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Sample records for artiodactyla

  1. Relationships of Cetacea (Artiodactyla among mammals: increased taxon sampling alters interpretations of key fossils and character evolution.

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    Michelle Spaulding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integration of diverse data (molecules, fossils provides the most robust test of the phylogeny of cetaceans. Positioning key fossils is critical for reconstructing the character change from life on land to life in the water. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reexamine relationships of critical extinct taxa that impact our understanding of the origin of Cetacea. We do this in the context of the largest total evidence analysis of morphological and molecular information for Artiodactyla (661 phenotypic characters and 46,587 molecular characters, coded for 33 extant and 48 extinct taxa. We score morphological data for Carnivoramorpha, Creodonta, Lipotyphla, and the raoellid artiodactylan Indohyus and concentrate on determining which fossils are positioned along stem lineages to major artiodactylan crown clades. Shortest trees place Cetacea within Artiodactyla and close to Indohyus, with Mesonychia outside of Artiodactyla. The relationships of Mesonychia and Indohyus are highly unstable, however--in trees only two steps longer than minimum length, Mesonychia falls inside Artiodactyla and displaces Indohyus from a position close to Cetacea. Trees based only on data that fossilize continue to show the classic arrangement of relationships within Artiodactyla with Cetacea grouping outside the clade, a signal incongruent with the molecular data that dominate the total evidence result. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Integration of new fossil material of Indohyus impacts placement of another extinct clade Mesonychia, pushing it much farther down the tree. The phylogenetic position of Indohyus suggests that the cetacean stem lineage included herbivorous and carnivorous aquatic species. We also conclude that extinct members of Cetancodonta (whales+hippopotamids shared a derived ability to hear underwater sounds, even though several cetancodontans lack a pachyostotic auditory bulla. We revise the taxonomy of living and extinct artiodactylans and

  2. Fauna characteristics and ecological distribution of Carnivora and Artiodactyla in Niubeiliang National Nature Reserve,China

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    ZENG Zhigao; SONG Yanling; MA Yingtai; WANG Xifeng; WU Xuntao; XIE Zhenfeng; SHAO Jianbin; LI Chunning

    2007-01-01

    Niubeiliang National Nature Reserve (NNR,108°45'-109°04'E,33°47'-33°56'N)is located on the eastern range of the Qinling Mountains in Shannxi Province,China and spans the southern and northern slopes of Mt.Qiuling.A transect survey and investigation were carried out in NNR to determine the fauna characteristics and ecological distribution of carnivora and artiodactyla from May 2003 to August 2004.The NNR has 18 mammals (carnivore and artiodactyl),two of which belong to the first class and seven to the second class of state key protected wildlife in China.The results of this study indicated that ungulates were abundant in the NNR,as all ungulates that were distributed within bit.Qiuling could be found within the reserve.However,only45.5%of the carnivores distributed within Mt.Qinling were detected within the NNR.Among the mammals,there were 12 oriental species (66.7%),1 palearctic specie (5.5%)and 5 widely-distributed species (27.8%).The NNR is a crossing area of palearctic species and oriental species on the zoogeographical regions,and it is a transitional area from the oriental realm to the palearctic realm.The results of the analysis on the ecological distribution of carnivore and artiodactyl in the area showed that their elevation ranges had large differences.The species whose elevation ranges above 1300 m,about 1000 m,and in 450-700 m occupied one third respectively.The results also indicated that species richness for the mammals in the NNR peaked at a middle elevation (rising at first,then descending with the increase in elevation).Not only on the southern slope,but also on the northern slope of Mt.Qinling,the number of species distributed in the area at 1800-2200 m a.s.l.was the largest (more than 80%),while the number of species distributed in the area above 2 600 m a.s.l.was the smallest (about 50%).Elevation gradients of species richness for the mammals in the NNR also embodied the mammal distributions among the vegetation types.The number of species

  3. Estudio paleopatológico de una hemimandíbula de Tethytragus (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) del Mioceno Medio de Somosaguas (Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid)

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    Sala Burgos, Nohemi; Cuevas González, Jaime; López Martínez, Nieves

    2007-01-01

    En este artículo se estudia el origen paleopatológico de una cavidad situada en el talónido del primer molar inferior en una hemimandíbula de Tethytragus (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) hallada en el yacimiento paleontológico del Mioceno Medio (Aragoniense) de Somosaguas Norte (Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid). El molar afectado muestra un desgaste anómalo con una fuerte reducción de la altura del talónido y una gran cavidad, que conecta la superficie oclusal con la cámara pulpar, bordeada de dentina ...

  4. Estudio paleopatológico de una hemimandíbula de Tethytragus (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) del Mioceno Medio de Somosaguas (Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid)

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    Sala-Burgos, N.; Cuevas-González, Jaime; López Martínez, Nieves

    2007-01-01

    [ES] En este artículo se estudia el origen paleopatológico de una cavidad situada en el talónido del primer molar inferior en una hemimandíbula de Tethytragus (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) hallada en el yacimiento paleontológico del Mioceno Medio (Aragoniense) de Somosaguas Norte (Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid). El molar afectado muestra un desgaste anómalo con una fuerte reducción de la altura del talónido y una gran cavidad, que conecta la superficie oclusal con la cámara pulpar, bordeada ...

  5. Haemonchus longistipes Railliet & Henry, 1909 (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae) from the Egyptian dromedary, Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae), first identification on the basis of light and ultrastructural data.

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    Morsy, Kareem; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Fol, Mona; Yehia, Salma

    2014-12-01

    Haemonchus longistipes is a gastrointestinal abomasal nematode which is one of the most prevalent and pathogenic parasites infesting the stomach of ruminants. On the basis of light and ultrastructural data, the objective of the present study was to introduce a first identification of the cameline haemonchosis caused by H. longistipes. Abomasa of 42 Egyptian camels Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae) were collected monthly from September 2013 to April 2014 from the main slaughter house of Cairo, Egypt. Adult male and female nematode worms were recovered from 26 (62%) specimens of the examined abomasa. The parasites were of yellow color; the body was filiform (slender) tapered towards the anterior end in male and towards both ends in female. Buccal capsules absent, the buccal cavity was small with a conspicuous dorsal lancet extended from dorsal wall. The cervical papillae were prominent and spine-like. The body length of the female worm was 16.6-20.5 (18.5 ± 0.3) mm. The anterior end to the cervical papillae was 3.19-4.30 (4.12 ± 0.5) mm. The vulva of the female had a linguiform process or flap, the tail is without a spine, and the anal pore at the posterior end of the body had a simple dorsal rim. The body of male was 10.4-14.7 (13.9 ± 2.0) mm in length. The male bursa had elongated lobes supported by long, slender rays. The small dorsal lobe was asymmetrical with Y-shaped dorsal rays. The spicules were long with a length of 0.52-0.54 (0.53 ± 0.05) mm, each provided with a small barb and pore near its extremity. Synlophe was bilaterally and dorsoventrally symmetrical; it extended from cephalic expansion over anterior 50% of prebursal or prevulvar body and consisted of a maximum of 42 ridges. The described species herein was compared with the three morphologically similar species Haemonchus mitchelli, Haemonchus okapiae, and H. longistipes with their synlophes consist of 42 ridges distributed over the anterior half of the body. These

  6. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Orders Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

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    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 612 specimens bearing names of 604 species-group taxa of Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea as of May 2016. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprising 582 holotypes; 16 lectotypes, two of which are newly designated herein; 7 syntypes (15 specimens); and 1 neotype. Included are several specimens that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections and therefore are not in the database. Thirty-seven of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these orders, Arthur J. Poole and Viola S. Schantz’s 1942 “Catalog of the Type Specimens of Mammals in the United States National Museum, Including the Biological Surveys Collection” (Bulletin of the United States National Museum, 178). One of these, Lutra iowa Goldman, 1941, was transferred to the National Museum’s Paleobiology Department collection and is mentioned only briefly in this work. Orders and families are arranged systematically following D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder’s 2005 Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, third edition, volume 1; within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically, and within each currently recognized genus, species and subspecies accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon, type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record. An addendum

  7. Ovarian folliculogenesis in collared peccary, Pecari tajacu (Artiodactyla: Tayassuidae).

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    Guimarães, Diva Anelie; de Garcia, Sylvia Cristina Garcia; Ferreira, Maria Auxiliadora Pantoja; da Silva, Suleima do Socorro Bastos; de Albuquerque, Natália Inagaki; Le Pendu, Yvonnick

    2012-03-01

    The sustainability and production of collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) has been studied in the last few years; however, further information on its reproduction is necessary for breeding systems success. Understanding folliculogenesis aspects will contribute to effective reproductive biotechniques, which are useful in the preservation and production of wildlife. The aim of this study was-to evaluate the ovarian folliculogenesis in collared peccary. Ovaries from six adult females of collared peccary were obtained through ovariectomy and analyzed. These were fixed in aqueous Bouin's solution and sectioned into 7 microm slices, stained with hematoxilin-eosin and analyzed by light microscopy. The number of pre-antral and antral follicles per ovary was estimated using the Fractionator Method. The follicles, oocytes and oocyte nuclei were measured using an ocular micrometer. Results showed that the length, width, thickness, weight, and the gross anatomy of the right and left ovaries were not significantly different. However, the mean number of corpora lutea was different between the phases of the estrous cycle (pcollared peccary.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Persian Gazella, Gazella subgutturosa (Artiodactyla: Bovidae based on cytochrome b in central Iran

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    Davoud Fadakar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Persian gazelle, Gazella subgutturosa, exists throughout arid and semiarid regions of Iran and has a key role in these frail ecosystems. Habitat degradation and population decline has placed it on the list of vulnerable species in 2008. The phylogenetic relationships of three Persian gazelle populations in the central part of Iran (i.e. Ghamishlou National Park and Wildlife Refuge, Mouteh Wildlife Refuge in Isfahan province and Kalmand-Bahadoran Protected Area in Yazd province were investigated using parts and short fragments of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (425 base pairs. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree separated the populations of Yazd and Isfahan provinces, but populations within the Isfahan province shared the same clade. All populations were classified as Persian gazelle. The studied populations are facing threats because of road construction, industrial development and urbanization. Accordingly urgent conservation plans are needed to preserve their genetic diversity and prevent them from falling into extinction.

  9. Survival of European mouflon (Artiodactyla: Bovidae) in Hawai'i based on tooth cementum lines

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    Hess, S.C.; Stephens, R.M.; Thompson, T.L.; Danner, R.M.; Kawakami, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable techniques for estimating age of ungulates are necessary to determine population parameters such as age structure and survival. Techniques that rely on dentition, horn, and facial patterns have limited utility for European mouflon sheep (Ovis gmelini musimon), but tooth cementum lines may offer a useful alternative. Cementum lines may not be reliable outside temperate regions, however, because lack of seasonality in diet may affect annulus formation. We evaluated the utility of tooth cementum lines for estimating age of mouflon in Hawai'i in comparison to dentition. Cementum lines were present in mouflon from Mauna Loa, island of Hawai'i, but were less distinct than in North American sheep. The two age-estimation methods provided similar estimates for individuals aged ???3 yr by dentition (the maximum age estimable by dentition), with exact matches in 51% (18/35) of individuals, and an average difference of 0.8 yr (range 04). Estimates of age from cementum lines were higher than those from dentition in 40% (14/35) and lower in 9% (3/35) of individuals. Discrepancies in age estimates between techniques and between paired tooth samples estimated by cementum lines were related to certainty categories assigned by the clarity of cementum lines, reinforcing the importance of collecting a sufficient number of samples to compensate for samples of lower quality, which in our experience, comprised approximately 22% of teeth. Cementum lines appear to provide relatively accurate age estimates for mouflon in Hawai'i, allow estimating age beyond 3 yr, and they offer more precise estimates than tooth eruption patterns. After constructing an age distribution, we estimated annual survival with a log-linear model to be 0.596 (95% CI 0.5540.642) for this heavily controlled population. ?? 2011 by University of Hawai'i Press.

  10. Divergent evolution in the cytoplasmic domains of PRLR and GHR genes in Artiodactyla

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    Li Meng-Hua

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin receptor (PRLR and growth hormone receptor (GHR belong to the large superfamily of class 1 cytokine receptors. Both of them have been identified as candidate genes affecting key quantitative traits, like growth and reproduction in livestock. We have previously studied the molecular anatomy of the cytoplasmic domain of GHR in different cattle breeds and artiodactyl species. In this study we have analysed the corresponding cytoplasmic signalling region of PRLR. Results We sequenced PRLR gene exon 10, coding for the major part of the cytoplasmic domain, from cattle, American bison, European bison, yak, sheep, pig and wild boar individuals. We found different patterns of variation in the two receptors within and between ruminants and pigs. Pigs and bison species have no variation within GHR exon 10, but show high haplotype diversity for the PRLR exon 10. In cattle, PRLR shows lower diversity than GHR. The Bovinae PRLR haplotype network fits better the known phylogenetic relationships between the species than that of the GHR, where differences within cattle breeds are larger than between the different species in the subfamily. By comparison with the wild boar haplotypes, a high number of subsequent nonsynonymous substitutions seem to have accumulated in the pig PRLR exon 10 after domestication. Conclusion Both genes affect a multitude of traits that have been targets of selection after domestication. The genes seem to have responded differently to different selection pressures imposed by human artificial selection. The results suggest possible effects of selective sweeps in GHR before domestication in the pig lineage or species divergence in the Bison lineage. The PRLR results may be explained by strong directional selection in pigs or functional switching.

  11. Test-day milk yield as a selection criterion for dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis Artiodactyla, Bovidae

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    Humberto Tonhati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the great demand for buffalo milk by-products the interest in technical-scientific information about this species is increasing. Our objective was to propose selection criteria for milk yield in buffaloes based on total milk yield, 305-day milk yield (M305, and test-day milk yield. A total of 3,888 lactations from 1,630 Murrah (Bubalus bubalis cows recorded between 1987 and 2001, from 10 herds in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were analyzed. Covariance components were obtained using the restricted maximum likelihood method applied to a bivariate animal model. Additive genetic and permanent environmental effects were considered as random, and contemporary group and lactation order as fixed effects. The heritability estimates were 0.22 for total milk yield and 0.19 for M305. For test-day yields, the heritability estimates ranged from 0.12 to 0.30, with the highest values being observed up to the third test month, followed by a decline until the end of lactation. The present results show that test-day milk yield, mainly during the first six months of lactation, could be adopted as a selection criterion to increase total milk yield.

  12. Test-day milk yield as a selection criterion for dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis Artiodactyla, Bovidae)

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    Humberto Tonhati; Mário Fernando Cerón-Muñoz; João Ademir de Oliveira; Lenira El Faro; André Luís Ferreira Lima; Lucia Galvão de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    Due to the great demand for buffalo milk by-products the interest in technical-scientific information about this species is increasing. Our objective was to propose selection criteria for milk yield in buffaloes based on total milk yield, 305-day milk yield (M305), and test-day milk yield. A total of 3,888 lactations from 1,630 Murrah (Bubalus bubalis) cows recorded between 1987 and 2001, from 10 herds in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were analyzed. Covariance components were obtained using...

  13. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos ( Lama guanicoe) (Artiodactyla, Camelidae)

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    María Zubillaga; Oscar Skewes; Nicolás Soto; Jorge E Rabinovich

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco ( Lama guanicoe), a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012) of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ) was estimated for each year as the matri...

  14. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos ( Lama guanicoe) (Artiodactyla, Camelidae)

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    Zubillaga, María; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás; Rabinovich, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco ( Lama guanicoe), a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012) of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ) was estimated for each year as the matrix highest positive eigenvalue. We applied a regression analysis with finite population growth rate (λ) as dependent variable, and total guanaco population, sheep population, annual mean precipitation, and winter mean temperature as independent variables, with and without time lags. The effect of guanaco population size was statistically significant, but the effects of the sheep population and the climatic variables on guanaco population growth rate were not statistically significant. PMID:25187878

  15. Cellular scaling rules for the brain of Artiodactyla include a highly folded cortex with few neurons

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    Rodrigo eSiqueira Kazu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of the cellular composition of rodent, primate, insectivore and afrotherian brains has shown that nonneuronal scaling rules are similar across these mammalian orders that diverged about 95 million years ago, and therefore appear to be conserved in evolution, while neuronal scaling rules appear to be free to vary in a clade-specific manner. Here we analyze the cellular scaling rules that apply to the brain of artiodactyls, a group within the order Cetartiodactyla, believed to be a relatively recent radiation from the common Eutherian ancestor. We find that artiodactyls share nonneuronal scaling rules with all groups analyzed previously. Artiodactyls share with afrotherians and rodents, but not with primates, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The neuronal scaling rules that apply to the remaining brain areas are however distinct in artiodactyls. Importantly, we show that the folding index of the cerebral cortex scales with the number of neurons in the cerebral cortex in distinct fashions across artiodactyls, afrotherians, rodents, and primates, such that the artiodactyl cerebral cortex is more convoluted than primate cortices of similar numbers of neurons. Our findings suggest that the scaling rules found to be shared across modern afrotherians, glires and artiodactyls applied to the common Eutherian ancestor, such as the relationship between the mass of the cerebral cortex as a whole and its number of neurons. In turn, the distribution of neurons along the surface of the cerebral cortex, which is related to its degree of gyrification, appears to be a clade-specific characteristic. If the neuronal scaling rules for artiodactyls extend to all cetartiodactyls, we predict that the large cerebral cortex of cetaceans will still have fewer neurons than the human cerebral cortex.

  16. Intraspecific Phylogeny of the Korean Water Deer, Hydropotes inermis argyropus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae)

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    Kim, Hye Ri; Kim, Eui Kyung; Jeon, Mi Gyung; Park, Yung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The water deer, Hydropotes inermis (Cervidae), is native to China and Korea and has two subspecies of the Chinese water deer (Hydropotes inermis inermis) and Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). To date, only the Korean water deer has been reported in South Korea. In this study, however, an intraspecific phylogeny and haplotype analysis based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I indicated that both Korean and Chinese water deer are found in South Korea. The populations of the tw...

