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Sample records for arx transcriptional targets

  1. Copy number variants in patients with intellectual disability affect the regulation of ARX transcription factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Minaka; Manning, Elizabeth; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Krecsmarik, Monika; Hawkins, Thomas A; Giacomotto, Jean; Zhao, Ting; Mueller, Thomas; Bader, Patricia I; Cheung, Sau W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bain, Nicole L; Hackett, Anna; Reddy, Chilamakuri C S; Mechaly, Alejandro S; Peers, Bernard; Wilson, Stephen W; Lenhard, Boris; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Gecz, Jozef; Becker, Thomas S; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2015-11-01

    Protein-coding mutations in the transcription factor-encoding gene ARX cause various forms of intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. In contrast, variations in surrounding non-coding sequences are correlated with milder forms of non-syndromic ID and autism and had suggested the importance of ARX gene regulation in the etiology of these disorders. We compile data on several novel and some already identified patients with or without ID that carry duplications of ARX genomic region and consider likely genetic mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental defects. We establish the long-range regulatory domain of ARX and identify its brain region-specific autoregulation. We conclude that neurodevelopmental disturbances in the patients may not simply arise from increased dosage due to ARX duplication. This is further exemplified by a small duplication involving a non-functional ARX copy, but with duplicated enhancers. ARX enhancers are located within a 504-kb region and regulate expression specifically in the forebrain in developing and adult zebrafish. Transgenic enhancer-reporter lines were used as in vivo tools to delineate a brain region-specific negative and positive autoregulation of ARX. We find autorepression of ARX in the telencephalon and autoactivation in the ventral thalamus. Fluorescently labeled brain regions in the transgenic lines facilitated the identification of neuronal outgrowth and pathfinding disturbances in the ventral thalamus and telencephalon that occur when arxa dosage is diminished. In summary, we have established a model for how breakpoints in long-range gene regulation alter the expression levels of a target gene brain region-specifically, and how this can cause subtle neuronal phenotypes relating to the etiology of associated neuropsychiatric disease.

  2. Identification of Arx targets unveils new candidates for controlling cortical interneuron migration and differentiation

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    Gaelle M Friocourt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor ARX have been found to be responsible for a wide spectrum of disorders extending from phenotypes with severe neuronal migration defects, such as lissencephaly, to mild forms of intellectual disabilities without apparent brain abnormalities, but with associated features of dystonia and epilepsy. Arx expression is mainly restricted to populations of GABA-containing neurons. Studies of the effects of ARX loss of function, either in humans or mutant mice, revealed varying defects, suggesting multiple roles of this gene in brain patterning, neuronal proliferation and migration, cell maturation and differentiation, as well as axonal outgrowth and connectivity. However, to date, little is known about how Arx functions as a transcription factor or which genes it binds and regulates. Recently, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and mRNA expression with microarray analysis and identified approximately 1000 gene promoters bound by Arx in transfected neuroblastoma N2a cells and mouse embryonic brain. To narrow the analysis of Arx targets to those most likely to control cortical interneuron migration and/or differentiation, we compare here our data to previously published studies searching for genes enriched or down-regulated in cortical interneurons between E13.5 and E15.5. We thus identified 14 Arx-target genes enriched (Cxcr7, Meis1, Ppap2a, Slc12a5, Ets2, Phlda1, Zif268, Igf1, Lmo3, Sema6, Lgi1, Alk, Tgfb3, Napb and 5 genes specifically down-regulated (Hmgn3, Lmo1, Ebf3, Rasgef1b and Slit2 in cortical migrating neurons. In this review, we present these genes and discuss how their possible regulation by Arx may lead to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons, resulting in mental retardation and epilepsy.

  3. The homeodomain-containing transcription factors Arx and Pax4 control enteroendocrine subtype specification in mice.

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    Anthony Beucher

    Full Text Available Intestinal hormones are key regulators of digestion and energy homeostasis secreted by rare enteroendocrine cells. These cells produce over ten different hormones including GLP-1 and GIP peptides known to promote insulin secretion. To date, the molecular mechanisms controlling the specification of the various enteroendocrine subtypes from multipotent Neurog3(+ endocrine progenitor cells, as well as their number, remain largely unknown. In contrast, in the embryonic pancreas, the opposite activities of Arx and Pax4 homeodomain transcription factors promote islet progenitor cells towards the different endocrine cell fates. In this study, we thus investigated the role of Arx and Pax4 in enteroendocrine subtype specification. The small intestine and colon of Arx- and Pax4-deficient mice were analyzed using histological, molecular, and lineage tracing approaches. We show that Arx is expressed in endocrine progenitors (Neurog3(+ and in early differentiating (ChromograninA(- GLP-1-, GIP-, CCK-, Sct- Gastrin- and Ghrelin-producing cells. We noted a dramatic reduction or a complete loss of all these enteroendocrine cell types in Arx mutants. Serotonin- and Somatostatin-secreting cells do not express Arx and, accordingly, the differentiation of Serotonin cells was not affected in Arx mutants. However, the number of Somatostatin-expressing D-cells is increased as Arx-deficient progenitor cells are redirected to the D-cell lineage. In Pax4-deficient mice, the differentiation of Serotonin and Somatostatin cells is impaired, as well as of GIP and Gastrin cells. In contrast, the number of GLP-1 producing L-cells is increased concomitantly with an upregulation of Arx. Thus, while Arx and Pax4 are necessary for the development of L- and D-cells respectively, they conversely restrict D- and L-cells fates suggesting antagonistic functions in D/L cell allocation. In conclusion, these finding demonstrate that, downstream of Neurog3, the specification of a subset of

  4. ARX/Arx is expressed in germ cells during spermatogenesis in both marsupial and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongshi; Pask, Andrew J; Hu, Yanqiu; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2014-03-01

    The X-linked aristaless gene, ARX, is essential for the development of the gonads, forebrain, olfactory bulb, pancreas, and skeletal muscle in mice and humans. Mutations cause neurological diseases, often accompanied by ambiguous genitalia. There are a disproportionately high number of testis and brain genes on the human and mouse X chromosomes. It is still unknown whether the X chromosome accrued these genes during its evolution or whether genes that find themselves on the X chromosome evolve such roles. ARX was originally autosomal in mammals and remains so in marsupials, whereas in eutherian mammals it translocated to the X chromosome. In this study, we examined autosomal ARX in tammars and compared it with the X-linked Arx in mice. We detected ARX mRNA in the neural cells of the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, and olfactory bulbs in developing tammars, consistent with the expression in mice. ARX was detected by RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization in the developing tammar wallaby gonads of both sexes, suggestive of a role in sexual development as in mice. We also detected ARX/Arx mRNA in the adult testis in both tammars and mice, suggesting a potential novel role for ARX/Arx in spermiogenesis. ARX transcripts were predominantly observed in round spermatids. Arx mRNA localization distributions in the mouse adult testis suggest that it escaped meiotic sex chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. Our findings suggest that ARX in the therian mammal ancestor already played a role in male reproduction before it was recruited to the X chromosome in eutherians.

  5. Arx together with FoxA2, regulates Shh floor plate expression.

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    Cho, Ginam; Lim, Youngshin; Cho, Il-Taeg; Simonet, Jacqueline C; Golden, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless related homeodomain transcription factor (ARX) are associated with a diverse set of X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy syndromes in humans. Although most studies have been focused on its function in the forebrain, ARX is also expressed in other regions of the developing nervous system including the floor plate (FP) of the spinal cord where its function is incompletely understood. To investigate the role of Arx in the FP, we performed gain-of-function studies in the chick using in ovo electroporation, and loss-of-function studies in Arx-deficient mice. We have found that Arx, in conjunction with FoxA2, directly induces Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression through binding to a Shh floor plate enhancer (SFPE2). We also observed that FoxA2 induces Arx through its transcriptional activation domain whereas Nkx2.2, induced by Shh, abolishes this induction. Our data support a feedback loop model for Arx function; through interactions with FoxA2, Arx positively regulates Shh expression in the FP, and Shh signaling in turn activates Nkx2.2, which suppresses Arx expression. Furthermore, our data are evidence that Arx plays a role as a context dependent transcriptional activator, rather than a primary inducer of Shh expression, potentially explaining how mutations in ARX are associated with diverse, and often subtle, defects.

  6. Expansion of the ARX spectrum.

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    Wallerstein, Robert; Sugalski, Rachel; Cohn, Leora; Jawetz, Robert; Friez, Michael

    2008-06-01

    We present four patients with ARX mutations and widely variant clinical presentations. Case 1, a female with a known ARX mutation has refractory infantile spasms and severe mental retardation. Case 2, a male presented with a neurodegenerative disorder and has a known ARX mutation likely de novo as mother is not a carrier. Cases 3 and 4, two siblings with a novel variant in ARX, which is not clearly pathogenic, have developmental delay. One of the siblings had a diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder, failure to thrive with severe feeding difficulties, intracranial hemorrhage, and seizures. There are very few affected females with ARX related infantile spasms. These cases expand the known phenotype of this emerging condition.

  7. Pax4 is not essential for beta-cell differentiation in zebrafish embryos but modulates alpha-cell generation by repressing arx gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiotsa, Joachim; Verbruggen, Vincianne; Giacomotto, Jean; Ishibashi, Minaka; Manning, Elisabeth; Rinkwitz, Silke; Manfroid, Isabelle; Voz, Marianne L; Peers, Bernard

    2012-12-17

    Genetic studies in mouse have demonstrated the crucial function of PAX4 in pancreatic cell differentiation. This transcription factor specifies β- and δ-cell fate at the expense of α-cell identity by repressing Arx gene expression and ectopic expression of PAX4 in α-cells is sufficient to convert them into β-cells. Surprisingly, no Pax4 orthologous gene can be found in chicken and Xenopus tropicalis raising the question of the function of pax4 gene in lower vertebrates such as in fish. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression and the function of the orthologous pax4 gene in zebrafish. pax4 gene is transiently expressed in the pancreas of zebrafish embryos and is mostly restricted to endocrine precursors as well as to some differentiating δ- and ε-cells but was not detected in differentiating β-cells. pax4 knock-down in zebrafish embryos caused a significant increase in α-cells number while having no apparent effect on β- and δ-cell differentiation. This rise of α-cells is due to an up-regulation of the Arx transcription factor. Conversely, knock-down of arx caused to a complete loss of α-cells and a concomitant increase of pax4 expression but had no effect on the number of β- and δ-cells. In addition to the mutual repression between Arx and Pax4, these two transcription factors negatively regulate the transcription of their own gene. Interestingly, disruption of pax4 RNA splicing or of arx RNA splicing by morpholinos targeting exon-intron junction sites caused a blockage of the altered transcripts in cell nuclei allowing an easy characterization of the arx- and pax4-deficient cells. Such analyses demonstrated that arx knock-down in zebrafish does not lead to a switch of cell fate, as reported in mouse, but rather blocks the cells in their differentiation process towards α-cells. In zebrafish, pax4 is not required for the generation of the first β- and δ-cells deriving from the dorsal pancreatic bud, unlike its crucial role in the

  8. Arx polyalanine expansion in mice leads to reduced pancreatic α-cell specification and increased α-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L Wilcox

    Full Text Available ARX/Arx is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor necessary for the specification and early maintenance of pancreatic endocrine α-cells. Many transcription factors important to pancreas development, including ARX/Arx, are also crucial for proper brain development. Although null mutations of ARX in human patients result in the severe neurologic syndrome XLAG (X-linked lissencephaly associated with abnormal genitalia, the most common mutation is the expansion of the first polyalanine tract of ARX, which results primarily in the clinical syndrome ISSX (infantile spasms. Mouse models of XLAG, ISSX and other human ARX mutations demonstrate a direct genotype-phenotype correlation in ARX-related neurologic disorders. Furthermore, mouse models utilizing a polyalanine tract expansion mutation have illustrated critical developmental differences between null mutations and expansion mutations in the brain, revealing context-specific defects. Although Arx is known to be required for the specification and early maintenance of pancreatic glucagon-producing α-cells, the consequences of the Arx polyalanine expansion on pancreas development remain unknown. Here we report that mice with an expansion mutation in the first polyalanine tract of Arx exhibit impaired α-cell specification and maintenance, with gradual α-cell loss due to apoptosis. This is in contrast to the re-specification of α-cells into β- and δ-cells that occurs in mice null for Arx. Overall, our analysis of an Arx polyalanine expansion mutation on pancreatic development suggests that impaired α-cell function might also occur in ISSX patients.

  9. ARX-NNPLS Model Based Optimization Strategy and Its Application in Polymer Grade Transition Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费正顺; 胡斌; 叶鲁彬; 梁军

    2012-01-01

    Since it is often difficult to build differential algebraic equations (DAEs) for chemical processes, a new data-based modeling approach is proposed using ARX (AutoRegressive with eXogenous inputs) combined with neural network under partial least squares framework (ARX-NNPLS), in which less specific knowledge of the process is required but the input and output data. To represent the dynamic and nonlinear behavior of the process, the ARX combined with neural network is used in the partial least squares (PLS) inner model between input and output latent variables. In the proposed dynamic optimization strategy based on the ARX-NNPLS model, neither parameterization nor iterative solving process for DAEs is needed as the ARX-NNPLS model gives a proper representation for the dynamic behavior of the process, and the computing time is greatly reduced compared to conventional control vector parameterization method. To demonstrate the ARX-NNPLS model based optimization strategy, the polyethylene grade transition in gas phase fluidized-bed reactor is taken into account. The optimization results show that the final optimal trajectory of quality index determined by the new approach moves faster to the target values and the computing time is much less.

  10. Aristaless related homeobox gene, Arx, is implicated in mouse fetal Leydig cell differentiation possibly through expressing in the progenitor cells.

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    Kanako Miyabayashi

    Full Text Available Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage.

  11. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  12. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  13. Contractions in the second polyA tract of ARX are rare, non-pathogenic polymorphisms.

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    Conti, Valerio; Marini, Carla; Mei, Davide; Falchi, Melania; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Guerrini, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Aristaless related homeobox (ARX) is a transcription factor containing highly conserved octapeptide, homeobox, acidic, and aristaless domains, as well as four polyA tracts. The most frequent ARX mutation found to date in patients with X-linked infantile spasms, Partington syndrome or X-linked mental retardation, is a duplication of 24 bp in exon 2, resulting in the expansion of the second polyA tract. Although the pathogenic role of this expansion has been well characterized, the effect of contractions in the same polyA tract is still debated since different reports have associated contractions to either mental retardation or a normal phenotype. Here, we report two unrelated girls with epilepsy and mental retardation who inherited from their unaffected parents, of either sex, a deletion of 24 bp (c.441_464del), resulting in a contraction of eight alanines in the second polyA tract of ARX. Segregation studies revealed the c.441_464del also in two healthy relatives of one of the patients. This finding supports the hypothesis that this contraction represents a rare, benign polymorphism. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

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    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  15. Iterative learning control of SOFC based on ARX identification model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an application of iterative learning control (ILC) technique to the voltage control of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. To meet the demands of the control system design, an autoregressive model with exogenous input (ARX) is established. Firstly, by regulating the variation of the hydrogen flow rate proportional to that of the current, the fuel utilization of the SOFC is kept within its admissible range. Then, based on the ARX model, three kinds of ILC controllers, i.e. P-, PI- and PD-type are designed to keep the voltage at a desired level. Simulation results demonstrate the potential of the ARX model applied to the control of the SOFC, and prove the excellence of the ILC controllers for the voltage control of the SOFC.

  16. A Tuning Procedure for ARX-based MPC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Daniel; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    identification techniques using convex optimization can be used for identification of such models from input-output data. The stochastic model of the ARX model identified from input-output data is modified with an ARMA model designed as part of the MPC-design procedure to ensure offset-free control. The ARMAX......We present an optimization based tuning procedure with certain robustness properties for an offset free Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The MPC is designed for univariate processes that can be represented by an ARX model. The advantage of ARX model representations is that standard system...... model description resulting from the extension can be realized as a state space model in innovation form. The MPC is designed and implemented based on this state space model in innovation form. Expressions for the closed-loop dynamics of the unconstrained system is used to derive the sensitivity...

  17. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  18. TF Target Mapper: a BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsman, S.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Jager, V.C.L. de; Spek, P. van der; Grosveld, F.; Strouboulis, J.; Katsantoni, E.Z.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool

  19. Transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer.

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    Lu, Yi

    2009-07-02

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American males today. Novel and effective treatment such as gene therapy is greatly desired. The early viral based gene therapy uses tissue-nonspecific promoters, which causes unintended toxicity to other normal tissues. In this chapter, we will review the transcriptionally regulated gene therapy strategy for prostate cancer treatment. We will describe the development of transcriptionally regulated prostate cancer gene therapy in the following areas: (1) Comparison of different routes for best viral delivery to the prostate; (2) Study of transcriptionally regulated, prostate-targeted viral vectors: specificity and activity of the transgene under several different prostate-specific promoters were compared in vitro and in vivo; (3) Selection of therapeutic transgenes and strategies for prostate cancer gene therapy (4) Oncolytic virotherapy for prostate cancer. In addition, the current challenges and future directions in this field are also discussed.

  20. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

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    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-05-27

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  1. Region 4 of sigma as a target for transcription regulation.

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    Dove, Simon L; Darst, Seth A; Hochschild, Ann

    2003-05-01

    Bacterial sigma factors play a key role in promoter recognition, making direct contact with conserved promoter elements. Most sigma factors belong to the sigma70 family, named for the primary sigma factor in Escherichia coli. Members of the sigma70 family typically share four conserved regions and, here, we focus on region 4, which is directly involved in promoter recognition and serves as a target for a variety of regulators of transcription initiation. We review recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of regulators that target region 4 of sigma.

  2. Classifying transcription factor targets and discovering relevant biological features

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    DeLisi Charles

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal in post-genomic research is discovering the network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs and the genes they regulate. We have previously reported the development of a supervised-learning approach to TF target identification, and used it to predict targets of 104 transcription factors in yeast. We now include a new sequence conservation measure, expand our predictions to include 59 new TFs, introduce a web-server, and implement an improved ranking method to reveal the biological features contributing to regulation. The classifiers combine 8 genomic datasets covering a broad range of measurements including sequence conservation, sequence overrepresentation, gene expression, and DNA structural properties. Principal Findings (1 Application of the method yields an amplification of information about yeast regulators. The ratio of total targets to previously known targets is greater than 2 for 11 TFs, with several having larger gains: Ash1(4, Ino2(2.6, Yaf1(2.4, and Yap6(2.4. (2 Many predicted targets for TFs match well with the known biology of their regulators. As a case study we discuss the regulator Swi6, presenting evidence that it may be important in the DNA damage response, and that the previously uncharacterized gene YMR279C plays a role in DNA damage response and perhaps in cell-cycle progression. (3 A procedure based on recursive-feature-elimination is able to uncover from the large initial data sets those features that best distinguish targets for any TF, providing clues relevant to its biology. An analysis of Swi6 suggests a possible role in lipid metabolism, and more specifically in metabolism of ceramide, a bioactive lipid currently being investigated for anti-cancer properties. (4 An analysis of global network properties highlights the transcriptional network hubs; the factors which control the most genes and the genes which are bound by the largest set of regulators. Cell-cycle and

  3. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

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    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2016-03-29

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors.

  5. A Tuning Procedure for ARX-based MPC of Multivariate Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Daniel; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    We present an optimization based tuning procedure with certain robustness properties for an offset free Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The MPC is designed for multivariate processes that can be represented by an ARX model. The stochastic model of the ARX model identified from input-output dat...

  6. Targeted inactivation and identification of targets of the Gli2a transcription factor in the zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is mediated by the Gli transcription factors and, in the zebrafish, plays an important role in patterning both the neural tube and myotome. Using a null allele of the gli2a gene induced by targeted mutagenesis, we show that Gli2a is completely dispensable in the fish but acts redundantly with Gli1 to regulate expression of known Hh targets, such as ptch2, prdm1a and eng2a, in the myotome and neural tube. To identify novel targets of Hh signaling, we performe...

  7. Targeted inactivation and identification of targets of the Gli2a transcription factor in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Hedgehog (Hh signaling is mediated by the Gli transcription factors and, in the zebrafish, plays an important role in patterning both the neural tube and myotome. Using a null allele of the gli2a gene induced by targeted mutagenesis, we show that Gli2a is completely dispensable in the fish but acts redundantly with Gli1 to regulate expression of known Hh targets, such as ptch2, prdm1a and eng2a, in the myotome and neural tube. To identify novel targets of Hh signaling, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq of whole embryo extracts. Samples were significantly enriched for 192 genomic regions, some of which are associated with four known Hh target genes, ptch1, ptch2, gli1 and olig2. Sequence analysis of these regions reveals a high level of conservation of Gli-binding sites from fish to mammals in some, but not all, cases. Expression analysis of other transcription units that are closely associated with peaks identified several putative targets not previously implicated as Hh targets, including myl10, hnmt, lrp4, efemp2, fras1, quo, and lamc1. Each of these genes shows loss of, or reduced expression in, embryos homozygous for an antimorphic allele of gli2a, you-too (yot, consistent with their being direct targets of Gli2a.

  8. Targeted inactivation and identification of targets of the Gli2a transcription factor in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Zhao, Zhonghua; Muller, Julius; Iyu, Audrey; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Guccione, Ernesto; Ruan, Yijun; Ingham, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is mediated by the Gli transcription factors and, in the zebrafish, plays an important role in patterning both the neural tube and myotome. Using a null allele of the gli2a gene induced by targeted mutagenesis, we show that Gli2a is completely dispensable in the fish but acts redundantly with Gli1 to regulate expression of known Hh targets, such as ptch2, prdm1a and eng2a, in the myotome and neural tube. To identify novel targets of Hh signaling, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) of whole embryo extracts. Samples were significantly enriched for 192 genomic regions, some of which are associated with four known Hh target genes, ptch1, ptch2, gli1 and olig2. Sequence analysis of these regions reveals a high level of conservation of Gli-binding sites from fish to mammals in some, but not all, cases. Expression analysis of other transcription units that are closely associated with peaks identified several putative targets not previously implicated as Hh targets, including myl10, hnmt, lrp4, efemp2, fras1, quo, and lamc1. Each of these genes shows loss of, or reduced expression in, embryos homozygous for an antimorphic allele of gli2a, you-too (yot), consistent with their being direct targets of Gli2a.

  9. Comparative Study between ARX and ARMAX System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Piltan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available System Identification is used to build mathematical models of a dynamic system based on measured data. To design the best controllers for linear or nonlinear systems, mathematical modeling is the main challenge. To solve this challenge conventional and intelligent identification are recommended. System identification is divided into different algorithms. In this research, two important types algorithm are compared to identifying the highly nonlinear systems, namely: AutoRegressive with eXternal model input (ARX and Auto Regressive moving Average with eXternal model input (Armax Theory. These two methods are applied to the highly nonlinear industrial motor.

  10. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  11. SKP2 is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN and a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Laura; Chen, Lindi; Milazzo, Giorgio; Gherardi, Samuele; Perini, Giovanni; Willmore, Elaine; Newell, David R; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2015-07-10

    SKP2 is the substrate recognition subunit of the ubiquitin ligase complex which targets p27(KIP1) for degradation. Induced at the G1/S transit of the cell cycle, SKP2 is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and contributes to malignancy. We previously identified SKP2 as a possible MYCN target gene and hence hypothesise that SKP2 is a potential therapeutic target in MYCN amplified disease. A positive correlation was identified between MYCN activity and SKP2 mRNA expression in Tet21N MYCN-regulatable cells and a panel of MYCN amplified and non-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter gene assays, MYCN bound directly to E-boxes within the SKP2 promoter and induced transcriptional activity which was decreased by the removal of MYCN and E-box mutation. Although SKP2 knockdown inhibited cell growth in both MYCN amplified and non-amplified cells, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced only in non-MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion these data identify SKP2 as a direct transcriptional target of MYCN and supports SKP2 as a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  12. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria.

  13. Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jione; Nathan, Elisha; Xu, Shan-Mei; Tzahor, Eldad; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute to the outflow tract and right ventricle, as well as to parts of the left ventricle and atria. Isl1, a member of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor family, is expressed early in this cardiac progenitor population and functions near the top of a transcriptional pathway essential for heart development. Isl1 is required for the survival and migration of SHF-derived cells into the early developing heart at the inflow and outflow poles. Despite this important role for Isl1 in early heart formation, the transcriptional regulation of Isl1 has remained largely undefined. Therefore, to identify transcription factors that regulate Isl1 expression in vivo, we screened the conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Isl1 locus for enhancer activity in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we report the identification of an enhancer from the mouse Isl1 gene that is sufficient to direct expression to the SHF and its derivatives. The Isl1 SHF enhancer contains three consensus Forkhead transcription factor binding sites that are efficiently and specifically bound by Forkhead transcription factors. Importantly, the activity of the enhancer is dependent on these three Forkhead binding sites in transgenic mouse embryos. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in the SHF and establish a transcriptional pathway upstream of Isl1 in the SHF. PMID:19580802

  14. Oncogenic c-kit transcript is a target for binase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Kretova, Olga V; Zelenikhin, Pavel V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-07-01

    Mutational activation of c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase is common in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). One such activating point mutation is the N822K replacement in the c-Kit protein. Here we investigate the selective cytotoxic effect of binase--RNase from Bacillus intermedius--on FDC-P1-N822K cells. These cells were derived from myeloid progenitor FDC-P1 cells, in which ectopic expression of N822K c-kit gene induces interleukin-3 independent growth. In order to determine whether the sensitivity of these cells to binase is caused by the expression of c-kit oncogene, the cytotoxicity of the RNase was studied in the presence of selective inhibitor of mutated c-Kit imatinib (Gleevec). Inhibition of mutated c-Kit protein leads to the loss of cell sensitivity to the apoptotic effect of binase, while the latter still decreases the amount of cellular RNA. Using green fluorescent protein as an expression marker for the c-Kit oncoprotein, we demonstrate that the elimination of c-Kit is the key factor in selective cytotoxicity of binase. Quantitative RT-PCR with RNA samples isolated from the binase-treated FDC-P1-N822K cells shows that binase treatment results in 41% reduction in the amount of с-kit mRNA. This indicates that the transcript of the activated mutant c-kit is the target for toxic action of binase. Thus, the combination of inhibition of oncogenic protein with the destruction of its mRNA is a promising approach to eliminating malignant cells.

  15. Tuning of methods for offset free MPC based on ARX model representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate model predictive control (MPC) based on ARX models. ARX models can be identified from data using convex optimization technologies and is linear in the system parameters. Compared to other model parameterizations this feature is an advantage in embedded applications fo...... is extended with a disturbance model state. The relation between the base case and the two extended methods are illustrated which provides good understanding and a platform for discussing tuning for good closed loop performance....

  16. Metastatic Bone Disease: Role of Transcription Factors and Future Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Pratap, Jitesh; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of cancer from the earliest event of cell transformation through stages of tumor growth and metastasis at a distal site involves many complex biological processes. Underlying the numerous responses of cancer cells to the tumor microenvironment which support their survival, migration and metastasis are transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes reflecting properties of the tumor cell. A number of transcription factors have been identified that play key roles in pro...

  17. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  18. Targeted transcript mapping for agronomic traits in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez del Carmen, M.A.; Celis-Gamboa, C.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bachem, C.W.B.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and bulked segregant analysis (BSA) was used to identify genes co-segregating with earliness of tuberization in a diploid potato population. This approach identified 37 transcript-derived fragments with a polymorphic segregation pat

  19. Target Identification for CNS Diseases by Transcriptional Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Altar, C. Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P.; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild ...

  20. Apaf-1 is a transcriptional target for E2F and p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moroni, M C; Hickman, E S; Lazzerini Denchi, E

    2001-01-01

    between the deregulation of the pRB pathway and apoptosis. Furthermore, because the pRB pathway is functionally inactivated in most cancers, the identification of Apaf-1 as a transcriptional target for E2F might explain the increased sensitivity of tumour cells to chemotherapy. We also show that......, independently of the pRB pathway, Apaf-1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53, suggesting that p53 might sensitize cells to apoptosis by increasing Apaf-1 levels....

  1. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  2. Genomewide identification of pheromone-targeted transcription in fission yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Anthony

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fission yeast cells undergo sexual differentiation in response to nitrogen starvation. In this process haploid M and P cells first mate to form diploid zygotes, which then enter meiosis and sporulate. Prior to mating, M and P cells communicate with diffusible mating pheromones that activate a signal transduction pathway in the opposite cell type. The pheromone signalling orchestrates mating and is also required for entry into meiosis. Results Here we use DNA microarrays to identify genes that are induced by M-factor in P cells and by P-factor in M-cells. The use of a cyr1 genetic background allowed us to study pheromone signalling independently of nitrogen starvation. We identified a total of 163 genes that were consistently induced more than two-fold by pheromone stimulation. Gene disruption experiments demonstrated the involvement of newly discovered pheromone-induced genes in the differentiation process. We have mapped Gene Ontology (GO categories specifically associated with pheromone induction. A direct comparison of the M- and P-factor induced expression pattern allowed us to identify cell-type specific transcripts, including three new M-specific genes and one new P-specific gene. Conclusion We found that the pheromone response was very similar in M and P cells. Surprisingly, pheromone control extended to genes fulfilling their function well beyond the point of entry into meiosis, including numerous genes required for meiotic recombination. Our results suggest that the Ste11 transcription factor is responsible for the majority of pheromone-induced transcription. Finally, most cell-type specific genes now appear to be identified in fission yeast.

  3. Targeting Transcription Elongation Machinery for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    INVESTIGATOR:    Kunxin  Luo CONTRACTING  ORGANIZATION:   University  of  California,  Berkeley REPORT  DATE:  May 2017   TYPE  OF  REPORT:    Annual...NUMBER A ND  ADDRESS(ES) University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94704 9. SPONSORING  /  MONITORING  AGENCY  NAME(S)  AND  ADDRESS(ES) 10...direct role for the P-TEFb transcription elongation machinery in breast cancer progression. However, in addition to residing in the 7SK snRNP

  4. Genome-Wide Chromosomal Targets of Oncogenic Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Wang JP, Widom J (2005) Improved alignment of nucleosome DNA sequences using a mixture model. Nucleic Acids Res 33: 6743–6755. 6. Ioshikhes IP, Albert I...EMBO J 24: 533–542. 26. Anderson JD, Widom J (2000) Sequence and position-dependence of the equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA target sites

  5. Tuning SISO offset-free Model Predictive Control based on ARX models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2012-01-01

    present MPC for SISO systems based on ARX models combined with the first order filter. We derive expressions for the closed-loop variance of the unconstrained MPC based on a state space representation in innovation form and use these expressions to develop a tuning procedure for the regulator. We...... establish formal equivalence between GPC and state space based off-set free MPC. By simulation we demonstrate this procedure for a third order system. The offset-free ARX MPC demonstrates satisfactory set point tracking and rejection of an unmeasured step disturbance for a simulated furnace with a long time...

  6. Target identification for CNS diseases by transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer's disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to tau, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson's disease (PD) include the ubiquitin-proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  7. Targeted Transcriptional Repression in Bacteria Using CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John S; Wong, Spencer; Peters, Jason M; Almeida, Ricardo; Qi, Lei S

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) interference (CRISPRi) is a powerful technology for sequence-specifically repressing gene expression in bacterial cells. CRISPRi requires only a single protein and a custom-designed guide RNA for specific gene targeting. In Escherichia coli, CRISPRi repression efficiency is high (~300-fold), and there are no observable off-target effects. The method can be scaled up as a general strategy for the repression of many genes simultaneously using multiple designed guide RNAs. Here we provide a protocol for efficient guide RNA design, cloning, and assay of the CRISPRi system in E. coli. In principle, this protocol can be used to construct CRISPRi systems for gene repression in other species of bacteria.

  8. Identifying microRNAs and transcript targets in Jatropha seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Galli

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, are endogenously encoded small RNAs that play a key role in diverse plant biological processes. Jatropha curcas L. has received significant attention as a potential oilseed crop for the production of renewable oil. Here, a sRNA library of mature seeds and three mRNA libraries from three different seed development stages were generated by deep sequencing to identify and characterize the miRNAs and pre-miRNAs of J. curcas. Computational analysis was used for the identification of 180 conserved miRNAs and 41 precursors (pre-miRNAs as well as 16 novel pre-miRNAs. The predicted miRNA target genes are involved in a broad range of physiological functions, including cellular structure, nuclear function, translation, transport, hormone synthesis, defense, and lipid metabolism. Some pre-miRNA and miRNA targets vary in abundance between the three stages of seed development. A search for sequences that produce siRNA was performed, and the results indicated that J. curcas siRNAs play a role in nuclear functions, transport, catalytic processes and disease resistance. This study presents the first large scale identification of J. curcas miRNAs and their targets in mature seeds based on deep sequencing, and it contributes to a functional understanding of these miRNAs.

  9. Transcription factor co-repressors in cancer biology: roles and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Campbell, Moray J

    2010-06-01

    Normal transcription displays a high degree of flexibility over the choice, timing and magnitude of mRNA expression levels that tend to oscillate and cycle. These processes allow for combinatorial actions, feedback control and fine-tuning. A central role has emerged for the transcriptional co-repressor proteins such as NCOR1, NCOR2/SMRT, CoREST and CTBPs, to control the actions of many transcriptional factors, in large part, by recruitment and activation of a range of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Thus, co-repressors and chromatin remodeling factors are recruited to transcription factors at specific promoter/enhancer regions and execute changes in the chromatin structure. The specificity of this recruitment is controlled in a spatial-temporal manner. By playing a central role in transcriptional control, as they move and target transcription factors, co-repressors act as a key driver in the epigenetic economy of the nucleus. Co-repressor functions are selectively distorted in malignancy, by both loss and gain of function and contribute to the generation of transcriptional rigidity. Features of transcriptional rigidity apparent in cancer cells include the distorted signaling of nuclear receptors and the WNTs/beta-catenin axis. Understanding and predicting the consequences of altered co-repressor expression patterns in cancer cells has diagnostic and prognostic significance, and also have the capacity to be targeted through selective epigenetic therapies.

  10. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  11. Hierarchical Least Squares Parameter Estimation for Multivariable ARX-like Systems%多变量ARX-like系统的递阶最小二乘估计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁平; 丁峰

    2008-01-01

    利用Kronecker积,推导出多变量ARX-like随机系统的辨识模型,使用递阶辨识原理研制了一个递阶最小二乘参数估计算法.提出的递阶最小二乘算法比现存递推最小二乘算法计算量小.给出了为仿真例子.%By using the Kronecker product,An identification model for multivariable ARX-like stochastic systems is derived and developed a hierarchical least squares parameter estimation algorithm by the hierarchical identification principle.The proposed algorithm has less computational eorts than the recursive least squares algorithm.A simulation example is included.

  12. Pendrin, a Novel Transcriptional Target of the Uroguanylin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rozenfeld

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Guanylin (GN and uroguanylin (UGN are low-molecular-weight peptide hormones produced mainly in the intestinal mucosa in response to oral salt load. GN and UGN (guanylin peptides induce secretion of electrolytes and water in both intestine and kidney. Thought to act as “intestinal natriuretic factors”, GN and UGN modulate renal salt secretion by both endocrine mechanisms (linking the digestive system and kidney and paracrine/autocrine (intrarenal mechanisms. The cellular function of GN and UGN in intestine and proximal tubule is mediated by guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C-, cGMP-, and G protein-dependent pathways, whereas, in principal cells of the cortical collecting duct (CCD, these peptide hormones act via GC-C-independent signaling through phospholipase A2 (PLA2. The Cl-/HCO-3 exchanger pendrin (SLC26A4, encoded by the PDS gene, is expressed in non-α intercalated cells of the CCD. Pendrin is essential for CCD bicarbonate secretion and is also involved in NaCl balance and blood pressure regulation. Our recent studies have provided evidence that pendrin-mediated anion exchange in the CCD is regulated at the transcriptional level by UGN. UGN exerts an inhibitory effect on the pendrin gene promoter likely via heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 action at a defined heat shock element (HSE site. Recent studies have unraveled novel roles for guanylin peptides in several organ systems including involvement in appetite regulation, olfactory function, cell proliferation and differentiation, inflammation, and reproductive function. Both the guanylin system and pendrin have also been implicated in airway function. Future molecular research into the receptors and signal transduction pathways involved in the action of guanylin peptides and the pendrin anion exchanger in the kidney and other organs, and into the links between them, may facilitate discovery of new therapies for hypertension, heart failure, hepatic failure and other fluid retention syndromes, as well as

  13. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This in...

  14. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Carretero, Julian; Al-shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R.; Poulsen, Hans S.; Aref, Amir R.; Barbie, David A.; Bradner, James E.; George, Rani; Gray, Nathanael S.; Young, Richard A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription factor genes including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors are highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  15. The Transcriptional Targets of Mutant FOXL2 in Granulosa Cell Tumours

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite their distinct biology, granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are treated the same as other ovarian tumours. Intriguingly, a recurring somatic mutation in the transcription factor Forkhead Box L2 (FOXL2) 402C>G has been found in nearly all GCTs examined. This investigation aims to identify the pathogenicity of mutant FOXL2 by studying its altered transcriptional targets. METHODS: The expression of mutant FOXL2 was reduced in the GCT cell line KGN, and wildtype and mutant FOXL2 wer...

  16. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...... to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy....

  17. FATS is a transcriptional target of p53 and associated with antitumor activity

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Frequent mutations of p53 in human cancers exemplify its crucial role as a tumor suppressor transcription factor, and p21, a transcriptional target of p53, plays a central role in surveillance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Our previous study has shown that FATS stabilize p21 to preserve genome integrity. In this study we identified a novel transcript variant of FATS (GenBank: GQ499374) through screening a cDNA library from mouse testis, which uncovered the promoter region of mouse FATS....

  18. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  19. Screening of ARX in mental retardation families: Consequences for the strategy of molecular diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poirier, K.; Lacombe, D.; Gilbert-Dussardier, B.; Raynaud, M.; Desportes, V.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Moraine, C.; Fryns, J.P.; Ropers, H.H.; Beldjord, C.; Chelly, J.; Bienvenu, T.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the human ARX gene have been shown to cause nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation (MRX) as well as syndromic forms such as X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG), Partington syndrome and X-linked infantile spasm. The most common causative mutation, a duplication of 24

  20. Nonlinear model predictive control using parameter varying BP-ARX combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.-F.; Xiao, L.-F.; Qian, J.-X.; Li, H.

    2012-03-01

    A novel back-propagation AutoRegressive with eXternal input (BP-ARX) combination model is constructed for model predictive control (MPC) of MIMO nonlinear systems, whose steady-state relation between inputs and outputs can be obtained. The BP neural network represents the steady-state relation, and the ARX model represents the linear dynamic relation between inputs and outputs of the nonlinear systems. The BP-ARX model is a global model and is identified offline, while the parameters of the ARX model are rescaled online according to BP neural network and operating data. Sequential quadratic programming is employed to solve the quadratic objective function online, and a shift coefficient is defined to constrain the effect time of the recursive least-squares algorithm. Thus, a parameter varying nonlinear MPC (PVNMPC) algorithm that responds quickly to large changes in system set-points and shows good dynamic performance when system outputs approach set-points is proposed. Simulation results in a multivariable stirred tank and a multivariable pH neutralisation process illustrate the applicability of the proposed method and comparisons of the control effect between PVNMPC and multivariable recursive generalised predictive controller are also performed.

  1. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Bialek

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs, act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR, for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  2. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  3. NGF-mediated transcriptional targets of p53 in PC12 neuronal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labhart Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is recognized as a critical regulator of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Mounting evidence also suggests a role for p53 in differentiation of cells including neuronal precursors. We studied the transcriptional role of p53 during nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of the PC12 line into neuron-like cells. We hypothesized that p53 contributed to PC12 differentiation through the regulation of gene targets distinct from its known transcriptional targets for apoptosis or DNA repair. Results Using a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning technique, we identified and validated 14 novel p53-regulated genes following NGF treatment. The data show p53 protein was transcriptionally activated and contributed to NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth during differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we describe stimulus-specific regulation of a subset of these target genes by p53. The most salient differentiation-relevant target genes included wnt7b involved in dendritic extension and the tfcp2l4/grhl3 grainyhead homolog implicated in ectodermal development. Additional targets included brk, sdk2, sesn3, txnl2, dusp5, pon3, lect1, pkcbpb15 and other genes. Conclusion Within the PC12 neuronal context, putative p53-occupied genomic loci spanned the entire Rattus norvegicus genome upon NGF treatment. We conclude that receptor-mediated p53 transcriptional activity is involved in PC12 differentiation and may suggest a contributory role for p53 in neuronal development.

  4. INTEGRATIVE COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF ANTISENSE TRANSCRIPTS AND miRNA TARGETS IN PLANT GENOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Y.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNA, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important components of gene expression in eukaryotes, forming a regulatory network. miRNAs are expressed through nucleolytic maturation of hairpin precursors transcribed by RNA Polymerase II or III. Such transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants, fungi and animals. miRNAs bind to target RNA transcripts and guide their cleavage (mostly for plants or act to prevent translation. siRNAs act via a similar mechanism of cleavage of their target genes, but they also can direct genomic DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. It is estimated that large fraction, up to 30% of all human genes also may be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNAs. For plant genomes numbers could be higher depending on quality of sequencing and genome annotation. Due to availability of genome and mRNA sequences genome-wide searches for sense-antisense transcripts have been reported, but few plant sense-antisense transcript pairs have been studied. Integration of these data in specialized databases is challenging problem of computer genomics. We have developed set of computer programs to define antisense transcripts and miRNA genes based on available sequencing data. We have analyzed data from PlantNATsDB (Plant Natural Antisense Transcripts DataBase which is a platform for annotating and discovering Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT by integrating various data sources [1]. NATs can be grouped into two categories, cis-NATs and trans-NATs. Cis-NAT pairs are transcribed from opposing DNA strands at the same genomic locus and have a variety of orientations and differing lengths of overlap between the perfect sequence complementary regions, whereas trans-NAT pairs are transcribed from different loci and form partial complementarily. The database contains at the moment 69 plant species. The database provides an integrative, interactive and information-rich web graphical interface to

  5. Patient mutation in AIRE disrupts P-TEFb binding and target gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žumer, Kristina; Plemenitaš, Ana; Saksela, Kalle; Peterlin, B Matija

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor that induces the expression of a large subset of otherwise strictly tissue restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, thereby enabling their presentation to developing T cells for negative selection. Mutations in AIRE lead to autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), a rare monogenetic disease. Although it has been reported that AIRE interacts with proteins involved in nuclear transport, DNA-damage response, chromatin remodeling, transcription and pre-mRNA-splicing, the precise mechanism of AIRE-induced tissue restricted antigen expression has remained elusive. In this study, we investigated an APECED patient mutation that causes the loss of the extreme C-terminus of AIRE and found that this mutant protein is transcriptionaly inactive. When tethered heterologously to DNA, this domain could stimulate transcription and splicing by itself. Moreover, the loss of this C-terminus disrupted interactions with the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Via P-TEFb, AIRE increased levels of RNA polymerase II on and enhanced pre-mRNA splicing of heterologous and endogenous target genes. Indeed, the inhibition of CDK9, the kinase subunit of P-TEFb, inhibited AIRE-induced pre-mRNA splicing of these genes. Thus, AIRE requires P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of target genes.

  6. Transcription-induced DNA double strand breaks: both oncogenic force and potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Michael C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2011-06-15

    An emerging model of transcriptional activation suggests that induction of transcriptional programs, for instance by stimulating prostate or breast cells with androgens or estrogens, respectively, involves the formation of DNA damage, including DNA double strand breaks (DSB), recruitment of DSB repair proteins, and movement of newly activated genes to transcription hubs. The DSB can be mediated by the class II topoisomerase TOP2B, which is recruited with the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor to regulatory sites on target genes and is apparently required for efficient transcriptional activation of these genes. These DSBs are recognized by the DNA repair machinery triggering the recruitment of repair proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), ATM, and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). If illegitimately repaired, such DSBs can seed the formation of genomic rearrangements like the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion oncogene in prostate cancer. Here, we hypothesize that these transcription-induced, TOP2B-mediated DSBs can also be exploited therapeutically and propose that, in hormone-dependent tumors like breast and prostate cancers, a hormone-cycling therapy, in combination with topoisomerase II poisons or inhibitors of the DNA repair components PARP1 and DNA-PK, could overwhelm cancer cells with transcription-associated DSBs. Such strategies may find particular utility in cancers, like prostate cancer, which show low proliferation rates, in which other chemotherapeutic strategies that target rapidly proliferating cells have had limited success.

  7. Transcript profiling of Elf5+/- mammary glands during pregnancy identifies novel targets of Elf5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee L Rogers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elf5, an epithelial specific Ets transcription factor, plays a crucial role in the pregnancy-associated development of the mouse mammary gland. Elf5(-/- embryos do not survive, however the Elf5(+/- mammary gland displays a severe pregnancy-associated developmental defect. While it is known that Elf5 is crucial for correct mammary development and lactation, the molecular mechanisms employed by Elf5 to exert its effects on the mammary gland are largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transcript profiling was used to investigate the transcriptional changes that occur as a result of Elf5 haploinsufficiency in the Elf5(+/- mouse model. We show that the development of the mouse Elf5(+/- mammary gland is delayed at a transcriptional and morphological level, due to the delayed increase in Elf5 protein in these glands. We also identify a number of potential Elf5 target genes, including Mucin 4, whose expression, is directly regulated by the binding of Elf5 to an Ets binding site within its promoter. CONCLUSION: We identify novel transcriptional targets of Elf5 and show that Muc4 is a direct target of Elf5, further elucidating the mechanisms through which Elf5 regulates proliferation and differentiation in the mammary gland.

  8. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  9. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  10. Global Promoter Targeting of a Conserved Lysine Deacetylase for Transcriptional Shutoff during Quiescence Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Jeffrey N; Boerma, Joseph W; Breeden, Linda L; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2015-09-01

    Quiescence is a conserved cell-cycle state characterized by cell-cycle arrest, increased stress resistance, enhanced longevity, and decreased transcriptional, translational, and metabolic output. Although quiescence plays essential roles in cell survival and normal differentiation, the molecular mechanisms leading to this state are not well understood. Here, we determined changes in the transcriptome and chromatin structure of S. cerevisiae upon quiescence entry. Our analyses revealed transcriptional shutoff that is far more robust than previously believed and an unprecedented global chromatin transition, which are tightly correlated. These changes require Rpd3 lysine deacetylase targeting to at least half of gene promoters via quiescence-specific transcription factors including Xbp1 and Stb3. Deletion of RPD3 prevents cells from establishing transcriptional quiescence, leading to defects in quiescence entry and shortening of chronological lifespan. Our results define a molecular mechanism for global reprogramming of transcriptome and chromatin structure for quiescence driven by a highly conserved chromatin regulator.

  11. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  12. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  13. Myocardin is a direct transcriptional target of Mef2, Tead and Foxo proteins during cardiovascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemers, Esther E; Sutherland, Lillian B; McAnally, John; Richardson, James A; Olson, Eric N

    2006-11-01

    Myocardin is a transcriptional co-activator of serum response factor (Srf), which is a key regulator of the expression of smooth and cardiac muscle genes. Consistent with its role in regulating cardiovascular development, myocardin is the earliest known marker specific to both the cardiac and smooth muscle lineages during embryogenesis. To understand how the expression of this early transcriptional regulator is initiated and maintained, we scanned 90 kb of genomic DNA encompassing the myocardin gene for cis-regulatory elements capable of directing myocardin transcription in cardiac and smooth muscle lineages in vivo. Here, we describe an enhancer that controls cardiovascular expression of the mouse myocardin gene during mouse embryogenesis and adulthood. Activity of this enhancer in the heart and vascular system requires the combined actions of the Mef2 and Foxo transcription factors. In addition, the Tead transcription factor is required specifically for enhancer activation in neural-crest-derived smooth muscle cells and dorsal aorta. Notably, myocardin also regulates its own enhancer, but in contrast to the majority of myocardin target genes, which are dependent on Srf, myocardin acts through Mef2 to control its enhancer. These findings reveal an Srf-independent mechanism for smooth and cardiac muscle-restricted transcription and provide insight into the regulatory mechanisms responsible for establishing the smooth and cardiac muscle phenotypes during development.

  14. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V.; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W.; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, Congbao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD’s co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallograp...

  15. The transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2 in granulosa cell tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseanne Rosario

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite their distinct biology, granulosa cell tumours (GCTs are treated the same as other ovarian tumours. Intriguingly, a recurring somatic mutation in the transcription factor Forkhead Box L2 (FOXL2 402C>G has been found in nearly all GCTs examined. This investigation aims to identify the pathogenicity of mutant FOXL2 by studying its altered transcriptional targets. METHODS: The expression of mutant FOXL2 was reduced in the GCT cell line KGN, and wildtype and mutant FOXL2 were overexpressed in the GCT cell line COV434. Total RNA was hybridised to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 microarrays. Comparisons were made between the transcriptomes of control cells and cells altered by FOXL2 knockdown and overexpression, to detect potential transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2. RESULTS: The overexpression of wildtype and mutant FOXL2 in COV434, and the silencing of mutant FOXL2 expression in KGN, has shown that mutant FOXL2 is able to differentially regulate the expression of many genes, including two well known FOXL2 targets, StAR and CYP19A. We have shown that many of the genes regulated by mutant FOXL2 are clustered into functional annotations of cell death, proliferation, and tumourigenesis. Furthermore, TGF-β signalling was found to be enriched when using the gene annotation tools GATHER and GeneSetDB. This enrichment was still significant after performing a robust permutation analysis. CONCLUSION: Given that many of the transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2 are known TGF-β signalling genes, we suggest that deregulation of this key antiproliferative pathway is one way mutant FOXL2 contributes to the pathogenesis of adult-type GCTs. We believe this pathway should be a target for future therapeutic interventions, if outcomes for women with GCTs are to improve.

  16. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery. PMID:21113025

  17. ARX model-based damage sensitive features for structural damage localization using output-only measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Koushik; Bhattacharya, Bishakh; Ray-Chaudhuri, Samit

    2015-08-01

    The study proposes a set of four ARX model (autoregressive model with exogenous input) based damage sensitive features (DSFs) for structural damage detection and localization using the dynamic responses of structures, where the information regarding the input excitation may not be available. In the proposed framework, one of the output responses of a multi-degree-of-freedom system is assumed as the input and the rest are considered as the output. The features are based on ARX model coefficients, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test statistical distance, and the model residual error. At first, a mathematical formulation is provided to establish the relation between the change in ARX model coefficients and the normalized stiffness of a structure. KS test parameters are then described to show the sensitivity of statistical distance of ARX model residual error with the damage location. The efficiency of the proposed set of DSFs is evaluated by conducting numerical studies involving a shear building and a steel moment-resisting frame. To simulate the damage scenarios in these structures, stiffness degradation of different elements is considered. It is observed from this study that the proposed set of DSFs is good indicator for damage location even in the presence of damping, multiple damages, noise, and parametric uncertainties. The performance of these DSFs is compared with mode shape curvature-based approach for damage localization. An experimental study has also been conducted on a three-dimensional six-storey steel moment frame to understand the performance of these DSFs under real measurement conditions. It has been observed that the proposed set of DSFs can satisfactorily localize damage in the structure.

