathematics Learning Strategies (MLS) factors namely mathematics attitude,…

  12. Welcoming low testosterone as a cardiovascular risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, M; Basaria, S

    2009-01-01

    Male hypogonadism now has a new spectrum of complications. They are mainly cardiometabolic in nature. Low serum testosterone levels are a risk factor for diabetes, metabolic syndrome, inflammation and dyslipidemia. These metabolic and inflammatory complications are not without consequences. Recent studies have shown low serum testosterone levels to be an independent risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. It is time to welcome low serum testosterone levels as a cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:19536127

  13. Welcoming low testosterone as a cardiovascular risk factor

    OpenAIRE

    Maggio, M; Basaria, S.

    2009-01-01

    Male hypogonadism now has a new spectrum of complications. They are mainly cardiometabolic in nature. Low serum testosterone levels are a risk factor for diabetes, metabolic syndrome, inflammation and dyslipidemia. These metabolic and inflammatory complications are not without consequences. Recent studies have shown low serum testosterone levels to be an independent risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. It is time to welcome low serum testosterone levels as a cardiovascular r...

  14. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as predictors of work effort: the moderating role of achievement goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysvik, Anders; Kuvaas, Bård

    2013-09-01

    This research explored the roles of intrinsic motivation (IM) and extrinsic motivation (EM) and the 2 × 2 model of achievement goals as predictors of increased work effort (WE). A cross-lagged field study was conducted among 1,441 employees from three large Norwegian service organizations across a 10-month time span. The results showed that the relationship between IM and increased WE was more positive for employees with high levels of mastery-approach goals. This observation suggests that having congruent goals may accentuate the positive relationship between IM and WE.

  15. The theory of reasoned action as parallel constraint satisfaction: towards a dynamic computational model of health behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G Orr

    Full Text Available The reasoned action approach, although ubiquitous in health behavior theory (e.g., Theory of Reasoned Action/Planned Behavior, does not adequately address two key dynamical aspects of health behavior: learning and the effect of immediate social context (i.e., social influence. To remedy this, we put forth a computational implementation of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA using artificial-neural networks. Our model re-conceptualized behavioral intention as arising from a dynamic constraint satisfaction mechanism among a set of beliefs. In two simulations, we show that constraint satisfaction can simultaneously incorporate the effects of past experience (via learning with the effects of immediate social context to yield behavioral intention, i.e., intention is dynamically constructed from both an individual's pre-existing belief structure and the beliefs of others in the individual's social context. In a third simulation, we illustrate the predictive ability of the model with respect to empirically derived behavioral intention. As the first known computational model of health behavior, it represents a significant advance in theory towards understanding the dynamics of health behavior. Furthermore, our approach may inform the development of population-level agent-based models of health behavior that aim to incorporate psychological theory into models of population dynamics.

  16. The theory of reasoned action as parallel constraint satisfaction: towards a dynamic computational model of health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark G; Thrush, Roxanne; Plaut, David C

    2013-01-01

    The reasoned action approach, although ubiquitous in health behavior theory (e.g., Theory of Reasoned Action/Planned Behavior), does not adequately address two key dynamical aspects of health behavior: learning and the effect of immediate social context (i.e., social influence). To remedy this, we put forth a computational implementation of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) using artificial-neural networks. Our model re-conceptualized behavioral intention as arising from a dynamic constraint satisfaction mechanism among a set of beliefs. In two simulations, we show that constraint satisfaction can simultaneously incorporate the effects of past experience (via learning) with the effects of immediate social context to yield behavioral intention, i.e., intention is dynamically constructed from both an individual's pre-existing belief structure and the beliefs of others in the individual's social context. In a third simulation, we illustrate the predictive ability of the model with respect to empirically derived behavioral intention. As the first known computational model of health behavior, it represents a significant advance in theory towards understanding the dynamics of health behavior. Furthermore, our approach may inform the development of population-level agent-based models of health behavior that aim to incorporate psychological theory into models of population dynamics.

  17. Reasons that lead mothers looking for a pre-hospital unit as a first option for attendance - Sorocaba/SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Helena Campos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the reasons lead mothers to seek the Pre- hospital Unit of Sorocaba Western Zone (UPH-ZO as first option of attendance and quantify the inappropriate motives for this search. Method: it is an exploratory study with quantitative analyze performed at UPH-ZO through the emergence bulletin (BE and the mothers or guardians interview. Results: nine hundred mothers and guardians were interviewed. Four reasons prevailed as motivation for search the UPH-ZO by first option: better and quick resolution with technological resources provided; restrict period for attendance at the Basic Health Unit (UBS; delay for appointment in the UBS; lack of Pediatrician in this Unit. The prevalent diagnostic hypothesis in the sample was acute gastroenterocolitis and superior aerial way infections. Conclusions: for the 68.8% of the sample the looking for UPH-ZO was adequate; 31.2% referred reasons that could be solved at the UBS. This Unit must just be the entrance for the users of the Health Unique System (SUS.

  18. EFFECT OF LEARNING ANXIETY OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE AS TURKISH ON ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir YOĞURTÇU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An anxiety emerges both as one of the individual's existential factors and as one of the concepts used to express the intrapsychic situations as a result of interactions and experiences with physical and social environment. In the related scientific researches, a foreign language learning anxiety was observed to be taken into consideration as separate from the general anxiety conceptualization. According to these studies anxiety is noticed more in psycho-motor production-focused listening and speaking skills, as well as is originated from the fear of communication, exam anxiety and fear of negative grading. According to the these findings, it is assumed to create an ideal teaching environment in classes where individuals will be more motivated free from an anxiety and to adopt a teaching and learning strategies. In this research, anxiety categories that are occurred in learning environment was identified with the help of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS developed by Horwitz and Cope (1986, that is frequently used in the literature. In addition, by the data obtained from exam anxiety scale developed by Sarason (1984, it aimed to study in what extent the exam anxiety effect the academic achievement of Kyrgyzstan-Turkey Manas University Preparatory classes students on Turkish language. According to the interpretation of empirical data obtained by multivariate statistical techniques, it was suggested to reduce the negative effects of anxiety in the learning process.

  19. Carbon nanotubes as vectors for gene therapy: past achievements, present challenges and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Katie; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Promising therapeutic and prophylactic effects have been achieved following advances in the gene therapy research arena, giving birth to the new generation of disease-modifying therapeutics. The greatest challenge that gene therapy vectors still face is the ability to deliver sufficient genetic payloads in order to enable efficient gene transfer into target cells. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene therapy vectors have been developed and explored over the past 10years, including carbon nanotubes. In this review we will address the application of carbon nanotubes as non-viral vectors in gene therapy with the aim to give a perspective on the past achievements, present challenges and future goals. A series of important topics concerning carbon nanotubes as gene therapy vectors will be addressed, including the benefits that carbon nanotubes offer over other non-viral delivery systems. Furthermore, a perspective is given on what the ideal genetic cargo to deliver using carbon nanotubes is and finally the geno-pharmacological impact of carbon nanotube-mediated gene therapy is discussed.

  20. Economic costs of achieving current conservation goals in the future as climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, M Rebecca; Klausmeyer, Kirk; Cameron, D Richard; Mackenzie, Jason; Roehrdanz, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Conservation of biologically diverse regions has thus far been accomplished largely through the establishment and maintenance of protected areas. Climate change is expected to shift climate space of many species outside existing reserve boundaries. We used climate-envelope models to examine shifts in climate space of 11 species that are representative of the Mount Hamilton Project area (MHPA) (California, U.S.A.), which includes areas within Alameda, Santa Clara, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, and San Benito counties and is in the state's Central Coast ecoregion. We used Marxan site-selection software to determine the minimum area required as climate changes to achieve a baseline conservation goal equal to 80% of existing climate space for all species in the MHPA through 2050 and 2100. Additionally, we assessed the costs associated with use of existing conservation strategies (land acquisition and management actions such as species translocation, monitoring, and captive breeding) necessary to meet current species-conservation goals as climate changes. Meeting conservation goals as climate changes through 2050 required an additional 256,000 ha (332%) of protected area, primarily to the south and west of the MHPA. Through 2050 the total cost of land acquisition and management was estimated at US$1.67-1.79 billion, or 139-149% of the cost of achieving the same conservation goals with no climate change. To maintain 80% of climate space through 2100 required nearly 380,000 additional hectares that would cost $2.46-2.62 billion, or 209-219% of the cost of achieving the same conservation goals with no climate change. Furthermore, maintaining 80% of existing climate space within California for 27% of the focal species was not possible by 2100 because climate space for these species did not exist in the state. The high costs of conserving species as the climate changes-that we found in an assessment of one conservation project-highlights the need for tools that will aid

  1. Oriented collagen as a potential cochlear implant electrode surface coating to achieve directed neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Kirkwood, John E; Lai, Edwina; Dazert, Stefan; Fuller, Gerald G; Heller, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    In patients with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the only therapeutic option when the amplification with conventional hearing aids does no longer lead to a useful hearing experience. Despite its great success, there are patients in which benefit from these devices is rather limited. One reason may be a poor neuron-device interaction, where the electric fields generated by the electrode array excite a wide range of tonotopically organized spiral ganglion neurons at the cost of spatial resolution. Coating of CI electrodes to provide a welcoming environment combined with suitable surface chemistry (e.g. with neurotrophic factors) has been suggested to create a closer bioelectrical interface between the electrode array and the target tissue, which might lead to better spatial resolution, better frequency discrimination, and ultimately may improve speech perception in patients. Here we investigate the use of a collagen surface with a cholesteric banding structure, whose orientation can be systemically controlled as a guiding structure for neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that spiral ganglion neurons survive on collagen-coated surfaces and display a directed neurite growth influenced by the direction of collagen fibril deposition. The majority of neurites grow parallel to the orientation direction of the collagen. We suggest collagen coating as a possible future option in CI technology to direct neurite outgrowth and improve hearing results for affected patients.

  2. How low is low? Low self-esteem as an indicator of internalizing psychopathology in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomaa, Rasmus; Väänänen, Juha-Matti; Fröjd, Sari; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Marttunen, Mauri

    2013-08-01

    Schools are among the most important setting for preventive interventions among adolescents. There are evidence-based intervention programs for adolescents at risk for and with early signs of mental health problems but one demanding task is to detect the ones who are in need of an intervention. The aim of the present study was to analyze associations between self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety in order to determine clinically relevant cut-points for male and female adolescents' self-esteem as measured with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). The participants of the present prospective study, started in 2002-2003, were 2070 adolescents aged 15 years (1,167 girls and 903 boys) at two study sites in Finland who participated at both baseline and 2-year follow-up. Self-esteem was related to depressive symptoms and social anxiety, and the RSES was able to discriminate between cases of depression and social phobia. The present study suggests a cutoff of 25 points to classify low self-esteem in both girls and boys. Low self-esteem may function as an indicator of various forms of internalizing psychopathology. The RSES is worth further examination as a potential screening tool for adolescents in risk of psychopathology.

  3. Low Density Self-Assembled InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots Grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; LIU Guo-Jun; WANG Xiao-Hua; LI Mei; LI Zhan-Guo; WAN Chun-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The serf-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs substrates with low density (5×108cm-2) are achieved using relatively higher growth temperature and low InAs coverage by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition.The macro-PL spectra exhibit three emission peaks at 1361,1280 and 1204nm,corresponding to the ground level (GS),the first excited state (ES1) and the second excited state (ES2) of the QDs,respectively,which are obtained when the GaAs capping layer/s grown using triethylgallium and tertiallybutylarsine.As a result of micro-PL,only a few peaks from individual dots have been observed.The exciton-biexciton behaviour was clearly observed at low temperature.

  4. Anti-idiotypic antibodies as cancer vaccines: achievements and future improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Zohra eLadjemi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAA, researchers have tried to develop immune-based anti-cancer therapies. Thanks to their specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs offer the major advantage to induce fewer side effects than those caused by non-specific conventional treatments (eg. chemotherapy, radiotherapy. Passive immunotherapy by means of mAbs or cytokines has proved efficacy in oncology and validated the use of immune-based agents as part of anti-cancer treatment options. The next step was to try to induce an active immune protection aiming to boost own’s host immune defense against TAAs. Cancer vaccines are thus developed to specifically induce active immune protection targeting only tumor cells while preserving normal tissues from a non-specific toxicity. But, as most of TAAs are self antigens, an immune tolerance against them exists representing a barrier to effective vaccination against these oncoproteins. One promising approach to break this immune tolerance consists in the use of anti-idiotypic mAbs, so called Ab2, as antigen surrogates. This vaccination strategy allows also immunization against non-proteic antigens (such as carbohydrates. In some clinical studies, anti-idiotypic (anti-Id cancer vaccines indeed induced efficient humoral and/or cellular immune responses associated with clinical benefit.This review article will focus on recent achievements of anti-Id mAbs use as cancer vaccines in solid tumors.

  5. The Reasons for a Low-priced Fashion Clothing Store Locating in Bustling Areas:Taking the Location Choice of ZARA's Sales Department as an Example%平价时装店身处繁华地段的原因——论ZARA销售部门的区位选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟晓东

    2011-01-01

    ZARA has caught most of the young peoples' hearts with its excellent quality and low prices. However, all of its exclusive agencies are located in the most bustling areas of the most advanced cities in the world with a large square. In terms of ZARA's characters, the factors of its sales department's choosing these locations are as follows. Firstly, these areas all have convenient traffic systems with large population and advanced economy. Secondly, these areas all have a high capabilities. Last but not least, there are many other luxury brands around ZARA in these places, which provide obvious contrast. As has mentioned, it's easy to see that ZARA's sales dpartment's choice accords with The Theory of Location Choice, and ZARA's sales department has every reason to set up exclusive stores in such places.%西班牙跨国服饰公司INDITEX的旗舰品牌ZARA,以其优秀的品质和低廉的价格迅速俘获了很多年轻人的心.然而,售价低廉的ZARA却都将专卖店开在租金高昂的高档商业区和繁华的交通枢纽地段,而且每家店铺的占地面积都非常大.从ZARA服饰的品牌特点来看,其销售部门的区位因素主要有繁华地段交通便利、人口密集、经济发达、对新事物的接受力高以及周围品牌的对比效应显著等.可见,ZARA销售部门的区位选择是符合区位选择理论的.

  6. Norm-Referenced Cognitive and Achievement Scores as Predictors of State-Wide High-Stakes Test Scores with Students Referred for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle, James M., II

    2013-01-01

    Relatively recent federal education initiatives, such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB; 2001), have focused on school accountability for student achievement including achievement of traditionally at-risk populations, such as students in special education, students from low-income or high poverty areas, and students who speak English as a new second…

  7. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  8. Concentric Tube Robots as Steerable Needles: Achieving Follow-the-Leader Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hunter B.; Neimat, Joseph; Webster, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Concentric tube robots can enable new clinical interventions if they are able to pass through soft tissue, deploy along desired paths through open cavities, or travel along winding lumens. These behaviors require the robot to deploy in such a way that the curved shape of its shaft remains unchanged as the tip progresses forward (i.e., “follow-the-leader” deployment). Follow-the-leader deployment is challenging for concentric tube robots due to elastic (and particularly torsional) coupling between the tubes that form the robot. However, as we show in this paper, follow-the-leader deployment is possible, provided that tube precurvatures and deployment sequences are appropriately selected. We begin by defining follow-the-leader deployment and providing conditions that must be satisfied for a concentric tube robot to achieve it. We then examine several useful special cases of follow-the-leader deployment, showing that both circular and helical precurvatures can be employed, and provide an experimental illustration of the helical case. We also explore approximate follow-the-leader behavior and provide a metric for the similarity of a general deployment to a follow-the-leader deployment. Finally, we consider access to the hippocampus in the brain to treat epilepsy, as a motivating clinical example for follow-the-leader deployment. PMID:26622208

  9. Concentric Tube Robots as Steerable Needles: Achieving Follow-the-Leader Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hunter B; Neimat, Joseph; Webster, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Concentric tube robots can enable new clinical interventions if they are able to pass through soft tissue, deploy along desired paths through open cavities, or travel along winding lumens. These behaviors require the robot to deploy in such a way that the curved shape of its shaft remains unchanged as the tip progresses forward (i.e., "follow-the-leader" deployment). Follow-the-leader deployment is challenging for concentric tube robots due to elastic (and particularly torsional) coupling between the tubes that form the robot. However, as we show in this paper, follow-the-leader deployment is possible, provided that tube precurvatures and deployment sequences are appropriately selected. We begin by defining follow-the-leader deployment and providing conditions that must be satisfied for a concentric tube robot to achieve it. We then examine several useful special cases of follow-the-leader deployment, showing that both circular and helical precurvatures can be employed, and provide an experimental illustration of the helical case. We also explore approximate follow-the-leader behavior and provide a metric for the similarity of a general deployment to a follow-the-leader deployment. Finally, we consider access to the hippocampus in the brain to treat epilepsy, as a motivating clinical example for follow-the-leader deployment.

  10. Achieving a coherent curriculum in second grade: Science as the organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park Rogers, Meredith A.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how a team of four second grade teachers used their approach to teaching science as a means for designing and implementing a coherent curriculum. Within this study, curriculum coherency refers to making logical instructional connections that are both visible and explicit for students. A teacher using a common teaching strategy or critical thinking skills in such a way that the commonalities between subject areas are clearly demonstrated to students is one example of curriculum coherency. The research framework guiding this study was phenomenology; I used a case study method for data analysis. The primary data source was field notes gathered during 10 weeks of classroom observations. Secondary data sources included observations of team meetings, two sets of interviews with each of the four teachers, an interview with the school principal, and artifacts used and developed by the teachers. An analysis of the data led me to interpret the following findings: (1) the teachers viewed science as a tool to motivate their students to learn and believed in teaching science through an inquiry-based approach; (2) they described science inquiry as a process of thinking organized around questions, and saw their teaching role as shifting between guided and open classroom inquiry; (3) they taught all subjects using an inquiry-based approach, emphasized the process skills associated with doing scientific inquiry, and consistently used the language of the process skills throughout their instruction of all disciplines; (4) their team's collaborative approach played a significant role in achieving their vision of a coherent curriculum; the successfulness of their collaboration relied on the unique contributions of each member and her commitment to professional development. This study demonstrates how an inquiry-based science curriculum can provide educators with an effective model for designing and implementing a coherent curriculum. Furthermore

  11. Italy as the Cradle of the Renaissance:From the Perspective of Its Partic-ular Reasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Mei

    2015-01-01

    The Renaissance is a period from the 14th to the 17th centuries, considered as a shift from Middle Ages to Modern times of European history. It developed from Middle Ages which laid its political, economical, cultural and social foundation. Owing to the development of capitalist production relations in Europe during the late Middle Ages, bourgeoisie initiated this cultural movement whose essence is humanism as a fight against feudalism.The Renaissance originated in the form of a cultural movement from Italy in the 14th century and swept over the whole Europe. Apart from the common factors contributing to this movement, the peculiar reasons why Italy became the bellwether of this essential cultural movement are as follows:direct inherit of ancient Roman tradi⁃tion, the favorable geographical position, the unparalleled cities with the development of commerce, city republics and secularism.

  12. The importance of safety in achieving the widespread use of hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edeskuty, F.J.

    1997-09-01

    The advantages of hydrogen fuel have been adequately demonstrated on numerous occasions. However, two major disadvantages have prevented any significant amount of corresponding development. These disadvantages have been in the economics of producing sufficient quantities of hydrogen and in the safety (both real and perceived) of its use. To date work has mostly been properly centered on solving the economic problems. However, a greater effort on the safety of new hydrogen systems now being proposed also deserves consideration. To achieve the greatest safety in the expansion of the use of hydrogen into its wide-spread use as a fuel, attention must be given to four considerations. These are, obtaining knowledge of all the physical principles involved in the new uses, having in place the regulations that allow the safe interfacing of the new systems, designing and constructing the new systems with safety in mind, and the training of the large number of people that will become the handlers of the hydrogen. Existing organizations that produce, transport, or use hydrogen on a large scale have an excellent safety record. This safety record comes as a consequence of dedicated attention to the above-mentioned principles. However, where these principles were not closely followed, accidents have resulted. Some examples can be cited. As the use of hydrogen becomes more widespread, there must be a mechanism for assuring the universal application of these principles. Larger and more numerous fleet operations with hydrogen fuel may be the best way to begin the indoctrination of the general public to the more general use of hydrogen fuel. Demonstrated safe operation with hydrogen is vital to its final acceptance as the fuel of choice.

  13. The Importance of Identity Development, Principled Moral Reasoning, and Empathy as Predictors of Openness to Diversity in Emerging Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylie W. Gerson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Programs that attempt to increase tolerance and openness to diverse cultures, religions, and ethnicities through education and exposure are popular and often successful in higher education, but at times backfire, leading instead to an increase in prejudice. The present study considered several intrapersonal and developmental factors that may be important to consider. Identity development (Measures of Psychosocial Development, based on Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development, moral reasoning (Defining Issues Test, based on Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, and empathy (a subscale of the California Personality Inventory were tested as predictors of openness to diversity (Miville-Guzman Universality-Diversity Scale with entering first-year university students (n = 282 at a small, private comprehensive university. As hypothesized, identity development, principled moral reasoning, and empathy each significantly and positively predicted openness to diversity, and the combination of predictors accounted for a moderately large portion of the criterion’s variance. Implications are discussed for developing effective programs to facilitate openness to diversity in emerging adulthood.

  14. Achieving 90–90–90 in paediatric HIV: adolescence as the touchstone for transition success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonia; Hazra, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of children less than 15 years estimated to be living with HIV globally approximated 3.2 million in 2013. Young people aged 15 to 24 years living with HIV approximated 4 million. The survival of these children and adolescents into adulthood poses new and urgent challenges of transition from the paediatric to adolescent to adult healthcare settings due to emerging developmental, psychosocial and comorbid issues. In order to achieve treatment targets of 90–90–90 across the continuum of care for paediatric HIV by 2020, focused efforts on the implementation of appropriate healthcare transition plans across the lifespan, with a focus on adolescence, should be prioritized. Discussion Published data or empirical evidence examining implementation of transition models and association with clinical outcomes are limited. While some guidelines do exist that offer recommendations about how to promote seamless transitions, very few data are available to assess the adequacy of these guidelines and whether they are effectively adhered to in clinical care settings globally. Furthermore, paediatric and adolescent HIV infection, either acquired perinatally or behaviourally, is set apart from other chronic illnesses as a highly stigmatizing disease that disproportionately affects poor, minority and often marginalized populations. Focused efforts on adolescence as the touchstone for transition practices and policies need to be implemented. Conclusions Optimal healthcare for these vulnerable populations, particularly in resource-limited settings, will require HIV-specific transitional care services and programmes that are coordinated, collaborative, integrated and, importantly, evidence-based. PMID:26639113

  15. Achieving 90–90–90 in paediatric HIV: adolescence as the touchstone for transition success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of children less than 15 years estimated to be living with HIV globally approximated 3.2 million in 2013. Young people aged 15 to 24 years living with HIV approximated 4 million. The survival of these children and adolescents into adulthood poses new and urgent challenges of transition from the paediatric to adolescent to adult healthcare settings due to emerging developmental, psychosocial and comorbid issues. In order to achieve treatment targets of 90–90–90 across the continuum of care for paediatric HIV by 2020, focused efforts on the implementation of appropriate healthcare transition plans across the lifespan, with a focus on adolescence, should be prioritized. Discussion: Published data or empirical evidence examining implementation of transition models and association with clinical outcomes are limited. While some guidelines do exist that offer recommendations about how to promote seamless transitions, very few data are available to assess the adequacy of these guidelines and whether they are effectively adhered to in clinical care settings globally. Furthermore, paediatric and adolescent HIV infection, either acquired perinatally or behaviourally, is set apart from other chronic illnesses as a highly stigmatizing disease that disproportionately affects poor, minority and often marginalized populations. Focused efforts on adolescence as the touchstone for transition practices and policies need to be implemented. Conclusions: Optimal healthcare for these vulnerable populations, particularly in resource-limited settings, will require HIV-specific transitional care services and programmes that are coordinated, collaborative, integrated and, importantly, evidence-based.

  16. Biosocial Influences on Sex Differences for Ability and Achievement Test Results as Well as Marks at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Siv

    1990-01-01

    A comparison was made of ability and achievement test results and school grades for 323 pairs of Swedish male and female twins and 740 controls in relation to social background. An interaction effect of sex and social background was found for verbal ability and mathematics test results. (SLD)

  17. Meningoradiculitis due to borreliosis presenting as low back pain only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Crevits, I.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels-Van Daele, M. [Department of Paediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-02-01

    We report a child with Borrelia burgdorferi meningoradiculitis. This entity, also known as Bannwarth syndrome, is rare and its presentation with low back pain only is even more unusual. The MRI findings can suggest the diagnosis. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 refs.

  18. A Ka-band monolithic low phase noise coplanar waveguide oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Delong; Hsu, Shawn; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A Ka-band oscillator has been designed, fabricated and tested using InAlAs/InGaAs HBTs. Coplanar waveguide technology has been employed to improve the Q-factor of the circuit. An output power of 2.6 dBm with DC to RF conversion efficiency of 7.8% was measured at 31.7 GHz. Low phase noise of -87 and -112 dBc/Hz were achieved at an offset frequency of 100 kHz and 1 MHz respectively. These low phase noise values can be attributed to the low 1/ f noise of the InAlAs/InGaAs HBT devices and the coplanar design used for the circuit.

  19. Latinas' heritage language as a source of resiliency: impact on academic achievement in STEM fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma D.; Gallard Martínez, Alejandro José; Brkich, Katie Lynn; Flores, Belinda Bustos; Claeys, Lorena; Pitts, Wesley

    2017-03-01

    This article highlights how the preservation of heritage languages is essential in the construction of three Georgia Latina participants' cultural identities and the creation of support networks that allow them to develop resiliency and achieve academically. We conceptualize resiliency as a strategy developed by the Latina participants using contextually mitigating factors during their STEM education. The findings presented in this manuscript are part of a larger, ongoing study of Latina resiliency and their paths to success in STEM fields in two states: Georgia and Texas. Following James Spradley's guidelines, data were collected via three separate semi-structured interviews with each participant. Intrinsic, multiple case studies were used to find both commonalities and differences, as well as to deepen our understanding of the role of the participants' heritage language in their development of resiliency in each particular case. The findings presented here were not part of a preconceived research hypothesis, but rather a theme that emerged while analyzing data collected in the state of Georgia. Georgia is not home to a long-established Hispanic/Latino population, but rather is part of the New Latino Diaspora (Wortham, Murillo and Hamann in Education in the new Latino diaspora: policy and the politics of identity. Ablex Publishing, New York, 2002), and therefore local natives do not necessarily perceive Latino immigrants and the Spanish language either as long-standing or permanent features of the state. In fact, in response to the growing diversity of the state during the past generation, Georgia has implemented multiple educational policies hostile toward immigrants and linguistic diversity (Beck and Allexsaht-Snider in Education in the new Latino diaspora: policy and the politics of identity. Ablex Press, Westport, 2002). Our findings suggest that the Latina participants' heritage languages allow them to engage in cultural traditions, encouraged by their

  20. The ground state properties of In(Ga)As/GaAs low strain quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieczarka, Maciej, E-mail: maciej.pieczarka@pwr.edu.pl; Sęk, Grzegorz

    2016-08-15

    We present theoretical studies on the confined states in low-strain In(Ga)As quantum dots (QDs). The 8-band k·p model together with the continuum elasticity theory and piezoelectric fields were employed to calculate the potential and confined electron and hole eigenstates. We focused on low-indium-content QDs with distinct in-plane asymmetry, which are naturally formed in the low strain regime of the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode. It has been found that the naturally thick wetting layer together with piezoelectric potential affect the total confinement potential to such extent that the hole eigenstates can get the spatial in-plane orientation orthogonal to the main axis of the dot elongation. This can influence both, qualitatively and quantitatively, many of the electronic and optical properties, as e.g. the polarization selection rules for the optical transition or the transitions oscillator strength. Eventually, importance of the degree of the shape asymmetry or the dots’ size, and differences between the low-strain (low-In-content) QDs and pure InAs dots formed in high strain conditions are discussed.

  1. Low dielectric polyimide aerogels as substrates for lightweight patch antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mary Ann B; Wright, Sarah; Sandberg, Anna; Nguyen, Baochau N; Van Keuls, Frederick W; Mueller, Carl H; Rodríguez-Solís, Rafael; Miranda, Félix A

    2012-11-01

    The dielectric properties and loss tangents of low-density polyimide aerogels have been characterized at various frequencies. Relative dielectric constants as low as 1.16 were measured for polyimide aerogels made from 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ) and biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetracarbozylic dianhydride (BPDA) cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene (TAB). This formulation was used as the substrate to fabricate and test prototype microstrip patch antennas and benchmark against state of practice commercial antenna substrates. The polyimide aerogel antennas exhibited broader bandwidth, higher gain, and lower mass than the antennas made using commercial substrates. These are very encouraging results, which support the potential advantages of the polyimide aerogel-based antennas for aerospace applications.

  2. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AS STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES IN OIL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernando Arellano Morales

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Man's interest in knowing and transform his reality, has led to a continuous and incessant development of science and the production of knowledge inherent in them. This cyclical and systemic process has become itself abundance of knowledge that is daily creating and disseminating, surpassing even the physical spaces where it can be stored and beyond assimilation, use and transfer. The complex and changing knowledge in the activities of oil organizations undoubtedly demands designing strategies that transform and create new experiences, knowledge and skills, in order to innovate traditional management processes, information technology and communication, the intellectual capital and organizational culture. This paper aims to highlight the importance of Knowledge Management (KM when the enthusiasm and ability to learn intangible capital of an organization is involved to generate knowledge to make intelligent decisions. As argue Argyris and Schön (1978 Nonaka (1991 Kogut and Zander (1992 "knowledge is one of the most critical variables to achieve sustainable success in any organization." In addition to highlighting the success of organizations and the economy of the country depend on its ability to produce, assimilate, to use and transmit knowledge, to transform it into a competitive advantage.

  3. Selenium nanoparticles as a carrier of 5-fluorouracil to achieve anticancer synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaoling; Wong, Yum-Shing; Zheng, Wenjie; Zhang, Yibo; Cao, Wenqiang; Chen, Tianfeng

    2012-08-28

    A simple method for preparing 5-fluorouracil surface-functionalized selenium nanoparticles (5FU-SeNPs) with enhanced anticancer activity has been demonstrated in the present study. Spherical SeNPs were capped with 5FU through formation of Se-O and Se-N bonds and physical adsorption, leading to the stable structure of the conjugates. 5FU surface decoration significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of SeNPs through endocytosis. A panel of five human cancer cell lines was shown to be susceptible to 5FU-SeNPs, with IC(50) values ranging from 6.2 to 14.4 μM. Despite this potency, 5FU-SeNP possesses great selectivity between cancer and normal cells. Induction of apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cells by 5FU-SeNPs was evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 cell population, DNA fragmentation, and nuclear condensation. The contribution of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway to the cell apoptosis was confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment of cells with a general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk significantly prevented 5FU-SeNP-induced apoptosis, indicating that 5FU-SeNP induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in A375 cells. Furthermore, 5FU-SeNP-induced apoptosis was found dependent on ROS generation. Our results suggest that the strategy to use SeNPs as a carrier of 5FU could be a highly efficient way to achieve anticancer synergism. 5FU-SeNPs may be a candidate for further evaluation as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for human cancers, especially melanoma.

  4. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  5. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V{sub Ga}. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1{mu}m. Gallium vacancies, V{sub Ga}, was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As{sub Ga} in the layer. As As{sub Ga} increases, photoquenchable As{sub Ga} decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As{sub Ga} content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga{sub As}, as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As{sub Ga}-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V{sub Ga} enhanced diffusion of As{sub Ga} to As precipitates. The supersaturated V{sub GA} and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As{sub Ga}-related defects gives 2.0 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV and 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As{sub Ga} and V{sub Ga}. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As{sub Ga}-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As{sub Ga}-Be{sub Ga} pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  6. "Old paradigm" Language proficiency tests as predictors of long-term academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Gamaroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A dictation test, a cloze test and an error recognition test were given to a group of Grade 7 pupils at Mmabatho High School from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, about half of whom had originated from former DET schools. These tests were subsequently examined ~possible predictors of long-term academic achievement. The best predictor was the dictation test, followed by the error recognition test. The cloze test was not a strong predictor of academic potential of long-term success. The research also showed that many learners from former DET schools did not perform well in a school that uses a Joint Matriculation Board syllabus or its equivalent. This has implications for current policy in education where the distinction between LI and L2 is eschewed in favour of "multicultural settings".In Dikteertoets, Inclozetoets en 'n foutherkenningstoets is aan ‘n groep graad 7-leerlinge van die Mbabatho Hoerskool gegee. Hierdie leerlinge is van verskillende taal- en kultuuragtergronde; bykans die helfte van hulle is afkomstig van die eertydse DOO-skole. Hierdie toetse is gevolglik ontleed as moontlike aanduiers van langtermyn-prestasie. Die beste aanduier was die dikteertoets, met die foutherkenningstoets in die tweede plek Die clozetoets was nie 'n sterk aanduier van akademiese vermoe oflangtermyn-sukses nie. Die navorsing het verder getoon dat baie leerders van voormalige DOO-skole nie so goed gevaar het in 'n skool wat gebruik maak van 'n leerplan van die Gesamentlike Matrikulasieraad of ekwivalent daarvan nie. Dit hou implikasies in vir die huidige opvoedingsbeleid waar die onderskeid tussen T1 en T2 ter syde gestel word ten gunste van "multikulturele omgewings".