  17. Macro y Microparásitos Descritos para la Familia Tayassuidae (Mammalia: Artiodactyla -resumen-

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    Pedro E Navas-Suárez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Los pecaríes pertenecen a la familia Tayassuidae‚ aunque por sus características morfológicas suelen ser confundidos con porcinos (Familia: Suidae; son conocidas tres especies: el pecarí del Chaco (Catagonus wagneri en peligro de extinción según la lista roja de la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza (UICN‚ distribuido en Bolivia‚ Paraguay y Argentina; pecarí de collar (Pecari tajacu de preocupación menor (UICN y distribución desde el sur de Estados Unidos hasta el norte de Argentina; y pecari de labio blanco (Tayassu pecari vulnerable (UICN con distribución desde el sur de México hasta el norte de Argentina. Debido a introducciones antrópicas de suidos domésticos en sus áreas distribución natural‚ el riesgo de transmisión de enfermedades de tipo infeccioso entre especies incrementa‚ lamentablemente el conocimiento y entendimiento de los efectos de este riesgo es limitado‚ debido al poco conocimiento en términos de distribución‚ ecología‚ enfermedades y diversidad genética en estas especies; por otro lado‚ su uso como fuente protéica para el ser humano es conocida‚ teniendo así‚ gran importancia para la salud humana (zoonosis. Mediante este estudio‚ se realizó una revisión sistemática para identificar y priorizar agentes infecciosos en pecaríes desde la perspectiva de macro y microparásitos. Los reportes evaluados (N=101 corresponden a documentos publicados clasificados en estudios serológicos (n=19‚ infecciones experimentales (n=1 y reportes de caso (n=41 (no reportado n=41. En términos generales‚ las tres especies han sido estudiadas tanto en vida libre como en cautiverio‚ aunque‚ las investigaciones se han desarrollado principalmente en pecaríes de collar; los agentes infecciosos se clasificaron así: macroparásitos (ácaros‚ garrapatas‚ helmintos‚ hongos‚ piojos y pulgas y microparásitos (bacterias‚ protozoos y virus. Fueron identificados 86 agentes infecciosos correspondientes a 47 macroparásitos y 39 microparásitos; de los cuales 37 son de carácter zoonótico‚ 50 se han reportado en animales domésticos (aves y mamíferos y 52 en animales silvestres (aves‚ mamíferos y reptiles. Los reportes evaluados proporcionan datos básicos sobre exposición‚ infección y en menor grado virulencia de algunos macro y microparásitos en pecaríes‚ pese a esto el impacto (directo e indirecto aún poco conocido; así mismo‚ por medio de esta revisión se brindan bases conceptuales para el abordaje epidemiológico de la especie (ej., estudios serológicos en poblaciones de vida libre‚ herramientas de diagnóstico para enfermedades‚ priorización de agentes para la familia‚ entre otras.

  18. Gross anatomy of the stomach of the pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

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    William Perez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The macroscopic anatomy of the stomach of the adult pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus, 1758, a cervid species considered to ingest high quantities of grass in its natural diet, was described. Fourteen deceased adult pampas deer of both sexes from a captive breeding station were used for this study. There were no differences in the absolute or relative size from the different compartments of the stomach in relation to gender. Compared to measurements in other ruminants, pampas deer appeared anatomically capable of feeding on a variety of diets as an 'intermediate feeder'.

  19. Cellular scaling rules for the brain of Artiodactyla include a highly folded cortex with few neurons

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    Rodrigo eSiqueira Kazu; Jose eMaldonado; Bruno eMota; Paul eManger; Suzana eHerculano-Houzel

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cellular composition of rodent, primate, insectivore, and afrotherian brains has shown that non-neuronal scaling rules are similar across these mammalian orders that diverged about 95 million years ago, and therefore appear to be conserved in evolution, while neuronal scaling rules appear to be free to vary in a clade-specific manner. Here we analyze the cellular scaling rules that apply to the brain of artiodactyls, a group within the order Cetartiodactyla, belie...

  20. Reconsideration of the systematics of the Early Pleistocene Cervavitus (Cervidae, Artiodactyla, Mammalia

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    Dong, W.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervavitus were usually found from the Late Miocene and Pliocene deposits in East Europe, Middle Asia and North China, but they were found recently in many Early Pleistocene localities in southern China. The latter resulted in the discussion of their systematic status between Cervavitus and Cervus. Here we show the Early Pleistocene forms from southern China are morphometrically more similar to northern China Cervavitus species, and the cladistic analysis shows that the southern China forms are closer to classic Cervavitus species than Cervus and that also proves their systematic status in Cervavitus rather than in Cervus. Cervavitus originated in Moldovan forests of East Europe in the late Vallesian (MN10 from a brachyodont and holometacarpal ancestor with two/three-tined antlers and Palaeomeryx fold and evolved into C. novorossiae. It dispersed into West Europe forests in the earliest Turolian and further west to France in the Ruscinian. It dispersed into northern China forests in the early Turolian and represented by C. shanxius. The great quantity of C. shanxius specimens with brachyodont teeth and complete lateral metacarpals implies the arid Loess Plateau of today was a humid forested region in the Late Miocene. C. shanxius migrated southwards in the Plio-Pleistocene probably due to the drying environment in northern China with uplifting of Himalayas and evolved into C. ultimus and C. fenqii, which survived in southern China until the Early Pleistocene (MNQ18.La revisión sistemática de Cervivatus sugiere que deriva del principal clado de los cérvidos posteriores a los muntiacinos, e implica que Procervulinae, Dicrocerinae y la primeras formas de Munticiacinae serían holometacarpales, como también lo es Cervivatus, originario en los bosques de Moldavia (Europa del Este durante el Vallesiense final (MN 10, a partir de un antecesor braquiodonto y holometacarpal, con astas con dos o tres candiles y pliegue paleomerícido, y que da lugar a C. novorossiae. Este se dispersó a Europa occidental durante el comienzo del Turoliense, y más al oeste a Francia durante el Rusciniense. Su dispersión en los bosques del norte de China se produjo también a comienzos del Turoliense, estando representado por C. shanxius. Existe una gran cantidad de ejemplares de C. shanxius con metápodos laterales completos, que debían ser útiles para equilibrar el cuerpo en las ramas de los árboles. Las áridas mesetas loésicas actuales fueron bosques húmedos durante el Mioceno final. C. shanxius emigró hacia el sur durante el Plio-Pleistoceno probablemente debido al ambiente más seco del norte de China, como consecuencia de la elevación de los Himalayas, dando lugar a C. ultimus y C. fenqii, que sobrevivieron en el sur de China hasta el Pleistoceno inicial (MNQ18.

  1. Topographic anatomy of the spinal cord and vertebromedullary relationships in Mazama gouazoubira Fisher, 1814 (Artiodactyla; Cervidae = Anatomia topográfica da medula espinal e relações vértebromedulares em Mazama gouazoubira Fisher, 1814 (Artiodactyla; Cervidae

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    Fabiano Campos Lima

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available To gain an understanding of the detailed anatomical aspects of Mazamagouazoubira (brocket deer, this paper describes the relationships between its spinal cord and the vertebral canal, adding information with a clinical and surgical approach. Three specimens of M. gouazoubira were prepared following the methods normally used inanatomy. The epaxial muscles and vertebral arches were removed to expose the spinal cord and the spinal nerve roots. The dimensions of the medullary segments were measured using a pachymeter with 0.05 mm precision. The spinal cord is cylindroidal, dorsoventrally flattened, with an average craniosacral length of 656.27 mm, and has two dilatations corresponding to the cervical and lumbar intumescences. The cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacrocaudal segments showed an average length of 175.07, 226.03, 123.47 and 43.63 mm, with indices of 28.02, 35.34, 19.68 and 6.93%, respectively. The medullary cone, whose average length is 46.27 mm, begins between L2 and L3 and ends between S1 and S2, with a mean index of 7.53%. The overall average distance between the nerve roots of the cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral segments was 2.23, 2.06 and 1.98 cm, respectively.Propondo conhecer os aspectos anatômicos pormenorizados de Mazama gouazoubira (veado catingueiro, o presente trabalho descreve as relações entre sua medula espinal e o canal vertebral, adicionando informações com enfoque clínico-cirúrgico. Utilizaram-se três espécimes de M. gouazoubira que foram preparados seguindo métodos usuais em anatomia. Retirou-se a musculatura epiaxial e os arcos vertebrais para a exposição da medula espinal e raízes dos nervos espinais. As dimensões dos segmentos medulares foram obtidas utilizando um paquímetro de precisão 0,05 mm. A medula espinal possui a forma cilindróide, aplanada dorsoventralmente, com comprimento crânio-sacral médio de 656,27 mm, possui duas dilatações correspondentes às intumescências cervical e lombar. Os segmentos cervical, torácico, lombar e sacro-caudal apresentam 175,07; 226,03; 123,47 e 43,63 mm de comprimento médio, com índices de 28,02; 35,34; 19,68 e 6,93% respectivamente. O cone medular de comprimento médio 46,27 mm inicia-se entre L2 e L3 e termina em S1 e S2, com índice médio de 7,53%. A média geral obtida para a distância entre as raízes dos nervos dos segmentos cervical, torácico e lombossacral foi de 2,23; 2,06 e 1,98 cm, respectivamente.

  2. Características morfológicas da distribuição vascular cerebral de Sus scrofa Linnaeus (Mammalia, Artiodactyla Morphological characteristics of the cerebral vascular distribution of Sus scrofa Linnaeus (Mammalia, Artiodactyla

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    Jurandyr de A. Câmara Filho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a vascularização arterial do encéfalo do javali, Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758, Suidae, e comparar com outras espécies. Cinco machos e cinco fêmeas foram injetados com látex colorido. O suprimento arterial do encéfalo foi descrito e análises morfológicas foram feitas. Nesta espécie o circuito arterial do encéfalo é formado por ramos da artéria carótida interna, como: as artérias comunicantes caudais, o ramo rostral, as artérias cerebrais rostrais, e artérias comunicantes rostrais.The aim this study was to verify the arterial vascularization of the wild boar brain, Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758, Suidae, and compare with other species. Five male and five female were injected with colored latex. The arterial supply of the brain was described and were done morphological analyses. In this species the arterial circuit of the brain is formed by the internal carotid artery branches, such as: the caudal communicant arteries, rostral branch, rostral cerebral arteries and rostral communicant arteries.

  3. El aparato urogenital del pecarí de collar (Pecari tajacu Chordata: Artiodactyla: un estudio anatómico

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    María Vargas García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available la finalidad de incrementar la información sobre la fisiología reproductiva del pecarí de collar (Pecari tajacu se realizó una descripción anatómica del aparato urogenital (au de esta especie. Se utilizaron ocho hembras y cinco machos que fueron anestesiados y perfundidos con solución de McKormik. Se realizaron disecciones para extraer el au y se describieron sus componentes. El au del pecarí de collar es característico del mamífero pero presenta similitudes con el au del cerdo. Este trabajo es el primer reporte donde se describe un seno urogenital, las glándulas vestibulares y la musculatura estriada asociada a la vulva. Es también, el primer reporte del au masculino del pecarí de collar, encontrándose algunas características exclusivas de esta especie.

  4. Variance component estimates applying random regression models for test-day milk yield in Caracu heifers (Bos taurus Artiodactyla, Bovidae

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    Lenira El Faro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Random regression models (RRM were used to estimate covariance functions for 2,155 first-lactation milk yields of native Brazilian Caracu heifers. The models included contemporary group (defined as year-month of test and paddock fixed effects, and quadratic effect of age of cow at calving. Genetic and permanent environmental effects were fitted by a random regression model and Legendre polynomials of days in milk (DIM. Schwarz's Bayesian information criteria (BIC indicated that the best RRM assumed a six coefficient function for both random effects and a sixth order variance function for residual structure. Akaike's information criteria suggested a model with the same number of coefficients for both effects and a residual structure fitted by a step function with 15 variances. Phenotypic, additive genetic, permanent environmental and residual variances were higher at the beginning and declined during lactation. The RRM heritability estimates were 0.09 to 0.26 and generally higher at the beginning and end of lactation. Some unexpected negative genetic correlations emerged when higher order covariance functions were used. A model with four coefficients for additive genetic covariance function explains more parsimoniously the changes in genetic variation with DIM since the genetic parameter was more acceptable and BIC was close to that for a six coefficient covariance function.

  5. Case 3018. Cervus gouazoubira Fischer, 1814 (currently Mazama gouazoubira; Mammalia, Artiodactyla): proposed conservation as the correct original spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this application is to conserve the spelling of the specific name of Cervus gouazoubira Fischer, 1814 for the brown brocket deer of South America (family Cervidae). This spelling, rather than the original gouazoubira, has been in virtually universal usage for almost 50 years.

  6. [Nutritional values in the diet of white-lipped peccary Tayassu pecari (Artiodactyla: Tayassuidae) in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Marco Tulio; Altrichter, Mariana; Sáenz, Joel; Eduarte, Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    We determined the potential nutritional levels in 25 species of plants, and in earthworms, that constitute part of the diet of white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica, from January 1998 to March 1999. The highest content of fat and energy was found in seeds of the Myristicacea family. The highest content of calcium was found in vegetative parts of Dieffenbachia spp. Nutritious contents differed among plant parts (seeds, fruits, stems and leaves). Fat and energy content were larger in seeds and fruits, whereas the largest content of protein was found in fruits and leaves. Mineral content also differed among plant parts. Calcium, potassium and magnesium were higher in leaves whereas copper and zinc were higher in seeds. Differences of diet between white-lipped peccaries in Corcovado and in other tropical regions of Latin America could be partially explained by our results. We found several species with higher fat and energy content than palms, which can explain the low consumption of palm seeds in Corcovado. It is possible that the regular consumption of stems and leaves of some species is related to their high mineral content. Seasonality of reproduction in Corcovado seems to be related not only to fruit availability but also to the nutritional quality of food. PMID:18494335

  7. Relationships of Cetacea (Artiodactyla) Among Mammals: Increased Taxon Sampling Alters Interpretations of Key Fossils and Character Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Spaulding; Maureen A O'Leary; John Gatesy

    2009-01-01

    Background Integration of diverse data (molecules, fossils) provides the most robust test of the phylogeny of cetaceans. Positioning key fossils is critical for reconstructing the character change from life on land to life in the water. Methodology/Principal Findings We reexamine relationships of critical extinct taxa that impact our understanding of the origin of Cetacea. We do this in the context of the largest total evidence analysis of morphological and molecular information for Artiodact...

  8. Dieta de Odocoileus virginianus (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) en un bosque templado del norte de Oaxaca, México

    OpenAIRE

    Graciela González; Miguel Briones-Salas

    2012-01-01

    La región de la Sierra Madre de Oaxaca, ubicada al norte del estado de Oaxaca, México, es una zona de ecosistemas con alta actividad forestal; en algunas áreas sus bosques templados son conservados por iniciativas de las comunidades indígenas que ahí habitan. Dentro de estos bosques, se analizó la dieta del venado cola blanca (Odocoileus virginianus) en San Miguel Amatlán y Santa Catarina Lachatao entre junio 1998 y agosto 1999. Se utilizó el análisis microhistológico de heces fecales, la obs...

  9. Monitoring the endangered population of the antelope Kobus leche smithemani (Artiodactyla: Bovidae), in the Bangweulu Ecosystem, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamudaala, Victor M; Munyeme, Musso; Matandiko, Wigganson; Muma, John B; Munang'andu, Hetron M

    2012-12-01

    Black lechwe (Kobus leche smithemani) is a semi-aquatic medium sized antelope currently enlisted on the IUCN red list of endangered species and is only endemic to the Bangweulu basin of Zambia. Its population has significantly decreased due to floods that took place during the period 1930-1940 from over 250 000-15000 leading the Zambian government to gazette all habitats of Black lechwe into state protected areas, and to establish urgent management strategies needed to save the remaining population from extinction. Using retrospective data, our findings show that the population has increased from 15000 animals in 1954 to 55 632 in 2009. The current population is estimated at 34.77% (55 632/160 000) of the carrying capacity of the Bangweulu basin. Although the Black lechwe is one of the 42 species offered for consumptive utilization by the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), only 0.12% and 0.08% of the current stock was offered for safari and resident hunting annually for the period 2005-2009, respectively. Annual quota utilization were estimated at 67% (n=37) and 81% (n=37) for safari and resident hunting, respectively. Hence, overall income obtained from utilization of Black lechwe is very low accounting for only 2.1% of the total revenue earned from wildlife utilization. Although the current population trend is showing a unit increase of 639 animals per year, it is still far below levels ideal for the lucrative utilization. In this study, we demonstrate that adverse ecological changes on wildlife species, can lead to their vulnerability and danger of extinction, and that their recovery to full carrying capacity may demand a considerable amount of time.

  10. ANÁLISE MORFOLÓGICA DO APARELHO UNGUEAL DO VEADO-CATINGUEIRO (Mazama gouazoubira, Fischer, 1814 (Artiodactyla, Cervidae

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    Lorenna Cardoso Rezende

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The species studied in this research is known as gray brocketdeer. Two Mazama gouazoubira (Fischer, 1814 adult exemplars, donated to the Laboratory of Anatomy of Domestic and Wild Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo University, were preserved in formaldehyde (10%. There are four ungulas or hulls on each member and they protect the distal end of the limb, covering the distal phalanx. The angle of the hoof was measured and samples of the digits were processed for light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In macroscopy, the length of the dorsal wall of the hoof measured approximately 2.5 cm, the angle formed at the step was 35° for the forelimb and 33° for the hindlimb. In microscopy, we could visualize the outer stratum as a very thin layer (141.5 μm, the middle stratum, composed of keratin tubular pigment, which is the main support structure of the wall of the hull, and the inner layer containing parallel slides in a longitudinal distribution, which is important to connect the hoof wall to the dorsal and lateral surface of the distal phalanx. The data from the ungular apparatus of the deers studied may help to elucidate the growth and identification of the footprints of these animals.

  11. Taxonomic status and paleoecology of Rusingoryx atopocranion (Mammalia, Artiodactyla), an extinct Pleistocene bovid from Rusinga Island, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, J. Tyler; Choiniere, Jonah N.; Tryon, Christian A.; Peppe, Daniel J.; Fox, David L.

    2011-05-01

    Rusingoryx atopocranion is a poorly known extinct alcelaphine bovid, documented in Pleistocene deposits associated with Middle Stone Age artifacts on Rusinga Island, Kenya. Following its initial description, Rusingoryx was subsumed into Megalotragus, which includes the extinct giant wildebeests, on the basis of its cranial architecture. Renewed investigations of the Pleistocene deposits on Rusinga Island recovered a large sample of Rusingoryx specimens that provide new taxonomic and paleoecological insight. This study (1) reviews the morphological and phylogenetic evidence concerning the taxonomic status of Rusingoryx and (2) evaluates its paleoecology and dietary habits . The morphology and phylogenetic data indicate that Rusingoryx is distinct from Megalotragus; they likely shared a common ancestor in the late Pliocene. Ecomorphology and mesowear analysis point to a specialized grazing adaptation, and its association with arid-adapted ungulates suggests a preference for arid grasslands. The confirmation of Rusingoryx as a valid taxonomic entity, together with the presence of other extinct taxa (including Megalotragus) on Rusinga Island, suggests an increasingly complex pattern of ungulate biogeography and extinctions in the late Quaternary of East Africa. Rusingoryx appears to have been part of an arid-adapted faunal community that potentially persisted in East Africa until the onset of the Holocene.