  18. Mutations of ARX are associated with striking pleiotropy and consistent genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mitsuhiro; Das, Soma; Petras, Kristin; Kitamura, Kunio; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou; Abuelo, Diane N; Barr, Mason; Bonneau, Dominique; Brady, Angela F; Carpenter, Nancy J; Cipero, Karen L; Frisone, Francesco; Fukuda, Takayuki; Guerrini, Renzo; Iida, Eri; Itoh, Masayuki; Lewanda, Amy Feldman; Nanba, Yukiko; Oka, Akira; Proud, Virginia K; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Schelley, Susan L; Selicorni, Angelo; Shaner, Rachel; Silengo, Margherita; Stewart, Fiona; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Toyama, Jun; Toutain, Annick; Vargas, Ana Lía; Yanazawa, Masako; Zackai, Elaine H; Dobyns, William B

    2004-02-01

    We recently identified mutations of ARX in nine genotypic males with X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG), and in several female relatives with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). We now report 13 novel and two recurrent mutations of ARX, and one nucleotide change of uncertain significance in 20 genotypic males from 16 families. Most had XLAG, but two had hydranencephaly and abnormal genitalia, and three males from one family had Proud syndrome or ACC with abnormal genitalia. We obtained detailed clinical information on all 29 affected males, including the nine previously reported subjects. Premature termination mutations consisting of large deletions, frameshifts, nonsense mutations, and splice site mutations in exons 1 to 4 caused XLAG or hydranencephaly with abnormal genitalia. Nonconservative missense mutations within the homeobox caused less severe XLAG, while conservative substitution in the homeodomain caused Proud syndrome. A nonconservative missense mutation near the C-terminal aristaless domain caused unusually severe XLAG with microcephaly and mild cerebellar hypoplasia. In addition, several less severe phenotypes without malformations have been reported, including mental retardation with cryptogenic infantile spasms (West syndrome), other seizure types, dystonia or autism, and nonsyndromic mental retardation. The ARX mutations associated with these phenotypes have included polyalanine expansions or duplications, missense mutations, and one deletion of exon 5. Together, the group of phenotypes associated with ARX mutations demonstrates remarkable pleiotropy, but also comprises a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders that begins with hydranencephaly, lissencephaly, and agenesis of the corpus callosum, and ends with a series of overlapping syndromes with apparently normal brain structure.

  19. A System Identification Software Tool for General MISO ARX-Type of Model Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lindskog, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The typical system identification procedure requires powerful and versatile software means. In this paper we describe and exemplify the use of a prototype identi#cation software tool, applicable for the rather broad class of multi input single output model structures with regressors that are formed by delayed in- and outputs. Interesting special instances of this model structure category include, e.g., linear ARX and many semi-physical structures, feed-forward neural networks, radial basis fu...

  20. An adaptive ARX model to estimate the RUL of aluminum plates based on its crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Barraza, Diana; Tercero-Gómez, Víctor G.; Beruvides, Mario G.; Limón-Robles, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A wide variety of Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) techniques deal with the problem of predicting the time for an asset fault. Most statistical approaches rely on historical failure data that might not be available in several practical situations. To address this issue, practitioners might require the use of self-starting approaches that consider only the available knowledge about the current degradation process and the asset operating context to update the prognostic model. Some authors use Autoregressive (AR) models for this purpose that are adequate when the asset operating context is constant, however, if it is variable, the accuracy of the models can be affected. In this paper, three autoregressive models with exogenous variables (ARX) were constructed, and their capability to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of a process was evaluated following the case of the aluminum crack growth problem. An existing stochastic model of aluminum crack growth was implemented and used to assess RUL estimation performance of the proposed ARX models through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Point and interval estimations were made based only on individual history, behavior, operating conditions and failure thresholds. Both analytic and bootstrapping techniques were used in the estimation process. Finally, by including recursive parameter estimation and a forgetting factor, the ARX methodology adapts to changing operating conditions and maintain the focus on the current degradation level of an asset.

  1. FORECASTING RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN BRAZIL: APPLICATION OF THE ARX MODEL

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    Joao Bosco de Castro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to propose the application of the ARX model to forecast residential electricity consumption in Brazil. Such estimates are critical for decision making in the energy sector,  from a technical, economic and environmentally sustainable standpoint. The demand for electricity follows a multiplicative model based on economic theory and involves four explanatory variables: the cost of residential electricity, the actual average income, the inflation of domestic utilities and the electricity consumption. The coefficients of the electricity consumption equation  were determined using the ARX model, which considers the influence of exogenous variables to estimate the dependent variable and employs an autoregression process for residual modeling to improve the explanatory power. The resulting model has a determination coefficient of 95.4 percent and all estimated coefficients were significant at the 0.10 descriptive level. Residential electricity consumption estimates were also determined for January and February 2010 within the 95 percent confidence interval, which included the actual consumption figures observed. The proposed model has been shown to be useful for estimating residential electricity consumption  in Brazil. Key-words: Time series. Electricity consumption. ARX modeling. 

  2. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-11-18

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediated by α-helices. Thus, α-helical decoys have been proposed as potential targeted therapies for pathologic bHLH transcription. Here, we developed a library of stabilized α-helices of OLIG2 (SAH-OLIG2) to test the capacity of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides to disrupt OLIG2 homodimerization, which drives the development and chemoresistance of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of human brain cancer. Although stapling successfully reinforced the α-helical structure of bHLH constructs of varying length, sequence-specific dissociation of OLIG2 dimers from DNA was not achieved. Re-evaluation of the binding determinants for OLIG2 self-association and stability revealed an unanticipated role of the C-terminal domain. These data highlight potential pitfalls in peptide-based targeting of bHLH transcription factors given the liabilities of their positively charged amino acid sequences and multifactorial binding determinants.

  3. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-11-03

    The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD's co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small-molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration, and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Oncogenic Splicing Factor SRSF1 Is a Critical Transcriptional Target of MYC

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    Shipra Das

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The SR protein splicing factor SRSF1 is a potent proto-oncogene that is frequently upregulated in cancer. Here, we show that SRSF1 is a direct target of the transcription factor oncoprotein MYC. These two oncogenes are significantly coexpressed in lung carcinomas, and MYC knockdown downregulates SRSF1 expression in lung-cancer cell lines. MYC directly activates transcription of SRSF1 through two noncanonical E-boxes in its promoter. The resulting increase in SRSF1 protein is sufficient to modulate alternative splicing of a subset of transcripts. In particular, MYC induction leads to SRSF1-mediated alternative splicing of the signaling kinase MKNK2 and the transcription factor TEAD1. SRSF1 knockdown reduces MYC's oncogenic activity, decreasing proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest a mechanism for SRSF1 upregulation in tumors with elevated MYC and identify SRSF1 as a critical MYC target that contributes to its oncogenic potential by enabling MYC to regulate the expression of specific protein isoforms through alternative splicing.

  5. Pharmacological targeting of the transcription factor SOX18 delays breast cancer in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Jeroen; Fontaine, Frank; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mittal, Deepak; Sierecki, Emma; Sacilotto, Natalia; Zuegg, Johannes; Robertson, Avril AB; Holmes, Kelly; Salim, Angela A; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Butler, Mark S; Robinson, Ashley S; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Johnston, Wayne; Alexandrov, Kirill; Black, Brian L; Hogan, Benjamin M; Val, Sarah De; Capon, Robert J; Carroll, Jason S; Bailey, Timothy L; Koopman, Peter; Jauch, Ralf; Smyth, Mark J; Cooper, Matthew A; Gambin, Yann; Francois, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacological targeting of transcription factors holds great promise for the development of new therapeutics, but strategies based on blockade of DNA binding, nuclear shuttling, or individual protein partner recruitment have yielded limited success to date. Transcription factors typically engage in complex interaction networks, likely masking the effects of specifically inhibiting single protein-protein interactions. Here, we used a combination of genomic, proteomic and biophysical methods to discover a suite of protein-protein interactions involving the SOX18 transcription factor, a known regulator of vascular development and disease. We describe a small-molecule that is able to disrupt a discrete subset of SOX18-dependent interactions. This compound selectively suppressed SOX18 transcriptional outputs in vitro and interfered with vascular development in zebrafish larvae. In a mouse pre-clinical model of breast cancer, treatment with this inhibitor significantly improved survival by reducing tumour vascular density and metastatic spread. Our studies validate an interactome-based molecular strategy to interfere with transcription factor activity, for the development of novel disease therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21221.001 PMID:28137359

  6. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding reg...

  7. Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

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    Michelle R. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor- (erythroid-derived 2 like 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2 is a key transcriptional activator of the antioxidant response pathway and is closely related to erythroid transcription factor NFE2. Under oxidative stress, NRF2 heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins and binds cis-acting enhancer sequences found near oxidative stress response genes. Using the dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN to activate NRF2, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq identified several hundred novel NRF2-mediated targets beyond its role in oxidative stress. Activated NRF2 bound the antioxidant response element (ARE in promoters of several known and novel target genes involved in iron homeostasis and heme metabolism, including known targets FTL and FTH1, as well as novel binding in the globin locus control region. Five novel NRF2 target genes were chosen for followup: AMBP, ABCB6, FECH, HRG-1 (SLC48A1, and TBXAS1. SFN-induced gene expression in erythroid K562 and lymphoid cells were compared for each target gene. NRF2 silencing showed reduced expression in lymphoid, lung, and hepatic cells. Furthermore, stable knockdown of NRF2 negative regulator KEAP1 in K562 cells resulted in increased NQO1, AMBP, and TBXAS1 expression. NFE2 binding sites in K562 cells revealed similar binding profiles as lymphoid NRF2 sites in all potential NRF2 candidates supporting a role for NRF2 in heme metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  8. The Streptococcus pneumoniae cia regulon: CiaR target sites and transcription profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascher, Thorsten; Zähner, Dorothea; Merai, Michelle; Balmelle, Nadège; de Saizieu, Antoine B; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2003-01-01

    The ciaR-ciaH system is one of 13 two-component signal-transducing systems of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mutations in the histidine protein kinase CiaH confer increased resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and interfere with the development of genetic competence. In order to identify the genes controlled by the cia system, the cia regulon, DNA fragments targeted by the response regulator CiaR were isolated from restricted chromosomal DNA using the solid-phase DNA binding assay and analyzed by hybridization to an oligonucleotide microarray representing the S. pneumoniae genome. A set of 18 chromosomal regions containing 26 CiaR target sites were detected and proposed to represent the minimal cia regulon. The putative CiaR target loci included genes important for the synthesis and modification of cell wall polymers, peptide pheromone and bacteriocin production, and the htrA-spo0J region. In addition, the transcription profile of cia loss-of-function mutants and those with an apparent activated cia system representing the off and on states of the regulatory system were analyzed. The transcript analysis confirmed the cia-dependent expression of seven putative target loci and revealed three additional cia-regulated loci. Five putative target regions were silent under all conditions, and for the remaining three regions, no cia-dependent expression could be detected. Furthermore, the competence regulon, including the comCDE operon required for induction of competence, was completely repressed by the cia system.

  9. Insulators target active genes to transcription factories and polycomb-repressed genes to polycomb bodies.

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    Hua-Bing Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb bodies are foci of Polycomb proteins in which different Polycomb target genes are thought to co-localize in the nucleus, looping out from their chromosomal context. We have shown previously that insulators, not Polycomb response elements (PREs, mediate associations among Polycomb Group (PcG targets to form Polycomb bodies. Here we use live imaging and 3C interactions to show that transgenes containing PREs and endogenous PcG-regulated genes are targeted by insulator proteins to different nuclear structures depending on their state of activity. When two genes are repressed, they co-localize in Polycomb bodies. When both are active, they are targeted to transcription factories in a fashion dependent on Trithorax and enhancer specificity as well as the insulator protein CTCF. In the absence of CTCF, assembly of Polycomb bodies is essentially reduced to those representing genomic clusters of Polycomb target genes. The critical role of Trithorax suggests that stable association with a specialized transcription factory underlies the cellular memory of the active state.

  10. Targeting the bHLH transcriptional networks by mutated E proteins in experimental glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, Sarah; Joly, Sandrine; Fries, Michel; Obermair, Franz-Josef; Burn, Felice; Mehmood, Rashid; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Raineteau, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GB) are aggressive primary brain tumors. Helix-loop-helix (HLH, ID proteins) and basic HLH (bHLH, e.g., Olig2) proteins are transcription factors that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation throughout development and into adulthood. Their convergence on many oncogenic signaling pathways combined with the observation that their overexpression in GB correlates with poor clinical outcome identifies these transcription factors as promising therapeutic targets. Important dimerization partners of HLH/bHLH proteins are E proteins that are necessary for nuclear translocation and DNA binding. Here, we overexpressed a wild type or a dominant negative form of E47 (dnE47) that lacks its nuclear localization signal thus preventing nuclear translocation of bHLH proteins in long-term glioma cell lines and in glioma-initiating cell lines and analyzed the effects in vitro and in vivo. While overexpression of E47 was sufficient to induce apoptosis in absence of bHLH proteins, dnE47 was necessary to prevent nuclear translocation of Olig2 and to achieve similar proapoptotic responses. Transcriptional analyses revealed downregulation of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2L1 and the proproliferative gene CDC25A as underlying mechanisms. Overexpression of dnE47 in glioma-initiating cell lines with high HLH and bHLH protein levels reduced sphere formation capacities and expression levels of Nestin, BCL2L1, and CDC25A. Finally, the in vivo induction of dnE47 expression in established xenografts prolonged survival. In conclusion, our data introduce a novel approach to jointly neutralize HLH and bHLH transcriptional networks activities, and identify these transcription factors as potential targets in glioma.

  11. NPPB and ACAN, two novel SHOX2 transcription targets implicated in skeletal development.

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    Miriam Aza-Carmona

    Full Text Available SHOX and SHOX2 transcription factors are highly homologous, with even identical homeodomains. Genetic alterations in SHOX result in two skeletal dysplasias; Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD and Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD, while no human genetic disease has been linked to date with SHOX2. SHOX2 is, though, involved in skeletal development, as shown by different knockout mice models. Due to the high homology between SHOX and SHOX2, and their functional redundancy during heart development, we postulated that SHOX2 might have the same transcriptional targets and cofactors as SHOX in limb development. We selected two SHOX transcription targets regulated by different mechanisms: 1 the natriuretic peptide precursor B gene (NPPB involved in the endochondral ossification signalling and directly activated by SHOX; and 2 Aggrecan (ACAN, a major component of cartilage extracellular matrix, regulated by the cooperation of SHOX with the SOX trio (SOX5, SOX6 and SOX9 via the protein interaction between SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX. Using the luciferase assay we have demonstrated that SHOX2, like SHOX, regulates NPPB directly whilst activates ACAN via its cooperation with the SOX trio. Subsequently, we have identified and characterized the protein domains implicated in the SHOX2 dimerization and also its protein interaction with SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX using the yeast-two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Immunohistochemistry of human fetal growth plates from different time points demonstrated that SHOX2 is coexpressed with SHOX and the members of the SOX trio. Despite these findings, no mutation was identified in SHOX2 in a cohort of 83 LWD patients with no known molecular defect, suggesting that SHOX2 alterations do not cause LWD. In conclusion, our work has identified the first cofactors and two new transcription targets of SHOX2 in limb development, and we hypothesize a time- and tissue-specific functional redundancy between SHOX and SHOX2.

  12. Target enrichment sequencing in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) using probes designed from transcript sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ze; Fan, Wen; Wang, Liping; Paudel, Dev; Leventini, Dante; Tillman, Barry L; Wang, Jianping

    2017-05-10

    Enabled by the next generation sequencing, target enrichment sequencing (TES) is a powerful method to enrich genomic regions of interest and to identify sequence variations. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of probe design from transcript sequences for TES application in calling sequence variants in peanut, an important allotetraploid crop with a large genome size. In this study, we applied an in-solution hybridization method to enrich DNA sequences of seven peanut genotypes. Our results showed that it is feasible to apply TES with probes designed from transcript sequences in polyploid peanut. Using a set of 31,123 probes, a total of 5131 and 7521 genes were targeted in peanut A and B genomes, respectively. For each genotype used in this study, the probe target capture regions were efficiently covered with high depth. The average on-target rate of sequencing reads was 42.47%, with a significant amount of off-target reads coming from genomic regions homologous to target regions. In this study, when given predefined genomic regions of interest and the same amount of sequencing data, TES provided the highest coverage of target regions when compared to whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and genotyping by sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling and subsequent validation revealed a high validation rate (85.71%) of homozygous SNPs, providing valuable markers for peanut genotyping. This study demonstrated the success of applying TES for SNP identification in peanut, which shall provide valuable suggestions for TES application in other non-model species without a genome reference available.

  13. Utilization of Rad51C promoter for transcriptional targeting of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Ying; Tian, Xiao; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Mao, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy that specifically targets malignant cells with minimal or no toxicity to normal tissue has been a long-standing goal of cancer research. Rad51 expression is elevated in a wide range of cancers and Rad51 promoter has been used to transcriptionally target tumor cells, however, a large size of Rad51 promoter limits its application for gene therapy. To identify novel tumor-specific promoters, we examined expression levels of Rad51 paralogs, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D as well as Rad52 in a panel of normal and tumor cell lines. We found that Rad51C is significantly overexpressed in cancer cells. The expression was up-regulated by approximately 6-fold at the mRNA level and 9-fold at the protein level. Interestingly, the 2064 bp long Rad51C promoter fragment was approximately 300-fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. A construct containing Rad51C promoter driving diphtheria toxin A efficiently killed several types of cancer cells with very mild effect to normal cells. These results underscore the potential of targeting the homologous recombination pathway in cancer cells and provide a proof of principle that the Rad51C promoter fragment can be used to transcriptionally target cancer cells. PMID:24742710

  14. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  15. Alternative Polyadenylation Regulates CELF1/CUGBP1 Target Transcripts Following T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisang, Daniel; Reilly, Cavan; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating gene expression. Transcript 3′ end shortening through changes in polyadenylation site usage occurs following T cell activation, but the consequences of APA on gene expression are poorly understood. We previously showed that GU-rich elements (GREs) found in the 3′ untranslated regions of select transcripts mediate rapid mRNA decay by recruiting the protein CELF1/CUGBP1. Using a global RNA sequencing approach, we found that a network of CELF1 target transcripts involved in cell division underwent preferential 3′ end shortening via APA following T cell activation, resulting in decreased inclusion of CELF1 binding sites and increased transcript expression. We present a model whereby CELF1 regulates APA site selection following T cell activation through reversible binding to nearby GRE sequences. These findings provide insight into the role of APA in controlling cellular proliferation during biological processes such as development, oncogenesis and T cell activation PMID:25123787

  16. FATS is a transcriptional target of p53 and associated with antitumor activity

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    Zhang Xifeng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Frequent mutations of p53 in human cancers exemplify its crucial role as a tumor suppressor transcription factor, and p21, a transcriptional target of p53, plays a central role in surveillance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Our previous study has shown that FATS stabilize p21 to preserve genome integrity. In this study we identified a novel transcript variant of FATS (GenBank: GQ499374 through screening a cDNA library from mouse testis, which uncovered the promoter region of mouse FATS. Mouse FATS was highly expressed in testis. The p53-responsive elements existed in proximal region of both mouse and human FATS promoters. Functional study indicated that the transcription of FATS gene was activated by p53, whereas such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-RE of FATS promoter. Furthermore, the expression of FATS increased upon DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. FATS expression was silent or downregulated in human cancers, and overexpression of FATS suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo independently of p53. Our results reveal FATS as a p53-regulated gene to monitor genomic stability.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses.

  18. Transcriptional activation of TFEB/ZKSCAN3 target genes underlies enhanced autophagy in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jason P; Reddy, Satya L; Merry, Diane E; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2014-03-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA demonstrates androgen-dependent toxicity due to unfolding and aggregation of the mutant protein. There are currently no disease-modifying therapies, but of increasing interest for therapeutic targeting is autophagy, a highly conserved cellular process mediating protein quality control. We have previously shown that genetic manipulations inhibiting autophagy diminish skeletal muscle atrophy and extend the lifespan of AR113Q knock-in mice. In contrast, manipulations inducing autophagy worsen muscle atrophy, suggesting that chronic, aberrant upregulation of autophagy contributes to pathogenesis. Since the degree to which autophagy is altered in SBMA and the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are incompletely defined, we sought to delineate autophagic status in SBMA using both cellular and mouse models. Here, we confirm that autophagy is induced in cellular and knock-in mouse models of SBMA and show that the transcription factors transcription factor EB (TFEB) and ZKSCAN3 operate in opposing roles to underlie these changes. We demonstrate upregulation of TFEB target genes in skeletal muscle from AR113Q male mice and SBMA patients. Furthermore, we observe a greater response in AR113Q mice to physiological stimulation of autophagy by both nutrient starvation and exercise. Taken together, our results indicate that transcriptional signaling contributes to autophagic dysregulation and provides a mechanistic framework for the pathologic increase of autophagic responsiveness in SBMA.

  19. Analysis of miRNAs targeting transcription factors in Persicaria minor induced by Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Abdul Fatah A.; Ali, Nazaruddin Muhammad; Ismail, Ismanizan; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2016-11-01

    A recent discovery showed small non-coding RNA known as microRNA has a crucial role in plant development and plant survival in extreme condition. In the past few years, researchers have managed to identify the various families of transcription factors that play a crucial role in regulating plant development and plant responses to stresses. This study focuses on the expression pattern of miRNA targeted transcription factor under biotic stress in a plant rich with secondary metabolite, Persicaria minor. A pathogenic fungus, Fusarium oxysporum was used in the biotic stress treatment since the previous study revealed this fungus could trigger plant defense system. Two small RNA libraries were constructed which consist of control and treated samples. In order to identify the potential target, psRobot target prediction software was used for each miRNA that shows significant change due to the infection. The result showed miR156b/c, miR172a, miR319, miR858, and miR894 were found to be targeting a wide range of transcription factors that involve in plant development and plant response towards stresses. The expression of miR156b/c and miR172 were up-regulated while the expression of miR319, miR858, and miR894 was found to be down-regulated. These results may provide a certain level of networking between those two regulatory molecules in plant genetic system under biotic stress.

  20. Identification of novel endogenous antisense transcripts by DNA microarray analysis targeting complementary strand of annotated genes

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    Kohama Chihiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent transcriptomic analyses in mammals have uncovered the widespread occurrence of endogenous antisense transcripts, termed natural antisense transcripts (NATs. NATs are transcribed from the opposite strand of the gene locus and are thought to control sense gene expression, but the mechanism of such regulation is as yet unknown. Although several thousand potential sense-antisense pairs have been identified in mammals, examples of functionally characterized NATs remain limited. To identify NAT candidates suitable for further functional analyses, we performed DNA microarray-based NAT screening using mouse adult normal tissues and mammary tumors to target not only the sense orientation but also the complementary strand of the annotated genes. Results First, we designed microarray probes to target the complementary strand of genes for which an antisense counterpart had been identified only in human public cDNA sources, but not in the mouse. We observed a prominent expression signal from 66.1% of 635 target genes, and 58 genes of these showed tissue-specific expression. Expression analyses of selected examples (Acaa1b and Aard confirmed their dynamic transcription in vivo. Although interspecies conservation of NAT expression was previously investigated by the presence of cDNA sources in both species, our results suggest that there are more examples of human-mouse conserved NATs that could not be identified by cDNA sources. We also designed probes to target the complementary strand of well-characterized genes, including oncogenes, and compared the expression of these genes between mammary cancerous tissues and non-pathological tissues. We found that antisense expression of 95 genes of 404 well-annotated genes was markedly altered in tumor tissue compared with that in normal tissue and that 19 of these genes also exhibited changes in sense gene expression. These results highlight the importance of NAT expression in the regulation

  1. Identification of direct regulatory targets of the transcription factor Sox10 based on function and conservation

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    Lee Sanghyuk

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox10, a member of the Sry-related HMG-Box gene family, is a critical transcription factor for several important cell lineages, most notably the neural crest stem cells and the derivative peripheral glial cells and melanocytes. Thus far, only a handful of direct target genes are known for this transcription factor limiting our understanding of the biological network it governs. Results We describe identification of multiple direct regulatory target genes of Sox10 through a procedure based on function and conservation. By combining RNA interference technique and DNA microarray technology, we have identified a set of genes that show significant down-regulation upon introduction of Sox10 specific siRNA into Schwannoma cells. Subsequent comparative genomics analyses led to potential binding sites for Sox10 protein conserved across several mammalian species within the genomic region proximal to these genes. Multiple sites belonging to 4 different genes (proteolipid protein, Sox10, extracellular superoxide dismutase, and pleiotrophin were shown to directly interact with Sox10 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We further confirmed the direct regulation through the identified cis-element for one of the genes, extracellular superoxide dismutase, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter assay. Conclusion In sum, the process of combining differential expression profiling and comparative genomics successfully led to further defining the role of Sox10, a critical transcription factor for the development of peripheral glia. Our strategy utilizing relatively accessible techniques and tools should be applicable to studying the function of other transcription factors.

  2. SPATA18, a Spermatogenesis-Associated Gene, Is a Novel Transcriptional Target of p53 and p63▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein, Chamutal; Brosh, Ran; Molchadsky, Alina; Madar, Shalom; Kogan-Sakin, Ira; Goldstein, Ido; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Flores, Elsa R.; Goldfinger, Naomi; Sarig, Rachel; Rotter, Varda

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 functions not only to suppress tumorigenesis but also to maintain normal development and homeostasis. Although p53 was implicated in different aspects of fertility, including spermatogenesis and implantation, the mechanism underlying p53 involvement in spermatogenesis is poorly resolved. In this study we describe the identification of a spermatogenesis-associated gene, SPATA18, as a novel p53 transcriptional target and show that SPATA18 transcription is induced by...

  3. Kaiso directs the transcriptional corepressor MTG16 to the Kaiso binding site in target promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn W Barrett

    Full Text Available Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs are transcriptional corepressors originally identified in acute myelogenous leukemia that have recently been linked to epithelial malignancy with non-synonymous mutations identified in both MTG8 and MTG16 in colon, breast, and lung carcinoma in addition to functioning as negative regulators of WNT and Notch signaling. A yeast two-hybrid approach was used to discover novel MTG binding partners. This screen identified the Zinc fingers, C2H2 and BTB domain containing (ZBTB family members ZBTB4 and ZBTB38 as MTG16 interacting proteins. ZBTB4 is downregulated in breast cancer and modulates p53 responses. Because ZBTB33 (Kaiso, like MTG16, modulates Wnt signaling at the level of TCF4, and its deletion suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc(Min mouse, we determined that Kaiso also interacted with MTG16 to modulate transcription. The zinc finger domains of Kaiso as well as ZBTB4 and ZBTB38 bound MTG16 and the association with Kaiso was confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. MTG family members were required to efficiently repress both a heterologous reporter construct containing Kaiso binding sites (4×KBS and the known Kaiso target, Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7/Matrilysin. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies placed MTG16 in a complex occupying the Kaiso binding site on the MMP-7 promoter. The presence of MTG16 in this complex, and its contributions to transcriptional repression both required Kaiso binding to its binding site on DNA, establishing MTG16-Kaiso binding as functionally relevant in Kaiso-dependent transcriptional repression. Examination of a large multi-stage CRC expression array dataset revealed patterns of Kaiso, MTG16, and MMP-7 expression supporting the hypothesis that loss of either Kaiso or MTG16 can de-regulate a target promoter such as that of MMP-7. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of transcriptional control by ZBTB family members and broaden the scope

  4. Direct ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of pathogenic DNA using homogeneous target-initiated transcription amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yurong; Ding, Shijia; Zhao, Dan; Yuan, Rui; Zhang, Yuhong; Cheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and specific methodologies for detection of pathogenic gene at the point-of-care are still urgent demands in rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases. This work develops a simple and pragmatic electrochemical biosensing strategy for ultrasensitive and specific detection of pathogenic nucleic acids directly by integrating homogeneous target-initiated transcription amplification (HTITA) with interfacial sensing process in single analysis system. The homogeneous recognition and specific binding of target DNA with the designed hairpin probe triggered circular primer extension reaction to form DNA double-strands which contained T7 RNA polymerase promoter and served as templates for in vitro transcription amplification. The HTITA protocol resulted in numerous single-stranded RNA products which could synchronously hybridized with the detection probes and immobilized capture probes for enzyme-amplified electrochemical detection on the biosensor surface. The proposed electrochemical biosensing strategy showed very high sensitivity and selectivity for target DNA with a dynamic response range from 1 fM to 100 pM. Using salmonella as a model, the established strategy was successfully applied to directly detect invA gene from genomic DNA extract. This proposed strategy presented a simple, pragmatic platform toward ultrasensitive nucleic acids detection and would become a versatile and powerful tool for point-of-care pathogen identification.

  5. Transcription Factor STAT3 as a Novel Molecular Target for Cancer Prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ailian; Yang, Zhengduo [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shen, Yicheng [College of Natural Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Zhou, Jia [Chemical Biology Program, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Shen, Qiang, E-mail: qshen@mdanderson.org [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-04-16

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are a family of transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, immune and inflammatory responses, and angiogenesis. Cumulative evidence has established that STAT3 has a critical role in the development of multiple cancer types. Because it is constitutively activated during disease progression and metastasis in a variety of cancers, STAT3 has promise as a drug target for cancer therapeutics. Recently, STAT3 was found to have an important role in maintaining cancer stem cells in vitro and in mouse tumor models, suggesting STAT3 is integrally involved in tumor initiation, progression and maintenance. STAT3 has been traditionally considered as nontargetable or undruggable, and the lag in developing effective STAT3 inhibitors contributes to the current lack of FDA-approved STAT3 inhibitors. Recent advances in cancer biology and drug discovery efforts have shed light on targeting STAT3 globally and/or specifically for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize current literature and discuss the potential importance of STAT3 as a novel target for cancer prevention and of STAT3 inhibitors as effective chemopreventive agents.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors as transcriptional nodal points and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D; Plutzky, Jorge

    2007-01-30

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of key metabolic pathways such as lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, and insulin sensitivity. More recent work implicates all 3 PPAR isotypes (alpha, gamma, and delta, also known as beta or beta/delta) in inflammatory and atherosclerotic pathways. Because these nuclear receptors are activated by extracellular signals and control multiple gene targets, PPARs can be seen as nodes that control multiple inputs and outputs involved in energy balance, providing insight into how metabolism and the vasculature may be integrated. The ongoing clinical use of fibrates, which activate PPARalpha, and thiazolidinediones, which activate PPARgamma, establishes these receptors as viable drug targets, whereas considerable in vitro animal model and human surrogate marker studies suggest that PPAR activation may limit inflammation and atherosclerosis. Together, these various observations have stimulated intense interest in PPARs as therapeutic targets and led to large-scale cardiovascular end-point trials with PPAR agonists. The first of these studies has generated mixed results that require careful review, especially in anticipation of additional clinical trial data and ongoing attempts to develop novel PPAR modulators. Such analysis of the existing PPAR data, the appropriate use of currently approved PPAR agonists, and continued progress in PPAR therapeutics will be predicated on a better understanding of PPAR biology.

  7. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  8. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  9. Occupying chromatin: Polycomb mechanisms for getting to genomic targets, stopping transcriptional traffic, and staying put

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeffrey A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Polycomb repressive complexes are conserved chromatin regulators with key roles in multicellular development, stem cell biology, and cancer. New findings advance molecular understanding of how they target to sites of action, interact with and alter local chromatin to silence genes, and maintain silencing in successive generations of proliferating cells. Chromatin modification by Polycomb proteins provides an essential strategy for gene silencing in higher eukaryotes. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) silence many key developmental regulators and are centrally integrated in the transcriptional circuitry of embryonic and adult stem cells. PRC2 trimethylates histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3-K27me3) and PRC1-type complexes ubiquitylate histone H2A and compact polynucleosomes. How PRCs and these signature activities are deployed to select and silence genomic targets is the subject of intense current investigation. We review recent advances on targeting, modulation, and functions of PRC1 and PRC2, and we consider progress on defining transcriptional steps impacted in Polycomb silencing. Key recent findings demonstrate PRC1 targeting independent of H3-K27me3 and emphasize nonenzymatic PRC1-mediated compaction. We also evaluate expanding connections between Polycomb machinery and non-coding RNAs. Exciting new studies supply the first systematic analyses of what happens to Polycomb complexes, and associated histone modifications, during the wholesale chromatin reorganizations that accompany DNA replication and mitosis. The stage is now set to reveal fundamental epigenetic mechanisms that determine how Polycomb target genes are silenced and how Polycomb silence is preserved through cell cycle progression. PMID:23473600

  10. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  11. Expansion of the first PolyA tract of ARX causes infantile spasms and status dystonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, R; Moro, F; Kato, M; Barkovich, A J; Shiihara, T; McShane, M A; Hurst, J; Loi, M; Tohyama, J; Norci, V; Hayasaka, K; Kang, U J; Das, S; Dobyns, W B

    2007-07-31

    ARX is a paired-type homeobox gene located on the X chromosome that contains five exons with four polyalanine (PolyA) tracts, a homeodomain, and a conserved C-terminal aristaless domain. Studies in humans have demonstrated remarkable pleiotropy: malformation phenotypes are associated with protein truncation mutations and missense mutations in the homeobox; nonmalformation phenotypes, including X-linked infantile spasms (ISS), are associated with missense mutations outside of the homeobox and expansion of the PolyA tracts. To investigate the role of ARX, we performed mutation analysis in 115 boys with cryptogenic ISS. This included two pairs of brothers. We found an expansion of the trinucleotide repeat that codes for the first PolyA tract from 10 to 17 GCG repeats (c.333_334ins[GCG]7) in six boys (5.2%) ages 2 to 14, from four families, including the two pairs of brothers. In addition to ISS, all six boys had severe mental retardation and generalized dystonia that appeared around the age of 6 months and worsened, eventually leading to stable severe quadriplegic dyskinesia within age 2 years. Three children experienced recurrent, life-threatening status dystonicus. In four children brain MRI showed multiple small foci of abnormal cavitation on T1 and increased signal intensity on T2 in the putamina, possibly reflecting progressive multifocal loss of tissue. The phenotype of infantile spasms with severe dyskinetic quadriparesis increases the number of human disorders that result from the pathologic expansion of single alanine repeats. ARX gene testing should be considered in boys with infantile spasms and dyskinetic cerebral palsy in the absence of a consistent perinatal history.

  12. HAND2 Targets Define a Network of Transcriptional Regulators that Compartmentalize the Early Limb Bud Mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterwalder, Marco; Speziale, Dario; Shoukry, Malak; Mohan, Rajiv; Ivanek, Robert; Kohler, Manuel; Beisel, Christian; Wen, Xiaohui; Scales, Suzie J.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Visel, Axel; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Zeller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary The genetic networks that govern vertebrate development are well studied, but how the interactions of trans-acting factors with cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are integrated into spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression is not clear. The transcriptional regulator HAND2 is required during limb, heart and branchial arch development. Here, we identify the genomic regions enriched in HAND2 chromatin complexes from mouse embryos and limb buds. Then, we analyze the HAND2 target CRMs in the genomic landscapes encoding transcriptional regulators required in early limb buds. HAND2 controls the expression of genes functioning in the proximal limb bud and orchestrates the establishment of anterior and posterior polarity of the nascent limb bud mesenchyme by impacting on Gli3 and Tbx3 expression. TBX3 is required downstream of HAND2 to refine the posterior Gli3 expression boundary. Our analysis uncovers the transcriptional circuits that function in establishing distinct mesenchymal compartments downstream of HAND2 and upstream of SHH signaling. PMID:25453830

  13. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  14. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  15. Visualization of the tire-soil interaction area by means of ObjectARX programming interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, W.; Gruszczyński, M.; Raba, B.; Lewicki, A.; Przybył, K.; Zaborowicz, M.; Koszela, K.; Boniecki, P.

    2014-04-01

    The process of data visualization, important for their analysis, becomes problematic when large data sets generated via computer simulations are available. This problem concerns, among others, the models that describe the geometry of tire-soil interaction. For the purpose of a graphical representation of this area and implementation of various geometric calculations the authors have developed a plug-in application for AutoCAD, based on the latest technologies, including ObjectARX, LINQ and the use of Visual Studio platform. Selected programming tools offer a wide variety of IT structures that enable data visualization and data analysis and are important e.g. in model verification.

  16. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  17. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  18. Identification of estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma as a direct transcriptional target of angiogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ang

    Full Text Available Nuclear translocation of angiogenin (ANG is essential for the proliferation of its target cells. ANG promotes rRNA synthesis, while whether it regulates mRNA transcription remains unknown. Using the chromatin immunoprecipitation method, we have identified 12 ANG-binding sequences. One of these sequences lies in the estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRγ gene which we designated as ANG-Binding Sequence within ERRγ (ABSE. ABSE exhibited ANG-dependent repressor activity in the luciferase reporter system. Down-regulation of ANG increased ERRγ expression, and active gene marker level at the ABSE region. The expression levels of ERRγ targets genes, p21(WAF/CIP and p27(KIP1, and the occupation of ERRγ on their promoter regions were increased in ANG-deficient cells accordingly. Furthermore, knockdown of ERRγ promoted the proliferation rate in ANG-deficient breast cancer cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry staining showed negative correlation between ANG and ERRγ in breast cancer tissue. Altogether, our study provides evidence that nuclear ANG directly binds to the ABSE of ERRγ gene and inhibits ERRγ transcription to promote breast cancer cell proliferation.

  19. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  20. Comprehensive reanalysis of transcription factor knockout expression data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals many new targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimand, Jüri; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Todd, Annabel E; Vilo, Jaak; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2010-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) perturbation experiments give valuable insights into gene regulation. Genome-scale evidence from microarray measurements may be used to identify regulatory interactions between TFs and targets. Recently, Hu and colleagues published a comprehensive study covering 269 TF knockout mutants for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the information that can be extracted from this valuable dataset is limited by the method employed to process the microarray data. Here, we present a reanalysis of the original data using improved statistical techniques freely available from the BioConductor project. We identify over 100,000 differentially expressed genes-nine times the total reported by Hu et al. We validate the biological significance of these genes by assessing their functions, the occurrence of upstream TF-binding sites, and the prevalence of protein-protein interactions. The reanalysed dataset outperforms the original across all measures, indicating that we have uncovered a vastly expanded list of relevant targets. In summary, this work presents a high-quality reanalysis that maximizes the information contained in the Hu et al. compendium. The dataset is available from ArrayExpress (accession: E-MTAB-109) and it will be invaluable to any scientist interested in the yeast transcriptional regulatory system.

  1. Transcription factor-microRNA-target gene networks associated with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Kristin R; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    The identification of reliable transcriptome biomarkers requires the simultaneous consideration of regulatory and target elements including microRNAs (miRNAs), transcription factors (TFs), and target genes. A novel approach that integrates multivariate survival analysis, feature selection, and regulatory network visualization was used to identify reliable biomarkers of ovarian cancer survival and recurrence. Expression profiles of 799 miRNAs, 17,814 TFs and target genes and cohort clinical records on 272 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer were simultaneously considered and results were validated on an independent group of 146 patients. Three miRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-22*, and ebv-miR-BHRF1-2*) were associated with both ovarian cancer survival and recurrence and 27 miRNAs were associated with either one hazard. Two miRNAs (hsa-miR-521 and hsa-miR-497) were cohort-dependent, while 28 were cohort-independent. This study confirmed 19 miRNAs previously associated with ovarian cancer and identified two miRNAs that have previously been associated with other cancer types. In total, the expression of 838 and 734 target genes and 12 and eight TFs were associated (FDR-adjusted P-value cancer survival and recurrence, respectively. Functional analysis highlighted the association between cellular and nucleotide metabolic processes and ovarian cancer. The more direct connections and higher centrality of the miRNAs, TFs and target genes in the survival network studied suggest that network-based approaches to prognosticate or predict ovarian cancer survival may be more effective than those for ovarian cancer recurrence. This study demonstrated the feasibility to infer reliable miRNA-TF-target gene networks associated with survival and recurrence of ovarian cancer based on the simultaneous analysis of co-expression profiles and consideration of the clinical characteristics of the patients.

  2. Transcription factor-microRNA-target gene networks associated with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin R Delfino

    Full Text Available The identification of reliable transcriptome biomarkers requires the simultaneous consideration of regulatory and target elements including microRNAs (miRNAs, transcription factors (TFs, and target genes. A novel approach that integrates multivariate survival analysis, feature selection, and regulatory network visualization was used to identify reliable biomarkers of ovarian cancer survival and recurrence. Expression profiles of 799 miRNAs, 17,814 TFs and target genes and cohort clinical records on 272 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer were simultaneously considered and results were validated on an independent group of 146 patients. Three miRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-22*, and ebv-miR-BHRF1-2* were associated with both ovarian cancer survival and recurrence and 27 miRNAs were associated with either one hazard. Two miRNAs (hsa-miR-521 and hsa-miR-497 were cohort-dependent, while 28 were cohort-independent. This study confirmed 19 miRNAs previously associated with ovarian cancer and identified two miRNAs that have previously been associated with other cancer types. In total, the expression of 838 and 734 target genes and 12 and eight TFs were associated (FDR-adjusted P-value <0.05 with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence, respectively. Functional analysis highlighted the association between cellular and nucleotide metabolic processes and ovarian cancer. The more direct connections and higher centrality of the miRNAs, TFs and target genes in the survival network studied suggest that network-based approaches to prognosticate or predict ovarian cancer survival may be more effective than those for ovarian cancer recurrence. This study demonstrated the feasibility to infer reliable miRNA-TF-target gene networks associated with survival and recurrence of ovarian cancer based on the simultaneous analysis of co-expression profiles and consideration of the clinical characteristics of the patients.

  3. Modal Identification of A Tested Steel Frame using Linear ARX Model Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Kaya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study contains the identification of modal dynamic properties of a 3-story large-scale steel test frame structure through shaking table measurements. Shaking table test is carried out to estimate the modal properties of the test frame such as natural frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes. Among many different model structures, ARX (Auto Recursive Exogenous model structure is used for modal identification of the frame structure system. The unknown parameters in the obtained ARX model structure are estimated by Least-Square method by minimizing the AIC criteria with the help of a program coded in advanced computing software MATLAB®. The adopted model structure is then tested out in time domain to verify the validity of the model with the selected model parameters. Then the modal characteristics of test frame and the story stiffness are estimated using the white noise shakings. An attempt is done to determine the change of modal characteristics and the story stiffness of test frame according to the velocity, which the test frame structure experienced during the shaking schedule and also during the input shaking of El Centro 1940 NS. Results shows that there is an increase in damping ratio and a decrease in both story stiffness and natural frequency for all modes when the damage forms at cementitious device and the test frame structure itself during the shaking schedule.

  4. Dynamic Flow Modeling Using Double POD and ANN-ARX System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Stefan; Seidel, Jürgen; Cohen, Kelly; Aradag, Selin; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Double Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (DPOD), a modification of conventional POD, is a powerful tool for modeling of transient flow field spatial features, in particular, a 2D cylinder wake at a Reynolds number of 100. To develop a model for control design, the interaction of DPOD mode amplitudes with open-loop control inputs needs to be captured. Traditionally, Galerkin projection onto the Navier Stokes equations has been used for that purpose. Given the stability problems as well as issues in correctly modeling actuation input, we propose a different approach. We demonstrate that the ARX (Auto Regressive eXternal input) system identification method in connection with an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) nonlinear structure leads to a model that captures the dynamic behavior of the unforced and transient forced open loop data used for model development. Moreover, we also show that the model is valid at different Reynolds numbers, for different open loop forcing parameters, as well as for closed loop flow states with excellent accuracy. Thus, we present with this DPOD-ANN-ARX model a paradigm shift for laminar circular cylinder wake modeling that is proven valid for feedback flow controller development.

  5. Molecular recognition: monomer of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 recognizes its dimer DNA binding target sites specifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is widely believed that dimerization is a requirement for the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 to recognize its specific DNA target sites. We used the basic region (226-252) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4, as both a monomeric peptide and a disulfide-linked dimer to investigate the interaction of the peptides with the DNA target sites AP-1 and CRE. CD and ITC experiments indicate that although the monomeric peptide GCN4-M has a weaker affinity with the DNA relative to the disulfide-linked dimer peptide GCN4-D, it recognizes AP-1 and CRE target sites specifically.

  6. RNA polymerase V targets transcriptional silencing components to promoters of protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Rowley, M Jordan; Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sandhu, Davinder; Gregory, Brian D; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing controls transposons and other repetitive elements through RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and heterochromatin formation. A key component of the Arabidopsis RdDM pathway is ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), which associates with siRNAs to mediate DNA methylation. Here, we show that AGO4 preferentially targets transposable elements embedded within promoters of protein-coding genes. This pattern of AGO4 binding cannot be simply explained by the sequences of AGO4-bound siRNAs; instead, AGO4 binding to specific gene promoters is also mediated by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) produced by RNA polymerase V. lncRNA-mediated AGO4 binding to gene promoters directs asymmetric DNA methylation to these genomic regions and is involved in regulating the expression of targeted genes. Finally, AGO4 binding overlaps sites of DNA methylation affected by the biotic stress response. Based on these findings, we propose that the targets of AGO4-directed RdDM are regulatory units responsible for controlling gene expression under specific environmental conditions.

  7. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  8. Affinity Density: a novel genomic approach to the identification of transcription factor regulatory targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelett, Dennis J; Lakeland, Daniel L; Weiss, Joseph B

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for identifying novel transcription factor regulatory targets based on calculating Local Affinity Density. Techniques from the signal-processing field were used, in particular the Hann digital filter, to calculate the relative binding affinity of different regions based on previously published in vitro binding data. To illustrate this approach, the complete genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and D.pseudoobscura were analyzed for binding sites of the homeodomain proteinc Tinman, an essential heart development gene in both Drosophila and Mouse. The significant binding regions were identified relative to genomic background and assigned to putative target genes. Valid candidates common to both species of Drosophila were selected as a test of conservation. The new method was more sensitive than cluster searches for conserved binding motifs with respect to positive identification of known Tinman targets. Our Local Affinity Density method also identified a significantly greater proportion of Tinman-coexpressed genes than equivalent, optimized cluster searching. In addition, this new method predicted a significantly greater than expected number of genes with previously published RNAi phenotypes in the heart. Algorithms were implemented in Python, LISP, R and maxima, using MySQL to access locally mirrored sequence data from Ensembl (D.melanogaster release 4.3) and flybase (D.pseudoobscura). All code is licensed under GPL and freely available at http://www.ohsu.edu/cellbio/dev_biol_prog/affinitydensity/.

  9. Research of Stone Automatic Laid System Based on ObjectARX2008%基于ObjectARX2008石材自动铺设系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵民; 李洪飞; 王若男; 侯玲玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 开发一套具有石材自动铺设、编号以及输出加工单的专业石材装饰设计软件.方法 以ObjectARX为CAD二次开发工具,VC++2005.NET为开发环境,利用ObjectARX应用程序的动态链接库特性,在CAD运行时可随时加载和却载应用程序.该系统采用面向对象方法,实现铺设参数的任意设定以及人机的实时交互,提取铺设区域信息,对不满意的铺设结果可以实时取消.同时利用循环分区铺设原理,实现复杂铺设功能,并采用剪切功能完善边缘区域的铺设.结果 能够以板型和行列两种方式进行铺设,完成了对实心区域和环形区域的铺设,同时可以再次打开文件时取消原铺设结果.结论 利用ObjectARX开发技术,达到了石材自动铺设设计要求,实现了石材铺设设计参数化,提高了石材铺设设计效率,拓宽了CAD在石材领域的应用.%The purpose of this paper is to develop a stone decorating design system with slab paving, numbering and processing table outputting automatically functions.ObjectARX is used as a tool in AutoCAD's secondary development,meanwhile VC + + 2005.NET is applied as a development environment.Through the DLL characteristics of Object ARX applications ,the applications program can be loaded and unloaded at any time when CAD is running.In this system, the object-oriented programming method is used to realize the setting of any parameters required in paving and the man-machine's interactive communicating in real-time.Meanwhile, paving information can be extracted and canceled when we are not satisfied with the results.Recycling paving principle is applied to realize complex paving function, and a trimming function is used to perfect the paving profile.The annular or solid area paving can be realized with slab size and rows-columns function in the system, and the laying result also can be canceled when the file is opened again.Through using ObjectARX development technology, the stone paving

  10. Transcriptional and Genomic Targets of Neural Stem Cells for Functional Recovery after Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a life-threatening disease characterized by a sudden rupture of cerebral blood vessels, and it is widely believed that neural cell death occurs after exposure to blood metabolites or subsequently damaged cells. Neural stem cells (NSCs, which maintain neurogenesis and are found in subgranular zone and subventricular zone, are thought to be an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism for these brain injuries. However, due to the complexity of NSCs and their microenvironment, current strategies cannot satisfactorily enhance functional recovery after hemorrhagic stroke. It is well known that transcriptional and genomic pathways play important roles in ensuring the normal functions of NSCs, including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and neural reconnection. Recently, emerging evidence from the use of new technologies such as next-generation sequencing and transcriptome profiling has provided insight into our understanding of genomic function and regulation of NSCs. In the present article, we summarize and present the current data on the control of NSCs at both the transcriptional and genomic levels. Using bioinformatics methods, we sought to predict novel therapeutic targets of endogenous neurogenesis and exogenous NSC transplantation for functional recovery after hemorrhagic stroke, which could also advance our understanding of its pathophysiology.

  11. Dynamic transcription factor activity and networks during ErbB2 breast oncogenesis and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, M S; Peñalver Bernabé, B; Shin, S; Asztalos, S; Dubbury, S J; Mui, M D; Bellis, A D; Bluver, D; Tonetti, D A; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Broadbelt, L J; Jeruss, J S; Shea, L D

    2014-12-01

    Tissue development and disease progression are multi-stage processes controlled by an evolving set of key regulatory factors, and identifying these factors necessitates a dynamic analysis spanning relevant time scales. Current omics approaches depend on incomplete biological databases to identify critical cellular processes. Herein, we present TRACER (TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRrays), which was employed to quantify the dynamic activity of numerous transcription factor (TFs) simultaneously in 3D and networks for TRACER (NTRACER), a computational algorithm that allows for cellular rewiring to establish dynamic regulatory networks based on activity of TF reporter constructs. We identified major hubs at various stages of culture associated with normal and abnormal tissue growth (i.e., ELK-1 and E2F1, respectively) and the mechanism of action for a targeted therapeutic, lapatinib, through GATA-1, which were confirmed in human ErbB2 positive breast cancer patients and human ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell lines that were either sensitive or resistant to lapatinib.