  7. Titanium alloy as a potential low radioactivation vacuum material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Junichiro, E-mail: kamiya.junichiro@jaea.go.jp; Hikichi, Yusuke; Kinsho, Michikazu; Ogiwara, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Hamatani, Noriaki; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Kamakura, Keita; Takahisa, Keiji [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    For the vacuum systems of high-intensity beam accelerators, low radioactivation materials with good vacuum characteristics and high mechanical strength are required. The titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V was investigated as a potential low activation vacuum material with high mechanical strength for the fabrication of vacuum components, particularly the flanges of beam pipes, in the J-PARC 3 GeV synchrotron. The dose rate of Ti-6Al-4V when irradiated by a 400 MeV proton was observed to decrease more rapidly than that of stainless steel. Furthermore, the generated radioactive isotopes were nuclides with relatively short half-lives. The outgassing rate per unit area of Ti-6Al-4V was approximately 10{sup −8 }Pa m{sup 3}/s m{sup 2} after pumping for 100 h, which is the same as the typical value for stainless steel. Additionally, the hydrogen concentration in bulk Ti-6Al-4V was reduced to approximately 1 ppm by vacuum firing at 700 °C for 9 h; the mechanical strength was not reduced by this process. These results indicate that Ti-6Al-4V is a good candidate for use as a low activation vacuum material with high mechanical strength.

  8. Low seroprevalent species D adenovirus vectors as influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available Seasonal and pandemic influenza remains a constant threat. While standard influenza vaccines have great utility, the need for improved vaccine technologies have been brought to light by the 2009 swine flu pandemic, highly pathogenic avian influenza infections, and the most recent early and widespread influenza activity. Species C adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (AD5 are potent vehicles for gene-based vaccination. While potent, most humans are already immune to this virus. In this study, low seroprevalent species D adenoviruses Ad26, 28, and 48 were cloned and modified to express the influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin gene for vaccine studies. When studied in vivo, these species D Ad vectors performed quite differently as compared to species C Ad vectors depending on the route of immunization. By intramuscular injection, species D vaccines were markedly weaker than species C vaccines. In contrast, the species D vaccines were equally efficient as species C when delivered mucosally by the intranasal route. Intranasal adenovirus vaccine doses as low as 10(8 virus particles per mouse induced complete protection against a stringent lethal challenge dose of influenza. These data support translation of species D adenoviruses as mucosal vaccines and highlight the fundamental effects of differences in virus tropism on vaccine applications.

  9. Language Learner Strategies and Linguistic Competence as Factors Affecting Achievement Test Scores in English for Specific Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkovic, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the effect of two factors on achievement test scores in English as a foreign language for specific purposes in higher education: preexisting linguistic competence and frequency of use of language learner strategies. The rationale for the analysis of language learner strategies as a factor affecting achievement test outcomes is…

  10. Realism, Authenticity, and Learning in Healthcare Simulations: Rules of Relevance and Irrelevance as Interactive Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rystedt, Hans; Sjoblom, Bjorn

    2012-01-01

    Because simulators offer the possibility of functioning as authentic representations of real-world tasks, these tools are regarded as efficient for developing expertise. The users' experience of realism is recognised as crucial, and is often regarded as an effect of the similarity between reality and the simulator itself. In this study, it is…

  11. The Interview as Collaborative Achievement: Interaction, Identity, and Ideology in a Speech Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmy, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This article contrasts a common conceptualization of the interview in applied linguistics, referred to as an "interview as research instrument" perspective, with an alternative, referred to as a "research interview as social practice" orientation. It illustrates implications of the two perspectives on interviews by contrasting a thematic analysis…

  12. Low dark current P-InAsSbP/n-InAs/N-InAsSbP/n+-InAs double heterostructure back-side illuminated photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunkov, P. N.; Il'inskaya, N. D.; Karandashev, S. A.; Karpukhina, N. G.; Lavrov, A. A.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyi, M. A.; Stus', N. M.; Usikova, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    P-InAsSbP/n-InAs/N-InAsSbP/n+-InAs double heterostructure photodiodes with linear impurity distribution in the space charge region have been fabricated and studied. The photodiodes showed good perspectives for use in low temperature pyrometry as low dark current (8·10-6 A/cm2, Vbias = -0.5 V, 164 K) and background limited infrared photodetector (BLIP) regime starting from 150 K (2π field of view, D3.1μm ∗ = 1.4·1012 cm Hz1/2/W) have been demonstrated.

  13. Facilitating progress in health behaviour theory development and modification: the reasoned action approach as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Katharine J; Noar, Seth M

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the question: what are barriers to health behaviour theory development and modification, and what potential solutions can be proposed? Using the reasoned action approach (RAA) as a case study, four areas of theory development were examined: (1) the theoretical domain of a theory; (2) tension between generalisability and utility, (3) criteria for adding/removing variables in a theory, and (4) organisational tracking of theoretical developments and formal changes to theory. Based on a discussion of these four issues, recommendations for theory development are presented, including: (1) the theoretical domain for theories such as RAA should be clarified; (2) when there is tension between generalisability and utility, utility should be given preference given the applied nature of the health behaviour field; (3) variables should be formally removed/amended/added to a theory based on their performance across multiple studies and (4) organisations and researchers with a stake in particular health areas may be best suited for tracking the literature on behaviour-specific theories and making refinements to theory, based on a consensus approach. Overall, enhancing research in this area can provide important insights for more accurately understanding health behaviours and thus producing work that leads to more effective health behaviour change interventions.

  14. Using the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) Group Model to Promote Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Steen, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group model is used to promote self-esteem and academic performance of English as a second language (ESL) students. The findings from the preliminary data indicated that the participants' self-esteem was significantly improved after participation in the group. There was no significant improvement in the total…

  15. Mathemaphobia and Teaching Learning Materials as Correlates of Pupils Achievement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyegoke, D. A.; Oyelabi, O.; Nnaji, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mathematics to the effective daily living and contributions to the scientific and technological advancement of the society cannot be over-emphasized. As important as this subject is, there seems to be a lot variable that promote or inhibit the pupils' performance in it as various level of Nigerian educational system. The study…

  16. Perceived Competence and Autonomy as Moderators of the Effects of Achievement Goal Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, YoonJung; Weinstein, Claire Ellen; Wicker, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of two moderators--perceived competence and perceived autonomy--in the relationships of achievement goal orientations with a broad range of learning-related variables, including interest, effort, learning strategy use and academic achievement. Perceived competence and autonomy played…

  17. Achievement Goal Orientations and Self-Reported Study Strategies as Predictors of Online Studying Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesope, Olusola O.; Zhou, Mingming; Nesbit, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether achievement motivations influence the adoption of learning strategies and learning strategies influence studying behavior in an online learning environment. The Goal Orientation Questionnaire was used to measure achievement motives, and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire was…

  18. Achievement Goals as Mediators of the Relationship between Competence Beliefs and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W.; Symes, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous work suggests that the expectation of failure is related to higher test anxiety and achievement goals grounded in a fear of failure. Aim: To test the hypothesis, based on the work of Elliot and Pekrun (2007), that the relationship between perceived competence and test anxiety is mediated by achievement goal orientations.…

  19. Examination of the Relationship between Perfectionism and English Achievement as Mediated by Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    GhorbanDordinejad, Farhad; Nasab, Amir Hosein Farjad

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of individual and affective factors which correlate foreign language learners' achievement both positively and negatively. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perfectionism and English language achievement among high school third graders in Chenaran, a city in northeast of Iran, mediated by foreign…

  20. Kinder als Experten fur Leistungsbewertung (Children as Experts in Assessment of Achievement).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Silvia-Iris; Vollstadt, Witlof

    2002-01-01

    Presents the results of a research project LeiHS, which investigated the assessment and feedback on achievement in Hamburg (Germany) schools. Shows that students and parents accept assessment and prefer reports where the grades are accompanied by comments on individual achievement in different subjects. Interviews students about their achievement…

  1. Components of Achievement Motivation as Predictors of Potential for Economic Change, Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroff, Joseph; And Others

    The major goal of this research study was the identification and validation of measures of components of personal achievement orientations that can be used in the job training program context. The guiding conceptions for the research were based on Atkinson's theory of achievement motivation, Gurin's investigations of expectancies, and measurement…

  2. Academic Commitment and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Academic Achievement in Additional Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. Ruric; Human-Vogel, Salomé

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of research within science and engineering education revolves around academic success and retention of science and engineering students. It is well known that South Africa is experiencing, for various reasons, an acute shortage of engineers. Therefore, we think it is important to understand the factors that contribute to attrition…

  3. Functional fixedness and functional reduction as common sense reasonings in chemical equilibrium and in geometry and polarity of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furió, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Bárcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-09-01

    Many of the learning difficulties in the specific domain of chemistry are found not only in the ideas already possessed by students but in the strategic and procedural knowledge that is characteristic of everyday thinking. These defects in procedural knowledge have been described as functional fixedness and functional reduction. This article assesses the procedural difficulties of students (grade 12 and first and third year of university) based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry: chemical equilibrium and geometry and polarity of molecules. In the first area, the theme of external factors affecting equilibria (temperature and concentration change) was selected because the explanations given by the students could be analyzed easily. The existence of a functional fixedness where Le Chatelier's principle was almost exclusively applied by rote could be observed, with this being the cause of the incorrect responses given to the proposed items. Functional fixedness of the Lewis structure also led to an incorrect prediction of molecular geometry. When molecular geometry was correctly determined by the students, it seemed that other methodological or procedural difficulties appeared when the task was to determine molecular polarity. The students showed a tendency, in many cases, to reduce the factors affecting molecular polarity in two possible ways: (a) assuming that polarity depends only on shape (geometric functional reduction) or (b) assuming that molecular polarity depends only on the polarity of bonds (bonding functional reduction).

  4. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  5. Girl Friends as Significant-Others: Their Influence on Young Men's Career Aspirations and Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Luther B.

    1977-01-01

    Girl friends are significant-others who influence young men's career aspirations and achievements. Girl friends and same sex peers evaluate a youth's educational potential using broader criteria than do parents. (Author/MV)

  6. Time-dependent Networks as Models to Achieve Fast Exact Time-table Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jacob, Rico

    2001-01-01

    We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models.......We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models....

  7. Time-Dependent Networks as Models to Achieve Fast Exact Time-Table Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gert Stølting; Jacob, Rico

    2003-01-01

    We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries for travelers using a train system. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models.......We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries for travelers using a train system. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models....

  8. Pumps as turbines for low cost micro hydro power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.A. [Nottingham Trent University (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Small centrifugal pumps are suitable for use as hydraulic turbines and have the advantage of being mass produced in many countries throughout the world. When used with an integral induction motor, they can be installed as a combined turbine and generator unit. Recent research and development work carried out at Nottingham Trent University in collaboration with the Intermediate Technology Development Group has concentrated on two aspects that had previously held back the wider application of this technology. A standard design of Induction Generator Controller (IGC), enabling these units to be used for isolated micro hydro schemes, has been proven, and is now being manufactured in five countries world-wide. Progress has also been made on the application of performance prediction methods which facilitate the selection of a pump unit for particular site conditions. Sites, suitable for the application of small centrifugal pumps as turbines are of two main types: firstly, as a low-cost alternative to crossflow turbines with an output of 5kW or less; secondly, for energy recovery in pipelines. These types of installation may be suitable for industrialized and developing countries. Three examples of different types of scheme are described in the paper and these show the favourable financial returns that are possible. (Author)

  9. Beyond Virtual Equality: Liberatory Consciousness as a Path to Achieve Trans* Inclusion in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, D. Chase J.

    2015-01-01

    Trans* men have not, as yet, received specific research attention in higher education. Based on intensive interviews with 25 trans* men enrolled in colleges or universities in New England, I explore their experiences in higher education. I analyze participants' descriptions of supports and challenges in their collegiate environments, as well as…

  10. Achievement of Early Compressive Strength in Concrete Using Sporosarcina pasteurii Bacteria as an Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Chidara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Often it is observed, attainment of early compressive strength in concrete is a challenge. Researchers have tried various admixtures to achieve the objective. This work addresses the issue of achieving early compressive strength in concrete using a bacterium called Sporosarcina pasteurii. The bacterium is characterised with the ability to precipitate calcium carbonate in the presence of any carbonate source and is known for its resistive capacity in extreme temperature and pressure zones. To establish the objective of gain in early strength around 192 concrete cubes were tested at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days and the results compared with controlled concrete. The bacterium was used in combination of chemicals and the dosage proportions were altered to achieve the desired M20 compressive strength at 28 days.

  11. Strategic planning as a tool for achieving alignment in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Eve J; Church, Kathryn C

    2012-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010, there is an urgent need for medical schools, teaching hospitals, and practice plans to work together seamlessly across a common mission. Although there is agreement that there should be greater coordination of initiatives and resources, there is little guidance in the literature to address the method to achieve the necessary transformation. Traditional approaches to strategic planning often engage a few leaders and produce a set of immeasurable initiatives. A nontraditional approach, consisting of a Whole-Scale (Dannemiller Tyson Associates, Ann Arbor, MI) engagement, appreciative inquiry, and a balanced scorecard can, more rapidly transform an academic health center. Using this nontraditional approach to strategic planning, increased organizational awareness was achieved in a single academic health center. Strategic planning can be an effective tool to achieve alignment, enhance accountability, and a first step in meeting the demands of the new landscape of healthcare.

  12. Achievement, agency, gender, and socioeconomic background as predictors of postschool choices: a multicontext study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D; Schoon, Ingrid; Tsai, Yi-Miau; Nagy, Gabriel; Trautwein, Ulrich; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2012-11-01

    In this article, the authors develop and test a differential effects model of university entry versus major selection using a set of common predictors, including background factors (gender and socioeconomic status), academic achievement, and academic self-concept. The research used data from 2 large longitudinal databases from Germany (N = 5,048) and England (N = 15,995) to explore the generalizability of the hypothesized model in 2 cultural contexts. For both countries, the results suggested that (a) socioeconomic status was a key predictor of university entry, whereas gender was a key predictor of major selection; (b) achievement and self-concept in both math and English were positive predictors of university entry; and (c) math achievement and self-concept predicted math-intensive major choice and lower likelihood of entering verbal-intensive majors (and vice versa). Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  13. Perceptions and relationships to school resources and academic achievement: Implications for the principal as instructional leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Keller Boudreaux

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple elements help to define school climate and its dimensions. The focus of an effective school climate is often on relationships/quality interactions, parental/community involvement, order and discipline, trust and feelings of safety, and classroom overcrowding. However, there is insufficient research on the elements of school resources and the relationship to student academic achievement. There are even fewer studies on teachers’ perceptions of this element and its affect student achievement. The researchers used secondary data to analyze teachers’ perceptions related indices of school resources and its direct relationship to student academic achievement. According to the data results, there were no significant differences between elementary and middle school teachers’ perceptions about access to resources. However, there was a difference in teachers’ perceptions who worked in schools with proficient reading and math scores on standardized test.

  14. Low density lipoproteins as circulating fast temperature sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Prassl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential physiological significance of the nanophase transition of neutral lipids in the core of low density lipoprotein (LDL particles is dependent on whether the rate is fast enough to integrate small (+/-2 degrees C temperature changes in the blood circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sub-second, time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technology with synchrotron radiation, we have monitored the dynamics of structural changes within LDL, which were triggered by temperature-jumps and -drops, respectively. Our findings reveal that the melting transition is complete within less than 10 milliseconds. The freezing transition proceeds slowly with a half-time of approximately two seconds. Thus, the time period over which LDL particles reside in cooler regions of the body readily facilitates structural reorientation of the apolar core lipids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low density lipoproteins, the biological nanoparticles responsible for the transport of cholesterol in blood, are shown to act as intrinsic nano-thermometers, which can follow the periodic temperature changes during blood circulation. Our results demonstrate that the lipid core in LDL changes from a liquid crystalline to an oily state within fractions of seconds. This may, through the coupling to the protein structure of LDL, have important repercussions on current theories of the role of LDL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  15. Low temperature properties of pnictide CrAs single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    High quality single crystal CrAs was grown by Sn flux method.The results of magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity are reported in a temperature range of 2 to 800 K.At low temperatures,a T2 dependence of resistivity is observed showing a Fermi-liquid behavior.The Kadowaki-Woods ratio is found to be 1×10-5 μΩ cm mol2 K2 mJ-2,which fits well to the universal value for many correlated electron systems.At about 270 K,a clear magnetic transition is observed with sharp changes of resistivity and susceptibility.Above 270 K,a linear-temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is observed up to 700 K,which resembles the T-dependent magnetic susceptibility of parents of iron-pnictides superconductors.

  16. Anaerobic digestion as a key technology in bio-energy production: Current achievements and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Dewil, Raf; Appels, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been applied for many decades for the treatment of organic wastes like manure, wastewater sludge and crop residues. Whereas these streams were considered as a nuisance in the past, nowadays, emphasis lies on resource recovery. These wastes are, indeed, providing an important source of renewable energy. Therefore, there is a renewed interest in anaerobic digestion as a technology for sustainable renewable energy production. Also, anaerobic digestion plays a central role...

  17. Parent Academic Involvement as Related to School Behavior, Achievement, and Aspirations: Demographic Variations Across Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy E.; Castellino, Domini R.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Nowlin, Patrick; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    A longitudinal model of parent academic involvement, behavioral problems, achievement, and aspirations was examined for 463 adolescents, followed from 7th (approximately 12 years old) through 11th (approximately 16 years old) grades. Parent academic involvement in 7th grade was negatively related to 8th-grade behavioral problems and positively…

  18. Parent Involvement, Academic Achievement and the Role of Student Attitudes and Behaviors as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research shows inconsistent relationships between parent involvement and academic achievement and often asks why such inconsistencies occur. The research proposes a theoretical model that separates parent involvement into those practices linking parents to children and those practices linking parents to other adults in the school…

  19. Academic Identification as a Mediator of the Relationship between Parental Socialization and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambler, Michael J.; Linke, Lance H.; Ward, Nadia L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether academic identification, or one's psychological and emotional investment in academics, mediates the association between child-reported parental educational socialization and standardized achievement test scores among a predominantly ethnic minority sample of 367 urban middle school students. We predicted that academic…

  20. Applause as an Achievement-Based Reward during a Computerised Self-Assessment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, Christos N.; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2012-01-01

    Affective feedback during a self-assessment test could help induce the learner to an optimal emotional state regarding the learning material. However, there is a lack of experimental evidence concerning the influence of affective feedback during a self-assessment test. This paper is a step towards this direction. The effect of achievement-based…

  1. The Increasing Enrollment of Returning Women Students and Their Achievement as Measured by Their Mean GPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, Kenneth R.

    The two purposes of this study were to: (1) determine whether there had been an increase in the enrollment of returning women students (twenty-five years of age or older) between the fall of 1975 and the fall of 1976 at the Quad-Cities Campus, Black Hawk College. A second problem was to compare the mean grade point average achieved by these…

  2. Teacher Effectiveness as Correlate of Students' Cognitive Achievement at Upper Basic Education in Basic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoh, Titus M.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to find out the relationship between students perception of their teacher effectiveness and academic achievement in Basic Technology. Teacher's personality, teaching techniques/classroom management strategy and appearance, all integrate to make for teacher effectiveness. To carry out this research, two research questions and one…

  3. Intrinsic Motivation, Perceived Competence and Classroom Engagement as Longitudinal Predictors of Adolescent Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Oros, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, classroom engagement and extrinsic motivation on reading development among youth. Using a nationally representative sample of students in the US, the researchers followed students longitudinally from fifth to eighth grade. Reading achievement was measured using…

  4. Parental Involvement as a Correlate of Academic Achievement of Primary School Pupils in Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajoju, Samuel A.; Aluede, Oyaziwo; Ojugo, Augustine I.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental involvement in children's education and the academic achievement of primary six pupils in Edo State, Nigeria. The ex-post facto research design was employed in this study. The sample consisted of 1,895 primary six pupils (1,024 males and 863 females drawn from 37,908 primary six pupils in…

  5. Cognitive Holding Power, Fluid Intelligence, and Mathematical Achievement as Predictors of Children's Realistic Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Li

    2009-01-01

    The present study explored whether first and second order cognitive holding power perceived by children in mathematical classrooms, fluid intelligence, and mathematical achievement predicted their performance on standard problems, and especially realistic problems. A sample of 119 Chinese 4-6th graders were administered the word problem test, the…

  6. SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS, ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION AND GENDER AS RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev ATES

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate preservice computer teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and achievement motivation levels for educational software development before and after the “Educational Software Design, Development and Evaluation (ESDDE” course. A pretest and post test design without a control group was employed. In 2008, 46 senior students (25 male and 21 female who were enrolled at Computer Education and Instructional Technology department participated in this study.The data were collected by the scale of self-efficacy beliefs towards Educational Software Development (ESD, achievement motivation scale besides student demographics form. Positively, the results revealed that the students’ self efficacy beliefs towards educational software development significantly improved after ESDDE course. Before the course, the students’ self-efficacy beliefs were significantly different according to perceived level of programming competency and gender in favor of male, however after the course there was no significant difference in self-efficacy beliefs regarding gender and perceived level of programming competency. Hence, achievement motivation levels after the course were significantly higher than before while gender and perceived level of programming competency had no significant effect on achievement motivation for ESD. The study is considered to contribute studies investigating gender and computer related self efficacy beliefs in IT education.

  7. Teacher Evaluation Tools: An Examination of Wyoming Evaluation Models as a Predictor of Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between teacher quality, student characteristics, teacher attributes, and student growth in reading. The legislation requirements enacted with NCLB (2002), WAEA (2013), and Chapter 29 (Wyoming Department of Education, 2010) necessitated that student achievement be a primary consideration…

  8. Academic Achievement, Perfectionism and Social Support as Predictors of Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ibrahim; Genctanirim, Dilek; Yalcin, Ilhan; Baydan, Yaprak

    2008-01-01

    This study examined likelihood of high school students' gender, levels of academic achievement, perfectionism and perceived social support in predicting their degree of test anxiety. Participants were 505 students from high schools in the Ankara metropolitan area. The Test Anxiety Inventory, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Perceived…

  9. Learning Environments as Basis for Cognitive Achievements of Students in Basic Science Classrooms in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomatofa, Rachel; Okoye, Nnamdi; Igwebuike, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The nature of classroom learning environments created by teachers had been considered very important for learning to take place effectively. This study investigated the effect of creating constructivist and transmissive learning environments on achievements of science students of different ability levels. 243 students formed the entire study…

  10. Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents…

  11. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  12. Effortful Control and Impulsivity as Concurrent and Longitudinal Predictors of Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Haugen, Rg; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Kupfer, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test if both effortful control (EC) and impulsivity, a reactive index of temperament, uniquely predict adolescents' academic achievement, concurrently and longitudinally (Time 1: "N" = 168, X-bar[subscript age] = 12 years). At Time 1, parents and teachers reported on students' EC and impulsivity.…

  13. Educational Encouragement, Parenting Styles, Gender and Ethnicity as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aqeel; Ahmad, Roslee; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Current study examines the predictors of academic achievement: role of parenting styles, educational encouragement, gender and ethnicity among special education students. Participants of this study consisted 200 special education students (N = 105 boys and N = 95 girls) age varies 14 to 19 years from one school located at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.…

  14. English Language Proficiency Tests and Academic Achievement: A Study on the Malaysian University English Test as a Predictor of Technical Programme Undergraduates Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhazlini Rahmat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Malaysian education system, English has always played an important role. In acknowledging its importance, Malaysian University English Test (MUET has been introduced to enable continued emphasis on this role.  MUET has been made compulsory for those who wish to pursue a first degree programme in local universities. This study aims to examine the relationship between English language proficiency test (as measured by MUET bands to predict the undergraduates academic achievement (as measured by Cumulative Grade Point Average score. It also aims to determine the recommended MUET band as an entry requirement for prospective technical programme undergraduates in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM. The study was carried out among 225 final year undergraduates of five different faculties in UPM, namely Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, and Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.  The data used were obtained by administering a brief questionnaire and were quantitatively analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 19.  The study revealed that there is a medium positive correlation between English language proficiency and academic achievement where students who have scored higher bands for MUET are the ones who obtained higher CGPA in their study. Based on the findings, it is recommended that UPM and other local universities make changes towards the minimum MUET entry requirement to help prospective undergraduates excel in their academic study. Keywords: English language proficiency, academic achievement, technical programme, MUET, CGPA

  15. Big Five Personality Traits, Cognitive Appraisals and Emotion Regulation Strategies as Predictors of Achievement Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sorić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In academic settings, emotions can arise in a variety of contexts and have adverse and interfering effects on learning and performance, especially those of negative valence. Thus, the investigation of their personal antecedents and different strategies implemented by students in order to regulate them, are important topics of research. The aim of this study was to examine the unique contribution of Big Five personality traits (as distal personal antecedents of emotions, cognitive control and value appraisals (as their proximal antecedents and students' tendencies to reappraise or suppress their emotions (as most important emotion regulation strategies for experiencing academic emotions of unhappiness, anger, anxiety and humiliation. The sample consisted of 500 high school students who completed the self-report questionnaire during their regular scheduled classes. The series of multiple hierarchical regression analyses showed that all groups of predictors have made significant and independent contribution to the explanation of all analysed emotions.

  16. Parent Academic Involvement as Related to School Behavior, Achievement, and Aspirations: Demographic Variations Across Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Nancy E.; Castellino, Domini R.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Nowlin, Patrick; Dodge, Kenneth A.; BATES, JOHN E.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    A longitudinal model of parent academic involvement, behavioral problems, achievement, and aspirations was examined for 463 adolescents, followed from 7th (approximately 12 years old) through 11th (approximately 16 years old) grades. Parent academic involvement in 7th grade was negatively related to 8th-grade behavioral problems and positively related to 11th-grade aspirations. There were variations across parental education levels and ethnicity: Among the higher parental education group, par...

  17. Achieving 90–90–90 in paediatric HIV: adolescence as the touchstone for transition success

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The number of children less than 15 years estimated to be living with HIV globally approximated 3.2 million in 2013. Young people aged 15 to 24 years living with HIV approximated 4 million. The survival of these children and adolescents into adulthood poses new and urgent challenges of transition from the paediatric to adolescent to adult healthcare settings due to emerging developmental, psychosocial and comorbid issues. In order to achieve treatment targets of 90–90–90 across ...

  18. Formal Kindergaten Experience as a Predictor of Academic Achievement of Primary Five Pupils in English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.T. Eweniyi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of formal kindergarten education on the achievement of primary five pupils. The academic performance of pupils with and without formal kindergarten experience were compared. Their achievement was based on their performance in the English language tests. The sample consisted of one hundred and twenty pupils made up of forty eight pupils with formal kindergarten education and seventy two pupils without formal kindergarten education selected from ten public primary five classes. The sample consisted of boys and girls.The instrument used for data collection was English language achievement tests. The instruments were administered to students in their various schools. The scores obtained from the tests were analysed using the t-test to find the significant difference between the means of the two groups. The results of this study revealed that formal kindergarten education has a long term effect on the performance of primary school pupils since those with formal kindergarten education performed significantly better than those without. Another finding was that the sex of the students has no effect on the academic performance of pupils in primary school.Conclusively, it was confirmed in the study that pupils with formal kindergarten education perform better than those without in Nigerian context at least in primary school, hence this study emphasized the importance of formal kindergarten education.

  19. Z'-gauge Bosons as Harbingers of Low Mass Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2012-01-01

    Massive Z'-gauge bosons act as excellent harbingers for string compactifications with a low string scale. In D-brane models they are associated to U(1) gauge symmetries that are either anomalous in four dimensions or exhibit a hidden higher dimensional anomaly. We discuss the possible signals of massive Z'-gauge bosons at hadron collider machines (Tevatron, LHC) in a minimal D-brane model consisting out of four stacks of D-branes. In this construction, there are two massive gauge bosons, which can be naturally associated with baryon number B and B-L (L being lepton number). Here baryon number is always anomalous in four dimensions, whereas the presence of a four-dimensional B-L anomaly depends on the U(1)-charges of the right handed neutrinos. In case B-L is anomaly free, a mass hierarchy between the two associated Z'-gauge bosons can be explained. In our phenomenological discussion about the possible discovery of massive Z'-gauge bosons, we take as a benchmark scenario the dijet plus W signal, recently obser...

  20. GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si with low threading dislocation density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Vaisman, Michelle; Lang, Jordan; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-07-01

    GaAsP on Si tandem cells represent a promising path towards achieving high efficiency while leveraging the Si solar knowledge base and low-cost infrastructure. However, dislocation densities exceeding 108 cm-2 in GaAsP cells on Si have historically hampered the efficiency of such approaches. Here, we report the achievement of low threading dislocation density values of 4.0-4.6 × 106 cm-2 in GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si, comparable with more established metamorphic solar cells on GaAs. Our GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si exhibit high open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency, allowing them to significantly surpass the power conversion efficiency of previous devices. The results in this work show a realistic path towards dual-junction GaAsP on Si cells with efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  1. Entrepreneurship Education in Delta State Tertiary Institution as a Means of Achieving National Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined entrepreneurship education in Delta Sate tertiary institutions as a means of national growth and development. Two research questions were asked to guide the study. The population comprised all the 1,898 academic staff in eight tertiary institutions in the state. A sample of 800 lecturers was drawn through the multi stage and…

  2. Differences in Academic Achievement among Texas High School Students as a Function of Music Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the score differences on the Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Reading and Mathematics measures among students in Grades 10 and 11 as a function of music enrollment. Specifically, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and enrollment in choir, band, or orchestra or no music enrollment…

  3. Feedback type as a moderator of the relationship between achievement goals and feedback reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anseel, Frederik; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Janssen, Onne; Duyck, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to shed new light on the inconsistent relationship between performance-approach (PAp) goals and feedback reactions by examining feedback type as a moderator. Results of a field experiment (N = 939) using a web-based work simulation task showed that the effect of achie

  4. Analysing Concept Maps as an Assessment Tool in Teaching Physics and Comparison with the Achievement Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingec, Sebnem Kandil

    2009-01-01

    Concept mapping is a technique that paves the way to represent knowledge schematically. In this research, concept mapping was used as an assessment method on the impulse-momentum topic. The purpose of this study was to determine teacher candidates' knowledge about understanding of the concepts of impulse and momentum by comparing and contrasting…

  5. Using a Facebook Group as a Forum to Distribute, Answer and Discuss Content: Influence on Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Britt, Virginia G.; Beard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using a Facebook group to increase preservice teachers' knowledge when one was used as a forum to share, answer, and discuss content-related questions in a technology course required for all students seeking teacher licensure. Further, it examined the students' prior use of Facebook groups, how the…

  6. Stable Same-Sex Friendships with Higher Achieving Partners Promote Mathematical Reasoning in Lower Achieving Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Dawn; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate friend influence over mathematical reasoning in a sample of 374 children in 187 same-sex friend dyads (184 girls in 92 friendships; 190 boys in 95 friendships). Participants completed surveys that measured mathematical reasoning in the 3rd grade (approximately 9 years old) and one year later in the 4th grade (approximately 10 years old). Analyses designed for dyadic data (i.e., longitudinal Actor-Partner Interdependence Models) indicated that higher achieving friends influenced the mathematical reasoning of lower achieving friends, but not the reverse. Specifically, greater initial levels of mathematical reasoning among higher achieving partners in the 3rd grade predicted greater increases in mathematical reasoning from 3rd grade to 4th grade among lower achieving partners. These effects held after controlling for peer acceptance and rejection, task avoidance, interest in mathematics, maternal support for homework, parental education, length of the friendship, and friendship group norms on mathematical reasoning. PMID:26402901

  7. Low-E Storm Windows Gain Acceptance as a Home Weatherization Measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbride, Theresa L.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2016-05-16

    This article for Home Energy Magazine describes work by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop low-emissivity storm windows as an energy efficiency-retrofit option for existing homes. The article describes the low-emissivity invisible silver metal coatings on the glass, which reflect heat back into the home in winter or back outside in summer and the benefits of low-e storm windows including insulation, air sealing, noise blocking, protection of antique windows, etc. The article also describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's efforts on behalf of DOE to overcome market barriers to adoption of the technology, including performance validation studies in the PNNL Lab Homes, cost effectiveness analysis, production of reports, brochures, how-to guides on low-e storm window installation for the Building America Solution Center, and a video posted on YouTube. PNNL's efforts were reviewed by the Pacific Northwest Regional Technical Forum (RTF), which serves as the advisory board to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Bonneville Power Administration. In late July 2015, the RTF approved the low-e storm window measure’s savings and specifications, a critical step in integrating low-e storm windows into energy-efficiency planning and utility weatherization and incentive programs. PNNL estimates that more than 90 million homes in the United States with single-pane or low-performing double-pane windows would benefit from the technology. Low-e storm windows are suitable not only for private residences but also for small commercial buildings, historic properties, and facilities that house residents, such as nursing homes, dormitories, and in-patient facilities. To further assist in the market transformation of low-e storm windows and other high-efficiency window attachments, DOE helped found the window Attachment Energy Rating Council (AERC) in 2015. AERC is an independent, public interest, non-profit organization whose mission is to rate

  8. Using Renewable Energy As a tool To Achieve Tourism sustainability in Mediterranean islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthie Michalena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the challenge of transforming Mediterranean islands into sustainable tourism areas, through the direct (or indirect use of renewable energy projects and technologies. Through demonstration and a discussion of cases studies from studied islands, which takes into account island-specific characteristics and particularities, we assess the compatibility of renewable energy technologies (RETs with sustainable tourism development. Conclusions emerge from this analysis which highlight prerequisites for RET-tourism compatibility; this has potential transferability to other insular territories. Developing an appreciation of the factors that can lead to sustainable tourism in islands through the use of renewable energy is a priority issue for two main reasons. Firstly, because until now scientific literature has only discussed the question of photovoltaics’ integration into tourism buildings, and secondly, because of the relatively high vulnerability to climate change impacts of islands compared to many mainland areas, according to predictions made by the United Nations and the European Union. Whilst international politics deal with the mass reduction of gaseous emissions into the atmosphere, reducing the adverse effects of climate change in the islands has become a significant component of national priorities.