  12. C-Banded Karyotype and Nucleolar Organizer Regions (NORs) of Wild Boar, Sus scrofa (Artiodactyla: Suidae) from Anatolia

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Atilla; İrfan ALBAYRAK

    2009-01-01

    The present study reports the karyotype, C-banding, and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) of 6 Sus scrofa (Linnaeus, 1758) males from Anatolia. The karyotype of S. scrofa comprised (2n) 38 chromosomes, the number of chromosomal arms (FN) was 64, and the number of autosomal arms (FNa) was 60. C-positive regions appeared to be restricted to the centromeric regions of autosomes 1, and 13-18, and the entire long arm of the Y chromosome. Some autosomes had very slight C-bands. The X chromosome ap...

  13. El aparato urogenital del pecarí de collar (Pecari tajacu Chordata: Artiodactyla): un estudio anatómico

    OpenAIRE

    María Vargas García; Erendira Quintana Sánchez; Ulises Aguilera-Reyes; Octavio Monroy-Vilchis; José Mauro Victoria Mora; Arturo Luna Blasio; Víctor M. Fajardo Guadarrama

    2015-01-01

    la finalidad de incrementar la información sobre la fisiología reproductiva del pecarí de collar (Pecari tajacu) se realizó una descripción anatómica del aparato urogenital (au) de esta especie. Se utilizaron ocho hembras y cinco machos que fueron anestesiados y perfundidos con solución de McKormik. Se realizaron disecciones para extraer el au y se describieron sus componentes. El au del pecarí de collar es característico del mamífero pero presenta similitudes con el au del cerdo. Este trabaj...

  14. Regionalización histológica de la glándula dorsal del pecarí de collar (Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae: Pecari tajacu

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    Juan Carlos González Morales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describe histológicamente la glándula dorsal de machos y hembras del pecarí de collar en tres regiones: craneal, media y caudal. Con las tinciones Hematocilinaeosina y Tricrómica de Masson observamos una clara regionalización morfológica e histológica de esta glándula y se describe por primera vez la presencia de glándulas tubuloacinares en la región craneal de la glándula dorsal del macho de pecarí, cuya función es aún desconocida.

  15. Los mamíferos fósiles del distrito de Puente de Piedra (Xenarthra, Glyptodontidae; Artiodactyla, Camelidae, Lamini, Grecia, provincia de Alajuela, Costa Rica

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    Eduardo A Pérez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el segundo registro fósil de la familia Camelidae, y primero del género Palaeolama para Costa Rica, hallado junto a placas de Glyptotherium. Esta asociación proporciona nuevos datos del Gran Intercambio Biótico Americano. El fósil del Camelidae consiste de un metapodial posterior izquierdo. Con base en estudios anteriores de hallazgos de mamíferos fósiles en localidades cercanas se le asigna una edad Irvingtoniano Temprano.

  16. Studies on the food and feeding habits of Gaur Bos taurus H. Smith (Mammalia: Artiodactyla: Bovidae) in two protected areas of Goa

    OpenAIRE

    S.D. Gad; S.K. Shyama

    2009-01-01

    Feeding habits and diet composition of gaur were studied at Bhagvan Mahaveer Wildlife Sanctuary and Mollem National Park, Goa. Altogether, 32 species of plants belonging to 17 families constitute the gaur diet. The fruits, leaves, young shoots, bark and flowers are consumed, with a preference for leaves (87%). In summer gaur also consumed the bark of cashew (Anacardium occidentale) and teak (Tectona grandis) trees. Strong association was observed between food preference and season (chi-square...

  17. Studies on the food and feeding habits of Gaur Bos taurus H. Smith (Mammalia: Artiodactyla: Bovidae in two protected areas of Goa

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    S.D. Gad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Feeding habits and diet composition of gaur were studied at Bhagvan Mahaveer Wildlife Sanctuary and Mollem National Park, Goa. Altogether, 32 species of plants belonging to 17 families constitute the gaur diet. The fruits, leaves, young shoots, bark and flowers are consumed, with a preference for leaves (87%. In summer gaur also consumed the bark of cashew (Anacardium occidentale and teak (Tectona grandis trees. Strong association was observed between food preference and season (chi-square=12.94; p=0.001. Peak feeding activity was observed early in the morning (0630 to 0830 hr and in the evening (1730 to 1845 hr. During hot hours of the day (1330 to 1530 hr, animals were found resting in the shade of large trees.

  18. Exploration of the taxonomy of some Pleistocene Cervini (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Cervidae) from Java and Sumatra (Indonesia): a geometric- and linear morphometric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwier, Ben; de Vos, John; Kovarovic, Kris

    2015-07-01

    Third molars of extant- and fossil Southeast Asian deer were metrically compared using a linear- and geometric morphometric approach and discussed in relation to known taxonomic information from the literature. Our analysis suggests the presence of medium sized deer of the genus Axis and large sized taxa of the genus Cervus s. l. in Java. Axis lydekkeri and Axis javanicus are considered valid taxa, with A. lydekkeri probably related to the subgenus Hyelaphus. The large deer, such as Cervus kendengensis, Cervus stehlini and Cervus problematicus are most likely of the subgenus Rusa, the former two closely related to extant Cervus timorensis. The Sumatran fossils are members of the subgenus Rusa, but not necessarily conspecific with extant Cervus (Rusa) unicolor.

  19. Efficacy of amitraz collars on white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) against free-living populations of Lone Star Ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collars containing the acaricide amitraz were fitted around necks of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann) confined in a 38.8 ha deer-fenced, densely vegetated plot in south Texas to determine efficacy in controlling free-living populations of lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (...

  20. A highly polymorphic insertion in the Y-chromosome amelogenin gene can be used for evolutionary biology, population genetics and sexing in Cetacea and Artiodactyla

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    Crouau-Roy Brigitte

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early radiation of the Cetartiodactyla is complex, and unambiguous molecular characters are needed to clarify the positions of hippotamuses, camels and pigs relative to the remaining taxa (Cetacea and Ruminantia. There is also a need for informative genealogic markers for Y-chromosome population genetics as well as a sexing method applicable to all species from this group. We therefore studied the sequence variation of a partial sequence of the evolutionary conserved amelogenin gene to assess its potential use in each of these fields. Results and discussion We report a large interstitial insertion in the Y amelogenin locus in most of the Cetartiodactyla lineages (cetaceans and ruminants. This sex-linked size polymorphism is the result of a 460–465 bp inserted element in intron 4 of the amelogenin gene of Ruminants and Cetaceans. Therefore, this polymorphism can easily be used in a sexing assay for these species. When taking into account this shared character in addition to nucleotide sequence, gene genealogy follows sex-chromosome divergence in Cetartiodactyla whereas it is more congruent with zoological history when ignoring these characters. This could be related to a loss of homology between chromosomal copies given the old age of the insertion. The 1 kbp Amel-Y amplified fragment is also characterized by high nucleotide diversity (64 polymorphic sites spanning over 1 kbp in seven haplotypes which is greater than for other Y-chromosome sequence markers studied so far but less than the mitochondrial control region. Conclusion The gender-dependent polymorphism we have identified is relevant not only for phylogenic inference within the Cetartiodactyla but also for Y-chromosome based population genetics and gender determination in cetaceans and ruminants. One single protocol can therefore be used for studies in population and evolutionary genetics, reproductive biotechnologies, and forensic science.

  1. 陕西府谷晚中新世蓝牛化石%LATE MIOCENE BOSELAPHINI (BOVIDAE, ARTIODACTYLA) FROM FUGU, SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆群

    2005-01-01

    尽管中国发现的中新羚(偶蹄目,牛科,蓝牛族)化石较少,但由于其重要的生物年代学意义而备受重视,被作为与欧洲Vallesian期动物群对比的重要分子.描述了新近在陕西府谷喇嘛沟发现的头骨标本.依据下颌骨形态与牙齿特征,将其归入Miotragocerus gregarius (Schlosser,1903).新发现的材料完善了该种的鉴定特征:中等大小的蓝牛类;角心强烈后倾,中等分散度,具前后两条棱,横断面呈椭圆形;雄性个体角心前的额骨部分强烈隆升,雌性个体则无明显隆起;脑颅部分成梯形,其最大宽度在角心后,最小宽度在枕骨位置上;基枕骨前后突之间没有沟槽发育;P2与P3具发育且后置的次尖;p4下后尖前后向扩展.对比研究表明,该种较Miotragocerus spectabilis原始,而后者为中国发现的蓝牛类的最后代表且于中新世末期绝灭.对比巴基斯坦以及欧洲的蓝牛,认为中国的Miotragocerus可能与欧洲的种类关系较为密切,而不同于巴基斯坦的Tragoportax.最新的研究资料表明,Miotragocerus在中国主要发现于晚中新世中晚期(Turolian期),可能在8 Ma之前从欧洲迁移至东亚,由于剧烈的气候及生态环境的改变于晚中新世末期与Urmiatheriinae等大型牛科化石一起绝灭.%Though rarely reported from china, Miotragocerus has long been considered as one of the Vallesian equivalent indicators in the comparison with European faunas. Study on new specimens of Miotragocerus gregarius improves its diagnostic characters. Comparison with European and Pakistan taxa reveals that Miotragocerus possibly migrated into Eastern Asia before 8 Ma, and evolved independently into M. Spectabilis, which went extinct at the end of Lated Miocene together with some large bovids, such as all genera of Urmiatheriinae, due to dramatically climated and ecological changes at the and of the Late Miocene.

  2. Los mamíferos fósiles del distrito de Puente de Piedra (Xenarthra, Glyptodontidae; Artiodactyla, Camelidae, Lamini), Grecia, provincia de Alajuela, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Eduardo A.

    2013-01-01

    Se presenta el segundo registro fósil de la familia Camelidae, y primero del género Palaeolama para Costa Rica, hallado junto a placas de Glyptotherium. Esta asociación proporciona nuevos datos del Gran Intercambio Biótico Americano. El fósil del Camelidae consiste de un metapodial posterior izquierdo. Con base en estudios anteriores de hallazgos de mamíferos fósiles en localidades cercanas se le asigna una edad Irvingtoniano Temprano.

  3. Estimativas de parâmetros populacionais e demográficos de Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae) em Piraí do Sul, Paraná, sul do Brasil Estimates of population and demographic parameters of Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae) in Piraí do Sul, Paraná, southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda G. Braga; Yoshiko S. Kuniyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo foi realizado em duas propriedades particulares, situadas no município de Piraí do Sul, sul do Brasil. Foram realizadas 16 fases de campo mensais, com três dias de duração, no período compreendido entre fevereiro de 2001 e maio de 2002, com o objetivo de obter informações sobre a biologia do veado-campeiro (Ozotoceros bezoarticus Linnaeus, 1758) e identificar os principais fatores de impacto sobre o mesmo. Foram computadas 1.065 observações, estimando-se 71,45 indivíduos na popula...

  4. Biometria testicular, eletroejaculação e características seminais de caititus, Tayassu tajacu Linnaeus, 1758 (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae) mantidos em cativeiro na Amazônia Oriental Testicular biometry, electroejaculation and seminal features of captive collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu Linnaeus, 1758, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae) raised in the Eastern Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Reis Kahwage; Alexandre Rossetto Garcia; Diva Anelie de Araújo Guimarães; Otávio Mitio Ohashi; Rosemar Silva Luz-Ramos; Hilma Lúcia Tavares Dias; Natália Inagaki de Albuquerque; Mário Mansour Pinheiro Bartha

    2010-01-01

    Estudos relacionados à obtenção e avaliação de sêmen de Tayassu tajacu são escassos, sendo necessárias pesquisas a respeito. Os objetivos do estudo foram avaliar a biometria testicular de caititus adultos cativos, testar a eficiência da eletroejaculação para obtenção de sêmen e avaliar suas características seminais ao longo do ano. Procedeu-se à eletroejaculação em oito animais adultos e as amostras de sêmen colhidas foram avaliadas quanto às características físicas e morfológicas. Os animais...

  5. Biometria testicular, eletroejaculação e características seminais de caititus, Tayassu tajacu Linnaeus, 1758 (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae mantidos em cativeiro na Amazônia Oriental Testicular biometry, electroejaculation and seminal features of captive collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu Linnaeus, 1758, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae raised in the Eastern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Reis Kahwage

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudos relacionados à obtenção e avaliação de sêmen de Tayassu tajacu são escassos, sendo necessárias pesquisas a respeito. Os objetivos do estudo foram avaliar a biometria testicular de caititus adultos cativos, testar a eficiência da eletroejaculação para obtenção de sêmen e avaliar suas características seminais ao longo do ano. Procedeu-se à eletroejaculação em oito animais adultos e as amostras de sêmen colhidas foram avaliadas quanto às características físicas e morfológicas. Os animais tinham testículo esquerdo com 3,8 ± 0,4 cm X 2,6 ± 0,3 cm e 2,3 ± 0,2 de consistência, e testículo direito com 3,8 ± 0,5 cm X 2,7 ± 0,3 cm e 2,3 ± 0,2 de consistência. A taxa de sucesso nas colheitas foi de 75,21%. O sêmen possuiu: volume 0,81 ± 0,86 mL, concentração 137,44 ± 153 x 106 sptz mL-1, pH 7,92 ± 0,73, motilidade 52,66 ± 28,79%, vigor 2,2 ± 0,8, integridade de membrana plasmática 55,84 ± 28,55%, defeitos maiores 22,87 ± 12,93%, defeitos menores 9,11 ± 5,88% e defeitos totais 31,52 ± 13,81%. Os animais apresentaram simetria testicular, a eletroejaculação se mostrou eficiente para a obtenção de ejaculados em caititus e as flutuações observadas na produção seminal não foram suficientes para caracterizá-los como animais de reprodução sazonal.Research development in semen collection and sperm evaluation of Tayassu tajacu are necessary. The aims of this research were to evaluate testicular biometry of captive collared peccaries, test electroejaculation for semen collection and evaluate seminal characteristics during the year. Eight animals were submitted to electroejaculation and semen samples were evaluated according their physical and morphological characteristics. Left testicles measured 3.8 ± 0.4 cm X 2.6 ± 0.3 cm and presented 2.3 ± 0.2 of consistence, while right testicles were 3.8 ± 0.5 cm X 2.7 ± 0.3 cm and presented 2.3 ± 0.2 of consistence. Success rate on semen collections achieved 75.21%. Semen presented 0.81 ± 0.86 mL (volume, 137.44 ± 153 x 106 sptz mL-1 (sperm concentration, 7.92 ± 0.73 (pH, 52.66 ± 28.79% (sperm motility, 2.2 ± 0.8 (vigour, 55.84 ± 28.55% (plasmatic membrane integrity, 22.87 ± 12.93% (primary defects, 9.11 ± 5.88% (secondary defects and 31.52 ± 13.81% (overall defects. Seminal characteristics showed no expressive variation along the year. Testicular symmetry was observed, electroejaculation was an efficient method to semen collection and slight mensal oscillations of seminal quality were not enough to characterize collared peccaries as seasonal reproductive animals.

  6. Topographic anatomy of the spinal cord and vertebromedullary relationships in Mazama gouazoubira Fisher, 1814 (Artiodactyla; Cervidae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5061 Topographic anatomy of the spinal cord and vertebromedullary relationships in Mazama gouazoubira Fisher, 1814 (Artiodactyla; Cervidae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Líria Queiroz Luz Hirano

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available To gain an understanding of the detailed anatomical aspects of Mazama gouazoubira (brocket deer, this paper describes the relationships between its spinal cord and the vertebral canal, adding information with a clinical and surgical approach. Three specimens of M. gouazoubira were prepared following the methods normally used in anatomy. The epaxial muscles and vertebral arches were removed to expose the spinal cord and the spinal nerve roots. The dimensions of the medullary segments were measured using a pachymeter with 0.05 mm precision. The spinal cord is cylindroidal, dorsoventrally flattened, with an average craniosacral length of 656.27 mm, and has two dilatations corresponding to the cervical and lumbar intumescences. The cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacrocaudal segments showed an average length of 175.07, 226.03, 123.47 and 43.63 mm, with indices of 28.02, 35.34, 19.68 and 6.93%, respectively. The medullary cone, whose average length is 46.27 mm, begins between L2 and L3 and ends between S1 and S2, with a mean index of 7.53%. The overall average distance between the nerve roots of the cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral segments was 2.23, 2.06 and 1.98 cm, respectively.To gain an understanding of the detailed anatomical aspects of Mazama gouazoubira (brocket deer, this paper describes the relationships between its spinal cord and the vertebral canal, adding information with a clinical and surgical approach. Three specimens of M. gouazoubira were prepared following the methods normally used in anatomy. The epaxial muscles and vertebral arches were removed to expose the spinal cord and the spinal nerve roots. The dimensions of the medullary segments were measured using a pachymeter with 0.05 mm precision. The spinal cord is cylindroidal, dorsoventrally flattened, with an average craniosacral length of 656.27 mm, and has two dilatations corresponding to the cervical and lumbar intumescences. The cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacrocaudal segments showed an average length of 175.07, 226.03, 123.47 and 43.63 mm, with indices of 28.02, 35.34, 19.68 and 6.93%, respectively. The medullary cone, whose average length is 46.27 mm, begins between L2 and L3 and ends between S1 and S2, with a mean index of 7.53%. The overall average distance between the nerve roots of the cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral segments was 2.23, 2.06 and 1.98 cm, respectively.

  7. Estimativas de parâmetros populacionais e demográficos de Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae em Piraí do Sul, Paraná, sul do Brasil Estimates of population and demographic parameters of Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae in Piraí do Sul, Paraná, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. Braga

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi realizado em duas propriedades particulares, situadas no município de Piraí do Sul, sul do Brasil. Foram realizadas 16 fases de campo mensais, com três dias de duração, no período compreendido entre fevereiro de 2001 e maio de 2002, com o objetivo de obter informações sobre a biologia do veado-campeiro (Ozotoceros bezoarticus Linnaeus, 1758 e identificar os principais fatores de impacto sobre o mesmo. Foram computadas 1.065 observações, estimando-se 71,45 indivíduos na população, sendo o tamanho médio dos grupos de 2,29 (DV ± 0,55, e a razão sexual de 0,83. Indivíduos isolados corresponderam a 40% das observações, sendo o maior grupo composto por 10 indivíduos. Registrou-se um pico de nascimentos entre setembro e novembro, embora esses tenham acontecido ao longo de todo o estudo. Foram registrados 34 óbitos, correspondendo a uma mortalidade de 47,6%, sendo as principais causas a predação por Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771, a caça e os atropelamentos. A população estudada encontra-se severamente ameaçada, e não sobreviverá por muito tempo a menos que políticas que garantam a sua conservação sejam adotadas. Estas políticas devem incluir o manejo adequado das áreas e o controle dos vetores de pressão.This study was conducted in two private properties in the municipality of Piraí do Sul (Paraná state, southern Brazil. Sixteen monthly visits were made each one lasting three days between February 2001 and May 2002. The study aimed at the observation of pampas deer biology (Ozotoceros bezoarticus Linnaeus, 1758, and the evaluation of main impacts to this population. We computed 1,065 observations of estimated 71.45 individuals. The average size of the groups was 2.29 (SD ± 0.55 animals, and the sexual ratio was 0.83. Isolated deer accounted for 40% of the observations, whereas the largest group comprised 10 individuals. It was recorded a peack period of births between September and November, although births were observed along all the studied period. Thirty-four deaths were recorded corresponding to a 47.6% death rate. The main causes of death were predatory actions by cougar Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771, hunting and individuals being run over by motor vehicles. The studied population is seriously endangered and it will not escape extinction unless certain policies to guarantee its conservation are adopted. These policies should include correct management of the areas and control of pressure vectors.