  12. Complexity of CNC transcription factors as revealed by gene targeting of the Nrf3 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjuga, Anna; Gourley, Tania S; Holm, Teresa M; Heng, Henry H Q; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Ahmed, Rafi; Andrews, Nancy C; Blank, Volker

    2004-04-01

    Cap'n'collar (CNC) family basic leucine zipper transcription factors play crucial roles in the regulation of mammalian gene expression and development. To determine the in vivo function of the CNC protein Nrf3 (NF-E2-related factor 3), we generated mice deficient in this transcription factor. We performed targeted disruption of two Nrf3 exons coding for CNC homology, basic DNA-binding, and leucine zipper dimerization domains. Nrf3 null mice developed normally and revealed no obvious phenotypic differences compared to wild-type animals. Nrf3(-/-) mice were fertile, and gross anatomy as well as behavior appeared normal. The mice showed normal age progression and did not show any apparent additional phenotype during their life span. We observed no differences in various blood parameters and chemistry values. We infected wild-type and Nrf3(-/-) mice with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and found no differences in these animals with respect to their number of virus-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells as well as their B-lymphocyte response. To determine whether the mild phenotype of Nrf3 null animals is due to functional redundancy, we generated mice deficient in multiple CNC factors. Contrary to our expectations, an absence of Nrf3 does not seem to cause additional lethality in compound Nrf3(-/-)/Nrf2(-/-) and Nrf3(-/-)/p45(-/-) mice. We hypothesize that the role of Nrf3 in vivo may become apparent only after appropriate challenge to the mice.

  13. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  14. Targeting TEAD/YAP-transcription-dependent necrosis, TRIAD, ameliorates Huntington's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying; Chen, Xigui; Xu, Min; Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Homma, Hidenori; Murata, Miho; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Tamura, Takuya; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Blandino, Giovanni; Sudol, Marius; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative diseases is not fully understood. Here we report that mutant huntingtin (Htt), a causative gene product of Huntington’s diseases (HD) selectively induces a new form of necrotic cell death, in which endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enlarges and cell body asymmetrically balloons and finally ruptures. Pharmacological and genetic analyses revealed that the necrotic cell death is distinct from the RIP1/3 pathway-dependent necroptosis, but mediated by a functional deficiency of TEAD/YAP-dependent transcription. In addition, we revealed that a cell cycle regulator, Plk1, switches the balance between TEAD/YAP-dependent necrosis and p73/YAP-dependent apoptosis by shifting the interaction partner of YAP from TEAD to p73 through YAP phosphorylation at Thr77. In vivo ER imaging with two-photon microscopy detects similar ER enlargement, and viral vector-mediated delivery of YAP as well as chemical inhibitors of the Hippo pathway such as S1P recover the ER instability and necrosis in HD model mice. Intriguingly S1P completely stops the decline of motor function of HD model mice even after the onset of symptom. Collectively, we suggest approaches targeting the signalling pathway of TEAD/YAP-transcription-dependent necrosis (TRIAD) could lead to a therapeutic development against HD.

  15. A Single Gene Target of an ETS-Family Transcription Factor Determines Neuronal CO2-Chemosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Julia P.; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis A.; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger; Ringstad, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO2), which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO2-detection and transforms neurons into CO2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO2-sensing neurons in other phyla. PMID:22479504

  16. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  17. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  18. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia P Brandt

    Full Text Available Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2, which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO(2-detection and transforms neurons into CO(2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO(2-sensing neurons in other phyla.

  19. Targeting signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) in human cancer by dietary polyphenolic antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Hamed; Ajami, Marjan; Maleki, Solmaz Nasseri; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Daglia, Maria; Tsetegho Sokeng, Arold Jorel; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-08-11

    Over the course of the last three decades, a large body of evidence has shown that polyphenols, the secondary metabolites occurring in plant foods and beverages, exert protective effects due to their antioxidant activity mediated through different mechanisms ranging from direct radical scavenging and metal chelating activities, to the capacity to inhibit pro-oxidant enzymes and to target specific cell-signalling pathways. In the last decade, dietary components, and polyphenols in particular have gained considerable attention as chemopreventive agents against different types of cancer. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family is a group of cytoplasmic transcription factors which interact with specific sequences of DNA, inducing the expression of specific genes which in turn give rise to adaptive and highly specific biological responses. Growing evidence suggests that, of the seven STAT members identified, STAT3 is over-expressed in many human tumors (i.e. solid tumors and hematological malignancies) promoting the onset and development of cancer in humans by inhibiting apoptosis or by inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. This review article aims to assess the most recent studies on the role of STATs, with focus on STAT3, in oncogenesis, and the promising effects of some polyphenols on STAT expression. Moreover, the mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of polyphenols which have an influence on STAT expression are discussed, with a focus on their ability to target specific cell-signalling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Societe Francaise de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. Foxp3 represses retroviral transcription by targeting both NF-kappaB and CREB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Forkhead box (Fox/winged-helix transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of immune responsiveness and Foxp3 is recognized as an essential functional marker of regulatory T cells. Herein we describe downstream signaling pathways targeted by Foxp3 that may negatively impact retroviral pathogenesis. Overexpression of Foxp3 in HEK 293T and purified CD4+ T cells resulted in a dose-dependent and time-dependent decrease in basal levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB activation. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal forkhead (FKH domain, critical for nuclear localization and DNA-binding activity, abrogated the ability of Foxp3 to suppress NF-kappaB activity in HEK 293T cells, but not in Jurkat or primary human CD4+ T cells. We further demonstrate that Foxp3 suppressed the transcription of two human retroviral promoters (HIV-1 and human T cell lymphotropic virus type I [HTLV-I] utilizing NF-kappaB-dependent and NF-kappaB-independent mechanisms. Examination of the latter identified the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB pathway as a target of Foxp3. Finally, comparison of the percent Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ T cells to the HTLV-I proviral load in HTLV-I-infected asymptomatic carriers and patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis suggested that high Foxp3 expression is associated with low proviral load and absence of disease. These results suggest an expanded role for Foxp3 in regulating NF-kappaB- and CREB-dependent cellular and viral gene expression.

  1. MicroRNA-214 Suppresses Gluconeogenesis by Targeting Activating Transcriptional Factor 4*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Yu, Junjie; Liu, Bin; Guo, Yajie; Deng, Jiali; Chen, Shanghai; Wang, Chunxia; Guo, Feifan

    2015-01-01

    Although the gluconeogenesis pathway is already a target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological functions of miR-214 in gluconeogenesis. The expression of miR-214 was suppressed by glucagon via protein kinase A signaling in primary hepatocytes, and miR-214 was down-regulated in the livers of fasted, high fat diet-induced diabetic and leptin receptor-mutated (db/db) mice. The overexpression of miR-214 in primary hepatocytes suppressed glucose production, and silencing miR-214 reversed this effect. Gluconeogenesis was suppressed in the livers of mice injected with an adenovirus expressing miR-214 (Ad-miR-214). Additionally, Ad-miR-214 alleviated high fat diet-induced elevation of gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, we found that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a reported target of miR-214, can reverse the suppressive effect of miR-214 on gluconeogenesis in primary hepatocytes, and this suppressive effect was blocked in liver-specific ATF4 knock-out mice. ATF4 regulated gluconeogenesis via affecting forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) transcriptional activity. Finally, liver-specific miR-214 transgenic mice exhibited suppressed gluconeogenesis and reduced expression of ATF4, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase in liver. Taken together, our results suggest that the miR-214-ATF4 axis is a novel pathway for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:25657009

  2. Targeted transcriptional activation of silent oct4 pluripotency gene by combining designer TALEs and inhibition of epigenetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultmann, Sebastian; Morbitzer, Robert; Schmidt, Christine S; Thanisch, Katharina; Spada, Fabio; Elsaesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2012-07-01

    Specific control of gene activity is a valuable tool to study and engineer cellular functions. Recent studies uncovered the potential of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins that can be tailored to activate user-defined target genes. It remains however unclear whether and how epigenetic modifications interfere with TALE-mediated transcriptional activation. We studied the activity of five designer TALEs (dTALEs) targeting the oct4 pluripotency gene. In vitro assays showed that the five dTALEs that target distinct sites in the oct4 promoter had the expected DNA specificity and comparable affinities to their corresponding DNA targets. In contrast to their similar in vitro properties, transcriptional activation of oct4 by these distinct dTALEs varied up to 25-fold. While dTALEs efficiently upregulated transcription of the active oct4 promoter in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) they failed to activate the silenced oct4 promoter in ESC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs), indicating that as for endogenous transcription factors also dTALE activity is limited by repressive epigenetic mechanisms. We therefore targeted the activity of epigenetic modulators and found that chemical inhibition of histone deacetylases by valproic acid or DNA methyltransferases by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine facilitated dTALE-mediated activation of the epigenetically silenced oct4 promoter in NSCs. Notably, demethylation of the oct4 promoter occurred only if chemical inhibitors and dTALEs were applied together but not upon treatment with inhibitors or dTALEs only. These results show that dTALEs in combination with chemical manipulation of epigenetic modifiers facilitate targeted transcriptional activation of epigenetically silenced target genes.

  3. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  4. The Transcription Factor ZNF217 Is a Prognostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target during Breast Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlepage, Laurie E.; Adler, Adam S.; Kouros-Mehr, Hosein; Huang, Guiqing; Chou, Jonathan; Krig, Sheryl R.; Griffith, Obi L.; Korkola, James E.; Qu, Kun; Lawson, Devon A.; Xue, Qing; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Yaswen, Paul; Rugo, Hope S.; Sweeney, Colleen A.; Collins, Colin C.; Gray, Joe W.; Chang, Howard Y.; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor ZNF217 is a candidate oncogene in the amplicon on chromosome 20q13 that occurs in 20% to 30% of primary human breast cancers and that correlates with poor prognosis. We show that Znf217 overexpression drives aberrant differentiation and signaling events, promotes increased self-renewal capacity, mesenchymal marker expression, motility, and metastasis, and represses an adult tissue stem cell gene signature downregulated in cancers. By in silico screening, we identified candidate therapeutics that at low concentrations inhibit growth of cancer cells expressing high ZNF217. We show that the nucleoside analogue triciribine inhibits ZNF217-induced tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance and inhibits signaling events [e.g., phospho-AKT, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)] in vivo. Our data suggest that ZNF217 is a biomarker of poor prognosis and a therapeutic target in patients with breast cancer and that triciribine may be part of a personalized treatment strategy in patients overexpressing ZNF217. Because ZNF217 is amplified in numerous cancers, these results have implications for other cancers. SIGNIFICANCE This study finds that ZNF217 is a poor prognostic indicator and therapeutic target in patients with breast cancer and may be a strong biomarker of triciribine treatment efficacy in patients. Because previous clinical trials for triciribine did not include biomarkers of treatment efficacy, this study provides a rationale for revisiting triciribine in the clinical setting as a therapy for patients with breast cancer who overexpress ZNF217. PMID:22728437

  5. Emergence of ETS transcription factors as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Said; Uren, Aykut

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of chromosomal translocations in prostate cancer has greatly enhanced our understanding of prostate cancer biology. Genomic rearrangements involving the ETS family of transcription factors are estimated to be present in 50-70% of prostate cancer cases. These rearrangements fuse the ETS factors with promoters of genes that are androgen regulated. Thus, the expression of ETS factors, such as ERG, ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5, is mediated by androgen. In-vitro and in-vivo studies suggest that overexpression of ETS proteins increase cell proliferation and confer an invasive phenotype to prostate cancer cells. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that ETS-fusion positive patients exhibit tumors corresponding to a more advanced disease. The ability of ETS factors to serve as markers for screening and diagnosing prostate cancer patients is being investigated, and the results have been largely positive to date. Additionally, ETS factors present an excellent opportunity as therapeutic targets and several strategies have been devised to directly target ETS proteins or their binding partners and downstream effectors.

  6. Expanded target and cofactor repertoire for the transcriptional activator LysM from Sulfolobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningning; Nguyen Duc, Trong; van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Muyldermans, Serge; Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Previously, Lrp-like transcriptional regulator LysM from the hyperthermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus was proposed to have a single target, the lysWXJK operon of lysine biosynthesis, and a single effector molecule, l-lysine. Here we identify ∼70 novel binding sites for LysM in the S. solfataricus genome with a LysM-specific nanobody-based chromatin immunoprecipitation assay coupled to microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip) and in silico target site prediction using an energy-based position weight matrix, and validate these findings with in vitro binding. LysM binds to intergenic and coding regions, including promoters of various amino acid biosynthesis and transport genes. We confirm that l-lysine is the most potent effector molecule that reduces, but does not completely abolish, LysM binding, and show that several other amino acids and derivatives, including d-lysine, l-arginine, l-homoarginine, l-glutamine and l-methionine and branched-chain amino acids l-leucine, l-isoleucine and l-valine, significantly affect DNA-binding properties of LysM. Therefore, it appears from this study that LysM is a much more versatile regulator than previously thought, and that it uses a variety of amino acids to sense nutritional quality of the environment and to modulate expression of the metabolic machinery of Sulfolobus accordingly.

  7. MicroRNA-93 alleviates neuropathic pain through targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xue-Tao; Ji, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhiyu; Wu, Xingjun; Wang, Quan; Sun, Shujie; Lu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the exact role of miRNAs in regulating neuropathic pain remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of miR-93 in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction sciatic nerve injury (CCI). We found a significant decrease of miR-93 in the spinal cord of CCI rats compared with sham rats. Overexpression of miR-93 significantly alleviated neuropathic pain development and reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, including interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6 in CCI rats. By bioinformatic analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay, we found that miR-93 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an important regulator of inflammation. Overexpression of miR-93 markedly suppressed the expression of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of STAT3 significantly reversed the miR-93 overexpression-induced suppressive effects on neuropathic pain development and neuroinflammation. Taken together, our study suggests that miR-93 inhibits neuropathic pain development of CCI rats possibly through inhibiting STAT3-mediated neuroinflammation. Our findings indicate that miR-93 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for neuropathic pain intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  9. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-05-13

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu(98)-Leu(115)). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser(62) Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser(10) In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu98–Leu115). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser62. Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser10. In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. PMID:27002159

  11. Murine cytomegalovirus targets transcription factor ATF4 to exploit the unfolded-protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhikang; Xuan, Baoqin; Chapa, Travis J; Gualberto, Nathaniel; Yu, Dong

    2012-06-01

    The unfolded-protein response (UPR), activated by sensor molecules PERK, ATF6, and IRE1 to resolve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has emerged as a key target for host cells and viruses to control the infection outcomes. The UPR regulates ER protein folding, controls cell fate upon ER stress, and plays an important role in innate immunity. We and others have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) modulates the UPR. We show here that murine CMV (MCMV), the widely used CMV model for small animal infection, regulated the UPR in a manner similar to that of HCMV. This modulatory ability was triggered by virion entry and enhanced by viral immediate-early and early gene expression. Thus, while vulnerable at early times, MCMV became resistant to exogenous ER stress at late times of infection. MCMV activated the PERK-ATF4 pathway but only induced a subset of representative ATF4 targets at levels somewhat lower than those by the ER stress inducer tunicamycin. Moreover, MCMV induced ER chaperone Bip but actively blocked IRE1-mediated Xbp1(s) protein accumulation. ATF4 depletion severely attenuated viral growth at a low multiplicity of infection by modestly reducing viral DNA synthesis and more pronouncedly inhibiting late gene transcription. Collectively, we show that the UPR is a conserved target of CMVs and identify ATF4, a key UPR component, as a factor critical for MCMV infection. This work sets the stage for using the MCMV model to explore the role of this stress response in CMV biology, particularly during infection of the host, which is difficult to study in HCMV.

  12. MENA is a transcriptional target of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaz Najafov

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway plays important roles in embryonic development and carcinogenesis. Overactivation of the pathway is one of the most common driving forces in major cancers such as colorectal and breast cancers. The downstream effectors of the pathway and its regulation of carcinogenesis and metastasis are still not very well understood. In this study, which was based on two genome-wide transcriptomics screens, we identify MENA (ENAH, Mammalian enabled homologue as a novel transcriptional target of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. We show that the expression of MENA is upregulated upon overexpression of degradation-resistant β-catenin. Promoters of all mammalian MENA homologues contain putative binding sites for Tcf4 transcription factor--the primary effector of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and we demonstrate functionality of these Tcf4-binding sites using luciferase reporter assays and overexpression of β-catenin, Tcf4 and dominant-negative Tcf4. In addition, lithium chloride-mediated inhibition of GSK3β also resulted in increase in MENA mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction between β-catenin and MENA promoter in Huh7 and HEK293 cells and also in mouse brain and liver tissues. Moreover, overexpression of Wnt1 and Wnt3a ligands increased MENA mRNA levels. Additionally, knock-down of MENA ortholog in D. melanogaster eyeful and sensitized eye cancer fly models resulted in increased tumor and metastasis formations. In summary, our study identifies MENA as novel nexus for the Wnt/β-catenin and the Notch signalling cascades.

  13. Sumoylation of bZIP transcription factor NRL modulates target gene expression during photoreceptor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-08-13

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl(-/-) mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl(-/-) phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis.

  14. Sumoylation of bZIP Transcription Factor NRL Modulates Target Gene Expression during Photoreceptor Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E.; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl−/− mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl−/− phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis. PMID:20551322

  15. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  16. XLMR in MRX families 29, 32, 33 and 38 results from the dup24 mutation in the ARX (Aristaless related homeobox gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Andrée

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked mental retardation (XLMR is the leading cause of mental retardation in males. Mutations in the ARX gene in Xp22.1 have been found in numerous families with both nonsyndromic and syndromic XLMR. The most frequent mutation in this gene is a 24 bp duplication in exon 2. Based on this fact, a panel of XLMR families linked to Xp22 was tested for this particular ARX mutation. Methods Genomic DNA from XLMR families linked to Xp22.1 was amplified for exon 2 in ARX using a Cy5 labeled primer pair. The resulting amplicons were sized using the ALFexpress automated sequencer. Results A panel of 11 families with X-linked mental retardation was screened for the ARX 24dup mutation. Four nonsyndromic XLMR families – MRX29, MRX32, MRX33 and MRX38 – were found to have this particular gene mutation. Conclusion We have identified 4 additional XLMR families with the ARX dup24 mutation from a panel of 11 XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. This finding makes the ARX dup24 mutation the most common mutation in nonsyndromic XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. As this mutation can be readily tested for using an automated sequencer, screening should be considered for any male with nonsyndromic MR of unknown etiology.

  17. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  18. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in human melanocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantarawong, Wipa [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Inter Departmental Multidisciplinary Graduate Program in Bioscience, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeda, Kazuhisa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Yoshizawa, Miki [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Pradermwong, Kantimanee [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Shibahara, Shigeki, E-mail: shibahar@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • In human melanocytes, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M and tyrosinase and their mRNAs. • In human melanoma cells, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M protein and tyrosinase mRNA. • Expression of MITF-H is less sensitive to cadmium toxicity in melanocyte-linage cells. • Cadmium does not decrease the expression of MITF-H in retinal pigment epithelial cells. • MITF-M is the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes. - Abstract: Dietary intake of cadmium is inevitable, causing age-related increase in cadmium accumulation in many organs, including hair, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and macular degeneration. The functions of cochlea and retina are maintained by melanocytes and RPE, respectively, and the differentiation of these pigment cells is regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). In the present study, we explored the potential toxicity of cadmium in the cochlea and retina by using cultured human melanocytes and human RPE cell lines. MITF consists of multiple isoforms, including melanocyte-specific MITF-M and widely expressed MITF-H. Levels of MITF-M protein and its mRNA in human epidermal melanocytes and HMV-II melanoma cells were decreased significantly by cadmium. In parallel with the MITF reduction, mRNA levels of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of melanin biosynthesis that is regulated by MITF-M, were also decreased. In RPE cells, however, the levels of total MITF protein, constituting mainly MITF-H, were not decreased by cadmium. We thus identify MITF-M as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes, thereby accounting for the increased risk of disability from melanocyte malfunction, such as hearing and vision loss among people with elevated cadmium exposure.

  19. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls. RESULTS: GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  20. Intra-nuclear mobility and target search mechanisms of transcription factors: a single-molecule perspective on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normanno, Davide; Dahan, Maxime; Darzacq, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Precise expression of specific genes in time and space is at the basis of cellular viability as well as correct development of organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation is fundamental and still one of the great challenges for biology. Gene expression is regulated also by specific transcription factors that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. Transcription factors dynamics, and especially the way they sample the nucleoplasmic space during the search for their specific target in the genome, are a key aspect for regulation and it has been puzzling researchers for forty years. The scope of this review is to give a state-of-the-art perspective over the intra-nuclear mobility and the target search mechanisms of specific transcription factors at the molecular level. Going through the seminal biochemical experiments that have raised the first questions about target localization and the theoretical grounds concerning target search processes, we describe the most recent experimental achievements and current challenges in understanding transcription factors dynamics and interactions with DNA using in vitro assays as well as in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Transport and RNA Processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A brassinosteroid transcriptional network revealed by genome-wide identification of BESI target genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaofei; Li, Lei; Zola, Jaroslaw; Aluru, Maneesha; Ye, Huaxun; Foudree, Andrew; Guo, Hongqing; Anderson, Sarah; Aluru, Srinivas; Liu, Peng; Rodermel, Steve; Yin, Yanhai

    2011-02-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are important regulators for plant growth and development. BRs signal to control the activities of the BES1 and BZR1 family transcription factors. The transcriptional network through which BES1 and BZR regulate large number of target genes is mostly unknown. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with Arabidopsis tiling arrays (ChIP-chip) and gene expression studies, we have identified 1609 putative BES1 target genes, 404 of which are regulated by BRs and/or in gain-of-function bes1-D mutant. BES1 targets contribute to BR responses and interactions with other hormonal or light signaling pathways. Computational modeling of gene expression data using Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNe) reveals that BES1-targeted transcriptional factors form a gene regulatory network (GRN). Mutants of many genes in the network displayed defects in BR responses. Moreover, we found that BES1 functions to inhibit chloroplast development by repressing the expression of GLK1 and GLK2 transcription factors, confirming a hypothesis generated from the GRN. Our results thus provide a global view of BR regulated gene expression and a GRN that guides future studies in understanding BR-regulated plant growth.

  2. Transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 is an effective target for a breast cancer vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunping; Zhou, He; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Protection against breast cancer was achieved with a DNA vaccine against murine transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1, which is overexpressed in aggressively proliferating D2F2 murine breast carcinoma. Growth of primary s.c. tumor and dissemination of pulmonary metastases was markedly suppressed by this oral DNA vaccine, carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, encoding murine Fos-related antigen 1, fused with mutant polyubiquitin, and cotransformed with secretory murine IL-18. The life span of 60% of vaccinated mice was tripled in the absence of detectable tumor growth after lethal tumor cell challenge. Immunological mechanisms involved activation of T, natural killer, and dendritic cells, as indicated by up-regulation of their activation markers and costimulatory molecules. Markedly increased specific target cell lysis was mediated by both MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells isolated from splenocytes of vaccinated mice, including a significant release of proinflammatory cytokines IFN- and IL-2. Importantly, fluorescence analysis of fibroblast growth factor 2 and tumor cell-induced vessel growth in Matrigel plugs demonstrated marked suppression of angiogenesis only in vaccinated animals. Taken together, this multifunctional DNA vaccine proved effective in protecting against growth and metastases of breast cancer by combining the action of immune effector cells with suppression of tumor angiogenesis. vaccine | tumor | metastases | antiangiogenesis

  3. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN-mediated targeted DNA Insertion in potato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Forsyth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines TALEN-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  4. Targeting the transcription factor Nrf2 to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Stacey; Pergola, Pablo E; Zager, Richard A; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2013-06-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are mediators in the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications, and they are inseparably linked as each begets and amplifies the other. CKD-associated oxidative stress is due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and diminished antioxidant capacity. The latter is largely caused by impaired activation of Nrf2, the transcription factor that regulates genes encoding antioxidant and detoxifying molecules. Protective effects of Nrf2 are evidenced by amelioration of oxidative stress, inflammation, and kidney disease in response to natural Nrf2 activators in animal models, while Nrf2 deletion amplifies these pathogenic pathways and leads to autoimmune nephritis. Given the role of impaired Nrf2 activity in CKD-induced oxidative stress and inflammation, interventions aimed at restoring Nrf2 may be effective in retarding CKD progression. Clinical trials of the potent Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl showed significant improvement in renal function in CKD patients with type 2 diabetes. However, due to unforeseen complications the BEACON trial, which was designed to investigate the effect of this drug on time to end-stage renal disease or cardiovascular death in patients with advanced CKD, was prematurely terminated. This article provides an overview of the role of impaired Nrf2 activity in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated oxidative stress and inflammation and the potential utility of targeting Nrf2 in the treatment of CKD.

  5. Nouvelles perspectives dans l'atteinte spécifique du langage présentée par les patients ARX et la dysrégulation sous-jacente de FOXP1

    OpenAIRE

    Curie, Aurore; Friocourt, Gaëlle; BERTRAND Sophie; Rochefort, Fanny; Loaëc, Nadège; Reboul, Anne; Nazir, Tatjana,; Brun, Amandine; Cheylus, Anne; Bussy, Gérald; Paulignan, Yves; Toutain, Annick; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Prieur, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    National audience; Le gène ARX (Aristaless Related homeobox) code pour un facteur de transcription dont les mutations ont été associées à plus de 10 syndromes différents allant de phénotypes caractérisés par des défauts de migration neuronale sévères tels que la lissencéphalie, à des formes plus modérées de Déficience Intellectuelle liée à l’X sans malformation cérébrale apparente, mais souvent associée à une dystonie ou à une épilepsie. Afin de mieux comprendre l’impact de la mutation la plu...

  6. In Vivo Chromatin Targets of the Transcription Factor Yin Yang 2 in Trophoblast Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Macías-Redondo, Sofía; Climent, María; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Muniesa, Pedro; Schoorlemmer, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Yin Yang 2 (YY2) is a zinc finger protein closely related to the well-characterized Yin Yang 1 (YY1). YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor, with defined functions in multiple developmental processes, such as implantation, cell differentiation, X inactivation, imprinting and organogenesis. Yy2 has been treated as a largely immaterial duplication of Yy1, as they share high homology in the Zinc Finger-region and similar if not identical in vitro binding sites. In contrast to these similarities, gene expression alterations in HeLa cells with attenuated levels of either Yy1 or Yy2 were to some extent gene-specific. Moreover, the chromatin binding sites for YY2, except for its association with transposable retroviral elements (RE) and Endogenous Retroviral Elements (ERVs), remain to be identified. As a first step towards defining potential Yy2 functions matching or complementary to Yy1, we considered in vivo DNA binding sites of YY2 in trophoblast stem (TS) cells. Results We report the presence of YY2 protein in mouse-derived embryonic stem (ES) and TS cell lines. Following up on our previous report on ERV binding by YY2 in TS cells, we investigated the tissue-specificity of REX1 and YY2 binding and confirm binding to RE/ERV targets in both ES cells and TS cells. Because of the higher levels of expression, we chose TS cells to understand the role of Yy2 in gene and chromatin regulation. We used in vivo YY2 association as a measure to identify potential target genes. Sequencing of chromatin obtained in chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays carried out with αYY2 serum allowed us to identify a limited number of chromatin targets for YY2. Some putative binding sites were validated in regular ChIP assays and gene expression of genes nearby was altered in the absence of Yy2. Conclusions YY2 binding to ERVs is not confined to TS cells. In vivo binding sites share the presence of a consensus binding motif. Selected sites were uniquely bound by YY2 as

  7. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C

    2002-01-01

    by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus......RNA primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...

  8. Decoupled ARX and RBF Neural Network Modeling Using PCA and GA Optimization for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ridong; Tao, Jili; Lu, Renquan; Jin, Qibing

    2016-12-08

    Modeling of distributed parameter systems is difficult because of their nonlinearity and infinite-dimensional characteristics. Based on principal component analysis (PCA), a hybrid modeling strategy that consists of a decoupled linear autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model and a nonlinear radial basis function (RBF) neural network model are proposed. The spatial-temporal output is first divided into a few dominant spatial basis functions and finite-dimensional temporal series by PCA. Then, a decoupled ARX model is designed to model the linear dynamics of the dominant modes of the time series. The nonlinear residual part is subsequently parameterized by RBFs, where genetic algorithm is utilized to optimize their hidden layer structure and the parameters. Finally, the nonlinear spatial-temporal dynamic system is obtained after the time/space reconstruction. Simulation results of a catalytic rod and a heat conduction equation demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy compared to several other methods.

  9. Stable Binding of the Conserved Transcription Factor Grainy Head to its Target Genes Throughout Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevil, Markus; Bondra, Eliana R; Schulz, Katharine N; Kaplan, Tommy; Harrison, Melissa M

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that transcription factor binding is temporally dynamic, and that changes in binding determine transcriptional output. Nonetheless, this model is based on relatively few examples in which transcription factor binding has been assayed at multiple developmental stages. The essential transcription factor Grainy head (Grh) is conserved from fungi to humans, and controls epithelial development and barrier formation in numerous tissues. Drosophila melanogaster, which possess a single grainy head (grh) gene, provide an excellent system to study this conserved factor. To determine whether temporally distinct binding events allow Grh to control cell fate specification in different tissue types, we used a combination of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to elucidate the gene regulatory network controlled by Grh during four stages of embryonic development (spanning stages 5-17) and in larval tissue. Contrary to expectations, we discovered that Grh remains bound to at least 1146 genomic loci over days of development. In contrast to this stable DNA occupancy, the subset of genes whose expression is regulated by Grh varies. Grh transitions from functioning primarily as a transcriptional repressor early in development to functioning predominantly as an activator later. Our data reveal that Grh binds to target genes well before the Grh-dependent transcriptional program commences, suggesting it sets the stage for subsequent recruitment of additional factors that execute stage-specific Grh functions. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Inhibition of transcription by the Caenorhabditis elegans germline protein PIE-1: genetic evidence for distinct mechanisms targeting initiation and elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dolan; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, specification of the germ lineage depends on PIE-1, a maternal protein that blocks mRNA transcription in germline blastomeres. Studies in mammalian cell culture have suggested that PIE-1 inhibits P-TEFb, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 in the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II during transcriptional elongation. We have tested this hypothesis using an in vivo complementation assay for PIE-1 function. Our results support the view that PIE-1 inhibits P-TEFb using the CTD-like motif YAPMAPT. This activity is required to block serine 2 phosphorylation in germline blastomeres, but unexpectedly is not essential for transcriptional repression or specification of the germline. We find that sequences outside of the YAPMAPT are required to inhibit serine 5 phosphorylation, and that this second inhibitory mechanism is essential for transcriptional repression and specification of the germ lineage. Our results suggest that PIE-1 uses partially redundant mechanisms to block transcription by targeting both the initiation and elongation phases of the transcription cycle.

  11. Modelling thermal comfort of visitors at urban squares in hot and arid climate using NN-ARX soft computing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminia, Shahab; Motamedi, Shervin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Piri, Jamshid; Mohammadi, Kasra; Hashim, Roslan; Roy, Chandrabhushan; Petković, Dalibor; Bonakdari, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    Visitors utilize the urban space based on their thermal perception and thermal environment. The thermal adaptation engages the user's behavioural, physiological and psychological aspects. These aspects play critical roles in user's ability to assess the thermal environments. Previous studies have rarely addressed the effects of identified factors such as gender, age and locality on outdoor thermal comfort, particularly in hot, dry climate. This study investigated the thermal comfort of visitors at two city squares in Iran based on their demographics as well as the role of thermal environment. Assessing the thermal comfort required taking physical measurement and questionnaire survey. In this study, a non-linear model known as the neural network autoregressive with exogenous input (NN-ARX) was employed. Five indices of physiological equivalent temperature (PET), predicted mean vote (PMV), standard effective temperature (SET), thermal sensation votes (TSVs) and mean radiant temperature ( T mrt) were trained and tested using the NN-ARX. Then, the results were compared to the artificial neural network (ANN) and the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The findings showed the superiority of the NN-ARX over the ANN and the ANFIS. For the NN-ARX model, the statistical indicators of the root mean square error (RMSE) and the mean absolute error (MAE) were 0.53 and 0.36 for the PET, 1.28 and 0.71 for the PMV, 2.59 and 1.99 for the SET, 0.29 and 0.08 for the TSV and finally 0.19 and 0.04 for the T mrt.

  12. Genome-Wide Targets Regulated by the OsMADS1 Transcription Factor Reveals Its DNA Recognition Properties1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, Imtiyaz; Das, Sanjukta; Chongloi, Grace L; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2016-01-01

    OsMADS1 controls rice (Oryza sativa) floral fate and organ development. Yet, its genome-wide targets and the mechanisms underlying its role as a transcription regulator controlling developmental gene expression are unknown. We identify 3112 gene-associated OsMADS1-bound sites in the floret genome. These occur in the vicinity of transcription start sites, within gene bodies, and in intergenic regions. Majority of the bound DNA contained CArG motif variants or, in several cases, only A-tracts. Sequences flanking the binding peak had a higher AT nucleotide content, implying that broader DNA structural features may define in planta binding. Sequences for binding by other transcription factor families like MYC, AP2/ERF, bZIP, etc. are enriched in OsMADS1-bound DNAs. Target genes implicated in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cellular processes, and hormone metabolism were enriched. Combining expression data from OsMADS1 knockdown florets with these DNA binding data, a snapshot of a gene regulatory network was deduced where targets, such as AP2/ERF and bHLH transcription factors and chromatin remodelers form nodes. We show that the expression status of these nodal factors can be altered by inducing the OsMADS1-GR fusion protein and present a model for a regulatory cascade where the direct targets of OsMADS1, OsbHLH108/SPT, OsERF034, and OsHSF24, in turn control genes such as OsMADS32 and OsYABBY5. This cascade, with other similar relationships, cumulatively contributes to floral organ development. Overall, OsMADS1 binds to several regulatory genes and, probably in combination with other factors, controls a gene regulatory network that ensures rice floret development. PMID:27457124

  13. State of Charge Estimation Using the Extended Kalman Filter for Battery Management Systems Based on the ARX Battery Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available State of charge (SOC is a critical factor to guarantee that a battery system is operating in a safe and reliable manner. Many uncertainties and noises, such as fluctuating current, sensor measurement accuracy and bias, temperature effects, calibration errors or even sensor failure, etc. pose a challenge to the accurate estimation of SOC in real applications. This paper adds two contributions to the existing literature. First, the auto regressive exogenous (ARX model is proposed here to simulate the battery nonlinear dynamics. Due to its discrete form and ease of implemention, this straightforward approach could be more suitable for real applications. Second, its order selection principle and parameter identification method is illustrated in detail in this paper. The hybrid pulse power characterization (HPPC cycles are implemented on the 60AH LiFePO4 battery module for the model identification and validation. Based on the proposed ARX model, SOC estimation is pursued using the extended Kalman filter. Evaluation of the adaptability of the battery models and robustness of the SOC estimation algorithm are also verified. The results indicate that the SOC estimation method using the Kalman filter based on the ARX model shows great performance. It increases the model output voltage accuracy, thereby having the potential to be used in real applications, such as EVs and HEVs.

  14. Targeted disruption of the CP2 gene, a member of the NTF family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, L; Barbour, V; Tuckfield, A; Clouston, D R; Topham, D; Cunningham, J M; Jane, S M

    2001-03-16

    The NTF-like family of transcription factors have been implicated in developmental regulation in organisms as diverse as Drosophila and man. The two mammalian members of this family, CP2 (LBP-1c/LSF) and LBP-1a (NF2d9), are highly related proteins sharing an overall amino acid identity of 72%. CP2, the best characterized of these factors, is a ubiquitously expressed 66-kDa protein that binds the regulatory regions of many diverse genes. Consequently, a role for CP2 has been proposed in globin gene expression, T-cell responses to mitogenic stimulation, and several other cellular processes. To elucidate the in vivo role of CP2, we have generated mice nullizygous for the CP2 allele. These animals were born in a normal Mendelian distribution and displayed no defects in growth, behavior, fertility, or development. Specifically, no perturbation of hematopoietic differentiation, globin gene expression, or immunological responses to T- and B-cell mitogenic stimulation was observed. RNA and protein analysis confirmed that the nullizygous mice expressed no full-length or truncated version of CP2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from multiple tissues demonstrated loss of CP2 DNA binding activity in the -/- lines. However, a slower migrating complex that was ablated with antiserum to NF2d9, the murine homologue of LBP-1a, was observed with these extracts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that recombinant LBP-1a can bind to known CP2 consensus sites and form protein complexes with previously defined heteromeric partners of CP2. These results suggest that LBP-1a/NF2d9 may compensate for loss of CP2 expression in vivo and that further analysis of the role of the NTF family of proteins requires the targeting of the NF2d9 gene.

  15. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads.

  16. Oncogene-initiated aberrant signaling engenders the metastatic phenotype: synergistic transcription factor interactions are targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    Certain p21GTPases (notably Ras) and some of their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (e.g., Ost, Dbl, Tiam) and downstream mediators (e.g., Raf, Myc) have the potential to promote the development of malignancies because they can enhance the transcription of genes that foster the tumorigenic and metastatic phenotype. Among these are genes that stimulate cell proliferation, confer immortality, and facilitate the invasion of normal tissues. Oncogenes upstream of Ras-cell surface receptors such as ErbB2/Neu, Met, or Trk (and their ligands), and nonreceptor cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases such as Src and Abl-not only can act through Ras but also contribute additional signals. This review presents a synopsis of our understanding of signaling pathways controlled by the p21GTPases, with a focus on transcription factors regulated by the pathways. Mutations in one or more of the elements in these signaling pathways are invariably found in cancer cells. Crosstalk among the pathways may explain how some forms of stress can contribute to the development of a malignancy. Abnormal signaling leads to modified cytoskeletal structures and permanently altered (i.e., self-sustaining or epigenetic) transcription of target genes. A common therne is that genes whose transcription is elevated to the greatest extent by Ras often have in their promoters juxtaposed binding sites for two different transcription factors (particularly those in the Fos/Jun, CREB/ATF, NFkB, and Ets families) each of which is activated and such that together they synergize to augment transcription substantially. Some of these transcription factors can also act as oncogenes in certain cell types when appropriately modified and expressed. This unifying theme among many different cancers suggests that strategies to restore the balance among the signaling pathways or to suppress synergistic interactions between transcription factors may prove broadly useful in reversing the malignant phenotype.

  17. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediat

  18. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Niu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4 genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2 and 10,712,733 (PA4 clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia.

  19. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Fan, Guoqiang; Xu, Enkai; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4) genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2) and 10,712,733 (PA4) clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia.

  20. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Takeyoshi [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Asahi, Toru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Sawamura, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.sawamura@gmail.com [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  1. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 is a direct transcriptional and epigenetic target of IL-13 involved in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, M; Kartashov, A V; Caldwell, J M; Collins, M H; Stucke, E M; Kc, K; Sherrill, J D; Herren, J; Barski, A; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Although interleukin (IL)-13 and neurotrophins are functionally important for the pathogenesis of immune responses, the interaction of these pathways has not been explored. Herein, by interrogating IL-13-induced responses in human epithelial cells we show that neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 (NTRK1), a cognate, high-affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), is an early transcriptional IL-13 target. Induction of NTRK1 was accompanied by accumulation of activating epigenetic marks in the promoter; transcriptional and epigenetic changes were signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 dependent. Using eosinophilic esophagitis as a model for human allergic inflammation, we found that NTRK1 was increased in inflamed tissue and dynamically expressed as a function of disease activity and that the downstream mediator of NTRK1 signaling early growth response 1 protein was elevated in allergic inflammatory tissue compared with control tissue. Unlike NTRK1, its ligand NGF was constitutively expressed in control and disease states, indicating that IL-13-stimulated NTRK1 induction is a limiting factor in pathway activation. In epithelial cells, NGF and IL-13 synergistically induced several target genes, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 26 (eotaxin-3). In summary, we have demonstrated that IL-13 confers epithelial cell responsiveness to NGF by regulating NTRK1 levels by a transcriptional and epigenetic mechanism and that this process likely contributes to allergic inflammation.

  2. SPATA18, a Spermatogenesis-Associated Gene, Is a Novel Transcriptional Target of p53 and p63▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Chamutal; Brosh, Ran; Molchadsky, Alina; Madar, Shalom; Kogan-Sakin, Ira; Goldstein, Ido; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Flores, Elsa R.; Goldfinger, Naomi; Sarig, Rachel; Rotter, Varda

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 functions not only to suppress tumorigenesis but also to maintain normal development and homeostasis. Although p53 was implicated in different aspects of fertility, including spermatogenesis and implantation, the mechanism underlying p53 involvement in spermatogenesis is poorly resolved. In this study we describe the identification of a spermatogenesis-associated gene, SPATA18, as a novel p53 transcriptional target and show that SPATA18 transcription is induced by p53 in a variety of cell types of both human and mouse origin. p53 binds a consensus DNA motif that resides within the first intron of SPATA18. We describe the spatiotemporal expression patterns of SPATA18 in mouse seminiferous tubules and suggest that SPATA18 transcription is regulated in vivo by p53. We also demonstrate the induction of SPATA18 by p63 and suggest that p63 can compensate for the loss of p53 activity in vivo. Our data not only enrich the known collection of p53 targets but may also provide insights on spermatogenesis defects that are associated with p53 deficiency. PMID:21300779

  3. Targeted Epigenetic Remodeling of Endogenous Loci by CRISPR/Cas9-Based Transcriptional Activators Directly Converts Fibroblasts to Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua B; Adler, Andrew F; Wang, Hong-Gang; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; Hutchinson, Hunter A; Reddy, Timothy E; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Leong, Kam W; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of exogenous fate-specifying transcription factors can directly reprogram differentiated somatic cells to target cell types. Here, we show that similar reprogramming can also be achieved through the direct activation of endogenous genes using engineered CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators. We use this approach to induce activation of the endogenous Brn2, Ascl1, and Myt1l genes (BAM factors) to convert mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced neuronal cells. This direct activation of endogenous genes rapidly remodeled the epigenetic state of the target loci and induced sustained endogenous gene expression during reprogramming. Thus, transcriptional activation and epigenetic remodeling of endogenous master transcription factors are sufficient for conversion between cell types. The rapid and sustained activation of endogenous genes in their native chromatin context by this approach may facilitate reprogramming with transient methods that avoid genomic integration and provides a new strategy for overcoming epigenetic barriers to cell fate specification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Youn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis.

  5. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation.

  6. On the phase behavior of mixed Ar-Xe submonolayer films on graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patrykiejew

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using Monte Carlo simulation methods in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles, we discuss the melting and the formation of ordered structures of mixed Ar-Xe submonolayer films on graphite. The calculations have been performed using two- as well as three-dimensional models of the systems studied. It is demonstrated that out-of plane motion does not affect the properties of the adsorbed films as long as the total density is not close to the monolayer completion. On the other hand, close to the monolayer completion, the promotion of particles to the second layer considerably affects the properties of mixed films. It has been shown that the mixture exhibits complete mixing in the liquid phase and freezes into solid phases of the structure depending upon the film composition. For submonolayer densities, the melting temperature exhibits non-monotonous changes with the film composition. In particular, the melting temperature initially increases when the xenon concentration increases up to about 20%, then it decreases and reaches minimum for the xenon concentration of about 40%. For still higher xenon concentrations, the melting point gradually increases to the temperature corresponding to pure xenon film. It has been also demonstrated that the topology of phase diagrams of mixed films is sensitive to the composition of adsorbed layers.

  7. Identification of Novel Target Genes of MADS-Box Transcription Factor RIN for Control of Fruit Ripening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozheng Qin; Yuying Wang; Baohua Cao; Weihao Wang; Shiping Tian

    2012-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor RIN represents a global developmental regulator of fruit ripening.However,the specific set of genes modulated by RIN and the mechanisms underlying the transcription regulation remain largely unknown.To search for potential downstream targets of RIN,we compared the global protein expression of wild-type tomato fruits with rin mutant using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics.A total of 41 proteins associated with various biological processes were identified as the candidates.Gene expression analysis indicated that the protein levels were correlated well with the mRNA levels for most proteins.A search for transcription factor binding sites revealed various RIN sites in the promoters of genes encoding the differentially expressed proteins.Among the candidate target genes,five (E8,TomloxC,PNAE,PGK,and ADH2) were identified as direct targets of RIN by chromatin immunoprecipitation.Detection of in vitro protein-DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the binding ability of RIN to the promoters of these genes.Two of the direct target genes,TomloxC and ADH2,which encoding lipoxygenase (LOX) and alcohol dehydrogenase,respectively,are critical for the production of characteristic tomato aromas derived from LOX pathway.Further study indicated that RIN also directly regulated the expression of HPL that encodes hydroperoxide lyase,another rate-limiting enzyme in LOX pathway.Mutation of RIN resulted in the deregulation of LOX pathway,leading to specific defect in the generation of hexanal,trans-2-hexanal,hexenol,and cis-3-hexanol,the primary aroma compounds derived from LOX pathway,during fruit ripening.These results indicate that RIN modulates aroma formation via direct regulation of gene expression of LOX pathway.Taken together,our findings suggest that the regulatory effect of RIN in fruit ripening is achieved by targeting specific molecular pathways.

  8. Wwp2, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Targets Transcription Factor Oct-4 for Ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiMingXu; BingLiao; QianJunZhang; BeiBeiWang; Hui,Li; XiaoMinZhong; HuiZhenSheng; YingXinZhao; YingMingZhao; YingJin

    2005-01-01

    The POU transcription factor Oct-4 is a master regulator affecting the fate of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which the activation and expression of Oct-4 are regulated still remain to be elucidated. We describe here a novel murine ubiquitin ligase, Wwp2, that specifically interacts with Oct-4 and promotes its ubiquitination both in vivo and in vitro. Remarkably, the expression of a catalytically inactive point mutant of Wwp2 abolishes Oct-4 ubiquitination. Moreover, Wwp2 promotes Oct-4 degradation in the presence of overexpressed ubiquitin. The degradation is blocked by treatment with proteasome inhibitor. Fusion of a single ubiquitin to Oct-4 inactivates its transcriptional activity in a heterologous Oct-4-driven reporter system. Furthermore, overexpression of Wwp2 in embryonic stem cells significantly reduces the Oct-4-transcriptional activities. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that Oct-4 can be posttranslationatly modified by ubiquitination and that this modification dramatically suppresses its transcriptional activity. These results reveal that the functional status of Oct-4, in addition to its expression level, dictates its transcriptional activity, and the results open up a new avenue to understand how Oct-4 defines the fate of embryonic stem cells.

  9. Phloem-Mobile Aux/IAA Transcripts Target to the Root Tip and Modify Root Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michitaka Notaguchi; Shmuel Wolf; William J. Lucas

    2012-01-01

    In plants,the phloem is the component of the vascular system that delivers nutrients and transmits signals from mature leaves to developing sink tissues.Recent studies have identified proteins,mRNA,and small RNA within the phloem sap of several plant species.It is now of considerable interest to elucidate the biological functions of these potential long-distance signal agents,to further our understanding of how plants coordinate their developmental programs at the whole-plant level.In this study,we developed a strategy for the functional analysis of phloem-mobile mRNA by focusing on IAA transcripts,whose mobility has previously been reported in melon (Cucumis melo cv.Hale's Best Jumbo).Indoleacetic acid (IAA) proteins are key transcriptional regulators of auxin signaling,and are involved in a broad range of developmental processes including root development.We used a combination of vasculature-enriched sampling and hetero-grafting techniques to identify IAA18 and IAA28 as phloemmobile transcripts in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.Micro-grafting experiments were used to confirm that these IAA transcripts,which are generated in vascular tissues of mature leaves,are then transported into the root system where they negatively regulate lateral root formation.Based on these findings,we present a model in which auxin distribution,in combination with phloem-mobile AuxIIAA transcripts,can determine the sites of auxin action.

  10. Whole genome expression profiling shows that BRG1 transcriptionally regulates UV inducible genes and other novel targets in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Nemzow, Leah; Chen, Hua; Hu, Jennifer J; Gong, Feng

    2014-01-01

    UV irradiation is known to cause cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs), and plays a large role in the development of cancer. Tumor suppression, through DNA repair and proper cell cycle regulation, is an integral factor in maintaining healthy cells and preventing development of cancer. Transcriptional regulation of the genes involved in the various tumor suppression pathways is essential for them to be expressed when needed and to function properly. BRG1, an ATPase catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, has been identified as a tumor suppressor protein, as it has been shown to play a role in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) of CPDs, suppress apoptosis, and restore checkpoint deficiency, in response to UV exposure. Although BRG1 has been shown to regulate transcription of some genes that are instrumental in proper DNA damage repair and cell cycle maintenance in response to UV, its role in transcriptional regulation of the whole genome in response to UV has not yet been elucidated. With whole genome expression profiling in SW13 cells, we show that upon UV induction, BRG1 regulates transcriptional expression of many genes involved in cell stress response. Additionally, our results also highlight BRG1's general role as a master regulator of the genome, as it transcriptionally regulates approximately 4.8% of the human genome, including expression of genes involved in many pathways. RT-PCR and ChIP were used to validate our genome expression analysis. Importantly, our study identifies several novel transcriptional targets of BRG1, such as ATF3. Thus, BRG1 has a larger impact on human genome expression than previously thought, and our studies will provide inroads for future analysis of BRG1's role in gene regulation.

  11. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  12. Treatment of allergic asthma by targeting transcription factors using nucleic-acid based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Serdar; Henke, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Alexander; Herz, Udo; Renz, Harald

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that T-helper 2 (Th2) cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases such as bronchial asthma, hay fever or food allergy. The differentiation of naïve T cells into Th2 cells producing a specific pattern of cytokines is tightly controlled and regulated by transcription factors. Thus down-regulation of mRNA-levels of a single transcription factor leads to a "knock-down" of several mediators simultaneously, representing an advantage compared to earlier approaches involving down-regulation of one intercellular inflammatory mediator, which is unlikely to influence all pathophysiological aspects of the disease. We review the impact of specific and master transcription factors involved in Th2 cell commitment and evaluate approaches for the down-regulation of these proteins by degradation of their mRNA using nucleic-acid based technologies including antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, DNAzymes, decoys oligonucleotides and RNA interference.