  9. Iron salts in solid state and in frozen solutions as dosimeters for low irradiation temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, T. [Facultad de Quimica UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Lartigue, J. [Facultad de Quimica UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Ramos, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mosqueira, G.F. [Direccion General de Divulgacion de la Ciencia de la UNAM, A.P. 70-487, C:P, D.F. Mexico 04510 (Mexico); Negron-Mendoza, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: negron@nuclecu.unam.mx

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work is to study the irradiation of iron salts in solid state (heptahydrated ferrous sulfate) and in frozen acid solutions. The study is focused on finding their possible use as dosimeters for low temperature irradiations and high doses. The analysis of the samples was made by UV-visible and Moessbauer spectroscopies. The output signal was linear from 0 to 10 MGy for the solid samples, and 0-600 Gy for the frozen solutions. The obtained data is reproducible and easy to handle. For these reasons, heptahydrate iron sulfate is a suitable dosimeter for low temperature and high irradiation doses, in solid state, and in frozen solution.

  10. Critical perspectives on cultural competence as a strategic opportunity for achieving high performance in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelitz, Philippa; Watson, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    * Cultural proficiency is a critical component of diversity competence. Diversity competency attends to issues of cultural proficiency and links cultural competence to issues of diverse representation and organizational inclusivity. * Developing and applying cultural competencies in diagnostic and invasive imaging services provides strategic opportunities to experience better patient cooperation, increase patient satisfaction, reduce medical errors, reduce patient complaints, and improve service recovery. * New Jersey recently passed legislation that requires 16 hours of cultural competency education as a condition of licensure to practice medicine. Four other states have similar legislation pending. The state of Washington passed legislation requiring all state accredited programs to include cultural competency education.

  11. Herbicides as weed control agents: state of the art: II. Recent achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility.

  12. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    hitting anything solid, they will create secondary electrons. These electrons are in fact the energy source needed to run interstellar chemistry. Slow electrons can in principle trigger three different primary processes in a molecule. The first is ionisation by electron impact (EI), which is used to create ions in mass spectrometry. In this process an electron hits a molecule M and knocks an outer shell electron to create a cation. This occurs whenever the electron energy is above the ionisation threshold of the target molecule. Another possibility is the attachment of a slow electron to a molecule to create an anion. This can occur at sharply defined resonance energies specific to the molecule M. A third possibility is to excite the molecule M to a neutral state M∗ .[9] M + e- -> M+ + 2 e- (Electron impact ionisation) M + e- -> M- (Electron attachment) M + e- -> M∗ + e- (Neutral excitation) The created states M+ , M- and M∗ are usually not stable states so they very often dissociate into ions and radicals, which can then further react with neighbouring molecules to form new chemical species. In these chemical reactions some products can be formed even at very low temperatures that would otherwise require a lot of thermal energy and/or special catalysts. The formation of ethylamine from ethylene and ammonia by hydroamination is one such example. The reaction is characterized by a high activation barrier caused by the electronic repulsion between the electron density rich C=C double bound and the lone pair electrons of ammo-nia. The reaction also has a highly negative entropy, so it becomes less favourable at higher temperatures, ruling out heat as a means to facilitate the reaction. In classical chemistry this problem is overcome by the use of catalysts. Unfortunately there still is no general catalyst for this kind of reaction. Recently it was shown that the reaction can efficiently be induced by low energy electron radiation.[10] One of the reaction partners is

  13. Navigating Schooled Numeracies: Explanations for Low Achievement, in Mathematics of UK Children from Low SES Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dave; Street, Brian; Tomlin, Alison

    2006-01-01

    The intention of the research reported here was to seek explanations for low achievement in school mathematics, as conventionally assessed, that derive from broad understandings of mathematics as social. Such a broad social perspective can provide explanations for low achievement, which could lead to different understandings and hence to different…

  14. Rachiplusia nu larva as a biofactory to achieve high level expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lucía Virginia; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Wolman, Federico Javier; Cascone, Osvaldo; Miranda, María Victoria

    2011-05-01

    A process based on orally-infected Rachiplusia nu larvae as biological factories for expression and one-step purification of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRP-C) is described. The process allows obtaining high levels of pure HRP-C by membrane chromatography purification. The introduction of the partial polyhedrin homology sequence element in the target gene increased HRP-C expression level by 2.8-fold whereas it increased 1.8-fold when the larvae were reared at 27 °C instead of at 24 °C, summing up a 4.6-fold overall increase in the expression level. Additionally, HRP-C purification by membrane chromatography at a high flow rate greatly increase D the productivity without affecting the resolution. The V(max) and K(m) values of the recombinant HRP-C were similar to those of the HRP from Armoracia rusticana roots.

  15. Vocabulary Learning as the Predictor of Third-Grader EFL Learners’ Achievement: A Case for Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jahangard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to formulate a model to predict the performance of Iranian high school third-graders on the End of the Course Achievement (ECA tests through their performance on the vocabulary tests, which were administered throughout the course. To meet this end, thirty two learners – aging seventeen to nineteen, all male – participated in the study which took nine months to complete. Their linguistic abilities were approximately at Intermediate-Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines (1998. The sampling procedure was the intact group method. 333 lexical items were taught to the learners in the decontextualized paired-associate
    translation method. The classes were held two hours a week in a nine-month course of time. Six sets of vocabulary tests were administered and every learner’s average was calculated. The learners’ scores on the ECA tests and their average scores on the vocabulary tests were analyzed through the regression analysis procedure to derive a model that could reliably predict the learners’ ECA scores through their average performance on the vocabulary scores. The analysis yielded the following
    formula: (AVERAGE VOCABULARY × 0.713 + 2.871± [3.1].

  16. "I Am because We Are:" Collectivism as a Foundational Characteristic of African American College Student Identity and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Leslie R.

    2009-01-01

    This study extends current research on African American college student achievement by focusing on collectivism, a key characteristic of African American racial identity. Collectivism serves as the framework for analysis of students' beliefs about the purpose of higher education, conceptualization of their roles and responsibilities as students,…

  17. "As a Person, I Feel I've Changed Pretty Immensely": Sojourners' Aspirations and Self-Perceived Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mareike

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the interplay between learners' linguistic and personal objectives as well as evaluations of their achievements in study-abroad contexts, an area that has thus far remained widely unexplored given the prevalence of product-oriented, outcomes-based research. The study draws on the case of one Canadian student of German who…

  18. Coping with stress and cognitive interference in student teachers performance as important factors influencing their achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cirila Peklaj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate the relations between student teachers' strategies for coping with stressful situations, cognitive interference factors and successfulness of presentation of student teachers' seminar work. There were 135 student teachers participating in the study. At the beginning of the semester they filled in the Way of Coping Questionnaire (Folkman & Lazarus, 1988. After their presentation of seminar theme they reported about the cognitive interference factors during the presentation (distractive factors and intrusive thoughts. Different aspects of their performance were also evaluated by the teacher according to the well-known criteria. The analysis of the results showed significant correlations between certain ways of coping, cognitive interference factors and success of performance. Further statistical analysis showed significant differences in experiencing distractive factors and intrusive thoughts during presentation between students with low, medium and high performance success. The importance of successful strategies for coping with verbal presentation and the implications for student teacher education are discussed.

  19. MODELING OF ACMEOGRAMME AS A WAY FOR TEACHERS TO ACHIEVE THE HIGHTS OF PROFESSIONALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Viktorovna Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topicality of acmeological approach is preconditioned by the innovative processes in modern education, the implementation of the Bologna Declaration, the increased requirements to the competences of the teacher. Today, the quality of education depends on the ability of teachers to make the acmeogramme with the aim to reach the heights of their professionalism. Modeling and implementation of acmeogramme helps to solve the tasks of personal and subjective-operational development of the teacher-professional.Acmeogramme helps the teacher to innovate activities, to improve pedagogical skills and to enhance mobility and activity in research work. Today, the level of competitiveness of a specialist is estimated based on his/her professional competencies that must have interdisciplinary, personal and reflexive character. Competence-based approach implies not only the knowledge but also the skills to apply this knowledge in practice. In this regard, acmeological approach supports and develops the ideas enhancing professional competences of the teacher. The article pays special attention to building up the Acme of the teacher, as it allows to develop a program of selfimprovement and self-development according to the requirements to modern specialists. The article pays attention to the structure of the acme which implies selfanalysis, goal setting, elaboration of program of professional development taking into consideration professional competences, and reflexive component.

  20. GPR as a Low Impact Paleontogical Survey Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdevant, G. C.; Leverence, R.; Stewart, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Deweyville Formation, a Pleistocene fluvial sandstone, is a prolific source of megafaunal fossils from periods of low stand environmental conditions. GPR was employed in an environmentally sensitive area in close proximity to a salt dome in Northwest Harris County, Texas as a method of evaluating the probable paleo-depositional environment and to prospect for potential further site development of two distinct fossiliferous zones. The primary zone of interest is a lag gravel bounded sand responsible for producing a regionally unique fossil assemblage including South American megafauna (Lundelius et al, 2013). The secondary zone of interest contains undisturbed mammoth remains housed in coarse white sand emplaced on top of a clay drape which has been hypothesized to represent an oxbow lake formed by the meandering paleo-Brazos river. With an accurate map of the paleo-channel planning future activity can focus on maximizing fossil recovery and minimizing site impact. Pulse EKKO 250 MHz, 400MHz, and 1GHz system was employed in a prospect area proximal to the secondary site to calibrate and evaluate these systems for their resolution and penetration depth in the modern sediments. The data was processed using EKKO Mapper and EKKO View Deluxe software packages, 3d volumes were produced and sliced. Preliminary results from the 250 MHz demonstrate successful imaging of the sand-clay interface. After these surveys were run a small portion of the site was excavated to confirm the estimated velocities, the observed anomalies, and refine our modeling and interpretation, and improve grid design for further surveys. It was confirmed that the sand-clay interface was easily observable using GPR, however the grid spacing proved to be too wide, leading to artifacts in the 3d volume produced.

  1. Apparent Retrocausation as a Consequence of Orthodox Quantum Mechanics Refined to Accommodate the Principle of Sufficient Reason

    CERN Document Server

    Stapp, Henry P

    2011-01-01

    The principle of sufficient reason asserts that anything that happens does so for a reason: no definite state of affairs can come into being unless there is a sufficient reason why that particular thing should happen. This principle is usually attributed to Leibniz, although the first recorded Western philosopher to use it was Anaximander of Miletus. The demand that nature be rational, in the sense that it be compatible with the principle of sufficient reason, conflicts with a basic feature of contemporary orthodox physical theory, namely the notion that nature's response to the probing action of an observer is determined by pure chance, and hence on the basis of absolutely no reason at all. This appeal to pure chance can be deemed to have no rational fundamental place in reason-based Western science. It is argued here, on the basis of the other basic principles of quantum physics, that in a world that conforms to the principle of sufficient reason, the usual quantum statistical rules will naturally emerge at...

  2. Retrocausal Effects as a Consequence of Orthodox Quantum Mechanics Refined to Accommodate The Principle of Sufficient Reason

    CERN Document Server

    Stapp, Henry P

    2011-01-01

    The principle of sufficient reason asserts that anything that happens does so for a reason: no definite state of affairs can come into being unless there is a sufficient reason why that particular thing should happen. This principle is usually attributed to Leibniz, although the first recorded Western philosopher to use it was Anaximander of Miletus. The demand that nature be rational, in the sense that it be compatible with the principle of sufficient reason, conflicts with a basic feature of contemporary orthodox physical theory, namely the notion that nature's response to the probing action of an observer is determined by pure chance, and hence on the basis of absolutely no reason at all. This appeal to pure chance can be deemed to have no rational fundamental place in reason-based Western science. It is argued here, on the basis of the other basic principles of quantum physics, that in a world that conforms to the principle of sufficient reason, the usual quantum statistical rules will naturally emerge at...

  3. The Reasons to Lack of Electronic Banking Achievement in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rasoulian

    2011-09-01

    importance of Internet, frameworks andencouraging policies to impress beneficiaries to use electronic banking. The second part introduces the culturalelements as the most important ones and then it attracts our attention to financial elements (the cost of Internetand commissions as the second influencing factor the influence of technical elements is fading away due to theimprovements in banking system. Different parameters like management obstacles also play an important role inthe way of electronic banking. The safety obstacles are influenced by the cultural issues and their direct influenceis not certified. Ghareche and Abdolbaghi introduce Internet foundation and decrease in service expenses,managers and experts, that this study confirms Internet foundation and decrease in service expenses. Moghaliconfirm culture as effective parameter (indirectly. Amade and Jafarpour introduce culture-social, managementand reject financial and technical parameters, that this study only confirms culture-social parameters as effectiveparameter.Conclusion: The result of study does not certify the safety obstacles and cultural, financial, and technicalmanagement obstacles are influencing respectively.

  4. Self-regulated processes as predictors of students' achievement in music theory in Slovenian elementary music schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Smolej Fritz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to examine the relation between processes of selfregulated learning and achievement in Music Theory (MT, a basic and obligatory subject in Slovenian music schools. A total of 457 fifth- and sixth- grade students (153 boys and 303 girls from 10 different elementary music schools in Slovenia participated in the study. Students completed a questionnaire about affective-motivational processes and a questionnaire about (metacognitive processes of selfregulated learning in MT, as well as achievement test. The final grades were collected at the end of the school year. The results showed that significant correlation exists between almost all affective-motivational and (metacognitive processes of self-regulated learning and achievement. Affective-motivational factors emerged as better predictors of students' achievement than (metacognitive factors. The most important individual predictors were anxiety and competence. It was also found that self-regulated processes explain a greater amount of variance for final grades than for the achievement test.

  5. Increasing numbers of nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 15 years: antithrombotic medication as reason and prognostic factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konczalla, Juergen; Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Brawanski, Nina; Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Platz, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually caused by a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, but in some patients no source of hemorrhage can be detected. More recent data showed increasing numbers of cases of spontaneous nonaneurysmal SAH (NASAH). The aim of this study was to analyze factors, especially the use of antithrombotic medications such as systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents (aCPs), influencing the increasing numbers of cases of NASAH and the clinical outcome. METHODS Between 1999 and 2013, 214 patients who were admitted to the authors' institution suffered from NASAH, 14% of all patients with SAH. Outcome was assessed according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months. Risk factors were identified based on the outcome. RESULTS The number of patients with NASAH increased significantly in the last 15 years of the study period. There was a statistically significant increase in the rate of nonperimesencephalic (NPM)-SAH occurrence and aCP use, while the proportion of elderly patients remained stable. Favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) was achieved in 85% of cases, but patients treated with aCPs had a significantly higher risk for an unfavorable outcome. Further analysis showed that elderly patients, and especially the subgroup with a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern, had a high risk for an unfavorable outcome, whereas the subgroup of NPM-SAH without a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern had a favorable outcome, similar to perimesencephalic (PM)-SAH. CONCLUSIONS Over the years, a significant increase in the number of patients with NASAH has been observed. Also, the rate of aCP use has increased significantly. Risk factors for an unfavorable outcome were age > 65 years, Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern, and aCP use. Both "PM-SAH" and "NPM-SAH without a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern" had excellent outcomes. Patients with NASAH and a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern had a significantly higher risk for an unfavorable outcome and death. Therefore, for further

  6. Southeast Asian refugee children: self-esteem as a predictor of depression and scholastic achievement in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patricia G; Burns, Kenneth R; Popovich, Judith M; Belknap, Ruth Ann; Frank-Stromborg, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    The eruption of conflicts and war in this century has led to new masses of refugees and displaced persons. Globally, host countries will continue to confront issues of how to ensure the successful adaptation of refugees who typically are women and children. The United States received three major waves of Southeast Asian (SEA) refugees during the past twenty-five years. One million SEA refugees arrived in the past decade; the majority were children and adolescents. Today, there is still a lack of understanding surrounding mental health issues and their relationship to children's violence experience. We know that SEA refugee children suffered violence during the war in Southeast Asia, their escape from homelands, in camps of asylum and in the U.S. Although researchers have examined the relationship of violence with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in refugee children, the findings have been unclear and sometimes conflictual in their relationship to scholastic achievement. In the U.S., healthy self-esteem is recognized as an important component of mental health and academic success, while low self-esteem is associated with depression and academic failure. In general, self-esteem and measures of self-esteem have not been studied cross-culturally. The authors report the findings of a measure of self-esteem, depression and academic achievement in a convenience sample of 237 Southeast Asian refugee children aged 6 to 17 years of age in the U.S. Internationally, nurses who assess the mental health of refugee children and design interventions to assist in their adaptation, will want to have an understanding of mental health issues cross-culturally.

  7. Multiculturalism as a dimension of school climate: the impact on the academic achievement of Asian American and Hispanic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Janet; Le, Thao N

    2010-10-01

    Multiculturalism constitutes an important element of school climate, but the relation between perceived multiculturalism and academic achievement has not been widely studied. This study examined the influence of students' perceptions of school support for multiculturalism on academic achievement among 280 Asian American and Hispanic youth, including ethnic identity and ethnocultural empathy as potential mediators. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that perceived multiculturalism was significantly positively related to ethnocultural empathy for Asian Americans and Hispanics, and that ethnocultural empathy, in turn, was predictive of academic achievement for Hispanics only. Results of bootstrapping to test for mediation effects revealed ethnocultural empathy to be a salient mediator for Hispanic youth. Although ethnic identity did not mediate the link between multiculturalism and academic achievement, ethnic identity was significantly predictive of achievement for Hispanics. On the whole, these findings suggest that fostering a school climate supportive of multiculturalism may improve empathy toward ethnic out-groups. Furthermore, schools that promote compassion and tolerance for diverse ethnic groups may achieve better academic outcomes among Hispanic youth.

  8. Efficacy and Utility Beliefs of Mothers and Children as Predictors of Mathematics Achievement for American Indian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orona, Cynthia C.

    2013-01-01

    American Indians have the largest high school dropout rates of all ethnic groups in the United States. Though drop outs technically occur in high school, they actually begin with lowered academic achievement during elementary school years. Looking to mothers as the primary caretakers, this study sought to explore the correlations between American…

  9. Middle School Characteristics That Predict Student Achievement, as Measured by the School-Wide California API Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Josie Abaroa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, through quantitative research, effective middle school characteristics that predict student achievement, as measured by the school-wide California API score. Characteristics were determined using an instrument developed by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), which asked middle…

  10. Non-participants and reasons for non-participation in a pragmatic trial of energy healing as cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Techau, Marzcia Elisa Camille; Lunde, Anita; Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard;

    2014-01-01

    -participation in a pragmatic trial of energy healing for rehabilitation for colorectal cancer. Methods: Three to seven days after postal recruitment, all eligible participants (n=783) were contacted by telephone. Reasons given for non-participation were recorded in 5 categories. Data were analyzed using Chi2. Results: More...

  11. Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide as integrin-targeting surface decorator of selenium nanoparticles to achieve enhanced anticancer efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenting; Fu, Yuanting; Yang, Fang; Yang, Yufeng; Liu, Ting; Zheng, Wenjie; Zeng, Lilan; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-08-27

    The poor permeability of glioma parenchyma represents a major limit for antiglioblastoma drug delivery. Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide (GLP), which has a high binding affinity to αvβ3 integrin overexpressed in glioma cells, was employed in the present study to functionalize selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) to achieve antiglioblastoma efficacy. GLP-SeNPs showed satisfactory size distribution, high stability, and selectivity between cancer and normal cells. In U87 glioma cell membrane, which has a high integrin expression level, GLP-SeNPs exhibited significantly higher cellular uptake than unmodified SeNPs. As expected, U87 cells exhibited a greater uptake of GLP-SeNPs than C6 cells with low integrin expression level. Furthermore, the internalization of GLP-SeNPs was inhibited by cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Lys) peptides, suggesting that cellular uptake into U87 cells and C6 cells occurred via αvβ3 integrin-mediated endocytosis. For U87 cells, the cytotoxicity of SeNPs decorated by GLP was enhanced significantly because of the induction of various apoptosis signaling pathways. Internalized GLP-SeNPs triggered intracellular reactive oxygen species downregulation. Therefore, p53, MAPKs, and AKT pathways were activated to advance cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that surface decoration of nanomaterials with GLP could be an efficient strategy for design and preparation of glioblastoma targeting nanodrugs.

  12. Thinking Skills Intervention for Low-Achieving First Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotulainen, Risto; Mononen, Riikka; Aunio, Pirjo

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the improving thinking skills (ITS-1) intervention study on the thinking skills of low-achieving first graders. The intervention programme consists of 12 lessons, each lasting for 45 min. Lessons offer enriched-discovery learning activities and tasks to be solved through inductive reasoning. We used a…

  13. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils.

  14. Rice Husk Ash Sandcrete Block as Low Cost Building Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.Sangeetha,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a widely used construction material for various types of structures due to its structural stability and strength. The construction industry is today consuming more than 400 million tonnes of concrete every year .Most of the increase in cement demand will be met by the use of supplementary cementing materials, as each ton of Portland cement clinker production is associated with similar amount of CO2 emission, which is a major source of global warming. Partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement with mineral admixtures like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, metakaolin, Rice husk Ash (RHA,etc with plasticizers eliminates these drawbacks. The use of rice husk modifies the physical qualities of fresh cement paste as well as microstructure of paste after hardening. By burning the rice husk under a uncontrolled temperature in the atmosphere, a highly reactive RHA was obtained and the ash was utilized as a supplementary cementing material. This paper presents the effects of using Rice Husk Ash (RHA as a partial cement replacement material in mortar mixes. This work is based on an experimental study of mortar made with replacement of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC with 10%, 20% 30% & 40% RHA. The properties investigated were the compressive strength, setting time, consistency, workability and specific gravity. Finally, a cost analysis was also done to compare the efficiency of rice husk ash sandcrete blocks. From the test results it can be concluded that rice husk ash can be utilized in day today life of manufacturing building blocks which are more economical and more eco-friendly than the cement concrete blocks which are produced now-a-days.

  15. Individualization of training process as a leading construction of skiers’ training component in preparation for higher achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorfolomeeva L.A.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to improve the process of preparation of skiers in preparation for higher achievements. It is spotted urgency of introduction of individualization in the training process, the principles and directions of realization. It is offered individualized relationship seen as consistent instructional techniques and forms of management training athletes. It is proved that increasing individualization rationality of functional reserves of athletes and prevent early retirement. Argues that the correction of the training process is the need for the development of genetic expression in the function of an athlete and popular sports specialization. It is noted that during the preparation of the highest achievements of a fundamentally important point is to ensure that the conditions under which the period of maximum susceptibility athlete to achieve the best results with the same period of the most intense and complex in the coordination for training loads.

  16. [English as a foreign language (EFL) homework diaries: evaluating gains and constraints for self-regulated learning and achievement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro; Mourão, Rosa; Trigo, Luisa; Suárez, Natalia; Fernández, Estrella; Tuero-Herrero, Ellián

    2011-11-01

    Although homework completion is said to be rather important to achievement, nowadays there is a growing concern of educators about the increasing number of students who do not engage properly on doing the homework tasks and the subsequent impact on school failure rates. Focusing on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and using a sample of 591 Portuguese fifth and sixth graders, the present study analyses the role played by a number of homework variables on students' achievement (proximal and distal), and their mediating role on the use of self-regulated learning strategies and perceived self-efficacy in the domain. Data confirm the indirect effect of homework on school achievement, by means of the referred cognitive and motivational variables (use of self-regulated learning strategies and self-efficacy). These findings are further discussed in order to highlight the significant role homework completion can play on fighting school failure.

  17. Application of a single-board computer as a low cost pulse generator

    CERN Document Server

    Fedrizzi, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    A BeagleBone Black (BBB) single-board open-source computer was implemented as a low-cost fully programmable pulse generator. The pulse generator makes use of the BBB Programmable Real-Time Unit (PRU) subsystem to achieve a deterministic temporal resolution of 5 ns, an RMS jitter of 290 ps and a timebase stability on the order of 10 ppm. A python based software framework has also been developed to simplify the usage of the pulse generator.

  18. Clinical examination findings as prognostic factors in low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Kongsted, Alice; Hestbaek, Lise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong tradition of performing a clinical examination of low back pain (LBP) patients and this is generally recommended in guidelines. However, establishing a pathoanatomic diagnosis does not seem possible in most LBP patients and clinical tests may potentially be more...... been investigated in confirmatory studies and study quality is generally low. There is a need for hypothesis testing studies designed specifically to investigate the prognostic value of the clinical tests, and a need for standardization of the performance and interpretation of tests....

  19. Space as a low-temperature regime of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Conrady, Florian

    2010-01-01

    I define a statistical model of graphs in which 2-dimensional spaces arise at low temperature. The configurations are given by graphs with a fixed number of edges and the Hamiltonian is a simple, local function of the graphs. Simulations show that there is a transition between a low-temperature regime in which the graphs form triangulations of 2-dimensional surfaces and a high-temperature regime, where the surfaces disappear. I use data for the specific heat and other observables to discuss whether this is a phase transition. The surface states are analyzed with regard to topology and defects.

  20. Correlation of Inductive and Deductive Logical Reasoning to College Physics Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyeart, Morris A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Questions and substantiates that both inductive and deductive components of logical reasoning contribute to achievement in an introductory college physics course, with deductive logical abilities contributing more to achievement. Performance on tests requiring both inductive and deductive logical reasoning ability correlated significantly with…

  1. Low grade inflammation as measured by levels of YKL-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, Camilla Noelle; Raymond, Ilan; Kistorp, Caroline;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low grade inflammation is of pathogenic importance in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. The inflammation marker YKL-40 correlates with insulin resistance and is highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. We aimed to investigate whether YKL-40 could...

  2. Large area, low capacitance, GaAs nanowire photodetector with a transparent Schottky collecting junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedi, M. A., E-mail: seyedi@usc.edu; Yao, M.; O' Brien, J.; Dapkus, P. D. [Center for Energy Nanoscience, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Wang, S. Y. [Center for Energy Nanoscience, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA and NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    2013-12-16

    We present experimental results on a GaAs/Indium-Tin-Oxide Schottky-like heterojunction photodetector based on a nanowire device geometry. By distributing the active detecting area over an array of nanowires, it is possible to achieve large area detection with low capacitance. Devices with bare GaAs and passivated AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires are fabricated to compare the responsivity with and without surface passivation. We are able to achieve responsivity of >0.5A/W and Signal-Noise-Ratio in excess of 7 dB for 2 V applied reverse bias with passivated nanowire devices. Capacitance-voltage measurement yields <5 nF/cm{sup 2}, which shows a strong possibility for high-speed applications with a broad area device.

  3. Reasoning Abilities in Primary School: A Pilot Study on Poor Achievers vs. Normal Achievers in Computer Game Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Francesca Maria; Ballauri, Margherita; Benigno, Vincenza; Caponetto, Ilaria; Pesenti, Elia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary research on the assessment of reasoning abilities in primary school poor achievers vs. normal achievers using computer game tasks. Subjects were evaluated by means of cognitive assessment on logical abilities and academic skills. The aim of this study is to better understand the relationship between…

  4. Using Eight Key Questions as an Inquiry-Based Framework for Ethical Reasoning Issues in a General Education Earth Systems and Climate Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. A.; Ball, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    An important objective in general education geoscience courses is to help students evaluate social and ethical issues based upon scientific knowledge. It can be difficult for instructors trained in the physical sciences to design effective ways of including ethical issues in large lecture courses where whole-class discussions are not practical. The Quality Enhancement Plan for James Madison University, "The Madison Collaborative: Ethical Reasoning in Action," (http://www.jmu.edu/mc/index.shtml) has identified eight key questions to be used as a framework for developing ethical reasoning exercises and evaluating student learning. These eight questions are represented by the acronym FOR CLEAR and are represented by the concepts of Fairness, Outcomes, Responsibilities, Character, Liberty, Empathy, Authority, and Rights. In this study, we use the eight key questions as an inquiry-based framework for addressing ethical issues in a 100-student general education Earth systems and climate change course. Ethical reasoning exercises are presented throughout the course and range from questions of personal behavior to issues regarding potential future generations and global natural resources. In the first few exercises, key questions are identified for the students and calibrated responses are provided as examples. By the end of the semester, students are expected to identify key questions themselves and justify their own ethical and scientific reasoning. Evaluation rubrics are customized to this scaffolding approach to the exercises. Student feedback and course data will be presented to encourage discussion of this and other approaches to explicitly incorporating ethical reasoning in general education geoscience courses.

  5. The duty to give reasons as a guarantee for a fair trial under the sight of the European Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Alves Mascarenhas Nardelli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to define the outlines of the judicial duty to provide reasons for their decisions in its theoretical aspect - according to contemporary procedural knowledge -, as well as to establish its importance for the concretion of a fair trial. At the same time, the duty to give reasons will be analyzed in a practical perspective according to the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, with a special emphasis in the case Taxquet v. Belgium and its impact on Jury Trials.

  6. Low molecular weight block copolymers as plasticizers for polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Karsten; Nielsen, Charlotte Juel; Hvilsted, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-alkyl, polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene, and polystyrene-b-poly(propylene glycol)monotridecyl ether were synthesized using macro initiators and atom transfer radical polymerization or by esterifications of homopolymers. The aim was a maximum molecular weight of 4 kg...... for polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-polystyrene (SIS) block copolymers. The end use properties of SIS plasticized with polystyrene-b-alkyl, measured as tensile strength, is higher than for SIS plasticized with dioctyl adipate. The polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene and polystyrene-bpoly(propylene glycol...

  7. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  8. Uniparental disomy as an explanation of presumptive low penetrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulisalo, T.; Chapelle, A. de la [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Kaitila, I. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)]|[Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1994-09-01

    Reduced penetrance has been proposed to account for an observed deficiency of affected individuals in the recessively inherited developmental disorder, cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH, MIM No.250250). We recently mapped the gene for CHH to the short arm of chromosome 9, and have shown that reduced penetrance is an unlikely explanation as no unaffected sibs with a genotype identical to that of the affected children were observed at any of the closest marker loci studied. Here we report that two CHH patients out of 45 Finnish uniplex patients had maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 9. The patients were tested with eighteen chromosome 9-specific markers and no paternal contribution was observed in any of the informative meioses. Paternity was confirmed by typing markers from all autosomes other than chromosome 9, and the X chromosome. Both patients were homozygous for all chromosome 9 markers with the exception of one of them who was heterozygous for the maternal alleles at two marker loci on 9q. Further studies will show what proportion of individuals homozygous for CHH is caused by UPD allowing its quantitative significance to be assessed. Based on the data presented here we propose UPD as a main mechanism contributing to the observed deficiency of affected individuals in CHH families.

  9. GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetector with low noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jun; WANG Bin; HAN Jun; LI Jian-jun; SHEN Guang-di

    2005-01-01

    A novel kind of multi-quantum well infrared photodetector(QWIP) is presented.In the new structure device,a p-type contact layer has been grown on the top of the conventional structure of QWIP,then a small tunneling current is instead of the large compensatory current,which made the device low dark current and low noise characteristics.The measured result of dark current is consistent with the calculated result,and the noise of the new structure QWIP is decreased to one third of the conventional QWIP.

  10. Stable same-sex friendships with higher achieving partners promote mathematical reasoning in lower achieving primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Dawn; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate friend influence over mathematical reasoning in a sample of 374 children in 187 same-sex friend dyads (184 girls in 92 friendships; 190 boys in 95 friendships). Participants completed surveys that measured mathematical reasoning in the 3rd grade (approximately 9 years old) and 1 year later in the 4th grade (approximately 10 years old). Analyses designed for dyadic data (i.e., longitudinal actor-partner interdependence model) indicated that higher achieving friends influenced the mathematical reasoning of lower achieving friends, but not the reverse. Specifically, greater initial levels of mathematical reasoning among higher achieving partners in the 3rd grade predicted greater increases in mathematical reasoning from 3rd grade to 4th grade among lower achieving partners. These effects held after controlling for peer acceptance and rejection, task avoidance, interest in mathematics, maternal support for homework, parental education, length of the friendship, and friendship group norms on mathematical reasoning.