  8. Estudo de uma população relictual de veado-campeiro, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae no municipio da Lapa, Paraná, Brasil A relictual population study of pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus (Artiodactyla, Cervidae at Lapa, Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Góss Braga Mauro de Moura-Britto

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus, 1758 was studied between August 1996 and September 1997 at Fazenda Santa Maria (25º34' and 25º36'S, 49º46'and 49º49'W at Lapa, Paraná State. During that period we have collected information on feeding habits, group composition, time of the year for birth of youngsters and time for antlers change. The presence of the animal in the area was confirmed by the finding of vestiges and visual occurrences. Animais were observed feeding on young leaves of soya been (Glicine max, oat (Avenasaliva, ryegrass (Lolium mulliflorum and barley (Hordeum vulgare. Only one female was observed feeding on dry leaves. A stag was observed feeding on a barley ear. Group's average size was 1.5 individual. Stags/female proportion was 1: 0.96. Animais displaying velvet coated antlers were observed in June and July which is in accordance with literature about antlers change in a definite period restricted to winter. Only one youngster was observed in September 1996. It is believed that the species survive in the region despite human activities through adaptation of feeding habits with the introduction of agricultura! species. This population could disappear in a few years because of the small number of individuais and their isolation.

  9. Fossil Bovidae from the Malay Archipelago and the Punjab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1958-01-01

    CONTENTS Introduction................... 1 Order Artiodactyla Owen............... 8 Family Bovidae Gray................ 8 Subfamily Bovinae Gill................ 8 Duboisia santeng (Dubois).............. 8 Epileptobos groeneveldtii (Dubois)............ 19 Hemibos triquetricornis Rütimeyer............

  10. Characterizing adaptive morphological patterns related to habitat use and body mass in Bovidae (Mammalia: Artiodactyla)%牛科(哺乳纲:偶蹄目)动物与生境利用有关的适应形态模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manuel MENDOZA; Paul PALMQVIST

    2006-01-01

    A multivariate analysis of the postcranial skeleton of extant bovids reveals patterns of osteological features indicative of ecological adaptations for habitat use and body size. The morphological patterns that characterize the postcranial anatomy of bovid species from each habitat type were identified with stepwise canonical discriminant analysis and decision trees, a technique based on machine learning. The analyses were carried out using 43 measurements from 110 extant bovid species. The discriminant functions and decision trees obtained allow a perfect discrimination among bovids adapted to open plains, forests and mountainous areas (100 % of correct reclassifications obtained in all comparisons), using sets of variables measured in all major limb bones as well as combinations of variables derived exclusively from single limb elements. Given that the adjusted algorithms involve small sets of postcranial measurements, they can also be applied to noncomplete specimens preserved in archaeological and paleontological assemblages, thus being useful for estimating the locomotor performances of ancient taxa. These algorithms, indicative of ecological adaptations for habitat use, combined with those adjusted with craniodental measurements for estimating the dietary preferences of bovid species, have the potential for characterizing the paleoautecology of extinct taxa and may be used in paleoenvironmental reconstruction. We also analyze if multiple regression equations show higher predictive ability for estimating body mass than simple regression equations, and propose the best algorithms obtained from postcranial morphological variables measured in each single major limb bone [Acta Zoologica Sinica 52 (6): 971-987, 2006].%对广义牛科动物颅后骨骼的多元变量分析揭示了牛科生境利用和体型之间的骨学特征.利用逐步分辨分析方法和一个基于机器学习的决策树方法鉴别了每种生境中牛科动物颅后解剖结构的形态特征.从110个广义牛科动物测量了43个指标进行了这项分析.利用所有主要肢骨测量值和以单根肢骨测量为主的测量值获得的分辨函数和决策树可以完美地区分适应开阔生境、森林和山地的牛科动物(在所有分析中得到了100%正确的再分类).由于调整的函数仅涉及到很小的颅后骨骼测量集,这些函数可以应用于研究考古学和古生物学发掘物中保存的不完整标本.这些表征生境利用的生态适应函数与那些用颅齿部性状建立、用于推测牛科动物食物选择的函数结合,具有刻画已灭绝的分类类群的古个体生态学和重建古环境的潜力.我们还分析了多元回归是否较单一因子回归表现出较高的预测能力,并提出了从每一种单根主要肢骨测量的颅后形态变量得到的最好代数函数[动物学报52(6):971-987,2006].

  11. Hormiga argentina Linepithema humile Mayr, 1868 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae y su rol como posible vector de contaminación microbiana en una lechería de cabras Capra hircus Linnaeus, 1758 (Artiodactyla: Bovidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ipinza-Regla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de establecer la acción de la hormiga argentina Linepithema humile, como potencial vector mecánico de microorganismos patógenos. Desde un plantel lechero de cabras ubicado en la comuna de Lampa, Región Metropolitana, Chile, se obtuvieron 63 muestras: 21 muestras Control A aspiradas directamente sobre el papel filtro esterilizado previo al paso de las hormigas, 21 muestras de hormigas aspiradas desde papel filtro y 21 muestras posterior al paso de las hormigas (Control B. La metodología incluyó siembras en medios de cultivos nutritivos, selectivos y diferenciales. Posteriormente y según el microorganismo a seguir se continuó con algunas pruebas bioquímicas específicas correspondientes a cada caso. En el presente estudio se decidió investigar la presencia de seis agentes patógenos importantes por su frecuencia en caso de infección en humanos: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp., Pseudomona aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes y Campylobacter jejuni. En los resultados de este estudio se detectaron cuatro potenciales patógenos: S. aureus, Salmonella spp., P. aeruginosa y E. coli. Además se encontraron otros agentes microbianos: Streptococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., Escherichia vulneris, Hafnia alvei, Serratia marcencens biog.1, Ewingella americana, Providencia rettgeri, Bacillus spp., Enterobacter aglomerans, Stomatococcus spp., Morganella morganii. Las muestras Control A resultaron negativas. Las muestras de hormigas fueron positivos en 95,23%, en cambio, las muestras controles B presentaron desarrollo bacteriano en 90,47% de los casos, siendo ambos estadísticamente mayores al control A (P < 0,05. Se logró confirmar que L. humile es capaz de transportar agentes microbianos en una lechería de cabras.

  12. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos (Lama guanicoe (Artiodactyla, Camelidae [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3h1

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    María Zubillaga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco (Lama guanicoe, a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012 of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ was estimated for each year as the matrix highest positive eigenvalue. We applied a regression analysis with finite population growth rate (λ as dependent variable, and total guanaco population, sheep population, annual mean precipitation, and winter mean temperature as independent variables, with and without time lags. The effect of population size was statistically significant, but the effects of the sheep population and the climatic variables on guanaco population growth rate were not statistically significant.

  13. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos (Lama guanicoe) (Artiodactyla, Camelidae) [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3h1

    OpenAIRE

    María Zubillaga; Oscar Skewes; Nicolás Soto; Jorge E Rabinovich

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco (Lama guanicoe), a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012) of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ) was estimated for each year as the matrix...

  14. Density but not climate affects the population growth rate of guanacos (Lama guanicoe (Artiodactyla, Camelidae [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4c3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Zubillaga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effects of population density and climatic variables on the rate of population growth in the guanaco (Lama guanicoe, a wild camelid species in South America. We used a time series of 36 years (1977-2012 of population sampling in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. Individuals were grouped in three age-classes: newborns, juveniles, and adults; for each year a female population transition matrix was constructed, and the population growth rate (λ was estimated for each year as the matrix highest positive eigenvalue. We applied a regression analysis with finite population growth rate (λ as dependent variable, and total guanaco population, sheep population, annual mean precipitation, and winter mean temperature as independent variables, with and without time lags. The effect of guanaco population size was statistically significant, but the effects of the sheep population and the climatic variables on guanaco population growth rate were not statistically significant.

  15. Hormiga argentina Linepithema humile Mayr, 1868 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) y su rol como posible vector de contaminación microbiana en una lechería de cabras Capra hircus Linnaeus, 1758 (Artiodactyla: Bovidae)

    OpenAIRE

    J Ipinza-Regla; D González; Figueroa, G

    2015-01-01

    Se trata de establecer la acción de la hormiga argentina Linepithema humile, como potencial vector mecánico de microorganismos patógenos. Desde un plantel lechero de cabras ubicado en la comuna de Lampa, Región Metropolitana, Chile, se obtuvieron 63 muestras: 21 muestras Control A aspiradas directamente sobre el papel filtro esterilizado previo al paso de las hormigas, 21 muestras de hormigas aspiradas desde papel filtro y 21 muestras posterior al paso de las hormigas (Control B). La metodolo...

  16. Aplicación del análisis 3D de elementos finitos en el estudio biomecánico de la dentición de mamíferos. Análisis preliminar en Procervulus ginsburgi (Cervidae, Artiodactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of complex structures and diverse materials, restricts our knowledge of the biomechanics of teeth. In this sense, finite element analysis (FEA is a method used in engineering and biomechanical studies to estimate the performance and changes produced by regimes of stress and strain in mechanic structures or the human skeleton, as well as in soft tissues. On only rare occasions it is applied to the problem of biomechanical design in animals and even less in fossil groups. In this work, we advance the preliminary results obtained on creating a complete complex 3D finite element model of the tooth of an extinct deer in order to test its functionality and mechanical properties.La combinación de las complejas estructuras y de los diversos materiales que integran los dientes, restringe nuestro conocimiento acerca de su biomecánica. En este sentido, el análisis de elementos finitos (AEF es un método utilizado en ingeniería y en estudios biomecánicos para estimar el rendimiento y las variaciones producidas por las tensiones y las deformaciones en estructuras mecánicas o del esqueleto humano, así como en tejidos blandos. En contadas ocasiones se ha aplicado este método al problema de diseño biomecánico de animales y aún menos en grupos fósiles. En este trabajo presentamos los resultados preliminares obtenidos al generar un completo y complejo modelo en 3D de elementos finitos del molar superior de un ciervo extinto para estudiar su funcionalidad y propiedades mecánicas.

  17. Evidence for the role of white-tailed deer(Artiodactyla:Cervidae)in the epidemiology of cattle ticks and southern cattle ticks (Acari:Ixodidae)in reinfestations along the Texas/Mexico border in South Texas-A review and update

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 1907 when the fever tick eradication campaign began until 1933 the tick eradication methods of dipping cattle in an acaricide or "pasture vacation" were enormously successful in eradicating southern cattle ticks [SCT, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini)], until failures began to oc...

  18. Efficient production of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsids in insect cells following down regulation of 3C protease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porta, Claudine; Xu, Xiaodong; Loureiro, Silvia;

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a significant economically and distributed globally pathogen of Artiodactyla. Current vaccines are chemically inactivated whole virus particles that require large-scale virus growth in strict bio-containment with the associated risks of accidental release or...

  19. Genetic resources, genome mapping and evolutionary genomics of the pig (Sus scrofa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, K.; Baxter, T.; Muir, W.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Schook, L.B.

    2007-01-01

    The pig, a representative of the artiodactyla clade, is one of the first animals domesticated, and has become an important agriculture animal as one of the major human nutritional sources of animal based protein. The pig is also a valuable biomedical model organism for human health. The pig's import

  20. Antibodies to ovine herpesvirus 2 glycoprotein antibodies decrease virus infectivity and prevent malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) is the etiological agent of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF), a generally fatal lymphoproliferative disease of many species in the order Artiodactyla. Development of a vaccine is critical to prevent mortality. Because OvHV-2 has not been cultured in vi...

  1. PALEOZOOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20151109Deng Tao(Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins,Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing100044,China);Lu Xiaokang A New Species of Crown-Antlered Deer Stephanocemas(Cervidae,Artiodactyla)from the Middle

  2. The evolution of the social brain: anthropoid primates contrast with other vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Shultz, Susanne; Dunbar, R. I. M.

    2007-01-01

    The social brain hypothesis argues that large brains have arisen over evolutionary time as a response to the social and ecological conflicts inherent in group living. We test predictions arising from the hypothesis using comparative data from birds and four mammalian orders (Carnivora, Artiodactyla, Chiroptera and Primates) and show that, across all non-primate taxa, relative brain size is principally related to pairbonding, but with enduring stable relationships in primates. We argue that th...

  3. Parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Tamara; Stojanov Igor; Dimitrijević Sanda

    2011-01-01

    Wild ruminants and wild boar belong to the order Artiodactyla, the suborders Ruminantia and Nonruminantia and are classified as wild animals for big game hunting, whose breeding presents a very important branch of the hunting economy. Diseases caused by protozoa are rarely found in wild ruminants in nature. Causes of coccidiosis, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystiosis, giardiasis, babesiosis, and theileriosis have been diagnosed in deer. The most ...

  4. Notes on the Mammals Found in Kazdağı National Park and Its Environs

    OpenAIRE

    Nuri YİĞİT; DEMİRSOY, Ali; Ahmet KARATAŞ; ÖZKURT, Şakir; ÇOLAK, Ercüment

    2006-01-01

    The present study is based on species collected and observed in Kazdağı National Park and its surroundings. Field collections yielded 40 mammal species from 6 orders: Insectivora (4), Chiroptera (14), Lagomorpha (1), Rodentia (11), Carnivora (8), and Artiodactyla (2), Of the species recorded in this study, 6 were new records from north-west Anatolia: Sorex volnuchini, Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis emarginatus, Eptesicus serotinus, Hypsugo savii, and Microtus subterraneus.

  5. DNA-DNA hybridizations support ungulate ancestry of Cetacea

    OpenAIRE

    Milinkovitch, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent morphological data on Pakicetus spp. and Basilosaurus spp. fossils suggest that cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) originate from carnivorous Mesonychid land mammals (Condylarthra) and made a gradual transition from land to sea in early Eocene (Gingerich et al. 1983; 1990). On the other hand, there is convincing evidence that Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla have evolved from Condylarthra (Van Valen 1978, Carrol 1988). Therefore, the Pakicetus and Basilosaurus data suggest a clo...

  6. 中国水牛种质资源和开发利用(1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文场; 周淑荣; 包秀芳; 刘佳贺

    2010-01-01

    @@ 水牛[Bubalus bubulbs(Linné)]在脊椎动物分类学上属于哺乳纲(Mammalia)偶蹄目(Artiodactyla)牛科(Bovidae)水牛属(Bubalus),因其皮厚、汗腺不发达、热时需浸水散热,故名"水牛".英文名Water buffalo;buffalo of China.

  7. investigations concerning the FMD-outbreak in Europe in 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Mouchantat, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute febrile infectious disease characterized by the formation of vesicles and erosions on mucous membranes (squamous epithelium) of the alimentary tract and on hairless skin. In addition to the order Artiodactyla families of the order Insectivora, Rodentia, Proboscidea, Perissodactyla and Carnivora are susceptible to a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection. Most descriptions of FMD in naturally infected roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Europe a...

  8. A new filarial nematode (Onchocercidae) from warthogs (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) of the Kruger National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, J R; Pletcher, J M; De Vos, V; Boomker, J

    1985-09-01

    Fifty-five warthogs [Phacochoerus aethiopicus (Suidae: Artiodactyla)] from the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa, were examined for parasites. Adult filarial nematodes were found in lymphatic vessels adjacent to peripheral and visceral lymph nodes, and microfilariae were found in lymph nodes and circulating blood. Both the adult parasite and the microfilaria are described. Specific identification is pending confirmation and recovery of intact adult specimens and microfilariae identical to those described herein. PMID:4067247

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: okapi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available okapi Okapia johnstoni Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Okapia_john...stoni_L.png Okapia_johnstoni_NL.png Okapia_johnstoni_S.png Okapia_johnstoni_NS.png http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+john...stoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnston...i&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: pig [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pig Sus scrofa domestica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Sus_scrofa_domestic...a_L.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_NL.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_S.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_NS.pn...g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+dom...estica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: llama [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available llama Lama glama Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Lama_glama_L.png Lam...a_glama_NL.png Lama_glama_S.png Lama_glama_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lam...a+glama&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: pronghorn [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pronghorn Antilocapra americana Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Antilocapra_americ...ana_L.png Antilocapra_americana_NL.png Antilocapra_americana_S.png Antilocapra_america...na_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=L http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=NS ...

  13. A higher-level MRP supertree of placental mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bininda-Emonds Olaf RP

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The higher-level phylogeny of placental mammals has long been a phylogenetic Gordian knot, with disagreement about both the precise contents of, and relationships between, the extant orders. A recent MRP supertree that favoured 'outdated' hypotheses (notably, monophyly of both Artiodactyla and Lipotyphla has been heavily criticised for including low-quality and redundant data. We apply a stringent data selection protocol designed to minimise these problems to a much-expanded data set of morphological, molecular and combined source trees, to produce a supertree that includes every family of extant placental mammals. Results The supertree is well-resolved and supports both polyphyly of Lipotyphla and paraphyly of Artiodactyla with respect to Cetacea. The existence of four 'superorders' – Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires – is also supported. The topology is highly congruent with recent (molecular phylogenetic analyses of placental mammals, but is considerably more comprehensive, being the first phylogeny to include all 113 extant families without making a priori assumptions of suprafamilial monophyly. Subsidiary analyses reveal that the data selection protocol played a key role in the major changes relative to a previously published higher-level supertree of placentals. Conclusion The supertree should provide a useful framework for hypothesis testing in phylogenetic comparative biology, and supports the idea that biogeography has played a crucial role in the evolution of placental mammals. Our results demonstrate the importance of minimising poor and redundant data when constructing supertrees.

  14. Fetal and early post-natal mineralization of the tympanic bulla in fin whales may reveal a Hitherto undiscovered evolutionary trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Cozzi

    Full Text Available The evolution of the cetacean skeleton followed a path that differentiated this group from other terrestrial mammals about 50 million years ago [1], and debate is still going on about the relationships between Cetacea and Artiodactyla [2], [3], [4]. Some skeletal traits of the basilosaurids (the more advanced forms of Archaeocetes, such as the expansion of the peribullary air sinuses, dental modification and vertebral size uniformity [5] are maintained and further emphasized also in contemporary odontocetes and mysticetes. Using Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry here we report that the deposition of bone mineral in fetal and newborn specimens of the fin whale Balaenoptera physalus is remarkably higher in the bulla tympanica than in the adjacent basal skull or in the rest of the skeleton. Ossification of the tympanic bulla in fetal Artiodactyla (bovine, hippopotamus is minimal, becomes sensible after birth and then progresses during growth, contrarily to the precocious mineralization that we observed in fin whales. Given the importance of the ear bones for the precise identification of phylogenetic relationship in therian evolution [6], this feature may indicate a specific evolutionary trait of fin whales and possibly other cetacean species or families. Early mineralization of the tympanic bulla allows immediate sound conduction in the aquatic medium and consequently holds potential importance for mother-calf relationship and postnatal survival.