  13. NELL-1, an osteoinductive factor, is a direct transcriptional target of Osterix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NELL-1 is a novel secreted protein associated with premature fusion of cranial sutures in craniosynostosis that has been found to promote osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization. Our previous study showed that Runx2, the key transcription factor in osteoblast differentiation, transactivates the NELL-1 promoter. In this study, we evaluated the regulatory involvement and mechanisms of Osterix, an essential transcription factor of osteoblasts, in NELL-1 gene expression and function. Promoter analysis showed a cluster of potential Sp1 sites (Sp1/Osterix binding sites within approximately 70 bp (from -71 to -142 of the 5' flanking region of the human NELL-1 transcriptional start site. Luciferase activity in our NELL-1 promoter reporter systems was significantly decreased in Saos-2 cells when Osterix was overexpressed. Mutagenesis study demonstrated that this suppression is mediated by the Sp1 sites. The binding specificity of Osterix to these Sp1 sites was confirmed in Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts by EMSA in vitro and ChIP assay in vivo. ChIP assay also showed that Osterix downregulated NELL-1 by affecting binding of RNA polymerase II to the NELL-1 promoter, but not by competing with Runx2 binding to the OSE2 sites. Moreover, NELL-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased when Osterix was overexpressed in Saos-2, U2OS, Hela and Glioma cells. Correspondingly, knockdown of Osterix increased NELL-1 transcription and osteoblastic differentiation in both Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts. These results suggest that Osterix is a direct transcriptional regulator with repressive effect on NELL-1 gene expression, contributing to a delicate balance of regulatory effects on NELL-1 transcription with Runx2, and may play a crucial role in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings also extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of Runx2, Osterix, and NELL-1 and demonstrate their crosstalk during

  14. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhanglin

    2014-01-01

    Sigma (σ) factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ Factors recruit the core RNA polymerase to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently, engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  15. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi eTripathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigma (σ factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ factors recruit the core RNA polymerase (RNAP to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  16. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  17. Transcription profiling of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA-1 expressing cells suggests targeting of chromatin remodeling complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Sompallae

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded nuclear antigen (EBNA-1 regulates virus replication and transcription, and participates in the remodeling of the cellular environment that accompanies EBV induced B-cell immortalization and malignant transformation. The putative cellular targets of these effects of EBNA-1 are largely unknown. To address this issue we have profiled the transcriptional changes induced by short- and long-term expression of EBNA-1 in the EBV negative B-cell lymphoma BJAB. Three hundred and nineteen cellular genes were regulated in a conditional transfectant shortly after EBNA-1 induction while a ten fold higher number of genes was regulated upon continuous EBNA-1 expression. Promoter analysis of the differentially regulated genes demonstrated a significant enrichment of putative EBNA-1 binding sites suggesting that EBNA-1 may directly influence the transcription of a subset of genes. Gene ontology analysis of forty seven genes that were consistently regulated independently on the time of EBNA-1 expression revealed an unexpected enrichment of genes involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture. The interaction network of the affected gene products suggests that EBNA-1 may promote a broad rearrangement of the cellular transcription landscape by altering the expression of key components of chromatin remodeling complexes.

  18. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  19. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2016-09-19

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells.

  20. Transcription factors as targets for improving Aspergillus niger as cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Bruno, K.S.; Thykær, Jette

    Altering fluxes for overcoming metabolic bottlenecks have traditionally been approached by genetic engineering of a single or few metabolic genes. This strategy struggles to overcome the subjacent regulation thus the outcome has frequently shown to be of limited success. Transcription factors hav...

  1. Identification of target genes of transcription factor CEBPB in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yu; Yang-De Zhang; Jun Zhou; De-Ming Yao; Xiang Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To indentify target genes of transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding proteinβ (CEBPB) in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid. Methods:A new strategy for high-throughput identification of direct target genes was established by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with in vitro selection. Then, 106 potential CEBPB binding fragments from the genome of the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated NB4 cells were identified. Results: Of them, 82 were mapped in proximity to known or previously predicted genes; 7 were randomly picked up for further confirmation by ChIP-PCR and 3 genes (GALM, ITPR2 and ORM2) were found to be specifically up-regulated in the ATRA-treated NB4 cells, indicating that they might be the down-stream target genes of ATRA. Conclusions: Our results provided new insight into the mechanisms of ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation.

  2. Facilitates Chromatin Transcription Complex Is an “Accelerator” of Tumor Transformation and Potential Marker and Target of Aggressive Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Garcia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT complex is involved in chromatin remodeling during transcription, replication, and DNA repair. FACT was previously considered to be ubiquitously expressed and not associated with any disease. However, we discovered that FACT is the target of a class of anticancer compounds and is not expressed in normal cells of adult mammalian tissues, except for undifferentiated and stem-like cells. Here, we show that FACT expression is strongly associated with poorly differentiated aggressive cancers with low overall survival. In addition, FACT was found to be upregulated during in vitro transformation and to be necessary, but not sufficient, for driving transformation. FACT also promoted survival and growth of established tumor cells. Genome-wide mapping of chromatin-bound FACT indicated that FACT’s role in cancer most likely involves selective chromatin remodeling of genes that stimulate proliferation, inhibit cell death and differentiation, and regulate cellular stress responses.

  3. Site-Specific Gene Targeting Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE)-Based Nuclease in Brassica oleracea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zijian Sun; Nianzu Li; Guodong Huang; Junqiang Xu; Yu Pan; Zhimin Wang; Qinglin Tang; Ming Song; Xiaojia Wang

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called“unit assembly”, specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  4. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of target genes by the sRNA FnrS in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwer, Pooja; Bauer, Susanne; Heinrichs, Elisabeth; Panda, Gurudutta; Saluja, Daman; Rudel, Thomas; Beier, Dagmar

    2017-07-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are well-established post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in bacteria that respond to a variety of environmental stimuli. They usually act by base-pairing with their target mRNAs, which is commonly facilitated by the RNA chaperone Hfq. In this study we initiated the analysis of the sRNA FnrS of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is induced under anaerobic conditions. We identified four putative FnrS target genes using bioinformatics approaches and validated these target genes using translational reporter gene fusions in both Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae, thereby demonstrating their downregulation by direct base-pairing between the respective mRNA and FnrS. We demonstrate deregulation of target mRNAs upon deletion of fnrS and provide evidence that the isc gene cluster required for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, which harbours iscS, which is a direct target of FnrS, is coordinately downregulated by the sRNA. By mutational analysis we show that, surprisingly, three distinct regions of FnrS are employed for interaction with different target genes.

  6. A Novel ARX-Based Approach for the Steady-State Identification Analysis of Industrial Depropanizer Column Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin D. Rincón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel steady-state identification (SSI method based on the auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX. This method allows the SSI with reduced tuning by analyzing the identifiability properties of the system. In particular, the singularity of the model matrices is used as an index for steady-state determination. In this contribution, the novel SSI method is compared to other available techniques, namely the F-like test, wavelet transform and a polynomial-based approach. These methods are implemented for SSI of three different case studies. In the first case, a simulated dataset is used for calibrating the output-based SSI methods. The second case corresponds to a literature nonlinear continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR example running at different steady states in which the ARX-based approach is tuned with the available input-output data. Finally, an industrial case with real data of a depropanizer column from PETROBRAS S.A. considering different pieces of equipment is analyzed. The results for a reflux drum case indicate that the wavelet and the F-like test can satisfactorily detect the steady-state periods after careful tuning and when respecting their hypothesis, i.e., smooth data for the wavelet method and the presence of variance in the data for the F-like test. Through a heat exchanger case with different measurement frequencies, we demonstrate the advantages of using the ARX-based method over the other techniques, which include the aspect of online implementation.

  7. Human teneurin-1 is a direct target of the homeobox transcription factor EMX2 at a novel alternate promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brož Daniela

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teneurin-1 is a member of a family of type II transmembrane proteins conserved from C.elegans to vertebrates. Teneurin expression in vertebrates is best studied in mouse and chicken, where the four members teneurin-1 to -4 are predominantly expressed in the developing nervous system in area specific patterns. Based on their distinct, complementary expression a possible function in the establishment of proper connectivity in the brain was postulated. However, the transcription factors contributing to these distinctive expression patterns are largely unknown. Emx2 is a homeobox transcription factor, known to be important for area specification in the developing cortex. A study of Emx2 knock-out mice suggested a role of Emx2 in regulating patterned teneurin expression. Results 5'RACE of human teneurin-1 revealed new alternative untranslated exons that are conserved in mouse and chicken. Closer analysis of the conserved region around the newly identified transcription start revealed promoter activity that was induced by EMX2. Mutation of a predicted homeobox binding site decreased the promoter activity in different reporter assays in vitro and in vivo in electroporated chick embryos. We show direct in vivo binding of EMX2 to the newly identified promoter element and finally confirm that the endogenous alternate transcript is specifically upregulated by EMX2. Conclusions We found that human teneurin-1 is directly regulated by EMX2 at a newly identified and conserved promoter region upstream of the published transcription start site, establishing teneurin-1 as the first human EMX2 target gene. We identify and characterize the EMX2 dependent promoter element of human teneurin-1.

  8. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  9. Fumarate hydratase inactivation in renal tumors: HIF1α, NRF2, and "cryptic targets" of transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikseng Ooi; Kyle A.Furge

    2012-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of fumarate hydratase (FH) causes type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC2),uterine fibroids,and cutaneous leimyomas,a condition known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC).The most direct effect of FH inactivation is intracellular fumarate accumulation.A majority of studies on FH inactivation over the past decade have focused on the theory that intracellular fumarate stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) through competitive inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases.Recently,a competing theory that intracellular fumarate activates nuclear factor (erythroidderived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) through post-translational modification of its negative regulator.Kelch-like ECH- associated protein 1 (KEAP1) has emerged from a computational modeling study and mouse model studies.This review dissects the origin of these two governing theories and highlights the presence of chromatin-structure-regulated targets of transcription factors,which we refer to as "cryptic targets" of transcription factors.One such cryptic target is heme oxygenase Ⅰ (HMOX1),the expression of which is known to be modulated by the gene product of SWI/SNF-related,matrix-associated,actin-dependent regulator of chromatin,subfamily a,member 4 (SMARCA4,also known as BRG1).

  10. Genome-wide Analysis of BP1 Transcriptional Targets in Breast Cancer Cell Line Hs578T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Song, Chengxue Dang, Yebo Fu, Yi Lian, Jenny Hottel, Xuelan Li, Tim McCaffrey, Sidney W. Fu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes are known to be critically important in tumor development and progression. The BP1 (Beta Protein 1 gene, an isoform of DLX4, belongs to the Distal-less (DLX subfamily of homeobox genes and encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor. Our studies have shown that the BP1 gene was overexpressed in 81% of primary breast cancer and its expression was closely correlated with the progression of breast cancer. However, the exact role of BP1 in breast has yet to be elucidated. Therefore, it is important to explore the potential transcriptional targets of BP1 via whole genome-scale screening. In this study, we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-on-chip and gene expression microarray assays to identify candidate target genes and gene networks, which are directly regulated by BP1 in ER negative (ER- breast cancer cells. After rigorous bioinformatic and statistical analysis for both ChIP-on-chip and expression microarray gene lists, 18 overlapping genes were noted and verified. Those potential target genes are involved in a variety of tumorigenic pathways, which sheds light on the functional mechanisms of BP1 in breast cancer development and progression.

  11. Transcriptional targeting of acute hypoxia in the tumour stroma is a novel and viable strategy for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, N; Porter, C D

    2005-07-01

    Deregulated tumour growth and neovascularization result in an inadequate tumour blood supply, leading to areas of chronic hypoxia and necrosis. Irregular vascular structure and abnormal tumour physiology also cause erratic blood flow in tumour vessels. We reasoned that tumour stroma, including vascular endothelial cells, would consequently experience transient hypoxia that may allow transcriptional targeting as part of an antivascular gene therapy approach to cancer. To exploit hypoxia for transcriptional regulation, retroviral vectors were generated with modified LTRs: a 6-mer of hypoxia response elements in place of the viral enhancer produced near wild-type levels of expression in hypoxia but was functionally inert in normoxia. In a tumour xenograft model, expression was mainly around areas of necrosis, which were shown to be hypoxic; no expression was detected in tumour stroma. Time-course experiments in vitro demonstrated that expression was transient in response to a hypoxic episode, such that a reporter gene would be insensitive to acute hypoxia in vivo. In contrast, a significant therapeutic effect was seen upon ganciclovir administration with a vector expressing thymidine kinase (TK) in the tumour stroma. Expression of TK was more effective when targeted to acute hypoxia in the stroma compared to chronic hypoxia in the poorly vascularized regions of the tumour cell compartment. The data presented here are evidence that hypoxia in the stromal compartment does occur and that transient hypoxia constitutes a valid therapeutic target.

  12. Regulation of locomotion and motoneuron trajectory selection and targeting by the Drosophila homolog of Olig family transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyallon, Justine; Apitz, Holger; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Timofeev, Katarina; Ferreira, Lauren; Salecker, Iris

    2012-01-01

    During the development of locomotion circuits it is essential that motoneurons with distinct subtype identities select the correct trajectories and target muscles. In vertebrates, the generation of motoneurons and myelinating glia depends on Olig2, one of the five Olig family bHLH transcription factors. We investigated the so far unknown function of the single Drosophila homolog Oli. Combining behavioral and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that oli is not required for gliogenesis, but plays pivotal roles in regulating larval and adult locomotion, and axon pathfinding and targeting of embryonic motoneurons. In the embryonic nervous system, Oli is primarily expressed in postmitotic progeny, and in particular, in distinct ventral motoneuron subtypes. oli mediates axonal trajectory selection of these motoneurons within the ventral nerve cord and targeting to specific muscles. Genetic interaction assays suggest that oli acts as part of a conserved transcription factor ensemble including Lim3, Islet and Hb9. Moreover, oli is expressed in postembryonic leg-innervating motoneuron lineages and required in glutamatergic neurons for walking. Finally, over-expression of vertebrate Olig2 partially rescues the walking defects of oli-deficient flies. Thus, our findings reveal a remarkably conserved role of Drosophila Oli and vertebrate family members in regulating motoneuron development, while the steps that require their function differ in detail. PMID:22796650

  13. Regulation of locomotion and motoneuron trajectory selection and targeting by the Drosophila homolog of Olig family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyallon, Justine; Apitz, Holger; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Timofeev, Katarina; Ferreira, Lauren; Salecker, Iris

    2012-09-15

    During the development of locomotion circuits it is essential that motoneurons with distinct subtype identities select the correct trajectories and target muscles. In vertebrates, the generation of motoneurons and myelinating glia depends on Olig2, one of the five Olig family bHLH transcription factors. We investigated the so far unknown function of the single Drosophila homolog Oli. Combining behavioral and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that oli is not required for gliogenesis, but plays pivotal roles in regulating larval and adult locomotion, and axon pathfinding and targeting of embryonic motoneurons. In the embryonic nervous system, Oli is primarily expressed in postmitotic progeny, and in particular, in distinct ventral motoneuron subtypes. oli mediates axonal trajectory selection of these motoneurons within the ventral nerve cord and targeting to specific muscles. Genetic interaction assays suggest that oli acts as part of a conserved transcription factor ensemble including Lim3, Islet and Hb9. Moreover, oli is expressed in postembryonic leg-innervating motoneuron lineages and required in glutamatergic neurons for walking. Finally, over-expression of vertebrate Olig2 partially rescues the walking defects of oli-deficient flies. Thus, our findings reveal a remarkably conserved role of Drosophila Oli and vertebrate family members in regulating motoneuron development, while the steps that require their function differ in detail.

  14. Single trial somatosensory evoked potential extraction with ARX filtering for a combined spinal cord intraoperative neuromonitoring technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merzagora Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When spinal cord functional integrity is at risk during surgery, intraoperative neuromonitoring is recommended. Tibial Single Trial Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs and H-reflex are here used in a combined neuromonitoring method: both signals monitor the spinal cord status, though involving different nervous pathways. However, SEPs express a trial-to-trial variability that is difficult to track because of the intrinsic low signal-to-noise ratio. For this reason single trial techniques are needed to extract SEPs from the background EEG. Methods The analysis is performed off line on data recorded in eight scoliosis surgery sessions during which the spinal cord was simultaneously monitored through classical SEPs and H-reflex responses elicited by the same tibial nerve electrical stimulation. The single trial extraction of SEPs from the background EEG is here performed through AutoRegressive filter with eXogenous input (ARX. The electroencephalographic recording can be modeled as the sum of the background EEG, which can be described as an autoregressive process not related to the stimulus, and the evoked potential (EP, which can be viewed as a filtered version of a reference signal related to the stimulus. The choice of the filter optimal orders is based on the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC. The reference signal used as exogenous input in the ARX model is a weighted average of the previous SEPs trials with exponential forgetting behavior. Results The moving average exponentially weighted, used as reference signal for the ARX model, shows a better sensibility than the standard moving average in tracking SEPs fast inter-trial changes. The ability to promptly detect changes allows highlighting relations between waveform changes and surgical maneuvers. It also allows a comparative study with H-reflex trends: in particular, the two signals show different fall and recovery dynamics following stressful conditions for the spinal

  15. Comparison of auditory evoked potentials and the A-line ARX Index for monitoring the hypnotic level during sevoflurane and propofol induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litvan, H; Jensen, E W; Revuelta, M

    2002-01-01

    Extraction of the middle latency auditory evoked potentials (AEP) by an auto regressive model with exogenous input (ARX) enables extraction of the AEP within 1.7 s. In this way, the depth of hypnosis can be monitored at almost real-time. However, the identification and the interpretation of the a......Extraction of the middle latency auditory evoked potentials (AEP) by an auto regressive model with exogenous input (ARX) enables extraction of the AEP within 1.7 s. In this way, the depth of hypnosis can be monitored at almost real-time. However, the identification and the interpretation...

  16. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  17. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  18. Genome-wide identification of transcriptional targets of RORA reveals direct regulation of multiple genes associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachana, Tewarit; Hu, Valerie W

    2013-05-22

    We have recently identified the nuclear hormone receptor RORA (retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-alpha) as a novel candidate gene for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our independent cohort studies have consistently demonstrated the reduction of RORA transcript and/or protein levels in blood-derived lymphoblasts as well as in the postmortem prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of individuals with ASD. Moreover, we have also shown that RORA has the potential to be under negative and positive regulation by androgen and estrogen, respectively, suggesting the possibility that RORA may contribute to the male bias of ASD. However, little is known about transcriptional targets of this nuclear receptor, particularly in humans. Here we identify transcriptional targets of RORA in human neuronal cells on a genome-wide level using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with an anti-RORA antibody followed by whole-genome promoter array (chip) analysis. Selected potential targets of RORA were then validated by an independent ChIP followed by quantitative PCR analysis. To further demonstrate that reduced RORA expression results in reduced transcription of RORA targets, we determined the expression levels of the selected transcriptional targets in RORA-deficient human neuronal cells, as well as in postmortem brain tissues from individuals with ASD who exhibit reduced RORA expression. The ChIP-on-chip analysis reveals that RORA1, a major isoform of RORA protein in human brain, can be recruited to as many as 2,764 genomic locations corresponding to promoter regions of 2,544 genes across the human genome. Gene ontology analysis of this dataset of genes that are potentially directly regulated by RORA1 reveals statistically significant enrichment in biological functions negatively impacted in individuals with ASD, including neuronal differentiation, adhesion and survival, synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and axonogenesis, as well as higher level functions such as

  19. Human lactoferrin efficiently targeted into caprine beta-lactoglobulin locus with transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To create genetically modified goat as a biopharming source of recombinant human lacotoferrin (hLF with transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Methods TALENs and targeting vector were transferred into cultured fibroblasts to insert hLF cDNA in the goat beta-lactoglobulin (BLG locus with homology-directed repair. The gene targeted efficiency was checked using sequencing and TE7I assay. The bi-allelic gene targeted colonies were isolated and confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, and used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Results The targeted efficiency for BLG gene was approximately 10%. Among 12 Bi-allelic gene targeted colonies, five were used in first round SCNT and 4 recipients (23% were confirmed pregnant at 30 d. In second round SCNT, 7 (53%, 4 (31%, and 3 (23% recipients were confirmed to be pregnant by ultrasound on 30 d, 60 d, and 90 d. Conclusion This finding signifies the combined use of TALENs and SCNT can generate bi-allelic knock-in fibroblasts that can be cloned in a fetus. Therefore, it might lay the foundation for transgenic hLF goat generation and possible use of their mammary gland as a bioreactor for large-scale production of recombinant hLF.

  20. System identification of a high-rise building applying multi-input-multi-output ARX model of modal analysis; Mode kaisekigata tanyuryoku tashutsuryoku ARX model wo mochiita koso kenbutsu no system dotei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T. [Shimizu Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-30

    Recently, with the increase of high-rise building construction, better precision is in demand in case of building model used for analyzing seismic, wind responses in the design. Particularly, the decay constant has been given uniformly for each type of structures, however, application of estimated value from practically measured results of real high-rise building in the design is preferred. In this report, purpose is to estimate the model parameters of multi-input-multi-output system by making optimum use of benefits of system identification using ARX model. Further, multi-input-multi-output ARX model based on the idea of mode analysis was established by revealing in common the self-regression coefficient for each output and algorithm for estimating its model constant was developed. Further, system identification was carried out by applying this proposed model in real seismic response record of high-rise building, effectiveness of the model was verified and seismic vibration characteristics of the building was evaluated. 27 refs.,10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. OPA3, mutated in 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, encodes two transcripts targeted primarily to mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizing, Marjan; Dorward, Heidi; Ly, Lien;

    2010-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type III (3-MGCA type III), caused by recessive mutations in the 2-exon gene OPA3, is characterized by early-onset bilateral optic atrophy, later-onset extrapyramidal dysfunction, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. Her...... we report the identification of a novel third OPA3 coding exon, the apparent product of a segmental duplication event, resulting in two gene transcripts, OPA3A and OPA3B. OPA3A deficiency (as in optic atrophy type 3) causes up-regulation of OPA3B. OPA3 protein function remains unknown...

  2. Transcription Factor Binding Probabilities in Orthologous Promoters: An Alignment-Free Approach to the Inference of Functional Regulatory Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Clarke, Neil D.

    Using a physically principled method of scoring genomic sequences for the potential to be bound by transcription factors, we have developed an algorithm for assessing the conservation of predicted binding occupancy that does not rely on sequence alignment of promoters. The method, which we call ortholog-weighting, assesses the degree to which the predicted binding occupancy of a transcription factor in a reference gene is also predicted in the promoters of orthologous genes. The analysis was performed separately for over 100 different transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Statistical significance was evaluated by simulation using permuted versions of the position weight matrices. Ortholog-weighting produced about twice as many significantly high scoring genes as were obtained from the S. cerevisiae genome alone. Gene Ontology analysis found a similar two-fold enrichment of genes. Both analyses suggest that ortholog-weighting improves the prediction of true regulatory targets. Interestingly, the method has only a marginal effect on the prediction of binding by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. We suggest several possibilities for reconciling this result with the improved enrichment that we observe for functionally related promoters and for promoters that are under positive selection.

  3. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga; Zhao, Yuqi; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G; Kim, Juyong B; Salfati, Elias L; Kundaje, Anshul B; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  4. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sazonova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS, and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC. Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  5. Targeting the EWS-ETS transcriptional program by BET bromodomain inhibition in Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Tim; Giorgi, Chiara; Schmidt, Oxana; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Buch, Thorsten; Niggli, Felix K; Schäfer, Beat W; Burdach, Stefan; Richter, Günther H S

    2016-01-12

    Ewing sarcomas (ES) are highly malignant bone or soft tissue tumors. Genetically, ES are defined by balanced chromosomal EWS/ETS translocations, which give rise to chimeric proteins (EWS-ETS) that generate an oncogenic transcriptional program associated with altered epigenetic marks throughout the genome. By use of an inhibitor (JQ1) blocking BET bromodomain binding proteins (BRDs) we strikingly observed a strong down-regulation of the predominant EWS-ETS protein EWS-FLI1 in a dose dependent manner. This was further enhanced by co-treatment with an inhibitor of the PI3K pathway. Microarray analysis further revealed JQ1 treatment to block a typical ES associated expression program. The effect on this expression program was mimicked by RNA interference with BRD3 or BRD4 expression, indicating that the EWS-FLI1 mediated expression profile is at least in part mediated via such epigenetic readers. Consequently, contact dependent and independent proliferation of different ES lines was strongly inhibited. Mechanistically, treatment of ES resulted in a partial arrest of the cell cycle as well as induction of apoptosis. Tumor development was suppressed dose dependently in a xeno-transplant model in immune deficient mice, overall indicating that ES may be susceptible to treatment with epigenetic inhibitors blocking BET bromodomain activity and the associated pathognomonic EWS-ETS transcriptional program.

  6. Targeting RNA polymerase I transcription and the nucleolus for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Ross D; Drygin, Denis; Pearson, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    The nucleoli are the site of the production of ribosomes, the protein synthetic apparatus of the cell. The presence of enlarged nucleoli, reflecting increased ribosomal gene transcription, has long been used by pathologists as an indicator of aggressive tumors. However, over the last 10 years a growing body of evidence has revealed that the nucleolus contains a dynamic cohort of over 4500 proteins, the majority of which have no function in ribosome production. The activity of some of these proteins is modulated by their regulated sequestration and release from the nucleolus. In particular, the nucleolus plays a central role in sensing cellular stress to modulate the abundance of the critical tumor suppressor protein p53. The finding that p53 activity is dysregulated in up to 50% of all human cancers highlights the importance of the nucleolar stress response in limiting malignant transformation. The development of drugs to selectively inhibit transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes in the nucleolus has paved the way for a new therapeutic approach to hijack nucleolar stress to selectively and non-genotoxically activate p53 in tumor cells. Here, we describe the potential application of this exciting new class of drugs for the treatment of human cancer.

  7. JAC, a direct target of oncogenic transcription factor Jun, is involved in cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, M; Reiter, F; Bader, A G; Castellazzi, M; Bister, K

    2001-11-20

    Using subtractive hybridization techniques, we have isolated a gene termed JAC that is strongly and specifically activated in avian fibroblasts transformed by the v-jun oncogene of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV17), but not in cells transformed by other oncogenic agents. Furthermore, JAC is highly expressed in cell lines derived from jun-induced avian fibrosarcomas. Kinetic analysis using a doxycycline-controlled conditional cell transformation system showed that expression of the 0.8-kb JAC mRNA is induced rapidly upon activation of the oncogenic v-jun allele. Nucleotide sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping revealed that the JAC gene contains two exons, with the longest ORF confined to exon 2. The deduced 68-amino acid chicken JAC protein is rich in cysteine residues and displays 37% sequence identity to mammalian high-sulfur keratin-associated proteins. The promoter region of JAC contains a consensus (5'-TGACTCA-3') and a nonconsensus (5'-TGAGTAA-3') AP-1 binding site in tandem, which are both specifically bound by the Gag-Jun hybrid protein encoded by ASV17. Mutational analysis revealed that the two AP-1 sites confer strong transcriptional activation by Gag-Jun in a synergistic manner. Ectopic expression of JAC in avian fibroblasts leads to anchorage-independent growth, strongly suggesting that deregulation of JAC is an essential event in jun-induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

  8. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  9. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma abrogates Smad-dependent collagen stimulation by targeting the p300 transcriptional coactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Wei, Jun; Kim, Suyeon; Barak, Yaacov; Mori, Yasuji; Varga, John

    2009-09-01

    Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) abrogate the stimulation of collagen gene transcription induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Here, we delineate the mechanisms underlying this important novel physiological function for PPAR-gamma in connective tissue homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that antagonistic regulation of TGF-beta activity by PPAR-gamma ligands involves cellular PPAR-gamma, since 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) failed to block TGF-beta-induced responses in either primary cultures of PPAR-gamma-null murine embryonic fibroblasts, or in normal human skin fibroblasts with RNAi-mediated knockdown of PPAR-gamma. Next, we examined the molecular basis underlying the abrogation of TGF-beta signaling by PPAR-gamma in normal human fibroblasts in culture. The results demonstrated that Smad-dependent transcriptional responses were blocked by PPAR-gamma without preventing Smad2/3 activation. In contrast, the interaction between activated Smad2/3 and the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase p300 induced by TGF-beta, and the accumulation of p300 on consensus Smad-binding DNA sequences and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the COL1A2 locus, were all prevented by PPAR-gamma. Wild-type p300, but not a mutant form of p300 lacking functional histone acetyltransferase, was able to restore TGF-beta-induced stimulation of COL1A2 in the presence of PPAR-gamma ligands. Collectively, these results indicate that PPAR-gamma blocked Smad-mediated transcriptional responses by preventing p300 recruitment and histone H4 hyperacetylation, resulting in the inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen gene expression. Pharmacological activation of PPAR-gamma thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach to target p300-dependent TGF-beta profibrotic responses such as stimulation of collagen gene expression.

  11. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  12. An integrated model of transcription factor diffusion shows the importance of intersegmental transfer and quaternary protein structure for target site finding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo G Schmidt

    Full Text Available We present a computational model of transcription factor motion that explains both the observed rapid target finding of transcription factors, and how this motion influences protein and genome structure. Using the Smoldyn software, we modelled transcription factor motion arising from a combination of unrestricted 3D diffusion in the nucleoplasm, sliding along the DNA filament, and transferring directly between filament sections by intersegmental transfer. This presents a fine-grain picture of the way in which transcription factors find their targets two orders of magnitude faster than 3D diffusion alone allows. Eukaryotic genomes contain sections of nucleosome free regions (NFRs around the promoters; our model shows that the presence and size of these NFRs can be explained as their acting as antennas on which transcription factors slide to reach their targets. Additionally, our model shows that intersegmental transfer may have shaped the quaternary structure of transcription factors: sequence specific DNA binding proteins are unusually enriched in dimers and tetramers, perhaps because these allow intersegmental transfer, which accelerates target site finding. Finally, our model shows that a 'hopping' motion can emerge from 3D diffusion on small scales. This explains the apparently long sliding lengths that have been observed for some DNA binding proteins observed in vitro. Together, these results suggest that transcription factor diffusion dynamics help drive the evolution of protein and genome structure.

  13. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  14. THZ1 targeting CDK7 suppresses STAT transcriptional activity and sensitizes T-cell lymphomas to BCL2 inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Florencia; Praditsuktavorn, Pannee; Fernando, Tharu M.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Marullo, Rosella; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Phillip, Jude; Pera, Benet; Yang, Shao Ning; Takpradit, Kaipol; Roman, Lidia; Gaudiano, Marcello; Crescenzo, Ramona; Ruan, Jia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Zhang, Tinghu; Cremaschi, Graciela; Gray, Nathanael S.; Cerchietti, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are aggressive diseases with poor response to chemotherapy and dismal survival. Identification of effective strategies to target PTCL biology represents an urgent need. Here we report that PTCL are sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and, in particular, to THZ1, a covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). The STAT-signalling pathway is highly vulnerable to THZ1 even in PTCL cells that carry the activating STAT3 mutation Y640F. In mutant cells, CDK7 inhibition decreases STAT3 chromatin binding and expression of highly transcribed target genes like MYC, PIM1, MCL1, CD30, IL2RA, CDC25A and IL4R. In surviving cells, THZ1 decreases the expression of STAT-regulated anti-apoptotic BH3 family members MCL1 and BCL-XL sensitizing PTCL cells to BH3 mimetic drugs. Accordingly, the combination of THZ1 and the BH3 mimetic obatoclax improves lymphoma growth control in a primary PTCL ex vivo culture and in two STAT3-mutant PTCL xenografts, delineating a potential targeted agent-based therapeutic option for these patients. PMID:28134252

  15. Mutant IDH: a targetable driver of leukemic phenotypes linking metabolism, epigenetics and transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant epigenomic programming is a hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia. This is partially due to somatic mutations that perturb cytosine methylation, histone post-translational modifications and transcription factors. Remarkably, mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes perturb the epigenome through all three of these mechanisms. Mutant IDH enzymes produce high levels of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate that competitively inhibits dioxygenase enzymes that modify methylcytosine to hydroxymethylcytosine and histone tail methylation. The development of IDH mutant specific inhibitors may now enable the therapeutic reprogramming of both layers of the epigenome spontaneously to revert the malignant phenotype of these leukemias and improve clinical outcome for acute myeloid leukemia patients with IDH mutations.

  16. Nocvel potential targets and related genes of transcription factor Caplp in Candida albicans 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YahWANG; Yong-bingCAO; Xin-mingJIA; De-junWANG; ZhengXU; HuiSHEN; KangYING; Wan-shengCHEN; Yuan-yingJIANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM Capl p, encoded by CAP1 in Candida albicans, is highly homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yapl p. It has been associated with tolerance to oxidative stress and resistance to a variety of toxicants previously. We used homemade microarray to reveal Capl p related genes in a broad spectrum as well as to lucubrate the functions of Capl p. METHODS Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes between CAP1 deletion strain CJD21 and its parental strain CAI4. CAP1 over-expression strain was constructed to confirm the relationship between CAP1 and some differentially expressedgenes. Bioinformatics was applied to reveal promoters with Capl p binding site as well as the clusters of differentially expressed genes. RT-PCR and drug efflux analysis were used to lucubrate the functions of Caplp in Candida albicans.

  17. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scooter Willis

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets.

  18. Fgfr3 is a transcriptional target of Ap2delta and Ash2l-containing histone methyltransferase complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl C Tan

    Full Text Available Polycomb (PcG and trithorax (trxG proteins play important roles in establishing lineage-specific genetic programs through induction of chromatin modifications that lead to gene silencing or activation. Previously, we described an association between the MLL/SET1 complexes and a highly restricted, gene-specific DNA-binding protein Ap2delta that is required for recruitment of the MLL/SET1 complex to target Hoxc8 specifically. Here, we reduced levels of Ap2delta and Ash2l in the neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro2A, and analyzed their gene expression profiles using whole-genome mouse cDNA microarrays. This analysis yielded 42 genes that are potentially co-regulated by Ap2delta and Ash2l, and we have identified evolutionarily conserved Ap2-binding sites in 20 of them. To determine whether some of these were direct targets of the Ap2delta-Ash2l complex, we analyzed several promoters for the presence of Ap2delta and Ash2l by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. Among the targets we screened, we identified Fgfr3 as a direct transcriptional target of the Ap2delta-Ash2l complex. Additionally, we found that Ap2delta is necessary for the recruitment of Ash2l-containing complexes to this promoter and that this recruitment leads to trimethylation of lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3. Thus, we have identified several candidate targets of complexes containing Ap2delta and Ash2l that can be used to further elucidate their roles during development and showed that Fgfr3 is a novel direct target of these complexes.

  19. Synthetic siRNAs effectively target cystein protease 12 and α-actinin transcripts in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaee, Roya; Ebadi, Parimah; Hatam, Gholamreza; Vafafar, Arghavan; Ghahramani Seno, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The flagellated protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) causes trichomoniasis, a reproductive tract infection, in humans. Trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In addition to direct consequences such as infertility and abortion, there are indications that trichomoniasis favours development of prostate cancer and it has also been associated with increased risk of spreading human immunodeficiency virus and papillomavirus infections. Reports from around the world show that the rate of drug resistance in T. vaginalis is increasing, and therefore new therapeutic approaches have to be developed. Studying molecular biology of T. vaginalis will be quite helpful in identifying new drugable targets. RNAi is a powerful technique which allows biologist to specifically target gene products (i.e. mRNA) helping them in unravelling gene functions and biology of systems. However, due to lack of some parts of the required intrinsic RNAi machinery, the RNAi system is not functional in all orders of life. Here, by using synthetic siRNAs targeting two genes, i.e. α-actinin and cystein protease 12 (cp12), we demonstrate T. vaginalis cells are amenable to RNAi experiments conducted by extrinsic siRNAs. Electroporation of siRNAs targeting α-actinin or cp12 into T. vaginalis cells resulted in, respectively, 48-67% and 33-72% downregulation of the cognate transcripts compared to the T. vaginalis cells received siRNAs targeting GL2 luciferase as a control. This finding is helpful in that it demonstrates the potential of using extrinsically induced RNAi in studies on molecular biology of T. vaginalis such as those aiming at identifying new drug targets.

  20. Optimizations of siRNA design for the activation of gene transcription by targeting the TATA-box motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Fan

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs are widely used to repress gene expression by targeting mRNAs. Some reports reveal that siRNAs can also activate or inhibit gene expression through targeting the gene promoters. Our group has found that microRNAs (miRNAs could activate gene transcription via interaction with the TATA-box motif in gene promoters. To investigate whether siRNA targeting the same region could upregulate the promoter activity, we test the activating efficiency of siRNAs targeting the TATA-box motif of 16 genes and perform a systematic analysis to identify the common features of the functional siRNAs for effective activation of gene promoters. Further, we try various modifications to improve the activating efficiency of siRNAs and find that it is quite useful to design the promoter-targeting activating siRNA by following several rules such as (a complementary to the TATA-box-centered region; (b UA usage at the first two bases of the antisense strand; (c twenty-three nucleotides (nts in length; (d 2'-O-Methyl (2'-OMe modification at the 3' terminus of the antisense strand; (e avoiding mismatches at the 3' end of the antisense strand. The optimized activating siRNAs potently enhance the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2 gene in human and mouse primary CD4+ T cells with a long-time effect. Taken together, our study provides a guideline for rational design the promoter-targeting siRNA to sequence-specifically enhance gene expression.

  1. Comparison of auditory evoked potentials and the A-line ARX Index for monitoring the hypnotic level during sevoflurane and propofol induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litvan, H; Jensen, E W; Revuelta, M

    2002-01-01

    Extraction of the middle latency auditory evoked potentials (AEP) by an auto regressive model with exogenous input (ARX) enables extraction of the AEP within 1.7 s. In this way, the depth of hypnosis can be monitored at almost real-time. However, the identification and the interpretation of the a...

  2. Targeting the Six1/Eya Transcriptional Complex for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    genetic and pharmacological approaches. Aim 1. Determine the role of the Six1/Eya interaction in tumor growth and peritoneal metastasis in EOC using a... genetic approach. Aim 2. Determine whether small molecules targeting the Six1/Eya interaction inhibit the proliferation and survival of EOC cells...intraperitoneal metastasis in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) using a genetic approach in vitro and in vivo. (Months 1-24). 1.1. Determine the role of the Six1

  3. Targeting the Six1/Eya transcriptional complex for ovarian cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    system (in order to improve them) would be the best way to move forward quickly while we were developing our ovarian cancer models. First , we...cancer cells as well as for migration and alterations in adhesion . Aim 2. Determine whether small molecules targeting the Six1/Eya interaction...of the Six1/Eya interaction on tumor progression in EOC. In generating these cell lines, we determined that increased expression of Six1 in some of

  4. Network motif-based identification of transcription factor-target gene relationships by integrating multi-source biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de los Reyes Benildo G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating data from multiple global assays and curated databases is essential to understand the spatio-temporal interactions within cells. Different experiments measure cellular processes at various widths and depths, while databases contain biological information based on established facts or published data. Integrating these complementary datasets helps infer a mutually consistent transcriptional regulatory network (TRN with strong similarity to the structure of the underlying genetic regulatory modules. Decomposing the TRN into a small set of recurring regulatory patterns, called network motifs (NM, facilitates the inference. Identifying NMs defined by specific transcription factors (TF establishes the framework structure of a TRN and allows the inference of TF-target gene relationship. This paper introduces a computational framework for utilizing data from multiple sources to infer TF-target gene relationships on the basis of NMs. The data include time course gene expression profiles, genome-wide location analysis data, binding sequence data, and gene ontology (GO information. Results The proposed computational framework was tested using gene expression data associated with cell cycle progression in yeast. Among 800 cell cycle related genes, 85 were identified as candidate TFs and classified into four previously defined NMs. The NMs for a subset of TFs are obtained from literature. Support vector machine (SVM classifiers were used to estimate NMs for the remaining TFs. The potential downstream target genes for the TFs were clustered into 34 biologically significant groups. The relationships between TFs and potential target gene clusters were examined by training recurrent neural networks whose topologies mimic the NMs to which the TFs are classified. The identified relationships between TFs and gene clusters were evaluated using the following biological validation and statistical analyses: (1 Gene set enrichment

  5. Novel targets of the CbrAB/Crc carbon catabolite control system revealed by transcript abundance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Sonnleitner

    Full Text Available The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to utilize a wide range of carbon and nitrogen compounds, allowing it to grow in vastly different environments. The uptake and catabolism of growth substrates are organized hierarchically by a mechanism termed catabolite repression control (Crc whereby the Crc protein establishes translational repression of target mRNAs at CA (catabolite activity motifs present in target mRNAs near ribosome binding sites. Poor carbon sources lead to activation of the CbrAB two-component system, which induces transcription of the small RNA (sRNA CrcZ. This sRNA relieves Crc-mediated repression of target mRNAs. In this study, we have identified novel targets of the CbrAB/Crc system in P. aeruginosa using transcriptome analysis in combination with a search for CA motifs. We characterized four target genes involved in the uptake and utilization of less preferred carbon sources: estA (secreted esterase, acsA (acetyl-CoA synthetase, bkdR (regulator of branched-chain amino acid catabolism and aroP2 (aromatic amino acid uptake protein. Evidence for regulation by CbrAB, CrcZ and Crc was obtained in vivo using appropriate reporter fusions, in which mutation of the CA motif resulted in loss of catabolite repression. CbrB and CrcZ were important for growth of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF sputum medium, suggesting that the CbrAB/Crc system may act as an important regulator during chronic infection of the CF lung.

  6. Design, evaluation, and screening methods for efficient targeted mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases in medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Inohaya, Keiji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Schartl, Manfred; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has become a powerful technology for reverse genetics. In this study, we have described efficient detection methods for TALEN-induced mutations at endogenous loci and presented guidelines of TALEN design for efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka, Oryzias latipes. We performed a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) using an automated microchip electrophoresis system, which is a simple and high-throughput method for evaluation of in vivo activity of TALENs and for genotyping mutant fish of F1 or later generations. We found that a specific pattern of mutations is dominant for TALENs harboring several base pairs of homologous sequences in target sequence. Furthermore, we found that a 5' T, upstream of each TALEN-binding sequence, is not essential for genomic DNA cleavage. Our findings provide information that expands the potential of TALENs and other engineered nucleases as tools for targeted genome editing in a wide range of organisms, including medaka.

  7. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  8. Negative Regulation of Anthocynanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by a miR156-Targeted SPL Transcription Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, J.Y.; Liu, C.; Felippes, F. F.; Weigel, D.; Wang, J.-W.

    2011-04-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized through an important metabolic pathway that leads to the production of diverse secondary metabolites, including anthocyanins, flavonols, flavones, and proanthocyanidins. Anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from Phe and share common precursors, dihydroflavonols, which are substrates for both flavonol synthase and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase. In the stems of Arabidopsis thaliana, anthocyanins accumulate in an acropetal manner, with the highest level at the junction between rosette and stem. We show here that this accumulation pattern is under the regulation of miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) genes, which are deeply conserved and known to have important roles in regulating phase change and flowering. Increased miR156 activity promotes accumulation of anthocyanins, whereas reduced miR156 activity results in high levels of flavonols. We further provide evidence that at least one of the miR156 targets, SPL9, negatively regulates anthocyanin accumulation by directly preventing expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes through destabilization of a MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcriptional activation complex. Our results reveal a direct link between the transition to flowering and secondary metabolism and provide a potential target for manipulation of anthocyanin and flavonol content in plants.

  9. MDRL lncRNA regulates the processing of miR-484 primary transcript by targeting miR-361.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as new players in gene regulation, but whether lncRNAs operate in the processing of miRNA primary transcript is unclear. Also, whether lncRNAs are involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial network remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA, named mitochondrial dynamic related lncRNA (MDRL, affects the processing of miR-484 primary transcript in nucleus and regulates the mitochondrial network by targeting miR-361 and miR-484. The results showed that miR-361 that predominantly located in nucleus can directly bind to primary transcript of miR-484 (pri-miR-484 and prevent its processing by Drosha into pre-miR-484. miR-361 is able to regulate mitochondrial fission and apoptosis by regulating miR-484 levels. In exploring the underlying molecular mechanism by which miR-361 is regulated, we identified MDRL and demonstrated that it could directly bind to miR-361 and downregulate its expression levels, which promotes the processing of pri-miR-484. MDRL inhibits mitochondrial fission and apoptosis by downregulating miR-361, which in turn relieves inhibition of miR-484 processing by miR-361. Our present study reveals a novel regulating model of mitochondrial fission program which is composed of MDRL, miR-361 and miR-484. Our work not only expands the function of the lncRNA pathway in gene regulation but also establishes a new mechanism for controlling miRNA expression.

  10. Retrotransposon-centered analysis of piRNA targeting shows a shift from active to passive retrotransposon transcription in developing mouse testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourier Tobias

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs bind transcripts from retrotransposable elements (RTE in mouse germline cells and seemingly act as guides for genomic methylation, thereby repressing the activity of RTEs. It is currently unknown if and how Piwi proteins distinguish RTE transcripts from other cellular RNAs. During germline development, the main target of piRNAs switch between different types of RTEs. Using the piRNA targeting of RTEs as an indicator of RTE activity, and considering the entire population of genomic RTE loci along with their age and location, this study aims at further elucidating the dynamics of RTE activity during mouse germline development. Results Due to the inherent sequence redundancy between RTE loci, assigning piRNA targeting to specific loci is problematic. This limits the analysis, although certain features of piRNA targeting of RTE loci are apparent. As expected, young RTEs display a much higher level of piRNA targeting than old RTEs. Further, irrespective of age, RTE loci near protein-coding coding genes are targeted to a greater extent than RTE loci far from genes. During development, a shift in piRNA targeting is observed, with a clear increase in the relative piRNA targeting of RTEs residing within boundaries of protein-coding gene transcripts. Conclusions Reanalyzing published piRNA sequences and taking into account the features of individual RTE loci provide novel insight into the activity of RTEs during development. The obtained results are consistent with some degree of proportionality between what transcripts become substrates for Piwi protein complexes and the level by which the transcripts are present in the cell. A transition from active transcription of RTEs to passive co-transcription of RTE sequences residing within protein-coding transcripts appears to take place in postnatal development. Hence, the previously reported increase in piRNA targeting of SINEs in postnatal testis development

  11. TRIAD1 Is a Novel Transcriptional Target of p53 and Regulates Nutlin-3a-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junwoo; An, Sungkwan; Choi, Yeong Min; Jung, Jin Hyuk; Li, Li; Meng, Hong; Dong, Yinmao; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; Bae, Seunghee

    2016-12-09

    Nutlin-3a is a non-genotoxic, p53-activating, MDM2 inhibitor being investigated as an anticancer agent. Although Nutlin-3a selectively antagonizes the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of MDM2, its efficacy is not entirely regulated by MDM2 levels in cancer cells. Here, we report that the cytotoxic effects of Nutlin-3a are regulated by TRIAD1 via a positive feedback loop with p53. We found that Nutlin-3a enhanced TRIAD1 transcription in a p53-dependent manner. Using in silico analysis and promoter luciferase assays, we demonstrated that p53-mediated transcription of TRIAD1 is mediated by a p53 consensus sequence in the TRIAD1 promoter region. Silencing TRIAD1 expression in wild-type p53 (p53(WT) ) cancer cells suppressed Nutlin-3a-mediated p53 activation and p53 target gene expression. These effects were enhanced in TRIAD1-overexpressing p53(WT) cancer cells, but not in p53-deficient cancer cells. Furthermore, TRIAD1 knockdown significantly reduced the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of Nutlin-3a in p53(WT) cancer cells, as demonstrated by cell viability assays, cell cycle analysis, clonogenic growth, and soft-agar colony forming assays. Together, these data indicate that TRIAD1 regulates Nutlin-3a-mediated p53 activation and the cytotoxic activity of Nutlin-3a. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The tumor suppressor p53 regulates autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis in lung cancer cells by targeting transcription factor EB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengli; Wang, Hongfeng; Ding, Qifeng; Xing, Yufei; Xu, Delai; Xu, Zhonghua; Zhou, Tong; Qian, Bin; Ji, Chenghong; Pan, Xue; Zhong, Anyuan; Ying, Zheng; Zhou, Caicun; Shi, Minhua

    2017-03-10

    The cellular protein degradation system, such as proteasomal or autophagy-lysosomal system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a master transcriptional factor in the regulation of autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and it has multiple biological functions including protein degradation, cell homeostasis and cell survival. In the present study we show that the tumor suppressor p53 can regulate TFEB nuclear translocation and activity in lung cancer cells. We found p53 deletion or chemical inhibition of p53 using pifithrin-α could promote the translocation of TFEB from cytoplasm to the nucleus, thus increased the TFEB-mediated lysosomal and autophagosomal biogenesis in lung cancer cells. Moreover, re-expression of p53 could decrease the expression levels of TFEB-targeting genes involved in ALP, and knockdown of TFEB could abolish the effect of p53 on the regulation of ALP gene expression. Taken together, our data indicate that p53 affects ALP through regulating TFEB nuclear translocation in lung cancer cells. Importantly, our study reveals a critical link between two keys factors in tumourigenesis and autophagy, and suggests a potential important role of p53-TFEB signaling axis in lung cancer.

  13. Identification of a target for CudA, the transcription factor which directs formation of the Dictyostelium tip organiser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Williams, Jeffrey G

    2010-01-01

    The tip of the Dictyostelium slug functions much like an embryonic organiser; when grafted onto the flank of a recipient slug, it recruits a mass of prespore cells and leads them away as part of a secondary slug. CudA is a nuclear protein which is expressed in prespore cells where it acts as a specific transcription factor. CudA is also expressed in an anteriorly located group of cells, the tip-organiser, that is believed to constitute the functional tip. We identify an expansin-like gene, expl7, that is expressed within the tip-organiser region and which is not expressed in a cudA null strain. The expl7 promoter contains a region that binds to CudA in vitro and this region is necessary for expression in the tip-organiser. These results provide an end-point for a previously defined signal transduction pathway in which regionalized expression of the ACA adenylyl cyclase within the tip-organiser leads to localised cAMP-induced activation of STATa and consequent binding of STATa to the cudA promoter. STATa then induces expression of cudA and cudA directs the transcription of target genes such as expl7.

  14. Crosstalk of the Androgen Receptor with Transcriptional Collaborators: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Obinata

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among males in Western countries. It is also the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in Japan. The progression of prostate cancer is mainly influenced by androgens and the androgen receptor (AR. Androgen deprivation therapy is an established therapy for advanced prostate cancer; however, prostate cancers frequently develop resistance to low testosterone levels and progress to the fatal stage called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Surprisingly, AR and the AR signaling pathway are still activated in most CRPC cases. To overcome this problem, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide were introduced for the treatment of CRPC. Despite the impact of these drugs on prolonged survival, CRPC acquires further resistance to keep the AR pathway activated. Functional molecular studies have shown that some of the AR collaborative transcription factors (TFs, including octamer transcription factor (OCT1, GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2 and forkhead box A1 (FOXA1, still stimulate AR activity in the castration-resistant state. Therefore, elucidating the crosstalk between the AR and collaborative TFs on the AR pathway is critical for developing new strategies for the treatment of CRPC. Recently, many compounds targeting this pathway have been developed for treating CRPC. In this review, we summarize the AR signaling pathway in terms of AR collaborators and focus on pyrrole-imidazole (PI polyamide as a candidate compound for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Myc is a Notch1 transcriptional target and a requisite for Notch1-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinakis, Apostolos; Szabolcs, Matthias; Politi, Katerina; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2006-06-13

    To explore the potential involvement of aberrant Notch1 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, we have used a transgenic mouse model. In these animals, mouse mammary tumor virus LTR-driven expression of the constitutively active intracellular domain of the Notch1 receptor (N1(IC)) causes development of lactation-dependent mammary tumors that regress upon gland involution but progress to nonregressing, invasive adenocarcinomas in subsequent pregnancies. Up-regulation of Myc in these tumors prompted a genetic investigation of a potential Notch1/Myc functional relationship in breast carcinogenesis. Conditional ablation of Myc in the mammary epithelium prevented the induction of regressing N1(IC) neoplasms and also reduced the incidence of nonregressing carcinomas, which developed with significantly increased latency. Molecular analyses revealed that both the mouse and human Myc genes are direct transcriptional targets of N1(IC) acting through its downstream Cbf1 transcriptional effector. Consistent with this mechanistic link, Notch1 and Myc expression is positively correlated by immunostaining in 38% of examined human breast carcinomas.