  11. [August Weismann's concept of germ plasma as the basic reason for the inadequacy of neo-Darwinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodnitskiĭ, D L

    2000-01-01

    Neo-Darwinism is a result of synthesis of Darwinian concept of natural selection with Weismannian concept of germ plasma. The concept of germ plasma is based on a hypothesis that phenotypic traits are completely determined by genes. Hence, neo-Darwinism describes evolution as a process of alternation of gene frequencies under the effect of natural selection. This is an inadequate approach to the study of evolution. In the course of evolution, genes change their functions, whereas phenotypic characters change their corresponding genes. As a result, every step of evolutionary transformation changes the structure of phenotype-to-genotype correspondence. Therefore, phenotypic evolution cannot be described in genetic terms, the same as to human languages cannot be translated one into another whenever the meaning of words is constantly changing. Consequently, Weismannian germ-plasma concept adequately describes the relation of characters to genes only during stasis, but is inapplicable to evolution.

  12. Film awards as indicators of cinematic creativity and achievement: A quantitative comparison of the Oscars and six alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2004-01-01

    Although film awards are often taken as indicating the creative achievements that underlie outstanding motion pictures, critics have questioned whether such honors represent a consensus regarding cinematic contributions. Nevertheless, a strong agreement was demonstrated by investigating 1,132films released between 1975 and 2002 that had received at least 1 award or award nomination from 7 distinct sources (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Briti...

  13. Porous hydroxyapatite tablets as carriers for low-dosed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosijns, A; Vervaet, C; Luyten, J; Mullens, S; Siepmann, F; Van Hoorebeke, L; Masschaele, B; Cnudde, V; Remon, J P

    2007-09-01

    The present study evaluated an innovative technique for the manufacturing of low-dosed tablets. Tablets containing hydroxyapatite and a pore forming agent (50% (w/w) Avicel PH 200/20, 37.5% and 50% corn starch/37.5% sorbitol) were manufactured by direct compression followed by sintering. The influence of pore forming agent (type and concentration), sinter temperature and sinter time on tablet properties was investigated. Sintering (1250 degrees C) revealed tablets with an acceptable friability (manufactured using a modified gelcasting technique yielding tablets with a median pore size of 60 and 80 microm. Release from these tablets was drastically increased indicating that the permeability of the tablets was influenced by the pore size, shape and connectivity of the porous network. Changing and controlling these parameters made it possible to obtain drug delivery systems providing different drug delivery behaviour.

  14. How Should Educational Neuroscience Conceptualise the Relation between Cognition and Brain Function? Mathematical Reasoning as a Network Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sashank; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest in applying neuroscience findings to topics in education. Purpose: This application requires a proper conceptualization of the relation between cognition and brain function. This paper considers two such conceptualizations. The area focus understands each cognitive competency as the product of one (and only…

  15. Examining Students' Proportional Reasoning Strategy Levels as Evidence of the Impact of an Integrated LEGO Robotics and Mathematics Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Ortiz, Araceli

    2015-01-01

    The presented study used a problem-solving experience in engineering design with LEGO robotics materials as the real-world mathematics-learning context. The goals of the study were (a) to determine if a short but intensive extracurricular learning experience would lead to significant student learning of a particular academic topic and (b) to…

  16. Functionalised inherently conducting polymers as low biofouling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Nagle, Alex R; Wallace, Gordon G; Hanks, Timothy W; Molino, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are a major component of microbial biofouling layers that develop on man-made surfaces placed in aquatic environments, resulting in significant economic and environmental impacts. This paper describes surface functionalisation of the inherently conducting polymers (ICPs) polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and their efficacy as fouling resistant materials. Their ability to resist interactions with the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was tested using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The capacity of the ICP-PEG materials to prevent settlement and colonisation of the fouling diatom Amphora coffeaeformis (Cleve) was also assayed. Variations were demonstrated in the dopants used during ICP polymerisation, along with the PEG molecular weight, and the ICP-PEG reaction conditions, all playing a role in guiding the eventual fouling resistant properties of the materials. Optimised ICP-PEG materials resulted in a significant reduction in BSA adsorption, and > 98% reduction in diatom adhesion.

  17. Sociology of Low Expectations: Recalibration as Innovation Work in Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John; Samuel, Gabrielle; Williams, Clare

    2015-11-01

    Social scientists have drawn attention to the role of hype and optimistic visions of the future in providing momentum to biomedical innovation projects by encouraging innovation alliances. In this article, we show how less optimistic, uncertain, and modest visions of the future can also provide innovation projects with momentum. Scholars have highlighted the need for clinicians to carefully manage the expectations of their prospective patients. Using the example of a pioneering clinical team providing deep brain stimulation to children and young people with movement disorders, we show how clinicians confront this requirement by drawing on their professional knowledge and clinical expertise to construct visions of the future with their prospective patients; visions which are personalized, modest, and tainted with uncertainty. We refer to this vision-constructing work as recalibration, and we argue that recalibration enables clinicians to manage the tension between the highly optimistic and hyped visions of the future that surround novel biomedical interventions, and the exigencies of delivering those interventions in a clinical setting. Drawing on work from science and technology studies, we suggest that recalibration enrolls patients in an innovation alliance by creating a shared understanding of how the "effectiveness" of an innovation shall be judged.

  18. Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Chuduk, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case study is low-rise residential building in Finland with under floor heating as a single heating system. The calculations of main parameters of under floor heating system and length of ground heat exchanger are conducted. As a result the conclusion about reasonable of using the studying system for low-rise residential building in Finn...

  19. High-voltage picosecond photoconductor switch based on low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Whitaker, John F.; Mourou, Gerard A.; Smith, Frank W.; Calawa, Arthur R.

    1990-01-01

    A GaAs material grown by molecular beam epitaxy at a low substrate temperature was used to fabricate a photoconductor switch that produces 6-V picosecond electrical pulses. The pulses were produced on a microwave coplanar-strip transmission line lithographically patterned on the low-temperature (LT) GaAs. A 150-fs laser pulse was used to generate carriers in the LT GaAs gap between the metal strips, partially shorting a high DC voltage placed across the lines. The 6-V magnitude of the electrical pulses obtained is believed to be limited by the laser pulse power and not by the properties of the LT GaAs. Experiments were also performed on a picosecond photoconductor switch fabricated on a conventional ion-damaged silicon-on-sapphire substrate. Although comparable pulse durations were obtained, the highest pulse voltage achieved with the latter device was 0.6 V.

  20. Silicon crystal as a low work function collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K. H.; Shimada, K.

    1975-01-01

    A test vehicle with a low work function collector which can be incorporated in a thermionic converter was constructed from standard vacuum components including an ultrahigh vacuum ion pump. The collector assembly was fabricated by diffusion bonding a (100) oriented silicon single crystal to a molybdenum block. The silicon surface was treated with cesium and oxygen to produce an NEA-type condition and the results were tested by photoemission and work function measurements. An n-type silicon collector was successfully activated to a work function of 1.0 eV, which was verified by photoemission spectral yield measurements. The stability test of an activated surface at elevated temperatures was conducted in the range from room temperature to 619 K, which was slightly lower than the designed collector temperature of 700 K. The work function measurements clearly demonstrated that the behavior of cesium replenishment on the activated Si surface was similar in nature to that of a metallic surface; that is, the loss of cesium by thermal desorption could be compensated by maintaining an adequate vapor pressure of cesium.

  1. 29 CFR 1605.2 - Reasonable accommodation without undue hardship as required by section 701(j) of title VII of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BECAUSE OF RELIGION § 1605.2 Reasonable accommodation without undue hardship as required by section 701(j... address other obligations under title VII not to discriminate on grounds of religion, nor other provisions... intended to provide guidance for statutes which require accommodation on bases other than religion such...

  2. Communication as a predictor of willingness to donate one's organs: an addition to the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Leo W; Carroll, Jeanine A; Rubenking, Bridget E; Amschlinger, Joe

    2008-12-01

    Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action has been used by many researchers, particularly in regard to health communication, to predict behavioral intentions and behavior. According to that theory, one's intention is the best predictor that one will engage in a behavior, and attitudes and social norms predict behavioral intentions. Other researchers have added different variables to the postulates of attitudes and social norms that Fishbein and Ajzen maintain are the best predictors of behavioral intention. Here we draw on data from a 2006 telephone survey (N = 420) gauging the awareness of an organ donation campaign in Northeast Ohio to examine the impact of communication on people's intentions. The current study supports the hypothesis that those who communicate with others are more likely to express a greater willingness to become an organ donor, but it expands the range of communication contexts. With demographics and attitudes toward organ donation controlled for, this study shows that communication with others about organ donation increases the willingness of individuals to have favorable attitudes about being an organ donor.

  3. To stop or not to stop: dissent and undue burden as reasons to stop participation in paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Wendy; Westra, Anna; de Beaufort, Inez; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2016-12-01

    Children participating in clinical research may show signs of discomfort, discontent, dissent and so on, that cannot be solved by comforting the child. When, and on what ground, should such signs lead to the decision to withdraw the child from the trial? In order to adequately protect children participating in clinical research, it is important to know how to determine during the course of a trial whether participation is still justified. Yet to date, legislation, ethical guidelines and medical ethical literature do not provide sufficient guidance. Therefore, in this paper we aim to provide the required clarity. We identify two types of reasons for taking signs of discomfort, discontent, dissent and so on, very seriously: (1) the principle of respect for the growing autonomy of the child, in those cases where a child expresses a clear, explicit and persistent wish to be withdrawn from the study; and (2) the principle of non-maleficence, in those cases where for an individual child, the research burden appears to be higher than acceptable. We recommend to closely monitor each child during the course of the study, thereby being vigilant to whether the child still wants to continue and to whether the actual burden the child experiences is still acceptable in relation to the permitted levels of burden.

  4. Racial/ethnic socialization and parental involvement in education as predictors of cognitive ability and achievement in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Meeta; Harrell, Zaje A T; Johnson, Deborah J

    2011-05-01

    Racial/ethnic socialization has not been studied in the context of other parenting behaviors such as parental involvement in education and its relationship to children's cognitive outcomes. The present study tested the impact of racial/ethnic socialization and parental involvement in education on cognitive ability and achievement in a sample of African American youth. Two dimensions of racial/ethnic socialization, cultural exposure (i.e., exposure to diverse cultures) and cultural socialization (i.e., in-group pride), were examined in a sample of 92 African American mother-child dyads, of which 50% were female. Maternal reports of involvement during their child's 5th grade year were examined as a moderator in the relationship between racial/ethnic socialization and cognitive ability and achievement. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that mothers' reports of cultural exposure messages measured in 4th grade predicted children's scores on 5th grade assessments of passage comprehension. There was also a significant interaction indicating that greater cultural exposure and more parental involvement in education predicted better reading passage comprehension scores over time. The implications for assessing dimensions relevant to cognitive ability and achievement in African American children are discussed.

  5. Price pressure. As the number of costly specialty drugs grows, insurers and providers push for more reasonable alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Melanie

    2013-01-28

    Faced with a rising tide of specialty drugs with eyebrow-raising prices, hospitals and insurers are pushing back. That means looking for less-costly alternatives, though options are limited. "Our goal is, as more patients come along, we get them on Elelyso and not on more expensive Cerezyme," says Eric Cannon, chief of pharmacy for insurer SelectHealth. Elelyso entered the market in 2012 and costs about $150,000 per year for a patient, versus the more costly rival drug Cerezyme.

  6. Self-harm reasons, goal achievement, and prediction of future self-harm intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen P; Santor, Darcy A

    2010-05-01

    Self-harm may have several reasons, and these reasons may have corresponding implied goals. The current study examined reasons for self-harm and whether the a priori goals intended by these reasons were achieved. Fifty-seven individuals with a history of self-harm were recruited online and volunteered their time to complete a series of online questionnaires assessing past self-harm frequency, self-harm reasons, whether the goal associated with these reasons was achieved, and future self-harm intent. Reasons to reduce tension and dissociation associated with more past self-harm, a higher intent to self-harm again, and it was reported that the goals associated with reasons were achieved (i.e., these internal states were extinguished). Achievement of these goals (i.e., reported reductions in tension and dissociation) mediated the relation between corresponding self-harm reasons and intent to self-harm in the future. Findings support the view that self-harm is a maladaptive coping strategy and the reinforcement component of the experiential avoidance model of self-harm. Results have clinical implications and heuristic value for future research, which are discussed.

  7. Low-cost, low-input RNA-seq protocols perform nearly as well as high-input protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Combs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of protocols extending RNA-sequencing to the single-cell regime have been published. However, we were concerned that the additional steps to deal with such minute quantities of input sample would introduce serious biases that would make analysis of the data using existing approaches invalid. In this study, we performed a critical evaluation of several of these low-volume RNA-seq protocols, and found that they performed slightly less well in per-gene linearity of response, but with at least two orders of magnitude less sample required. We also explored a simple modification to one of these protocols that, for many samples, reduced the cost of library preparation to approximately $20/sample.

  8. Selected Wood Properties of Prunus Africana (Hook Grown in Kenya as Possible Reasons for its High Natural Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Mburu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the influence of Prunus africana heartwood extractives on the growth of selected wood decay fungi. Also, wood chemical and mineral content, dimensional stability and anatomical features of P. africana were studied. Heartwood extractives were tested in 100 ppm and 500 ppm concentrations on white, brown rot, and blue stain fungi and growth inhibition was determined as a factor of time. Dimensional stability was determined by computing the swelling coefficient after the blocks were saturated with moisture. Klason lignin, Kürschner cellulose, extractive and ash contents were determined by standard procedures. Infrared analyses were performed using Perkin Elmer FTIR spectrometer. Microscopic examination was performed using an environmental scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the wood is dimensionally stable, and contains 12.7 % extractives, 37.6 % cellulose and 30.4 % lignin. Extractives deposited in vessels are highly soluble in dichloromethane and mainly composed of terpenes. Extractives were able to inhibit the growth of white rot fungi Coriolus versicolor, brown rot fungi Poria placenta and blue stain fungi Aureobasidium pullulans at different concentrations tested and could explain the high durability of Prunus africana wood species.

  9. Reasoning about geological space: Coupling 3D GeoModels and topological queries as an aid to spatial data selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Jacynthe; Bédard, Karine; Kirkwood, Donna; Lachance, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Topological relationships between geological objects are of great interest for mining and petroleum exploration. Indeed, adjacency, inclusion and intersection are common relationships between geological objects such as faults, geological units, fractures, mineralized zones and reservoirs. However, in the context of 3D modeling, actual geometric data models used to store those objects are not designed to manage explicit topological relationships. For example, with Gocad© software, topological analyses are possible but they require a series of successive manipulations and are time consuming. This paper presents the development of a 3D topological query prototype, TQuery, compatible with Gocad© modeling platform. It allows the user to export Gocad© objects to a data storage model that regularizes the topological relationships between objects. The development of TQuery was oriented towards the use of volumetric objects that are composed of tetrahedrons. Exported data are then retrieved and used for 3D topological and spatial queries. One of the advantages of TQuery is that different types of objects can be queried at the same time without restricting the operations to voxel regions. TQuery allows the user to analyze data more quickly and efficiently and does not require a 3D modeling specialist to use it, which is particularly attractive in the context of a decision-making aid. The prototype was tested on a 3D GeoModel of a continental red-bed copper deposit in the Silurian Robitaille Formation (Transfiguration property, Québec, Canada).

  10. QR-STEM: Energy and Environment as a Context for Improving QR and STEM Understandings of 6-12 Grade Teachers II. The Quantitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, R.; Lyford, M. E.; Myers, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Quantitative Reasoning in STEM (QR STEM) project is a state level Mathematics and Science Partnership Project (MSP) with a focus on the mathematics and statistics that underlies the understanding of complex global scientific issues. This session is a companion session to the QR STEM: The Science presentation. The focus of this session is the quantitative reasoning aspects of the project. As students move from understandings that range from local to global in perspective on issues of energy and environment, there is a significant increase in the need for mathematical and statistical conceptual understanding. These understandings must be accessible to the students within the scientific context, requiring the special understandings that are endemic within quantitative reasoning. The QR STEM project brings together interdisciplinary teams of higher education faculty and middle/high school teachers to explore complex problems in energy and environment. The disciplines include life sciences, physics, chemistry, earth science, statistics, and mathematics. These interdisciplinary teams develop open ended performance tasks to implement in the classroom, based on scientific concepts that underpin energy and environment. Quantitative reasoning is broken down into three components: Quantitative Literacy, Quantitative Interpretation, and Quantitative Modeling. Quantitative Literacy is composed of arithmetic concepts such as proportional reasoning, numeracy, and descriptive statistics. Quantitative Interpretation includes algebraic and geometric concepts that underlie the ability to interpret a model of natural phenomena which is provided for the student. This model may be a table, graph, or equation from which the student is to make predictions or identify trends, or from which they would use statistics to explore correlations or patterns in data. Quantitative modeling is the ability to develop the model from data, including the ability to test hypothesis using statistical

  11. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi eYou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome of food animals, which is subsequently transferred to animal waste. This waste contains complex constituents that are challenging to treat, including antimicrobial resistance determinants and low-dose antimicrobials. Unconfined storage or land deposition of a large volume of animal waste causes its wide contact with the environment and drives the expansion of the environmental resistome through mobilome facilitated horizontal genet transfer. The expanded environmental resistome, which encompasses both natural constituents and anthropogenic inputs, can persist under multiple stressors from agriculture and may re-enter humans, thus posing a public health risk to humans. For these reasons, this review focuses on agricultural antimicrobial use as a laboratory for understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion, briefly summarizes current knowledge on this topic, highlights the importance of research specifically on environmental microbial ecosystems considering antimicrobial resistance as environmental pollution, and calls attention to the needs for longitudinal studies at the systems level.

  12. Studying the impact of the class tournament as an assessment method on student achievements in physics courses

    CERN Document Server

    Dziob, Daniel; Sokolowska, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    Testing knowledge is an integral part of summative assessment at schools. It can be performed in many different ways. In this study we propose assessment of physics knowledge by using a tournament approach. Prior to a statistical analysis of the results obtained over a tournament organized in one of Polish high schools, all its specifics are discussed at length, including the types of questions assigned, as well as additional self- and peer-evaluation questionnaires, constituting an integral part of the tournament. The impact of the tournament upon student improvement is examined by confronting the results of a post-test with pre-tournament students' achievements reflected in scores earned in former, written tests. We also present some of students' feedback on the idea of tournament as a tool of assessment. Both the analysis of the tournament results and the students' opinions point to at least several benefits of our approach.

  13. Trait mindfulness, reasons for living and general symptom severity as predictors of suicide probability in males with substance abuse or dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Mohammadkhani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate suicide probability in Iranian males with substance abuse or dependence disorder and to investigate the predictors of suicide probability based on trait mindfulness, reasons for living and severity of general psychiatric symptoms.Participants were 324 individuals with substance abuse or dependence in an outpatient setting and prison. Reasons for living questionnaire, Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale and Suicide probability Scale were used as instruments. Sample was selected based on convenience sampling method. Data were analyzed using SPSS and AMOS.The life-time prevalence of suicide attempt in the outpatient setting was35% and it was 42% in the prison setting. Suicide probability in the prison setting was significantly higher than in the outpatient setting (p<0.001. The severity of general symptom strongly correlated with suicide probability. Trait mindfulness, not reasons for living beliefs, had a mediating effect in the relationship between the severity of general symptoms and suicide probability. Fear of social disapproval, survival and coping beliefs and child-related concerns significantly predicted suicide probability (p<0.001.It could be suggested that trait mindfulness was more effective in preventing suicide probability than beliefs about reasons for living in individuals with substance abuse or dependence disorders. The severity of general symptom should be regarded as an important risk factor of suicide probability.

  14. Low Carbon Development: Challenges for China as a Rapidly Industrializing Developing Country

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongboChen; HuaiguoHu; JiahuaPan

    2005-01-01

    China is in a stage of rapid industrialization. Over the past two decades, the size of the Chinese economy has more than quadrupled and energy consumption has more than doubled. The drive for more industrialization over the next two decades is leading to similar dynamics on a much larger scale. The net increase in emissions of CO2 between 1990 and 2001 amounted to 823 million tons, accounting for 27percent of the world total. Energy supplies and security are key constraints to industrialization; therefore, mitigation of emissions can in fact contribute to the achievement of development goals. There is a need for China to pursue a path of low carbon development. However, low and zero carbon technologies can hardly meet the demands for the physical expansion of the economy. In order to cope with the challenges for low carbon development, factors such as responsibility, capability, and potentials have to be taken into account in an international climate regime.

  15. On the Influence of New Media and Methods to Achieve Reasonable Spread

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡海燕

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of new media not only accelerates the spread of information and brings convenience to people, but also subtly changes every aspect of people's life.This paper aims to discuss the influences that the new media bring for people and the methods that can achieve reasonable spread. All of us have the responsibility and obligation to achieve reasonable spread and make the new media serve better for the human progress.

  16. Novel Euler-LaCoste linkage as a very low frequency vertical vibration isolator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, M A; Sirr, A; Ju, L; Blair, D G

    2012-08-01

    LaCoste linkage vibration isolators have shown excellent performance for ultra-low frequency vertical vibration isolation. However, such isolators depend on the use of conventional pre-stressed coil springs, which suffer from creep. Here, we show that compressional Euler springs can be configured to create a stable tension unit for use in a LaCoste structure. In a proof of concept experiment, we demonstrate a vertical resonance frequency of 0.15 Hz in an Euler-LaCoste configuration with 200 mm height. The system enables the use of very low creep maraging steel as spring elements to eliminate the creep while minimising spring mass and reducing the effect of parasitic resonances. Larger scale systems with optimized Euler spring boundary conditions should achieve performance suitable for applications on third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the proposed Einstein telescope.

  17. Achievement Goal Orientations and Self Handicapping as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Intrinsic Achievement Motivation and Negative Automatic Thoughts in Adolescence Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapikiran, Sahin

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the mediator and moderator role of self-handicapping and achievement goal orientations variables on the relationship between negative automatic thoughts intrinsic achievement motivation in high school students. 586 high school students, ranging in age from 14 to 20 (M = 16.08), adolescence students…

  18. A Structural Model of Algebra Achievement: Computational Fluency and Spatial Visualisation as Mediators of the Effect of Working Memory on Algebra Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Tammy Daun; Lederberg, Amy R.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a structural model of the relations among cognitive abilities and arithmetic skills and college students' algebra achievement. The model of algebra achievement was compared to a model of performance on the Scholastic Assessment in Mathematics (SAT-M) to determine whether the pattern of relations…

  19. Reference as an Interactive Achievement: Sequential and Longitudinal Analyses of Labeling Interactions in Shared Book Reading and Free Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Vivien; Rohlfing, Katharina J.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines how young children and their caregivers establish reference by jointly developing stable patterns of bodily, perceptual, and interactive coordination. Our longitudinal investigation focuses on two mother–child dyads engaged in picture-book reading and play. The dyads were videotaped at home once every 6 weeks while the children aged from 9 to 24 months. Inspired by conversation analysis and multimodal analysis, our developmental approach builds on the insight that the situated and embodied production of reference is fundamentally an interactive achievement. To examine the acquisition of reference, we developed a descriptive instrument that takes account of not only the dyad's joint accomplishment but also each participant's contributions to it. The instrument is based on the sequential reconstruction of the jobs that both participants have to accomplish jointly in order to achieve reference: establishing visual perception as a relevant resource, constituting a domain of scrutiny, locating a target, and construing the (meaning of the) referent. Methodologically, these jobs serve as a tertium comparationis for the longitudinal comparison of both the adult's as well as the child's contributions to establishing reference. We used this instrument to examine (1) what bodily and verbal resources the participants employed, and (2) how their contributions to accomplishing the jobs changed over time. Findings showed that the acquisition of reference was closely related to the child's increasing ability to recognize, fulfill, and set up conditional relevancies. We conclude that the adult's dynamic and contextualized use of conditional relevancies, recipient design, and observability is a crucial driving force in the acquisition of reference. PMID:28261122

  20. "The lobbying strategy is to keep excise as low as possible" - tobacco industry excise taxation policy in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasovsky Konstantin S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco taxes are one of the most effective ways to reduce tobacco use. Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs claim they wish to develop and secure excise systems that benefit both governments and the profitability of the companies themselves. The objective of the paper is to use the case of Ukraine, with its inconsistent history of excise tax changes in 1992-2008, to explore tobacco industry taxation strategies and tactics, and their implications for governmental revenues. Methods Details of tobacco industry policy on tobacco taxation in Ukraine were obtained by searching tobacco industry internal documents and various published reports. Results Even before entering the market in Ukraine, TTCs had made efforts to change the excise system in the country. In 1993-1994, TTCs lobbied the Ukrainian Government, and succeeded in achieving a lowering in tobacco tax. This, however, did not produce revenue increase they promised the Government. In 1996-1998, Ukrainian authorities increased excise several times, ignoring the wishes of TTCs, caused significant growth in revenue. Due to TTCs lobbying activities in 1999-2007 the tax increases were very moderate and it resulted in increased tobacco consumption in Ukraine. In 2008, despite the TTCs position, excise rates were increased twice and it was very beneficial for revenues. Conclusions The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control includes provisions both on tobacco taxation policy and on protection of public health policy from vested interests of tobacco industry. This paper provides arguments why tobacco taxation policy should also be protected from vested interests of tobacco industry. TTCs taxation strategy appears to be consistent: keep excise as low as possible. Apparent conflicts between TTCs concerning tax structures often hide their real aim to change tax structures for competing interests without increasing total tax incidence. Governments, that aim to reduce levels of

  1. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors.

  2. Low temperature preparation and superconductivity of F-doped SmFeAsO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. L.; Cui, Y. J.; Cheng, C. H.; Yang, Y.; Wang, L.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2010-11-01

    A low temperature (1100 °C) process of preparing F-doped SmFeAsO samples has been developed using SmF3 with nanometer scale as the source of fluorine. A series of the SmFeAsO1-xFx (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3) samples have been prepared using the present method. Compared with previous reports, the present SmF3 is more effective to introduce F into SmFeAsO system in which a transition temperature of 39 K can be observed when x = 0.05. The superconductivity is definitely enhanced with the increasing F-doping level. All the samples presented to be layered structure and the crystal particle size is about three times larger with sintering time increasing from 36 h to 48 h. Except for the nanometer scale of SmF3, the flux effect of SmF3 is recognized to be another reason for the decrease of the sintering temperature. Further more, a relatively large amount of SmF3 was also employed in the raw materials to introduce excessive F and this has induced higher Tc (55 K) in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2+δ system.

  3. Low temperature preparation and superconductivity of F-doped SmFeAsO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.L.; Cui, Y.J. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Yang, Y.; Wang, L.; Li, Y.C.; Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhao, Y., E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)

    2010-11-01

    A low temperature (1100 deg. C) process of preparing F-doped SmFeAsO samples has been developed using SmF{sub 3} with nanometer scale as the source of fluorine. A series of the SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3) samples have been prepared using the present method. Compared with previous reports, the present SmF{sub 3} is more effective to introduce F into SmFeAsO system in which a transition temperature of 39 K can be observed when x = 0.05. The superconductivity is definitely enhanced with the increasing F-doping level. All the samples presented to be layered structure and the crystal particle size is about three times larger with sintering time increasing from 36 h to 48 h. Except for the nanometer scale of SmF{sub 3}, the flux effect of SmF{sub 3} is recognized to be another reason for the decrease of the sintering temperature. Further more, a relatively large amount of SmF{sub 3} was also employed in the raw materials to introduce excessive F and this has induced higher T{sub c} (55 K) in SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2+{delta}}system.

  4. Microbial respiration and gene expression as a function of very low oxygen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiano, Laura

    recently, due to the lack of high-resolution methods for O2 concentration determination, several oxygen-related processes, such as aerobic respiration in pelagic aquatic ecosystems and in naturally oxygen poor waters (e.g. Oxygen Minimum Zones, OMZs), or the oxygen regulation of nitrification...... on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and the expression of their terminal oxidases genes. The results from this project show that it is indeed possible, by combining high resolution sensor technology (the STOX sensor) and all-glass bottle incubation (Appendix A) to achieve an extreme high sensitivity in O2...... detection (1-10 nM, and ~ 2 nM O2 /h, for respiration rates) (Manuscript I, II and IV). Thus this new method allows for precise determination of respiration rates also in low activity waters, within few hours of incubation time (Manuscript II). This low-O2 STOX based method has been compared with other...

  5. Low-level radioactive-waste compacts. Status report as of July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (P.L. 96-573), enacted in December 1980, established as federal policy that states take responsibility for providing disposal capacity for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated within their borders, except for defense waste and Federal R and D. At the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, DOE has documented the progress of states individually and collectively in fulfilling their responsibilities under the Public Law. Regionalization through formation of low-level waste compacts has been the primary vehicle by which many states are assuming this responsibility. To date seven low-level waste compacts have been drafted and six have been enacted by state legislatures or ratified by a governor. As indicated by national progress to date, DOE considers the task of compacting achievable by the January 1, 1986, exclusionary date set in law, although several states and NRC questioned this.

  6. Low surface area graphene/cellulose composite as a host matrix for lithium sulphur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manu U. M.; Luong, Nguyen Dang; Seppälä, Jukka; Tchernychova, Elena; Dominko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Graphene/cellulose composites were prepared and studied as potential host matrixes for sulphur impregnation and use in Li-S batteries. We demonstrate that with the proper design of a relatively low surface area graphene/cellulose composite, a high electrochemical performance along with good cyclability can be achieved. Graphene cellulose composites are built from two constituents: a two-dimensional electronic conductive graphene and cellulose fibres as a structural frame; together they form a laminar type of pore. The graphene sheets that uniformly anchor sulphur molecules provide confinement ability for polysulphides, sufficient space to accommodate sulphur volumetric expansion, a large contact area with the sulphur and a short transport pathway for both electrons and lithium ions. Nano-cellulose prevents the opening of graphene sheets due to the volume expansion caused by dissolved polysulphides during battery operation. This, in turn, prevents the diffusion of lithium polysulphides into the electrolyte, enabling a long cycle life.

  7. Scilab software as an alternative low-cost computing in solving the linear equations problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Fahrul; Haviluddin

    2017-02-01

    Numerical computation packages are widely used both in teaching and research. These packages consist of license (proprietary) and open source software (non-proprietary). One of the reasons to use the package is a complexity of mathematics function (i.e., linear problems). Also, number of variables in a linear or non-linear function has been increased. The aim of this paper was to reflect on key aspects related to the method, didactics and creative praxis in the teaching of linear equations in higher education. If implemented, it could be contribute to a better learning in mathematics area (i.e., solving simultaneous linear equations) that essential for future engineers. The focus of this study was to introduce an additional numerical computation package of Scilab as an alternative low-cost computing programming. In this paper, Scilab software was proposed some activities that related to the mathematical models. In this experiment, four numerical methods such as Gaussian Elimination, Gauss-Jordan, Inverse Matrix, and Lower-Upper Decomposition (LU) have been implemented. The results of this study showed that a routine or procedure in numerical methods have been created and explored by using Scilab procedures. Then, the routine of numerical method that could be as a teaching material course has exploited.

  8. Food Insecurity as a Risk Factor for Obesity in Low-Income Boushehrian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Mohammadpour Kaldeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food insecurity contributes to poor health and nutritional status such as higher prevalence of overweight and obesity and other mental and physical problems. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between food insecurity and obesity in low-income women living in Bushehr. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 Bushehrian women (19-49 years, non pregnant and non lactating. The women were interviewed for socio-economic, demographic, physical and household food security. The radimer-cornell food insecurity instrument and international physical activity questionnaire were used. For data analysis, logistic regression was conducted. Results: Overall, a majority of the households (86% experienced food insecurity. About more than half (55% of the women were obese. The mean body mass index of food insecure groups (30.43 ± 4.67 Kg/cm2 were significantly higher than food secure group (21.41 ± 1.61 Kg/cm2 (p<0.05. After adjusting for other variables using logistic regression, housewives (OR=3.99 and lower physical activity (OR=2.65 significantly increased as well as food security (OR= 0.04 significantly decreased the risk of obesity. Conclusion: The consumption of chip and high dense food and lower physical activity can be important reasons for overweight and obesity in food insecure women.

  9. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene asReasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen” in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R.; Goodman, Julie E.; Prueitt, Robyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed asreasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis—a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung—is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene asreasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen,” and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens. PMID:23335843

  10. Low normal thyroid function as a determinant of increased large very low density lipoprotein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Low-normal thyroid function may relate to increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but effects on lipoprotein subfractions are largely unknown. Associations of alterations in lipoprotein metabolism and functionality with low-normal thyroid function could be more pronounced in T

  11. Anion control as a strategy to achieve high-mobility and high-stability oxide thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Jeon, Sang Ho; Park, Joon Seok; Kim, Tae Sang; Son, Kyoung Seok; Seon, Jong-Baek; Seo, Seok-Jun; Kim, Sun-Jae; Lee, Eunha; Chung, Jae Gwan; Lee, Hyungik; Han, Seungwu; Ryu, Myungkwan; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-definition, large-area displays with three-dimensional visual effects represent megatrend in the current/future display industry. On the hardware level, such a "dream" display requires faster pixel switching and higher driving current, which in turn necessitate thin-film transistors (TFTs) with high mobility. Amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOS) such as In-Ga-Zn-O are poised to enable such TFTs, but the trade-off between device performance and stability under illumination critically limits their usability, which is related to the hampered electron-hole recombination caused by the oxygen vacancies. Here we have improved the illumination stability by substituting oxygen with nitrogen in ZnO, which may deactivate oxygen vacancies by raising valence bands above the defect levels. Indeed, the stability under illumination and electrical bias is superior to that of previous AOS-based TFTs. By achieving both mobility and stability, it is highly expected that the present ZnON TFTs will be extensively deployed in next-generation flat-panel displays.