  15. Species identification key of Korean mammal hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunok; Choi, Tae-Young; Woo, Donggul; Min, Mi-Sook; Sugita, Shoei; Lee, Hang

    2014-05-01

    The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology.

  16. Fetal and early post-natal mineralization of the tympanic bulla in fin whales may reveal a Hitherto undiscovered evolutionary trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Bruno; Podestà, Michela; Mazzariol, Sandro; Zotti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the cetacean skeleton followed a path that differentiated this group from other terrestrial mammals about 50 million years ago [1], and debate is still going on about the relationships between Cetacea and Artiodactyla [2], [3], [4]. Some skeletal traits of the basilosaurids (the more advanced forms of Archaeocetes), such as the expansion of the peribullary air sinuses, dental modification and vertebral size uniformity [5] are maintained and further emphasized also in contemporary odontocetes and mysticetes. Using Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry here we report that the deposition of bone mineral in fetal and newborn specimens of the fin whale Balaenoptera physalus is remarkably higher in the bulla tympanica than in the adjacent basal skull or in the rest of the skeleton. Ossification of the tympanic bulla in fetal Artiodactyla (bovine, hippopotamus) is minimal, becomes sensible after birth and then progresses during growth, contrarily to the precocious mineralization that we observed in fin whales. Given the importance of the ear bones for the precise identification of phylogenetic relationship in therian evolution [6], this feature may indicate a specific evolutionary trait of fin whales and possibly other cetacean species or families. Early mineralization of the tympanic bulla allows immediate sound conduction in the aquatic medium and consequently holds potential importance for mother-calf relationship and postnatal survival.

  17. Placentation in dolphins from the Amazon River Basin: the Boto, Inia geoffrensis, and the Tucuxi, Sotalia fluviatilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonatelli Marina

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent reassessment of the phylogenetic affinities of cetaceans makes it timely to compare their placentation with that of the artiodactyls. We studied the placentae of two sympatric species of dolphin from the Amazon River Basin, representing two distinct families. The umbilical cord branched to supply a bilobed allantoic sac. Small blood vessels and smooth muscle bundles were found within the stroma of the cord. Foci of squamous metaplasia occurred in the allanto-amnion and allantochorion. The interhemal membrane of the placenta was of the epitheliochorial type. Two different types of trophoblastic epithelium were seen. Most was of the simple columnar type and indented by fetal capillaries. However, there were also areolar regions with tall columnar trophoblast and these were more sparsely supplied with capillaries. The endometrium was well vascularised and richly supplied with actively secreting glands. These findings are consistent with the current view that Cetacea are nested within Artiodactyla as sister group to the hippopotamids.

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic aspects of collared peccary and white-lipped peccary placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, T.C.; Dantzer, Vibeke; Jones, C.J.P.;

    2006-01-01

    This study examines middle and late gestational placentae from 13 Tayassu tajacu (collared peccary) and 3 Tayassu pecari (white-lipped peccary), which are Artiodactyla belonging to the Family Tayassuidae. The chorionic sac of Tayassu species is diffuse and chorioallantoic. These epitheliochorial...... placentae show no trophoblast invasion into the uterine epithelium and there is interdigitation between fetal and maternal microvilli. Two distinct regions of the fetomaternal interface can be identified: the interareolar and the areolar regions. The uterine epithelium has eosinophilic cytoplasm...... vacuoles and cisternae. The placenta can therefore be classified as non-deciduate. The ultrastructural aspects of this study reveal features that have not previously been described and extend our knowledge of functions relating to materno-fetal transport in these species....

  19. Vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters), alpha-tocopherol and lipid levels in plasma of captive wild mammals and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, F J; Uehlein-Harrell, S; von Hegel, G; Wiesner, H

    1991-02-01

    Vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters), vitamin E and lipids were determined in a wide variety of wild mammals and birds held in captivity. In mammals plasma levels of vitamin A were generally below 500 ng/ml and those of vitamin E were highly variable (0.1-2 micrograms/ml). In primates, vitamin E levels were 3 to 8 micrograms/ml. Whereas in Marsupialia, Chiroptera, primates, Rodentia, Proboscidea, Sirenia, Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla only retinol was found, retinyl esters (basically retinol palmitate/oleate) represented 10 to 50% of the total plasma vitamin A in some birds of the order Ciconiiformes and Falconiformes. Retinol levels in birds were higher compared to mammals (500-2,000 ng/ml). The same was true for lipids as well as for vitamin E levels (1-26 micrograms/ml) in the plasma of birds. PMID:1905864

  20. A soluble class I molecule analogous to mouse Q10 in the horse and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, A M; Valas, R B; Maloy, W L; Coligan, J E

    1986-01-01

    Horse serum is shown to contain a soluble class I molecule analogous to the secreted Q10 molecule in the mouse. This molecule has several similarities to the recently described mouse Q10 molecule: it is smaller than membrane-bound equine class I molecules; it occurs in a high molecular mass complex of 200-300 kd in serum; and the serum levels of the equine molecule are similar to that of the Q10 molecule (about 30 micrograms/ml). A soluble molecule is also detected in the sera of species related to the horse; it has in fact been found in all the wild members of the order Perissodactyla so far tested. However, it was not detected in the serum of members of the orders Carnivora, Sirenia, Proboscidea, Artiodactyla, and Primates that were tested, nor in the serum of members of the order Rodentia other than in that of the genus Mus. PMID:3519445

  1. Evolutionary affinities of the order Perissodactyla and the phylogenetic status of the superordinal taxa Ungulata and Altungulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, D; Gouy, M; Duret, L

    1997-04-01

    Contrary to morphological claims, molecular data indicate that the order Perissodactyla (e.g., horses, rhinoceroses, and tapirs) is neither part of the superordinal taxon Paenungulata (Sirenia, Proboscidea, and Hyracoidea) nor an immediate outgroup of the paenungulates. Rather, Perissodactyla is closer to Carnivora and Cetartiodactyla (Cetacea+Artiodactyla) than it is to the paenungulates. Therefore, two morphologically defined superordinal taxa, Altungulata (Proboscidea, Sirenia, Hyracoidea, and Perissodactyla) and Ungulata (Altungulata and Cetartiodactyla), are invalidated. Perissodactyla, Carnivora, and Cetartiodactyla are shown to constitute a rather tight trichotomy. However, a molecular analysis of 36 protein sequences with a total concatenated length of 7885 aligned amino acids indicates that Perissodactyla is closer to Cetartiodactyla than either taxa is to Carnivora. The relationships among Paenungulata, Primates, and the clade consisting of Perissodactyla, Carnivora, and Cetartiodactylaa could not be resolved on the basis of the available data. PMID:9126561

  2. Pestiviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst

    2014-02-01

    Pestiviruses cause economically important diseases among domestic ruminants and pigs, but they may also infect a wide spectrum of wild species of even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla). Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and Border disease virus of sheep infect their hosts either transiently or persistently. Cellular and humoral immunotolerance to the infecting strain is a unique feature of persistent infection (PI) by ruminant pestiviruses. Persistence, caused by transplacental infection early in fetal development, depends on virally encoded interferon antagonists that inactivate the host's innate immune response to the virus without globally interfering with its function against other viruses. At epidemiological equilibrium, approximately 1-2% of animals are PI. Successful BVDV control programs show that removal of PI animals results in viral extinction in the host population. The nucleotide sequences of ruminant pestiviruses change little during persistent infection. Nevertheless, they display large heterogeneity, pointing to a long history of virus-host coevolution in which avirulent strains are more successful. PMID:25384138

  3. Report on Mammalian Fossils of Chinji Formation, Dhulian, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Khan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty mammalian fossil specimens of varying preservational state are described from the Chinji Formation of Dhulian, Pakistan. The remains described in this study are all teeth and represent the Proboscidea, Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. All the dental specimens are new variants recorded here for the first time. Pliotriplopus dhulianensis is new to science having small size and absence of crista than Pliotriplopus chinjiensis. These findings extend the geographic distribution of this dentally highly derived Triplopinae, which was previously restricted to a single species, Pliotriplopus chinjiensis. Additional fossils of the three mammalian orders are necessary to shed new light on the phylogenetic relationships within the first representatives of the orders in Eurasia. A very important, deciduous tooth of the species Stegolophodon cautleyi hitherto unknown is described in this report.

  4. A Checklist of the Mammals of small Italian islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Angelici

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present knowledge on mammals of small Italian islands consists mainly of episodic records. In this paper we collect all available information about the distribution of wild mammals on 47 small Italian islands. A total of 37-38 species was found, including: 1 Erinaceomorpha, 4 Soricomorpha, 16-17 Chiroptera, 3 Lagomorpha, 7 Rodentia, 2 Carnivora and 4 Artiodactyla. The subspecific level has been identified whenever possible. The mammal fauna of the Isle of Elba (Tuscan Archipelago is the richest, with 24 species, while the most common species are Rattus rattus present on 47 islands Oryctolagus cuniculus (34, and Mus musculus (33. With the exception of Crocidura sicula, the current mammal fauna on small Italian islands originated from introductions.
    Riassunto Checklist dei mammiferi delle piccole isole italiane Lo stato attuale delle conoscenze sui mammiferi delle piccole isole del territorio italiano è frutto, perlopiù, di segnalazioni episodiche. Abbiamo raccolto le informazioni disponibili riguardo i mammiferi selvatici. Sono state prese in esame 47 isole, sulle quali è stata segnalata la presenza di un totale di 37-38 specie così ripartite: 1 Erinaceomorpha, 4 Soricomorpha, 16-17 Chiroptera, 3 Lagomorpha, 7 Rodentia, 2 Carnivora e 4 Artiodactyla. Quando possibile è stato identificato anche il livello subspecifico. In base ai dati finora disponibili, la teriofauna dell’Isola d’Elba (Arcipelago Toscano risulta quella più diversificata (24 specie, mentre le specie più diffuse sono Rattus rattus, presente su 47 isole, Oryctolagus cuniculus (34 e Mus musculus (33. Con l’eccezione di Crocidura sicula, i popolamenti attuali di mammiferi selvatici nelle piccole isole italiane sono originati da introduzioni operate dall’uomo.

  5. CACERÍA DE SUBSISTENCIA DE MAMÍFEROS EN EL SECTOR ORIENTAL DE LA RESERVA DE BIÓSFERA EL TUPARRO – VICHADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica del Pilar Martínez Salas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENLa cacería de subsistencia ha sido una actividad de vital importancia para las comunidades indígenas como fuente de proteína y venta. Se caracterizó la cacería de subsistencia realizada por comunidades de las etnias Piaroa y Curripaco presentes en la Reserva de Biosfera el Tuparro, por medio de registros de caza durante nueve meses de estudio. Se encontró que no hay diferencias significativas en cuanto a especies y número de individuos cazados entre las dos etnias, siendo Artiodactyla y Rodentia los órdenes con mayor aporte respecto al número de individuos, biomasa y riqueza de especies, lo cual fue similar a otros estudios realizados en el Neotrópico. Los Piaroa cazan más frecuentemente cuando los estudiantes llegan de la ciudad al resguardo, mientras que los Curripaco lo hacen para las reuniones evangélicas. El arte de caza más usado por las comunidades de las dos etnias fue la escopeta. Las etnias estudiadas tienen sus zonas de caza en la Reserva de Biósfera El Tuparro, y en ellas, los Curripaco están aprovechando directamente los recursos de su zona núcleo del Parque Nacional Natural El Tuparro.ABSTRACTSubsistence hunting has been an activity of vital importance to indigenous communities as a source of protein and sale. We characterized subsistence hunting by Curripaco and Piaroa ethnic groups present in the Tuparro Biosphere Reserve, through hunting records over nine months of study. We found no significant differences in species and number of individuals hunted by the two ethnic groups. The orders Rodentia and Artiodactyla contributed the most in terms of number of individuals, biomass and species richness, which was similar to studies to the Neotropics. The Piaroa hunt more frequently when students return to the community lands from the city, while the Curripaco do so for religious gatherings. The hunting method used most often by both ethnic groups was the shotgun. The hunting areas used by ethnic groups are within

  6. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass)b. Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal’s characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal’s means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals’ skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can

  7. EL CARBONATO DE CALCIO Y SUS IMPLICANCIAS EN EL ANÁLISIS DE CONJUNTOS ARQUEOFAUNÍSTICOS. EL CASO LAGUNA EL DOCE (DEPARTAMENTO GENERAL LÓPEZ, PROVINCIA DE SANTA FE/The calcium carbonate and its implications for the analysis ofarchaeological faunal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Cornaglia Fernández

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Es frecuente que, bajo determinadas condiciones, se depositen concreciones de carbonato de calcio (CaCO3 sobre las superficies óseas de los huesos recuperados en sitios arqueológicos. En el presente trabajo se expone el análisis de los efectos tafonómicos de una muestra de especímenes óseos faunísticos procedentes del sitio arqueológico Laguna El Doce, sin limpiar y tras la remoción del carbonato de calcio, con el objeto de evaluar cómo influye la depositación de CaCO3 en el relevamiento de variables antrópicas y naturales, y ver en qué medida puede incrementar -o no- las observaciones de dichas variables. Para este trabajo se seleccionaron los taxones más representados en el conjunto y que registraron evidencias de haber sido ingresados antrópicamente al sitio [venado (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, ñandú (Rhea americana, guanaco (Lama guanicoe y Artiodactyla; NISP total= 1814]. Los resultados obtenidos permitieron observar un incremento significativo en la frecuencia de agentes tafonómicos naturales (i.e. acción de roedores y raíces y antrópicos, además de la observación de otras variables de interés para el análisis arqueofaunístico como la meteorización, las depositaciones de manganeso, entre otras.   Abstract   Often, under certain conditions, concretions of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 appear on the surface of bone specimens recovered from archaeological sites. In order to assess how the deposition of CaCO3 influences the identification of anthropogenic and natural variables, and to see how far this can increase –or not- the observations of these variables, this paper presents an analysis of the taphonomic effects on a faunal sample from the archaeological site Laguna El Doce after the removal of calcium carbonate. The most represented taxa in the assemblage and those which contained evidence of anthropic modifications were selected [pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, rhea (Rhea americana, guanaco (Lama guanicoe and

  8. Genetic Resources, Genome Mapping and Evolutionary Genomics of the Pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefei Chen, Tara Baxter, William M. Muir, Martien A. Groenen, Lawrence B. Schook

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The pig, a representative of the artiodactyla clade, is one of the first animals domesticated, and has become an important agriculture animal as one of the major human nutritional sources of animal based protein. The pig is also a valuable biomedical model organism for human health. The pig's importance to human health and nutrition is reflected in the decision to sequence its genome (3X. As an animal species with its wild ancestors present in the world, the pig provides a unique opportunity for tracing mammalian evolutionary history and defining signatures of selection resulting from both domestication and natural selection. Completion of the pig genome sequencing project will have significant impacts on both agriculture and human health. Following the pig whole genome sequence drafts, along with large-scale polymorphism data, it will be possible to conduct genome sweeps using association mapping, and identify signatures of selection. Here, we provide a description of the pig genome sequencing project and perspectives on utilizing genomic technologies to exploit pig genome evolution and the molecular basis for phenotypic traits for improving pig production and health.

  9. Seed predation by mammals in forest fragments in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchilla, Federico A

    2009-09-01

    Few studies have evaluated seed predation in fragmented landscapes, in which lower species diversity is expected to modifying ecological interactions. The rates of seed removal by mammals were investigated in a continuous forest and two fragmented patches of Premontane Tropical Moist Forest, in Monteverde, Costa Rica. The composition of mammalian seed-predators in each site was recorded during 16 months. The removal of four native tree species of experimental seeds: Ocotea valeriana and Ocotea whitei (Lauraceae), Panopsis costaricensis (Proteaceae) and Billia colombiana (Hippocastanaceae) in forest understories was followed during two annual fruiting seasons for each species. Results indicated similar species composition of seed-predators between continuous forest, the largest fragment (350 ha). However the smaller fragment (20 ha), had fewer seed predators. In this fragment, the specialized seed predator Heteromys desmarestianus (Rodentia) was more abundant. Unexpectedly, seed-predation in the two forest fragments and the continuous forest did not differ statistically for any of the seed species. Apparently, the higher abundance of small seed-predators in the fragments was compensated by the absence of medium and large seed-predators, like Agouti paca, Dasyprocta punctata (both Rodentia) and Pecari tajacu (Artiodactyla) recorded in continuous forest. Removal of experimentally-placed seeds was higher when the number of naturally occurring seeds in the sites was lower. This result could best be attributed to differential satiation of seed predators rather than differences in richness or abundance of seed predators.

  10. REVISED AND COMMENTED CHECKLIST OF MAMMAL SPECIES OF THE ROMANIAN FAUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Murariu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the permanent influences of different factors (habitat degradation and fragmentation, deforestation, infrastructure and urbanization, natural extension or decreasing of some species’ distribution, increasing number of alien species etc., from time to time the faunistic structure of a certain area is changing. As a result of the permanent and increasing anthropic and invasive species’ pressure, our previous checklist of recent mammals from Romania (since 1984 became out of date. A number of 108 taxa are mentioned in this checklist, representing 7 orders of mammals: Insectivora (10 species, Chiroptera (30 sp., Lagomorpha (2 sp., Rodentia (35 sp., Cetacea (3 sp., Carnivora (19 sp., Artiodactyla (8 sp.. In this list are mentioned the scientific and vernacular names (in Romanian and English languages, species distribution and conservation status, according to the Romanian regulations. Thus, only 21 species have stable populations while 76 have populations in decline or in drastic decline. Other categories are not evaluated or even present an increase in their population.

  11. Insights from stable light isotopes on enamel defects and weaning in Pliocene herbivores

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tamara A Franz-Odendaal; Julia A Lee-Thorp; Anusuya Chinsamy

    2003-12-01

    A high prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in several herbivores from the early Pliocene Langebaanweg locality, South Africa, indicates general systemic stress during the growing years of life. The presence of several linear enamel hypoplasias per tooth crown in many teeth further suggest that these stress events may be episodic. The 18O values along tooth crowns of mandibular second molars of Sivatherium hendeyi (Artiodactyla, Giraffidae) were used to investigate the cause of the stress events in this tooth type. Results show that weaning in this fossil giraffid occurred at a similar ontogenetic age to that in extant giraffes, and that the observed enamel hypoplasia towards the base of this tooth type manifested post-weaning. Further, high-resolution oxygen isotope analyses across S. hendeyi third molars suggest that the entire development of defective tooth crowns occurred under conditions of increased aridity in which the cool, rainy part of the seasonal cycle was missing. The high prevalence of this defect in many herbivores suggests that climatic conditions were not favourable. This study reiterates the value of stable isotope analyses in determining both the behaviour of fossil animals and the environmental conditions that prevailed during tooth development.