  16. Upregulation of NKX2.2, a target of EWSR1/FLI1 fusion transcript, in primary renal Ewing sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal Ewing sarcoma (ES is a rare malignant tumor characterized by fusion of the EWSR1 gene with a member of the ETS family of oncogenes, arising at a specific chromosomal translocation. Diagnosis of ES can be problematic, especially from cytological or small bioptical specimens because the differential diagnoses comprising a diverse group of small round blue cell tumors (SRBCTs. We report a case of primary renal ES in a young male, which had a t(11;22 (q24;q12 chromosome translocation encoding a type2 EWSR1/FLI1 fusion transcript. The tumor cells showed diffuse cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for CD99 and diffuse nuclear immunoreactivity for NKX2.2, an important oncogenic transcriptional target of EWSR1/FLI1, not only in the histological, but also in the cytological specimens. From the results of this case, we speculate that NKX2.2, in combination with CD99, may be a useful immunocytochemical marker to distinguish renal ES from other SRBCTs of kidney.

  17. Angiopoietin-2 is a direct transcriptional target of TAL1, LYL1 and LMO2 in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Virginie; El-Hajj, Rawan; Chalhoub, Elias; Dohet, Christiane; Pinet, Valérie; Couttet, Philippe; Mathieu, Danièle

    2012-01-01

    The two related basic helix-loop-helix, TAL1 and LYL1, and their cofactor LIM-only-2 protein (LMO2) are present in blood and endothelial cells. While their crucial role in early hematopoiesis is well established, their function in endothelial cells and especially in angiogenesis is less understood. Here, we identified ANGIOPOIETIN-2 (ANG-2), which encodes a major regulator of angiogenesis, as a direct transcriptional target of TAL1, LYL1 and LMO2. Knockdown of any of the three transcription factors in human blood and lymphatic endothelial cells caused ANG-2 mRNA and protein down-regulation. Transient transfections showed that the full activity of the ANG-2 promoter required the integrity of a highly conserved Ebox-GATA composite element. Accordingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that TAL1, LYL1, LMO2 and GATA2 occupied this region of ANG-2 promoter in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that LMO2 played a central role in assembling TAL1-E47, LYL1-LYL1 or/and LYL1-TAL1 dimers with GATA2. The resulting complexes were able to activate endogenous ANG-2 expression in endothelial cells as well as in non-endothelial cells. Finally, we showed that ANG-2 gene activation during angiogenesis concurred with the up-regulation of TAL1 and LMO2. Altogether, we identified ANG-2 as a bona fide target gene of LMO2-complexes with TAL1 and/or LYL1, highlighting a new function of the three hematopoietic factors in the endothelial lineage.

  18. Targeted gene disruption by use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Ogino, Yukiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Toyota, Kenji; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-11-18

    The cosmopolitan microcrustacean Daphnia pulex provides a model system for both human health research and monitoring ecosystem integrity. It is the first crustacean to have its complete genome sequenced, an unprecedented ca. 36% of which has no known homologs with any other species. Moreover, D. pulex is ideally suited for experimental manipulation because of its short reproductive cycle, large numbers of offspring, synchronization of oocyte maturation, and other life history characteristics. However, existing gene manipulation techniques are insufficient to accurately define gene functions. Although our previous investigations developed an RNA interference (RNAi) system in D. pulex, the possible time period of functional analysis was limited because the effectiveness of RNAi is transient. Thus, in this study, we developed a genome editing system for D. pulex by first microinjecting transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNAs into early embryos and then evaluating TALEN activity and mutation phenotypes. We assembled a TALEN construct specific to the Distal-less gene (Dll), which is a homeobox transcription factor essential for distal limb development in invertebrates and vertebrates, and evaluated its activity in vitro by single-strand annealing assay. Then, we injected TALEN mRNAs into eggs within 1 hour post-ovulation. Injected embryos presented with defects in the second antenna and altered appendage development, and indel mutations were detected in Dll loci, indicating that this technique successfully knocked out the target gene. We succeeded, for the first time in D. pulex, in targeted mutagenesis by use of Platinum TALENs. This genome editing technique makes it possible to conduct reverse genetic analysis in D. pulex, making this species an even more appropriate model organism for environmental, evolutionary, and developmental genomics.

  19. [Master Transcription Regulators Specifying Cell-Lineage Fates in Development As Possible Therapeutic Targets in Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyeva, L G; Vinogradova, T V; Chernov, I P; Sverdlov, E D

    2015-11-01

    The transformation of normal precursors into cancer cells is an intricately regulated, multistep process. The master regulatory genes that play a crucial role in the process of organism development may also play a key role in carcinogenesis. From such a point of view, cancer is not simply a genetic disease that is due to a progressive accumulation of mutation--it is also a disorder of the developmental system of the tissue in which cancer emerges. Master regulators and their genes disturb stem cell differentiation upon mutation and thus may serve as targets for cancer therapy, in addition to the classic oncogenes and suppressors of tumor formation. This review is an attempt to give a modern concept of master genes and their functions in adult stem cells of the organism and in carcinogenesis, with pancreatic cancer as an example.

  20. High conservation of a 5' element required for RNA editing of a C target in chloroplast psbE transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael L; Hanson, Maureen R

    2008-09-01

    C-to-U editing modifies 30-40 distinct nucleotides within higher-plant chloroplast transcripts. Many C targets are located at the same position in homologous genes from different plants; these either could have emerged independently or could share a common origin. The 5' sequence GCCGUU, required for editing of C214 in tobacco psbE in vitro, is one of the few identified editing cis-elements. We investigated psbE sequences from many plant species to determine in what lineage(s) editing of psbE C214 emerged and whether the cis-element identified in tobacco is conserved in plants with a C214. The GCCGUU sequence is present at a high frequency in plants that carry a C214 in psbE. However, Sciadopitys verticillata (Pinophyta) edits C214 despite the presence of nucleotide differences compared to the conserved cis-element. The C214 site in psbE genes is represented in members of four branches of spermatophytes but not in gnetophytes, resulting in the parsimonious prediction that editing of psbE C214 was present in the ancestor of spermatophytes. Extracts from chloroplasts from a species that has a difference in the motif and lacks the C target are incapable of editing tobacco psbE C214 substrates, implying that the critical trans-acting protein factors were not retained without a C target. Because noncoding sequences are less constrained than coding regions, we analyzed sequences 5' to two C editing targets located within coding regions to search for possible editing-related conserved elements. Putative editing cis-elements were uncovered in the 5' UTRs near editing sites psbL C2 and ndhD C2.

  1. Investigation of transcriptional gene silencing and mechanism induced by shRNAs targeted to RUNX3 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Zhi Feng; Xiu-Sheng He; Ying-Zhi Zhuang; Qiao Luo; Jun-Hao Jiang; Shuai Yang; Xue-Fang Tang; Ju-Lin Liu; Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate transcriptional gene silencing induced by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that target gene prompter regions of RUNX3 gene, and whether shRNAs homologous to DNA sequences may serve as initiators for methylation.METHODS: According to the principle of RNAi design,pSilencer3.1-H1-shRNA/RUNX3 expression vector was constructed, The recombinant plasmid shRNA was transfected into human stomach carcinoma cell line SGC7901 with Lipofectamine 2000. Then, the positive cell clones were screened by G418. The mRNA and protein expression level of RUNX3 in the stable transfected cell line SGC7901 were determined by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Characteristics of the cell lines including SGC7901, pSilencer3.1-H1/SGC7901 and pSilencer3.1-H1-shRNA/RUNX3/SGC7901 were analyzed with growth curves, clone formation rate and cell-cycle distribution. The activated level of RUNX3 was examined after treatment with the different density of 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) by using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting.RESULTS: In the cell line SGC7901 transfected with pSilencer3.1-Hl-shRNA/RUNX3, mRNA and protein expression of the RUNX3 gene was lost identified by RTPCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry assay.The growth of pSilencer3.1-H1-shRNA/RUNX3/SGC7901cells without expression of RUNX3 was the fastest (P < 0.05), its rate of clone formation was the highest (P <0.01), and the cell distribution in G0/G1 and S/M phases was lowest and highest, respectively (P < 0.05),compared with that of the transfected pSilencer3.1-H1 and non-transfected cells. Through RT-PCR and Western blot assay, inactivated RUNX3 could not be reactivated by 5-Aza-CdR.CONCLUSION: We found that, although shRNAs targeted to gene prompter regions of RUNX3 could effectively induce transcriptional repression with chromatic changes characteristic of inaction promoters, this was independent of DNA methylation, and the presence of RNA-dependent transcriptional silencing

  2. PlexinD1 Is a Novel Transcriptional Target and Effector of Notch Signaling in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Michael; Capparuccia, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The secreted semaphorin Sema3E controls cell migration and invasiveness in cancer cells. Sema3E-receptor, PlexinD1, is frequently upregulated in melanoma, breast, colon, ovarian and prostate cancers; however, the mechanisms underlying PlexinD1 upregulation and the downstream events elicited in tumor cells are still unclear. Here we show that the canonical RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling cascade controls PlexinD1 expression in primary endothelial and cancer cells. Transcriptional activation was studied by quantitative PCR and promoter activity reporter assays. We found that Notch ligands and constitutively activated intracellular forms of Notch receptors upregulated PlexinD1 expression; conversely RNAi-based knock-down, or pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling by gamma-secretase inhibitors, downregulated PlexinD1 levels. Notably, both Notch1 and Notch3 expression positively correlates with PlexinD1 levels in prostate cancer, as well as in other tumor types. In prostate cancer cells, Sema3E-PlexinD1 axis was previously reported to regulate migration; however, implicated mechanisms were not elucidated. Here we show that in these cells PlexinD1 activity induces the expression of the transcription factor Slug, downregulates E-cadherin levels and enhances cell migration. Moreover, our mechanistic data identify PlexinD1 as a pivotal mediator of this signaling axis downstream of Notch in prostate cancer cells. In fact, on one hand, PlexinD1 is required to mediate cell migration and E-cadherin regulation elicited by Notch. On the other hand, PlexinD1 upregulation is sufficient to induce prostate cancer cell migration and metastatic potential in mice, leading to functional rescue in the absence of Notch. In sum, our work identifies PlexinD1 as a novel transcriptional target induced by Notch signaling, and reveals its role promoting prostate cancer cell migration and downregulating E-cadherin levels in Slug-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings suggest that

  3. ARX gene mutation and clinical characteristics in male patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy%早发性癫痫脑病男性患儿 ARX 基因突变及其临床特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵滢; 章清萍; 张晓英; 包新华; 吴希如

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨早发性癫痫脑病男性患儿ARX基因突变及其临床表型特点。方法收集42例男性早发性癫痫脑病患儿详细的临床资料,采集患儿及家长外周血,应用PCR、直接测序和多重连接依赖的探针扩增( MLPA)技术对ARX基因第二外显子进行突变分析。对患儿的临床表型特点进行分析。结果42例早发性癫痫脑病患儿中3例患儿存在ARX基因第二外显子大片段缺失,检出率为7.14%(3/42)。其中1例为非特异性癫痫脑病,2例为婴儿痉挛症。3例患儿均于出生后6个月内出现难以控制的癫痫发作,2例患儿在脑电监测中发现高度失律,3例患儿对多种抗癫痫手段反应差,且均表现为严重的智力运动发育落后或倒退。未检出缺失的39例患儿发作形式呈现更多样化的特点,其中5例患儿大运动发育基本正常,3例患儿对ACTH或生酮饮食手段控制癫痫有效。结论早发性癫痫脑病患儿中部分存在ARX基因第二外显子大片段缺失。具有ARX基因突变的早发性癫痫脑病患儿,其临床表现为6个月内出现难治性癫痫发作,以部分性发作及痉挛发作为主,同时有显著的智力运动发育落后、甚至倒退;少数未检出缺失的患儿的大运动发育可基本正常,对ACTH或生酮饮食反应良好。%Objective To explore the ARX gene mutation and clinical phenotypic characteristics in male patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy .Methods Detailed clinical information and the peripheral blood of 42 male children with early-onset epileptic encephalopathies and their parents were collected .Exon 2 of ARX gene mutation was screened u-sing PCR-DNA sequencing and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification ( MLPA) , and the clinical phenotypic char-acteristics were also analyzed .Results Among 42 cases, large deletions of exon 2 for ARX gene can be detected in 3 ca-ses, and the overall mutation rate was

  4. Rotenone affects p53 transcriptional activity and apoptosis via targeting SIRT1 and H3K9 acetylation in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Liu, Te; Dong, Su-Yan; Guo, Yan-Jie; Jankovic, Joseph; Xu, Huaxi; Wu, Yun-Cheng

    2015-08-01

    The protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been recognized to exert its protective effect by directly deacetylasing histone and many other transcriptional factors including p53. However, the effect of SIRT1 on p53 expression at the transcriptional level still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that rotenone treatment decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, reduced SIRT1 level, and promoted p53 expression. Pre-treatment with resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, could attenuate rotenone-induced cell injury and p53 expression, whereas down-regulation of SIRT1 directly increased p53 expression. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that SIRT1 bound to H3K9 within the p53 promoter region, and this binding resulted in decreased H3K9 acetylation and increased H3K9 tri-methylation, thereby inhibiting p53 gene transcription. In conclusion, our data indicate that rotenone promotes p53 transcription and apoptosis through targeting SIRT1 and H3K9. This leads to nigrostriatal degeneration, the main pathogenic mechanism of motor features of Parkinson's disease. SIRT1, a deacetylase enzyme, has neuroprotective effects for Parkinson's disease via targeting various factors. Resveratrol activated SIRT1 can target H3K9 and regulate p53 gene expression at the transcriptional level, thus inhibiting p53 transcription to enhance neuroprotection, alleviating rotenone induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We think these findings should provide a new strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  5. IEA Common Exercise 4: ARX, ARMAX and grey-box models for thermal performance characterization of the test box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacher, Peder; Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff

    In this report results of applying time series models for assessing the thermal performance of the IEA Annex 58 test box based on data given in the Common Exercise 4 (CE4), which was measured in Almeria, Spain. Both ARX, ARMAX and grey-box models are applied. Finally, the same models are fitted...... for the Common Exercise 3b (CE3) data measured in Belgium and the results are compared. The focus in this report is on model selection and validation enabling a stable and reliable performance assessment. Basically, the challenge is to find a procedure for each type of model, which can give un...... radiation is present data), these aspects are discussed. Furthermore, new models for enhancing the description of the effect of solar radiation on the test box is presented....

  6. Testis-specific transcriptional regulators selectively occupy BORIS-bound CTCF target regions in mouse male germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Hinojosa, Samuel; Kang, Sungyun; Lobanenkov, Victor V.; Zentner, Gabriel E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite sharing the same sequence specificity in vitro and in vivo, CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog brother of the regulator of imprinted sites (BORIS) are simultaneously expressed in germ cells. Recently, ChIP-seq analysis revealed two classes of CTCF/BORIS-bound regions: single CTCF target sites (1xCTSes) that are bound by CTCF alone (CTCF-only) or double CTCF target sites (2xCTSes) simultaneously bound by CTCF and BORIS (CTCF&BORIS) or BORIS alone (BORIS-only) in germ cells and in BORIS-positive somatic cancer cells. BORIS-bound regions (CTCF&BORIS and BORIS-only sites) are, on average, enriched for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding and histone retention in mature spermatozoa relative to CTCF-only sites, but little else is known about them. We show that subsets of CTCF&BORIS and BORIS-only sites are occupied by several testis-specific transcriptional regulators (TSTRs) and associated with highly expressed germ cell-specific genes and histone retention in mature spermatozoa. We also demonstrate a physical interaction between BORIS and one of the analyzed TSTRs, TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 7-like (TAF7L). Our data suggest that CTCF and BORIS cooperate with additional TSTRs to regulate gene expression in developing male gametes and histone retention in mature spermatozoa, potentially priming certain regions of the genome for rapid activation following fertilization. PMID:28145452

  7. A study on stability analysis of atrial repolarization variability using ARX model in sinus rhythm and atrial tachycardia ECGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, J; Uma, G; Langley, P; Umapathy, M; Venkatesan, S; Palanikumar, G

    2016-12-01

    The interaction between the PTa and PP interval dynamics from the surface ECG is seldom explained. Mathematical modeling of these intervals is of interest in finding the relationship between the heart rate and repolarization variability. The goal of this paper is to assess the bounded input bounded output (BIBO) stability in PTa interval (PTaI) dynamics using autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model and to investigate the reason for causing instability in the atrial repolarization process. Twenty-five male subjects in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and ten male subjects experiencing atrial tachycardia (AT) were included in this study. Five minute long, modified limb lead (MLL) ECGs were recorded with an EDAN SE-1010 PC ECG system. The number of minute ECGs with unstable segments (Nus) and the frequency of premature activation (PA) (i.e. atrial activation) were counted for each ECG recording and compared between AT and NSR subjects. The instability in PTaI dynamics was quantified by measuring the numbers of unstable segments in ECG data for each subject. The unstable segments in the PTaI dynamics were associated with the frequency of PA. The presence of PA is not the only factor causing the instability in PTaI dynamics in NSR subjects, and it is found that the cause of instability is mainly due to the heart rate variability (HRV). The ARX model showed better prediction of PTa interval dynamics in both groups. The frequency of PA is significantly higher in AT patients than NSR subjects. A more complex model is needed to better identify and characterize healthy heart dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Estrogen Receptor α(ERα) Target Gene LRP16 Interacts with ERα and Enhances Receptor's Transcriptional Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wei-dong; ZHAO Ya-li; WU Zhi-qing; MENG Yuan-guang; ZANG Li; MU Yi-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: It has been shown that LRP16 is an estrogen-induced gene through its receptor (Erα). Although there is evidence demonstrating that inhibition of LRP16 gene expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells partially attenuates its estrogen-responsiveness, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. Here, the effect of LRP16 expression on the ER( signaling transduction was investigated. Methods: Cotransfection assays were used to measure the effect of LRP16 on ER(-mediated transcriptional activity. GST-pulldown and immunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays were employed to investigate the physical interaction of LRP16 and Erα. The mammalian two-hybrid method was used to map the functional interaction region. Results: the results of cotransfection assays demonstrated that the transcriptional activities of Erα were enhanced in a LRP16 dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 in the presence of estrogen, however, it was abolished in the absence of E2 in MCF-7 cells. The physical interaction of LRP16 and Erα proteins was confirmed by GST-pulldown in vitro and CoIP in vivo assays, which was enhanced by E2 but not dependent on its presence. Furthermore, the results of the mammalian two-hybrid assays indicated that the binding region of Erα to LRP16 located at the A/B AF-1 functional domain and E2 stimulated the binding of LRP16 to the full-length Erα molecule but not to the A/B region alone. Conclusion: These results support a role for estrogenically regulated LRP16 as an Erα coactivator, providing a positive feedback regulatory loop for Erα signal transduction. Based on this function of LRP16, we propose that Erα-positive breast cancer patients with high expression of LRP16 might benefit from targeting LRP16 therapy.

  9. Retrotransposon-centered analysis of piRNA targeting shows a shift from active to passive retrotransposon transcription in developing mouse testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) bind transcripts from retrotransposable elements (RTE) in mouse germline cells and seemingly act as guides for genomic methylation, thereby repressing the activity of RTEs. It is currently unknown if and how Piwi proteins distinguish RTE....... As expected, young RTEs display a much higher level of piRNA targeting than old RTEs. Further, irrespective of age, RTE loci near protein-coding coding genes are targeted to a greater extent than RTE loci far from genes. During development, a shift in piRNA targeting is observed, with a clear increase...... in the relative piRNA targeting of RTEs residing within boundaries of protein-coding gene transcripts. CONCLUSIONS: Reanalyzing published piRNA sequences and taking into account the features of individual RTE loci provide novel insight into the activity of RTEs during development. The obtained results...

  10. Long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is a transcriptional target of p53 and modulates p53-induced transactivation and tumor-suppressor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yasushi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2017-03-14

    p53 is one of the most important tumor suppressor genes and the direct transcriptional targets of p53 must be explored to elucidate its functional mechanisms. Thus far, the p53 targets that have been primarily studied are protein-coding genes. Our previous study revealed that several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are direct transcriptional targets of p53, and knockdown of specific lncRNAs modulates p53-induced apoptosis. In this study, analysis of next-generation chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data for p53 revealed that the lncRNA NEAT1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53. The suppression of NEAT1 induction by p53 attenuates the inhibitory effect of p53 on cancer cell growth and also modulates gene transactivation, including that of many lncRNAs. Furthermore, low expression of NEAT1 is related to poor prognosis in several cancers. These results indicate that the induction of NEAT1 expression contributes to the tumor-suppressor function of p53 and suggest that p53 and NEAT1 constitute a transcriptional network contributing to various biological functions and tumor suppression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. THE EFFECT OF TARGETED KNOCKOUT MUTATION ON THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILE OF THE KIDNEY IN TSC2 MUTANT LONG-EVANS (EKER) RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of a targeted knockout mutation on the transcriptional profile of the kidney inTsc2 mutant Long-Evans (Eker) rats. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common tumor of the adult kidney, accounting for up to 80% of malignant renal neoplasms. Hereditary...

  12. Inactivation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum urease gene using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-based targeted mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyman, Philip D; Beeri, Karen; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Rivera, Josefa; McCarthy, James K; Heuberger, Adam L; Peers, Graham; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L

    2015-05-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic algae with promise for green production of fuels and other chemicals. Recent genome-editing techniques have greatly improved the potential of many eukaryotic genetic systems, including diatoms, to enable knowledge-based studies and bioengineering. Using a new technique, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the gene encoding the urease enzyme in the model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was targeted for interruption. The knockout cassette was identified within the urease gene by PCR and Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA. The lack of urease protein was confirmed by Western blot analyses in mutant cell lines that were unable to grow on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Untargeted metabolomic analysis revealed a build-up of urea, arginine and ornithine in the urease knockout lines. All three intermediate metabolites are upstream of the urease reaction within the urea cycle, suggesting a disruption of the cycle despite urea production. Numerous high carbon metabolites were enriched in the mutant, implying a breakdown of cellular C and N repartitioning. The presented method improves the molecular toolkit for diatoms and clarifies the role of urease in the urea cycle.

  13. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia by dual inhibition of PI3K signaling and Cdk9-mediated Mcl-1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Powell, Jason A; Vergez, Francois; Segal, David H; Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Baker, Adele; Teh, Tse-Chieh; Barry, Emma F; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Lee, Erwin M; Nero, Tracy L; Jabbour, Anissa M; Pomilio, Giovanna; Green, Benjamin D; Manenti, Stéphane; Glaser, Stefan P; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel F; Ekert, Paul G; Lock, Richard B; Huang, David C S; Nilsson, Susie K; Récher, Christian; Wei, Andrew H; Guthridge, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Resistance to cell death is a hallmark of cancer and renders transformed cells resistant to multiple apoptotic triggers. The Bcl-2 family member, Mcl-1, is a key driver of cell survival in diverse cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A screen for compounds that downregulate Mcl-1 identified the kinase inhibitor, PIK-75, which demonstrates marked proapoptotic activity against a panel of cytogenetically diverse primary human AML patient samples. We show that PIK-75 transiently blocks Cdk7/9, leading to transcriptional suppression of MCL-1, rapid loss of Mcl-1 protein, and alleviation of its inhibition of proapoptotic Bak. PIK-75 also targets the p110α isoform of PI3K, which leads to a loss of association between Bcl-xL and Bak. The simultaneous loss of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL association with Bak leads to rapid apoptosis of AML cells. Concordantly, low Bak expression in AML confers resistance to PIK-75-mediated killing. On the other hand, the induction of apoptosis by PIK-75 did not require the expression of the BH3 proteins Bim, Bid, Bad, Noxa, or Puma. PIK-75 significantly reduced leukemia burden and increased the survival of mice engrafted with human AML without inducing overt toxicity. Future efforts to cotarget PI3K and Cdk9 with drugs such as PIK-75 in AML are warranted.

  14. Modulation of heat shock transcription factor 1 as a therapeutic target for small molecule intervention in neurodegenerative disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Neef

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington disease are devastating disorders with no therapeutic approaches to ameliorate the underlying protein misfolding defect inherent to poly-glutamine (polyQ proteins. Given the mounting evidence that elevated levels of protein chaperones suppress polyQ protein misfolding, the master regulator of protein chaperone gene transcription, HSF1, is an attractive target for small molecule intervention. We describe a humanized yeast-based high-throughput screen to identify small molecule activators of human HSF1. This screen is insensitive to previously characterized activators of the heat shock response that have undesirable proteotoxic activity or that inhibit Hsp90, the central chaperone for cellular signaling and proliferation. A molecule identified in this screen, HSF1A, is structurally distinct from other characterized small molecule human HSF1 activators, activates HSF1 in mammalian and fly cells, elevates protein chaperone expression, ameliorates protein misfolding and cell death in polyQ-expressing neuronal precursor cells and protects against cytotoxicity in a fly model of polyQ-mediated neurodegeneration. In addition, we show that HSF1A interacts with components of the TRiC/CCT complex, suggesting a potentially novel regulatory role for this complex in modulating HSF1 activity. These studies describe a novel approach for the identification of new classes of pharmacological interventions for protein misfolding that underlies devastating neurodegenerative disease.

  15. C-MYC transcriptionally amplifies SOX2 target genes to regulate self-renewal in multipotent otic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Kelvin Y; Shen, Jun; Corey, David P

    2015-01-13

    Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by the loss of sensory hair cells and neurons of the inner ear. Once lost, these cell types are not replaced. Two genes expressed in the developing inner ear are c-Myc and Sox2. We created immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cells, a fate-restricted cell type, by transient expression of C-MYC in SOX2-expressing otic progenitor cells. This activated the endogenous C-MYC and amplified existing SOX2-dependent transcripts to promote self-renewal. RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses revealed that C-MYC and SOX2 occupy over 85% of the same promoters. C-MYC and SOX2 target genes include cyclin-dependent kinases that regulate cell-cycle progression. iMOP cells continually divide but retain the ability to differentiate into functional hair cells and neurons. We propose that SOX2 and C-MYC regulate cell-cycle progression of these cells and that downregulation of C-MYC expression after growth factor withdrawal serves as a molecular switch for differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Myc post-transcriptionally induces HIF1 protein and target gene expression in normal and cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Megan R.; Ascano, Janice; Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of cancer metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), the master regulator of the hypoxic response, enhances tumorigenesis and influences metabolism via upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and suppression of mitochondrial respiration. Together, deregulated Myc and HIF1 cooperate to lend metabolic advantages to proliferating cancer cells and contribute to the Warburg Effect. Here we show that overexpression of Myc significantly stabilizes the alpha subunit of HIF1 (HIF1alpha) under normoxic conditions and enhances HIF1alpha accumulation under hypoxic conditions in cells. Post-transcriptional regulation of HIF1α by Myc led to the induction of HIF1α gene targets. Normoxic HIF1α protein expression was also dependent on Myc. Functionally; HIF1α expression was required for Myc-induced anchorage-independent growth and cell proliferation. Myc-dependent stabilization of HIF1α involved either disruption of binding to the VHL complex or post-translational protein modifications. Taken together, our findings uncover a previously uncharacterized regulatory relationship between Myc and HIF1 that has important implications for cancer metabolism and development. PMID:22186139

  17. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  18. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  19. Targeting the myofibroblast genetic switch: inhibitors of myocardin-related transcription factor/serum response factor-regulated gene transcription prevent fibrosis in a murine model of skin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Andrew J; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Amin, Mohammad A; Ruth, Jeffrey H; Campbell, Phillip; Fox, David A; Khanna, Dinesh; Larsen, Scott D; Neubig, Richard R

    2014-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), or scleroderma, similar to many fibrotic disorders, lacks effective therapies. Current trials focus on anti-inflammatory drugs or targeted approaches aimed at one of the many receptor mechanisms initiating fibrosis. In light of evidence that a myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-and serum response factor (SRF)-regulated gene transcriptional program induced by Rho GTPases is essential for myofibroblast activation, we explored the hypothesis that inhibitors of this pathway may represent novel antifibrotics. MRTF/SRF-regulated genes show spontaneously increased expression in primary dermal fibroblasts from patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of MRTF/SRF-regulated transcription (CCG-203971) inhibits expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen 1 (COL1A2) in both SSc fibroblasts and in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-stimulated fibroblasts. In vivo treatment with CCG-203971 also prevented bleomycin-induced skin thickening and collagen deposition. Thus, targeting the MRTF/SRF gene transcription pathway could provide an efficacious new approach to therapy for SSc and other fibrotic disorders.

  20. Critical analysis of the potential for the therapeutic targeting of the Sp1 transcription factor in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutooru I

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Indira Jutooru,1 Gayathri Chadalapaka,1 Stephen Safe1,21Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 2Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries and, in 2013, it is estimated that in excess of 45,220 new cases were diagnosed in the United States. PDAC is a highly aggressive disease that invariably evades early diagnosis. The mean survival time for patients with metastatic disease is only 3–6 months, and only 20%–30% of pancreatic cancer patients are alive after 12 months. Because pancreatic cancers are frequently detected at an advanced stage, treatments have provided very limited improvements in tumor regression and overall survival times after diagnosis. 5-Fluorouracil alone or in combination with other drugs has been extensively used for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer, and gemcitabine has partially replaced 5-fluorouracil as a treatment for pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine provides increased clinical benefits in terms of response rate; however, future studies need to focus on developing treatment modalities that will improve the survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients. Specificity protein 1 (Sp1 is overexpressed in PDAC patients, and high expression is associated with poor prognosis, lymph node metastasis, and low survival. Knockdown studies have shown that Sp1 plays an important role in cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, survival, and metastasis. Sp1 expression is low in normal tissue when compared to tumor tissue, which makes Sp1 a potential target for development of new mechanism-based drugs for treatment of pancreatic cancer. Several drugs such as tolfenamic acid, betulinic acid, and methyl-2-cyano3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11-dien-28-oate are shown to downregulate Sp1 expression through various pathways

  1. An mRNA Capping Enzyme Targets FACT to the Active Gene To Enhance the Engagement of RNA Polymerase II into Transcriptional Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rwik; Kaja, Amala; Ferdoush, Jannatul; Lahudkar, Shweta; Barman, Priyanka; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2017-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that an mRNA capping enzyme, Cet1, impairs promoter-proximal accumulation/pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) independently of its capping activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to control transcription. However, it is still unknown how Pol II pausing is regulated by Cet1. Here, we show that Cet1's N-terminal domain (NTD) promotes the recruitment of FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription that enhances the engagement of Pol II into transcriptional elongation) to the coding sequence of an active gene, ADH1, independently of mRNA-capping activity. Absence of Cet1's NTD decreases FACT targeting to ADH1 and consequently reduces the engagement of Pol II in transcriptional elongation, leading to promoter-proximal accumulation of Pol II. Similar results were also observed at other genes. Consistently, Cet1 interacts with FACT. Collectively, our results support the notion that Cet1's NTD promotes FACT targeting to the active gene independently of mRNA-capping activity in facilitating Pol II's engagement in transcriptional elongation, thus deciphering a novel regulatory pathway of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Engineering of the TetR family transcriptional regulator SAV151 and its target genes increases avermectin production in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Liu, Wenshuai; Sun, Di; Luo, Shuai; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2014-01-01

    Avermectins produced by Streptomyces avermitilis are used commercially for broad-spectrum parasite control in medical, veterinary, and agricultural fields. Our previous comparative transcriptome analysis of wild-type strain ATCC31267 vs. avermectin-overproducing strain 76-02-e revealed that the gene SAV151, which encodes a TetR family transcriptional regulator, was downregulated in 76-02-e. In the present study, we investigated the role of SAV151 in avermectin production. Deletion of SAV151 increased avermectin yield ~1-fold in ATCC31267, and this phenotype was complemented by a single copy of SAV151. Overexpression of SAV151 in ATCC31267 reduced avermectin yield by ~70%. RT-PCR analysis showed that the promoting effect of SAV151 deletion on avermectin production was not due to alteration of ave genes at the transcriptional level. SAV151 negatively regulated the transcription of itself and of the adjacent transcriptional unit SAV152-SAV153-SAV154. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel shift assays, purified His6-tagged SAV151 protein bound to the bidirectional SAV151-SAV152 promoter region. SAV151 bound to two palindromic sequences in this region and thereby repressed transcription from both directions. Two of the SAV151 target genes, SAV152 (which encodes a putative dehydrogenase) and SAV154 (which encodes a putative hydrolase), had promoting effects on avermectin production. Our findings provide the basis for a strategy to increase avermectin production by controlling SAV151 and its target genes.

  3. Eaf1p Is Required for Recruitment of NuA4 in Targeting TFIID to the Promoters of the Ribosomal Protein Genes for Transcriptional Initiation In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Bhawana; Sen, Rwik; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2015-09-01

    NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4) promotes transcriptional initiation of TFIID (a complex of TBP and TBP-associated factors [TAFs])-dependent ribosomal protein genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. However, it is not clearly understood how NuA4 regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein genes. Here, we show that NuA4 is recruited to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes, such as RPS5, RPL2B, and RPS11B, for TFIID recruitment to initiate transcription, and the recruitment of NuA4 to these promoters is impaired in the absence of its Eaf1p component. Intriguingly, impaired NuA4 recruitment in a Δeaf1 strain depletes recruitment of TFIID (a TAF-dependent form of TBP) but not the TAF-independent form of TBP to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes. However, in the absence of NuA4, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase) is involved in targeting the TAF-independent form of TBP to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes for transcriptional initiation. Thus, NuA4 plays an important role in targeting TFIID to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes for transcriptional initiation in vivo. Such a function is mediated via its targeted histone acetyltransferase activity. In the absence of NuA4, ribosomal protein genes lose TFIID dependency and become SAGA dependent for transcriptional initiation. Collectively, these results provide significant insights into the regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression and, hence, ribosome biogenesis and functions.

  4. Forkhead transcription factor FOXF1 is a novel target gene of the p53 family and regulates cancer cell migration and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, M; Sasaki, Y; Koyama, R; Takeda, K; Idogawa, M; Tokino, T

    2014-10-01

    p53 is an established tumor suppressor that can activate the transcription of multiple target genes. Recent evidence suggests that p53 may contribute to the regulation of cell invasion and migration. In this study, we show that the forkhead box transcription factor FOXF1 is a novel target of the p53 family because FOXF1 is upregulated by p53, TAp73 and TAp63. We show that FOXF1 is induced upon DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified a response element located within the FOXF1 gene that is responsive to wild-type p53, TAp73β and TAp63γ. The ectopic expression of FOXF1 inhibited cancer cell invasion and migration, whereas the inactivation of FOXF1 stimulated cell invasion and migration. We also show that FOXF1 regulates the transcriptional activity of E-cadherin (CDH1) by acting on its FOXF1 consensus binding site located upstream of the E-cadherin gene. Collectively, our results show that FOXF1 is a p53 family target gene, and our data suggest that FOXF1 and p53 form a portion of a regulatory transcriptional network that appears to have an important role in cancer cell invasion and migration.

  5. A large-scale identification of direct targets of the tomato MADS box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR reveals the regulation of fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Shima, Yoko; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-02-01

    The fruit ripening developmental program is specific to plants bearing fleshy fruits and dramatically changes fruit characteristics, including color, aroma, and texture. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest acting ripening regulators, is required for both ethylene-dependent and -independent ripening regulatory pathways. Recent studies have identified two dozen direct RIN targets, but many more RIN targets remain to be identified. Here, we report the large-scale identification of direct RIN targets by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) targeting the predicted promoters of tomato genes. Our combined ChIP-chip and transcriptome analysis identified 241 direct RIN target genes that contain a RIN binding site and exhibit RIN-dependent positive or negative regulation during fruit ripening, suggesting that RIN has both activator and repressor roles. Examination of the predicted functions of RIN targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of lycopene accumulation, ethylene production, chlorophyll degradation, and many other physiological processes. Analysis of the effect of ethylene using 1-methylcyclopropene revealed that the positively regulated subset of RIN targets includes ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive transcription factors. Intriguingly, ethylene is involved in the upregulation of RIN expression during ripening. These results suggest that tomato fruit ripening is regulated by the interaction between RIN and ethylene signaling.

  6. BDE47 induces rat CYP3A1 by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhan; Ji, Minghui; Yang, Hongbao; Cromie, Meghan; Gu, Jun; Wang, Chao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Yongquan; Gao, Weimin; Wang, Shou-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the liver and is involved in the metabolism of over 50% of xenobiotics. Our previous studies revealed that 2,2‧,4,4‧-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) could induce rat CYP3A1 expression, but the molecular basis remains unclear. Using in silico analysis, we identified a potential miR-23b recognition element (MRE23b) in the 3‧-UTR region of CYP3A1 mRNA, which was verified by the luciferase assay. The miR-23b mimic and inhibitor significantly down- and up-regulated the expression of CYP3A1, respectively. Additionally, BDE47 significantly down-regulated the expression of miR-23b in rats and in hepatic H4IIE cells. Induction or blockage of CYP3A1 by a miR-23b inhibitor or mimic could correspondingly alter BDE47-induced expression of CYP3A1 and cytotoxicity in H4IIE cells. Furthermore, LV-anti-miR-23b significantly decreased endogenous levels of miR-23b and increased the expression and activity of CYP3A1 in rat liver. LV-anti-miR-23b also significantly increased the hydroxylated metabolites of BDE47 (3-OH-BDE47, 4-OH-BDE42, and 4‧-OH-BDE49) in rat serum. In conclusion, we first found that BDE47 induced rat CYP3A1 expression by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b. This study helps provide a better understanding of CYP3A regulation and offers novel clues for the role of miRNAs in the metabolism and distribution of environmental pollutants.

  7. Stepwise assembly of functional C-terminal REST/NRSF transcriptional repressor complexes as a drug target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inui, Ken; Zhao, Zongpei; Yuan, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In human cells, thousands of predominantly neuronal genes are regulated by the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF). REST/NRSF represses transcription of these genes in stem cells and non-neuronal cells by tethering corepressor co...

  8. Homozygous mdm2 SNP309 cancer cells with compromised transcriptional elongation at p53 target genes are sensitive to induction of p53-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Melissa; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-10-27

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (T to G) in the mdm2 P2 promoter, mdm2 SNP309, leads to MDM2 overexpression promoting chemotherapy resistant cancers. Two mdm2 G/G SNP309 cancer cell lines, MANCA and A875, have compromised wild-type p53 that co-localizes with MDM2 on chromatin. We hypothesized that MDM2 in these cells inhibited transcription initiation at the p53 target genes p21 and puma. Surprisingly, following etoposide treatment transcription initiation occurred at the compromised target genes in MANCA and A875 cells similar to the T/T ML-1 cell line. In all cell lines tested there was equally robust recruitment of total and initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We found that knockdown of MDM2 in G/G cells moderately increased expression of subsets of p53 target genes without increasing p53 stability. Importantly, etoposide and actinomycin D treatments increased histone H3K36 trimethylation in T/T, but not G/G cells, suggesting a G/G correlated inhibition of transcription elongation. We therefore tested a chemotherapeutic agent (8-amino-adenosine) that induces p53-independent cell death for higher clinically relevant cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that T/T and G/G mdm2 SNP309 cells were equally sensitive to 8-amino-adenosine induced cell death. In conclusion for cancer cells overexpressing MDM2, targeting MDM2 may be less effective than inducing p53-independent cell death.

  9. p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 collaborate in the regulation of transcription by recruiting cyclin-Cdk complexes on the promoters of target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Serena; Gallastegui, Edurne; Besson, Arnaud; Abril, Gabriel; Aligué, Rosa; Pujol, Maria Jesus; Bachs, Oriol

    2015-08-18

    Transcriptional repressor complexes containing p130 and E2F4 regulate the expression of genes involved in DNA replication. During the G1 phase of the cell cycle, sequential phosphorylation of p130 by cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) disrupts these complexes allowing gene expression. The Cdk inhibitor and tumor suppressor p27(Kip1) associates with p130 and E2F4 by its carboxyl domain on the promoters of target genes but its role in the regulation of transcription remains unclear. We report here that p27(Kip1) recruits cyclin D2/D3-Cdk4 complexes on the promoters by its amino terminal domain in early and mid G1. In cells lacking p27(Kip1), cyclin D2/D3-Cdk4 did not associate to the promoters and phosphorylation of p130 and transcription of target genes was increased. In late G1, these complexes were substituted by p21(Cip1)-cyclin D1-Cdk2. In p21(Cip1) null cells cyclin D1-Cdk2 were not found on the promoters and transcription was elevated. In p21/p27 double null cells transcription was higher than in control cells and single knock out cells. Thus, our results clarify the role of p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) in transcriptional regulation of genes repressed by p130/E2F4 complexes in which p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) play a sequential role by recruiting and regulating the activity of specific cyclin-Cdk complexes on the promoters.

  10. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Ets transcription factor in complex with target DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Teruya; Toma, Sachiko; Ikemizu, Shinji; Kai, Hirofumi; Yamagata, Yuriko, E-mail: yamagata@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 862-0973 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The complex between the Ets domain of Ets2 and its target DNA has been crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The Ets2 transcription factor is a member of the Ets transcription-factor family. Ets2 plays a role in the malignancy of cancer and in Down’s syndrome by regulating the transcription of various genes. The DNA-binding domain of Ets2 (Ets domain; ETSD), which contains residues that are highly conserved among Ets transcription-factor family members, was expressed as a GST-fusion protein. The aggregation of ETSD produced after thrombin cleavage could be prevented by treatment with NDSB-195 (nondetergent sulfobetaine 195). ETSD was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the Ets2 target sequence (GGAA) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were grown using 25% PEG 3350, 80 mM magnesium acetate, 50 mM sodium cacodylate pH 5.0/5.5 as the reservoir at 293 K. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.89, b = 95.52, c = 71.89 Å, β = 101.7° and a V{sub M} value of 3.56 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å.

  11. The histone demethylases JMJD1A and JMJD2B are transcriptional targets of hypoxia-inducible factor HIF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Sophie; Kristensen, Malene Maag; Jensen, Kim Steen;

    2008-01-01

    Posttranslational histone modifications serve to store epigenetic information and control both nucleosome assembly and recruitment of non-histone proteins. Histone methylation occurs on arginine and lysine residues and is involved in the regulation of gene transcription. A dynamic control...

  12. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and ra...

  13. APE1/Ref-1 regulates STAT3 transcriptional activity and APE1/Ref-1-STAT3 dual-targeting effectively inhibits pancreatic cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Angelo A; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; Reed, April M; Shahda, Safi; He, Ying; Maitra, Anirban; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a largely incurable disease, and increasing evidence supports strategies targeting multiple molecular mediators of critical functions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Intracellular redox state modulates the activity of various signal transduction pathways and biological processes, including cell survival, drug resistance and responsiveness to microenvironmental factors. Recently, it has been shown that the transcription factor STAT3 is under redox control, but the mechanisms involved in its regulation are unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that STAT3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity is directly regulated by the redox function of the APE1/Ref-1 endonuclease, using overexpression and redox-specific mutational strategies, and gene knockdown. Also, pharmacological blockade of APE1/Ref-1 by the redox-selective inhibitor E3330 abrogates STAT3 DNA binding. Since APE1/Ref-1 also exerts redox control on other cancer-associated transcription factors, we assessed the impact of dual-targeting of STAT3 signaling and APE1/Ref-1 redox on pancreatic cancer cell functions. We observed that disruption of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity synergizes with STAT3 blockade to potently inhibit the proliferation and viability of human PDAC cells. Mechanistically, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual targeting promotes marked tumor cell apoptosis, with engagement of caspase-3 signaling, which are significantly increased in comparison to the effects triggered by single target blockade. Also, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual blockade results in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration. Overall, this work demonstrates that the transcriptional activity of STAT3 is directly regulated by the redox function of APE1/Ref-1, and that concurrent blockade of STAT3 and APE1/Ref-1 redox synergize effectively inhibit critical PDAC cell functions.

  14. Bromodomain inhibition of the transcriptional coactivators CBP/EP300 as a therapeutic strategy to target the IRF4 network in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conery, Andrew R; Centore, Richard C; Neiss, Adrianne; Keller, Patricia J; Joshi, Shivangi; Spillane, Kerry L; Sandy, Peter; Hatton, Charlie; Pardo, Eneida; Zawadzke, Laura; Bommi-Reddy, Archana; Gascoigne, Karen E; Bryant, Barbara M; Mertz, Jennifer A; Sims, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of chromatin co-regulatory factors represents a clinically validated strategy to modulate oncogenic signaling through selective attenuation of gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition preferentially abrogates the viability of multiple myeloma cell lines. Selective targeting of multiple myeloma cell lines through CBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition is the result of direct transcriptional suppression of the lymphocyte-specific transcription factor IRF4, which is essential for the viability of myeloma cells, and the concomitant repression of the IRF4 target gene c-MYC. Ectopic expression of either IRF4 or MYC antagonizes the phenotypic and transcriptional effects of CBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition, highlighting the IRF4/MYC axis as a key component of its mechanism of action. These findings suggest that CBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition represents a viable therapeutic strategy for targeting multiple myeloma and other lymphoid malignancies dependent on the IRF4 network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10483.001 PMID:26731516

  15. Combined genome-wide expression profiling and targeted RNA interference in primary mouse macrophages reveals perturbation of transcriptional networks associated with interferon signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craigon Marie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons (IFNs are potent antiviral cytokines capable of reprogramming the macrophage phenotype through the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs. Here we have used targeted RNA interference to suppress the expression of a number of key genes associated with IFN signalling in murine macrophages prior to stimulation with interferon-gamma. Genome-wide changes in transcript abundance caused by siRNA activity were measured using exon-level microarrays in the presence or absence of IFNγ. Results Transfection of murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs with a non-targeting (control siRNA and 11 sequence-specific siRNAs was performed using a cationic lipid transfection reagent (Lipofectamine2000 prior to stimulation with IFNγ. Total RNA was harvested from cells and gene expression measured on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Network-based analysis of these data revealed six siRNAs to cause a marked shift in the macrophage transcriptome in the presence or absence IFNγ. These six siRNAs targeted the Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2 transcripts. The perturbation of the transcriptome by the six siRNAs was highly similar in each case and affected the expression of over 600 downstream transcripts. Regulated transcripts were clustered based on co-expression into five major groups corresponding to transcriptional networks associated with the type I and II IFN response, cell cycle regulation, and NF-KB signalling. In addition we have observed a significant non-specific immune stimulation of cells transfected with siRNA using Lipofectamine2000, suggesting use of this reagent in BMDMs, even at low concentrations, is enough to induce a type I IFN response. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that the type I IFN response in murine BMDMs is dependent on Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2, and that siRNAs targeted to these genes results in perturbation of key transcriptional networks associated

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a therapeutic target for cancer and the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yi, Eun Hee; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a cytoplasmic transcription factor that modulates the transcription of a variety of genes to regulate important biological functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, angiogenesis, and immune response. Constitutive activation of STAT3 is important in oncogenic signaling and occurs at high frequency in human cancers, including diverse solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Moreover, it is associated with a poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment has recently been recognized as a key condition for cancer progression, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance by activation of STAT3 signaling. Therefore, understanding the biology associated with STAT3-mediated signaling cascades in the tumor microenvironment may offer the therapeutic potential to treat human cancers. This review presents an overview of the critical roles of STAT3 in the tumor microenvironment related to cancer biology and discusses recent advancements in the development of anticancer drugs that therapeutically inhibit STAT3 signaling cascades.

  17. The regulatory mechanism of fruit ripening revealed by analyses of direct targets of the tomato MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The developmental process of ripening is unique to fleshy fruits and a key factor in fruit quality. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest-acting ripening regulators, is required for broad aspects of ripening, including ethylene-dependent and -independent pathways. However, our knowledge of direct RIN target genes has been limited, considering the broad effects of RIN on ripening. In a recent work published in The Plant Cell, we identified 241 direct RIN target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) and transcriptome analysis. Functional classification of the targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of many biological processes including well-known ripening processes such as climacteric ethylene production and lycopene accumulation. In addition, we found that ethylene is required for the full expression of RIN and several RIN-targeting transcription factor genes at the ripening stage. Here, based on our recently published findings and additional data, we discuss the ripening processes regulated by RIN and the interplay between RIN and ethylene.

  18. Inference of expanded Lrp-like feast/famine transcription factor targets in a non-model organism using protein structure-based prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Justin; Plaisier, Christopher L; Lo, Fang Yin; Reiss, David J; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-01-01

    Widespread microbial genome sequencing presents an opportunity to understand the gene regulatory networks of non-model organisms. This requires knowledge of the binding sites for transcription factors whose DNA-binding properties are unknown or difficult to infer. We adapted a protein structure-based method to predict the specificities and putative regulons of homologous transcription factors across diverse species. As a proof-of-concept we predicted the specificities and transcriptional target genes of divergent archaeal feast/famine regulatory proteins, several of which are encoded in the genome of Halobacterium salinarum. This was validated by comparison to experimentally determined specificities for transcription factors in distantly related extremophiles, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, and cis-regulatory sequence conservation across eighteen related species of halobacteria. Through this analysis we were able to infer that Halobacterium salinarum employs a divergent local trans-regulatory strategy to regulate genes (carA and carB) involved in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, whereas Escherichia coli employs an operon. The prediction of gene regulatory binding sites using structure-based methods is useful for the inference of gene regulatory relationships in new species that are otherwise difficult to infer.

  19. Inference of expanded Lrp-like feast/famine transcription factor targets in a non-model organism using protein structure-based prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ashworth

    Full Text Available Widespread microbial genome sequencing presents an opportunity to understand the gene regulatory networks of non-model organisms. This requires knowledge of the binding sites for transcription factors whose DNA-binding properties are unknown or difficult to infer. We adapted a protein structure-based method to predict the specificities and putative regulons of homologous transcription factors across diverse species. As a proof-of-concept we predicted the specificities and transcriptional target genes of divergent archaeal feast/famine regulatory proteins, several of which are encoded in the genome of Halobacterium salinarum. This was validated by comparison to experimentally determined specificities for transcription factors in distantly related extremophiles, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, and cis-regulatory sequence conservation across eighteen related species of halobacteria. Through this analysis we were able to infer that Halobacterium salinarum employs a divergent local trans-regulatory strategy to regulate genes (carA and carB involved in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, whereas Escherichia coli employs an operon. The prediction of gene regulatory binding sites using structure-based methods is useful for the inference of gene regulatory relationships in new species that are otherwise difficult to infer.