  12. A multifunctional DNA origami as carrier of metal complexes to achieve enhanced tumoral delivery and nullified systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyu; Huang, Wei; Chan, Leung; Zhou, Binwei; Chen, Tianfeng

    2016-10-01

    The use of metal complexes in cancer treatment is hampered by the insufficient accumulation in tumor regions and observable systemic toxicity due to their nonspecificity in vivo. Herein we present a cancer-targeted DNA origami as biocompatible nanocarrier of metal complexes to achieve advanced antitumor effect. The formation of unique tetrahedral nanostructure of DNA cages effectively enhances the interaction between ruthenium polypyridyl complexes (RuPOP) and the cages, thus increasing the drug loading efficacy. Conjugation of biotin to the DNA-based nanosystem (Bio-cage@Ru) enhances its specific cellular uptake, drug retention and cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells. Different from free RuPOP and the cage itself, Bio-cage@Ru translocates to cell nucleus after internalization, where it undergoes self-immolative cleavage in response to DNases, leading to triggered drug release and induction of ROS-mediated cell apoptosis. Moreover, in the nude mice model, the nanosystem specifically accumulates in tumor sites, thus exhibits satisfactory in vivo antitumor efficacy, and alleviates the damage of liver, kidney, lung and heart function of nude mice induced by RuPOP and tumor xenografts. Collectively, this study demonstrates a strategy for construction of biocompatible and cancer-targeted DNA origami with enhanced anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity for next-generation cancer therapy.

  13. A novel AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction-based Hall sensor designed for low magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier, H.; Bouzaïene, L.; Sfaxi, L.; Maaref, H.

    2004-05-01

    A self-consistent theoretical analysis, using both Schrödinger and Poisson equations, is made to investigate and propose novel Hall devices based on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. The novel heterostructures are designed and optimized with respect to the measurements of low magnetic field du to their high sensitivity. In this study we attempt to show that the electron mobility of the studied heterostructure may be enhanced without loss in interface electron concentration by both increasing the spacer thickness and by inserting a -doping in a narrow quantum well within the AlGaAs barrier where the Al concentration in the well is less than in the barrier. Therefore, we predict a significant enhancement of device sensitivity to low magnetic field without compromise in noise performance.

  14. Comparison of the Level of Using Metacognitive Strategies during Study between High Achieving and Low Achieving Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Ahmet; Demir, Ozden

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the level of using metacognitive strategies during study between high achieving and low achieving prospective classroom teachers. This study was designed as a mixed method study. Metacognitive Learning Strategies Scale developed by Namlu (2004) was used to measure the use of metacognitive strategies…

  15. The relationship between vertical teaming in science and student achievement as reported in the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) at selected public schools in Bexar County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Veronica Hernandez

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vertical teaming in science and student achievement. This study compared student achievement of campuses implementing vertical teaming with schools that do not practice vertical teaming. In addition, this study explored the relationship between selected demographic variables and vertical teaming using Grade 5 Science TAKS results in the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS). Campus demographic variables such as economically disadvantaged, minority students, English language learners, student mobility, and experienced teachers were researched. A call-out yielded 168 responses. With the exclusion of the 12 campuses, a total of 156 participating campuses from 18 traditional school districts remained. Campuses employing vertical teaming were self-identified on the basis of having implemented the process for two or more years. The gain in percent mastered for Science TAKS scores from 2004 to 2007 was used as the Science TAKS score variable. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in student achievement in science for campuses practicing vertical teaming and campuses that did not. The two-way ANOVA was used to measure the relationship between the independent variables (vertical teaming and campus demographic variables) on the dependent variable (student achievement on Science TAKS). The results suggested that campuses having low percentages of economically disadvantaged students statistically gained more on the Science TAKS than campuses that have high percentages of economically disadvantaged students irrespective of vertical teaming practices. In addition, campuses that have low percentages of minority students statistically gained more on the Science TAKS than campuses that have high percentages of minority students despite vertical teaming participation. Recommendations include districts, state, and federal agencies providing campuses with a high percent of economically

  16. The Effect of Origami-Based Instruction on Spatial Visualization, Geometry Achievement, and Geometric Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arici, Sevil; Aslan-Tutak, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the effect of origami-based geometry instruction on spatial visualization, geometry achievement, and geometric reasoning of tenth-grade students in Turkey. The sample ("n" = 184) was chosen from a tenth-grade population of a public high school in Turkey. It was a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design. A…

  17. 38 CFR 21.53 - Reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and... employment handicap, or (2) A serious employment handicap. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3106(a)) (b) Definition. The... achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible, VA shall provide the...

  18. Using a multimode fiber as a high resolution, low loss spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate that a conventional multimode fiber can function as a high resolution, low loss spectrometer. The proposed spectrometer consists only of the fiber and a camera that images the speckle pattern generated by interference among the fiber modes. While this speckle pattern is detrimental to many applications, it encodes information about the spectral content of the input signal which can be recovered using calibration data. We achieve a spectral resolution of 0.15 nm over 25 nm bandwidth using 1 meter long fiber, and 0.03 nm resolution over 5 nm bandwidth with a 5 meter fiber. The insertion loss is less than 10%, and the signal to noise ratio in the reconstructed spectra is over 1000.

  19. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Ng, Tienkhee; Ooi, Boon S; Liao, Hsien-Yu; Shen, Chao; Chen, Long; Zhu, J Y

    2016-06-16

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq(-1)) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays.

  20. Improved High-Energy Response of AlGaAs/GaAs Solar Cells Using a Low-Cost Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorzad, Camron D.; Zhao, Xin; Harotoonian, Vache; Woodall, Jerry M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on an AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell with a significantly increased high-energy response that was produced via a modified liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique. This technique uses a one-step process in which the solid-liquid equilibrium Al-Ga-As:Zn melt in contact with an n-type vendor GaAs substrate simultaneously getters impurities in the substrate that shorten minority carrier lifetimes, diffuses Zn into the substrate to create a p- n junction, and forms a thin p-AlGaAs window layer that enables more high-energy light to be efficiently absorbed. Unlike conventional LPE, this process is performed isothermally. In our "double Al" method, the ratio of Al in the melt ("Al melt ratio") that was used in our process was two times more than what was previously reported in the record 1977 International Business Machines (IBM) solar cell. Photoluminescence (PL) results showed our double Al sample yielded a response to 405 nm light ("blue light"), which was more than twice as intense as the response from our replicated IBM cell. The original 1977 cell had a low-intensity spectral response to photon wavelengths under 443 nm (Woodall and Hovel in Sol Energy Mater Sol Cells 29:176, 1990). Secondary ion mass spectrometry results confirmed the increased blue light response was due to a large reduction in AlGaAs window layer thickness. These results proved increasing the Al melt ratio broadens the spectrum of light that can be transmitted through the window layer into the active GaAs region for absorption, increasing the overall solar cell efficiency. Our enhanced double Al method can pave the way for large-scale manufacturing of low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells.

  1. Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) as Surrogates for Low Sensitivity Gasoline Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Bhavani Shankar, Vijai Shankar

    2016-04-05

    Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) - binary mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane based on Research Octane Number (RON) - are popular gasoline surrogates for modeling combustion in spark ignition engines. The use of these two component surrogates to represent real gasoline fuels for simulations of HCCI/PCCI engines needs further consideration, as the mode of combustion is very different in these engines (i.e. the combustion process is mainly controlled by the reactivity of the fuel). This study presents an experimental evaluation of PRF surrogates for four real gasoline fuels termed FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) A, C, I, and J in a motored CFR (Cooperative Fuels Research) engine. This approach enables the surrogate mixtures to be evaluated purely from a chemical kinetic perspective. The gasoline fuels considered in this study have very low sensitivities, S (RON-MON), and also exhibit two-stage ignition behavior. The first stage heat release, which is termed Low Temperature Heat Release (LTHR), controls the combustion phasing in this operating mode. As a result, the performance of the PRF surrogates was evaluated by its ability to mimic the low temperature chemical reactivity of the real gasoline fuels. This was achieved by comparing the LTHR from the engine pressure histories. The PRF surrogates were able to consistently reproduce the amount of LTHR, closely match the phasing of LTHR, and the compression ratio for the start of hot ignition of the real gasoline fuels. This suggests that the octane quality of a surrogate fuel is a good indicator of the fuel’s reactivity across low (LTC), negative temperature coefficient (NTC), and high temperature chemical (HTC) reactivity regimes.

  2. COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES OF STUDY STRATEGIES AMONG HIGH AND LOW ACHIEVERS DISTANCE LEARNING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran YOUSUF

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to better understand and draw perceptions of low and high achiever distance learners about their study patterns. The study indicates the areas where significant difference is found among low and high achievers of Allama Iqbal Open University, Pakistan through a self developed questionnaire covering their preferred study location, study times, number of hours spent on study, the difficulties affecting their study patterns and the organization of study strategies in comparative perspective. Greater difficulties were being faced by low achievers in their study. Increased difficulties were encountered by low achievers with study material, volume of study, self-motivation and other factors. There was no significant difference between low and high achievers for their study strategies of studying materials without taking notes and reading aloud. Greater low achievers attempted easy portions of their study material first and took notes simultaneously as compared to high achievers.

  3. Growth and characterization of InAs quantum dots with low-density and long emission wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Guojun Liu; Zhanguo Li; Mei Li; Xiaohua Wang

    2008-01-01

    The growth parameters affecting the deposition of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs substrate by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are reported. The low-density InAs QDs (~ 5 × 108 cm-2) are achieved using high growth temperature and low InAs coverage. Photolu-minescence (PL) measurements show the good optical quality of low-density QDs. At room temperature,the ground state peak wavelength of PL spectrum and full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) are 1361 nm and 23 meV (35 nm), respectively, which are obtained as the GaAs capping layer grown using triethylgallium (TEG) and tertiallybutylarsine (TBA). The PL spectra exhibit three emission peaks at 1361, 1280,and 1204 nm, which correspond to the ground state, the first excited state, and the second excited state of the QDs, respectively.

  4. A low-noise K-Ka band oscillator using AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madihian, Mohammad; Takahashi, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    The design considerations, fabrication process, and performance of the first K-Ka-band oscillator implemented using a self-aligned AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) are described. A large-signal time-domain-based design approach has been used which applies a SPICE-F simulator for optimization of the oscillator circuit parameters for maximum output power. The oscillator employs a 2 x 10 sq mm emitter AlGaAs/GaAs HBT that was fabricated using a pattern inversion technology. The HBT has a base current 1/f noise power density lower than 1 x 10 to the -20th sq A/Hz at 1 kHz and lower than 1 x 10 to the -22nd sq A/Hz at 100 kHz for a collector current of 1 mA. The oscillator, which is composed of only low-Q microstrip transmission lines, has a phase noise of -80 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz off carrier when operated at 26.6 GHz. These results indicate the applicability of the HBTs to low-phase-noise monolithic oscillators at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, where both Si bipolar transistors and GaAs FETs are absent.

  5. Highly monodisperse low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes as simultaneous T1-T2 MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Alipour, A.; Soran-Erdem, Z.; Aykut, Z. G.; Demir, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin canting effect. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we showed their potential as dual contrast agents for both T1- and T2-weighted MRI via phantom studies, in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. Therefore, these low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes, while being non-toxic and bio-compatible, hold great promise as excellent dual-mode T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI.We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin

  6. Intrapersonal Achievement Goals and Underlying Reasons among Long Distance Runners: Their Relation with Race Experience, Self-Talk, and Running Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Delrue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In a sample of long distance runners, we examined the role of type of intrapersonal achievement goals (i.e., approach versus avoidance and type of underlying reasons (i.e., autonomous and controlled, assessed prior to the race, as predictors of both pre-race (e.g., race appraisals and post-race (e.g., flow experience outcomes. Of 221 (62.4% males runners, 111 reported pursuing an intrapersonal-approach goal (i.e., doing better than before as their dominant or preferred achievement goal for the race, while 86 prioritized intrapersonal-avoidance goals (i.e., avoiding to perform worse than before. Regression and path analyses showed that the type of achievement goals predicted none of the outcomes except for running time, with approach goals predicting better performance when compared to avoidance goals. Path analyses revealed that autonomous reasons underlying intrapersonal goal pursuit related positively to pre-race challenge appraisals, performance and, via need satisfaction, to flow experience. Interestingly, controlled reasons positively related to pre-race threat appraisals and positively predicted both positive and negative self-talk, with both yielding opposing relations with flow. These findings complement past research on the intersection between the Achievement Goal Approach and Self-Determination Theory and highlight the value of studying the reasons underlying intrapersonal achievement goals.

  7. High performance InAs quantum dot lasers on silicon substrates by low temperature Pd-GaAs wafer bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zihao; Preble, Stefan F. [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yao, Ruizhe; Lee, Chi-Sen; Guo, Wei, E-mail: wei-guo@uml.edu [Physics and Applied Physics Department, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Lester, Luke F. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    InAs quantum dot (QD) laser heterostructures have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy system on GaAs substrates, and then transferred to silicon substrates by a low temperature (250 °C) Pd-mediated wafer bonding process. A low interfacial resistivity of only 0.2 Ω cm{sup 2} formed during the bonding process is characterized by the current-voltage measurements. The InAs QD lasers on Si exhibit comparable characteristics to state-of-the-art QD lasers on silicon substrates, where the threshold current density J{sub th} and differential quantum efficiency η{sub d} of 240 A/cm{sup 2} and 23.9%, respectively, at room temperature are obtained with laser bars of cavity length and waveguide ridge of 1.5 mm and 5 μm, respectively. The InAs QD lasers also show operation up to 100 °C with a threshold current density J{sub th} and differential quantum efficiency η{sub d} of 950 A/cm{sup 2} and 9.3%, respectively. The temperature coefficient T{sub 0} of 69 K from 60 to 100 °C is characterized from the temperature dependent J{sub th} measurements.

  8. EXAMINATION MANAGEMENT AS A WAY OF ACHIEVING QUALITY ASSURANCE IN ODL INSTITUTIONS: The Case of Zimbabwe Open University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onias MAFA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An examination is an important component of any institution that educates people. It is a form of assessment used to measure the students’ understanding of the concepts and principles they would have learnt. Zimbabwe Open University, an Open and Distance Learning institution has been setting its own examinations for the academic programmes offered. Through examinations, ZOU students are encouraged to take an active role in analysing and questioning the things they would have learnt. This paper discusses the examinations management at ZOU with a special focus on the setting, administering, marking right up to the publication of results. It will also discuss the challenges that ZOU is facing in conducting examinations. It will finally emerge with some valuable practical suggestions on how ZOU can improve on its examination management and thereby achieve quality assurance in all its programmes. The investigation adopted the qualitative methodology and a case study design to generate data to address the questions which guided the study. The purposively sampled sample was drawn from ZOU’s National Centre, Bulawayo and Matabeleland North Regions. The sample consisted of manager -examinations, manager- quality control, chairpersons of departments from different faculties, programme leaders, programme coordinators, regional quality coordinators, regional administrators, and students who were in their second year of study. Face-to-face interviews were used to generate data from manager -examinations, manager- quality control, regional quality coordinators and regional administrators. Data from chairpersons of departments from different faculties, programme leaders, programme coordinators, second year students were generated through focus group discussions. Major findings were the management of examinations at ZOU enhances quality assurance, cited activities which contributed to quality assurance included setting of examination items for the item

  9. Aptitude Tests Versus School Exams as Selection Tools for Higher Education and the Case for Assessing Educational Achievement in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Advocates of using a US-style SAT for university selection claim that it is fairer to applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds than achievement tests because it assesses potential, not achievement, and that it allows finer discrimination between top applicants than GCEs. The pros and cons of aptitude tests in principle are discussed, focusing on…

  10. Parental Behaviors and Adolescents' Achievement Goals at the Beginning of Middle School: Emotional Problems as Potential Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Stephane; Ratelle, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Recent literature on the determinants of academic motivation has shown that parenting and emotions are central elements in understanding students' achievement goals. The authors of this study set out to examine the predictive relationship between parental behaviors during the last year of elementary school and adolescents' achievement goals at the…

  11. "I'm Not Doing as Well in This Class as I'd Like to": Exploring Achievement Motivation and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James S.; Denzine, Gypsy M.

    2004-01-01

    This study looked at the relationship of explanatory style and self-systems (including self-esteem and self-efficacy) and the motivation (expectations for success and task value) of students who were dissatisfied with their performance in a particular class. One result is the confirmation that situated variables such as self-efficacy provide the…

  12. Rats with Chronic, Stable Pulmonary Hypertension Tolerate Low Dose Sevoflurane Inhalation as Well as Normal Rats Do.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Yin

    Full Text Available The effects of low concentration of sevoflurane on right ventricular (RV function and intracellular calcium in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH have not been investigated clearly. We aim to study these effects and associated signaling pathways in rats with PAH.Hemodynamics were assessed with or without sevoflurane inhalation in established PAH rats. We analysis the classic RV function parameters and RV-PA coupling efficiency using steady-state PV loop recordings. The protein levels of SERCA2, PLB and p-PLB expression was analyzed by western blot to assess their relevance in PAH.Rats with PAH presented with RV hypertrophy and increased pulmonary arterial pressure. The values of Ea, R/L ratio, ESP, SW, PRSW, +dP/dtmax and the slope of the dP/dtmax-EDV relationship increased significantly in PAH rats (P<0.05. Sevoflurane induced a concentration-dependent decrease of systemic and pulmonary blood pressure, HR, RV contractility, and increased the R/L ratio in both groups. Sevoflurane reduced the expression of SERCA2 and increased the expression of PLB in both groups. Interestingly, sevoflurane only reduced the p-PLB/PLB ratio in PAH rats, not in normal rats.Rats with chronic, stable pulmonary hypertension tolerate low concentrations of sevoflurane inhalation as well as normal rats do. It may be related to the modulation of the SERCA2-PLB signaling pathway.

  13. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Ng, Tienkhee; Ooi, Boon S.; Liao, Hsien-Yu; Shen, Chao; Chen, Long; Zhu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq-1) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays.Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are

  14. Mobility: A Multivariate Study of Academic Achievement in Reading and Math for Eighth-Grade Students as Measured by the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference between levels of student mobility in reading and mathematics achievement as measured by the 2007-2008 Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) achievement test. The study also sought to determine if there existed a difference in socioeconomic and attendance…

  15. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2016-06-01

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq-1) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Low threshold all-optical crossbar switch on GaAs-GaAlAs channel waveguide arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    1994-09-01

    During the Phase 2 project entitled 'Low Threshold All-Optical Crossbar Switch on GaAs - GaAlAs Channel Waveguide Array,' Physical Optics Corporation (POC) developed the basic principles for the fabrication of all-optical crossbar switches. Based on this development. POC fabricated a 2 x 2 GaAs/GaAlAs switch that changes the direction of incident light with minimum insertion loss and nonlinear distortion. This unique technology can be used in both analog and digital networks. The applications of this technology are widespread. Because the all-optical network does not have any speed limitations (RC time constant), POC's approach will be beneficial to SONET networks, phased array radar networks, very high speed oscilloscopes, all-optical networks, IR countermeasure systems, BER equipment, and the fast growing video conferencing network market. The novel all-optical crossbar switch developed in this program will solve interconnect problems. and will be a key component in the widely proposed all-optical 200 Gb/s SONET/ATM networks.

  17. International Space Station as a Platform for Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael; Woodcock, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has established a new model for the achievement of the most difficult engineering goals in space: international collaboration at the program level with competition at the level of technology. This strategic shift in management approach provides long term program stability while still allowing for the flexible evolution of technology needs and capabilities. Both commercial and government sponsored technology developments are well supported in this management model. ISS also provides a physical platform for development and demonstration of the systems needed for missions beyond low earth orbit. These new systems at the leading edge of technology require operational exercise in the unforgiving environment of space before they can be trusted for long duration missions. Systems and resources needed for expeditions can be aggregated and thoroughly tested at ISS before departure thus providing wide operational flexibility and the best assurance of mission success. We will describe representative mission profiles showing how ISS can support exploration missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and other potential destinations. Example missions would include humans to lunar surface and return, and humans to Mars orbit as well as Mars surface and return. ISS benefits include: international access from all major launch sites; an assembly location with crew and tools that could help prepare departing expeditions that involve more than one launch; a parking place for reusable vehicles; and the potential to add a propellant depot.

  18. Teacher practices and student science grades as indicators of performance on the Reading, Mathematics, and Science Reasoning subtests of the ACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Marilyn R.

    In light of the federal mandates of standardized testing at all levels set in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, the purpose of this study was to determine if a significant relationship exists between high school science averages, the number of high school science courses taken, and the ACT Reading, Mathematics, and Science Reasoning subscores with consideration of the demographic characteristics of gender, ethnicity, and school attended. Further, this study examined the influence of the instructional practices and assessment methods used by the classroom teacher on students' ACT Science Reasoning subscores. The sample consisted of four public high schools in Northwest Tennessee, which provided data for students in the graduating classes of 2003 and 2004. Eight of 16 teachers at these schools who had taught students from both graduating classes completed a survey indicating instructional practices and assessment methods used in the classroom. Multiple regression results indicated positive significant relationships of white ethnicity, high school science average, and the number of high school courses taken to the three ACT subscores. Negative significant relationships were found for black ethnicity in relation to the three ACT subscores and for gender in relation to the ACT Mathematics and ACT Science Reasoning subscore. MANOVA results indicated no significant difference in instructional practices and Mann-Whitney U test results indicated no significant difference in assessment methods of teachers at lower- and higher-scoring schools. Further study is needed to determine the types of professional development activities that teachers need and desire to make positive changes in instructional practices and assessment methods to raise levels of achievement for all students.

  19. Effects of reciprocal teaching: A two-year intervention study among low achieving adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okkinga, Mariska; Gelderen, van Amos; Sleegers, Peter; Steensel, van Roel

    2015-01-01

    Low achieving adolescents are known to have difficulties with reading comprehension. This presentation discusses how reciprocal teaching can improve low achieving adolescents' reading comprehension in natural classroom settings (as opposed to small-group settings) and to what extent intervention eff

  20. Attitudes of practicing nurses as predictors of intended care behavior with persons who are HIV positive: testing the Ajzen-Fishbein Theory of Reasoned Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, H K; Goldenberg, D

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine practicing nurses' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions to care for HIV positive patients, using the Theory of Reasoned Action. One hundred and forty-one subjects completed a questionnaire developed according to guidelines described by Ajzen and Fishbein (1980). Consistent with the theory, nurses' attitudes and subjective norms were found to be significant predictors of intentions to care for persons who are HIV positive (R2 = 0.27). Personal beliefs found to discriminate between intenders and nonintenders were those related to possible consequences for self, family, and friends, but not job-related consequences. Normative beliefs which discriminated between groups were also related to nonprofessional referents' expectations. In addition, qualitative data showed persistent concerns about occupational risk for contracting AIDS. Based on the results of this research, it is recommended that nurse educators in both clinical and academic settings, target specific educational/training interventions to include transmission, prevention, as well as exploration of feelings, attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions about HIV-related topics. Further theory-based research and testing of interventions to change practicing nurses' attitudes and beliefs about HIV disease are advocated.

  1. Nanophotonic Modulator with Bismuth Ferrite as Low-loss Switchable Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We propose a nanophotonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as a tunable material. Due to near-zero losses in bismuth ferrite, modulation with up to 20 dB/μm extinction ratio and 12 μm propagation length is achieved.......We propose a nanophotonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as a tunable material. Due to near-zero losses in bismuth ferrite, modulation with up to 20 dB/μm extinction ratio and 12 μm propagation length is achieved....

  2. Cognitive Training for Children: Effects on Inductive Reasoning, Deductive Reasoning, and Mathematics Achievement in an Australian School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkl, Sophie; Porter, Amy; Ginns, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Inductive reasoning is a core cognitive process of fluid intelligence, predicting a variety of educational outcomes. The Cognitive Training for Children (CTC) program is an educational intervention designed to develop children's inductive reasoning skills, with previous investigations finding substantial effects of the program on both inductive…

  3. In situ co-crystallisation as a tool for low-temperature crystal engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew D

    2003-01-01

    Synthesis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction of a series of low-melting co-crystals of pyrazine and n-alkyl carboxylic acids demonstrates in situ co-crystallisation as a versatile tool for low-temperature crystal engineering.......Synthesis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction of a series of low-melting co-crystals of pyrazine and n-alkyl carboxylic acids demonstrates in situ co-crystallisation as a versatile tool for low-temperature crystal engineering....

  4. Parental Involvement and General Cognitive Ability as Predictors of Domain-Specific Academic Achievement in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Gottschling, Juliana; Spengler, Marion; Hegewald, Katrin; Spinath, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies showed that general cognitive ability (GCA) is a reliable predictor of academic achievement. In addition, parental involvement in their children's academic development is of major importance in early adolescence. This study investigated the incremental validity of parental involvement over GCA in the prediction of academic…

  5. Conscientiousness, Achievement Striving, and Intelligence as Performance Predictors in a Sample of German Psychology Students: Always a Linear Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Matthias; Knogler, Maximilian; Buhner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the interface between cognitive ability (intelligence) and personality in the prediction of academic performance have yielded mixed results so far. Especially an interaction between conscientiousness (and its facet achievement striving) and intelligence has been investigated. The hypothesis is that conscientiousness enhances the impact…

  6. Neurofeedback as an Intervention to Improve Reading Achievement in Students with Attention- Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Inattentive Subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Jeffry P.; O'Connor, Rollanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates that attention deficits have a deleterious effect on academic achievement. Impairments in attention, and not hyperactivity/impulsivity, are associated with learning difficulties and academic problems in students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To date, most studies have focused on symptoms…

  7. Psychological distress and student engagement as mediators of the relationship between peer victimization and achievement in middle school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totura, Christine M Wienke; Karver, Marc S; Gesten, Ellis L

    2014-01-01

    Peer victimization is a well-known national and international problem, contributing to a range of emotional, social, and behavioral consequences. Using structural equation modeling, the authors tested a theoretical model suggesting that psychological distress and student engagement mediate the association between the experience of victimization and concurrent academic achievement. Participants were 469 (46.4 % male, 53.6 % female) 6th to 8th grade students, from randomly selected classrooms in 11 middle schools in a southeastern school district. Structural equation models of the hypothesized effects demonstrated adequate fit to the data, with both symptoms of psychological distress and engagement mediating the relationship between victimization and academic achievement. In general, the results suggest that victimization predicts diminished academic achievement by way of psychological distress and poorer engagement in classroom and academic tasks. However, the direct relationship between victimization and measures of achievement lacked significance across many correlational and path analyses conducted. These findings have implications for researchers and practitioners in understanding how psychological distress and student engagement are associated with the academic performance of students who experience peer victimization.

  8. Electron reconstruction and electroweak processes as tools to achieve precision measurements at a hadron collider: From CDF to CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie [Univ. of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements are an important aspect of hadron colliders physics program. This thesis describes a method, together with a first application, of how to achieve and use precision measurements at the LHC. The idea is to use refernce processes to control the detector systematics and to constrain the theoretical predictions.

  9. Prior Mathematics Achievement, Cognitive Appraisals and Anxiety as Predictors of Finnish Students' Later Mathematics Performance and Career Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyttala, Minna; Bjorn, Piia Maria

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this two-year longitudinal study was to investigate the role and impact of prior mathematics performance, cognitive appraisals and mathematics-specific, affective anxiety in determining later mathematics achievement and future career orientation among Finnish adolescents. The basic ideas of the control-value theory, assumed to be…

  10. The Concurrent Validity of the Diagnostic Analysis of Reading Errors as a Predictor of the English Achievement of Lebanese Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigh, Philip A.; Khairallah, Shereen

    1983-01-01

    The concurrent validity of the Diagnostic Analysis of Reading Errors (DARE) subtests was studied, based on the responses of Lebanese secondary and postsecondary students relative to their achievement in an English course or on a standardized test of English proficiency. The results indicate that the DARE is not a viable predictor of English…

  11. Grandparents as Primary Caregivers and Their Effects on the Reading Achievement of Their Elementary-Age African American Grandchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Vanessa B.

    2009-01-01

    Using data collected from surveys completed by grandparents for their grandchildren (N = 72), this quantitative study examines the effects grandparent primary caregivers have on the reading achievement of their African American grandchildren. The study sought to answer the following question: How do the six types of parental involvement (Epstein,…

  12. Resources of Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Perception of Science Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Deniz; Bozdag, Hüseyin Cihan

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the predictive power of mathematics self-efficacy resources and perception of science self-efficacy on academic achievement. The study, adopting a relational screening model, was conducted with a total of 698 students in sixth, seventh and eighth grade level of a state secondary school. Mathematics…

  13. The effects of using diagramming as a representational technique on high school students' achievement in solving math word problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Banmali

    Methods and procedures for successfully solving math word problems have been, and continue to be a mystery to many U.S. high school students. Previous studies suggest that the contextual and mathematical understanding of a word problem, along with the development of schemas and their related external representations, positively contribute to students' accomplishments when solving word problems. Some studies have examined the effects of diagramming on students' abilities to solve word problems that only involved basic arithmetic operations. Other studies have investigated how instructional models that used technology influenced students' problem solving achievements. Still other studies have used schema-based instruction involving students with learning disabilities. No study has evaluated regular high school students' achievements in solving standard math word problems using a diagramming technique without technological aid. This study evaluated students' achievement in solving math word problems using a diagramming technique. Using a quasi-experimental experimental pretest-posttest research design, quantitative data were collected from 172 grade 11 Hispanic English language learners (ELLS) and African American learners whose first language is English (EFLLs) in 18 classes at an inner city high school in Northern New Jersey. There were 88 control and 84 experimental students. The pretest and posttest of each participating student and samples of the experimental students' class assignments provided the qualitative data for the study. The data from this study exhibited that the diagramming method of solving math word problems significantly improved student achievement in the experimental group (pvocabulary and symbols used in word problems and that both ELLs and EFLLs improved their problem solving success through careful attention to the creation and labeling of diagrams to represent the mathematics involved in standard word problems. Although Learnertype (ELL, EFLL

  14. Sputtered SiO2 as low acoustic impedance material for Bragg mirror fabrication in BAW resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Jimena; Wegmann, Enrique; Capilla, José; Iborra, Enrique; Clement, Marta; Vergara, Lucía; Aigner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the procedure to sputter low acoustic impedance SiO(2) films to be used as a low acoustic impedance layer in Bragg mirrors for BAW resonators. The composition and structure of the material are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy. The acoustic properties of the films (mass density and sound velocity) are assessed through X-ray reflectometry and picosecond acoustic spectroscopy. A second measurement of the sound velocity is achieved through the analysis of the longitudinal lambda/2 resonance that appears in these silicon oxide films when used as uppermost layer of an acoustic reflector placed under an AlN-based resonator.

  15. Partnership-Ready Schools: Building Systems and Mindsets for the Achievement Schools to Receive and Utilize Community Organizations as Partners in Student Success

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Ansel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the call for schools to leverage partnerships with community organizations as a means to provide services that will mitigate the effects of poverty in the pursuit of achieving ambitious academic outcomes has gained momentum. The Achievement Schools, a network of five neighborhood schools serving students in Memphis’ Frayser community, has prioritized the development of partnerships as a lever to turn around the academic performance of its schools by ensuring students’ no...

  16. Classroom quality as a predictor of first graders' time in non-instructional activities and literacy achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Leigh; Sparapani, Nicole; Toste, Jessica R; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how quality of the classroom learning environment influenced first grade students' (n=533) time spent in two non-instructional classroom activities (off-task and in transition) and their subsequent literacy outcomes. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that higher classroom quality was related to higher student performance in reading comprehension and expressive vocabulary. Further, classroom quality predicted the amount of time students spent off-task and in transitions in the classroom, with slopes of change across the year particularly impacted. Mediation effects were detected in the case of expressive vocabulary such that the influence of classroom quality on students' achievement operated through students' time spent in these non-instructional activities. Results highlight the importance of overall classroom quality to how students navigate the classroom environment during learning opportunities, with subsequent literacy achievement impacted. Implications for policy and educational practices are discussed.