  12. c-myc gene sequences and the phylogeny of bats and other eutherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, M M; Porter, C A; Goodman, M

    2000-09-01

    The complete protein-coding sequences of the c-myc proto-oncogene were determined for five species of four new orders of eutherian (placental) mammals. These newly obtained sequences were aligned to each other and to other available orthologs for the phylogenetic estimation of eutherian interordinal relationships. Several measures of sequence difference and base composition were first calculated to assess the major evolutionary properties of the three codon positions and two protein-coding exons of the gene. On the basis of these calculations, different parsimony, distance, and maximum likelihood approaches were adopted, with the most sophisticated involving the separate, then combined, likelihood analyses of the third codon positions of exon 2 versus all other sites. These phylogenetic approaches provided clear support for the grouping of Chiroptera (bats) with Artiodactyla (ruminants, camels, and pigs) and Carnivora (cats, dogs, and their allies), an interordinal arrangement that receives strong corroboration from other lines of evidence including complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. In contrast, these analyses failed to provide strong to reasonable support for any other interordinal group. This study concludes with specific recommendations about sampling and other strategies for maximizing the phylogenetic contributions of the c-myc gene to the continued resolution of the eutherian ordinal tree. PMID:12116424

  13. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology.

  14. Larger brain size indirectly increases vulnerability to extinction in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; González-Suárez, Manuela; Vilà, Carles; Revilla, Eloy

    2016-06-01

    Although previous studies have addressed the question of why large brains evolved, we have limited understanding of potential beneficial or detrimental effects of enlarged brain size in the face of current threats. Using novel phylogenetic path analysis, we evaluated how brain size directly and indirectly, via its effects on life history and ecology, influences vulnerability to extinction across 474 mammalian species. We found that larger brains, controlling for body size, indirectly increase vulnerability to extinction by extending the gestation period, increasing weaning age, and limiting litter sizes. However, we found no evidence of direct, beneficial, or detrimental effects of brain size on vulnerability to extinction, even when we explicitly considered the different types of threats that lead to vulnerability. Order-specific analyses revealed qualitatively similar patterns for Carnivora and Artiodactyla. Interestingly, for Primates, we found that larger brain size was directly (and indirectly) associated with increased vulnerability to extinction. Our results indicate that under current conditions, the constraints on life history imposed by large brains outweigh the potential benefits, undermining the resilience of the studied mammals. Contrary to the selective forces that have favored increased brain size throughout evolutionary history, at present, larger brains have become a burden for mammals.

  15. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passler, Thomas; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Walz, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the prototypic member of the genus Pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae. Infections with BVDV cause substantial economic losses to the cattle industries, prompting various organized control programs in several countries. In North America, these control programs are focused on the identification and removal of persistently infected (PI) cattle, enhancement of BVDV-specific immunity through vaccination, and the implementation of biosecure farming practices. To be successful, control measures must be based on complete knowledge of the epidemiology of BVDV, including the recognition of other potential sources of the virus. BVDV does not possess strict host-specificity, and infections of over 50 species in the mammalian order Artiodactyla have been reported. Over 50 years ago, serologic surveys first suggested the susceptibility of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), the most abundant free-ranging ruminant in North America, to BVDV. However, susceptibility of white-tailed deer to BVDV infection does not alone imply a role in the epidemiology of the virus. To be a potential wildlife reservoir, white-tailed deer must: (1) be susceptible to BVDV, (2) shed BVDV, (3) maintain BVDV in the population, and (4) have sufficient contact with cattle that allow spillback infections. Based on the current literature, this review discusses the potential of white-tailed deer to be a reservoir for BVDV. PMID:27379074

  16. Reliable discrimination of 10 ungulate species using high resolution melting analysis of faecal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ramón-Laca

    Full Text Available Identifying species occupying an area is essential for many ecological and conservation studies. Faecal DNA is a potentially powerful method for identifying cryptic mammalian species. In New Zealand, 10 species of ungulate (Order: Artiodactyla have established wild populations and are managed as pests because of their impacts on native ecosystems. However, identifying the ungulate species present within a management area based on pellet morphology is unreliable. We present a method that enables reliable identification of 10 ungulate species (red deer, sika deer, rusa deer, fallow deer, sambar deer, white-tailed deer, Himalayan tahr, Alpine chamois, feral sheep, and feral goat from swabs of faecal pellets. A high resolution melting (HRM assay, targeting a fragment of the 12S rRNA gene, was developed. Species-specific primers were designed and combined in a multiplex PCR resulting in fragments of different length and therefore different melting behaviour for each species. The method was developed using tissue from each of the 10 species, and was validated in blind trials. Our protocol enabled species to be determined for 94% of faecal pellet swabs collected during routine monitoring by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Our HRM method enables high-throughput and cost-effective species identification from low DNA template samples, and could readily be adapted to discriminate other mammalian species from faecal DNA.

  17. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. PMID:12438776

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic aspects of collared peccary and white-lipped peccary placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T C; Dantzer, V; Jones, C J P; Oliveira, M F; Miglino, M A

    2006-01-01

    This study examines middle and late gestational placentae from 13 Tayassu tajacu (collared peccary) and 3 Tayassu pecari (white-lipped peccary), which are Artiodactyla belonging to the Family Tayassuidae. The chorionic sac of Tayassu species is diffuse and chorioallantoic. These epitheliochorial placentae show no trophoblast invasion into the uterine epithelium and there is interdigitation between fetal and maternal microvilli. Two distinct regions of the fetomaternal interface can be identified: the interareolar and the areolar regions. The uterine epithelium has eosinophilic cytoplasm with dispersed, basophilic and electron-dense granules. Trophoblast cells are irregularly cuboidal on top of the fetal ridges and columnar on troughs, where cells have cytoplasmic vesicles and large basal vacuoles, surrounded by whorls of smooth membranes. Capillaries indent the trophoblast cells forming a placental barrier 3 microm or less thick. The columnar uterine glandular epithelium has a subpopulation of granules staining with Perl's Prussian blue reaction, suggesting iron secretion. In areolar areas, the trophoblast cells show apical microvilli, a basophilic cytoplasm with electron-dense intracellular vacuoles and cisternae. The placenta can therefore be classified as non-deciduate. The ultrastructural aspects of this study reveal features that have not previously been described and extend our knowledge of functions relating to materno-fetal transport in these species.

  19. The broad spectrum of Trichinella hosts: from cold- to warm-blooded animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozio, E

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, studies on Trichinella have shown that the host range is wider than previously believed and new Trichinella species and genotypes have been described. Three classes of vertebrates are known to act as hosts, mammals, birds and reptiles, and infected vertebrates have been detected on all continents but Antarctica. Mammals represent the most important hosts and all Trichinella species are able to develop in this vertebrate class. Natural infections with Trichinella have been described in more than 150 mammalian species belonging to 12 orders (i.e., Marsupialia, Insectivora, Edentata, Chiroptera, Lagomorpha, Rodentia, Cetacea, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, Tylopoda and Primates). The epidemiology of the infection greatly varies by species relative to characteristics, such as diet, life span, distribution, behaviour, and relationships with humans. The non-encapsulated species Trichinella pseudospiralis, detected in both mammals (14 species) and birds (13 species), shows a cosmopolitan distribution with three distinguishable populations in the Palearctic, Nearctic and Australian regions. Two additional non-encapsulated species, Trichinella papuae, detected in wild pigs and saltwater crocodiles of Papua New Guinea, and Trichinella zimbabwensis, detected in farmed Nile crocodiles of Zimbabwe, can complete their life cycle in both mammals and reptiles. To the best of our knowledge, T. papuae and T. zimbabwensis are the only two parasites known to complete their entire life cycle independently of whether the host is warm-blooded or cold-blooded. This suggests that these two Trichinella species are capable of activating different physiological mechanisms, according to the specific vertebrate class hosting them. PMID:15970384

  20. Sheep persistently infected with Border disease readily transmit virus to calves seronegative to BVD virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Reichle, S F; Reichert, C; Hässig, M; Stalder, H P; Bachofen, C; Peterhans, E

    2014-01-10

    Bovine viral diarrhea- and Border disease viruses of sheep belong to the highly diverse genus pestivirus of the Flaviviridae. Ruminant pestiviruses may infect a wide range of domestic and wild cloven-hooved mammals (artiodactyla). Due to its economic importance, programs to eradicate bovine viral diarrhea are a high priority in the cattle industry. By contrast, Border disease is not a target of eradication, although the Border disease virus is known to be capable of also infecting cattle. In this work, we compared single dose experimental inoculation of calves with Border disease virus with co-mingling of calves with sheep persistently infected with this virus. As indicated by seroconversion, infection was achieved only in one out of seven calves with a dose of Border disease virus that was previously shown to be successful in calves inoculated with BVD virus. By contrast, all calves kept together with persistently infected sheep readily became infected with Border disease virus. The ease of viral transmission from sheep to cattle and the antigenic similarity of bovine and ovine pestiviruses may become a problem for demonstrating freedom of BVD by serology in the cattle population. PMID:24315041

  1. For whales and seals the ocean is not blue: a visual pigment loss in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peichl, L; Behrmann, G; Kröger, R H

    2001-04-01

    Most terrestrial mammals have colour vision based on two spectrally different visual pigments located in two types of retinal cone photoreceptors, i.e. they are cone dichromats with long-to-middle-wave-sensitive (commonly green) L-cones and short-wave-sensitive (commonly blue) S-cones. With visual pigment-specific antibodies, we here demonstrate an absence of S-cones in the retinae of all whales and seals studied. The sample includes seven species of toothed whales (Odontoceti) and five species of marine carnivores (eared and earless seals). These marine mammals have only L-cones (cone monochromacy) and hence are essentially colour-blind. For comparison, the study also includes the wolf, ferret and European river otter (Carnivora) as well as the mouflon and pygmy hippopotamus (Artiodactyla), close terrestrial relatives of the seals and whales, respectively. These have a normal complement of S-cones and L-cones. The S-cone loss in marine species from two distant mammalian orders strongly argues for convergent evolution and an adaptive advantage of that trait in the marine visual environment. To us this suggests that the S-cones may have been lost in all whales and seals. However, as the spectral composition of light in clear ocean waters is increasingly blue-shifted with depth, an S-cone loss would seem particularly disadvantageous. We discuss some hypotheses to explain this paradox.

  2. Biomechanical determinants of transverse and rotary gallop in cursorial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Carlo M; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-12-01

    Transverse and rotary gallop differ in the placement of the leading hindfeet and forefeet: ipsilateral in the former gait, contralateral in the latter. We analysed 351 filmed sequences to assess the gallop type of 89 investigated mammalian species belonging to Carnivora, Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla orders. Twenty-three biometrical, ecological and physiological parameters were collected for each species both from literature data and from animal specimens. Most of the species showed only one kind of gallop: transverse (42%) or rotary (39%), while some species performed rotary gallop only at high speed (19%). In a factorial analysis, the first principal component (PC), which accounted for 40% of the total variance, was positively correlated to the relative speed and negatively correlated to size and body mass. The second PC was correlated to the ratio between distal and proximal limb segments. Large size and longer proximal limb segments were associated with transverse gallop, while rotary and speed-dependent species showed higher metacarpus/humerus and metatarsus/femur length ratio and faster relative speeds. The resulting limb excursion angles were proportional to the square-root of the Froude number, and significantly higher in rotary gallopers. The gait pattern analysis indicated significant differences between transverse and rotary gallop in forelimb and hindlimb duty factor (t-test; Pnumber of mammalian species, and indicate that the gallop pattern depends on diverse environmental, morphometrical and biomechanical characters. PMID:22933611

  3. Preliminary study of insects associated to indoor body decay in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardany Ramos-Pastrana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary study of insects associated to indoor body decay in Colombia. This is the first report studying insects associated to indoor body decay process of a white pig (Sus scrofa (Artiodactyla, Suidae in a controlled indoor environment in an urban area of Florencia city, Amazonia Piedmont, Colombia. For a period of 54 days, 9,220 individuals (immature and adults, distributed in 3 orders, 5 families, 10 genera, and 10 species were collected using entomological nets and tweezers. Five decaying stages are described (fresh, bloated, active decay, advanced decay and remains. During the fresh stage we recorded Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819, Ophyra aenescens (Wiedemann, 1830, Oxysarcodexia sp., Lepidodexia sp. and Lasiophanes sp.; during the bloating stage C. macellaria, C. albiceps, Lucilia eximia (Wiedemann, 1819, Hemilucillia semidiaphana (Rondani, 1850, Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758, O. aenescens, Oxysarcodexia sp., Lepidodexia sp., Dermestes maculatus De Geer, 1774 and Lasiphanes sp.; during the active decay C. macellaria, C. albiceps, L. eximia, M. domestica, O. aenescens, Lepidodexia sp. D. maculatus and Lasiophanes sp.; during the advanced decay C. macellaria, C. albiceps, M. domestica, Lepidodexia sp. and Lasiophanes sp.; and during the remains stage C. albiceps, D. maculatus and Lasiophanes sp. The insects were sorted out in 3 ecological categories; necrophagous, predators and parasites and sarco-saprophagous. According to Chao and Jack estimators, total richness was observed on day 20, with 100% of the expected species.

  4. Parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild ruminants and wild boar belong to the order Artiodactyla, the suborders Ruminantia and Nonruminantia and are classified as wild animals for big game hunting, whose breeding presents a very important branch of the hunting economy. Diseases caused by protozoa are rarely found in wild ruminants in nature. Causes of coccidiosis, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystiosis, giardiasis, babesiosis, and theileriosis have been diagnosed in deer. The most significant helminthoses in wild ruminants are fasciosis, dicrocoeliasis, paramphistomosis, fascioloidosis, cysticercosis, anoplocephalidosis, coenurosis, echinococcosis, pulmonary strongyloidiasis, parasitic gastroenteritis, strongyloidiasis and trichuriasis, with certain differences in the extent of prevalence of infection with certain species. The most frequent ectoparasitoses in wild deer and doe are diseases caused by ticks, mites, scabies mites, and hypoderma. The most represented endoparasitoses in wild boar throughout the world are coccidiosis, balantidiasis, metastrongyloidiasis, verminous gastritis, ascariasis, macracanthorhynchosis, trichinelosis, trichuriasis, cystecercosis, echinococcosis, and less frequently, there are also fasciolosis and dicrocoeliasis. The predominant ectoparasitoses in wild boar are ticks and scabies mites. Knowledge of the etiology and epizootiology of parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar is of extreme importance for the process of promoting the health protection system for animals and humans, in particular when taking into account the biological and ecological hazard posed by zoonotic infections.

  5. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  6. Epidemiology of leptospirosis at Sorocaba Zoo, São Paulo state, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. Ullmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is considered a worldwide distributed zoonosis, caused by the bacteria Leptospira spp. Since several species of wildlife animals are reportedly reservoirs, the aim of the present study was to know the epidemiology of leptospirosis at the Sorocaba Zoo, Southern Brazil. Serum samples of wild mammals from Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Didelphimorphia, Diprotodontia, Perissodactyla, Pilosa, Primates, Proboscidea and Rodentia orders, kept in captivity as well as from zoological staff were assayed by microscopic agglutination test (MAT. Whole blood, urine and tissue samples from wild mammals and synanthropic animals were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. An epidemiological survey was applied to evaluate the risk factors for animal infection and staff level of knowledge on leptospirosis. A total of 13/229 (5.68%; CI95% 3.37-9.47% serum samples from wild mammals were reagent on MAT. Serology from synanthropic animals, zoo staff and molecular analysis of animal samples were all negative. Leptospirosis knowledge of zoo park staff was considered medium. In conclusion, leptospiral infection occurs at the studied zoo but due to the low occurrence found, the lowest reported in literature, wild captive mammals do not act as source of infection of leptospirosis to other animals and human beings.

  7. Terrestrial mammals in an Atlantic Forest remnant, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Borba de Miranda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The threat degree and the ecological importance of terrestrial mammals make clear the need for constantly conducting researches in order to add information to the current knowledge on this theme. This study aimed to provide a list of terrestrial mammal species in an Atlantic Forest remnant located in the Southwestern Paraná state, Brazil. Species richness and occurrence frequency were studied from April to October 2009 using two methods: direct observation and recording of traces. We registered 20 taxa distributed into 7 orders: Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Didelphimorphia, Lagomorpha, Primates, Rodentia, and Xenarthra. Among these, 4 taxa were registered either by direct observation or by recording of traces and the others were registered only through traces. The most frequently occurring species were Didelphis sp. (30.6% and Cerdocyon thous (25.6%. Out of the 20 registered taxa, Leopardus pardalis, Leopardus tigrinus, and Cuniculus paca are listed as vulnerable in the Red Book of Threatened Fauna in Parana State. Although small, the study area may assist in the availability of food and shelter for the fauna of mammals, representing an important element of the regional landscape.

  8. A phylogenetic blueprint for a modern whale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatesy, John; Geisler, Jonathan H; Chang, Joseph; Buell, Carl; Berta, Annalisa; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S; McGowen, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of Cetacea in the Paleogene represents one of the most profound macroevolutionary transitions within Mammalia. The move from a terrestrial habitat to a committed aquatic lifestyle engendered wholesale changes in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. The results of this remarkable transformation are extant whales that include the largest, biggest brained, fastest swimming, loudest, deepest diving mammals, some of which can detect prey with a sophisticated echolocation system (Odontoceti - toothed whales), and others that batch feed using racks of baleen (Mysticeti - baleen whales). A broad-scale reconstruction of the evolutionary remodeling that culminated in extant cetaceans has not yet been based on integration of genomic and paleontological information. Here, we first place Cetacea relative to extant mammalian diversity, and assess the distribution of support among molecular datasets for relationships within Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates, including Cetacea). We then merge trees derived from three large concatenations of molecular and fossil data to yield a composite hypothesis that encompasses many critical events in the evolutionary history of Cetacea. By combining diverse evidence, we infer a phylogenetic blueprint that outlines the stepwise evolutionary development of modern whales. This hypothesis represents a starting point for more detailed, comprehensive phylogenetic reconstructions in the future, and also highlights the synergistic interaction between modern (genomic) and traditional (morphological+paleontological) approaches that ultimately must be exploited to provide a rich understanding of evolutionary history across the entire tree of Life.