  20. Smek promotes histone deacetylation to suppress transcription of Wnt target gene brachyury in pluripotent embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jungmook Lyut; Eek-hoon Jho; Wange Lu

    2011-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells (ESCs),Wnt-responsive development-related genes are silenced to maintain pluripotency and their expression is activated during differentiation. Acetylation of histones by histone acetyitransferases stimulates transcription,whereas deacetylation of histones by HDACs is correlated with transcriptional repression.Although Wnt-mediated gene transcription has been intimately linked to the acetylation or deacetylation of histones,how Wnt signaling regulates this type of histone modification is poorly understood. Here,we report that Smek,a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) complex,plays an important role in histone deacetylation and silencing of the Wnt-responsive gene,brachyury,in ESCs. Smek mediates recruitment of PP4c and HDAC1 to the Tcf/Lef binding site of the brachyury promoter and inhibits brachyury expression in ESCs. Activation of Wnt signaling during differentiation causes disruption of the Smek/PP4c/HDAC1 complex,resulting in an increase in histones H3 and H4 acetylation at the brachyury gene locus. These results suggest that the Smek-containing PP4 complex represses transcription of Wnt-responsive development-related genes through histone deacetylation,and that this complex is essential for ESC pluripotency maintenance.

  1. SCFCdc4 acts antagonistically to the PGC-1alpha transcriptional coactivator by targeting it for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian L; Hock, M Benjamin; Ekholm-Reed, Susanna; Wohlschlegel, James A; Dev, Kumlesh K; Kralli, Anastasia; Reed, Steven I

    2008-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a highly regulated transcriptional coactivator that coordinates energy metabolism in mammals. Misregulation of PGC-1alpha has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurological disorders. We identified SCF(Cdc4) as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates PGC-1alpha through ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. PGC-1alpha contains two Cdc4 phosphodegrons that bind Cdc4 when phosphorylated by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and p38 MAPK, leading to SCF(Cdc4)-dependent ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of PGC-1alpha. Furthermore, SCF(Cdc4) negatively regulates PGC-1alpha-dependent transcription. We demonstrate that RNAi-mediated reduction of Cdc4 in primary neurons results in an increase of endogenous PGC-1alpha protein, while ectopic expression of Cdc4 leads to a reduction of endogenous PGC-1alpha protein. Finally, under conditions of oxidative stress in neurons, Cdc4 levels are decreased, leading to an increase in PGC-1alpha protein and PGC-1alpha-dependent transcription. These results suggest that attenuation of SCF(Cdc4)-dependent proteasomal degradation of PGC-1alpha has a role in mediating the PGC-1alpha-dependent transcriptional response to oxidative stress.

  2. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun Liu; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; H. Earl Petzold; Eric P. Beers; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2014-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome.

  3. Discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets related to witches' broom disease in Paulownia fortunei by high-throughput sequencing and degradome approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Xu, Enkai; Cao, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) caused by the phytoplasma is a devastating disease of Paulownia trees. It has caused heavy yield losses to Paulownia production worldwide. However, knowledge of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs), especially miRNAs responsive to PaWB disease stress, is still rudimentary. In this study, to identify miRNAs and their transcript targets that are responsive to PaWB disease stress, six sequencing libraries were constructed from healthy (PF), PaWB-infected (PFI), and PaWB-infected, 20 mg L(-1) methyl methane sulfonate-treated (PFI20) P. fortunei seedlings. As a result, 95 conserved miRNAs belonging to 18 miRNA families, as well as 122 potential novel miRNAs, were identified. Most of them were found to be a response to PaWB disease-induced stress, and the expression levels of these miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The study simultaneously identified 109 target genes from the P. fortunei for 14 conserved miRNA families and 24 novel miRNAs by degradome sequencing. Furthermore, the functions of the miRNA targets were annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. The results presented here provide the groundwork for further analysis of miRNAs and target genes responsive to the PaWB disease stress, and could be also useful for addressing new questions to better understand the mechanisms of plant infection by phytoplasma in the future.

  4. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  5. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeepkiran JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran,1 Konidala Kranthi Kumar,1 Yellapu Nanda Kumar,2 Matcha Bhaskar11Division of Animal Biotechnology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, 2Biomedical Informatics Centre, Vector Control Research Centre, Indian Council of Medical Research, Pondicherry, India Abstract: The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10. The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9 and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC

  6. KSHV miRNAs Decrease Expression of Lytic Genes in Latently Infected PEL and Endothelial Cells by Targeting Host Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlie Plaisance-Bonstaff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV microRNAs are encoded in the latency-associated region. Knockdown of KSHV miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 increased expression of lytic genes in BC-3 cells, and increased virus production from latently infected BCBL-1 cells. Furthermore, iSLK cells infected with miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 deletion mutant viruses displayed increased spontaneous reactivation and were more sensitive to inducers of reactivation than cells infected with wild type KSHV. Predicted binding sites for miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 were found in the 3’UTRs of the cellular transcription factors MYB, Ets-1, and C/EBPα, which activate RTA, the KSHV replication and transcription activator. Targeting of MYB by miR-K12-11 was confirmed by cloning the MYB 3’UTR downstream from the luciferase reporter. Knockdown of miR‑K12-11 resulted in increased levels of MYB transcript, and knockdown of miR-K12-3 increased both C/EBPα and Ets-1 transcripts. Thus, miR-K12-11 and miR-K12-3 contribute to maintenance of latency by decreasing RTA expression indirectly, presumably via down‑regulation of MYB, C/EBPα and Ets-1, and possibly other host transcription factors.

  7. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization. PMID:28348809

  8. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunxiao; Lopez, Carlos A; Hu, Han; Xia, Yu; Freedman, David S; Reddington, Alexander P; Daaboul, George G; Unlü, M Selim; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2014-01-01

    The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  9. Iron-binding E3 ligase mediates iron response in plants by targeting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selote, Devarshi; Samira, Rozalynne; Matthiadis, Anna; Gillikin, Jeffrey W; Long, Terri A

    2015-01-01

    Iron uptake and metabolism are tightly regulated in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), BRUTUS (BTS), which contains three hemerythrin (HHE) domains and a Really Interesting New Gene (RING) domain, interacts with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are capable of forming heterodimers with POPEYE (PYE), a positive regulator of the iron deficiency response. BTS has been shown to have E3 ligase capacity and to play a role in root growth, rhizosphere acidification, and iron reductase activity in response to iron deprivation. To further characterize the function of this protein, we examined the expression pattern of recombinant ProBTS::β-GLUCURONIDASE and found that it is expressed in developing embryos and other reproductive tissues, corresponding with its apparent role in reproductive growth and development. Our findings also indicate that the interactions between BTS and PYE-like (PYEL) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors occur within the nucleus and are dependent on the presence of the RING domain. We provide evidence that BTS facilitates 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of PYEL proteins in the absence of iron. We also determined that, upon binding iron at the HHE domains, BTS is destabilized and that this destabilization relies on specific residues within the HHE domains. This study reveals an important and unique mechanism for plant iron homeostasis whereby an E3 ubiquitin ligase may posttranslationally control components of the transcriptional regulatory network involved in the iron deficiency response.

  10. Comparison of hepatic transcription profiles of locked ribonucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides: evidence of distinct pathways contributing to non-target mediated toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Koza-Taylor, Petra H; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Nelms, Linda F; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Hollingshead, Brett D; Burdick, Andrew D; Reed, Lori A; Warneke, James A; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2014-03-01

    Development of LNA gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by non-target mediated hepatotoxicity issues. In the present study, we investigated hepatic transcription profiles of mice administered non-toxic and toxic LNA gapmers. After repeated administration, a toxic LNA gapmer (TS-2), but not a non-toxic LNA gapmer (NTS-1), caused hepatocyte necrosis and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels. Microarray data revealed that, in addition to gene expression patterns consistent with hepatotoxicity, 17 genes in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway were altered in the TS-2 group. TS-2 significantly down-regulated myosin 1E (Myo1E), which is involved in release of clathrin-coated pits from plasma membranes. To map the earliest transcription changes associated with LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity, a second microarray analysis was performed using NTS-1, TS-2, and a severely toxic LNA gapmer (HTS-3) at 8, 16, and 72 h following a single administration in mice. The only histopathological change observed was minor hepatic hypertrophy in all LNA groups across time points. NTS-1, but not 2 toxic LNA gapmers, increased immune response genes at 8 and 16 h but not at 72 h. TS-2 significantly perturbed the CME pathway only at 72 h, while Myo1E levels were decreased at all time points. In contrast, HTS-3 modulated DNA damage pathway genes at 8 and 16 h and also modulated the CME pathway genes (but not Myo1E) at 16 h. Our results may suggest that different LNAs modulate distinct transcriptional genes and pathways contributing to non-target mediated hepatotoxicity in mice.

  11. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho's structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds - ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 - that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein-ligand complex

  12. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 – that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein

  13. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  14. TARGET:?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James M Acton

    2014-01-01

      By 2003. as military planners had become worried that the country's long-range conventional weapons, such as cruise missiles, might be too slow to reach hypothetical distant targets that needed to be struck urgently...

  15. Output targets and transcriptional regulation by a cyclic dimeric GMP-responsive circuit in the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Scr network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rosana B R; Chodur, Daniel M; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Trimble, Michael J; McCarter, Linda L

    2012-03-01

    The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Scr system modulates decisions pertinent to surface colonization by affecting the cellular level of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP). In this work, we explore the scope and mechanism of this regulation. Transcriptome comparison of ΔscrABC and wild-type strains revealed expression differences with respect to ∼100 genes. Elevated c-di-GMP repressed genes in the surface-sensing regulon, including those encoding the lateral flagellar and type III secretion systems and N-acetylglucosamine-binding protein GpbA while inducing genes encoding other cell surface molecules and capsular polysaccharide. The transcription of a few regulatory genes was also affected, and the role of one was characterized. Mutations in cpsQ suppressed the sticky phenotype of scr mutants. cpsQ encodes one of four V. parahaemolyticus homologs in the CsgD/VpsT family, members of which have been implicated in c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we demonstrate that CpsQ is a c-di-GMP-binding protein. By using a combination of mutant and reporter analyses, CpsQ was found to be the direct, positive regulator of cpsA transcription. This c-di-GMP-responsive regulatory circuit could be reconstituted in Escherichia coli, where a low level of this nucleotide diminished the stability of CpsQ. The molecular interplay of additional known cps regulators was defined by establishing that CpsS, another CsgD family member, repressed cpsR, and the transcription factor CpsR activated cpsQ. Thus, we are developing a connectivity map of the Scr decision-making network with respect to its wiring and output strategies for colonizing surfaces and interaction with hosts; in doing so, we have isolated and reproduced a c-di-GMP-sensitive regulatory module in the circuit.

  16. Identification of a target for CudA, the transcription factor which directs formation of the Dictyostelium tip organiser

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, HONG-YU; Williams, Jeffrey G.

    2010-01-01

    The tip of the Dictyostelium slug functions much like an embryonic organiser; when grafted onto the flank of a recipient slug, it recruits a mass of prespore cells and leads them away as part of a secondary slug. CudA is a nuclear protein which is expressed in prespore cells where it acts as a specific transcription factor. CudA is also expressed in an anteriorly located group of cells, the tip-organiser, that is believed to constitute the functional tip. We identify an expansin-like gene, ex...

  17. Curcumin and synthetic analogs induce reactive oxygen species and decreases specificity protein (Sp transcription factors by targeting microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhy Shruti U

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines, and studies in this laboratory in bladder and pancreatic cancer cells show that curcumin downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of curcumin and several synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of curcumin and synthetic analogs on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using standardized assays. The changes in Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analysed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a, miR-20a, miR-17-5p and ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 mRNA expression. Results The IC50 (half-maximal values for growth inhibition (24 hr of colon cancer cells by curcumin and synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs of curcumin varied from 10 μM for curcumin to 0.7 μM for the most active synthetic piperidine analog RL197, which was used along with curcumin as model agents in this study. Curcumin and RL197 inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET, survivin, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and NFκB (p65 and p50. Curcumin and RL197 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione significantly attenuated curcumin- and RL197-induced growth inhibition and downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes. The mechanism of curcumin-/RL197-induced repression of Sp transcription factors was ROS-dependent and due to induction of the Sp repressors ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 and downregulation of microRNAs (miR-27a, miR-20a and miR-17-5p that regulate these repressors

  18. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittka, A; Lucchini, S; Papenfort, K

    2008-01-01

    explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes) and flhDC (flagellar master regulator) were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant......-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria....

  19. Transcriptional factor HBP1 targets P16(INK4A), upregulating its expression and consequently is involved in Ras-induced premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, W; Liu, X; Paulson, K E; Yee, A S; Zhang, X

    2010-09-09

    Oncogene-mediated premature senescence has emerged as a potential tumor-suppressive mechanism in early cancer transitions. Many studies showed that Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participate in premature senescence. Our previous work indicated that the HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) transcription factor is involved in Ras- and p38 MAPK-induced premature senescence, but the mechanism of which has not yet been identified. Here, we showed that the p16(INK4A) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor is a novel target of HBP1 participating in Ras-induced premature senescence. The promoter of the p16(INK4A) gene contains an HBP1-binding site at position -426 to -433 bp from the transcriptional start site. HBP1 regulates the expression of the endogenous p16(INK4A) gene through direct sequence-specific binding. With HBP1 expression and the subsequent increase of p16(INK4A) gene expression, Ras induces premature senescence in primary cells. The data suggest a model in which Ras and p38 MAPK signaling engage HBP1 and p16(INK4A) to trigger premature senescence. In addition, we report that HBP1 knockdown is also required for Ras-induced transformation. All the data indicate that the mechanism of HBP1-mediated transcriptional regulation is important for not only premature senescence but also tumorigenesis.

  20. The Mammalian "Obesogen" Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Lyssimachou

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT, which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an "obesogenic" phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound.

  1. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases efficiently disrupt the target gene in Iberian ribbed newts (Pleurodeles waltl), an experimental model animal for regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Kousuke; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yokotani, Naoki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Eri; Agata, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of a lost tissue in an animal is an important issue. Although regenerative studies have a history of research spanning more than a century, the gene functions underlying regulation of the regeneration are mostly unclear. Analysis of knockout animals is a very powerful tool with which to elucidate gene function. Recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been developed as an effective technique for genome editing. This technique enables gene targeting in amphibians such as newts that were previously impossible. Here we show that newts microinjected with TALEN mRNAs designed for targeting the tyrosinase gene in single-cell stage embryos revealed an albino phenotype. Sequence analysis revealed that the tyrosinase genes were effectively disrupted in these albino newts. Moreover, precise genome alteration was achieved using TALENs and single strand oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Our results suggest that TALENs are powerful tools for genome editing for regenerative research in newts.

  2. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    Full Text Available The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC. S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  3. APAF1 is a key transcriptional target for p53 in the regulation of neuronal cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, A; Cregan, S P; MacLaurin, J G

    2001-01-01

    of this process have not been identified. In the present study, we demonstrate that p53 directly upregulates Apaf1 transcription as a critical step in the induction of neuronal cell death. Using DNA microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from neurons undergoing p53-induced apoptosis a 5-6-fold upregulation...... of Apaf1 mRNA was detected. Induction of neuronal cell death by camptothecin, a DNA-damaging agent that functions through a p53-dependent mechanism, resulted in increased Apaf1 mRNA in p53-positive, but not p53-deficient neurons. In both in vitro and in vivo neuronal cell death processes of p53-induced...... cell death, Apaf1 protein levels were increased. We addressed whether p53 directly regulates Apaf1 transcription via the two p53 consensus binding sites in the Apaf1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated p53-DNA binding activity at both p53 consensus binding sequences in extracts...

  4. Stepwise assembly of functional C-terminal REST/NRSF transcriptional repressor complexes as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Ken; Zhao, Zongpei; Yuan, Juan; Jayaprakash, Sakthidasan; Le, Le T M; Drakulic, Srdja; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M

    2017-02-20

    In human cells, thousands of predominantly neuronal genes are regulated by the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF). REST/NRSF represses transcription of these genes in stem cells and non-neuronal cells by tethering corepressor complexes. Aberrant REST/NRSF expression and intracellular localization are associated with cancer and neurodegeneration in humans. To date, detailed molecular analyses of REST/NRSF and its C-terminal repressor complex have been hampered largely by the lack of sufficient amounts of purified REST/NRSF and its complexes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to express and purify human REST/NRSF and its C-terminal interactors in a baculovirus multiprotein expression system as individual proteins and coexpressed complexes. All proteins were enriched in the nucleus, and REST/NRSF was isolated as a slower migrating form, characteristic of nuclear REST/NRSF in mammalian cells. Both REST/NRSF alone and its C-terminal repressor complex were functionally active in histone deacetylation and histone demethylation and bound to RE1/neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) sites. Additionally, the mechanisms of inhibition of the small-molecule drugs 4SC-202 and SP2509 were analyzed. These drugs interfered with the viability of medulloblastoma cells, where REST/NRSF has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Thus, a resource for molecular REST/NRSF studies and drug development has been established.

  5. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Yu

    Full Text Available The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS, to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  6. Rad3-Cds1 mediates coupling of initiation of meiotic recombination with DNA replication. Mei4-dependent transcription as a potential target of meiotic checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Keiko; Masai, Hisao

    2006-01-20

    Premeiotic S-phase and meiotic recombination are known to be strictly coupled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the checkpoint pathway regulating this coupling has been largely unknown. In fission yeast, Rad3 is known to play an essential role in coordination of DNA replication and cell division during both mitotic growth and meiosis. Here we have examined whether the Rad3 pathway also regulates the coupling of DNA synthesis and recombination. Inhibition of premeiotic S-phase with hydroxyurea completely abrogates the progression of meiosis, including the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB formation is restored in rad3 mutant even in the presence of hydroxyurea, although repair of DSBs does not take place or is significantly delayed, indicating that the subsequent recombination steps may be still inhibited. Examination of the roles of downstream checkpoint kinases reveals that Cds1, but not Chk1 or Mek1, is required for suppression of DSB in the presence of hydroxyurea. Transcriptional induction of some rec+ genes essential for DSB occurs at a normal timing and to a normal level in the absence of DNA synthesis in both the wild-type and cds1delta cells. On the other hand, the transcriptional induction of the mei4+ transcription factor and cdc25+ phosphatase, which is significantly suppressed by hydroxyurea in the wild-type cells, occurs almost to a normal level in cds1delta cells even in the presence of hydroxyurea. These results show that the Rad3-Cds1 checkpoint pathway coordinates initiation of meiotic recombination and meiotic cell divisions with premeiotic DNA synthesis. Because mei4+ is known to be required for DSB formation and cdc25+ is required for activation of meiotic cell divisions, we propose an intriguing possibility that the Rad3-Cds1 meiotic checkpoint pathway may target transcription of these factors.

  7. Bioinformatic analysis of patient-derived ASPS gene expressions and ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript levels identify potential therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Covell

    Full Text Available Gene expression data, collected from ASPS tumors of seven different patients and from one immortalized ASPS cell line (ASPS-1, was analyzed jointly with patient ASPL-TFE3 (t(X;17(p11;q25 fusion transcript data to identify disease-specific pathways and their component genes. Data analysis of the pooled patient and ASPS-1 gene expression data, using conventional clustering methods, revealed a relatively small set of pathways and genes characterizing the biology of ASPS. These results could be largely recapitulated using only the gene expression data collected from patient tumor samples. The concordance between expression measures derived from ASPS-1 and both pooled and individual patient tumor data provided a rationale for extending the analysis to include patient ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript data. A novel linear model was exploited to link gene expressions to fusion transcript data and used to identify a small set of ASPS-specific pathways and their gene expression. Cellular pathways that appear aberrantly regulated in response to the t(X;17(p11;q25 translocation include the cell cycle and cell adhesion. The identification of pathways and gene subsets characteristic of ASPS support current therapeutic strategies that target the FLT1 and MET, while also proposing additional targeting of genes found in pathways involved in the cell cycle (CHK1, cell adhesion (ARHGD1A, cell division (CDC6, control of meiosis (RAD51L3 and mitosis (BIRC5, and chemokine-related protein tyrosine kinase activity (CCL4.

  8. Opposing effects of dietary protein and sugar regulate a transcriptional target of Drosophila insulin-like peptide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Susanne; Melcher, Christoph; Bauer, Matthias; Katzenberger, Joerg; Pankratz, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Specific neurosecretory cells of the Drosophila brain express insulin-like peptides (dilps), which regulate growth, glucose homeostasis, and aging. Through microarray analysis of flies in which the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) were ablated, we identified a target gene, target of brain insulin (tobi), that encodes an evolutionarily conserved alpha-glucosidase. Flies with lowered tobi levels are viable, whereas tobi overexpression causes severe growth defects and a decrease in body glycogen. Interestingly, tobi expression is increased by dietary protein and decreased by dietary sugar. This pattern is reminiscent of mammalian glucagon secretion, which is increased by protein intake and decreased by sugar intake, suggesting that tobi is regulated by a glucagon analog. tobi expression is also eliminated upon ablation of neuroendocrine cells that produce adipokinetic hormone (AKH), an analog of glucagon. tobi is thus a target of the insulin- and glucagon-like signaling system that responds oppositely to dietary protein and sugar.

  9. Soybean miR172c Targets the Repressive AP2 Transcription Factor NNC1 to Activate ENOD40 Expression and Regulate Nodule Initiation[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youning; Wang, Lixiang; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Cai, Zhaoming; Zhang, Senlei; Zhao, Fang; Tian, Yinping; Jiang, Qiong; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are noncoding RNAs that act as master regulators to modulate various biological processes by posttranscriptionally repressing their target genes. Repression of their target mRNA(s) can modulate signaling cascades and subsequent cellular events. Recently, a role for miR172 in soybean (Glycine max) nodulation has been described; however, the molecular mechanism through which miR172 acts to regulate nodulation has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that soybean miR172c modulates both rhizobium infection and nodule organogenesis. miR172c was induced in soybean roots inoculated with either compatible Bradyrhizobium japonicum or lipooligosaccharide Nod factor and was highly upregulated during nodule development. Reduced activity and overexpression of miR172c caused dramatic changes in nodule initiation and nodule number. We show that soybean miR172c regulates nodule formation by repressing its target gene, Nodule Number Control1, which encodes a protein that directly targets the promoter of the early nodulin gene, ENOD40. Interestingly, transcriptional levels of miR172c were regulated by both Nod Factor Receptor1α/5α-mediated activation and by autoregulation of nodulation-mediated inhibition. Thus, we established a direct link between miR172c and the Nod factor signaling pathway in addition to adding a new layer to the precise nodulation regulation mechanism of soybean. PMID:25549672

  10. Regulation of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination: choreography of noncoding transcription, targeted DNA deamination, and long-range DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Allysia J; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as "Ch genes", e.g., Cγ, Cɛ, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming.

  11. Deregulated c—myc expression in quiescent CHO cells induces target gene transcription and subsequent apoptotic phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGCHANGMING; CANSHI; 等

    1999-01-01

    Human c-myc cDNA was fused with the hormonebinding domain (HBD) cDNA of murine estrogen receptor gene and the chimeric gene was introduced into the CHO cells.The fusion protein,c-MycER,becomes activated when the synthetic steroid,4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (OHT),binds HBD.Activated c-MycER,likely c-Myc,can induce quiescent CHO cells reentry into S phase and subsequent cell death under serum-free condition.In addition,the expression of some proposed c-myc target genes such as ODC,MrDb,cad,rccl and rcl were found to increase upon OHT induction before S phase entry and apoptosis,indicating that these target genes are involved in cell cycle regulation and/or apoptosis control.However,the mutant D106-143c-MycER protein does not have above activities.

  12. PML promotes metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer through transcriptional regulation of HIF1A target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponente, Manfredi; Campanini, Letizia; Cuttano, Roberto; Piunti, Andrea; Delledonne, Giacomo A; Coltella, Nadia; Valsecchi, Roberta; Villa, Alessandra; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pattini, Linda; Doglioni, Claudio; Bernardi, Rosa

    2017-02-23

    Elucidating the molecular basis of tumor metastasis is pivotal for eradicating cancer-related mortality. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) encompasses a class of aggressive tumors characterized by high rates of recurrence and metastasis, as well as poor overall survival. Here, we find that the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML exerts a prometastatic function in TNBC that can be targeted by arsenic trioxide. We found that, in TNBC patients, constitutive HIF1A activity induces high expression of PML, along with a number of HIF1A target genes that promote metastasis at multiple levels. Intriguingly, PML controls the expression of these genes by binding to their regulatory regions along with HIF1A. This mechanism is specific to TNBC cells and does not occur in other subtypes of breast cancer where PML and prometastatic HIF1A target genes are underexpressed. As a consequence, PML promotes cell migration, invasion, and metastasis in TNBC cell and mouse models. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PML with arsenic trioxide, a PML-degrading agent used to treat promyelocytic leukemia patients, delays tumor growth, impairs TNBC metastasis, and cooperates with chemotherapy by preventing metastatic dissemination. In conclusion, we report identification of a prometastatic pathway in TNBC and suggest clinical development toward the use of arsenic trioxide for TNBC patients.

  13. PML promotes metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer through transcriptional regulation of HIF1A target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponente, Manfredi; Campanini, Letizia; Cuttano, Roberto; Piunti, Andrea; Delledonne, Giacomo A.; Coltella, Nadia; Valsecchi, Roberta; Villa, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis of tumor metastasis is pivotal for eradicating cancer-related mortality. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) encompasses a class of aggressive tumors characterized by high rates of recurrence and metastasis, as well as poor overall survival. Here, we find that the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML exerts a prometastatic function in TNBC that can be targeted by arsenic trioxide. We found that, in TNBC patients, constitutive HIF1A activity induces high expression of PML, along with a number of HIF1A target genes that promote metastasis at multiple levels. Intriguingly, PML controls the expression of these genes by binding to their regulatory regions along with HIF1A. This mechanism is specific to TNBC cells and does not occur in other subtypes of breast cancer where PML and prometastatic HIF1A target genes are underexpressed. As a consequence, PML promotes cell migration, invasion, and metastasis in TNBC cell and mouse models. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PML with arsenic trioxide, a PML-degrading agent used to treat promyelocytic leukemia patients, delays tumor growth, impairs TNBC metastasis, and cooperates with chemotherapy by preventing metastatic dissemination. In conclusion, we report identification of a prometastatic pathway in TNBC and suggest clinical development toward the use of arsenic trioxide for TNBC patients. PMID:28239645

  14. Transcriptional control of Flt3 ligand targeted by fluorouracil-induced Egr-1 promoter in hematopoietic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ionizing radiation (IR activate the early growth response-1 (Egr-1 promoter by production of radical oxygen intermediates (ROIs. Egr-EF, an expression vector pCIneo containing Egr-1 promoter cloned upstream of the cDNA for Flt3 ligand, was used to treat hematopoietic damage. 5-fluorouracil, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, cause tumor cell death by producing DNA damage and generating ROIs. We therefore hypothesized that clinically employed chemotherapeutic agents that increase ROIs could also be employed to activate Egr-EF in a chemoinducible gene therapy strategy. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of Flt3 Ligand gene transcription regulated by fluorouracil-induced Egr-1 promoter on hematopoietic recovery. Methods Human Flt3 Ligand (FL cDNA and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP cDNA were linked together with IRES and inserted into the expression vector pCI-neo under control of the Egr-1 promoter (Egr-EF. The vector was transfected into the HFCL human bone marrow stromal cell line, and these cells were exposed to 5-FU, a chemotherapeutic drug. Expression of FL by HFCL/EF cells after 5-FU treatment was determined with ELISA, western blot and RT-PCR assays. In addition, the effect of FL from HFCL/EF cell culture supernatants on growth of CD34+ cells from cord blood was also studied. HFCL/EF cells were injected into CB-17 combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with B16 melanoma. 5-FU was given three days after injection of the HFCL/EF cells. In the recipient mice, white blood cell levels in peripheral blood and expression of EGFP and FL in human stromal cells were measured. Tumor volumes in tumor-bearing mice were also measured. Results 5-FU treatment increased EGFP levels and secreted FL levels in HFCL/EF cells. Supernatants from HFCL/EF cell cultures treated with 5-FU increased CD34+ cell growth significantly. HFCL/EF exhibited an increase in the number of white blood cells after chemotherapy

  15. Generation of obese rat model by transcription activator-like effector nucleases targeting the leptin receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Lu, Wenqing; Gao, Na; Long, Yi; Shao, Yanjiao; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ye, Shixin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2017-02-01

    The laboratory rat is a valuable mammalian model organism for basic research and drug discovery. Here we demonstrate an efficient methodology by applying transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to generate Leptin receptor (Lepr) knockout rats on the Sprague Dawley (SD) genetic background. Through direct injection of in vitro transcribed mRNA of TALEN pairs into SD rat zygotes, somatic mutations were induced in two of three resulting pups. One of the founders carrying bi-allelic mutation exhibited early onset of obesity and infertility. The other founder carried a chimeric mutation which was efficiently transmitted to the progenies. Through phenotyping of the resulting three lines of rats bearing distinct mutations in the Lepr locus, we found that the strains with a frame-shifted or premature stop codon mutation led to obesity and metabolic disorders. However, no obvious defect was observed in a strain with an in-frame 57 bp deletion in the extracellular domain of Lepr. This suggests the deleted amino acids do not significantly affect Lepr structure and function. This is the first report of generating the Lepr mutant obese rat model in SD strain through a reverse genetic approach. This suggests that TALEN is an efficient and powerful gene editing technology for the generation of disease models.

  16. Targeted Knock-Down of miR21 Primary Transcripts Using snoMEN Vectors Induces Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoharu Ono

    Full Text Available We have previously reported an antisense technology, 'snoMEN vectors', for targeted knock-down of protein coding mRNAs using human snoRNAs manipulated to contain short regions of sequence complementarity with the mRNA target. Here we characterise the use of snoMEN vectors to target the knock-down of micro RNA primary transcripts. We document the specific knock-down of miR21 in HeLa cells using plasmid vectors expressing miR21-targeted snoMEN RNAs and show this induces apoptosis. Knock-down is dependent on the presence of complementary sequences in the snoMEN vector and the induction of apoptosis can be suppressed by over-expression of miR21. Furthermore, we have also developed lentiviral vectors for delivery of snoMEN RNAs and show this increases the efficiency of vector transduction in many human cell lines that are difficult to transfect with plasmid vectors. Transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing snoMEN targeted to pri-miR21 induces apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which express high levels of miR21, but not in human primary cells. We show that snoMEN-mediated suppression of miRNA expression is prevented by siRNA knock-down of Ago2, but not by knock-down of Ago1 or Upf1. snoMEN RNAs colocalise with Ago2 in cell nuclei and nucleoli and can be co-immunoprecipitated from nuclear extracts by antibodies specific for Ago2.

  17. A novel HMM-based method for detecting enriched transcription factor binding sites reveals RUNX3 as a potential target in pancreatic cancer biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Levkovitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC is one of the most intractable malignancies. In order to search for potential new therapeutic targets, we relied on computational methods aimed at identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs over-represented in the promoter regions of genes differentially expressed in PAC. Though many computational methods have been implemented to accomplish this, none has gained overall acceptance or produced proven novel targets in PAC. To this end we have developed DEMON, a novel method for motif detection. METHODOLOGY: DEMON relies on a hidden Markov model to score the appearance of sequence motifs, taking into account all potential sites in a promoter of potentially varying binding affinities. We demonstrate DEMON's accuracy on simulated and real data sets. Applying DEMON to PAC-related data sets identifies the RUNX family as highly enriched in PAC-related genes. Using a novel experimental paradigm to distinguish between normal and PAC cells, we find that RUNX3 mRNA (but not RUNX1 or RUNX2 mRNAs exhibits time-dependent increases in normal but not in PAC cells. These increases are accompanied by changes in mRNA levels of putative RUNX gene targets. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated application of DEMON and a novel differentiation system led to the identification of a single family member, RUNX3, which together with four of its putative targets showed a robust response to a differentiation stimulus in healthy cells, whereas this regulatory mechanism was absent in PAC cells, emphasizing RUNX3 as a promising target for further studies.

  18. The tRNA-Derived Small RNAs Regulate Gene Expression through Triggering Sequence-Specific Degradation of Target Transcripts in the Oomycete Pathogen Phytophthora sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinhu; Li, Tingting; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolong; Quan, Junli; Jin, Weibo; Zhang, Meixiang; Fan, Guangjin; Wang, Ming-Bo; Shan, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Along with the well-studied microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a new class of transfer RNA-derived small RNA (tsRNA), which has recently been detected in multiple organisms and is implicated in gene regulation. However, while miRNAs and siRNAs are known to repress gene expression through sequence-specific RNA cleavage or translational repression, how tsRNAs regulate gene expression remains unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of tsRNAs in the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. We show that multiple tRNAs are processed into abundant tsRNAs, which accumulate in a similar developmental stage-specific manner and are negatively correlated with the expression of predicted target genes. Degradome sequencing and 5′ RLM RACE experiments indicate tsRNAs can trigger degradation of target transcripts. Transient expression assays using GUS sensor constructs confirmed the requirement of sequence complementarity in tsRNA-mediated RNA degradation in P. sojae. Our results show that the tsRNA are a class of functional endogenous sRNAs and suggest that tsRNA regulate gene expression through inducing sequence-specific degradation of target RNAs in oomycetes. PMID:28066490

  19. Molecular detection of the clostridia in an anaerobic biohydrogen fermentation system by hydrogenase mRNA-targeted reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Chen, Wei-En; Shih, Shiou-Yun; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Wen, Fu-Shyan; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2006-05-01

    Molecular biological approaches were developed to monitor the potential biohydrogen-producing clostridia in an anaerobic semisolid fermentation system that used brewery yeast waste as the fermentation substrate. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with 16S rDNA gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was employed to confirm the existence of clostridia in the system. Remarkably, reproducible nucleotide sequences of clostridia were obtained from different hydrogen production stages by using hydrogenase gene-targeted reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. These RNA-based information suggested that the predominant hydrogen-producing strains possess either a specific Clostridium pasteurianum-like or a specific Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase sequence. Comparison of the hydrogenase gene-targeted sequence profiles between PCR and RT-PCR revealed that the specific C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase harboring bacterial strains were dominant in both mRNA and bacterial population level. On the other hand, the specific C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase harboring strains expressed high level of hydrogenase mRNA but may not be dominant in population. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed the expression pattern of the clostridial hydrogenase mRNA and may serve as an activity index for the system.

  20. The bacterial effector HopX1 targets JAZ transcriptional repressors to activate jasmonate signaling and promote infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Gimenez-Ibanez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR, which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile. Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome.

  1. The landscape of host transcriptional response programs commonly perturbed by bacterial pathogens: towards host-oriented broad-spectrum drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Yared H; Lawrence, Christopher; Murali, T M

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant pathogen strains and new infectious agents pose major challenges to public health. A promising approach to combat these problems is to target the host's genes or proteins, especially to discover targets that are effective against multiple pathogens, i.e., host-oriented broad-spectrum (HOBS) drug targets. An important first step in the discovery of such drug targets is the identification of host responses that are commonly perturbed by multiple pathogens. In this paper, we present a methodology to identify common host responses elicited by multiple pathogens. First, we identified host responses perturbed by each pathogen using a gene set enrichment analysis of publicly available genome-wide transcriptional datasets. Then, we used biclustering to identify groups of host pathways and biological processes that were perturbed only by a subset of the analyzed pathogens. Finally, we tested the enrichment of each bicluster in human genes that are known drug targets, on the basis of which we elicited putative HOBS targets for specific groups of bacterial pathogens. We identified 84 up-regulated and three down-regulated statistically significant biclusters. Each bicluster contained a group of pathogens that commonly dysregulated a group of biological processes. We validated our approach by checking whether these biclusters correspond to known hallmarks of bacterial infection. Indeed, these biclusters contained biological process such as inflammation, activation of dendritic cells, pro- and anti- apoptotic responses and other innate immune responses. Next, we identified biclusters containing pathogens that infected the same tissue. After a literature-based analysis of the drug targets contained in these biclusters, we suggested new uses of the drugs Anakinra, Etanercept, and Infliximab for gastrointestinal pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori kx2 strain, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and the drug Simvastatin for

  2. The landscape of host transcriptional response programs commonly perturbed by bacterial pathogens: towards host-oriented broad-spectrum drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yared H Kidane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogen strains and new infectious agents pose major challenges to public health. A promising approach to combat these problems is to target the host's genes or proteins, especially to discover targets that are effective against multiple pathogens, i.e., host-oriented broad-spectrum (HOBS drug targets. An important first step in the discovery of such drug targets is the identification of host responses that are commonly perturbed by multiple pathogens. RESULTS: In this paper, we present a methodology to identify common host responses elicited by multiple pathogens. First, we identified host responses perturbed by each pathogen using a gene set enrichment analysis of publicly available genome-wide transcriptional datasets. Then, we used biclustering to identify groups of host pathways and biological processes that were perturbed only by a subset of the analyzed pathogens. Finally, we tested the enrichment of each bicluster in human genes that are known drug targets, on the basis of which we elicited putative HOBS targets for specific groups of bacterial pathogens. We identified 84 up-regulated and three down-regulated statistically significant biclusters. Each bicluster contained a group of pathogens that commonly dysregulated a group of biological processes. We validated our approach by checking whether these biclusters correspond to known hallmarks of bacterial infection. Indeed, these biclusters contained biological process such as inflammation, activation of dendritic cells, pro- and anti- apoptotic responses and other innate immune responses. Next, we identified biclusters containing pathogens that infected the same tissue. After a literature-based analysis of the drug targets contained in these biclusters, we suggested new uses of the drugs Anakinra, Etanercept, and Infliximab for gastrointestinal pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori kx2 strain, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-induced fibrogenic responses of hepatic stellate cells by targeting transcriptional coactivator p300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joong-Yeon; Oh, Min-A; Kim, Won Ho; Sohn, Hee-Young; Park, Sang Ick

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common consequence of various chronic liver injuries, including virus infection and ethanol. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contribute to liver fibrosis through the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including type I alpha collagen (COL1A). The activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates HSCs activation, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that AMPK inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-induced fibrogenic property of HSCs by regulating transcriptional coactivator p300. We treated human (LX-2) and rat (CFSC-2G) HSC lines with TGF-β to induce fibrogenic activation of HSCs. Pharmacological activation of AMPK by treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), metformin, or adiponectin lowered TGF-β-induced expression of COL1A and myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transient transduction of constitutively active AMPKα (caAMPKα) was sufficient to attenuate COL1A and α-SMA expression, whereas an AMPK inhibitor considerably abrogated the inhibitory effect of AICAR on fibrogenic gene expression. Although AMPK significantly suppressed Smad-dependent transcription, it did not affect TGF-β-stimulated phosphorylation, nuclear localization, or DNA-binding activity of Smad2/3. AICAR rather attenuated TGF-β-induced Smad3 interaction with transcriptional coactivator p300 accompanying with reduction of Smad3 acetylation. Moreover, AICAR induced not only physical interaction between AMPK and p300 but also proteasomal degradation of p300 protein. Our data provide substantial evidence that AMPK could be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of liver fibrosis, by demonstrating the underlying mechanism of AMPK-induced antifibrotic function in HSCs.

  4. Phase behavior of mixed Ar-Kr, Ar-Xe and Kr-Xe monolayer films on graphite: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrykiejew, A

    2013-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation methods in the grand canonical ensemble we have studied the behavior of mixed Ar-Kr, Ar-Xe and Kr-Xe monolayer films on the graphite basal plane. We have considered the adsorption of the lighter component, either argon or krypton, under the condition of a fixed chemical potential of the heavier component (krypton or xenon), as well as on the graphite surface with preadsorbed small amounts of a heavier noble gas. In both types of simulation the composition of the adsorbed layer is not conserved. We discuss the phase behavior of mixed films emerging from both types of 'computer experiment'. We also demonstrate that Monte Carlo simulation allows us to estimate the effects of preadsorbed xenon on the commensurate-incommensurate transition in the krypton monolayer film and gives the results that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Amrine, Katherine C H; Labavitch, John M; Powell, Ann L T; Cantu, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth), secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue.

  6. Improved detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR targeting the 5' region of S RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschläger, Stephan; Lelke, Michaela; Emmerich, Petra; Panning, Marcus; Drosten, Christian; Hass, Meike; Asogun, Danny; Ehichioya, Deborah; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan

    2010-06-01

    The method of choice for the detection of Lassa virus is reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. However, the high degree of genetic variability of the virus poses a problem with the design of RT-PCR assays that will reliably detect all strains. Recently, we encountered difficulties in detecting some strains from Liberia and Nigeria in a commonly used glycoprotein precursor (GPC) gene-specific RT-PCR assay (A. H. Demby, J. Chamberlain, D. W. Brown, and C. S. Clegg, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:2898-2903, 1994), which prompted us to revise the protocol. The design of the new assay, the GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay, took into account 62 S RNA sequences from all countries where Lassa fever is endemic, including 40 sequences generated from the strains in our collection. The analytical sensitivity of the new assay was determined with 11 strains from Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, and Nigeria by probit analysis; the viral loads detectable with a probability of 95% ranged from 342 to 2,560 S RNA copies/ml serum, which corresponds to 4 to 30 S RNA copies/assay. The GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay was validated with 77 serum samples and 1 cerebrospinal fluid sample from patients with laboratory-confirmed Lassa fever. The samples mainly originated from Liberia and Nigeria and included strains difficult to detect in the assay of 1994. The GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay detected virus in all clinical specimens (100% sensitivity). In conclusion, a new RT-PCR assay, based in part on the protocol developed by Demby et al. in 1994, for the detection of Lassa virus is described. Compared to the assay developed in 1994, the GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay offers improved sensitivity for the detection of Liberian and Nigerian Lassa virus strains.

  7. An Ehrlichia chaffeensis tandem repeat protein interacts with multiple host targets involved in cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeel, Abdul; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; McBride, Jere W

    2009-05-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes forming cytoplasmic membrane-bound microcolonies called morulae. To survive and replicate within phagocytes, E. chaffeensis exploits the host cell by modulating a number of host cell processes, but the ehrlichial effector proteins involved are unknown. In this study, we determined that p47, a secreted, differentially expressed, tandem repeat (TR) protein, interacts with multiple host proteins associated with cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that p47 interacts with polycomb group ring finger 5 (PCGF5) protein, Src protein tyrosine kinase FYN (FYN), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2), and adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). p47 interaction with these proteins was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation assays and colocalization in HeLa cells transfected with p47-green fluorescent fusion protein (AcGFP1-p47). Moreover, confocal microscopy demonstrated p47-expressing dense-cored (DC) ehrlichiae colocalized with PCGF5, FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1. An amino-terminally truncated form of p47 containing TRs interacted only with PCGF5 and not with FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1, indicating differences in p47 domains that are involved in these interactions. These results demonstrate that p47 is involved in a complex network of interactions involving numerous host cell proteins. Furthermore, this study provides a new insight into the molecular and functional distinction of DC ehrlichiae, as well as the effector proteins involved in facilitating ehrlichial survival in mononuclear phagocytes.

  8. Multiple Targets on the Gln3 Transcription Activator Are Cumulatively Required for Control of Its Cytoplasmic Sequestration

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    Rajendra Rai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable characteristic of nutritional homeostatic mechanisms is the breadth of metabolite concentrations to which they respond, and the resolution of those responses; adequate but rarely excessive. Two general ways of achieving such exquisite control are known: stoichiometric mechanisms where increasing metabolite concentrations elicit proportionally increasing responses, and the actions of multiple independent metabolic signals that cumulatively generate appropriately measured responses. Intracellular localization of the nitrogen-responsive transcription activator, Gln3, responds to four distinct nitrogen environments: nitrogen limitation or short-term starvation, i.e., nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR, long-term starvation, glutamine starvation, and rapamycin inhibition of mTorC1. We have previously identified unique sites in Gln3 required for rapamycin-responsiveness, and Gln3-mTor1 interaction. Alteration of the latter results in loss of about 50% of cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration. However, except for the Ure2-binding domain, no evidence exists for a Gln3 site responsible for the remaining cytoplasmic Gln3-Myc13 sequestration in nitrogen excess. Here, we identify a serine/threonine-rich (Gln3477–493 region required for effective cytoplasmic Gln3-Myc13 sequestration in excess nitrogen. Substitutions of alanine but not aspartate for serines in this peptide partially abolish cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration. Importantly, these alterations have no effect on the responses of Gln3-Myc13 to rapamycin, methionine sulfoximine, or limiting nitrogen. However, cytoplasmic Gln3-Myc13 sequestration is additively, and almost completely, abolished when mutations in the Gln3-Tor1 interaction site are combined with those in Gln3477–493 cytoplasmic sequestration site. These findings clearly demonstrate that multiple individual regulatory pathways cumulatively control cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration.

  9. The transcription factor Ace2 and its paralog Swi5 regulate ethanol production during static fermentation through their targets Cts1 and Rps4a in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Du, Jie; Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most widely used fermentation organism for ethanol production. However, the gene expression regulatory networks behind the ethanol fermentation are still not fully understood. Using a static fermentation model, we examined the ethanol yields on biomass of deletion mutants for 77 yeast genes encoding nonessential transcription factors, and found that deletion mutants for ACE2 and SWI5 showed dramatically increased ethanol yields. Overexpression of ACE2 or SWI5 in wild type cells reduced their ethanol yields. Furthermore, among the 34 target genes regulated by Ace2 and Swi5, deletion of CTS1,RPS4a,SIC1,EGT2,DSE2, or SCP160 led to increased ethanol yields, with the former two showing higher effects. Overexpression of CTS1 or RPS4a in both ace2/ace2 and swi5/swi5 mutants reduced their ethanol yields. In contrast, deletion of MCR1 or HO significantly decreased ethanol yields, with the former one showing the highest effect. Therefore, Ace2 and Swi5 are two negative regulators of ethanol yield during static fermentation of yeast cells, and both CTS1 and RPS4a are major effectors mediating these two transcription factors in regulating ethanol production.

  10. Replication-dependent and transcription-dependent mechanisms of DNA double-strand break induction by the topoisomerase 2-targeting drug etoposide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Tammaro

    Full Text Available Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of DNA (Top2cc. Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide's efficacy in cancer therapy.

  11. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Replication-dependent and transcription-dependent mechanisms of DNA double-strand break induction by the topoisomerase 2-targeting drug etoposide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Margaret; Barr, Peri; Ricci, Brett; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide's efficacy in cancer therapy.

  13. MicroRNA-128-2 targets the transcriptional repressor E2F5 enhancing mutant p53 gain of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, S; Fontemaggi, G; Fazi, F; Di Agostino, S; Padula, F; Biagioni, F; Muti, P; Strano, S; Blandino, G

    2012-01-01

    p53 mutations have profound effects on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) resistance to chemotherapeutic treatments. Mutant p53 proteins are usually expressed at high levels in tumors, where they exert oncogenic functions. Here we show that p53R175H, a hotspot p53 mutant, induces microRNA (miRNA)-128-2 expression. Mutant p53 binds to the putative promoter of miR128-2 host gene, ARPP21, determining a concomitant induction of ARPP21 mRNA and miR-128-2. miR-128-2 expression in lung cancer cells inhibits apoptosis and confers increased resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracyl treatments. At the molecular level, miR-128-2 post-transcriptionally targets E2F5 and leads to the abrogation of its repressive activity on p21waf1 transcription. p21waf1 protein localizes to the cytoplasmic compartment, where it exerts an anti-apoptotic effect by preventing pro-caspase-3 cleavage. This study emphasizes miRNA-128-2 role as a master regulator in NSCLC chemoresistance. PMID:22193543

  14. Enhanced Cardiac Akt/Protein Kinase B Signaling Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy in Part by Impairing Mitochondrial Function via Transcriptional Repression of Mitochondrion-Targeted Nuclear Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Adam R.; O'Neill, Brian T.; Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Tuinei, Joseph; Buchanan, Jonathan; Tsushima, Kensuke; Wang, Li; Caro, Pilar; Guo, Aili; Sloan, Crystal; Kim, Bum Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Pereira, Renata O.; McCrory, Mark A.; Nye, Brenna G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Shioi, Tetsuo; Weimer, Bart C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained Akt activation induces cardiac hypertrophy (LVH), which may lead to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that Akt activation contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological LVH. Akt activation induced LVH and progressive repression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathways. Preventing LVH by inhibiting mTOR failed to prevent the decline in mitochondrial function, but glucose utilization was maintained. Akt activation represses expression of mitochondrial regulatory, FAO, and oxidative phosphorylation genes in vivo that correlate with the duration of Akt activation in part by reducing FOXO-mediated transcriptional activation of mitochondrion-targeted nuclear genes in concert with reduced signaling via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/PGC-1α and other transcriptional regulators. In cultured myocytes, Akt activation disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics, which could be partially reversed by maintaining nuclear FOXO but not by increasing PGC-1α. Thus, although short-term Akt activation may be cardioprotective during ischemia by reducing mitochondrial metabolism and increasing glycolysis, long-term Akt activation in the adult heart contributes to pathological LVH in part by reducing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. PMID:25535334

  15. Expression profiling of the developing and mature Nrl-/- mouse retina: identification of retinal disease candidates and transcriptional regulatory targets of Nrl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeo; Mears, Alan J; Friedman, James S; Carter, Todd; He, Shirley; Oh, Edwin; Jing, Yuezhou; Farjo, Rafal; Fleury, Gilles; Barlow, Carrolee; Hero, Alfred O; Swaroop, Anand

    2004-07-15

    The rod photoreceptor-specific neural retina leucine zipper protein Nrl is essential for rod differentiation and plays a critical role in regulating gene expression. In the mouse retina, rods account for 97% of the photoreceptors; however, in the absence of Nrl (Nrl-/-), no rods are present and a concomitant increase in cones is observed. A functional all-cone mouse retina represents a unique opportunity to investigate, at the molecular level, differences between the two photoreceptor subtypes. Using mouse GeneChips (Affymetrix), we have generated expression profiles of the wild-type and Nrl-/- retina at three time-points representing distinct stages of photoreceptor differentiation. Comparative data analysis revealed 161 differentially expressed genes; of which, 78 exhibited significantly lower and 83 higher expression in the Nrl-/- retina. Hierarchical clustering was utilized to predict the function of these genes in a temporal context. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, intracellular transport and other processes, which likely correspond to differences between rods and cones and/or retinal remodeling in the absence of rods. A significant number of these genes may serve as candidates for diseases involving rod or cone dysfunction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that in addition to the rod phototransduction genes, Nrl might modulate the promoters of many functionally diverse genes in vivo. Our studies provide molecular insights into differences between rod and cone function, yield interesting candidates for retinal diseases and assist in identifying transcriptional regulatory targets of Nrl.