  17. Attitudes and normative beliefs of nursing students as predictors of intended care behaviors with AIDS patients: a test of the Ajzen-Fishbein theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D; Laschinger, H

    1991-03-01

    Few investigators have studied nurses' or nursing students' responses to caring for AIDS patients. The purpose of this exploratory study was to test the Ajzen-Fishbein (1980) Theory of Reasoned Action in a student nurse population about AIDS patient care. This theory offers an approach to explaining individuals' intentions to engage in certain behaviors as determined by two components: attitudes toward the behavior and subjective norms. Forty-six second-year baccalaureate nursing students completed a questionnaire developed according to guidelines described by Ajzen and Fishbein (alpha reliability range was .69-.85) prior to and following an instructional unit on caring for AIDS patients. Consistent with the theory, students' attitudes and subjective norms were found to be significant predictors of intentions to care for AIDS patients in their clinical experience (R2 = .29, F[1, 43] = 6.63, p less than .003). In addition, qualitative data resembled those in previous reports of fear of contagion among health professionals. The effects of the instructional unit about caring for AIDS patients resulted in significant changes in both attitudes and subjective norms.

  18. Characterization of Femtosecond Low-Temperature-Grown GaAs Photoconductive Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林位株; 刘智刚; 廖睿; 张海潮; 郭冰; 文锦辉; 赖天树

    2002-01-01

    A photoconductive response time, as short as 350 fs, of a low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) micro-coplanar photoconductive switch has been measured and modelled to the ultrafast trapping of the photoexcited carriers in LT-GaAs. The coherent interference of the pump and probe pulses results in a narrow spike photocurrent autocorrelation signal which maps the femtosecond optical pulses.

  19. Learning about Teaching the Extracurricular Topic of Nanotechnology as a Vehicle for Achieving a Sustainable Change in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Ron; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on teachers' transfer of a variety of teaching methods from a teaching module on nanotechnology, which is an example of a topic outside the science curriculum, to teaching topics that are part of the chemistry curriculum. Nanotechnology is outside the science curriculum, but it was used in this study as a means to carry out a…

  20. "If You Can Dream It, You Can Achieve It." Parent Memorable Messages as Indicators of College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranstuber, Haley; Carr, Kristen; Hosek, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated various aspects of parents' memorable messages about college as they relate to indicators of college student success. Findings revealed that parents' memorable messages about college focused on working (and playing) hard, the necessity of attending college, providing encouragement and support, and general advice based on…

  1. Canine olfaction as an alternative to analytical instruments for disease diagnosis: understanding 'dog personality' to achieve reproducible results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent literature has touted the use of canine olfaction as a diagnostic tool for identifying pre-clinical disease status, especially cancer and infection from biological media samples. Studies have shown a wide range of outcomes, ranging from almost perfect discrimination, all t...

  2. The Relationship between Anxiety and Attitude of Students Learning Turkish as a Foreign Language and Their Achievement on Target Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocer, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the anxiety connected with target language of the high school students learning Turkish as a foreign language. In this study, descriptive relational screening model was used. Two scales were used for collecting data. First scale was FLCAS-Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale; it was developed by Horwitz…

  3. An Analysis of Teacher and School Administrator Technology Beliefs and Skills as They Enter into a High Achieving Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Shelly Marie

    2009-01-01

    Teachers and administrators possess varied technology abilities and beliefs. In a study by Williams, Atkinson, Cate, and O'Hair (2008), technology integration and learning community development were positively related. As the teachers and administrators engaged in learning community development and technology integration substantive school…

  4. Poverty, School Size and Charter Designation as Predictors of Student Achievement on a Statewide High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past five years the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) has used the results of the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) to rate public school performance on the School Accountability Report (SAR). The public often considers the school ratings as indicative of the school's quality. There appears to be a lack of quantitative…

  5. Positive Affect and Negative Affect as Modulators of Cognition and Motivation: The Rediscovery of Affect in Achievement Goal Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornebekk, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    A central hypothesis of classical motivation theory is that affect underlies motivation and its behavioural manifestations. However, this has been largely ignored in the past 30 years because social cognitivism has been the dominant theory. As a result, studies have concentrated on social cognitive processes when analysing those factors that…

  6. Development of a microtpc detector as a standard instrument for low energy neutron field characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Maire, D; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Lebreton, L; Mayet, F; Médard, J; Muraz, J-F; Richer, J-P; Riffard, Q; Santos, D

    2013-01-01

    In order to measure energy and fluence of neutron fields, with energy ranging from 8 keV to 1 MeV, a new primary standard is being developed at the IRSN (Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety). This project, micro-TPC (Micro Time Projection Chamber), carried out in collaboration with the LPSC, is based on the nucleus recoil detector principle. The measurement strategy requires track reconstruction of recoiling nuclei down to a few keV, which can be achieved with a low pressure gaseous detector using a micro-pattern gaseous detector. A gas mixture, mainly isobutane, is used as a n-p converter to detect neutrons into the detection volume. Then electrons, coming from the ionization of the gas by the proton recoil, are collected by the pixelised anode (2D projection). A self-triggered electronics is able to perform the anode readout at a 50 MHz frequency in order to give the third dimension of the track. Then the scattering angle is deduced from this track using algorithms. The charge collection leads ...

  7. Low-water activity foods: increased concern as vehicles of foodborne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuchat, L.R.; Komitopoulou, E.; Beckers, H.; Betts, R.P.; Bourdichon, F.; Fanning, S.; Joosten, H.M.L.J.; Kuile, ter B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Foods and food ingredients with low water activity (aw) have been implicated with increased frequency in recent years as vehicles for pathogens that have caused outbreaks of illnesses. Some of these foodborne pathogens can survive for several months, even years, in low-aw foods and in dry food proce

  8. Low-water activity foods: increased concern as vehicles of foodborne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuchat, L.R.; Komitopoulou, E.; Beckers, H.; Betts, R.P.; Bourdichon, F.; Fanning, S.; Joosten, H.M.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Foods and food ingredients with low water activity (a(w)) have been implicated with increased frequency in recent years as vehicles for pathogens that have caused outbreaks of illnesses. Some of these foodborne pathogens can survive for several months, even years, in low-a(w) foods and in dry food p

  9. GaAs Wideband Low Noise Amplifier Design for Breast Cancer Detection System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei; Krozer, Viktor; Delcourt, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Modern wideband systems require low-noise receivers with bandwidth approaching 10 GHz. This paper presents ultra-wideband stable low-noise amplifier MMIC with cascode and source follower buffer configuration using GaAs technology. Source degeneration, gate and shunt peaking inductors are used to ...

  10. Yearly reduction of glucocorticoid dose by 50% as tapering schedule achieves complete remission for 124 pemphigus vulgaris patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyue; Gao, Yu; Peng, Yang; Zhao, Junyu; Chen, Xixue; Zhu, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are the first-line treatment for pemphigus vulgaris. Among 140 patients receiving systemic glucocorticoids, 124 patients achieved complete remission off or on a prednisone dose of ≤10 mg/day or less for 6 months or more. The mean average steroid controlling doses were 0.65, 0.62, 0.80, 1.08 and 1.38 mg/kg per day for the mucosal-dominant patients and the mild, moderate, severe and extensive cutaneous-involved patients, respectively (P pemphigus vulgaris within 3-6 years.

  11. Spectroscopic Investigation of Indium Halides as Substitutes of Mercury in Low Pressure Discharges for Lighting Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Briefi, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Low pressure discharges with indium halides as radiator are discussed as substitutes for hazardous mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps. In this work, the applicability of InBr and InCl in a low pressure discharge light source is investigated. The aim is to identify and understand the physical processes which determine the discharge characteristics and the efficiency of the generated near-UV emission of the indium halide molecule and of the indium atom which is created due to dissociatio...

  12. 100 nm AlSb/InAs HEMT for Ultra-Low-Power Consumption, Low-Noise Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagumako, Sonia; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wichmann, Nicolas; Bollaert, Sylvain; Danneville, François; Wallart, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We report on high frequency (HF) and noise performances of AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with 100 nm gate length at room temperature in low-power regime. Extrinsic cut-off frequencies fT/fmax of 100/125 GHz together with minimum noise figure NFmin = 0.5 dB and associated gain Gass = 12 dB at 12 GHz have been obtained at drain bias of only 80 mV, corresponding to 4 mW/mm DC power dissipation. This demonstrates the great ability of AlSb/InAs HEMT for high-frequency operation combined with low-noise performances in ultra-low-power regime. PMID:24707193

  13. 100 nm AlSb/InAs HEMT for Ultra-Low-Power Consumption, Low-Noise Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Gardès

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on high frequency (HF and noise performances of AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT with 100 nm gate length at room temperature in low-power regime. Extrinsic cut-off frequencies fT/fmax of 100/125 GHz together with minimum noise figure NFmin=0.5 dB and associated gain Gass=12 dB at 12 GHz have been obtained at drain bias of only 80 mV, corresponding to 4 mW/mm DC power dissipation. This demonstrates the great ability of AlSb/InAs HEMT for high-frequency operation combined with low-noise performances in ultra-low-power regime.

  14. A novel technique to achieve atomic macro-coherence as a tool to determine the nature of neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyero García, R.; Carpentier, A. V.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-10-01

    The photon spectrum in macro-coherent atomic deexcitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper, we revisit this intriguing possibility, presenting an alternative method for inducing large coherence in a target based on adiabatic techniques. More concretely, we propose the use of a modified version of coherent population return (CPR), namely two-photon CPR, that turns out to be extremely robust with respect to the experimental parameters and capable of inducing a coherence close to 100 % in the target.

  15. Why am I in Primary School Mathematics Teacher Education Program? An analysis of Reasons and Expectations in the Context of Gender and Academic Achievement: Case of Kastamonu University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfi İNCİKABI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine teacher candidates’ reasons for and their expectations from the mathematics teacher education program and to reveal the situation in the context of gender and academic success. Being descriptive in nature, the data was analyzed through the content analysis. 102 fourth grade students attending Kastamonu University primary school mathematics teacher education program participated in the research. According to research findings, external factors such as family, university entrance exam score, teacher influence were found to be effective among the reasons for preference of prospective teachers. Similarly, both low and high achieving teacher candidates were mainly attributed their reasons’ for selecting mathematics teachers education programmes to the external factors. It has been seen that the expectations of the prospective teachers concentrate on the themes of professional development, academic development and social development.. Male teacher candidates emphasized professional development while female candidates highlighted academic improvement, and social improvement factors. Mathematics teacher candidates from different level of success more adverted the expectancy of gaining of mathematics teaching skill.

  16. Polynorbornene as a low loss matrix material for IR metamaterial applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrington, Christian Lew; Sinclair, Michael B.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Lee, Yun-Ju; Sanchez, Andrea E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Hines, Paul; Dirk, Shawn M.; Rasberry, Roger D.

    2010-11-01

    Novel low loss photopatternable matrix materials for IR metamaterial applications were synthesized using the ring opening metathesis polymerization reaction (ROMP) of norbornene followed by a partial hydrogenation to remove most of the IR absorbing olefin groups which absorb in the 8-12 {micro}m range. Photopatterning was achieved via crosslinking of the remaining olefin groups with alpha, omega-dithiols via the thiol-ene coupling reaction. Since ROMP is a living polymerization the molecular weight of the polymer can be controlled simply by varying the ratio of catalyst to monomer. In order to determine the optimum photopattenable IR matrix material we varied the amount of olefin remaining after the partial hydrogenation. Hydrogenation was accomplished using tosyl hydrazide. The degree of hydrogenation can be controlled by altering the reaction time or reaction stoichiometry and the by-products can be easily removed during workup by precipitation into ethanol. Several polymers have been prepared using this reduction scheme including two polymers which had 54% and 68% olefin remaining. Free standing films (approx. 12 {micro}m) were prepared from the 68% olefin material using draw-down technique and subsequently irradiated with a UV lamp (365 nm) for thirty minutes to induce crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. After crosslinking, the olefin IR-absorption band disappeared and the Tg of the matrix material increased; both desirable properties for IR metamaterial applications. The polymer system has inherent photopatternable behavior primarily because of solubility differences between the pre-polymer and cross-linked matrix. Photopatterned structures using the 54% as well as the 68% olefin material were easily obtained. The synthesis, processing, and IR absorption data and the ramifications to dielectric metamaterials will be discussed.

  17. High Immunization Coverage in Children as One of the Major Achievements for the Health System in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Khazaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination considered as one of the most cost-effective health interventions worldwide  through prevention and control of many serious childhood diseases (1. It is estimated  global coverage of  Dose 3 of Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTP3among children one year old has been 86% in 2014 (by range from 77% to 96%  in African Region and Western Pacific Region; respectively (2. Globally in 2014, it is estimated about 18.7 million infants were not receive routine immunization services such as DTP3 vaccine. More than 60% of these children  were living in 10 undeveloped countries (3. Coverage rate the third dose of DTP vaccine (DTP3 in at the age of 12 months is a key indicator of National Immunization Programme (NIP performance; because it reflects completion of the basic infant immunization schedule and coverage with other vaccines (2. In this study we aimed to examine status of immunization coverage in Iran compared to other countries in the world during 1980-2015.

  18. Freeze-drying as suitable method to achieve ready-to-use yeast biosensors for androgenic and estrogenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarque, Sergio; Bittner, Michal; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant yeast assays (RYAs) have been proved to be a suitable tool for the fast screening of compounds with endocrine disrupting activities. However, ready-to-use versions more accessible to less equipped laboratories and field studies are scarce and far from optimal throughputs. Here, we have applied freeze-drying technology to optimize RYA for the fast assessment of environmental compounds with estrogenic and androgenic potencies. The effects of different cryoprotectants, initial optical density and long-term storage were evaluated. The study included detailed characterization of sensitivity, robustness and reproducibility of the new ready-to-use versions, as well as comparison with the standard assays. Freeze-dried RYAs showed similar dose-responses curves to their homolog standard assays, with Lowest Observed Effect Concentration (LOEC) and Median effective Concentration (EC50) of 1 nM and 7.5 nM for testosterone, and 0.05 nM and 0.5 nM for 17β-estradiol, respectively. Freeze-dried cells stored at 4 °C retained maximum sensitivity up to 2 months, while cells stored at -18 °C showed no decrease in sensitivity throughout the study (10 months). This ready-to-use RYA is easily accessible and may be potentially used for on-site applications.

  19. FRANCHISING AS A MEANS OF ACHIEVING INTERNATIONALIZATION: RESEARCH PROPOSITIONS FROM A MULTIPLE CASE STUDY OF BRAZILIAN FASHION RETAILERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Manoel Cunha de Almeida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Brazilian Franchising Association, the number of Brazilian franchises has grown 300% in the last ten years, but only 3% of Brazilian franchises operate in foreign markets, so the opportunity to internationalization is strong. Aiming to get a better understanding of possible distinctive features of Brazilian retail internationalization, this paper explores the determinants of franchising as the choice of internationalization entry mode by Brazilian’s firms in the fashion apparel sector. The multiple-case study was the approach used. The study resulted in eleven research propositions. Results show that government or trade organizations support, geographic distance, political and economic risk may not be determinant to internationalization. However cultural proximity and relationship with local partners can be determinant to internationalization. Moreover, brands that cater to a very specific segment and that their value proposition is closely linked to intangible factors may face problems in expanding to culturally distant international environments.

  20. Elements of product service systems as a potential to achieve a sustainable development: bibliometry and content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ariente Neto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of product-service systems (PSS is presented as an innovative strategy when offering products and services. It aims at for minimizing environmental impacts through sustainable business models. This study aims to identify which potentialities can be explored with regard to the elements of a PSS in a configuration that favor to offer answers on sustainable issues. To do so, the literature was analyzed by a structured process of bibliographic review. Among the results, three aspects are highlighted: (i the wideness of product concept to add services through PSS life-cycle, (ii the configuration of infra-structure to support a PSS by establishing the necessary communication relatively to logistics services. Finally, the net of actors should be explored to obtain organizational proposals that contribute to PSS performance.

  1. Combination of inulin and time dependent polymethacrylates as a coating system to achieve colonic delivery of indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Akhgari

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackground:In the previous study it was shown that films prepared from inulin (In in combination with Eudragit RS (ERS and RL (ERL were susceptible to inulinase. Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the suitability of these combinations for colonic delivery of indomethacin. "nMethods: Indomethacin was loaded onto non-pareil seeds using fluidized bed apparatus to produce pellets with 20% w/w drug load. Drug loaded pellets were coated with In-ERS in the ratios of 20:80 and 30:70, or In-ERL in the ratio of 20:80 to different coating loads. The release of drug was examined in simulated gastric (for 2 hrs and small intestine and in the presence of inulinase in simulated colonic medium (for 12 or 24 hrs. "nResults: The results of this study revealed that incorporation of inulin as a bacterially degradable polysaccharide into ERS or ERL could modulate drug release. Coating level up to 15% significantly affected drug release from In-ERL or In-ERS coated pellets. However further increase in coating load to 20% had no significant effect on drug release from In-ERL coated pellets (f1=9.39. Drug release from In-ERL coated pellets was faster and showed some pH dependency. "nConclusions: Formulation coated with In-ERS (20:80 and coating level of 20% was considered more appropriate for colon delivery of indomethacin, as drug release was pH independent and formulation was resistant to drug release in the upper GI media for up to 7 hrs. This formulation was also susceptible to inulinase and released about 40% of indomethacin in the simulated colonic media.

  2. When teammates are viewed as rivals: a cross-national investigation of achievement goals and intrateam moral behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardley, Ian D; Jackson, Ben

    2012-08-01

    This research aimed to (a) determine whether mastery and intrateam performance achievement goals predicted prosocial and antisocial teammate behavior, (b) explore whether effects of intrateam performance goals were mediated by moral disengagement, and (c) examine whether any effects (Study 2 only) were moderated by cohesion. In Study 1, team athletes (N = 282) from Australia completed questionnaires assessing the aforementioned variables. Structural equation modeling indicated that prosocial teammate behavior was positively predicted by mastery approach goals, and negatively predicted by mastery- and intrateam performance avoidance goals, whereas antisocial teammate behavior was positively predicted by intrateam performance-approach and -avoidance goals; these latter effects were mediated by moral disengagement. In Study 2, team athletes (N = 452) from the United Kingdom completed a measure of cohesion in addition to the Study 1 instruments; the analyses largely confirmed the Study 1 findings. However, the undesirable effect of mastery-avoidance goals on prosocial behavior seen in Study 1 was only apparent in Study 2 when individuals held strong perceptions of team cohesion. In sum, this investigation makes a novel contribution to the literature on team functioning in sport, being the first to explore how athletes' normative goals relative to their teammates might shape effective interaction processes.

  3. The use of electronic collars for training domestic dogs: estimated prevalence, reasons and risk factors for use, and owner perceived success as compared to other training methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackwell Emily J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of electronic training devices for dog training is controversial. The aims of this study were to give an indication of the extent to which dog owners use these devices in England, identify factors associated with their use, and compare owner report of outcomes. A convenience sample of dog owners in England was used to identify numbers using electronic training devices and identify reasons for use. Factors associated with use of remote e-collars only were determined by comparing dogs trained using these devices with two control populations matched for reason of use (recall / chasing problems. Comparison groups were: those using other ‘negative reinforcement / positive punishment’ training techniques, and those using ‘positive reinforcement / negative punishment’ based methods. A multinominal logistic regression model was used to compare factors between categories of training method. Owner reported success for use was compared using chi-squared analysis. Results For England only, 3.3% (n = 133 owners reported using remote activated e-collars, 1.4% (n = 54 reported use of bark activated e-collars, and 0.9% (n = 36 reported using electronic boundary fences. In comparison with the e-collar group, owners using reward based training methods for recall / chasing were 2.8 times more likely to be female and 2.7 times less likely to have attended agility training. Owners using other aversive methods for recall / chasing were 2.8 times more likely to have attended puppy classes than those using e-collars. However, the model only explained 10% variance between groups. A significantly higher proportion of owners in the reward group reported training success than those in the e-collar group. Conclusions In conclusion, a fairly low proportion of owners select to use electronic training devices. For a population matched by reason for training method use, characteristics of dogs, including occurrence of undesired

  4. Charge collection efficiency of GaAs detectors studied with low-energy heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R; Linhart, V; O'Shea, V; Pospísil, S; Raine, C; Smith, K; Sinor, M; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxially grown GaAs layers have recently been produced with sufficient thickness and low enough free carrier concentration to permit their use as radiation detectors. Initial tests have shown that the epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor as the depletion behaviour follows the square root dependency on the applied bias. This article presents the results of measurements of the growth of the active depletion depth with increasing bias using low-energy protons and alpha particles as probes for various depths and their comparison to values extrapolated from capacitance measurements. From the proton and alpha particle spectroscopic measurements, an active depth of detector material that collects 100% of the charge generated inside it was determined. The consistency of these results with independent capacitance measurements supports the idea that the GaAs epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor. (author)

  5. Using the Comprehensive Nursing Achievement Test as a Predictor of Success on the National Council Licensure Examination. Learning Theory and Applications Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study examined the feasibility of using the Comprehensive Nursing Achievement Test as a predictor of nursing students' eventual success on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). The predictive validity of other factors, such as age, college entrance test scores, and grades in second-year nursing courses, was also examined.…

  6. EFFECT OF RECYCLE TIRE ISOLATOR AS EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE SYSTEM FOR LOW RISE BUILDINGS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOW WEI JIE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of Recycle Tire Isolator (RTI as earthquake resistance system for low rise buildings in Malaysia. Most of the earthquake’s victims are due to the collapse of poorly designed concrete and masonry buildings. Therefore, an economical but reliable RTI is introduced to solve the problem in most of the developing countries such as Malaysia. This study focuses on the effect of RTI-5 (5 layers RTI in protecting three stories buildings. The vertical displacement of RTI-5 was determined through static compression test. The maximum vertical displacement of RTI-5 was obtained when the specimen was monotonically loaded to failure. Finite element analysis was carried out by using ANSYS V16.0 to model the RTI-5 and the results obtained were compared to the experimental results. The dynamic stiffness and damping ratio of RTI-5 were investigated through dynamic test. The behaviour of various thickness of RTI were examined and compared with Rubber Bearing (RB and Scrap Tire Rubber Pad (STRP.Total displacement of three stories buildings on fixed base and on base isolation were determined. The results from static compression test and finite element analysis showed that RTI-5 could sustain a vertical load of 380 kN with vertical deformation of 12.5 mm. It has been verified by finite element analysis (FEA where both of the results achieved close agreement in terms of vertical deformation. RTI-5 and STRP have similar vertical stiffness due to the employment of same material in fabrication. However, rubber bearing is stiffer than RTI-5 due to the present of embedded steel plates. Besides, RTI-4 is stiffer than RTI-5 due to the number of layers are lesser in RTI-4. The results of dynamic test shown that RTI-5 has higher damping ratio than RTI-4. In overall, total deformation at the top floor of the three stories building is reduced by 83% via implementation of RTI in the base of the building. It has been proven

  7. Femtosecond differential transmission measurements on low temperature GaAs metal-semiconductor-metal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Tautz, S.

    1997-01-01

    We report on differential transmission measurements on low temperature grown (LT)-GaAs with and without applied electrical fields at different wavelengths. Electrical fields up to 100 kV/cm can be applied via an interdigitated contact structure to our LT GaAs samples which have been removed from...

  8. The Newsletter as a Communication Medium in Teaching Low-Income Homemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Efionayi, Joseph Aibangbee

    The objectives of this study were to determine the sources from which low-income families generally receive information about nutrition, to determine the extent to which the participants acquired knowledge of nutrition principles as taught through a newsletter, and also to find out their attitude towards the publication as a medium of nutritional…

  9. Implementation of production function of labor law as a means of achieving the social stability in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Izbiyenova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the role and importance of the production function in the Russian labor law under modern conditions. Methods general comparative analysis abstraction analysis synthesis and speciallegal methods method of comparative law analysis technicallegal method etc.. Results the study proved the necessity of amendment in the civil law in terms of giving workers39 representatives the right to participate in the work of collective bodies of legal entities. The existing approaches to the formation of the management bodies do not allow to discuss the possibility of successful implementation of the production function of labour law. Scientific novelty for the first time by the examples of industrial democracy implementation in some foreign countries and in the Russian Federation the role and significance of industrial democracy was studied as the form of implementation of the production function of labour law. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in research activities when considering the functions of the Russian labour law and also in standardsetting activities for the improvement of normative legal acts. nbsp

  10. In situ low-relief landscape formation as a result of river network disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Willett, Sean D; Goren, Liran

    2015-04-23

    Landscapes on Earth retain a record of the tectonic, environmental and climatic history under which they formed. Landscapes tend towards an equilibrium in which rivers attain a stable grade that balances the tectonic production of elevation and with hillslopes that attain a gradient steep enough to transport material to river channels. Equilibrium low-relief surfaces are typically found at low elevations, graded to sea level. However, there are many examples of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, often referred to as relict landscapes, or as elevated peneplains. These do not grade to sea level and are typically interpreted as uplifted old landscapes, preserving former, more moderate tectonic conditions. Here we test this model of landscape evolution through digital topographic analysis of a set of purportedly relict landscapes on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, one of the most geographically complex, climatically varied and biologically diverse regions of the world. We find that, in contrast to theory, the purported surfaces are not consistent with progressive establishment of a new, steeper, river grade, and therefore they cannot necessarily be interpreted as a remnant of an old, low relief surface. We propose an alternative model, supported by numerical experiments, in which tectonic deformation has disrupted the regional river network, leaving remnants of it isolated and starved of drainage area and thus unable to balance tectonic uplift. The implication is that the state of low relief with low erosion rate is developing in situ, rather than preserving past erosional conditions.

  11. In situ low-relief landscape formation as a result of river network disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Willett, Sean D.; Goren, Liran

    2015-04-01

    Landscapes on Earth retain a record of the tectonic, environmental and climatic history under which they formed. Landscapes tend towards an equilibrium in which rivers attain a stable grade that balances the tectonic production of elevation and with hillslopes that attain a gradient steep enough to transport material to river channels. Equilibrium low-relief surfaces are typically found at low elevations, graded to sea level. However, there are many examples of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, often referred to as relict landscapes, or as elevated peneplains. These do not grade to sea level and are typically interpreted as uplifted old landscapes, preserving former, more moderate tectonic conditions. Here we test this model of landscape evolution through digital topographic analysis of a set of purportedly relict landscapes on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, one of the most geographically complex, climatically varied and biologically diverse regions of the world. We find that, in contrast to theory, the purported surfaces are not consistent with progressive establishment of a new, steeper, river grade, and therefore they cannot necessarily be interpreted as a remnant of an old, low relief surface. We propose an alternative model, supported by numerical experiments, in which tectonic deformation has disrupted the regional river network, leaving remnants of it isolated and starved of drainage area and thus unable to balance tectonic uplift. The implication is that the state of low relief with low erosion rate is developing in situ, rather than preserving past erosional conditions.

  12. The postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM questionnaire identifies quality of instruction as a key factor predicting academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the reliability of the PHEEM questionnaire translated into Portuguese. We present the results of PHEEM following distribution to doctors in three different medical residency programs at a university hospital in Brazil. INTRODUCTION: Efforts to understand environmental factors that foster effective learning resulted in the development of a questionnaire to measure medical residents' perceptions of the level of autonomy, teaching quality and social support in their programs. METHODS: The questionnaire was translated using the modified Brislin back-translation technique. Cronbach's alpha test was used to ensure good reliability and ANOVA was used to compare PHEEM results among residents from the Surgery, Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine departments. The Kappa coefficient was used as a measure of agreement, and factor analysis was employed to evaluate the construct strength of the three domains suggested by the original PHEEM questionnaire. RESULTS: The PHEEM survey was completed by 306 medical residents and the resulting Cronbach's alpha was 0.899. The weighted Kappa was showed excellent reliability. Autonomy was rated most highly by Internal Medicine residents (63.7% ± 13.6%. Teaching was rated highest in Anesthesiology (66.7% ± 15.4%. Residents across the three areas had similar perceptions of social support (59.0% ± 13.3% for Surgery; 60.5% ± 13.6% for Internal Medicine; 61.4% ± 14.4% for Anesthesiology. Factor analysis suggested that nine factors explained 58.9% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that PHEEM is a reliable instrument for measuring the quality of medical residency programs at a Brazilian teaching hospital. The results suggest that quality of teaching was the best indicator of overall response to the questionnaire.

  13. Medical net cost of low alcohol consumption - a cause to reconsider improved health as the link between alcohol and wage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdtham Ulf G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found a positive effect of low/moderate alcohol consumption on wages. This has often been explained by referring to epidemiological research showing that alcohol has protective effects on certain diseases, i.e., the health link is normally justified using selected epidemiological information. Few papers have tested this link between alcohol and health explicitly, including all diseases where alcohol has been shown to have either a protective or a detrimental effect. Aim Based on the full epidemiological information, we study the effect of low alcohol consumption on health, in order to determine if it is reasonable to explain the positive effect of low consumption on wages using the epidemiological literature. Methods We apply a non-econometrical cost-of-illness approach to calculate the medical care cost and episodes attributable to low alcohol consumption. Results Low alcohol consumption carries a net cost for medical care and there is a net benefit only for the oldest age group (80+. Low alcohol consumption also causes more episodes in medical care then what is saved, although inpatient care for women and older men show savings. Conclusion Using health as an explanation in the alcohol-wage literature appears invalid when applying the full epidemiological information instead of selected information.

  14. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermann, Renate [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Schmid, Guenter [Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany)

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac){sub 2}) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac){sub 2}) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10{sup −11} S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 1.5 × 10{sup −9} S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac){sub 2} in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac){sub 2}) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac){sub 2} doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT{sub 50} lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m{sup 2}. The LT{sub 50} lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  15. Deep level defects in n-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooney, P. M.; Watkins, K. P.; Jiang, Zenan; Basile, A. F. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Lewis, R. B.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.; Beaton, D. A.; Tiedje, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2013-04-07

    Deep level defects in n-type GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} having 0 < x < 0.012 and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at substrate temperatures between 300 and 400 Degree-Sign C have been investigated by Deep Level Capacitance Spectroscopy. Incorporating Bi suppresses the formation of an electron trap with activation energy 0.40 eV, thus reducing the total trap concentration in dilute GaAsBi layers by more than a factor of 20 compared to GaAs grown under the same conditions. We find that the dominant traps in dilute GaAsBi layers are defect complexes involving As{sub Ga}, as expected for MBE growth at these temperatures.

  16. Noncontact, Low Frequency Ultrasound as an Effective Therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected Biofilm Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    effective. Previous studies have shown physical effects on cells and their surrounding matrix due to ultrasound energy, termed cavitation and...Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound as an effective therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa–infected biofilm wounds Akhil K. Seth, MD1; Khang T...devices may potentially improve healing, but with no evidence of efficacy against biofilms. This study evaluates noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound

  17. Electronic- and band-structure evolution in low-doped (Ga,Mn)As

    OpenAIRE

    Yastrubchak, O.; J. Sadowski; Krzyzanowska, H.; Gluba, L.; Zuk, J.; Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been applied to study the electronic- and band-structure evolution in (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers with increasing Mn doping in the range of low Mn content, up to 1.2%. Structural and magnetic properties of the layers were characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and SQUID magnetometery, respectively. The revealed results of decrease in the band-gap transition energy with increasing Mn content in very low-doped ...

  18. A piezoelectric spring-mass system as a low-frequency energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongping; Hu, Lin; Yang, Jiashi; Wang, Hairen; Chen, Xuedong

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new structure consisting of a piezoelectric spring-mass system as a low-frequency piezoelectric energy harvester. A theoretical model is developed for the system from the theory of piezoelectricity. An analysis is performed to demonstrate the low-frequency nature of the system. Other basic characteristics of the energy harvester, including the output power, voltage, and efficiency, are also calculated and examined.

  19. Using Group Projects as a Strategy to Increase Cooperation among Low- and High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Pham, Thi Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the perceptions, interactions and behaviours of different-ability college students when they worked on different types of assessments. Two classes of 145 Vietnamese college students participated in this three-month study. The students were assigned to mixed-ability groups, each of which consisted of five students.…

  20. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  1. Multichannel Recorder for Low Frequency Signals: Application of Oscilloscope as Integrated Mobile Service for a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kochlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data acquisition and processing are well known for some time. Many applications use powerful hardware to acquire, process, and visualize signal waveforms. But there are some applications that do not have to perform high resolution signal acquisition and process large amount of data, for example, low frequency applications of embedded design and applications for remote power grid monitoring. The paper describes special system for low frequency signal data sample acquisition, processing, and visualization implemented as a service on Android-based smart device. The service makes smart device functioning as an oscilloscope or arbitrary waveform generator which is accessible remotely through Bluetooth. The design respects low power consumption requirements, simplicity, and user friendliness in application design. Application scenario was implemented as wireless data acquisition system for power grid monitoring.

  2. Beta-functionalised polythiophenes as microelectrode modifiers in low conductive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Marina; Franchini, GianCarlo; Manfredini, Matteo; Marchetti, Andrea; Pigani, Laura; Seeber, Renato; Tassi, Lorenzo; Ulrici, Alessandro; Vignali, Moris; Zanardi, Chiara; Zannini, Paolo

    2002-03-01

    A study on polythiophene coated microelectrodes is reported, the goal being that of checking the capability of these electrochemical systems to work in low conductive media. The possibility of electrochemically p-doping the polymer in the presence of very low concentrations or even in the absence of supporting electrolyte in the solution is ascertained, opening the way to the use of similar systems in pure solvent media. This result is obtained in such conditions that the presence of residual charges--and corresponding counterions--trapped inside the film coating can be reasonably hypothesised.