  9. Immunocontraception of captive exotic species: V. Prolonged antibody titers in Dall sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) and domestic goats (Capra hircus) immunized with porcine zona pellucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyda, Robin O; Frank, Kimberly M; Wallace, Roberta; Lamberski, Nadine; Kirkpatrick, Jay F

    2013-12-01

    Native porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception has been used to inhibit fertility in more than 80 species of ungulates, although the duration of contraception efficacy varies among species in both Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. This study examined anti-PZP antibody titers in Dall sheep and domestic goats at the Milwaukee County Zoo, and also Himalayan tahr and Armenian Mouflon sheep at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and, for comparison, Altai wapiti, lowland wisent, Javan banteng, and southern pudu at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, all were given a primer dose and booster dose of PZP. Of the San Diego Zoo Safari Park animals, the 4 comparison species demonstrated the typical 1-yr pattern of anti-PZP antibodies, whereas the Armenian sheep and Himalayan tahr showed prolonged (2-3 yr) antibody responses after a single primer and booster dose. The Dall sheep and domestic goats had significantly longer durations of antibody titers (3 yr) from a single year's treatment (primer plus booster). Analysis of the data indicates that Armenian sheep, Himalayan tahr, Dall sheep, and domestic goats have prolonged responses, and are more sensitive to PZP in that they produce a protracted antibody response.

  10. Larger brain size indirectly increases vulnerability to extinction in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; González-Suárez, Manuela; Vilà, Carles; Revilla, Eloy

    2016-06-01

    Although previous studies have addressed the question of why large brains evolved, we have limited understanding of potential beneficial or detrimental effects of enlarged brain size in the face of current threats. Using novel phylogenetic path analysis, we evaluated how brain size directly and indirectly, via its effects on life history and ecology, influences vulnerability to extinction across 474 mammalian species. We found that larger brains, controlling for body size, indirectly increase vulnerability to extinction by extending the gestation period, increasing weaning age, and limiting litter sizes. However, we found no evidence of direct, beneficial, or detrimental effects of brain size on vulnerability to extinction, even when we explicitly considered the different types of threats that lead to vulnerability. Order-specific analyses revealed qualitatively similar patterns for Carnivora and Artiodactyla. Interestingly, for Primates, we found that larger brain size was directly (and indirectly) associated with increased vulnerability to extinction. Our results indicate that under current conditions, the constraints on life history imposed by large brains outweigh the potential benefits, undermining the resilience of the studied mammals. Contrary to the selective forces that have favored increased brain size throughout evolutionary history, at present, larger brains have become a burden for mammals. PMID:27159368

  11. Mammalian Herbivores in the Boreal Forests: Their Numerical Fluctuations and Use by Man

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    Leonid Baskin

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the boreal zone, there are about 50 native mammalian herbivore species that belong to the orders Artiodactyla, Rodentia, and Lagomorpha. Of these species, 31 occur in the Nearctic and 24 in the Palaearctic. Only six species occur in both regions. Species of the family Cervidae have probably been, and still are, the most important group for man, as they provide both meat and hides. Pelts from squirrels, muskrats, and hares were commercially harvested at the beginning of the century, but have less value today. The semi-domestic reindeer in the Palaearctic produces meat and hides on a commercial basis. It is also used for milking, to a limited extent, as is the semi-domestic moose in Russia. The Siberian musk deer is used for its musk and is raised in captivity in China. All species heavier than 1 kg are utilized by man, those with a body mass in the range 1 kg - 1 hg are sometimes used, and species lighter than 1 hg are rarely used. Here, we review the numerical fluctuations in terms of periodicity and amplitude, based on an extensive data set found in the literature, especially from the former Soviet Union. Current understanding of the underlying factors behind the population fluctuations is briefly reviewed. Management and conservation aspects of the mammalian herbivores in the boreal zone are also discussed. We conclude that there is a challenge to manage the forests for the mammalian herbivores, but there is also a challenge to manage the populations of mammalian herbivores for the forests.

  12. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. PMID:26044348

  13. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  14. Faster speciation and reduced extinction in the tropics contribute to the Mammalian latitudinal diversity gradient.

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    Jonathan Rolland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in species richness from the poles to the tropics, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, is one of the most ubiquitous biodiversity patterns in the natural world. Although understanding how rates of speciation and extinction vary with latitude is central to explaining this pattern, such analyses have been impeded by the difficulty of estimating diversification rates associated with specific geographic locations. Here, we use a powerful phylogenetic approach and a nearly complete phylogeny of mammals to estimate speciation, extinction, and dispersal rates associated with the tropical and temperate biomes. Overall, speciation rates are higher, and extinction rates lower, in the tropics than in temperate regions. The diversity of the eight most species-rich mammalian orders (covering 92% of all mammals peaks in the tropics, except that of the Lagomorpha (hares, rabbits, and pikas reaching a maxima in northern-temperate regions. Latitudinal patterns in diversification rates are strikingly consistent with these diversity patterns, with peaks in species richness associated with low extinction rates (Primates and Lagomorpha, high speciation rates (Diprotodontia, Artiodactyla, and Soricomorpha, or both (Chiroptera and Rodentia. Rates of range expansion were typically higher from the tropics to the temperate regions than in the other direction, supporting the "out of the tropics" hypothesis whereby species originate in the tropics and disperse into higher latitudes. Overall, these results suggest that differences in diversification rates have played a major role in shaping the modern latitudinal diversity gradient in mammals, and illustrate the usefulness of recently developed phylogenetic approaches for understanding this famous yet mysterious pattern.

  15. Behavioral Traits and Airport Type Affect Mammal Incidents with U.S. Civil Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kristin B.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Martin, James A.; DeVault, Travis L.; Wang, Guiming

    2014-10-01

    Wildlife incidents with aircraft cost the United States (U.S.) civil aviation industry >US1.4 billion in estimated damages and loss of revenue from 1990 to 2009. Although terrestrial mammals represented only 2.3 % of wildlife incidents, damage to aircraft occurred in 59 % of mammal incidents. We examined mammal incidents (excluding bats) at all airports in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) National Wildlife Strike Database from 1990 to 2010 to characterize these incidents by airport type: Part-139 certified (certificated) and general aviation (GA). We also calculated relative hazard scores for species most frequently involved in incidents. We found certificated airports had more than twice as many incidents as GA airports. Incidents were most frequent in October ( n = 215 of 1,764 total) at certificated airports and November ( n = 111 of 741 total) at GA airports. Most (63.2 %) incidents at all airports ( n = 1,523) occurred at night but the greatest incident rate occurred at dusk (177.3 incidents/hr). More incidents with damage ( n = 1,594) occurred at GA airports (38.6 %) than certificated airports (19.0 %). Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates) incidents incurred greatest (92.4 %) damage costs ( n = 326; US51.8 million) overall and mule deer ( Odocoileus hemionus) was the most hazardous species. Overall, relative hazard score increased with increasing log body mass. Frequency of incidents was influenced by species relative seasonal abundance and behavior. We recommend airport wildlife officials evaluate the risks mammal species pose to aircraft based on the hazard information we provide and consider prioritizing management strategies that emphasize reducing their occurrence on airport property.

  16. The role of wild mammals in the maintenance of Rift Valley fever virus.

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    Olive, Marie-Marie; Goodman, Steven M; Reynes, Jean-Marc

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic arbovirus affecting primarily domestic ruminants and humans. Numerous vector species are known or implicated in the transmission of RVFV. The role of mammals in the maintenance of RVFV, and the existence of a wild mammal reservoir in the epidemiologic cycle of RVFV, remain largely unknown. Our objective is to present a detailed review of studies undertaken on RVFV, often associated with wild mammals, with the aim of focusing future research on potential reservoirs of the virus. Natural and experimental infections related to RVFV in several mammalian orders, including Artiodactyla, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Primata (nonhuman), Perissodactyla, Carnivora, Proboscidea, Erinaceomorpha, and Lagomorpha, are reviewed; the first four orders have received the greatest attention. The possible role of wild ruminants, especially African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), is also discussed. Conflicting results have been published concerning rodents but, based on the literature, the likely candidate species include the African genera Arvicanthis and Micaelamys and the widely introduced roof rat (Rattus rattus). Members of the orders Chiroptera and Rodentia should receive greater attention associated with new research programs. For the other orders mentioned above, few data are available. We are unaware of any investigation concerning the orders Afrosoricida and Soricomorpha, which are represented in the geographic area of RVFV and can be abundant. As a first step to resolve the question of wild mammals as a reservoir of RVFV, serologic and virologic surveys should be promoted during epizootic periods to document infected wild animals and, in the case of positive results, extended to interepidemic periods to explore the role of wild animals as possible reservoirs.

  17. The mammary gland-specific marsupial ELP and eutherian CTI share a common ancestral gene

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    Pharo Elizabeth A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marsupial early lactation protein (ELP gene is expressed in the mammary gland and the protein is secreted into milk during early lactation (Phase 2A. Mature ELP shares approximately 55.4% similarity with the colostrum-specific bovine colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI protein. Although ELP and CTI both have a single bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI-Kunitz domain and are secreted only during the early lactation phases, their evolutionary history is yet to be investigated. Results Tammar ELP was isolated from a genomic library and the fat-tailed dunnart and Southern koala ELP genes cloned from genomic DNA. The tammar ELP gene was expressed only in the mammary gland during late pregnancy (Phase 1 and early lactation (Phase 2A. The opossum and fat-tailed dunnart ELP and cow CTI transcripts were cloned from RNA isolated from the mammary gland and dog CTI from cells in colostrum. The putative mature ELP and CTI peptides shared 44.6%-62.2% similarity. In silico analyses identified the ELP and CTI genes in the other species examined and provided compelling evidence that they evolved from a common ancestral gene. In addition, whilst the eutherian CTI gene was conserved in the Laurasiatherian orders Carnivora and Cetartiodactyla, it had become a pseudogene in others. These data suggest that bovine CTI may be the ancestral gene of the Artiodactyla-specific, rapidly evolving chromosome 13 pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (PTI, spleen trypsin inhibitor (STI and the five placenta-specific trophoblast Kunitz domain protein (TKDP1-5 genes. Conclusions Marsupial ELP and eutherian CTI evolved from an ancestral therian mammal gene before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians between 130 and 160 million years ago. The retention of the ELP gene in marsupials suggests that this early lactation-specific milk protein may have an important role in the immunologically naïve young of these species.

  18. Ex vivo bioluminescence detection of alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 infection during malignant catarrhal fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewals, Benjamin; Myster, Françoise; Palmeira, Leonor; Gillet, Laurent; Ackermann, Mathias; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2011-07-01

    Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest asymptomatically, causes malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla order. Experimentally, WD-MCF can be reproduced in rabbits. WD-MCF is described as a combination of lymphoproliferation and degenerative lesions in virtually all organs and is caused by unknown mechanisms. Recently, we demonstrated that WD-MCF is associated with the proliferation of CD8(+) cells supporting a latent type of infection in lymphoid tissues. Here, we investigated the macroscopic distribution of AlHV-1 infection using ex vivo bioluminescence imaging in rabbit to determine whether it correlates with the distribution of lesions in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. To reach that goal, a recombinant AlHV-1 strain was produced by insertion of a luciferase expression cassette (luc) in an intergenic region. In vitro, the reconstituted AlHV-1 luc(+) strain replicated comparably to the parental strain, and luciferase activity was detected by bioluminescence imaging. In vivo, rabbits infected with the AlHV-1 luc(+) strain developed WD-MCF comparably to rabbits infected with the parental wild-type strain, with hyperthermia and increases of both CD8(+) T cell frequencies and viral genomic charge over time in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in lymph nodes at time of euthanasia. Bioluminescent imaging revealed that AlHV-1 infection could be detected ex vivo in lymphoid organs but also in lung, liver, and kidney during WD-MCF, demonstrating that AlHV-1 infection is prevalent in tissue lesions. Finally, we show that the infiltrating mononuclear leukocytes in nonlymphoid organs are mainly CD8(+) T cells and that latency is predominant during WD-MCF.

  19. A nationwide database linking information on the hosts with sequence data of their virus strains: A useful tool for the eradication of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Hanspeter; Hug, Corinne; Zanoni, Reto; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Peterhans, Ernst; Schweizer, Matthias; Bachofen, Claudia

    2016-06-15

    Pestiviruses infect a wide variety of animals of the order Artiodactyla, with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) being an economically important pathogen of livestock globally. BVDV is maintained in the cattle population by infecting fetuses early in gestation and, thus, by generating persistently infected (PI) animals that efficiently transmit the virus throughout their lifetime. In 2008, Switzerland started a national control campaign with the aim to eradicate BVDV from all bovines in the country by searching for and eliminating every PI cattle. Different from previous eradication programs, all animals of the entire population were tested for virus within one year, followed by testing each newborn calf in the subsequent four years. Overall, 3,855,814 animals were tested from 2008 through 2011, 20,553 of which returned an initial BVDV-positive result. We were able to obtain samples from at least 36% of all initially positive tested animals. We sequenced the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of more than 7400 pestiviral strains and compiled the sequence data in a database together with an array of information on the PI animals, among others, the location of the farm in which they were born, their dams, and the locations where the animals had lived. To our knowledge, this is the largest database combining viral sequences with animal data of an endemic viral disease. Using unique identification tags, the different datasets within the database were connected to run diverse molecular epidemiological analyses. The large sets of animal and sequence data made it possible to run analyses in both directions, i.e., starting from a likely epidemiological link, or starting from related sequences. We present the results of three epidemiological investigations in detail and a compilation of 122 individual investigations that show the usefulness of such a database in a country-wide BVD eradication program.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S; Cook, Peter F; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L; Marino, Lori

    2015-07-22

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of 'associative' regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  1. Evolution of C, D and S-type cystatins in mammals: an extensive gene duplication in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Abrantes, Joana; Pinheiro, Ana; Colaço, Bruno; Vitorino, Rui; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-01-01

    Cystatins are a family of inhibitors of cysteine peptidases that comprises the salivary cystatins (D and S-type cystatins) and cystatin C. These cystatins are encoded by a multigene family (CST3, CST5, CST4, CST1 and CST2) organized in tandem in the human genome. Their presence and functional importance in human saliva has been reported, however the distribution of these proteins in other mammals is still unclear. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis of the saliva of several mammals and studied the evolution of this multigene family. The proteomic analysis detected S-type cystatins (S, SA, and SN) in human saliva and cystatin D in rat saliva. The evolutionary analysis showed that the cystatin C encoding gene is present in species of the most representative mammalian groups, i.e. Artiodactyla, Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Primates. On the other hand, D and S-type cystatins are mainly retrieved from Primates, and especially the evolution of S-type cystatins seems to be a dynamic process as seen in Pongo abelii genome where several copies of CST1-like gene (cystatin SN) were found. In Rodents, a group of cystatins previously identified as D and S has also evolved. Despite the high divergence of the amino acid sequence, their position in the phylogenetic tree and their genome organization suggests a common origin with those of the Primates. These results suggest that the D and S type cystatins have emerged before the mammalian radiation and were retained only in Primates and Rodents. Although the mechanisms driving the evolution of cystatins are unknown, it seems to be a dynamic process with several gene duplications evolving according to the birth-and-death model of evolution. The factors that led to the appearance of a group of saliva-specific cystatins in Primates and its rapid evolution remain undetermined, but may be associated with an adaptive advantage.

  2. Historical biogeography of the strepsirhine primates of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Lying some 400 km off the coast of southeastern Africa, Madagascar is the world's largest oceanic island. It has been in roughly the same position relative to its parent continent for 120 million years, and as a consequence its mammal fauna is unusual in composition, with a low number of major taxa but a high diversity at lower taxonomic levels. Among Madagascar's native terrestrial mammals, only the orders Primates, Rodentia, Carnivora and Insectivora are represented (plus, until recently, the enigmatic and endemic Bibymalagasia, and Artiodactyla in the form of semiaquatic pygmy hippopotamuses). This reflects the fact that terrestrial mammals are notoriously poor over-water dispersers; yet at the same time the ancestors of all of Madagascar's mammals had to have crossed a wide oceanic barrier to get to the island at various points during the Tertiary. Here I examine the palaeogeographic evidence for potential land bridge or 'stepping-stone' connections with adjacent continents from the Mesozoic through the Cenozoic, and review the fossil records and phylogenies of each of Madagascar's mammalian groups in an attempt to estimate the minimum number of crossings necessary to produce the island's current faunal composition. Probable monophyletic origins for each major group, and thus a smaller rather than a larger number of crossings of the Mozambique Channel, imply that this water barrier has acted as a powerful filter; so powerful that it is unclear whether any crossings would have been possible without some form of subaerial connection, however ephemeral, at least from time to time during the Tertiary. Clarification of how Madagascar's terrestrial mammal fauna may have originated is thus as likely to emerge from the geology of the seafloor surrounding the island as it is to come from the fossil record or from the internal and external relationships of its various components.

  3. Antibodies to Neospora caninum in wild animals from Kenya, East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroglio, E; Wambwa, E; Castiello, M; Trisciuoglio, A; Prouteau, A; Pradere, E; Ndungu, S; De Meneghi, D

    2003-12-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum was examined in six wild Artiodactyla species, and in five wild Carnivora species from Kenya. Blood sera (104 wild ungulates from Marula Estates (MEs), and 31 wild carnivores from Masai-Mara reserve and from other wildlife areas in northern and Southern Kenya), were screened using a Neospora agglutination test (NAT), with a twofold dilution (1:40-1:320 titres). Presence of NAT antibodies to N. caninun is reported here for the first time in zebra (Equus burchelli), eland (Taurotragus oryx), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Thompson gazelle (Gazella thompsoni), impala (Aepyceros melampus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) and in free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus). At 1:80 dilution, prevalence was 61.5% in eland, 58.5% in zebra, 19.2% in Thompson gazelle, 33.3% in warthog, 50% in African buffalo, 30% in lion (Panthera leo), 20% in cheetah, and 33.3% in spotted hyena. Antibodies up to 1:320 titre were detected in eland (38.4%), zebra (19.5%), Thompson gazelle (3.8%) and lion (5%). Amongst herbivores, sero-prevalence was significantly (P<0.05) higher, at all dilutions, in "grazer/digger" species (e.g. eland and zebra) than in non-"grazer/digger" species (e.g. impala and Thompson gazelle). No antibodies to N. caninum were found in two leopards (Panthera pardus) and one serval (Felis serval). Our results indicates a steady presence of N. caninum in wild mammals from Kenya. The hypothesis of a sylvatic cycle of N. caninum could be suggested, but more data are needed to verify the hypothesis, as to evaluate the role of N. caninum infection on the dynamics of wild animals population in the study area. PMID:14651874

  4. A nationwide database linking information on the hosts with sequence data of their virus strains: A useful tool for the eradication of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Hanspeter; Hug, Corinne; Zanoni, Reto; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Peterhans, Ernst; Schweizer, Matthias; Bachofen, Claudia

    2016-06-15

    Pestiviruses infect a wide variety of animals of the order Artiodactyla, with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) being an economically important pathogen of livestock globally. BVDV is maintained in the cattle population by infecting fetuses early in gestation and, thus, by generating persistently infected (PI) animals that efficiently transmit the virus throughout their lifetime. In 2008, Switzerland started a national control campaign with the aim to eradicate BVDV from all bovines in the country by searching for and eliminating every PI cattle. Different from previous eradication programs, all animals of the entire population were tested for virus within one year, followed by testing each newborn calf in the subsequent four years. Overall, 3,855,814 animals were tested from 2008 through 2011, 20,553 of which returned an initial BVDV-positive result. We were able to obtain samples from at least 36% of all initially positive tested animals. We sequenced the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of more than 7400 pestiviral strains and compiled the sequence data in a database together with an array of information on the PI animals, among others, the location of the farm in which they were born, their dams, and the locations where the animals had lived. To our knowledge, this is the largest database combining viral sequences with animal data of an endemic viral disease. Using unique identification tags, the different datasets within the database were connected to run diverse molecular epidemiological analyses. The large sets of animal and sequence data made it possible to run analyses in both directions, i.e., starting from a likely epidemiological link, or starting from related sequences. We present the results of three epidemiological investigations in detail and a compilation of 122 individual investigations that show the usefulness of such a database in a country-wide BVD eradication program. PMID:26403669

  5. The Palestinian mammalian fauna acquired by the zoological gardens in the Gaza Strip

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    ABDEL FATTAH N. ABD RABOU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abd Rabou AFN. 2011. The Palestinian mammalian fauna acquired by the zoological gardens in the Gaza Strip. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 82-91. The Gaza Strip, which is an arid strip of the Palestinian land along the southeastern Mediterranean, harbors a considerable number of mammalian fauna due to its eco-geo-strategic position. Prior to 2006, the establishment of zoological gardens in the Gaza Strip was a sort of imagination due to Israeli constraints. These constraints were nurtured by the total Israeli destruction and demolition of the Rafah and Gaza private zoological gardens in 2004 and 2009 respectively, using heavy tanks and bulldozers. The establishment of many zoological gardens following the Israeli evacuation from the Gaza Strip in late 2005 encouraged wildlife trading. Hence, the current study comes to document the Palestinian mammalian faunistic species acquired by the zoological gardens in the Gaza Strip through frequent visits to Gaza zoological gardens and meetings with local people, wildlife hunters and zoo owners. A total number of 17 Palestinian mammalian faunistic species belonging to 12 families and 5 orders was encountered in the zoological gardens throughout the study period. The encountered species represent a good mix of the families and sizes of mammals generally found in other parts of Palestine. Order Carnivora represents 52.94% of the caged mammals, while the orders Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Artiodactyla and Insectivora represent 47.06%. The study documented the first sight of the Greater Egyptian Gerbil Gerbillus pyramidis in the Gaza Strip. Local hunting, tunnel trade and delivery were the lonely sources of the mammals encountered in the zoological gardens. The economic deprivation under the current Israeli blockade and the poor implementation of environmental laws and legislations concerning wildlife protection have made wildlife trading as a common practice. Finally, The author recommends to improving the management

  6. Surface Model and Tomographic Archive of Fossil Primate and Other Mammal Holotype and Paratype Specimens of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, Pretoria, South Africa.

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    Justin W Adams

    Full Text Available Nearly a century of paleontological excavation and analysis from the cave deposits of the Cradle of Humankind UNESCO World Heritage Site in northeastern South Africa underlies much of our understanding of the evolutionary history of hominins, other primates and other mammal lineages in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene of Africa. As one of few designated fossil repositories, the Plio-Pleistocene Palaeontology Section of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (DNMNH; the former Transvaal Museum curates much of the mammalian faunas recovered from the fossil-rich deposits of major South African hominin-bearing localities, including the holotype and paratype specimens of many primate, carnivore, and other mammal species (Orders Primates, Carnivora, Artiodactyla, Eulipotyphla, Hyracoidea, Lagomorpha, Perissodactyla, and Proboscidea. Here we describe an open-access digital archive of high-resolution, full-color three-dimensional (3D surface meshes of all 89 non-hominin holotype, paratype and significant mammalian specimens curated in the Plio-Pleistocene Section vault. Surface meshes were generated using a commercial surface scanner (Artec Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg, are provided in formats that can be opened in both open-source and commercial software, and can be readily downloaded either via an online data repository (MorphoSource or via direct request from the DNMNH. In addition to providing surface meshes for each specimen, we also provide tomographic data (both computerized tomography [CT] and microfocus [microCT] for a subset of these fossil specimens. This archive of the DNMNH Plio-Pleistocene collections represents the first research-quality 3D datasets of African mammal fossils to be made openly available. This simultaneously provides the paleontological community with essential baseline information (e.g., updated listing and 3D record of specimens in their current state of preservation and serves as a single resource of

  7. Signatures of positive selection in Toll-like receptor (TLR genes in mammals

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    Areal Helena

    2011-12-01

    recognized. The analyses performed in this work encompassed a large number of species covering some of the most representative mammalian groups - Artiodactyla, Rodents, Carnivores, Lagomorphs and Primates - that are affected by different families of viruses. This might explain the role of adaptive evolution in shaping viral TLR genes.

  8. First BAFF gene cloned from an aquatic mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fengtao; Ren, Wenhua; Gu, Shasha; Wang, Wenqian; Zhou, Lidan; Zhang, Yijun; Gan, Weifeng; Chen, Mingxing

    2012-08-01

    The finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) is one of the smallest cetacean species. Research into the immune system of the finless porpoise is essential to the protection of this species, but, to date, no genes coding for proteins from the tumor necrosis factor family (TNF family) have yet been reported from finless porpoises. The TNF B cell activating factor (BAFF) is critical to B cell survival, proliferation, maturation, and immunoglobulin secretion and to T cell activation. It acts through its three receptors, BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of BAFF (designated NpBAFF) from the finless porpoise was cloned using RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques, and its biological activities have been characterized. To our knowledge, this is the first report of any BAFF gene being cloned from an aquatic mammal. The full-length cDNA of NpBAFF consists of 1502 bases including an 852 bp open reading frame encoding 283 amino acids. This protein was found to contain a predicted transmembrane domain, a putative furin protease cleavage site, and a typical TNF homology domain corresponding to other, known BAFF homologues. Sequence comparison indicated that the amino acid sequence of NpBAFF was very similar to its bovine (87.68%), porcine (76.33%), hircine (87.68%) and canine (82.19%) counterparts. The predicted three-dimensional (3D) structure of the NpsBAFF monomer, analyzed by comparative protein modeling, revealed that it was very similar to its human counterpart. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that NpBAFF showed a notable homology with Artiodactyla BAFFs. The SUMO-NpsBAFF was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis showed that NpsBAFF could bind to its receptors on B cells. In vitro, MTT assays indicated that SUMO-NpsBAFF could promote the survival or proliferation of mouse splenic B cells grown with anti

  9. Influence of continental history on the ecological specialization and macroevolutionary processes in the mammalian assemblage of South America: Differences between small and large mammals

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    Fernández Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper tests Vrba's resource-use hypothesis, which predicts that generalist species have lower specialization and extinction rates than specialists, using the 879 species of South American mammals. We tested several predictions about this hypothesis using the biomic specialization index (BSI for each species, which is based on its geographical range within different climate-zones. The four predictions tested are: (1 there is a high frequency of species restricted to a single biome, which henceforth are referred to as stenobiomic species, (2 certain clades are more stenobiomic than others, (3 there is a higher proportion of biomic specialists in biomes that underwent through major expansion-contraction alternation due to the glacial-interglacial cycles, (4 certain combinations of inhabited biomes occur more frequently among species than do others. Results Our results are consistent with these predictions. (1 We found that 42 % of the species inhabit only one biome. (2 There are more generalists among species of Carnivora than in clades of herbivores. However, Artiodactyla, shows a distribution along the specialization gradient different from the one expected. (3 Biomic specialists are predominant in tropical rainforest and desert biomes. Nevertheless, we found some differences between small and large mammals in relation to these results. Stenobiomic species of micromammalian clades are more abundant in most biomes than expected by chance, while in the case of macromammalian clades stenobiomic species are more frequent than expected in tropical rainforest, tropical deciduous woodland and desert biomes only. (4 The most frequent combinations of inhabited biomes among the South American mammals are those with few biomes, i.e., the ones that suffered a higher rate of vicariance due to climatic cycles. Conclusion Our results agree with the resource-use hypothesis and, therefore, with a major role of the past climatic changes as

  10. A model for the Holocene extinction of the mammal megafauna in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficcarelli, G.; Coltorti, M.; Moreno-Espinosa, M.; Pieruccini, P. L.; Rook, L.; Torre, D.

    2003-03-01

    . Vegetation cover in the area of Santa Elena should have been extensive, and even more so in the Guayas and Guayabamba valleys. The newly densely vegetated areas, and fluvial barriers, transformed the refugia into lethal traps for large animals already under biological stress, such as were mastodons, ground sloths and equids. Within the megafauna, only tapirs and artiodactyla (Cervidae and Camelidae) survived. In our opinion, the most suitable model to justify the great crisis of the mammal megafauna at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, also in areas out of Ecuador, must be mainly based on the three parameters: high aridity, high humidity and geographic factors.

  11. Molecular evolution of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA in Ungulata (mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzery, E; Catzeflis, F M

    1995-11-01

    , but the relationships between Artiodactyla, Cetacea, and Perissodactyla remained unresolved. Nevertheless, we found no support for a Perissodactyla + Hyracoidea clade, neither with distance approach, nor with parsimony reconstruction. The 12S rRNA was useful to solve intraordinal relationships among Ungulata, but it seemed to harbor too few informative positions to decipher the bushlike radiation of some Ungulata orders, an event which has most probably occurred in a short span of time between 55 and 70 MYA.

  12. Characterization of the bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein gene family – analysis of gene sequences, regulatory regions within the promoter and expression of selected genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs belong to a large family of aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placenta of species in the Artiodactyla order. In cattle, the PAG gene family is comprised of at least 22 transcribed genes, as well as some variants. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the PAG family segregates into 'ancient' and 'modern' groupings. Along with sequence differences between family members, there are clear distinctions in their spatio-temporal distribution and in their relative level of expression. In this report, 1 we performed an in silico analysis of the bovine genome to further characterize the PAG gene family, 2 we scrutinized proximal promoter sequences of the PAG genes to evaluate the evolution pressures operating on them and to identify putative regulatory regions, 3 we determined relative transcript abundance of selected PAGs during pregnancy and, 4 we performed preliminary characterization of the putative regulatory elements for one of the candidate PAGs, bovine (bo PAG-2. Results From our analysis of the bovine genome, we identified 18 distinct PAG genes and 14 pseudogenes. We observed that the first 500 base pairs upstream of the translational start site contained multiple regions that are conserved among all boPAGs. However, a preponderance of conserved regions, that harbor recognition sites for putative transcriptional factors (TFs, were found to be unique to the modern boPAG grouping, but not the ancient boPAGs. We gathered evidence by means of Q-PCR and screening of EST databases to show that boPAG-2 is the most abundant of all boPAG transcripts. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence for the role of ETS- and DDVL-related TFs in the regulation of the boPAG-2 gene. Conclusion PAGs represent a relatively large gene family in the bovine genome. The proximal promoter regions of these genes display differences in putative TF binding sites, likely contributing to observed

  13. Surface Model and Tomographic Archive of Fossil Primate and Other Mammal Holotype and Paratype Specimens of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, Pretoria, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Justin W; Olah, Angela; McCurry, Matthew R; Potze, Stephany

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century of paleontological excavation and analysis from the cave deposits of the Cradle of Humankind UNESCO World Heritage Site in northeastern South Africa underlies much of our understanding of the evolutionary history of hominins, other primates and other mammal lineages in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene of Africa. As one of few designated fossil repositories, the Plio-Pleistocene Palaeontology Section of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (DNMNH; the former Transvaal Museum) curates much of the mammalian faunas recovered from the fossil-rich deposits of major South African hominin-bearing localities, including the holotype and paratype specimens of many primate, carnivore, and other mammal species (Orders Primates, Carnivora, Artiodactyla, Eulipotyphla, Hyracoidea, Lagomorpha, Perissodactyla, and Proboscidea). Here we describe an open-access digital archive of high-resolution, full-color three-dimensional (3D) surface meshes of all 89 non-hominin holotype, paratype and significant mammalian specimens curated in the Plio-Pleistocene Section vault. Surface meshes were generated using a commercial surface scanner (Artec Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg), are provided in formats that can be opened in both open-source and commercial software, and can be readily downloaded either via an online data repository (MorphoSource) or via direct request from the DNMNH. In addition to providing surface meshes for each specimen, we also provide tomographic data (both computerized tomography [CT] and microfocus [microCT]) for a subset of these fossil specimens. This archive of the DNMNH Plio-Pleistocene collections represents the first research-quality 3D datasets of African mammal fossils to be made openly available. This simultaneously provides the paleontological community with essential baseline information (e.g., updated listing and 3D record of specimens in their current state of preservation) and serves as a single resource of high

  14. The Late Pleistocene Duoi U'Oi cave in northern Vietnam: palaeontology, sedimentology, taphonomy and palaeoenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Anne-Marie; Demeter, F.; Duringer, P.; Helm, C.; Bano, M.; Vu, The Long; Kim Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Antoine, P.-O.; Thi Mai, Bui; Huong, Nguyen Thi Mai; Dodo, Y.; Chabaux, F.; Rihs, S.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes new fossil materials recovered at the Duoi U'Oi site, in December 2003, by a Vietnamese-French-Japanese team. The Duoi U'Oi cave is located in Man Duc village, 25 km of Hoà Binh city in northern Vietnam. It belongs to a karstic network developed in a dark grey micritic marine limestone dated from the Lower to the Middle Triassic. The sedimentary fill produced a rich mammalian fauna, essentially composed of isolated teeth of middle- to large-sized mammals (Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Proboscidea, Carnivora, Rodentia, Primates), and characteristic of Late Pleistocene. The results of the Duoi U'Oi fieldwork are of great interest for the following reasons: (1) the biochronological age of the fauna is consistent with 230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating from the calcitic floors (66±3 ka). The Duoi U'Oi fauna is thus the oldest well-dated modern fauna known for the Southeast Asian mainland; (2) in terms of sedimentology, the analysis of the formation of the fossiliferous breccia and that of the processes of deposits shows a close relation between the karstic deposits inside the cave and the deposits in the alluvial terraces. The observation of three levels of alluvial terraces associated with three caves situated at 62, 10 and 3 m above the present alluvial plain suggests that exokarstic and endokarstic sediments evolved together; (3) in terms of palaeobiogeography, Duoi U'Oi is the continental fauna showing the strongest resemblance with the Late Pleistocene faunas from Indonesian islands (Punung, Gunung Dawung, Lida Ajer, Sibrambang and Djambu caves); this implies that, at the time of Duoi U'Oi, ca 70 ka, the Sundaland was mainly characterised by faunas of modern aspect; (4) the analysis of major taphonomic factors that led to the mammal assemblage reveals a combination of selective agents (selective role of predators and porcupines, selective destruction of age classes for some species, selective preservation of fossils due to the deposition processes in

  15. 版纳微型猪近交系SRY基因编码区序列克隆及生物信息学分析%Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of coding region of the SRY gene in Banna mini-pig inbred line (BMI)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍金龙; 成文敏; 魏红江; 潘伟荣; 王配; 曾养志

    2011-01-01

    -softs,and also constructed the molecular phylogenetic tree on coding amino acids region of SRY gene with method of NJ and ME. Results The sequence length of coding region of the BMI SRY gene was 711 bp, with GenBank accession number GU991615, and encoding 236 amino acid. The similarity rates of nucleotide sequences of the coding region of SRY gene between the BMI and whale was (83. 7% ) , dolphin (82. 8% ) , deer (78.4% ) , sheep (78.0% ) , cattle (76. 9% ), seal (73. 3% ) , horse (73. 1% ), walrus (73.0% ) , panda (72.9%), human (72.7%), ass (72.7%), bear (72.2%), cat (71.6%), tiger (71.3%) and leopard (70. 8% ) ;while the similarity rates of amino acid sequences were 72. 8% , 54. 5% , 67. 3% , 64. 5% , 61. 5% , 61. 9% , 59. 5% , 61.4% , 62. 0% , 59.1% , 59. 0% , 62. 0% , 59. 6% , 59. 6% and 59. 2% , respectively. Conclusions The nucleotide sequence of the coding region and accordingly amino acid sequences of SRY gene of BMI and whale, dolphin, deer, sheep, cattle, seal, horse, walrus, panda, human, ass, bear, cat, tiger and leopard are quite conservative. NJ and ME molecular phylogenetic tree indicate that the taxonomic placement of BMI is clustered together with cattle, sheep and deer, which are the suidae, bovidae, cervidae, respectively, and all of them are artiodactyla animals.

  16. Genetic diversity based on cytochrome b gene analysis of different geographic populations of blue sheep in China%基于细胞色素b基因的中国岩羊不同地理种群遗传差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠楠; 刘振生; 王正寰; 黄丽红

    2012-01-01

    different populations from the Sichuan subspecies and higher than the reported genetic divergence of five known Artiodactyla animals. Therefore, we propose that, based on the mitochondrial DNA Cyt b gene, the sheep that are distributed on the Tibetan plateau do indeed form a valid subspecies of blue sheep. A molecular clock calculation estimated that the two subspecies might have separated approximately 1.05 million years ago. The average genetic distance within different geographical populations of the Sichuan subspecies (0.033 ± 0.0111) was not significantly different from the average genetic distance (0.042 ± 0.007) between populations of the two subspecies (t= 1. 824, P = 0. 084). This result indicates that significant genetic divergence had occurred among populations of the Sichuan subspecies. For example, the Helan Mountain population which includes individuals from Ningxia and Inner Mongolia, and the Xinjiang population both have significant genetic divergence compared with the populations from Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai, which have a much closer genetic relationship within themselves. Phylogenetic analyses between the 45 haplotypes based on Bayesian Inference and Maximum Parsimony revealed different maternal inheritances that corresponded to different geographical distribution regions. The Cansu, Qinghai, and Sichuan populations formed a cluster, indicating a close genetic relationship between them. The Ningxia population and the Inner Mongolia population from the Helan Mountain also grouped together; the Tibetan population formed a monophyletic group. The Xinjiang population and a Tibetan population ( RT1) tended to cluster together, which was sister group of the other three groups. Further studies are needed to help improve our understanding of the genetic composition and geographical characteristics of the Sichuan subspecies of blue sheep.%为了揭示中国岩羊不同地理种群的遗传差异,探讨岩羊亚种分化的分子机制,采用中国岩羊不