  16. Interconnection of post-transcriptional regulation: The RNA-binding protein Hfq is a novel target of the Lon protease in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía; Breidenstein, Elena B M; Taylor, Patrick K; Bains, Manjeet; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Fang, Yuan; Foster, Leonard J; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-01-01

    Besides being a major opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in a wide range of environments. This versatility is linked to complex regulation, which is achieved through the action of transcriptional regulators, and post-transcriptional regulation by intracellular proteases including Lon. Indeed, lon mutants in this species show defects in motility, biofilm formation, pathogenicity and fluoroquinolone resistance. Here, the proteomic approach stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was used to search for novel proteolytic targets. One of the proteins that accumulated in the lon mutant was the RNA-binding protein Hfq. Further experiments demonstrated the ability of Lon to degrade Hfq in vitro. Also, overexpression of the hfq gene in the wild-type strain led to partial inhibition of swarming, swimming and twitching motilities, indicating that Hfq accumulation could contribute to the phenotypes displayed by Lon mutants. Hfq overexpression also led to the upregulation of the small regulatory RNA PhrS. Analysis of the phenotypes of strains lacking or overexpressing this sRNA indicated that the Lon protease might be indirectly regulating the levels and activity of sRNAs via Hfq. Overall, this study revealed new links in the complex regulatory chain that controls multicellular behaviours in P. aeruginosa.

  17. MicroR-146 blocks the activation of M1 macrophage by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in hepatic schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease caused by the parasite of the Schistosoma genus and is characterized by egg-induced hepatic granulomas and fibrosis. Macrophages play a central role in schistosomiasis with several studies highlighting their differentiation into M2 cells involved in the survival of infected mice through limitation of immunopathology. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms of regulating macrophage differentiation. Here, we showed that the early stage of infection by Schistosoma japonicum induced expression of type 1 T-helper-cell (Th1 cytokine, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, leading to increase in M1 cells. However, the presence of liver-trapped eggs induced the expression of Th2 cytokines including interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 that upregulated the transcription of miR-146b by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/6 (STAT3/6 that bind to the promoter of the pre-miR-146b gene. We found that the miR-146a/b was significantly upregulated in macrophages during the progression of hepatic schistosomiasis. The elevated miR-146a/b inhibited the IFN-γ-induced differentiation of macrophages to M1 cells through targeting STAT1. Our data indicate the protective roles of miR-146a/b in hepatic schistosomiasis through regulating the differentiation of macrophages into M2 cells.

  18. Short hairpin RNA targeting NP mRNA inhibiting Newcastle disease virus production and other viral structural mRNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hua; Deng, Shu; Yang, Fa-Long; Li, Ding-Fei; Fu, An-Jing; Yang, Fan; Tang, Cheng

    2009-02-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), formally recognized as avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), is the etiological agent of Newcastle disease (ND), an affliction which can cause severe losses in the poultry industry. Better understanding of the molecular basis of viral structural genes involved with production should contribute significantly toward the development of improved prophylactic and therapeutic reagents to control the infection. Here we show that a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) eukaryotic expression vector targeting nucleocapsid (NP) gene of NDV can potently inhibit NDV production in both primary cells and embryonated chicken eggs. Moreover, shRNA specific for NP abolished the accumulation of not only the corresponding mRNA but also P, HN, F, M gene mRNA. The findings reveal that newly synthesized NP mRNA is essential for NDV transcription and replication, and provide a basis for the development of shRNAs as a prophylaxis and therapy for NDV infection in poultry.

  19. Modelling solar radiation reached to the Earth using ANFIS, NN-ARX, and empirical models (Case studies: Zahedan and Bojnurd stations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Jamshid; Kisi, Ozgur

    2015-02-01

    The amount of incoming solar energy that crosses the Earth's atmosphere is called solar radiation. The solar radiation is a series of ultraviolet wavelengths including visible and infrared light. The solar rays at the Earth's surface is one of the key factor in water resources, environmental and agricultural modelling. Solar radiation is rarely measured by weather stations in Iran and other developing countries; as a result, many empirical approaches have been applied to estimate it by using other climatic parameters. In this study, non-linear models, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and neural network auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (NN-ARX) along with empirical models, Angstrom and Hargreaves-Samani, have been used to estimate the solar radiation. The data was collected from two synoptic stations with different climatic conditions (Zahedan and Bojnurd) during the period of 5 and 7 years, respectively. These data contain sunshine hours, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, average relative humidity and solar radiation. The Angstrom and Hargreaves-Samani empirical models, respectively, based on sunshine hours and temperature were calibrated and evaluated in both stations. In order to train, test, and validate ANFIS and NNRX models, 60%, 25%, and 15% of the data were applied, respectively. The results of artificial intelligence models were compared with the empirical models. The findings showed that ANFIS (R2=0.90 and 0.97 for Zahedan and Bojnurd, respectively) and NN-ARX (R2=0.89 and 0.96 for Zahedan and Bojnurd, respectively) performed better than the empirical models in estimating daily solar radiation.

  20. ChIP-on-chip analysis identifies IL-22 as direct target gene of ectopically expressed FOXP3 transcription factor in human T cells

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    Jeron Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor (TF forkhead box P3 (FOXP3 is constitutively expressed at high levels in naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs. It is not only the most accepted marker for that cell population but is also considered lineage determinative. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP of TFs in combination with genomic tiling microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip has been shown to be an appropriate tool for identifying FOXP3 transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on a genome-wide scale. In combination with microarray expression analysis, the ChIP-on-chip technique allows identification of direct FOXP3 target genes. Results ChIP-on-chip analysis of the human FOXP3 expressed in resting and PMA/ionomycin–stimulated Jurkat T cells revealed several thousand putative FOXP3 binding sites and demonstrated the importance of intronic regions for FOXP3 binding. The analysis of expression data showed that the stimulation-dependent down-regulation of IL-22 was correlated with direct FOXP3 binding in the IL-22 promoter region. This association was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of ChIP-DNA. The corresponding ChIP-region also contained a matching FOXP3 consensus sequence. Conclusions Knowledge of the general distribution patterns of FOXP3 TFBSs in the human genome under resting and activated conditions will contribute to a better understanding of this TF and its influence on direct target genes, as well as its importance for the phenotype and function of Tregs. Moreover, FOXP3-dependent repression of Th17-related IL-22 may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon of Treg/Th17 cell plasticity.

  1. MiR-361-5p acts as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription-6(STAT6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dachuang [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Department of Urology, Xuzhou Central Hospital Affiliated with Southeast University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221009 (China); Surgery Central Laboratory of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Tao, Tao; Xu, Bin; Chen, Shuqiu; Liu, Chunhui [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Surgery Central Laboratory of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Zhang, Lei; Lu, Kai [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Huang, Yeqing; Jiang, Liang [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Surgery Central Laboratory of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Zhang, Xiaowen [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Huang, Xiaoming [Surgery Central Laboratory of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Zhang, Lihua [Department of Pathology, Zhongda Hospital Affiliated with Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Han, Conghui [Department of Urology, Xuzhou Central Hospital Affiliated with Southeast University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221009 (China); Chen, Ming, E-mail: mingchenseu@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China); Surgery Central Laboratory of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009 (China)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • The role of miR-361-5p in prostate cancer (PCa) has not been evaluated until date. • We found that the expression of miR-361-5p in CRPC was lower than in ADPC. • MiR-361-5p suppressed DU145 cell proliferation and triggered apoptosis. • STAT6 is a direct target of miR-361-5p. • STAT6 enhances the expression of Bcl-xL at the transcriptional level. - Abstract: Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), whose pathogenesis is known to be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), has a poor prognosis. In our present study, we found that the expression of miR-361-5p in CRPC was lower than in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC), indicating that miR-361-5p may play an important role in the progression of ADPC to CRPC. The role of miR-361-5p in prostate cancer (PCa) has not been evaluated until date. Our findings suggest that miR-361-5p is a suppressor in CRPC. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (STAT6), a direct target of miR-361-5p, enhances the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), while miR-361-5p inhibits its expression through STAT6. Therefore, miR-361-5p has great clinical significance in preventing the malignant progression of PCa.

  2. ChIP-on-chip analysis identifies IL-22 as direct target gene of ectopically expressed FOXP3 transcription factor in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeron, Andreas; Hansen, Wiebke; Ewert, Franziska; Buer, Jan; Geffers, Robert; Bruder, Dunja

    2012-12-17

    The transcription factor (TF) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is constitutively expressed at high levels in naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs). It is not only the most accepted marker for that cell population but is also considered lineage determinative. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of TFs in combination with genomic tiling microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip) has been shown to be an appropriate tool for identifying FOXP3 transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on a genome-wide scale. In combination with microarray expression analysis, the ChIP-on-chip technique allows identification of direct FOXP3 target genes. ChIP-on-chip analysis of the human FOXP3 expressed in resting and PMA/ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat T cells revealed several thousand putative FOXP3 binding sites and demonstrated the importance of intronic regions for FOXP3 binding. The analysis of expression data showed that the stimulation-dependent down-regulation of IL-22 was correlated with direct FOXP3 binding in the IL-22 promoter region. This association was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of ChIP-DNA. The corresponding ChIP-region also contained a matching FOXP3 consensus sequence. Knowledge of the general distribution patterns of FOXP3 TFBSs in the human genome under resting and activated conditions will contribute to a better understanding of this TF and its influence on direct target genes, as well as its importance for the phenotype and function of Tregs. Moreover, FOXP3-dependent repression of Th17-related IL-22 may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon of Treg/Th17 cell plasticity.

  3. Deep sequencing reveals direct targets of gammaherpesvirus-induced mRNA decay and suggests that multiple mechanisms govern cellular transcript escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Clyde

    Full Text Available One characteristic of lytic infection with gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV68, is the dramatic suppression of cellular gene expression in a process known as host shutoff. The alkaline exonuclease proteins (KSHV SOX, MHV-68 muSOX and EBV BGLF5 have been shown to induce shutoff by destabilizing cellular mRNAs. Here we extend previous analyses of cellular mRNA abundance during lytic infection to characterize the effects of SOX and muSOX, in the absence of other viral genes, utilizing deep sequencing technology (RNA-seq. Consistent with previous observations during lytic infection, the majority of transcripts are downregulated in cells expressing either SOX or muSOX, with muSOX acting as a more potent shutoff factor than SOX. Moreover, most cellular messages fall into the same expression class in both SOX- and muSOX-expressing cells, indicating that both factors target similar pools of mRNAs. More abundant mRNAs are more efficiently downregulated, suggesting a concentration effect in transcript targeting. However, even among highly expressed genes there are mRNAs that escape host shutoff. Further characterization of select escapees reveals multiple mechanisms by which cellular genes can evade downregulation. While some mRNAs are directly refractory to SOX, the steady state levels of others remain unchanged, presumably as a consequence of downstream effects on mRNA biogenesis. Collectively, these studies lay the framework for dissecting the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of mRNA to destruction during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  4. Pyrosequencing the transcriptome of the greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum reveals multiple transcripts encoding insecticide targets and detoxifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorman Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum is an economically important crop pest in temperate regions that has developed resistance to most classes of insecticides. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance have not been characterised and, to date, progress has been hampered by a lack of nucleotide sequence data for this species. Here, we use pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-FLX platform to produce a substantial and annotated EST dataset. This 'unigene set' will form a critical reference point for quantitation of over-expressed messages via digital transcriptomics. Results Pyrosequencing produced around a million sequencing reads that assembled into 54,748 contigs, with an average length of 965 bp, representing a dramatic expansion of existing cDNA sequences available for T. vaporariorum (only 43 entries in GenBank at the time of this publication. BLAST searching of non-redundant databases returned 20,333 significant matches and those gene families potentially encoding gene products involved in insecticide resistance were manually curated and annotated. These include, enzymes potentially involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and those encoding the targets of the major chemical classes of insecticides. A total of 57 P450s, 17 GSTs and 27 CCEs were identified along with 30 contigs encoding the target proteins of six different insecticide classes. Conclusion Here, we have developed new transcriptomic resources for T. vaporariorum. These include a substantial and annotated EST dataset that will serve the community studying this important crop pest and will elucidate further the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance.

  5. Transcript Analysis for Internal Biodosimetry Using Peripheral Blood from Neuroblastoma Patients Treated with (131)I-mIBG, a Targeted Radionuclide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, David A; Karski, Erin E; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Koneru, Harsha; Matthay, Katherine K; Allen, Shelly; Hartmann, Christine L; Peterson, Leif E; DuBois, Steven G; Coleman, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Calculating internal dose from therapeutic radionuclides currently relies on estimates made from multiple radiation exposure measurements, converted to absorbed dose in specific organs using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. As an alternative biodosimetric approach, we utilized gene expression analysis of whole blood from patients receiving targeted radiotherapy. Collected blood from patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma who received (131)I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine ((131)I-mIBG) at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) was used to compare calculated internal dose with the modulation of chosen gene expression. A total of 40 patients, median age 9 years, had blood drawn at baseline, 72 and 96 h after (131)I-mIBG infusion. Whole-body absorbed dose was calculated for each patient based on the cumulated activity determined from injected mIBG activity and patient-specific time-activity curves combined with (131)I whole-body S factors. We then assessed transcripts that were the most significant for describing the mixed therapeutic treatments over time using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Modulation was evaluated statistically using multiple regression analysis for data at 0, 72 and 96 h. A total of 10 genes were analyzed across 40 patients: CDKN1A; FDXR; GADD45A; BCLXL; STAT5B; BAX; BCL2; DDB2; XPC; and MDM2. Six genes were significantly modulated upon exposure to (131)I-mIBG at 72 h, as well as at 96 h. Four genes varied significantly with absorbed dose when controlling for time. A gene expression biodosimetry model was developed to predict absorbed dose based on modulation of gene transcripts within whole blood. Three transcripts explained over 98% of the variance in the modulation of gene expression over the 96 h (CDKN1A, BAX and DDB2). To our knowledge, this is a novel study, which uses whole blood collected from patients treated with a radiopharmaceutical, to characterize biomarkers that may be useful

  6. miR-27b attenuates apoptosis induced by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV infection via targeting runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, belonging to the coronaviridae family, is the key cause of the fatal diarrhea of piglets and results in many pathological processes. microRNAs (miRNAs play a key role in the regulation of virus-induced apoptosis. During the process of apoptosis induced by TGEV infection in PK-15 cells, the miR-27b is notably down-regulated. Thus, we speculate that miR-27b is involved in regulating the process of apoptosis in PK-15 cells. In this study we demonstrated that the over-expression of miR-27b led to the inhibition of TGEV-induced apoptosis, reduction of Bax protein level, and decrease of caspase-3 and −9 activities. Conversely, silencing of miR-27b by miR-27b inhibitors enhanced apoptosis via up-regulating Bax expression and promoting the activities of caspase-3 and −9 in TGEV-infected cells. Subsequently, the runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1 is a candidate target of miR-27b predicted by bioinformatics search. We further identified that the miR-27b directly bound to the 3′ UTR of RUNX1 mRNA and suppressed RUNX1 expression, which indicates RUNX1 is the direct target gene of miR-27b. The over-expression of RUNX1 increased apoptosis and knockdown RUNX1blocked apoptosis of viral-infected cells via regulating Bax expression and the activities of caspase-3 and −9. Our data reveal that miR-27b may repress the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by targeting RUNX1, indicating that TGEV may induce apoptosis via down-regulating miR-27b and that miR-27b may act as a target for therapeutic intervention.

  7. TALE-class homeodomain transcription factors, homothorax and extradenticle, control dendritic and axonal targeting of olfactory projection neurons in the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Mai; Totani, Yoko; Walldorf, Uwe; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo

    2011-10-01

    Precise neuronal connectivity in the nervous system depends on specific axonal and dendritic targeting of individual neurons. In the Drosophila brain, olfactory projection neurons convey odor information from the antennal lobe to higher order brain centers such as the mushroom body and the lateral horn. Here, we show that Homothorax (Hth), a TALE-class homeodomain transcription factor, is expressed in many of the antennal lobe neurons including projection neurons and local interneurons. In addition, HTH is expressed in the progenitors of the olfactory projection neurons, and the activity of hth is required for the generation of the lateral but not for the anterodorsal and ventral lineages. MARCM analyses show that the hth is essential for correct dendritic targeting of projection neurons in the antennal lobe. Moreover, the activity of hth is required for axonal fasciculation, correct routing and terminal branching of the projection neurons. We also show that another TALE-class homeodomain protein, Extradenticle (Exd), is required for the dendritic and axonal development of projection neurons. Mutation of exd causes projection neuron defects that are reminiscent of the phenotypes caused by the loss of the hth activity. Double immunostaining experiments show that Hth and Exd are coexpressed in olfactory projection neurons and their progenitors, and that the expressions of Hth and Exd require the activity of each other gene. These results thus demonstrate the functional importance of the TALE-class homeodomain proteins in cell-type specification and precise wiring of the Drosophila olfactory network.

  8. microRNA156-targeted SPL/SBP box transcription factors regulate tomato ovary and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira e Silva, Geraldo Felipe; Silva, Eder Marques; Azevedo, Mariana da Silva; Guivin, Mike Anderson Corazon; Ramiro, Daniel Alves; Figueiredo, Cassia Regina; Carrer, Helaine; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Nogueira, Fabio Tebaldi Silveira

    2014-05-01

    Fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is well understood at the molecular level. However, information regarding genetic pathways associated with tomato ovary and early fruit development is still lacking. Here, we investigate the possible role(s) of the microRNA156/SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like (SPL or SBP box) module (miR156 node) in tomato ovary development. miR156-targeted S. lycopersicum SBP genes were dynamically expressed in developing flowers and ovaries, and miR156 was mainly expressed in meristematic tissues of the ovary, including placenta and ovules. Transgenic tomato cv. Micro-Tom plants over-expressing the AtMIR156b precursor exhibited abnormal flower and fruit morphology, with fruits characterized by growth of extra carpels and ectopic structures. Scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses showed the presence of meristem-like structures inside the ovaries, which are probably responsible for the ectopic organs. Interestingly, expression of genes associated with meristem maintenance and formation of new organs, such as LeT6/TKN2 (a KNOX-like class I gene) and GOBLET (a NAM/CUC-like gene), was induced in developing ovaries of transgenic plants as well as in the ovaries of the natural mutant Mouse ear (Me), which also displays fruits with extra carpels. Conversely, expression of the MADS box genes MACROCALYX (MC) and FUL1/TDR4, and the LEAFY ortholog FALSIFLORA, was repressed in the developing ovaries of miR156 over-expressors, suggesting similarities with Arabidopsis at this point of the miR156/SPL pathway but with distinct functional consequences in reproductive development. Altogether, these observations suggest that the miR156 node is involved in maintenance of the meristematic state of ovary tissues, thereby controlling initial steps of fleshy fruit development and determinacy.

  9. Small interfering RNA targeting the nonstructural gene 1 transcript inhibits influenza A virus replication in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Roopali; Khanna, Madhu; Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Sharma, Sonal; Gupta, Neha; Saxena, Latika

    2012-12-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses counteracts the host immune response against the influenza viruses by not only inhibiting the nuclear export and maturation of host cell messenger RNA (mRNA), but by also blocking the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-mediated inhibition of viral RNA translation. Reduction of NS1 gene product in the host cell may be a potent antiviral strategy to provide protection against the influenza virus infection. We used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) synthesized against the viral mRNA to down regulate the NS1 gene and observed its effect on inhibition of virus replication. When NS1 gene-specific siRNA were transfected in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by influenza A virus infection, approximately 60% inhibition in intracellular levels of NS1 RNA was observed. When siRNA was administered in BALB/c mice, 92% reduction in the levels of NS1 gene expression in mice lungs was observed. A significant reduction in the lung virus titers and cytokine levels was also detected in the presence of siRNAs as compared with the untreated control. The study was validated by the use of selectively disabled mutants of each set of siRNA. Our findings suggest that siRNA targeted against NS1 gene of influenza A virus can provide considerable protection to the virus-infected host cells and may be used as potential candidates for nucleic acid-based antiviral therapy for prevention of influenza A virus infection.

  10. miR-320a regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in multiple myeloma by targeting pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yinghao [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Wu, Depei, E-mail: wudepei@medmail.com.cn [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Wang, Jishi, E-mail: lgylhlyh@aliyun.com [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China)

    2016-05-13

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is implicated in cancer development and progression. While miR-320a is reported to be deregulated in many malignancy types, its biological role in multiple myeloma (MM) remains unclear. Here, we observed reduced expression of miR-320a in MM samples and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-320a dramatically suppressed cell viability and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in vitro. Mechanistic investigation led to the identification of Pre-B-cellleukemia transcription factor 3 (PBX3) as a novel and direct downstream target of miR-320a. Interestingly, reintroduction of PBX3 abrogated miR-320a-induced MM cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. In a mouse xenograft model, miR-320a overexpression inhibited tumorigenicity and promoted apoptosis. Our findings collectively indicate that miR-320a inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in MM cells by directly targeting PBX3, supporting its utility as a novel and potential therapeutic agent for miRNA-based MM therapy. -- Highlights: •Expression of miR-320a in MM cell induces apoptosis in vitro. •miR-320a represses PBX3 via targeting specific sequences in the 3′UTR region. •Exogenous expression of PBX3 reverses the effects of miR-320a in inhibiting MM cell growth and promoting apoptosis. •Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits tumor growth and increases apoptosis in vivo.

  11. Carotenoid profiling, in silico analysis and transcript profiling of miRNAs targeting carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in different developmental tissues of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Archana; Yogindran, Sneha; Sharma, Deepak; Kaul, Sanjana; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat; Dhar, Manoj K

    2016-11-01

    Carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is one of the highly significant and very well elucidated secondary metabolic pathways in plants. microRNAs are the potential regulators, widely known for playing a pivotal role in the regulation of various biological as well as metabolic processes. miRNAs may assist in the metabolic engineering of the secondary metabolites for the production of elite genotypes with increased biomass and content of various metabolites. miRNA mediated regulation of carotenoid biosynthetic genes has not been elucidated so far. To illustrate the potential regulatory role of miRNAs in carotenoid biosynthesis, transcript profiling of the known miRNAs and their possible target carotenoid genes was undertaken at eight different developmental stages of tomato, using stem-loop PCR approach combined with quantitative RT-PCR. The inter-relationship amongst carotenoid content, biosynthetic genes and miRNAs was studied in depth. Comparative expression profiles of miRNA and target genes showed variable expression in different tissues studied. The expression level of miRNAs and their target carotenoid genes displayed similar pattern in the vegetative tissues as compared to the reproductive ones, viz. fruit (different stages), indicating the possibility of regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at various stages of fruit development. This was later confirmed by the HPLC analysis of the carotenoids. The present study has further enhanced the understanding of regulation of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plants. The identified miRNAs can be employed to manipulate the biosynthesis of different carotenoids, through metabolic engineering for the production of lycopene rich tomatoes.

  12. Detection of respiratory viruses and bacteria in children using a twenty-two target reverse-transcription real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Chelsey; Misir, Amita; Hui, Charles; Jabbour, Mona; Barrowman, Nicholas; Langill, Jonathan; Bowes, Jennifer; Slinger, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rapid detection of the wide range of viruses and bacteria that cause respiratory infection in children is important for patient care and antibiotic stewardship. We therefore designed and evaluated a ready-to-use 22 target respiratory infection reverse-transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) panel to determine if this would improve detection of these agents at our pediatric hospital. RT-qPCR assays for twenty-two target organisms were dried-down in individual wells of 96 well plates and saved at room temperature. Targets included 18 respiratory viruses and 4 bacteria. After automated nucleic acid extraction of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples, rapid qPCR was performed. RT-qPCR results were compared with those obtained by the testing methods used at our hospital laboratories. One hundred fifty-nine pediatric NPA samples were tested with the RT-qPCR panel. One or more respiratory pathogens were detected in 132/159 (83%) samples. This was significantly higher than the detection rate of standard methods (94/159, 59%) (Pviruses, bocavirus, and coronaviruses. The panel internal control assay performance remained stable at room temperature storage over a two-month testing period. The RT-qPCR panel was able to identify pathogens in a high proportion of respiratory samples. The panel detected more positive specimens than the methods in use at our hospital. The pre-made panel format was easy to use and rapid, with results available in approximately 90 minutes. We now plan to determine if use of this panel improves patient care and antibiotic stewardship.

  13. Electronic spectra of ArXe molecules in the region of Xe* (6s', 6p, 5d), 77 000-80 200 cm{sup -1}, using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodorkovskii, M A; Murashov, S V [Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artamonova, T O; Beliaeva, A A; Rakcheeva, L P [Russian scientific center Applied Chemistry, 197198, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pastor, A A; Serdobintsev, P Yu; Timofeev, N A; Shevkunov, I A; Dement' ev, I A [Saint-Petersburg State University, 198904, Petrodvorets (Russian Federation); Nordgren, J, E-mail: mkhodorkovskii@rscac.spb.r [Department of Physics, Fysiska Institutionen, Uppsala Universitet, Box 530, SE-751 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-14

    The excited electronic states of ArXe molecules in the region 77 000-80 200 cm{sup -1} were studied using the (2+1) and (3+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods. The use of different methods of multi-photon excitation and Ar{sup +} ion registration allowed us to obtain some new data. Molecular constants were obtained for previously unknown excited states of molecules with the following dissociation limits: ArXe* {yields} Ar{sup 1}S{sub 0}+Xe*6rcy[5/2]{sub 3} with {Omega} = 2, 3 symmetry; Ar{sup 1}S{sub 0}+Xe*6p[3/2]{sub 2} with {Omega} = 1, 2 symmetry; Xe{sup 0}S{sub 1} {yields} Xe*6s'[1/2]{sup 0}{sub 1} with {Omega} = 0{sup +} symmetry.

  14. Electronic spectra of ArXe molecules in the region of Xe* (5d, 7s, 7p, 6p'), 80 300-89 500 cm{sup -1}, using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodorkovskii, M A; Murashov, S V [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artamonova, T O; Beliaeva, A A; Rakcheeva, L P [Russian Scientific Center ' Applied Chemistry' , 197198, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pastor, A A; Serdobintsev, P Yu; Timofeev, N A; Shevkunov, I A; Dement' ev, I A [Saint Petersburg State University, 198904, Petrodvorets (Russian Federation); Nordgren, J, E-mail: mkhodorkovskii@rscac.spb.r [Department of Physics, Uppsala Universitet, Fysiska Institutionen, Box 530, SE-751 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-12-14

    The electronic spectra of ArXe molecules in the 80 300-89 500 cm{sup -1} region were recorded by (2 + n) and (3 + n) REMPI methods. The vibrational progressions attributed to transitions of molecules from the ground state to the bounded excited state and wide unstructured bands related to transitions to the continuous upper state were obtained. The molecular constants of ArXe* were calculated for all the observed progressions in the 80 300-87 000 cm{sup -1} region as an approximation of an anharmonic oscillator and the Morse potential. For different excited states the energy of harmonic oscillator and the dissociation energy are changed from 10 to 100 cm{sup -1} and from 70 to 750 cm{sup -1}, respectively.

  15. MicroRNA-149 Increases the Sensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells to 5-Fluorouracil by Targeting Forkhead Box Transcription Factor FOXM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previously, we have shown that microRNA (miR-149 suppresses the migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC cells by targeting forkhead box transcription factor (FOXM1. However, the roles of miR-149 in the chemoresistance of CRC cells to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether miR-149 targets FOXM1 to regulate the 5-FU resistance of CRC. Methods: The qRT-PCR assay was performed to detect the expression of miR-149 in 5-FU-resistant CRC cells (HCT-8/5-FU and LoVo/5-FU and their parental CRC cells (HCT-8 and LoVo. Also, the effects of miR-149 expression on the sensitivity of CRC cells to 5-FU were determined by gain- and loss-of-function assays. Finally, whether miR-149 regulates the 5-FU resistance of CRC cells by targeting the mammalian Forkhead Box M1 (FOXM1 was investigated. Results: The expression of miR-149 was significantly downregulated in 5-FU-resistant CRC cells in comparison with their parental CRC cells. Re-expression of miR-149 could enhance the 5-FU sensitivity of 5-FU-resistant CRC cells by increasing 5-FU-inducing apoptosis, while downregulation of miR-149 could decrease the 5-FU sensitivity of parental CRC cells by decreasing 5-FU-inducing apoptosis. In addition, the luciferase assay indicated that miR-149 could bind to the 3'-UTR sequence of FOXM1 mRNA. The silencing of FOXM1 could mimic the effect of miR-149 upregulation on the 5-FU resistance of 5-FU-resistant CRC cells. Furthermore, the expression of miR-149 in the 5-FU-responding CRC tissues was significantly higher than that in the non-responding tissues and inversely correlated with FOXM1 mRNA level. Conclusions: MiR-149 reverses the resistance of CRC cells to 5-FU by directly targeting FOXM1. Thus, targeting miR-149/FOXM1 signaling will be a potential strategy in the treatment of 5-FU-chemoresistant CRC.

  16. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  17. Diindolylmethane suppresses ovarian cancer growth and potentiates the effect of cisplatin in tumor mouse model by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandala Prabodh K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is activated in majority of ovarian tumors and confers resistance to cisplatin treatment in patients with ovarian cancer. We have reported previously that diindolylmethane (DIM inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cells. However, to date the exact mechanism by which DIM induces growth suppressive effects has not been clear. In this report the mode of action of DIM is investigated. Methods Six human ovarian cancer cell lines and an ovarian tumor xenograft animal model were used to study the effect of diindolylmethane alone or in combination with cisplatin. Results Diindolylmethane treatment induced apoptosis in all six ovarian cancer cell lines. Phosphorylation of STAT3 at Tyr-705 and Ser-727 was reduced by DIM in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, diindolylmethane treatment inhibited nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activity of STAT3. Interleukin (IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 at Tyr-705 was significantly blocked by DIM. Overexpression of STAT3 by gene transfection blocked DIM-induced apoptosis. In addition, DIM treatment reduced the levels of IL-6 in ovarian cancer cells and in the tumors. DIM treatment also inhibited cell invasion and angiogenesis by suppressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α and vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF. Importantly, diindolylmethane treatment potentiated the effects of cisplatin in SKOV-3 cells by targeting STAT3. Oral administration of 3 mg diindolylmethane per day and subsequent administration of cisplatin substantially inhibited in vivo tumor growth. Western blotting analysis of tumor lysates indicated increased apoptosis and reduced STAT3 activation. Conclusions These findings provide a rationale for further clinical investigation of DIM alone or in combination for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  18. The Transcription Factor p8 Regulates Autophagy in Response to Palmitic Acid Stress via a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Dian-Fu; Li, An-Qi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-02-26

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradative process that allows cells to maintain homoeostasis in numerous physiological situations. This process also functions as an essential protective response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes the removal and degradation of unfolded proteins. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which autophagy is initiated and regulated in response to ER stress. In this study, different types of autophagy were identified in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells in response to the stress induced by nutrient starvation or lipotoxicity in which the regulation of these pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent or -independent, respectively. Interestingly, we found that p8, a stress-inducible transcription factor, was enhanced in MKN45 cells treated with palmitic acid to induce lipotoxicity. Furthermore, an increase in autophagy was observed in MKN45 cells stably overexpressing p8 using a lentivirus system, and autophagy induced by palmitic acid was blocked by p8 RNAi compared with the control. Western blotting analyses showed that autophagy was regulated by p8 or mTOR in response to the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/activating transcription factor 6-mediated ER stress of lipotoxicity or the parkin-mediated mitochondrial stress of nutrient starvation, respectively. Furthermore, our results indicated that autophagy induced by palmitic acid is mTOR-independent, but this autophagy pathway was regulated by p8 via p53- and PKCα-mediated signaling in MKN45 cells. Our findings provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy induced by the lipotoxic effects of excess fat accumulation in cells.

  19. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body—column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat. PMID:27727328

  20. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G; Voytas, Daniel F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body-column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat.

  1. MicroRNA-34a targets epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Saber; Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Fu, Shangyi; Yang, Luquan; Tania, Mousumi; Zhang, Xianqin; Xiao, Xiuli; Zhang, Xianning; Fu, Junjiang

    2017-03-28

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) plays an essential role against tumorigenesis and progression of cancer metastasis. Here, we analyzed the expression, targets and functional effects of miR-34a on epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), such as TWIST1, SLUG and ZEB1/2, and an EMT-inducing protein NOTCH1 in breast cancer (BC) cell migration and invasion and its correlation with tumorigenesis and clinical outcomes. Expression of miR-34a is downregulated in human metastatic breast cancers (MBC) compared to normal breast tissues and is negatively correlated with clinicopathological features of MBC patients. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in MBC cell-line BT-549 significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion, but exhibits no clear effect on BC cell growth. We found that miR-34a is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway with mediatory of NOTCH1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 upon 3'-UTR activity in MBC cell lines, but has no inhibitory effects on SLUG and ZEB2. Furthermore, we investigated the synergistic effects of Thymoquinone (TQ) and miR-34a together on the expression of EMT-associated proteins. Results showed that co-delivery of miR-34a and TQ is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway by directly targeting TWIST1 and ZEB1 in BT-549 cell line, indicating that they might be a promising therapeutic combination against breast cancer metastasis. Epigenetic inactivation of the EMT-TFs/miR-34a pathway can potentially alter the equilibrium of these regulations, facilitating EMT and metastasis in BC. Altogether, our findings suggest that miR-34a alone could serve as a potential therapeutic agent for MBC, and together with TQ, their therapeutic potential is synergistically enhanced.

  2. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Zhu, Minghui; Li, Yang

    2014-04-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy.

  3. Efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication using novel modified microRNA-30a targeting 3′-untranslated region transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEJATI, AHMAD; SHAHMAHMOODI, SHOHREH; AREFIAN, EHSAN; SHOJA, ZABIHOLLAH; MARASHI, SAYED-MAHDI; TABATABAIE, HAMIDEH; MOLLAEI-KANDELOUS, YAGHOUB; SOLEIMANI, MASOUD; NATEGH, RAKHSHANDEH

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy is currently considered to be a combinatorial anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) therapy. Although artificial polycistronic microRNAs (miRs) can reduce HIV-1 escape mutant variants, this approach may increase the risk of side effects. The present study aimed to optimize the efficiency of anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy in order to reduce the cell toxicity induced by multi-short hairpin RNA expression. An artificial miR-30a-3′-untranslated region (miR-3-UTR) obtained from a single RNA polymerase II was used to simultaneously target all viral transcripts. The results of the present study demonstrated that HIV-1 replication was significantly inhibited in the cells with the miR-3-UTR construct, suggesting that miR-3′-UTR may serve as a promising tool for RNAi-based gene therapy in the treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27168813

  4. RNA-Seq analysis of rye-grass transcriptomic response to an herbicide inhibiting acetolactate-synthase identifies transcripts linked to non-target-site-based resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhoux, Arnaud; Carrère, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bonin, Ludovic; Délye, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides that disrupts agricultural weed control is a worldwide concern for food security. NTSR is considered a polygenic adaptive trait driven by differential gene regulation in resistant plants. Little is known about its genetic determinism, which precludes NTSR diagnosis and evolutionary studies. We used Illumina RNA-sequencing to investigate transcriptomic differences between plants from the global major weed rye-grass sensitive or resistant to the acetolactate-synthase (ALS) inhibiting herbicide pyroxsulam. Plants were collected before and along a time-course after herbicide application. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded a resource (LOLbase) including 92,381 contigs representing potentially active transcripts that were assigned putative annotations. Early effects of ALS inhibition consistent with the literature were observed in resistant and sensitive plants, proving LOLbase data were relevant to study herbicide response. Comparison of resistant and sensitive plants identified 30 candidate NTSR contigs. Further validation using 212 plants resistant or sensitive to pyroxsulam and/or to the ALS inhibitors iodosulfuron + mesosulfuron confirmed four contigs (two cytochromes P450, one glycosyl-transferase and one glutathione-S-transferase) were NTSR markers which combined expression levels could reliably identify resistant plants. This work confirmed that NTSR is driven by differential gene expression and involves different mechanisms. It provided tools and foundation for subsequent NTSR investigations.

  5. T cell post-transcriptional miRNA-mRNA interaction networks identify targets associated with susceptibility/resistance to collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula B Donate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to recent studies indicating that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs in T cells contributes to increased severity of rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that deregulated miRNAs may interact with key mRNA targets controlling the function or differentiation of these cells in this disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test our hypothesis, we used microarrays to survey, for the first time, the expression of all known mouse miRNAs in parallel with genome-wide mRNAs in thymocytes and naïve and activated peripheral CD3(+ T cells from two mouse strains the DBA-1/J strain (MHC-H2q, which is susceptible to collagen induced arthritis (CIA, and the DBA-2/J strain (MHC-H2d, which is resistant. Hierarchical clustering of data showed the several T cell miRNAs and mRNAs differentially expressed between the mouse strains in different stages of immunization with collagen. Bayesian statistics using the GenMir(++ algorithm allowed reconstruction of post-transcriptional miRNA-mRNA interaction networks for target prediction. We revealed the participation of miR-500, miR-202-3p and miR-30b*, which established interactions with at least one of the following mRNAs: Rorc, Fas, Fasl, Il-10 and Foxo3. Among the interactions that were validated by calculating the minimal free-energy of base pairing between the miRNA and the 3'UTR of the mRNA target and luciferase assay, we highlight the interaction of miR-30b*-Rorc mRNA because the mRNA encodes a protein implicated in pro-inflammatory Th17 cell differentiation (Rorγt. FACS analysis revealed that Rorγt protein levels and Th17 cell counts were comparatively reduced in the DBA-2/J strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This result showed that the miRNAs and mRNAs identified in this study represent new candidates regulating T cell function and controlling susceptibility and resistance to CIA.

  6. Identification of target genes of the bZIP transcription factor OsTGAP1, whose overexpression causes elicitor-induced hyperaccumulation of diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Phytoalexins are specialised antimicrobial metabolites that are produced by plants in response to pathogen attack. Momilactones and phytocassanes are the major diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice and are synthesised from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, which is derived from the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway. The hyperaccumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes due to the hyperinductive expression of the relevant biosynthetic genes and the MEP pathway gene OsDXS3 in OsTGAP1-overexpressing (OsTGAP1ox rice cells has previously been shown to be stimulated by the chitin oligosaccharide elicitor. In this study, to clarify the mechanisms of the elicitor-stimulated coordinated hyperinduction of these phytoalexin biosynthetic genes in OsTGAP1ox cells, transcriptome analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing were performed, resulting in the identification of 122 OsTGAP1 target genes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that nearly all of the momilactone and phytocassane biosynthetic genes, which are clustered on chromosomes 4 and 2, respectively, and the MEP pathway genes were hyperinductively expressed in the elicitor-stimulated OsTGAP1ox cells. Unexpectedly, none of the clustered genes was included among the OsTGAP1 target genes, suggesting that OsTGAP1 did not directly regulate the expression of these biosynthetic genes through binding to each promoter region. Interestingly, however, several OsTGAP1-binding regions were found in the intergenic regions among and near the cluster regions. Concerning the MEP pathway genes, only OsDXS3, which encodes a key enzyme of the MEP pathway, possessed an OsTGAP1-binding region in its upstream region. A subsequent transactivation assay further confirmed the direct regulation of OsDXS3 expression by OsTGAP1, but other MEP pathway genes were not included among the OsTGAP1 target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that OsTGAP1 participates in the enhanced accumulation of

  7. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  8. Visualized gene network reveals the novel target transcripts Sox2 and Pax6 of neuronal development in trans-placental exposure to bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemical in our daily life, and its health effect in response to prenatal exposure is still controversial. Early-life BPA exposure may impact brain development and contribute to childhood neurological disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate molecular target genes of neuronal development in trans-placental exposure to BPA.A meta-analysis of three public microarray datasets was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes (DEGs in exposure to BPA. The candidate genes of neuronal development were identified from gene ontology analysis in a reconstructed neuronal sub-network, and their gene expressions were determined using real-time PCR in 20 umbilical cord blood samples dichotomized into high and low BPA level groups upon the median 16.8 nM.Among 36 neuronal transcripts sorted from DAVID ontology clusters of 457 DEGs using the analysis of Bioconductor limma package, we found two neuronal genes, sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2 and paired box 6 (Pax6, had preferentially down-regulated expression (Bonferroni correction p-value <10(-4 and log2-transformed fold change ≤-1.2 in response to BPA exposure. Fetal cord blood samples had the obviously attenuated gene expression of Sox2 and Pax6 in high BPA group referred to low BPA group. Visualized gene network of Cytoscape analysis showed that Sox2 and Pax6 which were contributed to neural precursor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation might be down-regulated through sonic hedgehog (Shh, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA and Notch signaling.These results indicated that trans-placental BPA exposure down-regulated gene expression of Sox2 and Pax6 potentially underlying the adverse effect on childhood neuronal development.

  9. Generation of Foxo3-targeted Mice by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) into Zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P; Liu, Q; Liu, S; Su, X; Feng, W; Lei, X; Liu, J; Cui, K; Huang, B; Shi, D

    2015-06-01

    In this study, for exploring the mechanism of forkhead box O3(Foxo3) participating in regulation of the activation of primordial oocytes, Foxo3-targeted mice were generated by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) into mouse zygotes. The TALEN sites were designed with high conservative homologous region among pig, bovine, buffalo and mouse by commercial bio-companies. The TALENs mutagenic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair activity were determined to be 31.3% in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK-293T) cells by dual luciferase reporter assay system. Then, we firstly injected TALEN-mRNAs into the cytoplasm of mouse zygotes by micromanipulation, and four of 48 mouse blastocysts were identified as mutation by sequencing. Subsequently, by the method of TALEN-mRNAs injected into the zygotes with pronucleus micromanipulation technique, we obtained seven Foxo3 mutants of 20 FVB/NJ backgrounds mice which were Foxo3-independent alleles with frameshift and deletion mutations. It was very interesting that all seven were heterozygous mutants (Foxo3(-/+) ), and the gene mutagenesis rates of the mice reached 35%. The five Foxo3 mutant females were all infertile in the following 6 months after birth. The histological examination results showed that there were rare primordial follicles and primary follicles in the ovary of Foxo3 mutant compared to that of wide-type female mice. Moreover, one of two mutant males was subfertile and another was fertile normally. Those results suggested that the mutant of Foxo3 severely affected the fertile ability of female and perhaps male in some degree; furthermore, an even more efficient TALENs-based gene mutation method has been established to be poised to revolutionize the study of mouse and other species genetics.

  10. A Transcription Factor-Binding Domain of the Coactivator CBP Is Essential for Long-Term Memory and the Expression of Specific Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Brindle, Paul K.; Abel, Ted; Wood, Marcelo A.; Attner, Michelle A.

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptional activation is a key process required for long-term memory formation. Recently, the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) was shown to be critical for hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. As a coactivator with intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity, CBP interacts with…

  11. microProtein Prediction Program (miP3) : A Software for Predicting microProteins and Their Target Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klein, Niek; Magnani, Enrico; Banf, Michael; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2015-01-01

    An emerging concept in transcriptional regulation is that a class of truncated transcription factors (TFs), called microProteins (miPs), engages in protein-protein interactions with TF complexes and provides feedback controls. A handful of miP examples have been described in the literature but the e

  12. A Transcription Factor-Binding Domain of the Coactivator CBP Is Essential for Long-Term Memory and the Expression of Specific Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Brindle, Paul K.; Abel, Ted; Wood, Marcelo A.; Attner, Michelle A.

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptional activation is a key process required for long-term memory formation. Recently, the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) was shown to be critical for hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. As a coactivator with intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity, CBP interacts with…

  13. Targeting downstream transcription factors and epigenetic modifications following Toll-like receptor 7/8 ligation to forestall tissue injury in anti-Ro60 associated heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Reed, Joanne H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Halushka, Marc K; Buyon, Jill P

    2016-02-01

    Based on the consistent demonstration of fibrosis of the atrioventricular node surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in anti-Ro antibody exposed fetuses dying with heart block, this study focuses on macrophage signaling stimulated by ssRNA associated with the Ro60 protein and the impact of antagonizing innate cell drivers such as TLR7/8. Transcriptome and epigenetic modifications which affect transcription factors, NF-κB and STAT1, were selected to evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in which TLR7/8 was ligated following treatment with either anti-Ro60/Ro60/hY3 RNA immune complexes or transfection with hY3. Based on microarray, TNF and IL6 were among the most highly upregulated genes in both stimulated conditions, each of which was significantly inhibited by preincubation with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). In contrast, following stimulation of macrophages with either TNF-α or IFN-α, which do not signal through TLR, the resultant gene expression was refractory to HCQ. Ligation of TLR7/8 resulted in increased histone methylation as measured by increased H3K4me2, a requirement for binding of NF-κB at certain promoters, specifically the kB1 region in the TNF promoter (ChIP-qPCR), which was significantly decreased by HCQ. In summary, these results support that the HCQ-sensitive phenotype of hY3 stimulated macrophages reflects the bifurcation of TLR downstream signals involving NF-κB and STAT 1 pathways and for the former dimethylation of H3K4. Accordingly, HCQ may act more as a preventive measure in downregulating the initial production of IFN-α or TNF-α and not affect the resultant autocoid stimulation reflected in TNF-α and IFN-α responsive genes. The beneficial scope of antimalarials in the prevention of organ damage, inclusive of heart block in an anti-Ro offspring or more broadly SLE, may include in part, a mechanism targeting TLR-dependent epigenetic modification.

  14. Arx: a toolset for the efficient simulation and direct synthesis of high-performance signal processing algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, K.L.; Gerez, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the efficient implementation of highperformance signal-processing algorithms. In early stages of such designs many computation-intensive simulations may be necessary. This calls for hardware description formalisms targeted for efficient simulation (such as the programming langua

  15. 用ObjectARX开发板翅式换热器参数化CAD系统%evelopment of CAD System for Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger with ObjectARX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹群彩; 凌祥; 涂善东

    2001-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of plate-fin heat exchangers,a CAD system was developed with parametric technique and ObjectARX combined with programming language Visual C++,which has integrated the following two advantages-one is powerful image displaying and compiling functions under AutoCAD ambient,the other is object-oriented programming and high efficiency of Visual C++.Thus,the rapid innovation of plate-fin heat exchanger can be realized by this system in conjunction with heat calculation module and rapid pricing system of plate-fin heat exchanger formerly proposed by the authors.

  16. Developing engineering drawing module base on ObjectARX%基于ObjectARX开发工程图模块的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏永乐; 晁彩霞

    2013-01-01

    The 3D solid modeling is used widely in the design of machine production. But, the 2D drawing is still essential in production manufacturing and in technical exchanging. In order to construct the 2D drawing from 3D solid model, the engineering drawing module is developed based on AutoCAD with the secondary development tool ObjcetARX. Constructing the 2D drawing from a 3D solid model and automatic dimension are realized, and the 2D drawing is created in the model space which makes the user's operation more convenient. An example shows that the engineering drawing module can extract the information of the 2D drawing from the 3D features solid and can construct 2D drawing rapidly. The design efficiency can be enhanced greatly.%三维实体建模在机械产品的设计过程中得到了广泛应用,但二维工程图仍是当前指导生产和进行技术交流必不可少的文件.为了从三维实体模型快速得到二维工程图,利用ObjectARX二次开发工具,在AutoCAD平台上开发工程图模块,实现了实体模型向工程图的快速转化以及自动标注.工程图生成在模型空间,方便后续操作.通过实例证明该工程图模块能够从特征实体模型中提取工程图的相关信息,快速生成二维工程图,大大提高用户的工作效率.

  17. A single amino acid change within the R2 domain of the VvMYB5b transcription factor modulates affinity for protein partners and target promoters selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoid pathway is spatially and temporally controlled during plant development and the transcriptional regulation of the structural genes is mostly orchestrated by a ternary protein complex that involves three classes of transcription factors (R2-R3-MYB, bHLH and WDR. In grapevine (Vitis vinifera L., several MYB transcription factors have been identified but the interactions with their putative bHLH partners to regulate specific branches of the flavonoid pathway are still poorly understood. Results In this work, we describe the effects of a single amino acid substitution (R69L located in the R2 domain of VvMYB5b and predicted to affect the formation of a salt bridge within the protein. The activity of the mutated protein (name VvMYB5bL, the native protein being referred as VvMYB5bR was assessed in different in vivo systems: yeast, grape cell suspensions, and tobacco. In the first two systems, VvMYB5bL exhibited a modified trans-activation capability. Moreover, using yeast two-hybrid assay, we demonstrated that modification of VvMYB5b transcriptional properties impaired its ability to correctly interact with VvMYC1, a grape bHLH protein. These results were further substantiated by overexpression of VvMYB5bR and VvMYB5bL genes in tobacco. Flowers from 35S::VvMYB5bL transgenic plants showed a distinct phenotype in comparison with 35S::VvMYB5bR and the control plants. Finally, significant differences in transcript abundance of flavonoid metabolism genes were observed along with variations in pigments accumulation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that VvMYB5bL is still able to bind DNA but the structural consequences linked to the mutation affect the capacity of the protein to activate the transcription of some flavonoid genes by modifying the interaction with its co-partner(s. In addition, this study underlines the importance of an internal salt bridge for protein conformation and thus for the establishment

  18. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-small ka, CyrillicB target genes in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmases, A.; Gonzalez, I.; Menendez, S.; Arpi, O.; Corominas, J.; Servitja, S.; Tusquets, I.; Chamizo, C.; Rincon, R.; Espinosa, L.; Bigas, A.; Eroles, P.; Furriol, J.; Lluch, A.; Rovira, A.; Albanell, J.; Rojo, F.

    2014-01-01

    NF-small ka, CyrillicB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-small ka, CyrillicB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-small ka

  19. A new target for an old regulator: H-NS represses transcription of bolA morphogene by direct binding to both promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ricardo N; Dressaire, Clémentine; Domingues, Susana; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2011-07-22

    The Escherichia coli bolA morphogene is very important in adaptation to stationary phase and stress response mechanisms. Genes of this family are widespread in gram negative bacteria and in eukaryotes. The expression of this gene is tightly regulated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and its overexpression is known to induce round cellular morphology. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the H-NS protein, a pleiotropic regulator of gene expression, is a new transcriptional modulator of the bolA gene. In this work we show that and in vivo the levels of bolA are down-regulated by H-NS and in vitro this global regulator interacts directly with the bolA promoter region. Moreover, DNaseI foot-printing experiments mapped the interaction regions of H-NS and bolA and revealed that this global regulator binds not only one but both bolA promoters. We provide a new insight into the bolA regulation network demonstrating that H-NS represses the transcription of this important gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A titratable two-step transcriptional amplification strategy for targeted gene therapy based on ligand-induced intramolecular folding of a mutant human estrogen receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ian Y; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The efficacy and safety of cardiac gene therapy depend critically on the level and the distribution of therapeutic gene expression following vector administration. We aimed to develop a titratable two-step transcriptional amplification (tTSTA) vector strategy, which allows modulation of ...