  3. Studies on electrical double layer capacitor with a low-viscosity ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate as electrolyte

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Pandey; S A Hashmi

    2013-08-01

    The performance of an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) composed of high surface area activated carbon electrodes and a new ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate, [EMIm]TCB, as the electrolyte has been investigated by impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge–discharge studies. The high ionic conductivity (∼1.3 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 20 °C) and low viscosity (∼22 cP) of the ionic liquid, [EMIm]TCB, make it attractive as electrolyte for its use in EDLCs. The optimum capacitance value of 195.5 F g-1 of activated carbon has been achieved with stable cyclic performance.

  4. Utilization of peatlands as possible land resource for low-input agriculture: cultivation of Vaccinium species as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Rodima, Ako; Rannik, Kaire; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2013-04-01

    The best way of soil protection is its sustainable and expedient use, which secures soils ecological functioning. Recent years, by exploitation of peat soils for their different use, has raised important issues concerning their input to global climate change as important source of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitters. The dynamics of GHG are determined by different factors as: site specific conditions including hydrology, soil type, vegetation, area management, including meteorological and climatic conditions. Therefore, in this current paper we are presenting the study results were we estimated CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from exhausted cultivated peatland with Vaccinium species and determined the soil chemical composition. For comparision a virgin state peatland was observed. The main goals of the paper are: (1) to present the experimental results of greenhouse gases generation and peat chemical composition (antioxidant activity of peat, C/N ratio, fiber content, water extractable phenolics) relationships on different microsites either on natural plant cover or Vaccinium species cultivation area on exhausted milled peat area; (2) to discuss how peat soil quality contributes to greenhouse gases emission; (3) and what kind of relationship reveals between low input agricultural system in which Vaccinium species are cultivated on exhausted milled peat area. The study are is located in nearby Ilmatsalu (58°23'N, 26°31'E) in South Estonia, inside of which the three microsites are determined. Microsites are different from each other by exploitation and plant cover type. 1). Natural plant cover, 2). Cultivated area with Vaccinium angustifolium x V. corymbosum, 3). Cultivated area with Vaccinium angustifolium. The determined soil type according to WRB was Fibri Dystric Histosol. The main part of study focuses on the analyses of greenhouse gases. For this purpose the closed chamber method was used. The greenhouse gas samples were collected from spring to autumn 2011 throughout

  5. The low-methionine content of vegan diets may make methionine restriction feasible as a life extension strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies confirm that dietary methionine restriction increases both mean and maximal lifespan in rats and mice, achieving "aging retardant" effects very similar to those of caloric restriction, including a suppression of mitochondrial superoxide generation. Although voluntary caloric restriction is never likely to gain much popularity as a pro-longevity strategy for humans, it may be more feasible to achieve moderate methionine restriction, in light of the fact that vegan diets tend to be relatively low in this amino acid. Plant proteins - especially those derived from legumes or nuts - tend to be lower in methionine than animal proteins. Furthermore, the total protein content of vegan diets, as a function of calorie content, tends to be lower than that of omnivore diets, and plant protein has somewhat lower bioavailability than animal protein. Whole-food vegan diets that moderate bean and soy intake, while including ample amounts of fruit and wine or beer, can be quite low in methionine, while supplying abundant nutrition for health (assuming concurrent B12 supplementation). Furthermore, low-fat vegan diets, coupled with exercise training, can be expected to promote longevity by decreasing systemic levels of insulin and free IGF-I; the latter effect would be amplified by methionine restriction - though it is not clear whether IGF-I down-regulation is the sole basis for the impact of low-methionine diets on longevity in rodents.

  6. Pigs as animal model for low-birth-weight babies. Developing cognitive tests and examining neuroprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the cognitive performance of piglets with low birth weight (LBW) caused by intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), and the effects of a possible therapy to prevent IUGR-related brain damage and associated cognitive impairments were studied. To achieve these goals, several conditions

  7. Low pressure water vapour discharge as a light source: II. Electrical characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artamonova, E; Artamonova, T; Beliaeva, A; Khodorkovskii, M; Melnikov, A; Milenin, V; Murashov, S; Rakcheeva, L; Timofeev, N [Saint Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 3, Petrodvoretz, Saint Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Michael, D [General Electric Global Research Center, One Research Circle (Bldg K1 Rm 4B31A), Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States); Zissis, G, E-mail: timofeev@pobox.spbu.r, E-mail: michael@crd.ge.co, E-mail: georges.zissis@laplace.univ-tlse.f [Universite Toulouse 3-Paul Sabatier, LAPLACE Building 3R2, 118 rte de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-09-07

    The electric field strength, electrode fall voltage, light emission characteristics and efficiency of a (Ar + H{sub 2}O) dc discharge as functions of water vapour content, argon pressure and electric current are presented. The data show that the main processes of 306.4 nm OH band generation are (1) a collision between an excited argon atom and a water molecule with simultaneous excitation of OH into the A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state and (2) electron excitation of a ground state hydroxyl molecule produced by a quenching process from a water molecule. Electric field strength measurements make it possible to conclude that the light production efficiency of the plasma under study can reach 35 lm W{sup -1}. It is possible, with these data, to propose a model of the plasma in question having reasonable accordance with the experiment and show the way to further increase the efficiency.

  8. Low temperature processed planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing silver nanowires as top electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Fushan; Yang, Kaiyu; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we reported a low temperature processed planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell employing silver nanowires as the top electrode and ZnO nanoparticles as the electron transport layer. The CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite was grown as the light absorber via two-step spin-coating technique. The as-fabricated perovskite solar cell exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency of 9.21% with short circuit current density of 19.75 mA cm-2, open circuit voltage of 1.02, and fill factor value of 0.457. The solar cell's performance showed negligible difference between the forward and reverse bias scan. This work paves a way for realizing low cost solution processable solar cells.

  9. Low Bandgap InAs-Based Thermophotovoltaic Cells for Heat-Electricity Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krier, A.; Yin, M.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Krier, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    The practical realization of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells, which can directly convert heat into electric power, is of considerable technological interest. However, most existing TPV cells require heat sources at temperatures of ˜1800°C. Here we report a low bandgap mid-infrared cell based on InAs and demonstrate TPV operation with heat sources at temperatures in the range 500-950°C. The maximum open circuit voltage ( V oc) and short circuit current density ( J sc) were measured as 0.06 V and 0.89 A cm-2 for a blackbody temperature of 950°C and an incident power density of 720 mW cm-2 without antireflection coating or electrode optimisation. TPV operation was obtained with heat sources at temperatures as low as 500°C, which represents progress towards energy scavenging and waste heat recovery applications.

  10. Suppression of low-frequency charge noise in gates-defined GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jie; Li, Hai-Ou, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Ke; Cao, Gang; Song, Xiang-Xiang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-12-07

    To reduce the charge noise of a modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, we have fabricated shallow-etched GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots using the wet-etching method to study the effects of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) underneath the metallic gates. The low-frequency 1/f noise in the Coulomb blockade region of the shallow-etched quantum dot is compared with a non-etched quantum dot on the same wafer. The average values of the gate noise are approximately 0.5 μeV in the shallow-etched quantum dot and 3 μeV in the regular quantum dot. Our results show the quantum dot low-frequency charge noise can be suppressed by the removal of the 2DEG underneath the metallic gates, which provides an architecture for noise reduction.

  11. Choked Jets and Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts as Hidden Neutrino Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Senno, Nicholas; Meszaros, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We consider choked gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets as possible sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. We take into account the jet propagation physics and radiation constraints, which are relevant for high-energy neutrino production in dense environments. Efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays inside a high density stellar environment is possible for sufficiently low-power jets and/or jets buried in an extended envelope, and such conditions are favorable also for the GRB jets to become stalled. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic SNe and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs. Focusing on this possibility, we calculate the resulting neutrino spectra including the relevant microphysical processes such as multipion production in pp and pgamma interactions, as well as the energy losses of mesons and muons. We obtain diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results on the luminosity function of LL GRBs. Although current uncertainties are large, we confirm that LL GRBs can potentially give a significant contributi...

  12. Effective Teaching Factors and Student Reading Strategies as Predictors of Student Achievement in PISA 2009: The Case of China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingqi; Muñoz, Marco; King Hess, Kristin; Liu, Shujie

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated effective teaching factors and student reading strategies as predictors of student reading achievement in the United States and China. Participants were 10,348 students in the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) study, 5115 from China and 5233 from the United States. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA)…

  13. Effects of Using History as a Tool to Teach Mathematics on Students' Attitudes, Anxiety, Motivation and Achievement in Grade 11 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    For decades, educators have advocated using history of mathematics in mathematics classrooms. Empirical research on the efficacy of this practice, however, is scarce. A quasi-experiment was used to investigate the effects of using history as a tool to teach mathematics on grade 11 students' mathematics achievement. Effects in three affective…

  14. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  15. Yoga as a treatment for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Douglas G.; Holt, Jacquelyn A.; Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current...

  16. Passivhaus as a low-energy building standard. Contribution to a typology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dequaire, X. [Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Pboks 4, St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-08-15

    With a rising concern for climate change, energy security and the environment, passive houses are receiving increasing interest among politicians and planners, and the concept is used and expressed in several settings to describe a type of very-low-energy building. Different approaches have arisen with several attempts to provide systems of validation of low-energy buildings. One major reference is the formalization into the German Passivhaus standard by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, which is presented as a strategy for energy efficiency. This article explores several underlying key issues, and a typology for energy in buildings is proposed and then developed for passive houses and exemplified using the Passivhaus standard. The concepts of low-energy buildings as expressed in some European standards, labels or certificates are explained and a special attention is provided to the Passivhaus standard. The final analysis shows the weakness of some approaches and the pertinence of the Passivhaus standard and invites for further research.

  17. Renewable and low-carbon energies as mitigation options of climate change for China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how renewable and low-carbon energies can serve as mitigation options of climate change in China's power sector. Our study is based on scenarios developed in PowerPlan, a bottom-up model simulating a countries' power sector and its emissions. We first adjusted the model to Chi

  18. Energy based study of quasi-static delamination as a low cycle fatigue process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, L.; Yao, L.; Alderliesten, R.C.; Benedictus, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes to treat quasi-static mode I delamination growth of CFRP as a low-cycle fatigue process. To this end, mode I quasi-static and fatigue delamination tests were performed. An average physical Strain Energy Release Rate (SERR), derived from an energy balance, is used to characterize t

  19. Low-loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, Feridun; Aydinli, Atilla; Agan, Sedat

    2003-01-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguide technology. The films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique using silane, germane, and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Fourier transform infrared spec

  20. Weekly low-dose mitoxantrone plus doxorubicin as second-line chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bontenbal (Marijke); A.S.Th. Planting (André); C.J. Rodenburg (C.); A. Dees; J. Verweij (Jaap); C.C.M. Bartels (Carina); J. Alexieva-Figusch (Jana); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWeekly low dose mitoxantrone (3 mg/m2) plus doxorubicin (8 mg/m2) was administered as second-line chemotherapy to 33 patients with advanced breast cancer. Four out of 28 evaluable patients (14%) obtained a partial response with a median duration of 34 weeks (range 18-67+ weeks), while 8

  1. Low temperature transport in p-doped InAs nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Upadhyay, Shivendra; Jespersen, Thomas Sand; Madsen, Morten Hannibal;

    2013-01-01

    We present low temperature electrical measurements of p-type Indium Arsenide nanowires grown via molecular beam epitaxy using Beryllium as a dopant. Growth of p-type wires without stacking faults is demonstrated. Devices in field-effect geometries exhibit ambipolar behavior, and the temperature...

  2. Asynchronous interaction, online technologies self-efficacy and self-regulated learning as predictors of academic achievement in an online class

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Rosie M. Hector

    This research is a correlational study of the relationship among the independent variables: asynchronous interaction, online technologies self-efficacy, and self-regulated learning, and the dependent variable; academic achievement. This study involves an online computer literacy course at a local community college. Very little research exists on the relationship among asynchronous interaction, online technologies self-efficacy and self-regulated learning on predicting academic achievement in an online class. Liu (2008), in his study on student interaction in online courses, concluded that student interaction is a complex issue that needs more research to increase our understanding as it relates to distance education. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between asynchronous interaction, online technologies self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and academic achievement in an online computer literacy class at a community college. The researcher used quantitative methods to obtain and analyze data on the relationships among the variables during the summer 2010 semester. Forty-five community college students completed three web-based self-reporting instruments: (a) the GVU 10th WWW User Survey Questionnaire, (b) the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Survey, and (c) selected items from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Additional data was obtained from asynchronous discussions posted on Blackboard(TM) Learning Management System. The results of this study found that there were statistically significant relationships between asynchronous interaction and academic achievement (r = .55, p academic achievement (r = .50, p learning and academic achievement ( r = -.02, p learning experience. Driscoll (2005) said constructivist pedagogy sees the learner as an active participant in their learning experience rather than a passive vessel to be filled with information. This study is beneficial to theorists, administrators, leaders, online

  3. Low Blood Lead Levels and educational achievement in 7-8 year old children in the Community of Madrid (Spain Bajos niveles de plomo en sangre y rendimiento escolar en niños de 7-8 años en la Comunidad de Madrid (España Baixos níveis de chumbo no sangue e sucesso escolar nas crianças entre os 7-8 anos na Comunidade de Madrid (Espanha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Martínez García

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead affects the behavioral and cognitive functions of children. The current lead safety level for avoiding these adverse effects is still controversial.Methods of study: A cross-sectional study included 511 children from 23 primary schools within the Comunidad de Madrid (the Madrid Region –including the city of Madrid and the large urban-industrial conurbation of satellite towns surrounding it, Spain. The children’s blood lead levels were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In addition, the teachers completed an eight-item questionnaire about the children’s behavior and academic achievement. Parents filled in a self-completion survey about the sociodemographic variables of the children and the family.Results: The mean Blood Lead Level (BLL of the children was 4.1 μg/dL SD 1.6 μg/dL (log transformed 3.8 μg/dL SD 0.2 μg/dL. Multivariate analysis controlling for relevant sociodemographic cofactors (among others, sex, age and educational level of the parents showed a negative association, but this was not statistically significant.Conclusions: Despite the low blood lead levels found in the children of the Comunidad de Madrid (Spain and the design limitations of the study, the results obtained suggest the existence of a harmful, but not statistically significant, effect of blood lead on the behavior and academic achievement of children.Objetivos: El plomo en sangre provoca en los niños efectos sobre las funciones cognitivas y sobre el comportamiento. No existe acuerdo sobre los niveles en sangre que evitarían esos efectos.Métodos: Estudio transversal en el que participaron 511 niños pertenecientes a 23 colegios de la Comunidad de Madrid (la ciudad de Madrid y su Corona Metropolitana, España, a los que se les determinaron los niveles de plomo en sangre por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica. Además, los profesores cumplimentaron un cuestionario de ocho preguntas sobre aspectos conductuales y de

  4. 推行合理低价法的意义%Meaning of promoting reasonable low bidding price

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董卫亭

    2011-01-01

    从现阶段合理低价法的现状入手,总结了合理低价法在实际操作中存在的问题,重点论述了实施合理低价法的必要性及意义,并给出了实施合理低价法必须坚持的原则,从而最终实现最低价中标。%Starting from the status of reasonable low price, the essay summarizes the problems existing in actual low price bidding, mainly discusses the necessity and meaning of implementing reasonable low price, and shows principles which should be held in implementing reasonable low price, so as to realize the lowest bidding price.

  5. Bismuth ferrite as low-loss switchable material for plasmonic waveguide modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose new designs of plasmonic modulators, which can beused for dynamic signal switching in photonic integrated circuits. We studyperformance of a plasmonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as atunable material. The bismuth ferrite core is sandwiched between metalplates (metal...... modulation in both phase andamplitude control schemes. Due to high field confinement between themetal layers, existence of mode cut-offs for certain values of the corethickness, and near-zero material losses in bismuth ferrite, efficientmodulation performance is achieved. For the phase control scheme...

  6. Evaluating the Iowa Gambling Task as a Direct Assessment of Impulsivity with Low-Income Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Jessica D; Roy, Amanda L; Raver, C Cybele

    2013-10-01

    This study examined performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994) as a measure of low-income school-aged children's affective decision-making and considered its utility as a direct indicator of impulsivity. One hundred and ninety-three 8-11 year olds performed a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task, a validated measure of decision-making. Multi-level modeling was used to examine children's performance over the course of the task, with age, gender, and teachers' ratings of child impulsivity (BIS-11; Patton, Stanford, & Barratt, 1995) used to predict children's Iowa Gambling performance. Higher impulsivity scores predicted a decrease in slope of Iowa Gambling performance, indicating students rated higher on impulsivity chose more disadvantageously across the task blocks. Results support evidence of the validity of the Iowa Gambling Task as a measure of impulsivity in low-income minority children.

  7. Omnidirectional reflector using nanoporous SiO2 as a low-refractive-index material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, J Q; Ojha, Manas; Cho, Woojin; Plawsky, J L; Gill, W N; Gessmann, Th; Schubert, E F

    2005-06-15

    Triple-layer omnidirectional reflectors (ODRs) consisting of a semiconductor, a quarter-wavelength transparent dielectric layer, and a metal have high reflectivities for all angles of incidence. Internal ODRs (ambient material's refractive index n > 1.0) are demonstrated that incorporate nanoporous SiO2, a low-refractive-index material (n = 1.23), as well as dense SiO2 (n = 1.46). GaP and Ag serve as the semiconductor and the metal layer, respectively. Reflectivity measurements, including angular dependence, are presented. Calculated angle-integrated TE and TM reflectivities for ODRs employing nanoporous SiO2 are R(int)/TE = 99.9% and R(int)/TM = 98.9%, respectively, indicating the high potential of the ODRs for low-loss waveguide structures.

  8. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  9. Radiation crosslinking of CMC-Na at low dose and its application as substitute for hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Wu, Jilan

    2005-04-01

    The slight radiation-crosslinked CMC-Na as a substitute for hydrogel was prepared by gamma irradiation below gelation dose. The effects of various parameters such as absorbed dose, concentration of inorganic salts, pH, swelling temperature and swelling time on the swelling ratio in water were investigated in detail. This kind of slight crosslinked CMC-Na showed good water absorption below 60°C, whereas, it became solution when heated up to 70°C. Such CMC-Na gel is different from the true gel that is insoluble in boiled water; nevertheless, it can be used as hydrogel at room temperature and produced at low dose. Due to its low cost, it might be useful for its application in agriculture or others.

  10. Radiation crosslinking of CMC-Na at low dose and its application as substitute for hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Pengfei; Peng Jing E-mail: jpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li Jiuqiang; Wu Jilan

    2005-04-01

    The slight radiation-crosslinked CMC-Na as a substitute for hydrogel was prepared by gamma irradiation below gelation dose. The effects of various parameters such as absorbed dose, concentration of inorganic salts, pH, swelling temperature and swelling time on the swelling ratio in water were investigated in detail. This kind of slight crosslinked CMC-Na showed good water absorption below 60 deg. C, whereas, it became solution when heated up to 70 deg. C. Such CMC-Na gel is different from the true gel that is insoluble in boiled water; nevertheless, it can be used as hydrogel at room temperature and produced at low dose. Due to its low cost, it might be useful for its application in agriculture or others.

  11. Low-loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Feridun; Aydinli, Atilla; Agan, Sedat

    2003-12-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguide technology. The films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique using silane, germane, and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the compositional properties of the samples. It was found that addition of germane leads to decreasing of N-H- and O-H-related bonds. The propagation loss values of the planar waveguides were correlated with the decrease in the hydrogen-related bonds of the as-deposited waveguides and resulted in very low values, eliminating the need for high-temperature annealing as is usually done.

  12. Circulating Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins and Antibodies against Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins as Potential Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was evaluation of the diagnostic utility of serum oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), antibodies against oxLDLs (o-LAB), and CEA as risk markers of colorectal cancer (CRC). Material and Methods. The serum levels of study factors were measured in 73 patients with CRC and in 35 healthy controls who were gender- and BMI-matched to the study group. Concentrations of oxLDL, o-LAB, and CEA were detected in ELISA tests. Serum lipids, lipoproteins, and gl...

  13. FLUOROETHERS AS A WORKING FLUIDS FOR LOW TEMPERATURE ORGANIC RANKINE CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemenko S.V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrofluoroethers as a new class of working fluids for the organic Rankine cycle have been considered to utilize the low-potential waste heat. Temperature range 300…400 K was chosen to provide energy conversion of waste heat from fuel cells. The direct assessment of the efficiency criteria for the Rankine cycle via artificial neural networks (ANN was used. To create ANN the critical parameters of substance and normal boiling temperature as input were chosen. The forecast of efficiency criteria for the Rankine cycle as output parameter which reproduces the coefficient of performance with high accuracy and without thermodynamic property calculations was presented.

  14. Low temperature growth and electrical characterization of insulators for GaAs MISFETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, J. M.; Ghandhi, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the low temperature growth of oxides and layers on GaAs and the detailed electrical characterization of these oxides is reported. A plasma anodization system was designed, assembled, and put into operation. A measurement system was assembled for determining capacitance and conductance as a function of gate voltage for frequencies in the range from 1 Hz to 1 MHz. Initial measurements were carried out in Si-SiO2 capacitors in order to test the system and in GaAs MIS capacitors abricated using liquid anodization.

  15. The effects of low level laser therapy (Ga- Al- As on myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahebjamei M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscular pain is one of the most common causes for facial pain. Myofacial pain dysfunction"nsyndrome (MPDS is one of the most important disorders of facial area that affected patients suffer from"npain, tenderness of one or more masticatory muscles and limitation of movements. Lack of specific and"neffective therapeutic method, makes it necessary to find a treatment to decrease pain. Considering the"nanalgesic and anti- inflammatory effects of low-level laser, some investigators have recommended it for"nMPDS patient's treatment. In this study, the effects of low level laser (Ga-Al-As on MPDS patients"nreferred to dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, were investigated. Twenty- two"nMPDS patents, with mean age 33.32 years, were treated for 4 weeks (12 visits. Clinical examinations"nwere performed in 6 stages. The results of this study showed that variables such as pain severity, cheek"npain, pain frequency and tenderness of masseter, temporal, internal and external pterygoid muscles, had a"nstatistically significant improvement at the end of treatment with low level laser (GA-A1-AS which"nlasted for three months, (follow- up period. Results of this study showed that, low-level laser therapy"nhas a sedative effect on the pain and tenderness of masticatory muscles in MPDS. Patients and having an"naccurate and regular program to complete treatment period, has an important role in MPDS"nimprovement.

  16. rganizational features as situational strength: engaging the low-conscientious employee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milam, A.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most robust findings in work psychology is the role that conscientiousness plays in performance; more recently, research indicates that conscientious employees are also the most engaged in their work. The present study examines whether the organization has any role in this relation, and if it is possible for individuals who are low in conscientiousness to also feel high levels of engagement. One hundred forty-one full-time Romanian workers and their peers, representing a variety of industries, were surveyed, revealing that features of the organization can actually attenuate the relation between conscientiousness and engagement. Specifically, when employees perceive that the organization is relatively formalized (i.e., where following rules is important, and in organizations where there is a perception that effort is rewarded, conscientiousness is not as strongly associated with engagement. These organizational features represent situational strength, and when situations are strong, scripts and rules tend to predict behavior, rather than personality. As such, it may be possible for low-conscientiousness individuals to actually become more engaged through organizational change. For those who are low in conscientiousness, for example, a formal work environment likely provides structure and decreases ambiguity, which aids in lower conscientious employees becoming more engaged. Similarly, when it is perceived that the organization rewards effort, those who are low in conscientiousness receive this reinforcement, and likely benefit the most, as their levels of engagement tend to approach those who are higher in conscientiousness.

  17. Scientific Reasoning, School Achievement and Gender: A Multilevel Study of between and within School Effects in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuneberg, Helena; Hautamäki, Jarkko; Hotulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between reasoning and school achievement were studied taking into account the multilevel nature (school- and class-levels) of the data. We gathered data from 51 classes at seven schools in metropolitan and Eastern Finland (N = 769, 395 males, 15-year-old students). To study scientific reasoning, we used a modified version of…

  18. Preparation and Evaluation of Jojoba Oil Methyl Ester as Biodiesel and as Blend Components in Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis L.) produces seeds that contain around 50 to 60 weight percent of inedible long-chain wax esters that are suitable as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. A Jojoba oil methyl ester (JME) was prepared in effort to evaluate an important fuel propertie...

  19. Belief in school meritocracy as a system-justifying tool for low status students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, Virginie; Bonnot, Virginie; Krauth-Gruber, Silvia; Darnon, Céline

    2015-01-01

    The belief that, in school, success only depends on will and hard work is widespread in Western societies despite evidence showing that several factors other than merit explain school success, including group belonging (e.g., social class, gender). In the present paper, we argue that because merit is the only track for low status students to reach upward mobility, Belief in School Meritocracy (BSM) is a particularly useful system-justifying tool to help them perceive their place in society as being deserved. Consequently, for low status students (but not high status students), this belief should be related to more general system-justifying beliefs (Study 1). Moreover, low status students should be particularly prone to endorsing this belief when their place within a system on which they strongly depend to acquire status is challenged (Study 2). In Study 1, high status (boys and high SES) were compared to low status (girls and low SES) high school students. Results indicated that BSM was related to system-justifying beliefs only for low SES students and for girls, but not for high SES students or for boys. In Study 2, university students were exposed (or not) to information about an important selection process that occurs at the university, depending on the condition. Their subjective status was assessed. Although such a confrontation reduced BSM for high subjective SES students, it tended to enhance it for low subjective SES students. Results are discussed in terms of system justification motives and the palliative function meritocratic ideology may play for low status students.

  20. Low-income mothers as "othermothers" to their romantic partners' children: women's coparenting in multiple partner fertility relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Linda M; Hardaway, Cecily R

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we investigated low-income mothers' involvement in multiple partner fertility (MPF) relationships and their experiences as "othermothers" to their romantic partners' children from previous and concurrent intimate unions. Othermothering, as somewhat distinct from stepmothering, involves culturally-scripted practices of sharing parenting responsibilities with children's biological parents. We framed this investigation using this concept because previous research suggests that many low-income women practice this form of coparenting in their friend and kin networks. What is not apparent in this literature, however, is whether women unilaterally othermother their romantic partners' children from different women. How often and under what circumstances do women in nonmarital MPF intimate unions with men coparent their partners' children from other relationships? We explored this question using a modified grounded theory approach and secondary longitudinal ethnographic data on 256 low-income mostly unmarried mothers from the Three-City Study. Results indicated that 78% of the mothers had been or were involved in MPF unions and while most had othermothered the children of their friends and relatives, 89% indicated that they did not coparent their partners' children from any MPF relationship. Mothers' reasons for not doing so were embedded in: (a) gendered scripts around second families, or "casa chicas"; (b) the tenuous nature of pass-through MPF relationships; and (c) mothers' own desires for their romantic partners to child-swap. Implications of this research for family science and practice are discussed.

  1. Formation process and superparamagnetic properties of (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals in GaAs fabricated by annealing of (Ga,Mn)As layers with low Mn content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadowski, Janusz; Domagala, Jaroslaw Z.; Mathieu, Roland;

    2011-01-01

    °C) annealing of (Ga,Mn)As layers with Mn concentrations between 0.1% and 2%, grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 270°C. Decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As is already observed at the lowest annealing temperature of 400°C for layers with initial Mn content of 1% and 2%. Both cubic and hexagonal (Mn...

  2. Hybrid acoustic metamaterial as super absorber for broadband low-frequency sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yufan; Ren, Shuwei; Meng, Han; Xin, Fengxian; Huang, Lixi; Chen, Tianning; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lu, Tian Jain

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid acoustic metamaterial is proposed as a new class of sound absorber, which exhibits superior broadband low-frequency sound absorption as well as excellent mechanical stiffness/strength. Based on the honeycomb-corrugation hybrid core (H-C hybrid core), we introduce perforations on both top facesheet and corrugation, forming perforated honeycomb-corrugation hybrid (PHCH) to gain super broadband low-frequency sound absorption. Applying the theory of micro-perforated panel (MPP), we establish a theoretical method to calculate the sound absorption coefficient of this new kind of metamaterial. Perfect sound absorption is found at just a few hundreds hertz with two-octave 0.5 absorption bandwidth. To verify this model, a finite element model is developed to calculate the absorption coefficient and analyze the viscous-thermal energy dissipation. It is found that viscous energy dissipation at perforation regions dominates the total energy consumed. This new kind of acoustic metamaterials show promising engineering applications, which can serve as multiple functional materials with extraordinary low-frequency sound absorption, excellent stiffness/strength and impact energy absorption. PMID:28240239

  3. Classification of the Z-Pinch Waste Stream as Low-Level Waste for Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singledecker, Steven John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this document is to describe the waste stream from Z-Pinch Residual Waste Project that due to worker safety concerns and operational efficiency is a candidate for blending Transuranic and low level waste together and can be safely packaged as low-level waste consistent with DOE Order 435.1 requirements and NRC guidance 10 CFR 61.42. This waste stream consists of the Pu-ICE post-shot containment systems, including plutonium targets, generated from the Z Machine experiments requested by LANL and conducted by SNL/NM. In the past, this TRU waste was shipped back to LANL after Sandia sends the TRU data package to LANL to certify the characterization (by CCP), transport and disposition at WIPP (CBFO) per LANL MOU-0066. The Low Level Waste is managed, characterized, shipped and disposed of at NNSS by SNL/NM per Sandia MOU # 11-S-560.

  4. A thin-film cryotron suitable for use as an ultra-low-temperature switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Peter J.; Mates, John A. B.; Doriese, W. Bertrand; Hilton, Gene C.; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Ullom, Joel N.; Schmidt, Daniel R.

    2016-10-01

    Low-temperature superconducting circuits have become important for many scientific applications. However, there are presently no high current-capacity switches (˜1 mA) with low power dissipation for sub-Kelvin operation. One candidate for a sub-Kelvin switch is the cryotron, a device in which the superconductivity of a wire is suppressed with a magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a cryotron switch suitable for sub-Kelvin temperatures. In the closed state, the maximum device current is about 900 μA. The device is switched to its open state with 2 mA of control current and has a leakage of approximately 500 nA. The transition between the closed and open states of the device is faster than 200 ns, where the measurement is limited by the speed of our measurement apparatus. We also discuss low-temperature applications for our cryotron such as a single-pole, double-throw switch.

  5. Health potential of polyols as sugar replacers, with emphasis on low glycaemic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Geoffrey

    2003-12-01

    Abstract Polyols are hydrogenated carbohydrates used as sugar replacers. Interest now arises because of their multiple potential health benefits. They are non-cariogenic (sugar-free tooth-friendly), low-glycaemic (potentially helpful in diabetes and cardiovascular disease), low-energy and low-insulinaemic (potentially helpful in obesity), low-digestible (potentially helpful in the colon), osmotic (colon-hydrating, laxative and purifying) carbohydrates. Such potential health benefits are reviewed. A major focus here is the glycaemic index (GI) of polyols as regards the health implications of low-GI foods. The literature on glycaemia and insulinaemia after polyol ingestion was analysed and expressed in the GI and insulinaemic index (II) modes, which yielded the values: erythritol 0, 2; xylitol 13, 11; sorbitol 9, 11; mannitol 0, 0; maltitol 35, 27; isomalt 9, 6; lactitol 6, 4; polyglycitol 39, 23. These values are all much lower than sucrose 65, 43 or glucose 100, 100. GI values on replacing sucrose were independent of both intake (up to 50 g) and the state of carbohydrate metabolism (normal, type 1 with artificial pancreas and type 2 diabetes mellitus). The assignment of foods and polyols to GI bands is considered, these being: high (> 70), intermediate (> 55-70), low (> 40-55), and very low (< 40) including non-glycaemic; the last aims to target particularly low-GI-carbohydrate-based foods. Polyols ranged from low to very low GI. An examination was made of the dietary factors affecting the GI of polyols and foods. Polyol and other food GI values could be used to estimate the GI of food mixtures containing polyols without underestimation. Among foods and polyols a departure of II from GI was observed due to fat elevating II and reducing GI. Fat exerted an additional negative influence on GI, presumed due to reduced rates of gastric emptying. Among the foods examined, the interaction was prominent with snack foods; this potentially damaging insulinaemia could be

  6. Reasons Low-Income Parents Offer Snacks to Children: How Feeding Rationale Influences Snack Frequency and Adherence to Dietary Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Rachel E; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Taveras, Elsie M; Geller, Alan C; Rimm, Eric B; Land, Thomas; Perkins, Meghan; Davison, Kirsten K

    2015-07-21

    Although American children snack more than ever before, the parental role in promoting snacking is not well understood. In 2012-2013 at baseline in an intervention study to prevent childhood obesity in low-income Massachusetts communities, n = 271 parents of children aged 2-12 years completed surveys regarding nutritive and non-nutritive reasons they offered children snacks, demographics, and dietary factors. An analysis of variance demonstrated that parents reported offering snacks (mean/week; standard deviation (SD)) for nutritive reasons like promoting growth (x̄ = 2.5; SD 2.2) or satisfying hunger (x̄ = 2.4; SD 2.1) almost twice as often as non-nutritive reasons like keeping a child quiet (x̄ = 0.7; SD 1.5) or celebrating events/holidays (x̄ = 0.8; SD 1.1). Parents reported giving young children (2-5 years) more snacks to reward behavior (1.9 vs. 1.1, p parents of older children (6-12 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to obtain adjusted odds ratios, which indicated reduced child adherence to dietary recommendations when parents offered snacks to reward behavior (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.83; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70-0.99), celebrate events/holidays (OR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.52-0.99), or achievements (OR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.68-0.98). Parental intentions around child snacking are likely important targets for obesity prevention efforts.

  7. Microbial fuel cells as power supply of a low-power temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Firas; Ondel, Olivier; Allard, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) show great promise as a concomitant process for water treatment and as renewable energy sources for environmental sensors. The small energy produced by MFCs and the low output voltage limit the applications of MFCs. Specific converter topologies are required to step-up the output voltage of a MFC. A Power Management Unit (PMU) is proposed for operation at low input voltage and at very low power in a completely autonomous way to capture energy from MFCs with the highest possible efficiency. The application of sensors for monitoring systems in remote locations is an important approach. MFCs could be an alternative energy source in this case. Powering a sensor with MFCs may prove the fact that wastewater may be partly turned into renewable energy for realistic applications. The Power Management Unit is demonstrated for 3.6 V output voltage at 1 mW continuous power, based on a low-cost 0.7-L MFC. A temperature sensor may operate continuously on 2-MFCs in continuous flow mode. A flyback converter under discontinuous conduction mode is also tested to power the sensor. One continuously fed MFC was able to efficiently and continuously power the sensor.

  8. Cross-linked polystyrene sulfonic acid and polyethylene glycol as a low-fouling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghunaim, Abdullah; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2016-04-01

    A negatively charged hydrophilic low fouling film was prepared by thermally cross-linking a blend consisting of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The film was found to be stable by dip-washing. The fouling resistance of this material toward bacterial (Escherichia coli) and colloidal (polystyrene particles) attachment, non-specific protein (fibronectin) adsorption and cell (3T3 NIH) adhesion was evaluated and was compared with glass slides modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes, oxidized 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (sulfonic acid, SA), and n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory and thermodynamic models based on surface energy were used to explain the interaction behaviors of E. coli/polystyrene particles-substrate and protein-substrate interactions, respectively. The cross-linked PSS-PEG film was found to be slightly better than SA and PEG toward resisting non-specific protein adsorption, and showed comparable low attachment results as those of PEG toward particle, bacterial and NIH-3T3 cells adhesion. The low-fouling performance of PSS-PEG, a cross-linked film by a simple thermal curing process, could allow this material to be used for applications in aqueous environments, where most low fouling hydrophilic polymers, such as PSS or PEG, could not be easily retained.

  9. InGaAs-based mm-wave integrated subharmonic mixer exhibiting low input power requirement and low noise characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, P.; Hong, K.; Pavlidis, D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The authors have designed and fabricated an integrated InGaAs-based subharmonic mixer which showed a single-sideband conversion loss of 10.5dB and double-sideband noise temperature of 1,164 K at a very low LO power level of 1.1mW. Also demonstrated was the feasibility of integrating mixer diodes with antenna and other interconnect metal structures on InP. Simulations indicate the potential for performance improvements with L{sub c} decreasing to 9.6dB and T{sub mix} decreasing to approximately 700 K for anode sizes of 1{micro}m. A significant advantage of the InGaAs subharmonic mixers is that their P{sub LO} requirements are approximately a factor of 0.2 to 0.37 of that required by GaAs technology. Another advantage of InGaAs mixer technology is that high-performance three-terminal device technology, available on InP, could potentially be used to integrate LNA front ends and IF amplifiers with the mixers, to form high-performance monolithic millimeter-wave receivers.

  10. Chromatography paper as a low-cost medium for accurate spectrophotometric assessment of blood hemoglobin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Meaghan; Elguea, Carlos; Yan, Jasper S; Pawlowski, Michal; Williams, Jessica; Wahed, Amer; Oden, Maria; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-06-21

    Anemia affects a quarter of the world's population, and a lack of appropriate diagnostic tools often prevents treatment in low-resource settings. Though the HemoCue 201+ is an appropriate device for diagnosing anemia in low-resource settings, the high cost of disposables ($0.99 per test in Malawi) limits its availability. We investigated using spectrophotometric measurement of blood spotted on chromatography paper as a low-cost (paper, and a bench-top spectrophotometer validated the approach before the development of a low-cost reader. We optimized impregnating paper with chemicals to lyse red blood cells, paper type, drying time, wavelengths measured, and sensitivity to variations in volume of blood, and we validated our approach using patient samples. Lysing the blood cells with sodium deoxycholate dried in Whatman Chr4 chromatography paper gave repeatable results, and the absorbance difference between 528 nm and 656 nm was stable over time in measurements taken up to 10 min after sample preparation. The method was insensitive to the amount of blood spotted on the paper over the range of 5 μL to 25 μL. We created a low-cost, handheld reader to measure the transmission of paper cuvettes at these optimal wavelengths. Training and validating our method with patient samples on both the spectrometer and the handheld reader showed that both devices are accurate to within 2 g dL(-1) of the HemoCue device for 98% and 95% of samples, respectively.

  11. A Qualitative Study of Self-Esteem, Peer Affiliation, and Academic Outcome among Low Achieving Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chi-hung; Choi, Eudora

    2010-01-01

    Background: A limited amount of research has been conducted on children and adolescents who are low achievers. In Hong Kong, educators describe low achieving students in terms of academic performance, they seldom focus on socio-emotional aspects, such as self-esteem, peer affiliation, and inter-personal relationships. However, low achieving…

  12. Low-energy protons associated with interplanetary shocks as a coherent population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanahuja, B.; Domingo, V.

    1987-07-01

    We investigate the flow pattern of low-energy protons (35--1600 keV) associated with interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 between August 1978 and April 1980. The analysis of the shape of the distribution function in the solar wind frame and its temporal evolution indicates that the low-energy protons can behave as a coherent, independent population of particles in the solar wind. Ahead of the shock this population propagates along the magnetic field in the same direction as the solar wind flow, while after the passage of the perturbed region associated with the shock, it propagates in the opposite sense. The behavior of the flow pattern of this population through the shock front is discussed for the 17 largest events observed in this period. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  13. Exercise as a Mean to Control Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Mathur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs, which include cardiovascular disease, some cancers, for example, colon cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes, are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. It has now become clear that low-grade chronic inflammation is a key player in the pathogenesis of most CNCDs. Given that regular exercise offers protection against all causes of mortality, primarily by protection against atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, we suggest that exercise may exert some of its beneficial health effects by inducing anti-inflammatory actions. Recently, IL-6 was introduced as the first myokine, defined as a cytokine, which is produced and released by contracting skeletal muscle fibres, exerting its effects in other organs of the body. We suggest that skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ and that myokines may be involved in mediating the beneficial effects against CNCDs associated with low-grade inflammation.

  14. Hip fracture presenting as mechanical low back pain subsequent to a fall: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Gleberzon, Brian; Hyde, David

    2006-01-01

    This case chronicles the assessment and clinical management of a 54 year old female patient who presented with post traumatic lower back, hip and lower extremity pain, initially attributed to mechanical low back pain but ultimately diagnosed as a hip fracture. This case study illustrates a number of important issues germane to chiropractic care. These are; the importance of using different assessment procedures, combined with clinical experience, in order to differentiate between those patien...

  15. Self-supported interconnected Pt nanoassemblies as highly stable electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bao Yu; Ng, Wan Theng; Wu, Hao Bin; Wang, Xin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-16

    In it for the long haul: Clusters of Pt nanowires (3D Pt nanoassemblies, Pt NA) serve as an electrocatalyst for low-temperature fuel cells. These Pt nanoassemblies exhibit remarkably high stability following thousands of voltage cycles and good catalytic activity, when compared with a commercial Pt catalyst and 20 % wt Pt catalyst supported on carbon black (20 % Pt/CB).

  16. Conserving the linear momentum in stochastic dynamics: Dissipative particle dynamics as a general strategy to achieve local thermostatization in molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passler, Peter P; Hofer, Thomas S

    2017-02-15

    Stochastic dynamics is a widely employed strategy to achieve local thermostatization in molecular dynamics simulation studies; however, it suffers from an inherent violation of momentum conservation. Although this short-coming has little impact on structural and short-time dynamic properties, it can be shown that dynamics in the long-time limit such as diffusion is strongly dependent on the respective thermostat setting. Application of the methodically similar dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) provides a simple, effective strategy to ensure the advantages of local, stochastic thermostatization while at the same time the linear momentum of the system remains conserved. In this work, the key parameters to employ the DPD thermostats in the framework of periodic boundary conditions are investigated, in particular the dependence of the system properties on the size of the DPD-region as well as the treatment of forces near the cutoff. Structural and dynamical data for light and heavy water as well as a Lennard-Jones fluid have been compared to simulations executed via stochastic dynamics as well as via use of the widely employed Nose-Hoover chain and Berendsen thermostats. It is demonstrated that a small size of the DPD region is sufficient to achieve local thermalization, while at the same time artifacts in the self-diffusion characteristic for stochastic dynamics are eliminated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Achievement of constitutive fluorescent pLEXSY-egfp Leishmania braziliensis and its application as an alternative method for drug screening in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Matheus Silva e; de Souza, Luciana Ângelo; Onofre, Thiago Souza; Silva, Abelardo; de Almeida, Márcia Rogéria; Bressan, Gustavo Costa; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gene reporter-fluorescent cells have emerged as alternative method for drug screening. OBJECTIVE Achievement of constitutive expression of fluorescent protein GFP by Leishmania braziliensis as alternative method for drug screening. METHODS L. braziliensis-GFP was generated using Leishmania tarentolae pLEXSY-egfp for constitutive expression of GFP. Fluorescent cells were selected and subjected to standardisation tests of anti-promastigote and anti-intracellular amastigote assays. FINDINGS Our results showed that L. braziliensis-GFP method is faster and more sensitive than Allamar Blue-resazurin. MAIN CONCLUSION Transfected parasites maintained stable fluorescence after successive in vitro passages and pLEXSY system can be used to achieve non-L. tarentolae fluorescent cells. PMID:28177050

  18. Chitosan-phosphotungstic acid complex as membranes for low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, M.; Pecoraro, C. M.; Di Quarto, F.; Bocchetta, P.

    2015-02-01

    Free-standing Chitosan/phosphotungstic acid polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by an easy and fast in-situ ionotropic gelation process performed at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study their morphological features and their thickness as a function of the chitosan concentration. The membrane was tested as proton conductor in low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell allowing to get peak power densities up to 350 mW cm-2. Electrochemical impedance measurements allowed to estimate a polyelectrolyte conductivity of 18 mS cm-1.

  19. TRPV Channels in Mast Cells as a Target for Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser irradiation in the visible as well as infrared range is applied to skin for treatment of various diseases. Here we summarize and discuss effects of laser irradiation on mast cells that leads to degranulation of the cells. This process may contribute to initial steps in the final medical effects. We suggest that activation of TRPV channels in the mast cells forms a basis for the underlying mechanisms and that released ATP and histamine may be putative mediators for therapeutic effects.

  20. Discovery of indole-based tetraarylimidazoles as potent inhibitors of urease with low antilipoxygenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naureen, Sadia; Chaudhry, Faryal; Asif, Nadia; Munawar, Munawar Ali; Ashraf, Muhammad; Nasim, Faizul Hassan; Arshad, Humera; Khan, Misbahul Ain

    2015-09-18

    A series of tetraarylimidazoles (5A-5O) were prepared by one pot four component condensation reactions of 2-arylindole-3-carbaldehydes, substituted anilines, benzil and ammonium acetate in acetic acid. The synthesized compounds exhibited potent antiurease activity with IC50 values ranging from 0.12 ± 0.06 μM to 29.12 ± 0.18 μM as compared with thiourea. However, low inhibition profiles were observed for lipoxygenase. The data show that tetraarylimidazoles containing a substituted 2-penylindole have emerged as a new class of potent inhibitors of urease enzyme.

  1. Low temperature processed planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing silver nanowires as top electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Fushan, E-mail: fushanli@hotmail.com; Yang, Kaiyu; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • All solution processed perovskite solar cells were realized with Ag nanowires. • ZnO nanoparticles were used as electron transport layer. • The solar cells showed a photovoltaic behavior with efficiency of 9.21%. • Device performance showed negligible difference between forward and reverse scan. - Abstract: In this paper, we reported a low temperature processed planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell employing silver nanowires as the top electrode and ZnO nanoparticles as the electron transport layer. The CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite was grown as the light absorber via two-step spin-coating technique. The as-fabricated perovskite solar cell exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency of 9.21% with short circuit current density of 19.75 mA cm{sup −2}, open circuit voltage of 1.02, and fill factor value of 0.457. The solar cell's performance showed negligible difference between the forward and reverse bias scan. This work paves a way for realizing low cost solution processable solar cells.

  2. Low-reactive circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ashes as source material for geopolymer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Li, Qin; Shen, Lifeng; Zhang, Mengqun; Zhai, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, low-reactive circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ashes (CFAs) have firstly been utilized as a source material for geopolymer synthesis. An alkali fusion process was employed to promote the dissolution of Si and Al species from the CFAs, and thus to enhance the reactivity of the ashes. A high-reactive metakaolin (MK) was also used to consume the excess alkali needed for the fusion. Reactivities of the CFAs and MK were examined by a series of dissolution tests in sodium hydroxide solutions. Geopolymer samples were prepared by alkali activation of the source materials using a sodium silicate solution as the activator. The synthesized products were characterized by mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractography (XRD), as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results of this study indicate that, via enhancing the reactivity by alkali fusion and balancing the Na/Al ratio by additional aluminosilicate source, low-reactive CFAs could also be recycled as an alternative source material for geopolymer production.

  3. Studies on Some Nitramine based Low Vulnerability Ammunition Propellants with Cellulose Acetate as a Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G.A. Pillai

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Several formulations of propellants based on RDX as an energetic solid ingredients and cellulose acetate (CA as a binder were processed using either dioctyl pthalate(DOP or tracetin(TA as plastisizer and a small amount of nitrocellulose(NC. The Performance of these propellants was evaluated on the basis of closed vessel firing data. The vulnerability aspects of these formulations were compared with those of conventional picrite propellant, NQ on the basis of their ignition temperatures and sensitivity to friction and impact. Triacetin was found to be better plasticizer than DOP for CA binder. Some RDX/CA/TA/NC/-based propellants were found to have energy levels comparable with NQ propellant and had less sensitivity to heat, impact and friction, and therefore have the potential for being used as low-vulnerability ammunition propellants for gun applications.

  4. Intrathecal sufentanil or fentanyl as adjuvants to low dose bupivacaine in endoscopic urological procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis used: Analysis of variance and Chi-square test. Results: The onset of sensory and motor blockade was significantly rapid in Group A as compared with Groups B and C. The maximum upper level of sensory block was higher in Group A patients than Groups B and C patients. Quality of analgesia was significantly better and prolonged in sufentanil group as compared with other two groups. Motor block was more intense and prolonged in Group A as compared with Groups B and C patients. Request for post-operative analgesic was significantly delayed in Group B patients. Conclusions: Spinal anesthesia for endoscopic urological procedures in elderly patients using low dose bupivacaine (5 mg combined with 10 μg sufentanil is associated with a lower incidence of hemodynamic instability, better quality and prolonged duration as compared to that by adding 25 μg fentanyl.

  5. Reasons for non-immunization of children in an urban, low income group in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Joseph L; Babbar, Harsh; Yadav, Sangita

    2002-07-01

    A study was undertaken on 500 children under the age of 5 years belonging to a low income group. All were attending the paediatrics outpatient department of a large teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Only 25% were found to have received complete primary immunization as per the National Immunization Schedule (bacille Calmette-Guérin at birth, three doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus and oral poliovirus vaccine at 6,10 and 14 weeks and measles vaccine at 9 months). The major reasons for non-immunization of the children were: migration to a native village (26.4%); domestic problems (9.6%); the immunization centre was located too far from their home (9.6%); and the child was unwell when the vaccination was due (9%). Twelve per cent of mothers could not give any reason for non-immunization. In addition to the migration of children to rural areas, the other significant finding was an indirect effect of intensive OPV administration as part of polio eradication initiative. The lack of awareness and fear of side effects constituted a small minority of reasons for non-immunization.

  6. Confidence scores as measures of metacognitive monitoring in primary students? (Limited) validity in predicting academic achievement and the mediating role of self-concept

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsche, Eva Susanne; Kröner, Stephan; Dresel, Markus; Kopp, Bärbel; Martschinke, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Stankov and Lee (2008) have shown confidence scores to have unique predictive effects on achievement criteria when the corresponding test scores are controlled. These findings suggest that confidence scores might provide valid indicators of metacognitive monitoring. However, as confidence is related to self-concept (Kröner u. Biermann, 2007), it is possible that the unique predictive effects disappear when self-concept is also controlled. This study examines whether average confidence regardi...

  7. Emotional intelligence as a predictor of self-efficacy among students with different levels of academic achievement at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMENEH GHARETEPEH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: studies have indicated that emotional intelligence is positively related to self-efficacy and can predict the academic achievement. The present study aimed to investigate the role of emotional intelligence in identifying self-efficacy among the students of Public Health School with different levels of academic achievement. Methods: This correlational study was conducted on all the students of Public Health School. 129 students were included in the study through census method. Data were collected using Emotional Intelligence and self-efficacy questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis by SPSS 14. Results: The average score of students with high academic achievement was higher in self-efficacy (39.78±5.82 and emotional intelligence (117.07±10.33 variables and their components than that of students with low academic achievement (39.17±5.91, 112.07±13.23. The overall emotional intelligence score to predict self-efficacy explanation was different among students with different levels of academic achievement (p<0.001. Self-efficacy structure was explained through self-awareness and self-motivation components in students with low academic achievement (r=0.571. In students with high academic achievement, self-awareness, selfmotivation and social consciousness played an effective role in explaining self-efficacy (r=0.677, p<0.001. Conclusion: Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy play an important role in achieving academic success and emotional intelligence can explain self-efficacy. Therefore, it is recommended to teach emotional intelligence skills to students with low academic achievement through training workshops.

  8. Roadless and Low-Traffic Areas as Conservation Targets in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Nuria; Kreft, Stefan; Kati, Vassiliki; Schluck, Martin; Jonsson, Bengt-Gunnar; Mihok, Barbara; Okarma, Henryk; Ibisch, Pierre L.

    2011-11-01

    With increasing road encroachment, habitat fragmentation by transport infrastructures has been a serious threat for European biodiversity. Areas with no roads or little traffic ("roadless and low-traffic areas") represent relatively undisturbed natural habitats and functioning ecosystems. They provide many benefits for biodiversity and human societies (e.g., landscape connectivity, barrier against pests and invasions, ecosystem services). Roadless and low-traffic areas, with a lower level of anthropogenic disturbances, are of special relevance in Europe because of their rarity and, in the context of climate change, because of their contribution to higher resilience and buffering capacity within landscape ecosystems. An analysis of European legal instruments illustrates that, although most laws aimed at protecting targets which are inherent to fragmentation, like connectivity, ecosystem processes or integrity, roadless areas are widely neglected as a legal target. A case study in Germany underlines this finding. Although the Natura 2000 network covers a significant proportion of the country (16%), Natura 2000 sites are highly fragmented and most low-traffic areas (75%) lie unprotected outside this network. This proportion is even higher for the old Federal States (western Germany), where only 20% of the low-traffic areas are protected. We propose that the few remaining roadless and low-traffic areas in Europe should be an important focus of conservation efforts; they should be urgently inventoried, included more explicitly in the law and accounted for in transport and urban planning. Considering them as complementary conservation targets would represent a concrete step towards the strengthening and adaptation of the Natura 2000 network to climate change.

  9. Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials as Active Layer Components in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Tejas Attreya

    Thin-film photovoltaics offer the promise of cost-effective and scalable solar energy conversion, particularly for applications of semi-transparent solar cells where the poor absorption of commercially-available silicon is inadequate. Applications ranging from roof coatings that capture solar energy to semi-transparent windows that harvest the immense amount of incident sunlight on buildings could be realized with efficient and stable thin-film solar cells. However, the lifetime and efficiency of thin-film solar cells continue to trail their inorganic silicon counterparts. Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides, have recently been explored as materials in thin-film solar cells due to their exceptional optoelectronic properties, solution-processability, and chemical inertness. Thus far, issues with the processing of these materials has held back their implementation in efficient photovoltaics. This dissertation reports processing advances that enable demonstrations of low-dimensional nanomaterials in thin-film solar cells. These low-dimensional photovoltaics show enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and environmental stability in comparison to previous devices, with a focus on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as an active layer component. The introduction summarizes recent advances in the processing of carbon nanotubes and their implementation through the thin-film photovoltaic architecture, as well as the use of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides in photovoltaic applications and potential future directions for all-nanomaterial solar cells. The following chapter reports a study of the interaction between carbon nanotubes and surfactants that enables them to be sorted by electronic type via density gradient ultracentrifugation. These insights are utilized to construct of a broad distribution of carbon nanotubes that absorb throughout the solar spectrum. This polychiral distribution is then shown

  10. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits.

  11. Low-water activity foods: increased concern as vehicles of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, Larry R; Komitopoulou, Evangelia; Beckers, Harry; Betts, Roy P; Bourdichon, François; Fanning, Séamus; Joosten, Han M; Ter Kuile, Benno H

    2013-01-01

    Foods and food ingredients with low water activity (a(w)) have been implicated with increased frequency in recent years as vehicles for pathogens that have caused outbreaks of illnesses. Some of these foodborne pathogens can survive for several months, even years, in low-a(w) foods and in dry food processing and preparation environments. Foodborne pathogens in low-a(w) foods often exhibit an increased tolerance to heat and other treatments that are lethal to cells in high-a(w) environments. It is virtually impossible to eliminate these pathogens in many dry foods or dry food ingredients without impairing organoleptic quality. Control measures should therefore focus on preventing contamination, which is often a much greater challenge than designing efficient control measures for high-a(w) foods. The most efficient approaches to prevent contamination are based on hygienic design, zoning, and implementation of efficient cleaning and sanitation procedures in the food processing environment. Methodologies to improve the sensitivity and speed of assays to resuscitate desiccated cells of foodborne pathogens and to detect them when present in dry foods in very low numbers should be developed. The goal should be to advance our knowledge of the behavior of foodborne pathogens in low-a(w) foods and food ingredients, with the ultimate aim of developing and implementing interventions that will reduce foodborne illness associated with this food category. Presented here are some observations on survival and persistence of foodborne pathogens in low-a(w) foods, selected outbreaks of illnesses associated with consumption of these foods, and approaches to minimize safety risks.

  12. The Problem: Low-Achieving Districts and Low-Performing Boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective school districts maintain superintendent and school board collegiality which can foster success and connectedness among members. Delagardelle and Alsbury (2008 found that superintendents and board members are not consistent in their perceptions about the work the board does, and Glass (2007 found that states do not require boards to undergo evaluation for effectiveness. In the current study, 115 board meetings were observed using the School Board Video Project (SBVP survey, which was created in 2012 by researchers to uncover school board meetings’ effectiveness. MANOVA, Univariate ANOVA, and Pearson Chi-Square test results revealed significant differences between low-, medium-, and high-performing districts’ school board meetings. Evidence indicated that low-performing districts’ board meetings were: less orderly; had less time spent on student achievement; lacked respectful and attentive engagement across speakers; had board meeting members who seemed to advance their own agenda; had less effective working relationships among the governance team; had fewer board members who relied on the superintendent for advice and input; had one member, other than the board president, stand out for taking excessive time during meetings; and did not focus on policy items as much as high- and medium-performing school districts. The research concluded that more school board members from low-performing districts needed training to improve their effectiveness. Furthermore, highly refined and target-enhanced school board training programs might lead to lasting governance success and more effective teaming that could improve district, and ultimately, student achievement.

  13. Giant band bending induced by Ag on InAs(110) surfaces at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, V. Yu.; Le Lay, G.; Vinh, Le Thanh; Hricovini, K.; Bonnet, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    We show by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy [G. Le Lay, V. Yu Aristov, J. Kanski, P. O. Nilsson, U. O. Karlsson, K. Hricovini, and J. E. Bonnet (unpublished)] (core levels and valence band) as well as by Kelvin probe measurements, both under illumination and in the dark, at low temperature (LT) T~=20 K and room temperature (RT) T~=300 K, that upon deposition of minute amounts of silver (about 0.01-0.1 monolayer) onto in situ well-cleaved, highly doped, n- and p-type InAs(110) surfaces, one induces a giant movement of the Fermi level EF into the conduction band. We thus create a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas at the surface (strong downwards band bending): as a matter of fact, we do observe emission of electrons from filled states up to the EF placed far above the conduction-band minimum (CBM). It is also shown that the growth is laminar at LT, while it follows a Volmer-Weber mode at RT, with indications of chemical interactions between the Ag and In atoms at both temperatures. At LT the deposited atoms interact with the dangling bonds of the In atoms and saturate them for θ~=1 monolayer (ML). At low coverages and LT, the individual Ag atoms create donorlike surface states (SS) (adsorption-induced states) and EF can be pinned by these SS in the conduction band. This leads to the formation of a 2D electron channel at the InAs surface already at θ~=0.01-0.1 ML for both types of semiconductors. At higher coverages one observes the onset of metallization for both temperatures and Ag clusters can produce another type of SS, typically metal-induced gap states near the CBM. These proposals, as well as the experimental facts, are discussed in the light of the current theoretical models of Schottky-barrier formation.

  14. Continuous operation of an ultra-low-power microcontroller using glucose as the sole energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inyoung; Sode, Takashi; Loew, Noya; Tsugawa, Wakako; Lowe, Christopher Robin; Sode, Koji

    2017-07-15

    An ultimate goal for those engaged in research to develop implantable medical devices is to develop mechatronic implantable artificial organs such as artificial pancreas. Such devices would comprise at least a sensor module, an actuator module, and a controller module. For the development of optimal mechatronic implantable artificial organs, these modules should be self-powered and autonomously operated. In this study, we aimed to develop a microcontroller using the BioCapacitor principle. A direct electron transfer type glucose dehydrogenase was immobilized onto mesoporous carbon, and then deposited on the surface of a miniaturized Au electrode (7mm(2)) to prepare a miniaturized enzyme anode. The enzyme fuel cell was connected with a 100 μF capacitor and a power boost converter as a charge pump. The voltage of the enzyme fuel cell was increased in a stepwise manner by the charge pump from 330mV to 3.1V, and the generated electricity was charged into a 100μF capacitor. The charge pump circuit was connected to an ultra-low-power microcontroller. Thus prepared BioCapacitor based circuit was able to operate an ultra-low-power microcontroller continuously, by running a program for 17h that turned on an LED every 60s. Our success in operating a microcontroller using glucose as the sole energy source indicated the probability of realizing implantable self-powered autonomously operated artificial organs, such as artificial pancreas.

  15. Low-carbon communities as a context for individual behavioural change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, Eva; Johnson, Mikael; Saastamoinen, Mika [National Consumer Research Centre, P.O. Box 5, 00531 Helsinki (Finland); Robinson, Simon [Manchester Knowledge Capital, Churchgate House, 56 Oxford Street, Manchester, M60 7HJ (United Kingdom); Vadovics, Edina [Green Dependent Sustainable Solutions Association, Eva u. 4, 2100 Goedoelloe (Hungary)

    2010-12-15

    Previous attempts to change energy-related behaviour were targeted at individuals as consumers of energy. Recent literature has suggested that more focus should be placed on the community level and that energy users should be engaged in the role of citizens, and not only that of consumers. This article analyses different types of emerging low-carbon communities as a context for individual behavioural change. The focus is on how these communities offer solutions to problems in previous attempts to change individual behaviour. These problems include social dilemmas, social conventions, socio-technical infrastructures and the helplessness of individuals. Different community types are examined, including geographical communities as well as sector-based, interest-based and smart mob communities. Through four case studies representing each of these community types, we examine how different communities reframe problems on the individual level to reduce carbon emissions. On the basis of an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of various community solutions, implications are drawn for further research and for the design and support of low-carbon communities. (author)

  16. N,N-dimethylbiguanide complexes displaying low cytotoxicity as potential large spectrum antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olar, Rodica; Badea, Mihaela; Marinescu, Dana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Iorgulescu, Emilia-Elena; Lazar, Veronica

    2010-07-01

    The new complexes M(DMBG)(2)(ClO(4))(2) (M:Mn, Ni, Cu and Zn; DMBG: N,N-dimethylbiguanide) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, EPR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR as well as electronic spectroscopy data. Complex [Ni(DMBG)(2)](ClO(4))(2).2DMF (DMF: N,N-dimethylformamide) crystallizes in the monoclinic P2(1)/c space group while [Cu(DMBG)(2)](ClO(4))(2) adopt monoclinic P21/c space group as X-ray single crystal data indicate. The redox behavior of complexes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The metal-free N,N-dimethylbiguanide and complexes exhibit specific anti-infective properties as demonstrated the low MIC values, a large antimicrobial spectrum and also inhibit the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains to colonize the inert surfaces. The complexes exhibit also a low cytotoxicity levels on HeLa cells.

  17. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Lin; Jing Yang; Hui-Ming Li; San-Jue Hu; Jun-Ling Xing

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints,many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals.Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models.The surgery is simple:after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina,stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally,one rod for each vertebra,to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG).Then,CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by stenosis,such as a laterally herniated disc or foraminal stenosis.As the intraforaminal implantation of a rod results in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous action potentials associated with hyperalgesia,spontaneous pain,and mechanical allodynia,CCD provides an animal model that mimics radicular pain in humans.This review concerns the mechanisms of neuronal hyperexcitability,focusing on various patterns of spontaneous discharge including one possible pain signal for mechanical allodynia-evoked bursting.Also,new data regarding its significant property of maintaining peripheral input are also discussed.Investigations using this animal model will enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms for low back pain and sciatica.Furthermore,the peripheral location of the DRG facilitates its use as a locus for controlling pain with minimal central effects,in the hope of ultimately uncovering analgesics that block neuropathic pain without influencing physiological pain.

  18. Identification of UDP-linked murein precursors as contaminants in recombinant proteins of low molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, M K; Andrade, L J; Phillips, T B; van Schravendijk, M R

    1999-11-01

    The A(280)/A(260) ratio of a purified protein is frequently used as an indication of the purity of the preparation with respect to nucleic acids. We show here that for low-molecular-weight recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli, a low A(280)/A(260) ratio can also result from contamination with UDP-linked murein precursors derived from bacterial cell wall metabolism. Although these precursors are small molecules of molecular weight 1000-1200, they comigrate in gel filtration with recombinant human FKBP (MW 11,820). This gel filtration behavior, which is distinct from that of unmodified mononucleotides, does not reflect binding interactions with FKBP, but is an intrinsic property of these precursors. Therefore, these molecules would be expected to copurify with other low-molecular-weight proteins, especially in the abbreviated purification protocols made possible by freeze-thaw release of recombinant proteins from E. coli (Johnson, B. H., and Hecht, M. H. (1994) BioTechnology 12, 1357-1360). Several alternative strategies are discussed for integrating these findings into the design of improved purification procedures for low-molecular-weight recombinant proteins.

  19. Low Serum Concentration of Obestatin as a Predictor of Mortality in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia Beberashvili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obestatin, a proposed anorexigenic gut hormone, has been shown to have a number of beneficial cardiotropic effects in experimental studies. We hypothesized that obestatin alteration in hemodialysis patients may link to clinical outcomes. This cross-sectional study with prospective followup for almost 4 years was performed on 94 prevalent hemodialysis patients. Obestatin, leptin, proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-6, and various nutritional markers were measured. Patients with low obestatin levels, defined as a level less than median, had a worse all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. The crude all-cause (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.17 to 4.24 and cardiovascular mortality hazard ratios (HR 4.03, 95% CI 1.27 to 12.76 in these patients continued to be significant after adjustment for various confounders for all-cause mortality. Across the four obestatin-TNF-α categories, the group with low obestatin and high TNF-α (above median level exhibited a worse outcome in both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Clinical characteristics of patients in low obestatin high TNF-α group did not differ from other obestatin-TNF-α categorized groups. In summary, low serum obestatin concentration is an independent predictor of mortality in prevalent hemodialysis patients. Novel interactions were observed between obestatin and TNF-α, which were associated with mortality risk, especially those due to cardiovascular causes.

  20. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    This article documents our ongoing search for the elusive "intermediate-mass" black holes. These would bridge the gap between the approximately ten solar mass "stellar-mass" black holes that are the end-product of the life of a massive star, and the "supermassive" black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses found at the centers of massive galaxies. The discovery of black holes with intermediate mass is the key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes, or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth only hundreds of millions of years after the Big Bang. Here we focus on searches for black holes with masses of 10^4-10^6 solar masses that are found at galaxy centers. We will refer to black holes in this mass range as "low-mass" black holes, since they are at the low-mass end of supermassive black holes. We review the searches for low-mass black holes to date and show tentative evidence, from the number of low-mass black holes that are ...