  1. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-small ka, CyrillicB target genes in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmases, A.; Gonzalez, I.; Menendez, S.; Arpi, O.; Corominas, J.; Servitja, S.; Tusquets, I.; Chamizo, C.; Rincon, R.; Espinosa, L.; Bigas, A.; Eroles, P.; Furriol, J.; Lluch, A.; Rovira, A.; Albanell, J.; Rojo, F.

    2014-01-01

    NF-small ka, CyrillicB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-small ka, CyrillicB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-small

  2. Identity between rat htf and human xbp-1 genes: determination of gene structure, target sequence, and transcription promotion function for HTF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokura, K; Kishimoto, T; Tamura, T

    2000-01-11

    Hepatocarcinogenesis-related transcription factor (HTF) was originally isolated from rats in which the expression was enhanced in hepatocellular carcinomas. Rat HTF (rHTF) is structurally similar to human X-box-binding protein-1 (hXBP-1), and both factors are unique in respective genomes. A previous study showed that hXBP-1 mRNA is detectable ubiquitously but is enriched in the human liver as rHTF. In this study, we demonstrated the analogous exon-intron organization and significant sequence homology for rhtf and hxbp-1 genes. Alignment of amino acid sequences of rHTF and hXBP-1 revealed that all the characteristic motifs in rHTF were conserved in hXBP-1. Moreover, Southern blotting patterns provided with the rHTF and hXBP-1 probes were basically the same. These two genes were thus thought to belong to the same evolutional lineage. We determined the consensus binding sequence (CRCGTCA) for rHTF by CASTing, and it was found to be nearly the same as that for hXBP-1. Transactivation ability of rHTF was also demonstrated. The rhtf gene generates two types of mRNAs (2.0 kb and 2.5 kb), both of which encode identical rHTF protein. These transcripts had distinct transcription initiation sites. The 2.0 kb promoter, that was revealed by the transient luciferase assay, contained GC-box and CAAT-box. Sequences around the transcription initiation site for the 2.0 kb transcript were similar in rhtf and hxbp-1 genes. Our observations suggest that HTF is a rat homolog of hXBP-1.

  3. The second development of AutoCAD dimension mark system based on the ObjectARX%基于ObjectARX的AutoCAD尺寸标注测试系统二次开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王传俊

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the Windows operating system and the operating environment based on VisualC++, the basic method of program design and the advantages of AutoCAD second development using ObjectARX application program. Give out the methods of three view dimension testing system for developing portfolio , and deeply verify the feasibility of using ObjectARX to develop AutoCAD for the second time in the Visual C++environment.%  分析了在Windows操作系统下,基于Visual C++运行环境,利用ObjectARX应用程序对AutoCAD进行二次开发的优点和基本方法。以AutoCAD尺寸标注测试系统为实例,给出开发组合体三视图尺寸标注测试系统的方法,进一步验证了在Visual C++环境下用ObjectARX对AutoCAD二次开发的可行性。

  4. Developmental gonadal expression of the transcription factor SET and its target gene, P450c17 (17alpha-hydroxylase/c17,20 lyase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Compagnone, N A; Fiore, C; Vigne, J L; Culp, P; Musci, T J; Mellon, S H

    2001-10-01

    Cytochrome P450c17 catalyzes the 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase activity needed for sex steroid synthesis. We recently characterized the nuclear phosphoprotein SET as a novel transcriptional regulator that binds to the -447/-399 region of the rat P450c17 gene, along with the transcription factors COUP-TF II, NGF-IB, and SF-1. Gel shift studies localized SET binding to nucleotides -410/-402. We have shown that SET activates transcription of the rat P450c17 gene in neuronal precursor cells and now show that it also activates transcription from the -418/-399 region of the rat P450c17 gene in mouse Leydig MA-10 cells. Studying the ontogenic expression of SET and P450c17 in the rodent gonad, we found that SET expression preceded P450c17 expression in the embryonic genital ridge, suggesting that SET may be important for initiating P450c17 expression in this region. Expression of SET also preceded P450c17 expression in the testis and ovary, and its expression was much greater during embryogenesis than in the adult gonad. In the adult rat testis, P450c17 was expressed only in Leydig cells, while SET was expressed in Leydig cells and in spermatocytes. In the adult rat ovary, P450c17 was expressed only in theca cells, while SET was expressed in theca cells and also in oocytes. Because SET is expressed early in development in the genital ridge and in the testis and ovary, and because SET has many functions in addition to its activity as a transcription factor, we determined whether SET acts a transcription factor in oocytes. The SET protein was detected by Western blots in Xenopus oocytes from stages II through VI and in mature oocytes. Using extracts of Xenopus oocytes in gel shift assays, we detected a protein that bound to the -418/-399 region of the rat P450c17 gene, to which SET binds. Nuclear injection of either a -418/-399TK32LUC wildtype reporter construct or a construct containing a mutant SET site into Xenopus oocytes from stages III through VI resulted in

  5. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21–22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, di...

  6. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB target genes in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmases, Alba; González, Irene; Menendez, Silvia; Arpí, Oriol; Corominas, Josep Maria; Servitja, Sonia; Tusquets, Ignasi; Chamizo, Cristina; Rincón, Raúl; Espinosa, Lluis; Bigas, Anna; Eroles, Pilar; Furriol, Jessica; Lluch, Anna; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Rojo, Federico

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-κB -dependent genes and the biological consequences are unclear. We studied NF-κB -dependent gene expression induced by doxorubicin in breast cancer cells and fresh human cancer specimens with different genetic backgrounds focusing on their p53 status. NF-κB -dependent signature of doxorubicin was identified by gene expression microarrays in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin and the IKKβ-inhibitor MLN120B, and confirmed ex vivo in human cancer samples. The association with p53 was functionally validated. Finally, NF-κB activation and p53 status was determined in a cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Doxorubicin treatment in the p53-mutated MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in NF NF-κB driven-gene transcription signature. Modulation of genes related with invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance (ICAM-1, CXCL1, TNFAIP3, IL8) were confirmed in additional doxorubicin-treated cell lines and fresh primary human breast tumors. In both systems, p53-defcient background correlated with the activation of the NF-κB -dependent signature. Furthermore, restoration of p53WT in the mutant p53 MDA-MB-231 cells impaired NF-κB driven transcription induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, a p53 deficient background and nuclear NF-κB /p65 in breast cancer patients correlated with reduced disease free-survival. This study supports that p53 deficiency is necessary for a doxorubicin driven NF-κB -response that limits doxorubicin cytotoxicity in breast cancer and is linked to an aggressive clinical behavior. PMID:24344116

  7. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  8. Threonine-4 of mammalian RNA polymerase II CTD is targeted by Polo-like kinase 3 and required for transcriptional elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Corinna; Heidemann, Martin; Koch, Frederic; Descostes, Nicolas; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Fenouil, Romain; Ferrier, Pierre; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Chapman, Rob D; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2012-06-13

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has evolved an array of heptad repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 at the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit (Rpb1). Differential phosphorylation of Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 in the 5' and 3' regions of genes coordinates the binding of transcription and RNA processing factors to the initiating and elongating polymerase complexes. Here, we report phosphorylation of Thr4 by Polo-like kinase 3 in mammalian cells. ChIPseq analyses indicate an increase of Thr4-P levels in the 3' region of genes occurring subsequently to an increase of Ser2-P levels. A Thr4/Ala mutant of Pol II displays a lethal phenotype. This mutant reveals a global defect in RNA elongation, while initiation is largely unaffected. Since Thr4 replacement mutants are viable in yeast we conclude that this amino acid has evolved an essential function(s) in the CTD of Pol II for gene transcription in mammalian cells.

  9. Cisplatin-induced regulation of signal transduction pathways and transcription factors in p53-mutated subclone variants of hepatoma cells: Potential application for therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Ho, Chun-Te; Lai, Kun-Goung; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chen, Yin-Ju; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is commonly recognized as a DNA-damaging drug; however, its versatile antitumor effects have been demonstrated to extend beyond this narrow functional attribute. The present study determined how cisplatin regulates alternative pathways and transcription factors to exert its additional antitumor actions. Cisplatin was observed to be able to trigger an endoplasmic reticulum stress response through aggravated nitrosative stress coupled to perturbed mitochondrial calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis, which substantially downregulated glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78 expression by suppressing the cleavage of activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α (90 kDa) to its active 50 kDa subunit. Concomitantly, the ATF4-ATF3-C/emopamil binding protein homologous protein axis was activated by cisplatin, which triggered cellular glutathione (GSH) depletion by strongly inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase heavy chain (γ-GCSh), a key enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. The present study also demonstrated that cisplatin substantially inhibited β-catenin, causing a marked downregulation of survivin and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2. Taken together, the present results uncovered a novel mechanism of cisplatin that could simultaneously trigger the inhibition of three prominent antiapoptotic effector molecules (Bcl-2, survivin and GRP78) and effectively promote GSH depletion by inhibiting γ-GCSh. These newly discovered functional attributes of cisplatin can provide an avenue for novel combined therapeutic strategies to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells effectively.

  10. Transcription factors as targets of the anti-inflammatory treatment. A cell culture study with extracts from some Mediterranean diet plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalińska, K; Guzdek, A; Rokicki, M; Koj, A

    2005-03-01

    During the inflammatory response at least 2 transcription factors, NF-kappaB and AP-1, are involved in the altered profile of gene expression. We used human hepatoma (HepG2) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model system: NF-kappaB and AP-1 were activated by the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the absence or presence of 21 selected plant extracts and the effect was evaluated by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). In both types of cells activation of NF-kappaB by IL-1 was significantly inhibited by extracts from Scandix australis and Artemisia alba, whereas extracts from Amaranthus sp., Eryngium campestre, Thymus pulegioides and Reichardia picroides elicited cell-type dependent response. The IL-1-induced AP-1 activation was diminished by extracts from Scandix australis, Amaranthus sp. and Artemisia alba more potently in HUVEC, while extracts from Urospermum picroides and Scandix pecten-veneris in HepG2 cells. Inhibitory activities of plant extracts towards cytokine activated NF-kappaB and AP-1 depend to some extent on the order of addition of IL-1 and plant extract to the cell culture, but the mechanism of action of extract components is not clear: although plant polyphenols may participate they are unlikely to be the only mediators, and MAP kinases were found generally not involved in down-regulation of transcription factors activity by plant extracts.

  11. FGF19 (fibroblast growth factor 19) as a novel target gene for activating transcription factor 4 in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makoto; Li, Juan; Maruyama, Ryuto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2013-02-15

    FGF19 (fibroblast growth factor 19), expressed in the small intestine, acts as an enterohepatic hormone by mediating inhibitory effects on the bile acid synthetic pathway and regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In an attempt to identify novel agents other than bile acids that induce increased FGF19 expression, we found that some ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress inducers were effective. When intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were incubated with thapsigargin, marked increases were observed in the mRNA and secreted protein levels of FGF19. This was not associated with the farnesoid X receptor. Reporter gene analyses using the 5'-promoter region of FGF19 revealed that a functional AARE (amino-acid-response element) was localized in this region, and this site was responsible for inducing its transcription through ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4), which is activated in response to ER stress. EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays showed that ATF4 bound to this site and enhanced FGF19 expression. Overexpression of ATF4 in Caco-2 cells induced increased FGF19 mRNA expression, whereas shRNA (short hairpin RNA)-mediated depletion of ATF4 significantly attenuated a thapsigargin-induced increase in FGF19 mRNA.

  12. Binding of the RING polycomb proteins to specific target genes in complex with the grainyhead-like family of developmental transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckfield, Annabel; Clouston, David R; Wilanowski, Tomasz M; Zhao, Lin-Lin; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2002-03-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins represses homeotic gene expression through the assembly of multiprotein complexes on key regulatory elements. The mechanisms mediating complex assembly have remained enigmatic since most PcG proteins fail to bind DNA. We now demonstrate that the human PcG protein dinG interacts with CP2, a mammalian member of the grainyhead-like family of transcription factors, in vitro and in vivo. The functional consequence of this interaction is repression of CP2-dependent transcription. The CP2-dinG interaction is conserved in evolution with the Drosophila factor grainyhead binding to dring, the fly homologue of dinG. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the grh-dring complex forms on regulatory elements of genes whose expression is repressed by grh but not on elements where grh plays an activator role. These observations reveal a novel mechanism by which PcG proteins may be anchored to specific regulatory elements in developmental genes.

  13. Effects of exposure to Prestige-like heavy fuel oil and to perfluorooctane sulfonate on conventional biomarkers and target gene transcription in the thicklip grey mullet Chelon labrosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, E.; Raingeard, D.; Diaz de Cerio, O.; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, M.; Ruiz, P.; Izagirre, U.; Orbea, A.; Marigomez, I.; Cajaraville, M.P. [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Cancio, I., E-mail: ibon.cancio@ehu.es [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Thicklip grey mullets Chelon labrosus inhabit coastal and estuarine areas where they can be chronically exposed to commonly released pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and perfluorinated compounds. These pollutants can also originate from accidental spills, such as the Prestige oil spill in 2002, which resulted in the release of a heavy fuel oil that affected coastal ecosystems in the Bay of Biscay. Peroxisome proliferation (PP), induced biotransformation metabolism, immunosuppression and endocrine disruption are some of the possible biological effects caused by such chemicals. With the aim of studying the effects of organic toxic chemicals on such biological processes at the transcriptional and at the cell/tissue level, juvenile mullets were exposed to the typical mammalian peroxisome proliferator perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and to fresh (F) and weathered (WF) Prestige-like heavy fuel oil for 2 and 16 days. First, fragments of genes relevant to biotransformation, immune/inflammatory and endocrine disruption processes were cloned using degenerate primers. Fuel oil elicited a significant PP response as proved by the transcriptional upregulation of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase (aox1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {alpha} (ppar{alpha}) and retinoic X receptor, by the AOX1 activity induction and by the increased peroxisomal volume density. PFOS only elicited a significant induction of AOX1 activity at day 2 and of PPAR{alpha} mRNA expression at day 16. All treatments significantly increased catalase mRNA expression at day 16 in liver and at day 2 in gill. Cyp1a transcription (liver and gill) and EROD activity were induced in fuel oil treated organisms. In the case of phase II metabolism only hepatic glutathione S-transferase mRNA was overexpressed in mullets exposed to WF for 16 days. Functionally, this response was reflected in a significant accumulation of bile PAH metabolites. WF treated fish accumulated mainly high molecular

  14. Procyanidin B2 3,3(″)-di-O-gallate, a biologically active constituent of grape seed extract, induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via targeting NF-κB, Stat3, and AP1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Alpna; Raina, Komal; Shrestha, Suraj Prakash; Miller, Bettina; Thompson, John A; Wempe, Michael F; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified procyanidin B2 3,3(″)-di-O-gallate (B2G2) as most active constituent of grape seed extract (GSE) for efficacy against prostate cancer (PCa). Isolating large quantities of B2G2 from total GSE is labor intensive and expensive, thereby limiting both efficacy and mechanistic studies with this novel anticancer agent. Accordingly, here we synthesized gram-scale quantities of B2G2, compared it with B2G2 isolated from GSE for possible equivalent biological activity and conducted mechanistic studies. Both B2G2 preparations inhibited cell growth, decreased clonogenicity, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptotic death, comparable to each other, in various human PCa cell lines. Mechanistic studies focusing on transcription factors involved in apoptotic and survival pathways revealed that B2G2 significantly inhibits NF-κB and activator protein1 (AP1) transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription3 (Stat3) in PCa cell lines, irrespective of their functional androgen receptor status. B2G2 also decreased survivin expression which is regulated by NF-κB, AP1, and Stat3 and increased cleaved PARP level. In summary, we report B2G2 chemical synthesis at gram-quantity with equivalent biological efficacy against human PCa cell lines and same molecular targeting profiles at key transcription factors level. The synthetic B2G2 will stimulate more research on prostate and possibly other malignancies in preclinical models and clinical translation.

  15. RNA microarray analysis in prenatal mouse cochlea reveals novel IGF-I target genes: implication of MEF2 and FOXM1 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortensia Sanchez-Calderon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I provides pivotal cell survival and differentiation signals during inner ear development throughout evolution. Homozygous mutations of human IGF1 cause syndromic sensorineural deafness, decreased intrauterine and postnatal growth rates, and mental retardation. In the mouse, deficits in IGF-I result in profound hearing loss associated with reduced survival, differentiation and maturation of auditory neurons. Nevertheless, little is known about the molecular basis of IGF-I activity in hearing and deafness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A combination of quantitative RT-PCR, subcellular fractionation and Western blotting, along with in situ hybridization studies show IGF-I and its high affinity receptor to be strongly expressed in the embryonic and postnatal mouse cochlea. The expression of both proteins decreases after birth and in the cochlea of E18.5 embryonic Igf1(-/- null mice, the balance of the main IGF related signalling pathways is altered, with lower activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and stronger activation of p38 kinase. By comparing the Igf1(-/- and Igf1(+/+ transcriptomes in E18.5 mouse cochleae using RNA microchips and validating their results, we demonstrate the up-regulation of the FoxM1 transcription factor and the misexpression of the neural progenitor transcription factors Six6 and Mash1 associated with the loss of IGF-I. Parallel, in silico promoter analysis of the genes modulated in conjunction with the loss of IGF-I revealed the possible involvement of MEF2 in cochlear development. E18.5 Igf1(+/+ mouse auditory ganglion neurons showed intense MEF2A and MEF2D nuclear staining and MEF2A was also evident in the organ of Corti. At P15, MEF2A and MEF2D expression were shown in neurons and sensory cells. In the absence of IGF-I, nuclear levels of MEF2 were diminished, indicating less transcriptional MEF2 activity. By contrast, there was an increase in the nuclear accumulation of FoxM1 and a

  16. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  17. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and neural stem cell (NSC lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Cerbini

    Full Text Available Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs. The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and neural stem cell (NSC) lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  19. Diverse control of metabolism and other cellular processes in Streptomyces coelicolor by the PhoP transcription factor: genome-wide identification of in vivo targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Smith, Colin P

    2012-10-01

    Streptomycetes sense and respond to the stress of phosphate starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP signal transduction system. To identify the in vivo targets of PhoP we have undertaken a chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-microarray analysis of wild-type and phoP mutant cultures and, in parallel, have quantified their transcriptomes. Most (ca. 80%) of the previously in vitro characterized PhoP targets were identified in this study among several hundred other putative novel PhoP targets. In addition to activating genes for phosphate scavenging systems PhoP was shown to target two gene clusters for cell wall/extracellular polymer biosynthesis. Furthermore PhoP was found to repress an unprecedented range of pathways upon entering phosphate limitation including nitrogen assimilation, oxidative phosphorylation, nucleotide biosynthesis and glycogen catabolism. Moreover, PhoP was shown to target many key genes involved in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, including afsS, atrA, bldA, bldC, bldD, bldK, bldM, cdaR, cdgA, cdgB and scbR-scbA. Intriguingly, in the PhoP-dependent cpk polyketide gene cluster, PhoP accumulates substantially at three specific sites within the giant polyketide synthase-encoding genes. This study suggests that, following phosphate limitation, Streptomyces coelicolor PhoP functions as a 'master' regulator, suppressing central metabolism, secondary metabolism and developmental pathways until sufficient phosphate is salvaged to support further growth and, ultimately, morphological development.

  20. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Philosophiae portus e arx philosophiae: apropriação e superação agostiniana da tradição filosófica Grego-Romana em relação à felicidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Nunes Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mantendo-se na linha de São Justino, o qual, apesar de valorizar a Filosofia Grego-Romana, defende ser o Cristianismo a "verdadeira filosofia", Agostinho fundamenta ou alicerça seu conceito de felicidade na tradição filosófica que o antecedeu, a qual é concebida por ele como um philosophiae portus (porto da filosofia. Entretanto, como pensador cristão, buscando superar o eudaimonismo grego-romano, ao distinguir sabedoria e Verdade, sendo esta última identificada com Deus, faz da Fé Cristã o arx philosophiae (ápice da filosofia, a que chama de "nossa Filosofia Cristã", lugar da "verdadeira felicidade", que, para ele, é a principal finalidade de todo filosofar.

  2. Development and application of a microplate method to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens of fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajji, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A microbioassay was developed for evaluating the in vitro antifungal activity of 30 preselected essential oils. A template based on 10 serial dilutions with eight replicates per dilution arranged on two 96-well ELISA plates was used as a reproducible and standardized design to identify the in vitro effectiveness of these essential oils against Penicillium italicum Wehmer, Penicillium digitatum Sacc. and Colletotrichum musea (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Arx, three postharvest fungal pathogens, on fruits. Growth of mycelium was monitored by measuring optical density (492 nm. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cinnamomum verum and Eugenia caryophyllus were found to be still active against all the three pathogens even at 100 ppm. Compared to other methods, this microbioassay proved to be a rapid, reproducible, and efficient method for testing the efficacy of essential oils that inhibit spore germination in P. italicum, P. digitatum and C. musea. The assay requires relatively small amounts of essential oils.

  3. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  4. xol-1, the master sex-switch gene in C. elegans, is a transcriptional target of the terminal sex-determining factor TRA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Balázs; Kutnyánszky, Vera; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Steták, Attila; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Vellai, Tibor

    2009-12-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sex is determined by the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes: XX animals (2X:2A=1.0) develop as hermaphrodites and XO animals (1X:2A=0.5) develop as males. TRA-1, the worm ortholog of Drosophila Cubitus interruptus and mammalian Gli (Glioma-associated homolog) proteins, is the terminal transcription factor of the C. elegans sex-determination pathway, which specifies hermaphrodite fate by repressing male-specific genes. Here we identify a consensus TRA-1 binding site in the regulatory region of xol-1, the master switch gene controlling sex determination and dosage compensation. xol-1 is normally expressed in males, where it promotes male development and prevents dosage compensation. We show that TRA-1 binds to the consensus site in the xol-1 promoter in vitro and inhibits the expression of xol-1 in XX animals in vivo. Furthermore, inactivation of tra-1 enhances, whereas hyperactivation of tra-1 suppresses, lethality in animals with elevated xol-1 activity. These data imply the existence of a regulatory feedback loop within the C. elegans sex-determination and dosage-compensation cascade that ensures the accurate dose of X-linked genes in cells destined to adopt hermaphrodite fate.

  5. Structural Basis for LMO2-Driven Recruitment of the SCL:E47bHLH Heterodimer to Hematopoietic-Specific Transcriptional Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel El Omari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate is governed by combinatorial actions of transcriptional regulators assembling into multiprotein complexes. However, the molecular details of how these complexes form are poorly understood. One such complex, which contains the basic-helix-loop-helix heterodimer SCL:E47 and bridging proteins LMO2:LDB1, critically regulates hematopoiesis and induces T cell leukemia. Here, we report the crystal structure of (SCL:E47bHLH:LMO2:LDB1LID bound to DNA, providing a molecular account of the network of interactions assembling this complex. This reveals an unexpected role for LMO2. Upon binding to SCL, LMO2 induces new hydrogen bonds in SCL:E47, thereby strengthening heterodimer formation. This imposes a rotation movement onto E47 that weakens the heterodimer:DNA interaction, shifting the main DNA-binding activity onto additional protein partners. Along with biochemical analyses, this illustrates, at an atomic level, how hematopoietic-specific SCL sequesters ubiquitous E47 and associated cofactors and supports SCL’s reported DNA-binding-independent functions. Importantly, this work will drive the design of small molecules inhibiting leukemogenic processes.

  6. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs. PMID:27051344

  7. Targeting oxidative stress in the hypothalamus: the effect of transcription factor STAT3 knockdown on endogenous antioxidants-mediated appetite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Dong-Yih; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that the redox sensing system in the hypothalamus participates in fuel metabolism and that endogenous antioxidants contribute to the regulation of phenylpropanolamine (PPA), an anorectic drug-induced appetite suppression. We explored whether the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) is involved in PPA's action. Rats were given PPA once a day for 4 days. Changes in endogenous antioxidants, Janus kinase-2 (JAK2), STAT3, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), levels during PPA treatment were assessed and compared. Feeding, body weight, and NPY decreased with the biggest reduction on Day 2 during PPA treatment. Antioxidants, JAK2, pSTAT3, POMC expression, and STAT3/DNA-binding activity increased and were expressed in a pattern opposite to NPY expression. Moreover, cerebral STAT3 knockdown modified PPA-induced anorexia and antioxidants, POMC, and NPY expression. superoxide dismutase immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus increased and the inhibition of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production reversed antioxidants, STAT3, POMC, and NPY expression. It is suggested that hypothalamic JAK2-STAT3 participates in regulating antioxidants-mediated appetite control. This result may further the understanding of ROS-involved appetite control.

  8. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho; Park, Kwang-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs.

  9. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  10. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome Escherichia coli tiling arrays reveals a complex relationship to distribution of target selection protein B, transcription and chromosome architectural elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Ge; Zheng Lou; Hong Cui; Lei Shang; Rasika M Harshey

    2011-09-01

    Of all known transposable elements, phage Mu exhibits the highest transposition efficiency and the lowest target specificity. In vitro, MuB protein is responsible for target choice. In this work, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the genome-wide distribution of MuB and its relationship to Mu target selection using high-resolution Escherichia coli tiling DNA arrays. We have also assessed how MuB binding and Mu transposition are influenced by chromosome-organizing elements such as AT-rich DNA signatures, or the binding of the nucleoid-associated protein Fis, or processes such as transcription. The results confirm and extend previous biochemical and lower resolution in vivo data. Despite the generally random nature of Mu transposition and MuB binding, there were hot and cold insertion sites and MuB binding sites in the genome, and differences between the hottest and coldest sites were large. The new data also suggest that MuB distribution and subsequent Mu integration is responsive to DNA sequences that contribute to the structural organization of the chromosome.

  11. PBK/TOPK interacts with the DBD domain of tumor suppressor p53 and modulates expression of transcriptional targets including p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F; Gartenhaus, R B; Eichberg, D; Liu, Z; Fang, H-B; Rapoport, A P

    2010-10-07

    PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase, T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase) is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells but its role in oncogenesis remains unclear. Here we show, by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and yeast two-hybrid analysis, that PBK/TOPK physically interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 through its DNA-binding (DBD) domain in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells that express wild-type p53. PBK also binds to p53 mutants carrying five common point mutations in the DBD domain. The PBK-p53 interaction appears to downmodulate p53 transactivation function as indicated by PBK/TOPK knockdown experiments, which show upregulated expression of the key p53 target gene and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in HCT116 cells, particularly after genotoxic damage from doxorubicin. Furthermore, stable PBK/TOPK knockdown cell lines (derived from HCT116 and MCF-7 cells) showed increased apoptosis, G(2)/M arrest and slower growth as compared to stable empty vector-transfected control cell lines. Gene microarray studies identified additional p53 target genes involved in apoptosis or cell cycling, which were differentially regulated by PBK knockdown. Together, these data suggest that increased levels of PBK/TOPK may contribute to tumor cell development and progression through suppression of p53 function and consequent reductions in the cell-cycle regulatory proteins such as p21. PBK/TOPK may therefore be a valid target for antineoplastic kinase inhibitors to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and growth suppression.

  12. Enhanced Rice Blast Resistance by CRISPR/Cas9-Targeted Mutagenesis of the ERF Transcription Factor Gene OsERF922.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Wang

    Full Text Available Rice blast is one of the most destructive diseases affecting rice worldwide. The adoption of host resistance has proven to be the most economical and effective approach to control rice blast. In recent years, sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs have been demonstrated to be powerful tools for the improvement of crops via gene-specific genome editing, and CRISPR/Cas9 is thought to be the most effective SSN. Here, we report the improvement of rice blast resistance by engineering a CRISPR/Cas9 SSN (C-ERF922 targeting the OsERF922 gene in rice. Twenty-one C-ERF922-induced mutant plants (42.0% were identified from 50 T0 transgenic plants. Sanger sequencing revealed that these plants harbored various insertion or deletion (InDel mutations at the target site. We showed that all of the C-ERF922-induced allele mutations were transmitted to subsequent generations. Mutant plants harboring the desired gene modification but not containing the transferred DNA were obtained by segregation in the T1 and T2 generations. Six T2 homozygous mutant lines were further examined for a blast resistance phenotype and agronomic traits, such as plant height, flag leaf length and width, number of productive panicles, panicle length, number of grains per panicle, seed setting percentage and thousand seed weight. The results revealed that the number of blast lesions formed following pathogen infection was significantly decreased in all 6 mutant lines compared with wild-type plants at both the seedling and tillering stages. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between any of the 6 T2 mutant lines and the wild-type plants with regard to the agronomic traits tested. We also simultaneously targeted multiple sites within OsERF922 by using Cas9/Multi-target-sgRNAs (C-ERF922S1S2 and C-ERF922S1S2S3 to obtain plants harboring mutations at two or three sites. Our results indicate that gene modification via CRISPR/Cas9 is a useful approach for enhancing blast resistance in

  13. Replication-Dependent and Transcription-Dependent Mechanisms of DNA Double-Strand Break Induction by the Topoisomerase 2-Targeting Drug Etoposide

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Tammaro; Peri Barr; Brett Ricci; Hong Yan

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is ...

  14. The κB transcriptional enhancer motif and signal sequences of V(DJ recombination are targets for the zinc finger protein HIVEP3/KRC: a site selection amplification binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lai-Chu

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ZAS family is composed of proteins that regulate transcription via specific gene regulatory elements. The amino-DNA binding domain (ZAS-N and the carboxyl-DNA binding domain (ZAS-C of a representative family member, named κB DNA binding and recognition component (KRC, were expressed as fusion proteins and their target DNA sequences were elucidated by site selection amplification binding assays, followed by cloning and DNA sequencing. The fusion proteins-selected DNA sequences were analyzed by the MEME and MAST computer programs to obtain consensus motifs and DNA elements bound by the ZAS domains. Results Both fusion proteins selected sequences that were similar to the κB motif or the canonical elements of the V(DJ recombination signal sequences (RSS from a pool of degenerate oligonucleotides. Specifically, the ZAS-N domain selected sequences similar to the canonical RSS nonamer, while ZAS-C domain selected sequences similar to the canonical RSS heptamer. In addition, both KRC fusion proteins selected oligonucleoties with sequences identical to heptamer and nonamer sequences within endogenous RSS. Conclusions The RSS are cis-acting DNA motifs which are essential for V(DJ recombination of antigen receptor genes. Due to its specific binding affinity for RSS and κB-like transcription enhancer motifs, we hypothesize that KRC may be involved in the regulation of V(DJ recombination.

  15. Rational design of ligands targeting triplet repeating transcripts that cause RNA dominant disease: application to myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushechnikov, Alexei; Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; French, Jonathan M; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-07-22

    Herein, we describe the design of high affinity ligands that bind expanded rCUG and rCAG repeat RNAs expressed in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. These ligands also inhibit, with nanomolar IC(50) values, the formation of RNA-protein complexes that are implicated in both disorders. The expanded rCUG and rCAG repeats form stable RNA hairpins with regularly repeating internal loops in the stem and have deleterious effects on cell function. The ligands that bind the repeats display a derivative of the bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33258, which was identified by searching known RNA-ligand interactions for ligands that bind the internal loop displayed in these hairpins. A series of 13 modularly assembled ligands with defined valencies and distances between ligand modules was synthesized to target multiple motifs in these RNAs simultaneously. The most avid binder, a pentamer, binds the rCUG repeat hairpin with a K(d) of 13 nM. When compared to a series of related RNAs, the pentamer binds to rCUG repeats with 4.4- to >200-fold specificity. Furthermore, the affinity of binding to rCUG repeats shows incremental gains with increasing valency, while the background binding to genomic DNA is correspondingly reduced. Then, it was determined whether the modularly assembled ligands inhibit the recognition of RNA repeats by Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein, the expanded-rCUG binding protein whose sequestration leads to splicing defects in DM1. Among several compounds with nanomolar IC(50) values, the most potent inhibitor is the pentamer, which also inhibits the formation of rCAG repeat-MBNL1 complexes. Comparison of the binding data for the designed synthetic ligands and MBNL1 to repeating RNAs shows that the synthetic ligand is 23-fold higher affinity and more specific to DM1 RNAs than MBNL1. Further studies show that the designed ligands are cell permeable to mouse myoblasts. Thus, cell permeable ligands that bind repetitive RNAs have been designed

  16. Micro-PET/CT Monitoring of Herpes Thymidine Kinase Suicide Gene Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft: The Advantage of a Cell-specific Transcriptional Targeting Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy based on tissue-restricted expression of cytotoxic gene should achieve superior therapeutic index over an unrestricted method. This study compared the therapeutic effects of a highly augmented, prostate-specific gene expression method to a strong constitutive promoter-driven approach. Molecular imaging was coupled to gene therapy to ascertain real-time therapeutic activity. The imaging reporter gene (luciferase and the cytotoxic gene (herpes simplex thymidine kinase were delivered by adenoviral vectors injected directly into human prostate tumors grafted in SCID mice. Serial bioluminescence imaging, positron emission tomography, and computed tomography revealed restriction of gene expression to the tumors when prostate-specific vector was employed. In contrast, administration of constitutive active vector resulted in strong signals in the liver. Liver serology, tissue histology, and frail condition of animals confirmed liver toxicity suffered by the constitutive active cohorts, whereas the prostate-targeted group was unaffected. The extent of tumor killing was analyzed by apoptotic staining and human prostate marker (prostate-specific antigen. Overall, the augmented prostate-specific expression system was superior to the constitutive approach in safeguarding against systemic toxicity, while achieving effective tumor killing. Integrating noninvasive imaging into cytotoxic gene therapy will provide a useful strategy to monitor gene expression and therapeutic efficacy in future clinical protocols.

  17. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  18. Differential effects of black raspberry and strawberry extracts on BaPDE-induced activation of transcription factors and their target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Stoner, Gary D; Huang, Chuanshu

    2008-04-01

    The chemopreventive properties of edible berries have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, however, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer effects are largely unknown. Our previous studies have shown that a methanol extract fraction of freeze-dried black raspberries inhibits benzoapyrene (BaP)-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells. This fraction also blocks activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) induced by benzoapyrene diol-epoxide (BaPDE) in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl 41 cells. To determine if different berry types exhibit specific mechanisms for their anti-cancer effects, we compared the effects of extract fractions from both black raspberries and strawberries on BaPDE-induced activation of various signaling pathways in Cl 41 cells. Black raspberry fractions inhibited the activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) by BaPDE as well as their upstream PI-3K/Akt-p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. In contrast, strawberry fractions inhibited NFAT activation, but did not inhibit the activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB or the PI-3K/Akt-p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Consistent with the effects on NFAT activation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induction by BaPDE was blocked by extract fractions of both black raspberries and strawberries, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, which depends on AP-1 activation, was suppressed by black raspberry fractions but not strawberry fractions. These results suggest that black raspberry and strawberry components may target different signaling pathways in exerting their anti-carcinogenic effects.

  19. Black raspberry extracts inhibit benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide-induced activator protein 1 activation and VEGF transcription by targeting the phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Song, Lun; Zhang, Dongyun; Tong, Qiangsong; Ding, Min; Bowman, Linda; Aziz, Robeena; Stoner, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that freeze-dried black raspberry extract fractions inhibit benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells and benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide [B(a)PDE]-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. The phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt pathway is critical for B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. In the present study, we determined the potential involvement of PI-3K and its downstream kinases on the inhibition of AP-1 activation by black raspberry fractions, RO-FOO3, RO-FOO4, RO-ME, and RO-DM. In addition, we investigated the effects of these fractions on the expression of the AP-1 target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Pretreatment of Cl 41 cells with fractions RO-F003 and RO-ME reduced activation of AP-1 and the expression of VEGF, but not iNOS. In contrast, fractions RO-F004 and RO-DM had no effect on AP-1 activation or the expression of either VEGF or iNOS. Consistent with inhibition of AP-1 activation, the RO-ME fraction markedly inhibited activation of PI-3K, Akt, and p70 S6 kinase (p70(S6k)). In addition, overexpression of the dominant negative PI-3K mutant delta p85 reduced the induction of VEGF by B(a)PDE. It is likely that the inhibitory effects of fractions RO-FOO3 and RO-ME on B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation and VEGF expression are mediated by inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt pathway. In view of the important roles of AP-1 and VEGF in tumor development, one mechanism for the chemopreventive activity of black raspberries may be inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt/AP-1/VEGF pathway.

  20. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... targeting specific cis-acting elements in genes, and by the significant lack of fixed tertiary structure in their extensive intrinsically disordered regions. Recent research in protein intrinsic disorder (ID) has changed our understanding of transcriptional activation domains from 'negative noodles' to ID...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  1. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  2. MicroRNAs in the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2)-regulated Gtl2-Dio3 Noncoding RNA Locus Promote Cardiomyocyte Proliferation by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amanda L; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-09-18

    Understanding cell cycle regulation in postmitotic cardiomyocytes may lead to new therapeutic approaches to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. We have demonstrated previously that microRNAs encoded by the Gtl2-Dio3 noncoding RNA locus function downstream of the MEF2A transcription factor in skeletal muscle regeneration. We have also reported expression of these miRNAs in the heart. Here we investigated the role of two Gtl2-Dio3 miRNAs, miR-410 and miR-495, in cardiac muscle. Overexpression of miR-410 and miR-495 robustly stimulated cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Interestingly, unlike our findings in skeletal muscle, these miRNAs did not modulate the activity of the WNT signaling pathway. Instead, these miRNAs targeted Cited2, a coactivator required for proper cardiac development. Consistent with miR-410 and miR-495 overexpression, siRNA knockdown of Cited2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in robust proliferation. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of Cdkn1c/p57/Kip2, a cell cycle inhibitor, and increased expression of VEGFA, a growth factor with proliferation-promoting effects. Therefore, miR-410 and miR-495 are among a growing number of miRNAs that have the ability to potently stimulate neonatal cardiomyocyte proliferation.

  3. In Vitro Transcription Assays and Their Application in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Ma, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In vitro transcription assays have been developed and widely used for many years to study the molecular mechanisms involved in transcription. This process requires multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and a series of transcription factors that act to modulate the activity of RNAP during gene expression. Sequencing gel electrophoresis of radiolabeled transcripts is used to provide detailed mechanistic information on how transcription proceeds and what parameters can affect it. In this paper we describe the protocol to study how the essential elongation factor NusA regulates transcriptional pausing, as well as a method to identify an antibacterial agent targeting transcription initiation through inhibition of RNAP holoenzyme formation. These methods can be used a as platform for the development of additional approaches to explore the mechanism of action of the transcription factors which still remain unclear, as well as new antibacterial agents targeting transcription which is an underutilized drug target in antibiotic research and development.

  4. Rfx6 is an Ngn3-dependent winged helix transcription factor required for pancreatic islet cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer, Josselin; Flasse, Lydie; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Beucher, Anthony; Orvain, Christophe; Peers, Bernard; Ravassard, Philippe; Vermot, Julien; Voz, Marianne L; Mellitzer, Georg; Gradwohl, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor neurogenin 3 (Neurog3 or Ngn3) controls islet cell fate specification in multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells in the mouse embryo. However, our knowledge of the genetic programs implemented by Ngn3, which control generic and islet subtype-specific properties, is still fragmentary. Gene expression profiling in isolated Ngn3-positive progenitor cells resulted in the identification of the uncharacterized winged helix transcription factor Rfx6. Rfx6 is initially expressed broadly in the gut endoderm, notably in Pdx1-positive cells in the developing pancreatic buds, and then becomes progressively restricted to the endocrine lineage, suggesting a dual function in both endoderm development and islet cell differentiation. Rfx6 is found in postmitotic islet progenitor cells in the embryo and is maintained in all developing and adult islet cell types. Rfx6 is dependent on Ngn3 and acts upstream of or in parallel with NeuroD, Pax4 and Arx transcription factors during islet cell differentiation. In zebrafish, the Rfx6 ortholog is similarly found in progenitors and hormone expressing cells of the islet lineage. Loss-of-function studies in zebrafish revealed that rfx6 is required for the differentiation of glucagon-, ghrelin- and somatostatin-expressing cells, which, in the absence of rfx6, are blocked at the progenitor stage. By contrast, beta cells, whose number is only slightly reduced, were no longer clustered in a compact islet. These data unveil Rfx6 as a novel regulator of islet cell development.

  5. Experimental Studies on Regulation of PAX3 on Transcriptional Activities of Target Gene MITF%PAX3对靶基因MITF转录活性调控的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 常尚揆; 冯永; 钱敏飞; 李吉平; 张淳

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨配对盒基因(pair box 3,PAX3)突变对小眼球畸形相关转录因子(microphthalmia-asso‐ciated transcription factor ,MITF)基因转录活性的影响及其在I型Waardenburg综合征(Waardenburg syndrome , WS)发病中的作用。方法野生型PAX3及其致病突变H80D和H186fsX5表达质粒瞬时转染293T细胞,应用荧光素酶活性检测系统对M IT F报告基因活性检测,观察野生/突变 PAX3蛋白对其靶基因M IT F转录活性的调控作用及二个突变蛋白对野生PAX3蛋白功能的影响;应用生物素标记的含序列attaat的DNA寡核苷酸链探针分别沉淀PAX3、H80D和H186fsX5蛋白,检测野生/突变PAX3蛋白与靶基因MITF启动子的结合力。结果尽管H80D蛋白仍残余部分功能可增加M IT F启动子转录活性,但与野生PAX3蛋白相比,二者差异有显著统计学意义(P<0.01),而 H186fsX5蛋白则完全失去调控MITF启动子转录活性作用(P<0.01);二者均未对野生PAX3蛋白功能产生显性负效应作用(P>0.05)。突变 H80D蛋白与野生 PAX3蛋白均可与MITF启动子特异DNA序列attaat结合,而突变H186fsX5蛋白则不能与之结合。结论 H80D和H186fsX5影响靶基因M IT F转录活性,使其表达下调、黑色素合成减少,以单倍体剂量不足效应致I型WS。%Objective To investigate the impact of pair box 3 (PAX3) gene mutations on transcriptional ac‐tivity of target gene microphthalmia -associated transcription factor (MITF) and the role it plays in the pathogene‐sis of Waardenburg syndrome type I .Methods The 293T cells were transient transfected with wild type (WT ) PAX3 and mutant type (M T ) H80D ,H186fsX5 plasmids .We observed and analysed the regulation effects of WT/MT PAX3 on the transcriptional activities of MITF and the influence of the two mutants on WT PAX3 function u‐sing luciferase activity assays ,detect DNA binding capacity of WT/MT PAX3 to MITF

  6. Skin expression of mammalian target of rapamycin and forkhead box transcription factor O1, and serum insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with acne vulgaris and their relationship with diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamia, N F; Abdallah, D M; Sorour, O; Mourad, B; Younan, D N

    2016-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial disorder of the pilosebaceous units. Several studies have reported that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, forkhead box transcription factor (Fox)O1 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) interactions may be the key to understanding the links between genetic and environmental factors in acne vulgaris. To evaluate the immunohistochemical detection of mTOR and FoxO1 in the skin, and the serum level of IGF-1 in patients with acne vulgaris. This study was carried out on 60 participants, including 40 patients with acne and 20 controls. A diet questionnaire was administered to the patients and controls. Serum levels of IGF-1 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and skin biopsies were taken from lesions on the backs of the patients and controls. FoxO1 and mTOR expression was detected using immunohistochemistry. A significantly higher serum IGF-1 level was found in the patients with acne than in the controls. The cytoplasmic expression of FoxO1 was found to be significantly greater in the acne group, whereas in the control subjects this expression was likely to be nuclear. Both the cytoplasmic expression and the nuclear expression of mTOR were significantly more intense in the patients with acne than in the controls. Excess consumption of a high-glycaemic-load diet was significantly associated with higher serum levels of IGF-1 and cytoplasmic expression of FoxO1 and mTOR. These results suggest that FoxO1, mTOR, serum IGF-1 and a high-glycaemic-load diet may play a role in acne pathogenesis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  7. Transcriptional targeting of sphingosine-1- phosphate receptor S1P2 by epigallocatechin- 3-gallate prevents sphingosine-1-phosphate- mediated signaling in macrophage-differentiated HL-60 promyelomonocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokor R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rima Chokor, Sylvie Lamy, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de recherche BIOMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, CanadaBackground: Macrophage chemotaxis followed by blood–brain barrier transendothelial migration is believed to be associated with inflammation in the central nervous system. Antineuroinflammatory strategies have identified the dietary-derived epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG as an efficient agent to prevent neuroinflammation-associated neurodegenerative diseases by targeting proinflammatory mediator signaling.Methods: Given that high levels of sphingosine kinase and its product, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, are present in brain tumors, we used quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunoblotting to test whether EGCG may impact on S1P receptor gene expression and prevent S1P response in undifferentiated and in terminally differentiated macrophages.Results: Promyelomonocytic human leukemia (HL-60 cells were differentiated into macrophages, and S1P triggered phosphorylation in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK intracellular signaling, as shown by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with EGCG prior to differentiation inhibited the response to S1P in all three pathways, while EGCG abrogated P38 MAPK phosphorylation when present only during differentiation. Terminally-differentiated macrophages were, however, insensitive to EGCG treatment. Using qRT-PCR, gene expression of the S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, and S1P5 was predominantly induced in terminally-differentiated macrophages, while the S1P2 was decreased by EGCG treatment.Conclusion: Our data suggest that diet-derived EGCG achieves efficient effects as a preventive agent, targeting signaling pathways prior to cell terminal differentiation. Such properties could impact on cell chemotaxis

  8. Transcriptional Regulation by CHIP/LDB Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes “on” or “off” depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required

  9. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  10. miR-191 May Regulate Pig Preadipocyte Differentiation by Targeting The Transcription Factor C/EBPβ%miR-191通过调控C/EBPβ转录影响猪前体脂肪细胞分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘帅; 宁小敏; 李美航; 仇杨; 李艳杰; 董培越; 杨公社

    2013-01-01

    对实验室前期Solexa结果进行深入挖掘,结合生物信息学分析从不同发育阶段猪皮下脂肪组织差异表达的miRNAs中筛选出高丰度差异极显著的候选miR-191.采用腺病毒过表达miR-191,实时定量PCR、Western blot及双荧光素酶报告基因检测等技术方法,初步研究miR-191对猪前体脂肪细胞分化的影响.结果发现,miR-191随着猪前体脂肪细胞的分化表达量逐渐增加.与对照组相比,过表达miR-191的猪前体脂肪细胞中miR-191转录本显著增加,并引起CCAAT增强子结合蛋白β(C/EBPβ)、PPARγ和aP2的mRNA水平降低,抑制了猪前体脂肪细胞分化.同时,Western blot结果显示,与对照组相比过表达miR-191的猪前体脂肪细胞在48 h C/EBPβ蛋白水平下降了55%.更重要的是,通过TargetScan等算法正向筛选以及MicroInspector反向筛选联合获得miR-191候选靶基因,经双荧光素酶报告基因检测结果证实,miR-191可直接作用于C/EBPβ 3'UTR,从而降低萤火虫荧光素酶活性.综上所述,miR-191可能通过抑制脂肪细胞分化早期标志基因C/EBPβ的表达,从而抑制了猪前体脂肪细胞的分化.%Based on our previous solexa sequencing data, combining with bioinformatics analysis of microRNA expression changes in porcine adipose tissue from different growth phases in a model of obesity, we found the expression level of miR-191 was significantly different in developing swine adipose tissue. In this research, we successfully overexpressed miR-191's transcripts by recombinant adenovirus in primary cultured porcine preadipocytes, and then investigated the impact on differentiation of pig preadipocyte by Real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot. The results showed that miR-191's expression level gradually increased during differentiation. The miR-191 transcripts increased dramatically when miR-191 overexpressed compared to the control group, which caused the decrease of C/EBPp, PPARy and aP2's mRNA level and the

  11. 基于ObjectARX的宗海界址图快速自动化绘制技术%Fast-Automatic Technology for Drawing Parcel Sea Boundary Map Base on ObjectARX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玉超; 曾纪胜

    2014-01-01

    宗海图精确记载宗海位置、界址点、界址线及与相邻宗海关系,是申明海域使用权属的重要依据,宗海图包括宗海位置图和宗海界址图。目前,大部分宗海界址图都是通过AutoCAD结合ArcGIS等多个软件绘制,绘制步骤比较繁琐。该文提出了基于ObjectARX的宗海界址图快速自动化绘制技术,基于该技术开发出的宗海界址图快速成图系统可以减少宗海界址图的绘制步骤,实现了在单一AutoCAD环境下宗海界址图的快速自动化绘制。%Parcel sea map record parcels the sea location,sea boundary points,sea boundary line and the relationship with the adjacentsea accurately, which is the important basis for stating the sea using right.Parcel sea map includes the parcel sea location map and parcel sea boundary map.Currently,the parcel sea boundary map is drawed by AutoCAD combine with ArcGIS and other softwares,but there are complicated steps by mixed using these softwares .This paper proposed the Fast-automatic technology for drawing parcel sea boundary map base on ObjectARX, the parcel sea boundary map fast mapping system which developed by the above-mentioned technology reduced the steps of drawing parcel sea boundary map, and realized the Fast-automatic parcel sea boundary map drawing use only AutoCAD.

  12. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  13. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  14. iTAK: A program for genome-wide prediction and classification of plant transcription factors, transcriptional regulators and protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the expression of target genes by binding to specific elements in their regulatory regions. Transcriptional regulators (TRs) also regulate the expression of target genes; however, they operate indirectly via interaction with the basal transcript...

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan Babu, M; Teichmann, Sarah A; Aravind, L

    2006-04-28

    The structure of complex transcriptional regulatory networks has been studied extensively in certain model organisms. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these networks across organisms, which would reveal important principles of adaptive regulatory changes, are poorly understood. We use the known transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli to analyse the conservation patterns of this network across 175 prokaryotic genomes, and predict components of the regulatory networks for these organisms. We observe that transcription factors are typically less conserved than their target genes and evolve independently of them, with different organisms evolving distinct repertoires of transcription factors responding to specific signals. We show that prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks have evolved principally through widespread tinkering of transcriptional interactions at the local level by embedding orthologous genes in different types of regulatory motifs. Different transcription factors have emerged independently as dominant regulatory hubs in various organisms, suggesting that they have convergently acquired similar network structures approximating a scale-free topology. We note that organisms with similar lifestyles across a wide phylogenetic range tend to conserve equivalent interactions and network motifs. Thus, organism-specific optimal network designs appear to have evolved due to selection for specific transcription factors and transcriptional interactions, allowing responses to prevalent environmental stimuli. The methods for biological network analysis introduced here can be applied generally to study other networks, and these predictions can be used to guide specific experiments.

  16. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  17. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted t