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Sample records for artificial tongue-placed tactile

  1. Improving human ankle joint position sense using an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    Proprioception is comprised of sensory input from several sources including muscle spindles, joint capsule, ligaments and skin. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the central nervous system was able to integrate an artificial biofeedback delivered through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue to improve proprioceptive acuity at the ankle joint. To address this objective, nine young healthy adults were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task with and without biofeedback. The underlying principle of the biofeedback consisted of supplying subjects with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device (Tongue Display Unit). Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determined using the absolute error and the variable error, respectively. Results showed more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than withou...

  2. Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for perceptual supplementation: application to human disability and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper aims at introducing the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution" or "perceptual supplementation", we are developing in the fields of human disability and biomedical engineering. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); (2) ankle proprioceptive acuity improvement for driving assistance in older and/or disabled adults; and (3) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper presents results of three feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  3. Optimizing the Use of an Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for Improving Ankle Joint Position Sense in Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consists of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36-point (6 X 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within a predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 X 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in a too plantarflexed and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. Two ADZ values of 0.5° and 1.5° were...

  4. Optimizing the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for improving ankle joint position sense in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerme, N; Chenu, O; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36- point (6 x 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 x 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in too plantar and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. The effects of two ADZ values of 0.5 degrees and 1.5 degrees were evaluated. Results showed (1) more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than without biofeedback and (2) more accurate and more consistent ankle joint matching performances when using the biofeedback device with the smaller ADZ value. These findings suggest that (1) electrotactile stimulation of the tongue can be used to improve ankle joint proprioception and (2) this improvement can be increased through an appropriate specification of the ADZ parameter provided by the biofeedback system. Further investigations are needed to strengthen the potential clinical value of this device.

  5. Controlling posture using a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback system

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper introduces an original biofeedback system for improving human balance control, whose underlying principle consists in providing additional sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution to the user through a tongue-placed tactile output device. To assess the effect of this biofeedback system on postural control during quiet standing, ten young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Results showed reduced CoP displacements in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition. The present findings evidenced the ability of the central nervous system to efficiently integrate an artificial plantar-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling control posture during quiet standing.

  6. Tongue-placed tactile biofeedback suppresses the deleterious effects of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Whereas the acuity of the position sense at the ankle can be disturbed by muscle fatigue, it recently also has been shown to be improved, under normal ankle neuromuscular state, through the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback. The underlying principle of this biofeedback consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue. Within this context, the purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether this biofeedback could mitigate the deleterious effect of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle. To address this objective, sixteen young healthy university students were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task in two conditions of No-fatigue and Fatigue of the ankle muscles and two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determin...

  7. How a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback modifies postural control mechanisms during quiet standing

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Boisgontier, Matthieu; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback on postural control mechanisms during quiet standing. To this aim, sixteen young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements, recorded using a force platform, were used to compute the horizontal displacements of the vertical projection the centre of gravity (CoGh) and those of the difference between the CoP and the vertical projection of the CoG (CoP-CoGv). Altogether, the present findings suggest that the main way the plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback improves postural control during quiet standing is via both a reduction of the correction thresholds and an increased efficiency of the corrective mechanism involving the CoGh displacements.

  8. Inter-individual variability in sensory weighting of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Boisgontier, Matthieu; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the sensory weighting of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture could be subject to inter-individual variability. To achieve this goal, 60 young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Overall, results showed reduced CoP displacements in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition, evidencing the ability of the central nervous system to efficiently integrate an artificial plantar-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling posture during quiet standing. Results further showed a significant positive correlation between the CoP displacements measured in the No-biofeedback condition and the decrease in the CoP displacements induced by the use of the biofeedback. In other words, the degree of postural stab...

  9. A Plantar-pressure Based Tongue-placed Tactile Biofeedback System for Balance Improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining an upright stance represents a complex task, which is achieved by integrating sensory information from the visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems. When one of these sensory inputs becomes unavailable and/or inaccurate and/or unreliable, postural control generally is degraded. One way to solve this problem is to supplement and/or substitute limited/altered/missing sensory information by providing additional sensory information to the central nervous system via an alternative sensory modality. Along these lines, we developed an original biofeedback system [1] whose underlying principle consists in supplying the user with supplementary sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution through a tongue-placed output device (Tongue Display Unit, "TDU" [2]). The purpose of the present experiment was to assess its effectiveness in improving balance in young healthy adults.

  10. Generation of tactile maps for artificial skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon McGregor

    Full Text Available Prior research has shown that representations of retinal surfaces can be learned from the intrinsic structure of visual sensory data in neural simulations, in robots, as well as by animals. Furthermore, representations of cochlear (frequency surfaces can be learned from auditory data in neural simulations. Advances in hardware technology have allowed the development of artificial skin for robots, realising a new sensory modality which differs in important respects from vision and audition in its sensorimotor characteristics. This provides an opportunity to further investigate ordered sensory map formation using computational tools. We show that it is possible to learn representations of non-trivial tactile surfaces, which require topologically and geometrically involved three-dimensional embeddings. Our method automatically constructs a somatotopic map corresponding to the configuration of tactile sensors on a rigid body, using only intrinsic properties of the tactile data. The additional complexities involved in processing the tactile modality require the development of a novel multi-dimensional scaling algorithm. This algorithm, ANISOMAP, extends previous methods and outperforms them, producing high-quality reconstructions of tactile surfaces in both simulation and hardware tests. In addition, the reconstruction turns out to be robust to unanticipated hardware failure.

  11. Synthetic and Bio-Artificial Tactile Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Carrozza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art of artificial tactile sensing, with a particular focus on bio-hybrid and fully-biological approaches. To this aim, the study of physiology of the human sense of touch and of the coding mechanisms of tactile information is a significant starting point, which is briefly explored in this review. Then, the progress towards the development of an artificial sense of touch are investigated. Artificial tactile sensing is analysed with respect to the possible approaches to fabricate the outer interface layer: synthetic skin versus bio-artificial skin. With particular respect to the synthetic skin approach, a brief overview is provided on various technologies and transduction principles that can be integrated beneath the skin layer. Then, the main focus moves to approaches characterized by the use of bio-artificial skin as an outer layer of the artificial sensory system. Within this design solution for the skin, bio-hybrid and fully-biological tactile sensing systems are thoroughly presented: while significant results have been reported for the development of tissue engineered skins, the development of mechanotransduction units and their integration is a recent trend that is still lagging behind, therefore requiring research efforts and investments. In the last part of the paper, application domains and perspectives of the reviewed tactile sensing technologies are discussed.

  12. Human tactile perception as a standard for artificial tactile sensing--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, J; Najarian, S

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the most important features of human skin tactile properties with special emphasis on the characteristics which are vital in the design of artificial systems. Contrary to the visual and auditory senses, the touch signal is not a well-defined quantity. As a result, the researchers of this field are still dealing with the basics of collecting the most relevant data. Following this, mimicking the sense of touch by producing artificial tactile skin is a challenging process. Although the sense of touch is widely distributed all over the human body, the tactile perception in the human hand is of great importance in terms of surgical and medical robotics applications. In this study, the role of various mechanoreceptors in the human hand, such as, RA, SA I, SA II, and PC units are discussed in relation to the stimuli like force, position, softness, and surface texture. Taking human hand as a suitable tactile model, the necessary engineering features of an artificial tactile sensor, such as, spatial and temporal resolutions, force sensitivity, and linearity, are being reviewed. In this work, we also report on the current and possible future applications of tactile sensors in various surgical procedures.

  13. Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, Saba; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.3390/s110908626

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects' shapes and, more specifically, the objects' surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 \\times 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Na\\"ive Bayes (NB), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) were implemented and compared ...

  14. Pressure sensor-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback for balance improvement - Biomedical application to prevent pressure sores formation and falls

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); and (2) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper describes the architecture and the functioning principle of these biofeedback systems and presents preliminary results of two feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  15. Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Sam Ge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects’ shapes and, more specifically, the objects’ surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 × 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Naïve Bayes (NB, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, and Support Vector Machines (SVM were implemented and compared for various parameters. Finally, the most accurate method was selected to evaluate the proposed skin structure in recognition of three different curvatures. The results showed an accuracy rate of 97.5% in surface curvature discrimination.

  16. Fabrication of a wearable fabric tactile sensor produced by artificial hollow fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Ogura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Sato, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    An artificial-hollow-fiber structure as a new material for MEMS was developed and applied to a novel type of fabric tactile sensor. The artificial hollow fiber was fabricated by uniformly deposited metal and insulation layers on the surface of an elastic tube. A special rotating mechanism for uniformly depositing a metal layer on the tube surface during sputtering was developed. A rectangular-shaped fabric tactile sensor was produced by combining artificial hollow fibers and typical cotton yarns, like a cloth. The sensor can detect a contact force by measuring changes in capacitance at all intersection points of the artificial hollow fibers. Two different types of wearable-tactile-sensor glove, a patched type and a direct knit type, were also fabricated, and it was confirmed that both types can detect a normal load by measuring the capacitance change.

  17. Biomimetic approaches to the design of materials for artificial tactile perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rossi, Danilo

    While the computational and materials-synthesis aspects of artificial tactile perception remain rather abstract, three fields of investigation have been identified as promising: thermotactile interactions for sensory fusion, strain dilatation sensing for low-level computation, and strain-rate-to-impulse frequency information coding. Attention is also given to the possibilities of a 'pseudoepidermal layer' capable of resolving individual stress tensor components, and a 'pseudodermal pad' that can serve as a rheological skin-analog.

  18. Artificial Roughness Encoding with a Bio-inspired MEMS-based Tactile Sensor Array

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    Calogero Maria Oddo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A compliant 2x2 tactile sensor array was developed and investigated for roughness encoding. State of the art cross shape 3D MEMS sensors were integrated with polymeric packaging providing in total 16 sensitive elements to external mechanical stimuli in an area of about 20 mm2, similarly to the SA1 innervation density in humans. Experimental analysis of the bio-inspired tactile sensor array was performed by using ridged surfaces, with spatial periods from 2.6 mm to 4.1 mm, which were indented with regulated 1N normal force and stroked at constant sliding velocity from 15 mm/s to 48 mm/s. A repeatable and expected frequency shift of the sensor outputs depending on the applied stimulus and on its scanning velocity was observed between 3.66 Hz and 18.46 Hz with an overall maximum error of 1.7%. The tactile sensor could also perform contact imaging during static stimulus indentation. The experiments demonstrated the suitability of this approach for the design of a roughness encoding tactile sensor for an artificial fingerpad.

  19. Fully printed flexible fingerprint-like three-axis tactile and slip force and temperature sensors for artificial skin.

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    Harada, Shingo; Kanao, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-12-23

    A three-axis tactile force sensor that determines the touch and slip/friction force may advance artificial skin and robotic applications by fully imitating human skin. The ability to detect slip/friction and tactile forces simultaneously allows unknown objects to be held in robotic applications. However, the functionalities of flexible devices have been limited to a tactile force in one direction due to difficulties fabricating devices on flexible substrates. Here we demonstrate a fully printed fingerprint-like three-axis tactile force and temperature sensor for artificial skin applications. To achieve economic macroscale devices, these sensors are fabricated and integrated using only printing methods. Strain engineering enables the strain distribution to be detected upon applying a slip/friction force. By reading the strain difference at four integrated force sensors for a pixel, both the tactile and slip/friction forces can be analyzed simultaneously. As a proof of concept, the high sensitivity and selectivity for both force and temperature are demonstrated using a 3×3 array artificial skin that senses tactile, slip/friction, and temperature. Multifunctional sensing components for a flexible device are important advances for both practical applications and basic research in flexible electronics.

  20. An Examination of a Music Appreciation Method Incorporating Tactile Sensations from Artificial Vibrations

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    Ideguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Ryujyu; Ooshima, Keita

    We examined how test subject impressions of music changed when artificial vibrations were incorporated as constituent elements of a musical composition. In this study, test subjects listened to several music samples in which different types of artificial vibration had been incorporated and then subjectively evaluated any resulting changes to their impressions of the music. The following results were obtained: i) Even if rhythm vibration is added to a silent component of a musical composition, it can effectively enhance musical fitness. This could be readily accomplished when actual sounds that had been synchronized with the vibration components were provided beforehand. ii) The music could be listened to more comfortably by adding not only a natural vibration extracted from percussion instruments but also artificial vibration as tactile stimulation according to intentional timing. Furthermore, it was found that the test subjects' impression of the music was affected by a characteristic of the artificial vibration. iii) Adding vibration to high-frequency areas can offer an effective and practical way of enhancing the appeal of a musical composition. iv) The movement sensations of sound and vibration could be experienced when the strength of the sound and vibration are modified in turn. These results suggest that the intentional application of artificial vibration could result in a sensitivity amplification factor on the part of a listener.

  1. Tactile on-chip pre-processing with techniques from artificial retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Lopez, R.; Vidal-Verdu, F.; Linan, G.; Roca, E.; Rodriguez-Vazquez, A.

    2005-06-01

    The interest in tactile sensors is increasing as their use in complex unstructured environments is demanded, like in telepresence, minimal invasive surgery, robotics etc. The matrix of pressure data these devices provide can be managed with many image processing algorithms to extract the required information. However, as in the case of vision chips or artificial retinas, problems arise when the array size and the computation complexity increase. Having a look to the skin, the information collected by every mechanoreceptor is not carried to the brain for its processing, but some complex pre-processing is performed to fit the limited throughput of the nervous system. This is specially important for high bandwidth demanding tasks. Experimental works report that neural response of skin mechanoreceptors encodes the change in local shape from an offset level rather than the absolute force or pressure distributions. This is also the behavior of the retina, which implements a spatio-temporal averaging. We propose the same strategy in tactile preprocessing, and we show preliminary results when it faces the detection of the slip, which involves fast real-time processing.

  2. Study of the tactile perception of bathroom tissues: Comparison between the sensory evaluation by a handfeel panel and a tribo-acoustic artificial finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieulin, C; Pailler-Mattei, C; Vargiolu, R; Lancelot, S; Zahouani, H

    2017-02-01

    Tactile perception is one of the sensorial modes most stimulated by our daily environment. In particular, perceived softness is an important parameter for judging the sensory quality of surfaces and fabrics. Unfortunately, its assessment greatly depends on the tactile sense of each person, which in turn depends on many factors. Currently, the predominant method for evaluating the tactile perception of fabrics is the human handfeel panel. This qualitative approach does not permit the quantitative measure of touch feel perception. In this study, we present a new artificial finger device to investigate the tactile sensing of ten bathroom tissues. It enables simultaneously measuring the friction and vibrations caused when sliding an artificial finger on the surface of the tissue. The comparison between the results obtained with the artificial finger and the tactile perception evaluated using a handfeel panel showed that the artificial finger is able to separate the two parts of the tactile perception of bathroom tissues: softness and surface texture (velvetiness). The statistical analysis suggests that there is a good correlation between the vibrations measured with the artificial finger and the softness evaluated by the panel. It then shows that the friction measured by the artificial finger is related to the surface texture of a bathroom tissue. The ability of the artificial finger to mimic human touch is demonstrated. Finally, a Principal Component Analysis orders the signatures of the tactile perception of the bathroom tissues in four different groups.

  3. A Bio-Hybrid Tactile Sensor Incorporating Living Artificial Skin and an Impedance Sensing Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheneler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of a bio-hybrid tactile sensor array that incorporates a skin analogue comprised of alginate encapsulated fibroblasts is described. The electrical properties are modulated by mechanical stress induced during contact, and changes are detected by a ten-channel dual-electrode impedance sensing array. By continuously monitoring the impedance of the sensor array at a fixed frequency, whilst normal and tangential loads are applied to the skin surface, transient mechanotransduction has been observed. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the preliminary prototype bio-hybrid tactile sensor.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of the tactile feedback system based on artificial skin and electrotactile stimulation.

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    Franceschi, M; Seminara, L; Pinna, L; Dosen, S; Farina, D; Valle, M

    2015-08-01

    This research is motivated by the need of integrating cutaneous sensing into a prosthetic device, enabling a bidirectional communication between the amputee and the prosthetic limb. An electronic skin based on piezoelectric polymer sensors transduces mechanical contact into electrical response which is conveyed to the human subject by electrotactile stimulation. Rectangular electrode arrays are placed on each patient's forearm and experiments are conducted on five different subjects to determine how well the orientation, position and direction of single lines are recognized. Overall, subjects discriminate the different touch modalities with acceptable success rates. In particular, the direction is identified at best and longitudinal lines on the patient's skin are recognized with the highest success rates. These preliminary results assess the feasibility of the artificial skin - electrostimulation system for prosthetic applications.

  5. Assimilation of virtual legs and perception of floor texture by complete paraplegic patients receiving artificial tactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokur, Solaiman; Gallo, Simone; Moioli, Renan C; Donati, Ana Rita C; Morya, Edgard; Bleuler, Hannes; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2016-09-19

    Spinal cord injuries disrupt bidirectional communication between the patient's brain and body. Here, we demonstrate a new approach for reproducing lower limb somatosensory feedback in paraplegics by remapping missing leg/foot tactile sensations onto the skin of patients' forearms. A portable haptic display was tested in eight patients in a setup where the lower limbs were simulated using immersive virtual reality (VR). For six out of eight patients, the haptic display induced the realistic illusion of walking on three different types of floor surfaces: beach sand, a paved street or grass. Additionally, patients experienced the movements of the virtual legs during the swing phase or the sensation of the foot rolling on the floor while walking. Relying solely on this tactile feedback, patients reported the position of the avatar leg during virtual walking. Crossmodal interference between vision of the virtual legs and tactile feedback revealed that patients assimilated the virtual lower limbs as if they were their own legs. We propose that the addition of tactile feedback to neuroprosthetic devices is essential to restore a full lower limb perceptual experience in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and will ultimately, lead to a higher rate of prosthetic acceptance/use and a better level of motor proficiency.

  6. Assimilation of virtual legs and perception of floor texture by complete paraplegic patients receiving artificial tactile feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokur, Solaiman; Gallo, Simone; Moioli, Renan C.; Donati, Ana Rita C.; Morya, Edgard; Bleuler, Hannes; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries disrupt bidirectional communication between the patient’s brain and body. Here, we demonstrate a new approach for reproducing lower limb somatosensory feedback in paraplegics by remapping missing leg/foot tactile sensations onto the skin of patients’ forearms. A portable haptic display was tested in eight patients in a setup where the lower limbs were simulated using immersive virtual reality (VR). For six out of eight patients, the haptic display induced the realistic illusion of walking on three different types of floor surfaces: beach sand, a paved street or grass. Additionally, patients experienced the movements of the virtual legs during the swing phase or the sensation of the foot rolling on the floor while walking. Relying solely on this tactile feedback, patients reported the position of the avatar leg during virtual walking. Crossmodal interference between vision of the virtual legs and tactile feedback revealed that patients assimilated the virtual lower limbs as if they were their own legs. We propose that the addition of tactile feedback to neuroprosthetic devices is essential to restore a full lower limb perceptual experience in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and will ultimately, lead to a higher rate of prosthetic acceptance/use and a better level of motor proficiency. PMID:27640345

  7. A Prototype Tactile Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-15

    Active Touch Sensing. Technical Report, MIT Artificial Inteligence Laboratory, 1981. (9] Larcombe, M. Carbon Fibre Tactile Sensors. Technical Report...thesis, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1981. [13] Purbrick, John A. A Force Transducer Employing Conductive Silicone Rubber. Technical Report, MIT Artificial

  8. Detection of optogenetic stimulation in somatosensory cortex by non-human primates--towards artificial tactile sensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis May

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthesis research aims to enable communication between the brain and external assistive devices while restoring lost functionality such as occurs from stroke, spinal cord injury or neurodegenerative diseases. In future closed-loop sensorimotor prostheses, one approach is to use neuromodulation as direct stimulus to the brain to compensate for a lost sensory function and help the brain to integrate relevant information for commanding external devices via, e.g. movement intention. Current neuromodulation techniques rely mainly of electrical stimulation. Here we focus specifically on the question of eliciting a biomimetically relevant sense of touch by direct stimulus of the somatosensory cortex by introducing optogenetic techniques as an alternative to electrical stimulation. We demonstrate that light activated opsins can be introduced to target neurons in the somatosensory cortex of non-human primates and be optically activated to create a reliably detected sensation which the animal learns to interpret as a tactile sensation localized within the hand. The accomplishment highlighted here shows how optical stimulation of a relatively small group of mostly excitatory somatosensory neurons in the nonhuman primate brain is sufficient for eliciting a useful sensation from data acquired by simultaneous electrophysiology and from behavioral metrics. In this first report to date on optically neuromodulated behavior in the somatosensory cortex of nonhuman primates we do not yet dissect the details of the sensation the animals exerience or contrast it to those evoked by electrical stimulation, issues of considerable future interest.

  9. Tactile Aids

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    Mohtaramossadat Homayuni

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Tactile aids, which translate sound waves into vibrations that can be felt by the skin, have been used for decades by people with severe/profound hearing loss to enhance speech/language development and improve speechreading.The development of tactile aids dates from the efforts of Goults and his co-workers in the 1920s; Although The power supply was too voluminous and it was difficult to carry specially by children, it was too huge and heavy to be carried outside the laboratories and its application was restricted to the experimental usage. Nowadays great advances have been performed in producing this instrument and its numerous models is available in markets around the world.

  10. Tactile asymbolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmasov, Daniel; Ropper, Allan H

    2016-04-01

    Agraphesthesia has been attributed to impairment of the ability to detect more rudimentary directionality of lines written on the skin (directional cutaneous kinesthesia). We examined a patient who had a dissociation between preserved perception of line directionality and the loss of graphesthesia for letters and numbers. A man with a metastatic right parietal lesion was tested for the ability to determine the directionality of lines drawn on the palms and forehead and then evaluated for recognition of letters and numbers in these regions. Our patient could identify the directions of lines, letters and numbers drawn on paper. The ability to detect the direction and shape of lines drawn on the skin of the palms and on the forehead was preserved but he had agraphesthesia for numbers and letters in these same locations. The finding of isolated agraphesthesia for letters and numbers may be assigned to damage in the right parietal lobe. It represents a deficit of somatosensory processing that is of a higher order than detection of line directionality. The term "tactile asymbolia" may capture the dissociation. These clinical findings suggest that tactile cortex in humans, like visual cortex, may be hierarchically organized, as has been demonstrated in primates.

  11. Tactile Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project has developed a set of tactile display garments that will be used to evaluate various tactile display methodologies. The garments include two sleeves...

  12. TACTILE SENSING FOR OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    2009-01-01

    in unstructured environments, tactile sensing can provide more than valuable to complementary vision information about mechanical properties such as recognition and characterization, force, pressure, torque, compliance, friction, and mass as well as object shape, texture, position and pose. In this paper, we......The artificial sense of touch is a research area that can be considered still in demand, compared with the human dexterity of grasping a wide variety of shapes and sizes, perform complex tasks, and switch between grasps in response to changing task requirements. For handling unknown objects...... described the working principles of a few types of tactile sensing cells, focusing on the piezoresistive materials. Starting from a set of requirements for developing a high resolution flexible array sensor we have investigated if CSA pressure sensitive conductive rubber could be a proper candidate and can...

  13. Magnetic Tactile Sensor for Braille Reading

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-04-27

    We report a biomimetic magnetic tactile sensor for Braille characters reading. The sensor consists of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia implemented on magnetic micro sensors. The nanocomposite is produced from the highly elastic polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires that exhibit a permanent magnetic behavior. This design enables remote operation and does not require an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires. The highly elastic nanocomposite is easy to pattern, corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces, which allows recognizing small changes in surface texture, as in the case of Braille dots. The 6 dots of a braille cell are read from top to bottom with a tactile sensor array consisting of 4 elements and 1 mm long nanocomposite cilia.

  14. Directional Tactile Pavings in a Universal Design Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The topic of the presentation is the directional tactile pavings or tactile guidelines that are used by blind and visually impaired people for orientation, in this presentation primarily in the street environment. The focus is the difference between so-called natural and artificial tactile pavings, how they can and should be used, and how the tactile guidelines can be understood as devices of Universal Design. It is discussed whether guidelines based on foreign research can be transferred to the Danish context without additional Danish research. The tests that are known to have been made in Denmark have generally been conducted with a very low number of participants. A secondary focus is the architectural qualities of the tactile pavings, which is a subject for discussion among landscape architects in the Danish context.

  15. Tactile Response of Building Materials by Tactile Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    岡島, 達雄; 呉, 健丹; 堀越, 哲美; 武田, 雄二; 水谷, 章夫; 川邊, 伸二; ホリコシ, テツミ; ミズタニ, アキオ; カワベ, シンジ; Horikoshi, Tetsumi; Mizutani, Akio; Kawabe, Shinji

    1991-01-01

    The object of this paper is to clarify the tactile response of building materials by tactile sensor. We developed the compact tactile sensor that can measure the physical values of warmth, hardness and roughness of building materials. At a temperature of 2℃, psychological values of warmth, hardness and roughness were obtaind from the physical values of sixty materials by the tactile sensor. The tactile comfort value can be expressed from physical values of warmth, hardness and roughness by th...

  16. Spatial patterns in tactile perception: is there a tactile field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Patrick; Giovagnoli, Giulia

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies of tactile spatial perception focussed either on a single point of stimulation, on local patterns within a single skin region such as the fingertip, on tactile motion, or on active touch. It remains unclear whether we should speak of a tactile field, analogous to the visual field, and supporting spatial relations between stimulus locations. Here we investigate this question by studying perception of large-scale tactile spatial patterns on the hand, arm and back. Experiment 1 investigated the relation between perception of tactile patterns and the identification of subsets of those patterns. The results suggest that perception of tactile spatial patterns is based on representing the spatial relations between locations of individual stimuli. Experiment 2 investigated the spatial and temporal organising principles underlying these relations. Experiment 3 showed that tactile pattern perception makes reference to structural representations of the body, such as body parts separated by joints. Experiment 4 found that precision of pattern perception is poorer for tactile patterns that extend across the midline, compared to unilateral patterns. Overall, the results suggest that the human sense of touch involves a tactile field, analogous to the visual field. The tactile field supports computation of spatial relations between individual stimulus locations, and thus underlies tactile pattern perception.

  17. Towards the Tactile Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, Dávid; Gulyás, András; Fitzek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    5G communication networks enable the steering and control of Internet of Things and therefore require extreme low latency communication referred to as the tactile Internet. In this paper we show that the massive use of network coding throughout the network significantly improves latency and reduce...... the frequency of packet re-transmission, so an architecture built around network coding may be a feasible road towards realizing the tactile internet vision. Our contribution is threefold: (i) we show how network coding improves latency and reduces packet re-transmission with respect to other coding schemes...

  18. Tactile Navigation Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    The use of the tactile modality is not common in Human Computer Interaction. However, there may be good reasons to do so. For example in situations in which the visual sense is restricted (e.g., in virtual environments lacking a wide field of view, or for the visually handicapped persons), or overlo

  19. Tactile Signing with One-Handed Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous; rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especially in turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language, tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Language focused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partially blind or…

  20. Tactile Instrument for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-30

    of cat sensory development (from Turner and Bateson , 1988).............................14 Figure 12: Helmet mounted tactile display (from Morag, 1987...Matthews and Gregory , 1999; Braithwaite, Groh, and Alvarez, 1997). The cost of spatial disorientation mishaps also includes mission failure, the...3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Conception Gestation Birth Figure 11: Ontology of cat sensory development (from Turner and Bateson , 1988). 3

  1. Tactile perception during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Roberta; Inuggi, Alberto; Vargas, Claudia D; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Jacono, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that tactile perception becomes less acute during movement to optimize motor control and to prevent an overload of afferent information generated during action. This empirical phenomenon, known as "tactile gating effect," has been associated with mechanisms of sensory feedback prediction. However, less attention has been given to the tactile attenuation effect during the observation of an action. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how the observation of a goal-directed action influences tactile perception as during overt action. In a first experiment, we recorded vocal reaction times (RTs) of participants to tactile stimulations during the observation of a reach-to-grasp action. The stimulations were delivered on different body parts that could be either congruent or incongruent with the observed effector (the right hand and the right leg, respectively). The tactile stimulation was contrasted with a no body-related stimulation (an auditory beep). We found increased RTs for tactile congruent stimuli compared to both tactile incongruent and auditory stimuli. This effect was reported only during the observation of the reaching phase, whereas RTs were not modulated during the grasping phase. A tactile two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task was then conducted in order to quantify the changes in tactile sensitivity during the observation of the same goal-directed actions. In agreement with the first experiment, the tactile perceived intensity was reduced only during the reaching phase. These results suggest that tactile processing during action observation relies on a process similar to that occurring during action execution.

  2. Tactile perception of cognitive robots

    OpenAIRE

    Schöpfer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Compared to other modalities like vision, tactile sensing has been so far neglected by robotic researchers. At the time of writing, tactile sensing devices that can just approach the performance of the human sense of touch seem out of reach. Despite this fact the use and exploitation of available sensors should not be disregarded. Tactile sensing is indispensable for in-hand manipulation and can reveal object properties that cannot be acquired by optical sensors. The aim of this dissertati...

  3. Categorical perception of tactile distance

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, F. L. C.; Longo, M. R.; Bremner, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased ...

  4. Robot hand with soft tactile sensors and underactuated control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, H; Murashima, Y; Honma, N; Akazawa, K

    2013-01-01

    We developed a robot hand with three fingers and controlled them using underactuated control to obtain a more flexible grip. With underactuated control, we can flexibly operate an artificial robot hand and reduce the number of actuators. The robot fingers had three joints to imitate human fingers. One finger was driven by one wire and one servo motor for bending and by three torsion springs for extension. We also developed a soft tactile sensor having three pneumatic sensors and mounted it on front of each robot fingers. We obtained the following information from our experimental examinations of the robot hand. It adaptively grasped an object by underactuated control. The soft tactile sensor deftly touched an object, and the data showed the contact position with. By analyzing the data from tactile sensors, we obtained the rough information of the object's shape.

  5. Texture- and deformability-based surface recognition by tactile image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Pal, Monalisa; Tibarewala, D N; Konar, Amit; Pal, Kunal

    2016-08-01

    Deformability and texture are two unique object characteristics which are essential for appropriate surface recognition by tactile exploration. Tactile sensation is required to be incorporated in artificial arms for rehabilitative and other human-computer interface applications to achieve efficient and human-like manoeuvring. To accomplish the same, surface recognition by tactile data analysis is one of the prerequisites. The aim of this work is to develop effective technique for identification of various surfaces based on deformability and texture by analysing tactile images which are obtained during dynamic exploration of the item by artificial arms whose gripper is fitted with tactile sensors. Tactile data have been acquired, while human beings as well as a robot hand fitted with tactile sensors explored the objects. The tactile images are pre-processed, and relevant features are extracted from the tactile images. These features are provided as input to the variants of support vector machine (SVM), linear discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour (kNN) for classification. Based on deformability, six household surfaces are recognized from their corresponding tactile images. Moreover, based on texture five surfaces of daily use are classified. The method adopted in the former two cases has also been applied for deformability- and texture-based recognition of four biomembranes, i.e. membranes prepared from biomaterials which can be used for various applications such as drug delivery and implants. Linear SVM performed best for recognizing surface deformability with an accuracy of 83 % in 82.60 ms, whereas kNN classifier recognizes surfaces of daily use having different textures with an accuracy of 89 % in 54.25 ms and SVM with radial basis function kernel recognizes biomembranes with an accuracy of 78 % in 53.35 ms. The classifiers are observed to generalize well on the unseen test datasets with very high performance to achieve efficient material

  6. High Resolution Flexible Tactile Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a tactile sensor for robotics inspired by the human sense of touch. It consists of two parts: a static tactile array sensor based on piezoresistive rubber and a dynamic sensor based on piezoelectric PVDF film. The combination of these two layers addresses b...

  7. An active tactile perception system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriu, E.; Greenspan, M.; Gelinas, F.; McMath, W. S.; Yeung, S. K.

    System development and application aspects are described for an experimental robotic system for the tactile perception of the global geometric profile of object surfaces which are larger than the dimensions of the tactile sensor. Local cutaneous information provided by a tactile sensor is integrated with the kinesthetic position parameters of a robot arm, resulting in a 3D geometric model of the tactile sensor pose on the explored object surface. Currently available tactile sensors provide poor information on the geometric profile of 3D object surfaces. In order to maximize the information available for 3D analysis, an instrumented passive compliant wrist was used to attach a pressure measuring tactile probe to the robot arm carrier. Data was collected by a noncompliant planar sensing array in direct contact with an object surface. Information recorded includes the following: positional and orientation data on the robot arm manipulator, passive compliance kinesthetic data as measured by the kinematics of the wrist, and cutaneous tactile data represented by the binary image of the sensors pose on the object. The dimensions of the sensor array were found to be a critical factor in system performance. Use of a large array results in fewer touch poses being required to explore an object's surface, on the other hand a large planar array will touch fewer and higher peaks thus missing surface detail. To improve performance, there is a need to design tactile sensors specifically for geometric profile measuring.

  8. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  9. Presentation of Various Tactile Sensations Using Micro-Needle Electrotactile Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Mayuko; Kitamura, Norihide; Tanaka, Kohei; Miki, Norihisa

    2016-01-01

    Tactile displays provoke tactile sensations by artificially stimulating tactile receptors. While many types of tactile displays have been developed, electrotactile displays that exploit electric stimulation can be designed to be thin, light, flexible and thus, wearable. However, the high voltages required to stimulate tactile receptors and limited varieties of possible sensations pose problems. In our previous work, we developed an electrotactile display using a micro-needle electrode array that can drastically reduce the required voltage by penetrating through the high-impedance stratum corneum painlessly, but displaying various tactile sensations was still a challenge. In this work, we demonstrate presentation of tactile sensation of different roughness to the subjects, which is enabled by the arrangement of the electrodes; the needle electrodes are on the fingertip and the ground electrode is on the fingernail. With this arrangement, the display can stimulate the tactile receptors that are located not only in the shallow regions of the finger but also those in the deep regions. It was experimentally revealed that the required voltage was further reduced compared to previous devices and that the roughness presented by the display was controlled by the pulse frequency and the switching time, or the stimulation flow rate. The proposed electrotactile display is readily applicable as a new wearable haptic device for advanced information communication technology.

  10. Hi-Speed Tactile Sensing for Array-type Tactile Sensor and Object Manipulation based on Tactile Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Wataru; Kobayashi, Futoshi; Kojima, Fumio; Nakamoto, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Tadashi; Imamura, Nobuaki; Shirasawa, Hidenori

    Recently, a robotic hand with tactile sensors is developed all over the world. We also have developed a universal robot hand with tactile sensors and other sensors. Tactile sensors are very important for manipulating objects dexterously. However, array-type tactile sensor has many I/O, thus require much processing time. In this paper, we propose a hi-speed tactile sensing based on the genetic algorithm in order to measure the tactile information rapidly. The validity of the proposed method shows through some experiments. Moreover, a multi-object manipulation according to the tactile information is proposed.

  11. Tactile score a knowledge media for tactile sense

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with one of the most novel advances in natural computing, namely, in the field of tactile sense analysis. Massage, which provides relaxation and stimulation for human beings, is analyzed in this book for the first time by encoding the motions and tactile senses involved. The target audience is not limited to researchers who are interested in natural computing but also includes those working in ergonomic design, biomedical engineering, Kansei engineering, and cognitive science.

  12. Sensitivity enhancement of a micro-scale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhua

    2010-08-01

    A microscale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of force detection. Guided by the principles of the human tactile perception mechanism, specifically the epidermal ridges, artificial epidermal ridges made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were designed and placed on micro-fabricated metal strain gauge arrays. A polyimide layer was fabricated to facilitate attachment between the metal and PDMS, so that patterned copper could be deposited on the polyimide to function as the strain gauges. The aspect ratio of the artificial epidermal ridges was optimized using material stability calculations and finite element method (FEM) simulations, and the optimal structure obtained was 400 µm in width and 110 µm in height. Experiments verified the effectiveness of enhancing the sensitivity of such a tactile sensor with the artificial epidermal ridges, in that the outputs of the strain gauges were 1.8 times more sensitive than those of a tactile sensor without ridges. The proposed artificial epidermal ridges are readily applicable to any developed tactile sensors for performance enhancement.

  13. Tactile Data Entry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on our successful Phase I Tactile Data Entry program, Barron Associates proposes development of a Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system to permit...

  14. Bodily Illusions Modulate Tactile Perception

    OpenAIRE

    De Vignemont, Frédérique; H. Ehrsson, Henrik; Haggard, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Touch differs from other exteroceptive senses in that the body itself forms part of the tactile percept. Interactions between proprioception and touch provide a powerful way to investigate the implicit body representation underlying touch. Here, we demonstrate that an intrinsic primary quality of a tactile object, for example its size, is directly affected by the perceived size of the body part touching it. We elicited proprioceptive illusions that the left index finger was either elongating ...

  15. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  16. Contralateral tactile masking between forearms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-03-01

    Masking effects have been demonstrated in which tactile sensitivity is affected when one touch is close to another on the body surface. Such effects are likely a result of local lateral inhibitory circuits that sharpen the spatial tuning of a given tactile receptor. Mutually inhibitory pathways have also been demonstrated between cortical tactile maps of the two halves of the body. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations. Here, we measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on this contralateral masking effect. Tactile sensitivity was measured on one forearm, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to the opposite arm. Results were compared to sensitivity while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the right shoulder. Sensitivity on the forearm was reduced by over 3 dB when the arms were touching and by 0.52 dB when they were held parallel. The masking effect depended on the position of the masking stimulus. Its effectiveness fell off by 1 STD when the stimulus was 29 % of arm length from the corresponding contralateral point. This long-range inhibitory effect in the tactile system suggests a surprisingly intimate relationship between the two sides of the body.

  17. Virtual environment tactile system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters.

  18. Tactile Modulation of Emotional Speech Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Salminen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally only speech communicates emotions via mobile phone. However, in daily communication the sense of touch mediates emotional information during conversation. The present aim was to study if tactile stimulation affects emotional ratings of speech when measured with scales of pleasantness, arousal, approachability, and dominance. In the Experiment 1 participants rated speech-only and speech-tactile stimuli. The tactile signal mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech. In the Experiment 2 the aim was to study whether the way the tactile signal was produced affected the ratings. The tactile signal either mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech sample in question, or the amplitude changes of another speech sample. Also, concurrent static vibration was included. The results showed that the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing and dominant than the speech-only stimuli. The speech-only stimuli were rated as more approachable than the speech-tactile stimuli, but only in the Experiment 1. Variations in tactile stimulation also affected the ratings. When the tactile stimulation was static vibration the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing than when the concurrent tactile stimulation was mimicking speech samples. The results suggest that tactile stimulation offers new ways of modulating and enriching the interpretation of speech.

  19. Tactile function of educable mentally retarded children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, A

    1975-08-01

    The tactile perception ability of 29 seven-and eight-year-old educable mentally retarded children was evaluated by using the tactile perception portions of the Southern California Sensory Integration Tests. The children were also observed for tactile defensive behavior. Compared to normal children of the same age (as reported in normative data), this sample of children was significantly inferior in manual form, finger identification, graphesthesia, and perception of simultaneous stimuli, but not in the localization of single stimuli. During the testing, 62 percent showed tactile defensive behavior. The role of tactile perception in the development of symbolic communications is reviewed.

  20. Perceptual dimensions for a dynamic tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Tartter, Vivien C.; Seward, Andrew G.; Genzer, Boris; Gourgey, Karen; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2009-02-01

    We propose a new approach for converting graphical and pictorial information into tactile patterns that can be displayed in a static or dynamic tactile device. The key components of the proposed approach are (1) an algorithm that segments a scene into perceptually uniform segments; (2) a procedure for generating perceptually distinct tactile patterns; and (3) a mapping of the visual textures of the segments into tactile textures that convey similar concepts. We used existing digital halftoning and other techniques to generate a wide variety of tactile textures. We then conducted formal and informal subjective tests with sighted (but visually blocked) and visually-impaired subjects to determine the ability of human tactile perception to perceive differences among them. In addition to generating perceptually distinguishable tactile patterns, our goal is to identify significant dimensions of tactile texture perception, which will make it possible to map different visual attributes into independent tactile attributes. Our experimental results indicate that it is poosible to generate a number of perceptually distinguishable tactile patterns, and that different dimensions of tactile texture perception can indeed be identified.

  1. Magnetic Nanocomposite Cilia Tactile Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-10-21

    A multifunctional biomimetic nanocomposite tactile sensor is developed that can detect shear and vertical forces, feel texture, and measure flow with extremely low power consumption. The sensor\\'s high performance is maintained within a wide operating range that can be easily adjusted. The concept works on rigid and flexible substrates and the sensors can be used in air or water without any modifications.

  2. A Dual-Organic-Transistor-Based Tactile-Perception System with Signal-Processing Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yaping; Shen, Hongguang; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2017-02-22

    Organic-device-based tactile-perception systems can open up new opportunities for the next generation of intelligent products. To meet the critical requirements of artificial perception systems, the efficient construction of organic smart elements with integrated sensing and signal processing functionalities is highly desired, but remains a challenge. This study presents a dual-organic-transistor-based tactile-perception element (DOT-TPE) with biomimetic functionality by the construction of organic synaptic transistors with integrated sensing transistors. The unique geometry of the DOT-TPE permits instantaneous sensing of pressure stimuli and synapse-like processing of an electric signal in a single element. More importantly, these organic-transistor-based tactile-perception elements can be built into arrays to serve as bionic tactile-perception systems. The combined biomimetic functionality of tactile-perception systems, together with their promising features of flexibility and large-area fabrication, makes this work represent a step forward toward novel e-skin devices for artificial intelligence.

  3. Integration of force reflection with tactile sensing for minimally invasive robotics-assisted tumor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasaz, A; Patel, R V

    2013-01-01

    Tactile sensing and force reflection have been the subject of considerable research for tumor localization in soft-tissue palpation. The work presented in this paper investigates the relevance of force feedback (presented visually as well as directly) during tactile sensing (presented visually only) for tumor localization using an experimental setup close to one that could be applied for real robotics-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The setup is a teleoperated (master-slave) system facilitated with a state-of-the-art minimally invasive probe with a rigidly mounted tactile sensor at the tip and an externally mounted force sensor at the base of the probe. The objective is to capture the tactile information and measure the interaction forces between the probe and tissue during palpation and to explore how they can be integrated to improve the performance of tumor localization. To quantitatively explore the effect of force feedback on tactile sensing tumor localization, several experiments were conducted by human subjects to locate artificial tumors embedded in the ex vivo bovine livers. The results show that using tactile sensing in a force-controlled environment can realize, on average, 57 percent decrease in the maximum force and 55 percent decrease in the average force applied to tissue while increasing the tumor detection accuracy by up to 50 percent compared to the case of using tactile feedback alone. The results also show that while visual presentation of force feedback gives straightforward quantitative measures, improved performance of tactile sensing tumor localization is achieved at the expense of longer times for the user. Also, the quickness and intuitive data mapping of direct force feedback makes it more appealing to experienced users.

  4. Bio-inspired tactile sensor with arrayed structures based on electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Sato, Hiroshi; Taya, Minoru

    2009-03-01

    We reported some work on flexible tactile sensors based on Flemion ionic polymer metal composites previously. In this work, we compared the signals in both voltage and current with the signals obtained from a giant nerve fiber reported previously by other researchers. We found some similarities between the artificial tactile sensor and the nerve fiber, in both of which ionic movement play a very important role. This bio-inspired Flemion based ionic polymer metal composites would be a good candidate for bio-related sensors especially for prosthetic limb socket interface applications.

  5. Social facilitation of insect reproduction with motor-driven tactile stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzsák, Adrienn; Dieffenderfer, James; Bozkurt, Alper; Schal, Coby

    2014-05-22

    Tactile stimuli provide animals with important information about the environment, including physical features such as obstacles, and biologically relevant cues related to food, mates, hosts and predators. The antennae, the principal sensory organs of insects, house an array of sensory receptors for olfaction, gustation, audition, nociception, balance, stability, graviception, static electric fields, and thermo-, hygro- and mechanoreception. The antennae, being the anteriormost sensory appendages, play a prominent role in social interactions with conspecifics that involve primarily chemosensory and tactile stimuli. In the German cockroach (Blattella germanica) antennal contact during social interactions modulates brain-regulated juvenile hormone production, ultimately accelerating the reproductive rate in females. The primary sensory modality mediating this social facilitation of reproduction is antennal mechanoreception. We investigated the key elements, or stimulus features, of antennal contact that socially facilitate reproduction in B. germanica females. Using motor-driven antenna mimics, we assessed the physiological responses of females to artificial tactile stimulation. Our results indicate that tactile stimulation with artificial materials, some deviating significantly from the native antennal morphology, can facilitate female reproduction. However, none of the artificial stimuli matched the effects of social interactions with a conspecific female.

  6. Optimization-Based Wearable Tactile Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alvaro G; Lobo, Daniel; Chinello, Francesco; Cirio, Gabriel; Malvezzi, Monica; San Martin, Jose; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2016-10-20

    Novel wearable tactile interfaces offer the possibility to simulate tactile interactions with virtual environments directly on our skin. But, unlike kinesthetic interfaces, for which haptic rendering is a well explored problem, they pose new questions about the formulation of the rendering problem. In this work, we propose a formulation of tactile rendering as an optimization problem, which is general for a large family of tactile interfaces. Based on an accurate simulation of contact between a finger model and the virtual environment, we pose tactile rendering as the optimization of the device configuration, such that the contact surface between the device and the actual finger matches as close as possible the contact surface in the virtual environment. We describe the optimization formulation in general terms, and we also demonstrate its implementation on a thimble-like wearable device. We validate the tactile rendering formulation by analyzing its force error, and we show that it outperforms other approaches.

  7. Blind Braille readers mislocate tactile stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterr, Annette; Green, Lisa; Elbert, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    In a previous experiment, we observed that blind Braille readers produce errors when asked to identify on which finger of one hand a light tactile stimulus had occurred. With the present study, we aimed to specify the characteristics of this perceptual error in blind and sighted participants. The experiment confirmed that blind Braille readers mislocalised tactile stimuli more often than sighted controls, and that the localisation errors occurred significantly more often at the right reading hand than at the non-reading hand. Most importantly, we discovered that the reading fingers showed the smallest error frequency, but the highest rate of stimulus attribution. The dissociation of perceiving and locating tactile stimuli in the blind suggests altered tactile information processing. Neuroplasticity, changes in tactile attention mechanisms as well as the idea that blind persons may employ different strategies for tactile exploration and object localisation are discussed as possible explanations for the results obtained.

  8. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  9. Freezing in Touch: Sound Enhances Tactile Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Yeh Tsai; Su-Ling Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Perceptual segregation in rapidly changing visual displays can be facilitated by a synchronized salient sound that segregates itself from other sounds in the sequence (Vroomen & de Gelder, 2000). We examined whether this “freezing” phenomenon can also be found in tactile perception. Three vibrators were placed on the participant's palm to produce four different tactile patterns. Four sounds were presented separately and simultaneously with each of the four tactile patterns. Among the three sa...

  10. Tactile Perception - Role of Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Skedung, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to interconnect human tactile perception with various physical properties of materials. Tactile perception necessitates contact and relative motion between the skin and the surfaces of interest. This implies that properties such as friction and surface roughness ought to be important physical properties for tactile sensing. In this work, a method to measure friction between human fingers and surfaces is presented. This method is believed to best represent friction in...

  11. The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties during Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Walters, Eliza K.; Ditman, Tali; Gagnon, Stephanie A.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., "Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while…

  12. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Integrated Flexible, Waterproof, Transparent, and Self-Powered Tactile Sensing Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu-Zhou; Sun, Yi-Jing; Fan, Zhiyong; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-23

    Portable and wearable electronic devices are human-centered devices; therefore, many unique attributes are highly desirable, such as flexibility, being self-powered, and waterproof. These properties render devices excellent adaptivity in harsh operation environments. In this work, we report an integrated triboelectric tactile sensor array with flexible, transparent, self-powered, and waterproof features. Each tactile sensor is a surface nano/microtexture enhanced triboelectric nanogenerator. The sensor array can serve as a touch panel for electronic devices. Owing to a unique design of a built-in triboelectric contact pair and an electrical shielding layer, an individual pixel of the fabricated tactile sensor array can generate an open circuit voltage up to 1.613 V and a short circuit current density of 47.308 mA/m(2) under 612.5 kPa. The tactile sensors can produce stable voltage signals regardless of the materials of the touching objects, and work stably both in ambient and aqueous environments. To examine the touch panel function of a sensor array, a matrix of 10 × 10 individually addressable 4 mm × 4 mm triboelectric sensors has been integrated into a thin, transparent, and flexible film, and the 2-D touch mapping has been successfully demonstrated. The unique triboelectric tactile sensor array reported here is robust and highly versatile, and it may find broad applications in display, wearable electronics, artificial skins, Internet of Things (IoT), etc.

  14. Distilling the underlying dimensions of tactile melodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Spapé, M.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We created 59 tactile melodies by transforming pieces of music from the auditory domain to the vibrotactile domain. Sixteen observers judged these tactile melodies on a set of 16 characteristics such as 'melodious', 'bombastic', and 'alarming'. By using advanced multivariate statistical methods, we

  15. Tactile information presentation in the cockpit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes two aspects of the application of tactile information presentation in the cockpit. The first half of the paper discusses why the tactile channel might be used instead of, or in addition to, the more common visual and auditory channels. It lists several categories of information

  16. Ergonomics of tactile and haptic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, J.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2006-01-01

    The area of tactile and haptic interactions has produced a number of exemplar systems and an even greater number of research papers. The time has come to systematize the knowledge that has been gained in order to produce guidance. The Ergonomics of Tactile and Haptic Interactions symposium provides

  17. The Design of Tactile Thematic Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Megan M.; Lobben, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the design and legibility of tactile thematic maps, focusing on symbolization and the comprehension of spatial patterns on the maps. The results indicate that discriminable and effective tactile thematic maps can be produced using classed data with a microcapsule paper production method. The participants…

  18. Effects of Fusion between Tactile and Proprioceptive Inputs on Tactile Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P.; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2011-01-01

    Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment. PMID:21464943

  19. Effects of fusion between tactile and proprioceptive inputs on tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2011-03-25

    Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment.

  20. Effects of fusion between tactile and proprioceptive inputs on tactile perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P Warren

    Full Text Available Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment.

  1. The Development of Tactile Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, A J; Spence, C

    2017-01-01

    Touch is the first of our senses to develop, providing us with the sensory scaffold on which we come to perceive our own bodies and our sense of self. Touch also provides us with direct access to the external world of physical objects, via haptic exploration. Furthermore, a recent area of interest in tactile research across studies of developing children and adults is its social function, mediating interpersonal bonding. Although there are a range of demonstrations of early competence with touch, particularly in the domain of haptics, the review presented here indicates that many of the tactile perceptual skills that we take for granted as adults (e.g., perceiving touches in the external world as well as on the body) take some time to develop in the first months of postnatal life, likely as a result of an extended process of connection with other sense modalities which provide new kinds of information from birth (e.g., vision and audition). Here, we argue that because touch is of such fundamental importance across a wide range of social and cognitive domains, it should be placed much more centrally in the study of early perceptual development than it currently is.

  2. Auditory adaptation improves tactile frequency perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommett, Lexi E; Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Yau, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-11

    Our ability to process temporal frequency information by touch underlies our capacity to perceive and discriminate surface textures. Auditory signals, which also provide extensive temporal frequency information, can systematically alter the perception of vibrations on the hand. How auditory signals shape tactile processing is unclear: perceptual interactions between contemporaneous sounds and vibrations are consistent with multiple neural mechanisms. Here we used a crossmodal adaptation paradigm, which separated auditory and tactile stimulation in time, to test the hypothesis that tactile frequency perception depends on neural circuits that also process auditory frequency. We reasoned that auditory adaptation effects would transfer to touch only if signals from both senses converge on common representations. We found that auditory adaptation can improve tactile frequency discrimination thresholds. This occurred only when adaptor and test frequencies overlapped. In contrast, auditory adaptation did not influence tactile intensity judgments. Thus, auditory adaptation enhances touch in a frequency- and feature-specific manner. A simple network model in which tactile frequency information is decoded from sensory neurons that are susceptible to auditory adaptation recapitulates these behavioral results. Our results imply that the neural circuits supporting tactile frequency perception also process auditory signals. This finding is consistent with the notion of supramodal operators performing canonical operations, like temporal frequency processing, regardless of input modality.

  3. Development of a Tactile Sensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae; Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2010-01-01

    . The paper describes the related research work we have developed for sensor design, exploration and control for a robot gripping system, in order to analyze normal forces applied on the tactile pixels for gripping force control and generate tactile images for gripping positioning and object recognition....... Section 1 gives an introduction of principles and technologies in tactile sensing for robot grippers. Section 2 presents the sensor cell (taxel) and array design and characterization. Section 3 introduces object recognition and shape analysis ideas showing a few preliminary examples, where geometrical...

  4. Development of flexible array tactile sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of an array tactile sensor for use in robotic grippers based on a flexible piezoresistive material. We start by comparing different cell structures in terms of output characteristics and we construct an array of cells in a row and columns layout. A real...... time data acquisition system scans all the cells and converts electrical resistance to tactile pressure maps. We validate that this information can be used to improve grasping and perform object recognition. Key words: piezoresistivity, tactile, sensor, pressure, robotics...

  5. Salience of Tactile Cues: An Examination of Tactor Actuator and Tactile Cue Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    section offers one approach to conceptualization and investigation of tactile display effectiveness. 1.2.3.1 Tactor Characteristics Early studies of...and/or the ability of the user to attend to alerts. As an example, individuals with higher levels of neuroticism , emotional reactivity, and/or lower... conceptual framework of factors affecting tactile salience. Additional research is planned to investigate moderating variables on tactile salience. In

  6. Bayesian Alternation During Tactile Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar Mathias Goeke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition, rotation only (native condition, and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition. Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants’ responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND. Then we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67 than the Bayesian integration model (χred2= 4.34. Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all model (χred2= 1.64, which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2= 1.09 utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  7. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Masakazu; Hidaka, Souta

    2013-12-13

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimulation can suppress the percept of visual stimuli: Visual orientation discrimination performance was degraded when a tactile vibration was applied to the observer's index finger of hands. We also demonstrated that this tactile suppression effect on visual perception occurred primarily when the tactile and visual information were spatially and temporally consistent. The current findings would indicate that neural signals could closely and directly interact with each other, sufficient to induce the perceptual suppression effect, even across sensory modalities.

  8. Psychophysical dimensions of tactile perception of textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shogo; Nagano, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews studies on the tactile dimensionality of physical properties of materials in order to determine a common structure for these dimensions. Based on the commonality found in a number of studies and known mechanisms for the perception of physical properties of textures, we conclude that tactile textures are composed of three prominent psychophysical dimensions that are perceived as roughness/smoothness, hardness/softness, and coldness/warmness. The roughness dimension may be divided into two dimensions: macro and fine roughness. Furthermore, it is reasonable to consider that a friction dimension that is related to the perception of moistness/dryness and stickiness/slipperiness exists. Thus, the five potential dimensions of tactile perception are macro and fine roughness, warmness/coldness, hardness/softness, and friction (moistness/dryness, stickiness/slipperiness). We also summarize methods such as psychological experiments and mathematical approaches for structuring tactile dimensions and their limitations.

  9. Tactile Perception and Reading: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradtmueller, Weldon; Harodon, Holly

    1976-01-01

    Examines the concept that all perceptual development seems to involve the tactile or sense of feel and attempts to comprehend this relationship. Its implications for teaching reading and for developing instructional techniques are also considered. (Author/RK)

  10. Conveying Looming with a Localized Tactile Cue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    clusters for use in building a library of tactile icons versus building a set of metaphorical stimuli or exploiting tactile “melodies”). Moreover...active duty or reserve status, and government employees. No otherwise-eligible legally -adult subjects were excluded from participation solely because of...methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology. 71: 655-658. Heise, D. R. 1965. Semantic differential profiles for 1,000 most frequent English words

  11. Evolutionary Specialization of Tactile Perception in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eve R; Gracheva, Elena O; Bagriantsev, Slav N

    2016-05-01

    Evolution has endowed vertebrates with the remarkable tactile ability to explore the world through the perception of physical force. Yet the sense of touch remains one of the least well understood senses at the cellular and molecular level. Vertebrates specializing in tactile perception can highlight general principles of mechanotransduction. Here, we review cellular and molecular adaptations that underlie the sense of touch in typical and acutely mechanosensitive vertebrates.

  12. Piezoresistive Tactile Sensor Discriminating Multidirectional Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdo Jung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flexible tactile sensors capable of detecting the magnitude and direction of the applied force together are of great interest for application in human-interactive robots, prosthetics, and bionic arms/feet. Human skin contains excellent tactile sensing elements, mechanoreceptors, which detect their assigned tactile stimuli and transduce them into electrical signals. The transduced signals are transmitted through separated nerve fibers to the central nerve system without complicated signal processing. Inspired by the function and organization of human skin, we present a piezoresistive type tactile sensor capable of discriminating the direction and magnitude of stimulations without further signal processing. Our tactile sensor is based on a flexible core and four sidewall structures of elastomer, where highly sensitive interlocking piezoresistive type sensing elements are embedded. We demonstrate the discriminating normal pressure and shear force simultaneously without interference between the applied forces. The developed sensor can detect down to 128 Pa in normal pressure and 0.08 N in shear force, respectively. The developed sensor can be applied in the prosthetic arms requiring the restoration of tactile sensation to discriminate the feeling of normal and shear force like human skin.

  13. Touch sensitive electrorheological fluid based tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Davidson, Rob; Taylor, Paul

    2005-12-01

    A tactile display is programmable device whose controlled surface is intended to be investigated by human touch. It has a great number of potential applications in the field of virtual reality and elsewhere. In this research, a 5 × 5 tactile display array including electrorheological (ER) fluid has been developed and investigated. Force responses of the tactile display array have been measured while a probe was moved across the upper surface. The purpose of this was to simulate the action of touch performed by human finger. Experimental results show that the sensed surface information could be controlled effectively by adjusting the voltage activation pattern imposed on the tactels. The performance of the tactile display is durable and repeatable. The touch sensitivity of this ER fluid based tactile display array has also been investigated in this research. The results show that it is possible to sense the touching force normal to the display's surface by monitoring the change of current passing through the ER fluid. These encouraging results are helpful for constructing a new type of tactile display based on ER fluid which can act as both sensor and actuator at the same time.

  14. Ambiguity in Tactile Apparent Motion Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Liaci

    Full Text Available In von Schiller's Stroboscopic Alternative Motion (SAM stimulus two visually presented diagonal dot pairs, located on the corners of an imaginary rectangle, alternate with each other and induce either horizontal, vertical or, rarely, rotational motion percepts. SAM motion perception can be described by a psychometric function of the dot aspect ratio ("AR", i.e. the relation between vertical and horizontal dot distances. Further, with equal horizontal and vertical dot distances (AR = 1 perception is biased towards vertical motion. In a series of five experiments, we presented tactile SAM versions and studied the role of AR and of different reference frames for the perception of tactile apparent motion.We presented tactile SAM stimuli and varied the ARs, while participants reported the perceived motion directions. Pairs of vibration stimulators were attached to the participants' forearms and stimulator distances were varied within and between forearms. We compared straight and rotated forearm conditions with each other in order to disentangle the roles of exogenous and endogenous reference frames.Increasing the tactile SAM's AR biased perception towards vertical motion, but the effect was weak compared to the visual modality. We found no horizontal disambiguation, even for very small tactile ARs. A forearm rotation by 90° kept the vertical bias, even though it was now coupled with small ARs. A 45° rotation condition with crossed forearms, however, evoked a strong horizontal motion bias.Existing approaches to explain the visual SAM bias fail to explain the current tactile results. Particularly puzzling is the strong horizontal bias in the crossed-forearm conditions. In the case of tactile apparent motion, there seem to be no fixed priority rule for perceptual disambiguation. Rather the weighting of available evidence seems to depend on the degree of stimulus ambiguity, the current situation and on the perceptual strategy of the individual

  15. Tactile display with dielectric multilayer elastomer actuatorsq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysek, Marc; Lotz, Peter; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    Tactile perception is the human sensation of surface textures through the vibrations generated by stroking a finger over the surface. The skin responds to several distributed physical quantities. Perhaps the most important are high-frequency vibrations, pressure distributions (static shape) and thermal properties. The integration of tactile displays in man-machine interfaces promises a more intuitive handling. For this reason many tactile displays are developed using different technologies. We present several state-of-the-art tactile displays based on different types of dielectric elastomer actuators to clarify the advantages of our matrix display based on multilayer technology. Using this technology perpendicular and hexagonal arrays of actuator elements (tactile stimulators) can be integrated into a PDMS substrate. Element diameters down to 1 mm allow stimuli at the range of the human two-point-discrimination threshold. Driving the elements by column and row addressing enables various stimulation patterns with a reduced number of feeding lines. The transient analysis determines charging times of the capacitive actuators depending on actuator geometry and material parameters. This is very important to ensure an adequate dynamic characteristic of the actuators to stimulate the human skin by vibrations. The suitability of multilayer dielectric elastomer actuators for actuation in tactile displays has been determined. Beside the realization of a static tactile display - where multilayer DEA are integrated as drives for movable contact pins - we focus on the direct use of DEA as a vibrotactile display. Finally, we present the scenario and achieved results of a recognition threshold test. Even relative low voltages in the range of 800 V generate vibrations with 100% recognition ratio within the group of participants. Furthermore, the frequency dependent characteristic of the determined recognition threshold confirms with established literature.

  16. Factors affecting tactile spatial acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, J C; Kisner, J M

    1998-01-01

    Tactile spatial acuity on the fingerpad was measured using a grating orientation task. In this task, subjects are required to identify the orientation of square-wave gratings placed on the skin. Previous studies have shown that performance varies as a function of the width of the grooves in the gratings. In the present study, both groove width and the overall size and configuration of the contactors were varied. Sensitivity improved with wider grooves and with larger contactors. Additional measurements showed that the improved sensitivity is not the result of the increase in total area contacted, but rather is due to two other factors associated with larger contactors. One is the greater linear extent of the larger contactors. The other appears to be due to the reduction in the interference produced by the outer edge of the contactor. Specifically, as the contactor increases in size, the distance between the outer edge and the center portion of the grooves also increases. It was also shown that subjects are more sensitive to a single, continuous groove as compared with two grooves of the same total length but spatially discontinuous. Similarly, subjects are more sensitive to a contactor with a continuous groove than to a contactor in which just the end points of the groove are presented. The results are generally consistent with the results of peripheral, neurophysiological recordings. The results are discussed in terms of the way in which both spatial and intensive factors may affect sensitivity to grating orientation.

  17. Tactile Cuing to Augment Multisensory Human–Machine Interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, Peter A.; Lawson, Ben; Cholewiak, Roger; Elliott, Linda R.; Erp, van Jan B.F.; Mortimer, Bruce J.P.; Rupert, Angus; Redden, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Tactile displays promise to improve the information-processing capacity of operators, especially when used in conjunction with visual and auditory displays. In this article, we describe current applications and future directions in tactile cuing.

  18. Tactile Perception for Stroke Induce Changes in Electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Nae Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study provided a neurophysiological evidence on tactile perception in individuals with chronic stroke. Occupational therapists should consider an active tactile exploration as a useful modality on occupational performance in rehabilitation training.

  19. High-Speed Tactile Sensing for Array-Type Tactile Sensor and Object Manipulation Based on Tactile Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Fukui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a universal robot hand with tactile and other sensors. An array-type tactile sensor is crucial for dexterous manipulation of objects using a robotic hand, since this sensor can measure the pressure distribution on finger pads. The sensor has a very high resolution, and the shape of a grasped object can be classified by using this sensor. The more the number of measurement points provided, the higher the accuracy of the classification, but with a corresponding lengthening of the measurement cycle. In this paper, the problem of slow response time is resolved by using software for an array-type tactile sensor with high resolution that emulates the human sensor system. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated through experiments.

  20. Perception of tactile graphics: embossings versus cutouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Amy; Hopkins, Rose; Jin, David; Yazzolino, Lindsay; Verma, Svena; Merabet, Lotfi; Phillips, Flip; Sinha, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical information, such as illustrations, graphs, and diagrams, are an essential complement to text for conveying knowledge about the world. Although graphics can be communicated well via the visual modality, conveying this information via touch has proven to be challenging. The lack of easily comprehensible tactile graphics poses a problem for the blind. In this paper, we advance a hypothesis for the limited effectiveness of tactile graphics. The hypothesis contends that conventional graphics that rely upon embossings on two-dimensional surfaces do not allow the deployment of tactile exploratory procedures that are crucial for assessing global shape. Besides potentially accounting for some of the shortcomings of current approaches, this hypothesis also serves a prescriptive purpose by suggesting a different strategy for conveying graphical information via touch, one based on cutouts. We describe experiments demonstrating the greater effectiveness of this approach for conveying shape and identity information. These results hold the potential for creating more comprehensible tactile drawings for the visually impaired while also providing insights into shape estimation processes in the tactile modality.

  1. Robotic Tactile Sensing Technologies and System

    CERN Document Server

    Dahiya, Ravinder S

    2013-01-01

    Future robots are expected to work closely and interact safely with real-world objects and humans alike. Sense of touch is important in this context, as it helps estimate properties such as shape, texture, hardness, material type and many more; provides action related information, such as slip detection; and helps carrying out actions such as rolling an object between fingers without dropping it. This book presents an in-depth description of the solutions available for gathering tactile data, obtaining aforementioned tactile information from the data and effectively using the same in various robotic tasks. Better integration of tactile sensors on a robot’s body is prerequisite for the effective utilization of tactile data. For this reason, the hardware, software and application related issues (and resulting trade-offs) that must be considered to make tactile sensing an effective component of robotic platforms are discussed in-depth.To this end, human touch sensing has also been explored. The design hints co...

  2. Learning tactile skills through curious exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo ePape

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present curiosity-driven, autonomous acquisition of tactile exploratory skills on a biomimetic robot finger equipped with an array of microelectromechanical touch sensors. Instead of building tailored algorithms for solving a specific tactile task, we employ a more general curiosity-driven reinforcement learning approach that autonomously learns a set of motor skills in absence of an explicit teacher signal. In this approach, the acquisition of skills is driven by the information content of the sensory input signals relative to a learner that aims at representing sensory inputs using fewer and fewer computational resources. We show that, from initially random exploration of its environment, the robotic system autonomously develops a small set of basic motor skills that lead to different kinds of tactile input. Next, the system learns how to exploit the learned motor skills to solve supervised texture classification tasks. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of autonomous acquisition of tactile skills on physical robotic platforms through curiosity-driven reinforcement learning, overcomes typical difficulties of engineered solutions for active tactile exploration and underactuated control, and provides a basis for studying developmental learning through intrinsic motivation in robots.

  3. Path integration in tactile perception of shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Alessandro; Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-11-01

    Whenever we move the hand across a surface, tactile signals provide information about the relative velocity between the skin and the surface. If the system were able to integrate the tactile velocity information over time, cutaneous touch may provide an estimate of the relative displacement between the hand and the surface. Here, we asked whether humans are able to form a reliable representation of the motion path from tactile cues only, integrating motion information over time. In order to address this issue, we conducted three experiments using tactile motion and asked participants (1) to estimate the length of a simulated triangle, (2) to reproduce the shape of a simulated triangular path, and (3) to estimate the angle between two-line segments. Participants were able to accurately indicate the length of the path, whereas the perceived direction was affected by a direction bias (inward bias). The response pattern was thus qualitatively similar to the ones reported in classical path integration studies involving locomotion. However, we explain the directional biases as the result of a tactile motion aftereffect.

  4. Freezing in Touch: Sound Enhances Tactile Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Yeh Tsai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual segregation in rapidly changing visual displays can be facilitated by a synchronized salient sound that segregates itself from other sounds in the sequence (Vroomen & de Gelder, 2000. We examined whether this “freezing” phenomenon can also be found in tactile perception. Three vibrators were placed on the participant's palm to produce four different tactile patterns. Four sounds were presented separately and simultaneously with each of the four tactile patterns. Among the three same-pitch tones, an abrupt high-pitch tone was presented simultaneously with the designated temporal position of the target pattern in the sequence of tactual stimuli that was presented rapidly and repeatedly. The task was to identify the tactile pattern of the target. Results showed that participants responded faster and more accurately with the high-pitch tone, compared to the condition when all the tones were of the same pitch. However, the result reversed when an extra tactile cue was presented on the wrist. This suggests that a salient auditory signal can improve perceptual segregation not only in vision but also in touch. That is, it is a cross-modal facilitation, not an alerting or attentional cueing effect.

  5. Freezing effect in tactile perception: sound facilitates tactile identification by enhancing intensity but not duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Yeh; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2013-08-01

    Identification of a visual target can be enhanced by a simultaneously presented high tone embedded in a sequence of low tones. This is called "freezing effect" because it is as if the target display was frozen in time by the tone. Until now, however, it has not been known whether this sound facilitation effect exists for a target with modalities other than vision, such as tactility, and if so, what its underlying mechanism is. We demonstrate, for the first time, an audio-tactile freezing effect (Experiment 1). We use a method of constant stimuli in conjunction with a 2-AFC task to determine the point of subjective equality (PSE) of the duration (Experiment 2A) or intensity (Experiment 2B) of the tactile target. Results do not support the view that a high tone expands the duration of the tactile target, but rather that the tone enhances participants' subjective tactile intensity. When the tactile intensity of the target was increased to match the shift of PSE as in Experiment 2B, this increased intensity indeed improved identification, further suggesting that intensity enhancement is the mechanism (Experiment 3). The perceived tactile intensity enhancement by a sound indicates genuine multisensory integration.

  6. From Dual-Mode Triboelectric Nanogenerator to Smart Tactile Sensor: A Multiplexing Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zou, Jingdian; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Meng; Cao, Xia; Wang, Ning; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-03-23

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can be applied for the next generation of artificial intelligent products, where skin-like tactile sensing advances the ability of robotics to feel and interpret environment. In this paper, a flexible and thin tactile sensor was developed on the basis of dual-mode TENGs. The effective transduction of touch and pressure stimulus into independent and interpretable electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of location and pressure with a plane resolution of 2 mm, a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity up to 28 mV·N(-1), and a linear pressure detection ranging from 40 to 140 N. Interestingly, this self-powered dual-mode sensor can even interpret contact and hardness of objects by analyzing the shape of the current peak, which makes this low-cost TENG-based sensor promising for applications in touch screens, electronic skins, healthcare, and environmental survey.

  7. A chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin with interactive colour changing controlled by tactile sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Nguyen, Amanda; Chortos, Alex; To, John W. F.; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Bae, Won-Gyu; Tok, Jeffrey B.-H.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-01

    Some animals, such as the chameleon and cephalopod, have the remarkable capability to change their skin colour. This unique characteristic has long inspired scientists to develop materials and devices to mimic such a function. However, it requires the complex integration of stretchability, colour-changing and tactile sensing. Here we show an all-solution processed chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin (e-skin), in which the e-skin colour can easily be controlled through varying the applied pressure along with the applied pressure duration. As such, the e-skin's colour change can also be in turn utilized to distinguish the pressure applied. The integration of the stretchable, highly tunable resistive pressure sensor and the fully stretchable organic electrochromic device enables the demonstration of a stretchable electrochromically active e-skin with tactile-sensing control. This system will have wide range applications such as interactive wearable devices, artificial prosthetics and smart robots.

  8. AWARENESS: Tactility and Experience as Transformational Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Bang, Anne Louise; Locher, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Awareness Project investigates the following question: Can dialogue tools that challenge tactile competencies support the development of fashion and textile design in a sustainable direction? In this article, we pay special attention to user engagement and design education and discuss...... experiences of tactile sensibility as a means to create increased awareness about the material quality of textiles and garments. The aim of our research is to develop new dialogue tools to be used in the teaching of fashion and textile design students in order to stimulate new ways of thinking and engaging...... with users. By employing participatory methods in the field of fashion and textiles, we seek to develop an alternative transformational strategy that may further the design of products and services for a more sustainable future. In the initial theoretical section, we define tactile sensibility, which...

  9. Polarity effect in electrovibration for tactile display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Kurt A; Nammi, Krishnakant; Agarwal, Abhishek K; Tyler, Mitchell E; Haase, Steven J; Beebe, David J

    2006-10-01

    Electrovibration is the tactile sensation of an alternating potential between the human body and a smooth conducing surface when the skin slides over the surface and where the current is too small to stimulate sensory nerves directly. It has been proposed as a high-density tactile display method, for example to display pictographic information to persons who are blind. Previous models for the electrovibration transduction mechanism are based on a parallel-plate capacitor in which the electrostatic force is insensitive to polarity. We present experimental data showing that electrovibratory perceptual sensitivity to positive pulses is less than that for negative or biphasic pulses and propose that this disparity may be due to the asymmetric electrical properties of human skin. We furthermore propose using negative pulses for insulated tactile displays based on electrovibration because their sensory thresholds were found to be more stable than for waveforms incorporating positive pulses.

  10. Visual and tactile assessment of neuromuscular fade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brull, S J; Silverman, D G

    1993-08-01

    The accuracy of visual and tactile assessment of the neuromuscular fade in response to train-of-four (TOF) and double-burst stimulation (DBS) were compared to assess their relative utility in the clinical setting. For each of 74 data sets with a mechanographic TOF ratio less than 0.70, an observer (blinded to the presence or degree of fade) performed visual and tactile assessments of fade in response to TOF, DBS3,3, and DBS3,2 stimuli at low current (20 and 30 mA) and high current (50 and 60 mA). For the range of mechanographic TOF ratios between 0.41 and 0.70, visual assessment failed to identify TOF, DBS3,3, and DBS3,2 fade in 46%, 18%, and 14% of cases at high current and in 23%, 5%, and 0% of cases at low current, respectively. Tactile assessments failed to identify fade in 55%, 23%, and 14% of cases at high current and in 23%, 14%, and 14% of cases at low current. Overall, the ability to detect fade was comparable for visual and tactile assessments regardless of the method of neurostimulation (P = NS with paired t-test). However, the degree of overestimation of the fade ratio (i.e., quantitative assessment) tended to be less when using tactile means; the difference achieved significance for TOF at low current and DBS3,3 at both low and high currents. We conclude that the differences between the visual and tactile means of assessment are relatively small compared to the differences among the TOF and DBS patterns of neurostimulation. Both subjective techniques are often inadequate in settings in which assurance of full recovery of neuromuscular function is critical.

  11. The effect of volumetric (3D) tactile symbols within inclusive tactile maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Jaume; Puyuelo, Marina; Lloveras, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Point, linear and areal elements, which are two-dimensional and of a graphic nature, are the morphological elements employed when designing tactile maps and symbols for visually impaired users. However, beyond the two-dimensional domain, there is a fourth group of elements - volumetric elements - which mapmakers do not take sufficiently into account when it comes to designing tactile maps and symbols. This study analyses the effect of including volumetric, or 3D, symbols within a tactile map. In order to do so, the researchers compared two tactile maps. One of them uses only two-dimensional elements and is produced using thermoforming, one of the most popular systems in this field, while the other includes volumetric symbols, thus highlighting the possibilities opened up by 3D printing, a new area of production. The results of the study show that including 3D symbols improves the efficiency and autonomous use of these products.

  12. Modulation of Motion Perception of Ipsilateral Tactile Stimuli Using Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Suzuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the modulation of tactile motion perception by presenting static sounds with two alternately and repeatedly presented vibrotactile stimuli for the perception of tactile apparent motion. Previous research on tactile motion perception has used direction judgment tasks for apparent motion that consist of two non-repeating, or more than two repeating stimuli. However, the direction of two repeating apparent motion stimuli has been considered too ambiguous to be judged. The present study shows that the additional presentation of sounds with manipulated timings could help to determine the perceived direction of tactile motion despite the ambiguity in the interpretation of tactile stimuli at ipsilateral locations. Furthermore, we found that there is a limited alternation rate for tactile stimuli that can be used to achieve significant modulation using sound. We relate the temporal properties observed during crossmodal effects in tactile motion perception, to those observed during some other crossmodal phenomena.

  13. Sensorization of Robotic Hand Using Optical Three-Axis Tactile Sensor: Evaluation with Grasping and Twisting Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafiah Yussof

    2010-01-01

    tasks. Conclusion: Experimental result shows that the robot hand managed to perform grasping and twisting of bottle cap smoothly. The overall results revealed good performance of the proposed optical three-axis tactile sensor system and robot hand control algorithm for future application in a real artificial robot hand. In addition, slippage sensation measured in a robot control system could contribute a better maneuvering of the robot arm-finger system.

  14. Suppl\\'eance perceptive par \\'electro-stimulation linguale embarqu\\'ee : perspectives pour la pr\\'evention des escarres chez le bless\\'e m\\'edullaire

    CERN Document Server

    Chenu, Olivier; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. This paper proposes an application for pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia).

  15. Novel tactile feedback to reduce overt stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Dwight E; Goggans, Paul M; Snyder, Gregory J

    2012-08-22

    Stuttering is generally considered to be a speech disorder that affects ∼1% of the global population. Various forms of speech feedback have been shown to reduce overt stuttered speaking, and in particular, second speech signal through speech feedback has drastically reduced utterances of stuttered speech in adults with persistent stuttering. This study reports data for increased overt fluency of speech in an adult stuttering population, whereby the vocalization of the speaker is captured by a microphone or an accelerometer, signal processed, and returned as mechanical tactile speech feedback to the speaker's skin. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to show that both the microphone and the accelerometer speaking conditions were significantly more fluent than a control (no feedback) condition, with the microphone-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 71% and the accelerometer-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 80%. It is apparent that self-generated tactile feedback can be used to enhance fluency significantly in those who stutter.

  16. Meet our Neighbours - a tactile experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, L.; Lobo Correia, A.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary science is a key field in astronomy that draws lots of attention and that engages large amounts of enthusiasts. On its essence, it is a visual science and the current resources and activities for the inclusion of visually impaired children, although increasing, are still costly and somewhat scarce. Therefore there is a paramount need to develop more low cost resources in order to provide experiences that can reach all, even the more socially deprived communities. "Meet our neighbours!-a tactile experience", plans to promote and provide inclusion activities for visually impaired children and their non-visually impaired peers through the use of astronomy hands-on low cost activities. Is aimed for children from the ages of 6 to 12 years old and produce data set 13 tactile images of the main objects of the Solar System that can be used in schools, science centres and outreach associations. Accessing several common problems through tactile resources, with this project we present ways to successfully provide low cost solutions (avoiding the expensive tactile printing costs), promote inclusion and interactive hands-on activities for visually impaired children and their non-visually impaired peers and create dynamic interactions based on oral knowledge transmission between them. Here we describe the process of implementing such initiative near target communities: establishing a bridge between scientists, children and teachers. The struggles and challenges perceived during the project and the enrichment experience of engaging astronomy with these specific groups, broadening horizons in an overall experience accessible to all.

  17. Tactile Astronomy - a Portuguese case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, L.; Alves, F.; Correia, A.

    2012-09-01

    Although astronomy plays an important role in the most various outreach initiatives, as well as school science curricula, due to its strong visual component in knowledge acquisition, astronomy subjects are not entirely well addressed and accessed by visually impaired students and/or general public. This stresses the need of more tactile material production, still very scarce in an educational context whether formal or informal. This is a case study activity developed based on different schematic tactile images of several objects present in our solar system. These images in relief, highlight, through touch, several relevant features present in the different astronomical objects studied. The scientific knowledge is apprehended through the use of a tactile key, complemented with additional information. Through proper hands-on activities implementation and careful analysis of the outcome, the adapted images associated with an explanatory key prove to be a valuable resource in tactile astronomy domain. Here we describe the process of implementing such initiative near visually impaired students. The struggles and challenges perceived by all involved and the enrichment experience of engaging astronomy with visually impaired audiences, broadening horizons in an overall experience accessible to all.

  18. Investigating Tactile Stimulation in Symbiotic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orso, Valeria; Mazza, Renato; Gamberini, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The core characteristics of tactile stimuli, i.e., recognition reliability and tolerance to ambient interference, make them an ideal candidate to be integrated into a symbiotic system. The selection of the appropriate stimulation is indeed important in order not to hinder the interaction from the...

  19. The neural basis of tactile motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2014-12-15

    The manipulation of objects commonly involves motion between object and skin. In this review, we discuss the neural basis of tactile motion perception and its similarities with its visual counterpart. First, much like in vision, the perception of tactile motion relies on the processing of spatiotemporal patterns of activation across populations of sensory receptors. Second, many neurons in primary somatosensory cortex are highly sensitive to motion direction, and the response properties of these neurons draw strong analogies to those of direction-selective neurons in visual cortex. Third, tactile speed may be encoded in the strength of the response of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferents and of a subpopulation of speed-sensitive neurons in cortex. However, both afferent and cortical responses are strongly dependent on texture as well, so it is unclear how texture and speed signals are disambiguated. Fourth, motion signals from multiple fingers must often be integrated during the exploration of objects, but the way these signals are combined is complex and remains to be elucidated. Finally, visual and tactile motion perception interact powerfully, an integration process that is likely mediated by visual association cortex.

  20. Seeing the Body Distorts Tactile Size Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Sadibolova, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Vision of the body modulates somatosensation, even when entirely non-informative about stimulation. For example, seeing the body increases tactile spatial acuity, but reduces acute pain. While previous results demonstrate that vision of the body modulates somatosensory sensitivity, it is unknown whether vision also affects metric properties of…

  1. Aero-tactile integration in speech perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gick, Bryan; Derrick, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Visual information from a speaker’s face can enhance1 or interfere with2 accurate auditory perception. This integration of information across auditory and visual streams has been observed in functional imaging studies3,4, and has typically been attributed to the frequency and robustness with which perceivers jointly encounter event-specific information from these two modalities5. Adding the tactile modality has long been considered a crucial next step in understanding multisensory integration. However, previous studies have found an influence of tactile input on speech perception only under limited circumstances, either where perceivers were aware of the task6,7 or where they had received training to establish a cross-modal mapping8–10. Here we show that perceivers integrate naturalistic tactile information during auditory speech perception without previous training. Drawing on the observation that some speech sounds produce tiny bursts of aspiration (such as English ‘p’)11, we applied slight, inaudible air puffs on participants’ skin at one of two locations: the right hand or the neck. Syllables heard simultaneously with cutaneous air puffs were more likely to be heard as aspirated (for example, causing participants to mishear ‘b’ as ‘p’). These results demonstrate that perceivers integrate event-relevant tactile information in auditory perception in much the same way as they do visual information. PMID:19940925

  2. Novel high resolution tactile robotic fingertips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Jankovics, Vince; Gorsic, Matija;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel robotic fingertip based on piezoresistive rubber that can sense pressure tactile stimuli with a high spatial resolution over curved surfaces. The working principle is based on a three-layer sandwich structure (conductive electrodes on top and bottom and piezoresistive...

  3. Tactile display device using an electrorheological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H. Douglas

    1994-08-01

    A tactile display device utilizes an electrorheological fluid to activate a plurality of tactile dots. A voltage is selectively produced uniformly across an electrorheological fluid flowing between a common ground electrode and a plurality of conductive dot electrodes, thereby producing an increase in the fluid's viscosity to the extent that fluid flow between the two electrodes is restricted. The flow restriction produces a build-up of electrorheological fluid in a corresponding dot actuator chamber. The resulting pressure increase in the chamber displaces an elastic diaphragm fixed to a display surface to form a lump which can be perceived by the reader as one dot in a Braille character cell. A flow regulation system provides a continually pressurized flow system and provides for free flow of the electrorheological fluid through the plurality of dot actuator chambers when they are not activated. The device is adaptable to printed circuit techniques and can simultaneously display tactile dots representative of a full page of Braille characters stored on a medium such as a tape cassette or to display tactile dots representative of non-Braille data appearing on a computer monitor or contained on another data storage medium. In an alternate embodiment, the elastic diaphragm drives a plurality of spring-loaded pins provided with positive stops to maintain consistent displacements of the pins in both their actuated and nonactuated positions.

  4. Tactile feedback for myoelectric forearm prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, H.J.B

    2014-01-01

    Tactile feedback about, at least, hand aperture and grasping force, is required for (1) optimal control of a myoelectric forearm prosthesis, (2) to reduce the burden on the visual system and (3) to enable more subconscious use of the prosthesis. In this thesis, the possibilities of vibrotactile and

  5. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-02-10

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking.

  6. Direction coding using a tactile chair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, S.C. de; Erp, J.B.F. van; Kiefer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    This laboratory study examined the possibility of using a car seat instrumented with tactile display elements (tactors) to communicate directional information to a driver. A car seat fitted with an 8 by 8 matrix of tactors embedded in the seat pan was used to code eight different directions.Localiza

  7. Instrumental tactile diagnostics in robot-assisted surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solodova RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rozalia F Solodova,1,2 Vladimir V Galatenko,1,2 Eldar R Nakashidze,3 Igor L Andreytsev,3 Alexey V Galatenko,1 Dmitriy K Senchik,2 Vladimir M Staroverov,1 Vladimir E Podolskii,1,2 Mikhail E Sokolov,1,2 Victor A Sadovnichy1,2 1Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, 2Institute of Mathematical Studies of Complex Systems, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 31st Surgery Department, Clinical Hospital 31, Moscow, Russia Background: Robotic surgery has gained wide acceptance due to minimizing trauma in patients. However, the lack of tactile feedback is an essential limiting factor for the further expansion. In robotic surgery, feedback related to touch is currently kinesthetic, and it is mainly aimed at the minimization of force applied to tissues and organs. Design and implementation of diagnostic tactile feedback is still an open problem. We hypothesized that a sufficient tactile feedback in robot-assisted surgery can be provided by utilization of Medical Tactile Endosurgical Complex (MTEC, which is a novel specialized tool that is already commercially available in the Russian Federation. MTEC allows registration of tactile images by a mechanoreceptor, real-time visualization of these images, and reproduction of images via a tactile display. Materials and methods: Nine elective surgeries were performed with da Vinci™ robotic system. An assistant performed tactile examination through an additional port under the guidance of a surgeon during revision of tissues. The operating surgeon sensed registered tactile data using a tactile display, and the assistant inspected the visualization of tactile data. First, surgeries where lesion boundaries were visually detectable were performed. The goal was to promote cooperation between the surgeon and the assistant and to train them in perception of the tactile feedback. Then, instrumental tactile diagnostics was utilized in case of visually undetectable boundaries. Results: In robot-assisted surgeries where lesion

  8. Tactile display on the remaining hand for unilateral hand amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human rely profoundly on tactile feedback from fingertips to interact with the environment, whereas most hand prostheses used in clinics provide no tactile feedback. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility to use a tactile display glove that can be worn by a unilateral hand amputee on the remaining healthy hand to display tactile feedback from a hand prosthesis. The main benefit is that users could easily distinguish the feedback for each finger, even without training. The claimed advantage is supported by preliminary tests with healthy subjects. This approach may lead to the development of effective and affordable tactile display devices that provide tactile feedback for individual fingertip of hand prostheses.

  9. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  10. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception

    OpenAIRE

    Masakazu Ide; Souta Hidaka

    2013-01-01

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimul...

  11. Millisecond Precision Spike Timing Shapes Tactile Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Mackevicius, Emily L.; Best, Matthew D.; Hannes P Saal; Bensmaia, Sliman J.

    2012-01-01

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequ...

  12. Laser application on haptics: Tactile stiffness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Memeo, M.; Cannella, F.; Valente, M.; Caldwell, D. G.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-06-01

    There is a great interest in exploring the proprieties of the sense of the touch, its detailed knowledge in fact is a key issue in the area of robotics, haptics and human-machine interaction. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a novel measurement method for the assessment of the tactile stiffness based on a original test rig; tactile stiffness is defined as the ratio between force, exerted by the finger, and the displacement of the finger tip operated during the test. To reach this scope, the paper describes a specific experimental test-rig used for the evaluation of subject tactile sensitivity, where finger force applied during tests as well as displacement and velocity of displacement, operated by the subject under investigation, are measured. Results show that tactile stiffness is linear respect to stimuli spatial difference (which is proportional to the difficulty to detect the variation of them). In particular, it has been possible to relate the force and displacement measured during the tests. The relationship between the response of the subject to the grating, velocity and force is determined. These results permit to carry out the further experimental tests on the same subject avoiding the use of a load cell and therefore simplifying the measurement test rig and data post-processing. Indeed, the first aspect (use of a load cell) can be relevant, because the grating positions are different, requiring a specific re-calibration and setting before each trial; while the second aspect allows simplify the test rig complexity and the processing algorithm.

  13. Remote Tactile Displays for Future Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    earcons for sound where musical parameters (e.g., frequency, timbre , rhythm, intensity, register) are varied to create concise, easily understood...Van Erp and Spapé (2003) essentially used this type of approach to create 59 tactile “melodies” by transforming pieces of music from the auditory...Instruments for Musical Expression, Dublin, Ireland, 1-6, 2002. Hart, F. G.; Staveland, L. E. Development of NASA-TLX (Task Load Index): Results of

  14. Aero-tactile integration in speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Gick, Bryan; Derrick, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Visual information from a speaker’s face can enhance1 or interfere with2 accurate auditory perception. This integration of information across auditory and visual streams has been observed in functional imaging studies3,4, and has typically been attributed to the frequency and robustness with which perceivers jointly encounter event-specific information from these two modalities5. Adding the tactile modality has long been considered a crucial next step in understanding multisensory integration...

  15. Tactile Imaging Markers to Characterize Female Pelvic Floor Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    van Raalte, Heather; Egorov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Vaginal Tactile Imager (VTI) records pressure patterns from vaginal walls under an applied tissue deformation and during pelvic floor muscle contractions. The objective of this study is to validate tactile imaging and muscle contraction parameters (markers) sensitive to the female pelvic floor conditions. Twenty-two women with normal and prolapse conditions were examined by a vaginal tactile imaging probe. We identified 9 parameters which were sensitive to prolapse conditions (p < 0.05 fo...

  16. Tactile Imaging Markers to Characterize Female Pelvic Floor Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raalte, Heather; Egorov, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    The Vaginal Tactile Imager (VTI) records pressure patterns from vaginal walls under an applied tissue deformation and during pelvic floor muscle contractions. The objective of this study is to validate tactile imaging and muscle contraction parameters (markers) sensitive to the female pelvic floor conditions. Twenty-two women with normal and prolapse conditions were examined by a vaginal tactile imaging probe. We identified 9 parameters which were sensitive to prolapse conditions (p pelvic floor prolapse.

  17. Effective tactile noise facilitates visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, J E; Doti, R; Faubert, J

    2012-01-01

    The fulcrum principle establishes that a subthreshold excitatory signal (entering in one sense) that is synchronous with a facilitation signal (entering in a different sense) can be increased (up to a resonant-like level) and then decreased by the energy and frequency content of the facilitating signal. As a result, the sensation of the signal changes according to the excitatory signal strength. In this context, the sensitivity transitions represent the change from subthreshold activity to a firing activity in multisensory neurons. Initially the energy of their activity (supplied by the weak signals) is not enough to be detected but when the facilitating signal enters the brain, it generates a general activation among multisensory neurons, modifying their original activity. In our opinion, the result is an integrated activation that promotes sensitivity transitions and the signals are then perceived. In other words, the activity created by the interaction of the excitatory signal (e.g., visual) and the facilitating signal (tactile noise) at some specific energy, produces the capability for a central detection of an otherwise weak signal. In this work we investigate the effect of an effective tactile noise on visual perception. Specifically we show that tactile noise is capable of decreasing luminance modulated thresholds.

  18. Influence of Visual Motion on Tactile Motion Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensmaïa, S. J.; Killebrew, J. H.; Craig, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Subjects were presented with pairs of tactile drifting sinusoids and made speed discrimination judgments. On some trials, a visual drifting sinusoid, which subjects were instructed to ignore, was presented simultaneously with one of the two tactile stimuli. When the visual and tactile gratings drifted in the same direction (i.e., from left to right), the visual distractors were found to increase the perceived speed of the tactile gratings. The effect of the visual distractors was proportional to their temporal frequency but not to their perceived speed. When the visual and tactile gratings drifted in opposite directions, the distracting effect of the visual distractors was either substantially reduced or, in some cases, reversed (i.e., the distractors slowed the perceived speed of the tactile gratings). This result suggests that the observed visual-tactile interaction is dependent on motion and not simply on the oscillations inherent in drifting sinusoids. Finally, we find that disrupting the temporal synchrony between the visual and tactile stimuli eliminates the distracting effect of the visual stimulus. We interpret this latter finding as evidence that the observed visual-tactile interaction operates at the sensory level and does not simply reflect a response bias. PMID:16723415

  19. Context-dependent changes in tactile perception during movement execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; McGlone, Francis; Spence, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Tactile perception is inhibited during movement execution, a phenomenon known as tactile suppression. Here, we investigated whether the type of movement determines whether or not this form of sensory suppression occurs. Participants performed simple reaching or exploratory movements. Tactile discrimination thresholds were calculated for vibratory stimuli delivered to participants' wrists while executing the movement, and while at rest (a tactile discrimination task, TD). We also measured discrimination performance in a same vs. different task for the explored materials during the execution of the different movements (a surface discrimination task, SD). The TD and SD tasks could either be performed singly or together, both under active movement and passive conditions. Consistent with previous results, tactile thresholds measured at rest were significantly lower than those measured during both active movement and passive touch (that is, tactile suppression was observed). Moreover, SD performance was significantly better under conditions of single-tasking, active movements, as well as exploratory movements, as compared to conditions of dual-tasking, passive movements, and reaching movements, respectively. Therefore, the present results demonstrate that when active hand movements are made with the purpose of gaining information about the surface properties of different materials an enhanced perceptual performance is observed. As such, it would appear that tactile suppression occurs for irrelevant tactual features during both reaching and exploratory movements, but not for those task-relevant features that result from action execution during tactile exploration. Taken together, then, these results support a context-dependent modulation of tactile suppression during movement execution.

  20. Context-dependent changes in tactile perception during movement execution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana eJuravle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tactile perception is inhibited during movement execution, a phenomenon known as tactile suppression. Here, we investigated whether the type of movement determines whether or not this form of sensory suppression occurs. Participants performed simple reaching or exploratory movements. Tactile discrimination thresholds were calculated for vibratory stimuli delivered to participants’ wrists while executing the movement, and while at rest (a tactile discrimination task, TD. We also measured discrimination performance in a same vs. different task for the explored materials during the execution of the different movements (a surface discrimination task, SD. The TD and SD tasks could either be performed singly or together, both under active movement and passive conditions. Consistent with previous results, tactile thresholds measured at rest were significantly lower than those measured during both active movement and passive touch (that is, tactile suppression was observed. Moreover, SD performance was significantly better under conditions of single-tasking, active movements, as well as exploratory movements, as compared to conditions of dual-tasking, passive movements, and reaching movements, respectively. Therefore, the present results demonstrate that when active hand movements are made with the purpose of gaining information about the surface properties of different materials enhanced perceptual performance is observed. As such, it would appear that tactile suppression occurs for irrelevant tactual features during both reaching and exploratory movements, but not for those task-relevant features that result from action execution during tactile exploration. Taken together, then, these results support a context-dependent modulation of tactile suppression during movement execution.

  1. Visuomotor adaptation changes stereoscopic depth perception and tactile discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Robert; Fantoni, Carlo; Caudek, Corrado; Assad, John A; Domini, Fulvio

    2013-10-23

    Perceptual judgments of relative depth from binocular disparity are systematically distorted in humans, despite in principle having access to reliable 3D information. Interestingly, these distortions vanish at a natural grasping distance, as if perceived stereo depth is contingent on a specific reference distance for depth-disparity scaling that corresponds to the length of our arm. Here we show that the brain's representation of the arm indeed powerfully modulates depth perception, and that this internal calibration can be quickly updated. We used a classic visuomotor adaptation task in which subjects execute reaching movements with the visual feedback of their reaching finger displaced farther in depth, as if they had a longer arm. After adaptation, 3D perception changed dramatically, and became accurate at the "new" natural grasping distance, the updated disparity scaling reference distance. We further tested whether the rapid adaptive changes were restricted to the visual modality or were characteristic of sensory systems in general. Remarkably, we found an improvement in tactile discrimination consistent with a magnified internal image of the arm. This suggests that the brain integrates sensory signals with information about arm length, and quickly adapts to an artificially updated body structure. These adaptive processes are most likely a relic of the mechanisms needed to optimally correct for changes in size and shape of the body during ontogenesis.

  2. Finite element analysis of (SA) mechanoreceptors in tactile sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Syamimi; Yahud, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses the structural design of a fingertip model in order to analyse the sensory function of slow adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors by using the finite element analysis (FEA) method. A biologically inspired tactile sensor was designed to mimic a similar response of the human mechanoreceptors in the human glabrous skin. The simulation work was done by using COMSOL Multiphysics. The artificial skin was modelled as a solid square block of silicone elastomer with a semi cylinder protrusion on top. It was modelled as a nearly incompressible and linear hyperelastic material defined by Neo Hookean constitutive law. The sensing element on the other hand was modelled by using constantan alloy mimicking the SA1 receptor. Boundary loads of 1 N/m² to 4 N/m² with the increment of 1 N/m² were applied to the top surface of the protrusion in z and x-direction for normal and shear stress, respectively. The epidermal model base was constrained to maintain the same boundary conditions throughout all simulations. The changes of length experienced by the sensing element were calculated. The simulations result in terms of strain was identified. The simulated result was plotted in terms of sensing element strain against the boundary load and the graph should produce a linear response.

  3. The importance of synchrony and temporal order of visual and tactile input for illusory limb ownership experiences - an FMRI study applying virtual reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bekrater-Bodmann

    Full Text Available In the so-called rubber hand illusion, synchronous visuotactile stimulation of a visible rubber hand together with one's own hidden hand elicits ownership experiences for the artificial limb. Recently, advanced virtual reality setups were developed to induce a virtual hand illusion (VHI. Here, we present functional imaging data from a sample of 25 healthy participants using a new device to induce the VHI in the environment of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI system. In order to evaluate the neuronal robustness of the illusion, we varied the degree of synchrony between visual and tactile events in five steps: in two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied prior to visual stimulation (asynchrony of -300 ms or -600 ms, whereas in another two conditions, the tactile stimulation was applied after visual stimulation (asynchrony of +300 ms or +600 ms. In the fifth condition, tactile and visual stimulation was applied synchronously. On a subjective level, the VHI was successfully induced by synchronous visuotactile stimulation. Asynchronies between visual and tactile input of ±300 ms did not significantly diminish the vividness of illusion, whereas asynchronies of ±600 ms did. The temporal order of visual and tactile stimulation had no effect on VHI vividness. Conjunction analyses of functional MRI data across all conditions revealed significant activation in bilateral ventral premotor cortex (PMv. Further characteristic activation patterns included bilateral activity in the motion-sensitive medial superior temporal area as well as in the bilateral Rolandic operculum, suggesting their involvement in the processing of bodily awareness through the integration of visual and tactile events. A comparison of the VHI-inducing conditions with asynchronous control conditions of ±600 ms yielded significant PMv activity only contralateral to the stimulation site. These results underline the temporal limits of the induction of limb ownership related to

  4. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  5. TACTILE SENSOR AND METHOD FOR DETERMINING A SHEAR FORCE AND SLIP WITH SUCH A TACTILE SENSOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, F; Holweg, E.G.M.; Regtien, P.P.L.; Jongkind, W.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9740339 (A1) The invention relates to a tactile sensor comprising a base plate provided at a first side with a plurality of electrically conducting wires forming a row, and provided at a second side opposite to the first side of the base plate with a plurality of electrically cond

  6. Integration of auditory and tactile inputs in musical meter perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Gamble, Darik; Sarnlertsophon, Kristine; Wang, Xiaoqin; Hsiao, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Musicians often say that they not only hear but also "feel" music. To explore the contribution of tactile information to "feeling" music, we investigated the degree that auditory and tactile inputs are integrated in humans performing a musical meter-recognition task. Subjects discriminated between two types of sequences, "duple" (march-like rhythms) and "triple" (waltz-like rhythms), presented in three conditions: (1) unimodal inputs (auditory or tactile alone); (2) various combinations of bimodal inputs, where sequences were distributed between the auditory and tactile channels such that a single channel did not produce coherent meter percepts; and (3) bimodal inputs where the two channels contained congruent or incongruent meter cues. We first show that meter is perceived similarly well (70-85 %) when tactile or auditory cues are presented alone. We next show in the bimodal experiments that auditory and tactile cues are integrated to produce coherent meter percepts. Performance is high (70-90 %) when all of the metrically important notes are assigned to one channel and is reduced to 60 % when half of these notes are assigned to one channel. When the important notes are presented simultaneously to both channels, congruent cues enhance meter recognition (90 %). Performance dropped dramatically when subjects were presented with incongruent auditory cues (10 %), as opposed to incongruent tactile cues (60 %), demonstrating that auditory input dominates meter perception. These observations support the notion that meter perception is a cross-modal percept with tactile inputs underlying the perception of "feeling" music.

  7. Tactile displays in the cockpit: Developments in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Jansen, C.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Veen, H.J van

    2008-01-01

    Tactile displays provide information by applying local vibrations to the user's skin. The research organization TNO has developed a tactile torso display by implementing a number of pager motors, or “tactors” into a vest, allowing for the generation of spatio-temporal patterns. TNO carries out resea

  8. Relative finger position influences whether you can localize tactile stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, K.E.; Anema, H.A.; Brenner, E.; Dijkerman, H.C.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether the relative positions of the fingers influence tactile localization, participants were asked to localize tactile stimuli applied to their fingertips. We measured the location and rate of errors for three finger configurations: fingers stretched out and together so that they a

  9. Tactile Cuing to Augment Multisensory Human-Machine Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, P.A.; Lawson, B.; Cholewiak, R.; Elliott, L.R.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Mortimer, B.J.P.; Rupert, A.; Redden, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Tactile displays promise to improve the information-processing capacity of operators, especially when used in conjunction with visual and auditory displays. In this article, we describe current applications and future directions in tactile cuing. © 2015 by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. All r

  10. A Case Study of Tactile Language and its Possible Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup; Nielsen, Anja; Strøm, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    of a five year old congenital deafblind child communicating with his mother about a slide experience tactile linguistic features of phonology, morphology, semantics and syntax were explored. The linguistic features of tactile language were found to involve a potential unique and complex structure based...

  11. Tactile Perception in Adults with Autism: A Multidimensional Psychophysical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Carissa; McGlone, Francis; Folger, Stephen; Tannan, Vinay; Baranek, Grace; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Essick, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Although sensory problems, including unusual tactile sensitivity, are heavily associated with autism, there is a dearth of rigorous psychophysical research. We compared tactile sensation in adults with autism to controls on the palm and forearm, the latter innervated by low-threshold unmyelinated afferents subserving a social/affiliative…

  12. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localisation and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePatanè

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviours. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localising, probing and negotiating obstacles.Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe, and basal angular encoders allow tactile localisation in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behaviour of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material.The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: First, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localisation with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorisation. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the

  13. Acoustic Tactile Representation of Visual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pubudu Madhawa

    Our goal is to explore the use of hearing and touch to convey graphical and pictorial information to visually impaired people. Our focus is on dynamic, interactive display of visual information using existing, widely available devices, such as smart phones and tablets with touch sensitive screens. We propose a new approach for acoustic-tactile representation of visual signals that can be implemented on a touch screen and allows the user to actively explore a two-dimensional layout consisting of one or more objects with a finger or a stylus while listening to auditory feedback via stereo headphones. The proposed approach is acoustic-tactile because sound is used as the primary source of information for object localization and identification, while touch is used for pointing and kinesthetic feedback. A static overlay of raised-dot tactile patterns can also be added. A key distinguishing feature of the proposed approach is the use of spatial sound (directional and distance cues) to facilitate the active exploration of the layout. We consider a variety of configurations for acoustic-tactile rendering of object size, shape, identity, and location, as well as for the overall perception of simple layouts and scenes. While our primary goal is to explore the fundamental capabilities and limitations of representing visual information in acoustic-tactile form, we also consider a number of relatively simple configurations that can be tied to specific applications. In particular, we consider a simple scene layout consisting of objects in a linear arrangement, each with a distinct tapping sound, which we compare to a ''virtual cane.'' We will also present a configuration that can convey a ''Venn diagram.'' We present systematic subjective experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed display for shape perception, object identification and localization, and 2-D layout perception, as well as the applications. Our experiments were conducted with visually blocked

  14. Interactions between tactile and proprioceptive representations in haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon-Gonzalez, L; Naufel, S N; Santos, V J; Helms Tillery, S

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic limbs, regardless of their sophisticated motor control, require sensory feedback to viably interact with the environment. Toward that aim, the authors examined interrelationships between tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Through human psychophysics experiments, they evaluated error patterns of subjects estimating hand location in a horizontal 2-dimensional workspace under 3 tactile conditions. While tactile cues did not significantly affect the structure of the pattern of errors, touching the workspace reduced estimation errors. During neurophysiological experiments, a macaque grasped textured objects using 2 hand postures. Sensory coding showed dependence on both roughness of the manipulandum and posture. In summary, the authors suggest that tactile sensations underlying haptics are processed in a stable spatial reference frame provided by a proprioceptive system, and that tactile and proprioceptive inputs can be encoded simultaneously by individual cells. Such insights will be useful for providing stable, adaptive sensory feedback for neuroprosthetics.

  15. Composite thermal micro-actuator array for tactile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enikov, Eniko T.; Lazarov, Kalin V.

    2003-07-01

    Tactile perception of complex symbols through tactile stimulation is an exciting application of a phenomenon known as tactile illusion (TI). Sensation of motion on the skin can be produced by a limited number of discrete mechanical actuators applying light pressure over the skin. This phenomenon can thus be used as a neurophysiological testing tool to determine central and peripheral nervous system injury as well as providing an additional human-machine communication channel. This paper describes the development of a 4 x 5 actuator array of individual vibrating pixels for fingertip tactile communication. The array is approximately one square centimeter and utilizes novel micro-clutch MEMS technology. The individual pixels are turned ON and OFF by pairs of microscopic composite thermal actuators, while the main vibration is generated by a vibrating piezo-electric plate. The physiological parameters required for inducing tactile illusion are described. The fabrication sequence for the thermal micro-actuators along with actuation results are also presented.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Tactile Sensation by Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yem, Vibol; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    An electrotactile display is a tactile interface that provides tactile perception by passing electrical current through the surface of the skin. It is actively used instead of mechanical tactile displays for tactile feedback because of several advantages such as its small and thin size, light weight, and high responsiveness. However, the similarities and differences between these sensations is still not clear. This study directly compares the intensity sensation of electrotactile stimulation to that of mechanical stimulation, and investigates the characteristic sensation of anodic and cathodic stimulation. In the experiment, participants underwent a 30 pps electrotactile stimulus every one second to their middle finger, and were asked to match this intensity by adjusting the intensity of a mechanical tactile stimulus to an index finger. The results showed that anodic stimulation mainly produced vibration sensation, whereas cathodic sensation produced both vibration and pressure sensations. Relatively low pressure sensation was also observed for anodic stimulation but it remains low, regardless of the increasing of electrical intensity.

  17. Touch, compliance, and awareness of tactile contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joule, Robert-Vincent; Guéguen, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    Many experimental studies have shown that touch increases compliance with a request; however, the difference between the effect of touch on compliance between participants who notice and those who do not notice such contact remains in question. An experiment was conducted in which a female confederate asked 368 female smokers to give her a cigarette. In the Touch condition, when making her request, the confederate slightly touched the participant on her forearm. Analysis showed the touch was associated with significantly higher compliance to the request, and a difference was evident in the Touch condition between subjects who had noticed the tactile contact and those who had not.

  18. Tactile Sensitivity of Children: Effects of Frequency, Masking, and the Non-Pacinian I Psychophysical Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Burak; Oztek, Cigdem

    2007-01-01

    Tactile perception depends on the contributions of four psychophysical tactile channels mediated by four corresponding receptor systems. The sensitivity of the tactile channels is determined by detection thresholds that vary as a function of the stimulus frequency. It has been widely reported that tactile thresholds increase (i.e., sensitivity…

  19. Feeling small: exploring the tactile perception limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, Lisa; Arvidsson, Martin; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M; Berglund, Birgitta; Rutland, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The human finger is exquisitely sensitive in perceiving different materials, but the question remains as to what length scales are capable of being distinguished in active touch. We combine material science with psychophysics to manufacture and haptically explore a series of topographically patterned surfaces of controlled wavelength, but identical chemistry. Strain-induced surface wrinkling and subsequent templating produced 16 surfaces with wrinkle wavelengths ranging from 300 nm to 90 μm and amplitudes between 7 nm and 4.5 μm. Perceived similarities of these surfaces (and two blanks) were pairwise scaled by participants, and interdistances among all stimuli were determined by individual differences scaling (INDSCAL). The tactile space thus generated and its two perceptual dimensions were directly linked to surface physical properties - the finger friction coefficient and the wrinkle wavelength. Finally, the lowest amplitude of the wrinkles so distinguished was approximately 10 nm, demonstrating that human tactile discrimination extends to the nanoscale.

  20. Tactile length contraction as Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jonathan; Ngo, Vy; Goldreich, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    To perceive, the brain must interpret stimulus-evoked neural activity. This is challenging: The stochastic nature of the neural response renders its interpretation inherently uncertain. Perception would be optimized if the brain used Bayesian inference to interpret inputs in light of expectations derived from experience. Bayesian inference would improve perception on average but cause illusions when stimuli violate expectation. Intriguingly, tactile, auditory, and visual perception are all prone to length contraction illusions, characterized by the dramatic underestimation of the distance between punctate stimuli delivered in rapid succession; the origin of these illusions has been mysterious. We previously proposed that length contraction illusions occur because the brain interprets punctate stimulus sequences using Bayesian inference with a low-velocity expectation. A novel prediction of our Bayesian observer model is that length contraction should intensify if stimuli are made more difficult to localize. Here we report a tactile psychophysical study that tested this prediction. Twenty humans compared two distances on the forearm: a fixed reference distance defined by two taps with 1-s temporal separation and an adjustable comparison distance defined by two taps with temporal separation t ≤ 1 s. We observed significant length contraction: As t was decreased, participants perceived the two distances as equal only when the comparison distance was made progressively greater than the reference distance. Furthermore, the use of weaker taps significantly enhanced participants' length contraction. These findings confirm the model's predictions, supporting the view that the spatiotemporal percept is a best estimate resulting from a Bayesian inference process.

  1. Tactile Experience Shapes Prey-Capture Behavior in Etruscan Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eBrecht

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A crucial role of tactile experience for the maturation of neural response properties in the somatosensory system is well established, but little is known about the role of tactile experience in the development of tactile behaviors. Here we study how tactile experience affects prey capture behavior in Etruscan shrews, Suncus etruscus. Prey capture in adult shrews is a high-speed behavior that relies on precise attacks guided by tactile Gestalt cues. We studied the role of tactile experience by three different approaches. First, we analyzed the hunting skills of young shrews right after weaning. We found that prey capture in young animals is most but not all aspects similar to that of adults. Second we performed whisker trimming for three to four weeks after birth. Such deprivation resulted in a lasting disruption of prey capture even after whisker re-growth: attacks lacked precise targeting and had a lower success rate. Third, we presented adult shrews with an entirely novel prey species, the giant cockroach. The shape of this roach is very different from the shrew’s normal (cricket prey and the thorax – the preferred point of attack in crickets – is protected a heavy cuticle. Initially shrews attacked giant roaches the same way they attack crickets and targeted the thoracic region. With progressive experience, however, shrews adopted a new attack strategy targeting legs and underside of the roaches while avoiding other body parts. Speed and efficiency of attacks improved. These data suggest that tactile experience shapes prey capture behavior.

  2. Reliability of tactile tools for pain assessment in blind athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Ana Claudia de Souza; Pagliuca, Lorita M Freitag; Almeida, Paulo Cesar P; Dallaire, Clemence C

    2008-06-01

    Health professionals have numerous visual and reporting scales at their disposal to assess pain. In recent years new tactile tools have been created (Pain Texture Scale and Tactile Pain Scale). This study validates these scales compared with the Numerical Rating Scale in 36 blind athletes who were assessed before and after competitions in the World Paralympics Games organized by the International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA) in Quebec, Canada. The reliability of these scales was analyzed through the intraclass correlation coefficient. Results showed good reliability for the Tactile Pain Scale and satisfactory reliability for the Pain Texture Scale.

  3. Development of flexible tactile sensors for hexapod robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Børlum-Petersen, Mikkel; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    on the upper and lower part of the rubber. To address a wider range of tactile stimuli, namely the dynamic tactile stimuli, a piezoelectric thin film sensor based on polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) is embedded into the leg tip mould. Both piezoresistive array and piezoelectric types of sensors are investigated......This paper describes the development of flexible based tactile array sensors based on piezoresistive rubber for use in the leg tips of hexapod robotics. The sensors are composed of a sandwich similar structure, with a piezoresistive rubber used as the middle layer and flexPCB electrodes...

  4. Acquisition of a 250-word vocabulary through a tactile vocoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P L; Frost, B J; Mason, J L; Chung, K

    1985-04-01

    In a previous experiment [P. L. Scilley, "Evaluation of a vibrotactile auditory prosthetic device for the profoundly deaf," unpublished Masters thesis, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada (1980)] two normal subjects learned to identify 70 and 150 words, respectively, using the Queen's Tactile Vocoder. In the present experiment, the most advanced subject continued word learning until a tactile vocabulary of 250 words was acquired. At this point randomized tests were given to obtain an indication of final performance level. From these data conditional probabilities of correct response for each stimulus word and significant confusions were obtained, which provides insight into the advantages and present limitations of the tactile vocoder.

  5. Tiny Feel: A New Miniature Tactile Module Using Elastic and Electromagnetic Force for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Heon; Kim, Sang-Youn; Book, Wayne J.; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    For tactile feedback in mobile devices, the size and the power consumption of tactile modules are the dominant factors. Thus, vibration motors have been widely used in mobile devices to provide tactile sensation. However, the vibration motor cannot sufficiently generate a great amount of tactile sensation because the magnitude and the frequency of the vibration motor are coupled. For the generation of a wide variety of tactile sensations, this paper presents a new tactile actuator that incorporates a solenoid, a permanent magnet and an elastic spring. The feedback force in this actuator is generated by elastic and electromagnetic force. This paper also proposes a tiny tactile module with the proposed actuators. To construct a tiny tactile module, the contactor gap of the module is minimized without decreasing the contactor stroke, the output force, and the working frequency. The elastic springs of the actuators are separated into several layers to minimize the contactor gap without decreasing the performance of the tactile module. Experiments were conducted to investigate each contactor output force as well as the frequency response of the proposed tactile module. Each contactor of the tactile module can generate enough output force to stimulate human mechanoreceptors. As the contactors are actuated in a wide range of frequency, the proposed tactile module can generate various tactile sensations. Moreover, the size of the proposed tactile module is small enough to be embedded it into a mobile device, and its power consumption is low. Therefore, the proposed tactile actuator and module have good potential in many interactive mobile devices.

  6. Testing of tactile sensors for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lisa; Weadon, Timothy L.; Evans, Thomas; DeVallance, David B.; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to integrate tactile sensing into robotic manipulators performing tasks in space environments, including those used to repair satellites. Integration can be achieved by embedding specialized tactile sensors. Reliable and consistent signal interpretation can be obtained by ensuring that sensors with a suitable sensing mechanism are selected based on operational demands, and that materials used within the sensors do not change structurally under vacuum and expected applied pressures, and between temperatures of -80°C to +120°C. The sensors must be able to withstand space environmental conditions and remain adequately sensitive throughout their operating life. Additionally, it is necessary to integrate the sensors into the target system with minimum disturbance while remaining responsive to applied loads. Previous work has been completed to characterize sensors within the selected temperature and pressure ranges. The current work builds on this investigation by embedding these sensors in different geometries and testing the response measured among varying configurations. Embedding material selection was aided by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) to determine stress/strain behavior for adhesives and compliant layers used to keep the sensors in place and distribute stresses evenly. Electromechanical characterization of the embedded sensor packages was conducted by using the DMA in tandem with an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR) meter. Methods for embedding the sensor packages were developed with the aid of finite element analysis and physical testing to account for specific geometrical constraints. Embedded sensor prototypes were tested within representative models of potential embedding locations to compare final embedded sensor performance.

  7. Spatial asymmetry in tactile sensor skin deformation aids perception of edge orientation during haptic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D; Hellman, Randall B; Santos, Veronica J

    2014-01-01

    Upper-limb amputees rely primarily on visual feedback when using their prostheses to interact with others or objects in their environment. A constant reliance upon visual feedback can be mentally exhausting and does not suffice for many activities when line-of-sight is unavailable. Upper-limb amputees could greatly benefit from the ability to perceive edges, one of the most salient features of 3D shape, through touch alone. We present an approach for estimating edge orientation with respect to an artificial fingertip through haptic exploration using a multimodal tactile sensor on a robot hand. Key parameters from the tactile signals for each of four exploratory procedures were used as inputs to a support vector regression model. Edge orientation angles ranging from -90 to 90 degrees were estimated with an 85-input model having an R (2) of 0.99 and RMS error of 5.08 degrees. Electrode impedance signals provided the most useful inputs by encoding spatially asymmetric skin deformation across the entire fingertip. Interestingly, sensor regions that were not in direct contact with the stimulus provided particularly useful information. Methods described here could pave the way for semi-autonomous capabilities in prosthetic or robotic hands during haptic exploration, especially when visual feedback is unavailable.

  8. Haptic exploration of fingertip-sized geometric features using a multimodal tactile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D.; Hellman, Randall B.; Santos, Veronica J.

    2014-06-01

    Haptic perception remains a grand challenge for artificial hands. Dexterous manipulators could be enhanced by "haptic intelligence" that enables identification of objects and their features via touch alone. Haptic perception of local shape would be useful when vision is obstructed or when proprioceptive feedback is inadequate, as observed in this study. In this work, a robot hand outfitted with a deformable, bladder-type, multimodal tactile sensor was used to replay four human-inspired haptic "exploratory procedures" on fingertip-sized geometric features. The geometric features varied by type (bump, pit), curvature (planar, conical, spherical), and footprint dimension (1.25 - 20 mm). Tactile signals generated by active fingertip motions were used to extract key parameters for use as inputs to supervised learning models. A support vector classifier estimated order of curvature while support vector regression models estimated footprint dimension once curvature had been estimated. A distal-proximal stroke (along the long axis of the finger) enabled estimation of order of curvature with an accuracy of 97%. Best-performing, curvature-specific, support vector regression models yielded R2 values of at least 0.95. While a radial-ulnar stroke (along the short axis of the finger) was most helpful for estimating feature type and size for planar features, a rolling motion was most helpful for conical and spherical features. The ability to haptically perceive local shape could be used to advance robot autonomy and provide haptic feedback to human teleoperators of devices ranging from bomb defusal robots to neuroprostheses.

  9. Tactile soft-sparse mean fluid-flow imaging with a robotic whisker array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Cagdas; Jones, Douglas L; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2015-08-04

    An array of whiskers is critical to many mammals to survive in their environment. However, current engineered systems generally employ vision, radar or sonar to explore the surroundings, not having sufficiently benefited from tactile perception. Inspired by the whisking animals, we present here a novel tomography-based tactile fluid-flow imaging technique for the reconstruction of surroundings with an artificial whisker array. The moment sensed at the whisker base is the weighted integral of the drag force per length, which is proportional to the relative velocity squared on a whisker segment. We demonstrate that the 2D cross-sectional mean fluid-flow velocity-field can be successfully mapped out by collecting moment measurements at different angular positions with the whisker array. We use a regularized version of the FOCal underdetermined system solver algorithm with a smoothness constraint to obtain soft-sparse static estimates of the 2D cross-sectional velocity-squared distribution. This new proposed approach has the strong potential to be an alternative environmental sensing technology, particularly in dark or murky environments.

  10. CROSS-MODAL PLASTICITY OF TACTILE PERCEPTION IN BLINDNESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, K.; Stilla, Randall

    2011-01-01

    This review focusses on cross-modal plasticity resulting from visual deprivation. This is viewed against the background of task-specific visual cortical recruitment that is routine during tactile tasks in the sighted and that may depend in part on visual imagery. Superior tactile perceptual performance in the blind may be practice-related, although there are unresolved questions regarding the effects of Braille-reading experience and the age of onset of blindness. While visual cortical areas are clearly more involved in tactile microspatial processing in the blind than in the sighted, it still remains unclear how to reconcile these tactile processes with the growing literature implicating visual cortical activity in a wide range of cognitive tasks in the blind, including those involving language, or with studies of short-term, reversible visual deprivation in the normally sighted that reveal plastic changes even over periods of hours or days. PMID:20404414

  11. The Slip Hypothesis: Tactile Perception and its Neuronal Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    The slip hypothesis of epicritic tactile perception interprets actively moving sensor and touched objects as a frictional system, known to lead to jerky relative movements called 'slips'. These slips depend on object geometry, forces, material properties, and environmental factors, and, thus, have the power to incorporate coding of the perceptual target, as well as perceptual strategies (sensor movement). Tactile information as transferred by slips will be encoded discontinuously in space and time, because slips sometimes engage only parts of the touching surfaces and appear as discrete and rare events in time. This discontinuity may have forced tactile systems of vibrissae and fingertips to evolve special ways to convert touch signals to a tactile percept.

  12. Acquisition of a bodily-tactile language as first language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    towards Tactile Sign Language (TSL). The access to participation in complex TSL culture is crucial for language acquisition. We already know how to transfer the patterns of social interaction into the bodily-tactile modality. This is the fundation on which to build actual linguistic participation. TSL......Language acquisition in the bodily-tactile modality is difficult to understand, describe, and support. This chapter advocates a reinterpretation of the gestural and idiosyncratic bodily-tactile communication of people with congenital deafblindness (CDB) in terms of early language acquisition...... as a first language is presently a theoretic possibility. We need more research on how to accommodate TSL to language Development and on how to fit TSL into participation in complex cultural activities....

  13. ISO's work on tactile and haptic interaction guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Carter, J.; Andrew, I.

    2006-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important both in assistive technologies and in special purpose computing environments. While considerable research exists, the current lack of ergonomic standards in this area results in many systems being developed without sufficient concerns

  14. Insights into the Capabilities of Tactile-Foot Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel wearable interface for the foot: a shoe‐integrated tactile display that enables users to obtain information through the sense of touch via their feet. A 16‐point array of actuators stimulates the sole of the foot by inducing different vibration frequencies. A series of experiments were conducted with 20 sighted and 5 blind voluntary subjects to evaluate the role of tactile perception by the human foot and the tactile sensitivity of the plantar surface. Tests evaluated the perception of simple shapes, patterns and directional instructions. The results showed that some information is discriminable and that tactile‐foot stimulation could be used for a wide number of applications in human‐machine interaction. Furthermore, the results also suggested that the blind perform better in some key tasks and support the feasibility of footwear providing tactile feedback for situational awareness, mobility and the navigation assistance of the blind.

  15. The role of working memory in tactile selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli; Spence, Charles

    2009-04-01

    Load theory suggests that working memory controls the extent to which irrelevant distractors are processed (e.g., Lavie, Hirst, De Fockert, & Viding, 2004). However, so far this proposal has only been tested in vision. Here, we examine the extent to which tactile selective attention also depends on working memory. In Experiment 1, participants focused their attention on continuous target vibrations while attempting to ignore pulsed distractor vibrations. In Experiment 2, targets were always presented to a particular hand, with distractors being presented to the other hand. In both experiments, a high (vs. low) load in a concurrent working memory task led to greater interference by the tactile distractors. These results establish the role of working memory in the control of tactile selective attention, demonstrating for the first time that the principles of load theory also apply to the tactile modality.

  16. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  17. Artificial blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman

    2008-07-01

    Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  18. Tactile Sun: Bringing an Invisible Universe to the Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, G. M.; Pantoja, C. A.

    2014-07-01

    A tactile model of the Sun has been created as a strategy for communicating astronomy to the blind or visually impaired, and as a useful outreach tool for general audiences. The model design was a collaboration between an education specialist, an astronomy specialist and a sculptor. The tactile Sun has been used at astronomy outreach events in Puerto Rico to make activities more inclusive and to increase public awareness of the needs of those with disabilities.

  19. Spinal pharmacology of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Rats develop tactile allodynia to stimulation of the plantar surface of the hindpaw with von Frey filaments within days of the onset of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. This is prevented by insulin and alleviated by systemic lignocaine, but the aetiology is unknown.Using indwelling lumbar intrathecal catheters to deliver pharmacological agents, we have investigated whether tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats is dependent on mechanisms associated with spinal sensitization, by ass...

  20. Arborealities: The Tactile Ecology of Hardy’s Woodlanders

    OpenAIRE

    William A. Cohen

    2014-01-01

    This article asks what consequences two recent movements in scholarship - affect theory and environmental studies - might have for understanding the Victorian tactile imagination. Thomas Hardy's 1887 novel 'The Woodlanders' provides a means of addressing this question, for it shares with posthumanist critics a view that people are material things in a world of things, and that the world is itself a collection of vital agencies and networked actors. Hardy shows how a tactile modality provides...

  1. Interactive Display under the Influence of Tactile Sense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ge-yang; YAO Jing

    2010-01-01

    Humans have a variety of sense in dynamic environment,and tactile sensation is an important way apperceiving the world.It enhances the process of experience and the interaction between humans and environment.However,vision as a dominant sense impairs the variety of sense.In the display design,current designers often put more emphasi on structure,form,color,such other visual elements,consequently neglect the importance of the tactile sensation,which weakens real experience of humans.

  2. To what extent do Gestalt grouping principles influence tactile perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallace, Alberto; Spence, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Since their formulation by the Gestalt movement more than a century ago, the principles of perceptual grouping have primarily been investigated in the visual modality and, to a lesser extent, in the auditory modality. The present review addresses the question of whether the same grouping principles also affect the perception of tactile stimuli. Although, to date, only a few studies have explicitly investigated the existence of Gestalt grouping principles in the tactile modality, we argue that many more studies have indirectly provided evidence relevant to this topic. Reviewing this body of research, we argue that similar principles to those reported previously in visual and auditory studies also govern the perceptual grouping of tactile stimuli. In particular, we highlight evidence showing that the principles of proximity, similarity, common fate, good continuation, and closure affect tactile perception in both unimodal and crossmodal settings. We also highlight that the grouping of tactile stimuli is often affected by visual and auditory information that happen to be presented simultaneously. Finally, we discuss the theoretical and applied benefits that might pertain to the further study of Gestalt principles operating in both unisensory and multisensory tactile perception.

  3. Tactile device utilizing a single magnetorheological sponge: experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soomin; Kim, Pyunghwa; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In the field of medicine, several new areas have been currently introduced such as robot-assisted surgery. However, the major drawback of these systems is that there is no tactile communication between doctors and surgical sites. When the tactile system is brought up, telemedicine including telerobotic surgery can be enhanced much more than now. In this study, a new tactile device is designed using a single magnetorhological (MR) sponge cell to realize the sensation of human organs. MR fluids and an open celled polyurethane foam are used to propose the MR sponge cell. The viscous and elastic sensational behaviors of human organs are realized by the MR sponge cell. Before developing the tactile device, tactile sensation according to touch of human fingers are quantified in advance. The finger is then treated as a reduced beam bundle model (BBM) in which the fingertip is comprised of an elastic beam virtually. Under the reduced BBM, when people want to sense an object, the fingertip is investigated by pushing and sliding. Accordingly, while several magnitudes of magnetic fields are applied to the tactile device, normal and tangential reaction forces and bending moment are measured by 6-axis force/torque sensor instead of the fingertip. These measured data are used to compare with soft tissues. It is demonstrated that the proposed MR sponge cell can realize any part of the organ based on the obtained data.

  4. A tactile sensor using a conductive graphene-sponge composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Hong, Ahyoung; Choi, Yeonhoi; Ha, Chunho; Park, Wanjun

    2016-04-01

    For sensors that emulate human tactile perception, we suggest a simple method for fabricating a highly sensitive force sensor using a conductive polyurethane sponge where graphene flakes are self-assembled into the porous structure of the sponge. The complete sensor device shows a sensitive and reliable detection response for a broad range of pressure and dynamic pressure that correspond to human tactile perception. Sensitivity of the sensor to detect vibration is also confirmed with vertical actuations due to slipping over micro-scale ridge structures attached on the sensors. Based on the sensor's ability to detect both pressure and vibration, the sensor can be utilized as a flexible tactile sensor.For sensors that emulate human tactile perception, we suggest a simple method for fabricating a highly sensitive force sensor using a conductive polyurethane sponge where graphene flakes are self-assembled into the porous structure of the sponge. The complete sensor device shows a sensitive and reliable detection response for a broad range of pressure and dynamic pressure that correspond to human tactile perception. Sensitivity of the sensor to detect vibration is also confirmed with vertical actuations due to slipping over micro-scale ridge structures attached on the sensors. Based on the sensor's ability to detect both pressure and vibration, the sensor can be utilized as a flexible tactile sensor. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00774k

  5. Audio-tactile integration and the influence of musical training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kuchenbuch

    Full Text Available Perception of our environment is a multisensory experience; information from different sensory systems like the auditory, visual and tactile is constantly integrated. Complex tasks that require high temporal and spatial precision of multisensory integration put strong demands on the underlying networks but it is largely unknown how task experience shapes multisensory processing. Long-term musical training is an excellent model for brain plasticity because it shapes the human brain at functional and structural levels, affecting a network of brain areas. In the present study we used magnetoencephalography (MEG to investigate how audio-tactile perception is integrated in the human brain and if musicians show enhancement of the corresponding activation compared to non-musicians. Using a paradigm that allowed the investigation of combined and separate auditory and tactile processing, we found a multisensory incongruency response, generated in frontal, cingulate and cerebellar regions, an auditory mismatch response generated mainly in the auditory cortex and a tactile mismatch response generated in frontal and cerebellar regions. The influence of musical training was seen in the audio-tactile as well as in the auditory condition, indicating enhanced higher-order processing in musicians, while the sources of the tactile MMN were not influenced by long-term musical training. Consistent with the predictive coding model, more basic, bottom-up sensory processing was relatively stable and less affected by expertise, whereas areas for top-down models of multisensory expectancies were modulated by training.

  6. Design and technical construction of a tactile display for sensory feedback in a hand prosthesis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antfolk Christian

    2010-09-01

    in non-amputees indicate that the proposed tactile display, in its simple form, can be used to relocate tactile input from an artificial hand to the forearm and that the system can coexist with a myoelectric control systems. The proposed system may be a valuable addition to users of myoelectric prosthesis providing conscious sensory feedback during manipulation of objects.

  7. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  8. Artificial urushi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity.

  9. Tactile enhancement of auditory and visual speech perception in untrained perceivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gick, Bryan; Jóhannsdóttir, Kristín M.; Gibraiel, Diana; Mühlbauer, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    A single pool of untrained subjects was tested for interactions across two bimodal perception conditions: audio-tactile, in which subjects heard and felt speech, and visual-tactile, in which subjects saw and felt speech. Identifications of English obstruent consonants were compared in bimodal and no-tactile baseline conditions. Results indicate that tactile information enhances speech perception by about 10 percent, regardless of which other mode (auditory or visual) is active. However, within-subject analysis indicates that individual subjects who benefit more from tactile information in one cross-modal condition tend to benefit less from tactile information in the other. PMID:18396924

  10. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  11. Artificial Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. They may cause you to need an amputation. Traumatic injuries, including from traffic accidents and military combat Cancer Birth defects If you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ...

  12. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  13. Braille in the Sighted: Teaching Tactile Reading to Sighted Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Bola

    Full Text Available Blind people are known to have superior perceptual abilities in their remaining senses. Several studies suggest that these enhancements are dependent on the specific experience of blind individuals, who use those remaining senses more than sighted subjects. In line with this view, sighted subjects, when trained, are able to significantly progress in relatively simple tactile tasks. However, the case of complex tactile tasks is less obvious, as some studies suggest that visual deprivation itself could confer large advantages in learning them. It remains unclear to what extent those complex skills, such as braille reading, can be learnt by sighted subjects. Here we enrolled twenty-nine sighted adults, mostly braille teachers and educators, in a 9-month braille reading course. At the beginning of the course, all subjects were naive in tactile braille reading. After the course, almost all were able to read whole braille words at a mean speed of 6 words-per-minute. Subjects with low tactile acuity did not differ significantly in braille reading speed from the rest of the group, indicating that low tactile acuity is not a limiting factor for learning braille, at least at this early stage of learning. Our study shows that most sighted adults can learn whole-word braille reading, given the right method and a considerable amount of motivation. The adult sensorimotor system can thus adapt, to some level, to very complex tactile tasks without visual deprivation. The pace of learning in our group was comparable to congenitally and early blind children learning braille in primary school, which suggests that the blind's mastery of complex tactile tasks can, to a large extent, be explained by experience-dependent mechanisms.

  14. Perceptual learning: tactile letter recognition transfers across body surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Gabriel; Auvray, Malika

    2014-01-01

    Visual-to-tactile sensory substitution devices are designed to assist visually impaired people by converting visual stimuli into tactile stimuli. The important claim has been made that, after training with these devices, the tactile stimuli can be moved from one body surface to another without any decrease in performance. This claim, although recurrent, has never been empirically investigated. Moreover, studies in the field of tactile perceptual learning suggest that performance improvement transfers only to body surfaces that are closely represented in the somatosensory cortex, i.e. adjacent or homologous contralateral body surfaces. These studies have however mainly used discrimination tasks of stimuli varying along only one feature (e.g., orientation of gratings) whereas, in sensory substitution, tactile information consists of more complex stimuli. The present study investigated the extent to which there is a transfer of tactile letter learning. Participants first underwent a baseline session in which the letters were presented on their belly, thigh, and shin. They were subsequently trained on only one of these body surfaces, and then re-tested on all of them, as a post-training session. The results revealed that performance improvement was the same for both the trained and the untrained surfaces. Moreover, this transfer of perceptual learning was equivalent for adjacent and non-adjacent body surfaces, suggesting that tactile learning transfer occurs independently of the distance on the body. A control study consisting of the same baseline and post-training sessions, without training in between, revealed weaker improvement between the two sessions. The obtained results support the claim that training with sensory substitution devices results in a relative independence from the stimulated body surface.

  15. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments-the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation-we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception.

  16. Braille in the Sighted: Teaching Tactile Reading to Sighted Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Łukasz; Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Hańczur, Paweł; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Blind people are known to have superior perceptual abilities in their remaining senses. Several studies suggest that these enhancements are dependent on the specific experience of blind individuals, who use those remaining senses more than sighted subjects. In line with this view, sighted subjects, when trained, are able to significantly progress in relatively simple tactile tasks. However, the case of complex tactile tasks is less obvious, as some studies suggest that visual deprivation itself could confer large advantages in learning them. It remains unclear to what extent those complex skills, such as braille reading, can be learnt by sighted subjects. Here we enrolled twenty-nine sighted adults, mostly braille teachers and educators, in a 9-month braille reading course. At the beginning of the course, all subjects were naive in tactile braille reading. After the course, almost all were able to read whole braille words at a mean speed of 6 words-per-minute. Subjects with low tactile acuity did not differ significantly in braille reading speed from the rest of the group, indicating that low tactile acuity is not a limiting factor for learning braille, at least at this early stage of learning. Our study shows that most sighted adults can learn whole-word braille reading, given the right method and a considerable amount of motivation. The adult sensorimotor system can thus adapt, to some level, to very complex tactile tasks without visual deprivation. The pace of learning in our group was comparable to congenitally and early blind children learning braille in primary school, which suggests that the blind's mastery of complex tactile tasks can, to a large extent, be explained by experience-dependent mechanisms.

  17. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments–the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation—we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception. PMID:28163677

  18. Wearable tactile sensor based on flexible microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Koh, Zhao Ming; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-08-16

    In this work, we develop a liquid-based thin film microfluidic tactile sensor of high flexibility, robustness and sensitivity. The microfluidic elastomeric structure comprises a pressure sensitive region and parallel arcs that interface with screen-printed electrodes. The microfluidic sensor is functionalized with a highly conductive metallic liquid, eutectic gallium indium (eGaIn). Microdeformation on the pressure sensor results in fluid displacement which corresponds to a change in electrical resistance. By emulating parallel electrical circuitry in our microchannel design, we reduced the overall electrical resistance of the sensor, therefore enhancing its device sensitivity. Correspondingly, we report a device workable within a range of 4 to 100 kPa and sensitivity of up to 0.05 kPa(-1). We further demonstrate its robustness in withstanding >2500 repeated loading and unloading cycles. Finally, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the sensors may be multiplexed to detect forces at multiple regions of the hand. In particular, our sensors registered unique electronic signatures in object grasping, which could provide better assessment of finger dexterity.

  19. Millisecond precision spike timing shapes tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackevicius, Emily L; Best, Matthew D; Saal, Hannes P; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-10-31

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequency composition of vibrations shapes the evoked percept. Mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin exhibit temporal patterning in their responses, but the importance and behavioral relevance of spike timing, particularly for naturalistic stimuli, remains to be elucidated. Based on neurophysiological recordings from Rhesus macaques, we show that spike timing conveys information about the frequency composition of skin vibrations, both for individual afferents and for afferent populations, and that the temporal fidelity varies across afferent class. Furthermore, the perception of skin vibrations, measured in human subjects, is better predicted when spike timing is taken into account, and the resolution that predicts perception best matches the optimal resolution of the respective afferent classes. In light of these results, the peripheral representation of complex skin vibrations draws a powerful analogy with the auditory and vibrissal systems.

  20. Direct tactile manipulation of the flight plan in a modern aircraft cockpit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre; Fogh, Rune; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-01-01

    An original experimental approach has been chosen, with an incremental progression from a traditional physical cockpit, to a tactile flight simulator reproducing traditional controls, to a prototype navigation display with direct tactile functionality, first located in the traditional low positio...

  1. Spinal pharmacology of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Nigel A; Chaplan, Sandra R

    1997-01-01

    Rats develop tactile allodynia to stimulation of the plantar surface of the hindpaw with von Frey filaments within days of the onset of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. This is prevented by insulin and alleviated by systemic lignocaine, but the aetiology is unknown.Using indwelling lumbar intrathecal catheters to deliver pharmacological agents, we have investigated whether tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats is dependent on mechanisms associated with spinal sensitization, by assessing the efficacy of agents that inhibit specific components of spinal nociceptive processing.Dose-dependent inhibition of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats was noted with the N-type calcium channel antagonist SNX 239, the α2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine, the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist AP5 and the non-NMDA receptor antagonist NBQX.No effect on tactile allodynia was noted after intrathecal administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor ketorolac, the L-type calcium channel inhibitor diltiazem or any vehicle.These data suggest that the tactile allodynia of diabetic rats involves spinal glutamatergic pathways but is not associated with spinal release of nitric oxide or prostaglandins. PMID:9421298

  2. The role of vibration in tactile speed perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, Chris J; Ernst, Marc O; Moscatelli, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The relative motion between the surface of an object and our fingers produces patterns of skin deformation such as stretch, indentation, and vibrations. In this study, we hypothesized that motion-induced vibrations are combined with other tactile cues for the discrimination of tactile speed. Specifically, we hypothesized that vibrations provide a critical cue to tactile speed on surfaces lacking individually detectable features like dots or ridges. Thus masking vibrations unrelated to slip motion should impair the discriminability of tactile speed, and the effect should be surface-dependent. To test this hypothesis, we measured the precision of participants in discriminating the speed of moving surfaces having either a fine or a ridged texture, while adding masking vibratory noise in the working range of the fast-adapting mechanoreceptive afferents. Vibratory noise significantly reduced the precision of speed discrimination, and the effect was much stronger on the fine-textured than on the ridged surface. On both surfaces, masking vibrations at intermediate frequencies of 64 Hz (65-μm peak-to-peak amplitude) and 128 Hz (10 μm) had the strongest effect, followed by high-frequency vibrations of 256 Hz (1 μm) and low-frequency vibrations of 32 Hz (50 and 25 μm). These results are consistent with our hypothesis that slip-induced vibrations concur to the discrimination of tactile speed.

  3. The phase of prestimulus alpha oscillations affects tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Lei; Ro, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that neural oscillations in the 8- to 12-Hz range influence sensory perception. In the current study, we examined whether both the power and phase of these mu/alpha oscillations predict successful conscious tactile perception. Near-threshold tactile stimuli were applied to the left hand while electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded over the contralateral right somatosensory cortex. We found a significant inverted U-shaped relationship between prestimulus mu/alpha power and detection rate, suggesting that there is an intermediate level of alpha power that is optimal for tactile perception. We also found a significant difference in phase angle concentration at stimulus onset that predicted whether the upcoming tactile stimulus was perceived or missed. As has been shown in the visual system, these findings suggest that these mu/alpha oscillations measured over somatosensory areas exert a strong inhibitory control on tactile perception and that pulsed inhibition by these oscillations shapes the state of brain activity necessary for conscious perception. They further suggest that these common phasic processing mechanisms across different sensory modalities and brain regions may reflect a common underlying encoding principle in perceptual processing that leads to momentary windows of perceptual awareness.

  4. Tactile sensory system: encoding from the periphery to the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lynette A; Smith, Allan M

    2014-01-01

    Specialized mechanoreceptors in the skin respond to mechanical deformation and provide the primary input to the tactile sensory system. Although the morphology of these receptors has been documented, there is still considerable uncertainty as to the relation between cutaneous receptor morphology and the associated physiological responses to stimulation. Labelled-line models of somatosensory processes in which specific mechanoreceptors are associated with particular sensory qualities fail to account for the evidence showing that all types of tactile afferent units respond to a varying extent to most types of natural stimuli. Neurophysiological and psychophysical experiments have provided the framework for determining the relation between peripheral afferent or cortical activity and tactile perception. Neural codes derived from these afferent signals are evaluated in terms of their capacity to predict human perceptual performance. One particular challenge in developing models of the tactile sensory system is the dual use of sensory signals from the skin. In addition to their perceptual function they serve as inputs to the sensorimotor control system involved in manipulation. Perceptions generated through active touch differ from those resulting from passive stimulation of the skin because they are the product of self-generated exploratory processes. Recent research in this area has highlighted the importance of shear forces in these exploratory movements and has shown that fingertip skin is particularly sensitive to shear generated during both object manipulation and tactile exploration.

  5. A Handheld Device for the In Situ Acquisition of Multimodal Tactile Sensing Data

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal tactile sensing could potentially enable robots to improve their performance at manipulation tasks by rapidly discriminating between task-relevant objects. Data-driven approaches to this tactile perception problem show promise, but there is a dearth of suitable training data. In this two-page paper, we present a portable handheld device for the efficient acquisition of multimodal tactile sensing data from objects in their natural settings, such as homes. The multimodal tactile sens...

  6. Effects of a Wearable, Tactile Aid on Language Comprehension of Prelingual Profoundly Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Adele

    Factors influencing the use of nonacoustic aids (such as visual displays and tactile devices) with the hearing impaired are reviewed. The benefits of tactile devices in improving speech reading/lipreading and speech are pointed out. Tactile aids which provide information on rhythm, rate, intensity, and duration of speech increase lipreading and…

  7. Tactile roughness perception in the presence of olfactory and trigeminal stimulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koijck, L.A.; Toet, A.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that odorants consistently evoke associations with textures and their tactile properties like smoothness and roughness. Also, it has been observed that olfaction can modulate tactile perception. We therefore hypothesized that tactile roughness perception may be biased tow

  8. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  9. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containin......Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie...

  10. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  11. Tactile display for virtual 3D shape rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Mansutti, Alessandro; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel system for the simultaneous visual and tactile rendering of product shapes which allows designers to simultaneously touch and see new product shapes during the conceptual phase of product development. This system offers important advantages, including potential cost and time savings, compared with the standard product design process in which digital 3D models and physical prototypes are often repeatedly modified until an optimal design is achieved. The system consists of a tactile display that is able to represent, within a real environment, the shape of a product. Designers can explore the rendered surface by touching curves lying on the product shape, selecting those curves that can be considered style features and evaluating their aesthetic quality. In order to physically represent these selected curves, a flexible surface is modeled by means of servo-actuated modules controlling a physical deforming strip. The tactile display is designed so as to be portable, low cost, modular,...

  12. Tactile and proprioceptive temporal discrimination are impaired in functional tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tinazzi

    Full Text Available In order to obtain further information on the pathophysiology of functional tremor, we assessed tactile discrimination threshold and proprioceptive temporal discrimination motor threshold values in 11 patients with functional tremor, 11 age- and sex-matched patients with essential tremor and 13 healthy controls.Tactile discrimination threshold in both the right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional tremor than in the other groups. Proprioceptive temporal discrimination threshold for both right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional and essential tremor than in healthy controls. No significant correlation between discrimination thresholds and duration or severity of tremor was found.Temporal processing of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli is impaired in patients with functional tremor. The mechanisms underlying this impaired somatosensory processing and possible ways to apply these findings clinically merit further research.

  13. The role of tactile support in arm levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Burkhard; Piesbergen, Christoph; Lucic, Kristina; Staudacher, Melina; Hagl, Maria

    2013-10-01

    How many persons need tactile support à la Milton H. Erickson to achieve arm levitation during hypnosis? How do these differ from those who do not need it? Hypnotic arm levitation was suggested three times consecutively to 30 medium suggestible students. Sixteen succeeded without any tactile support; 7 needed it one or two times; 5 needed it every time; and 2 achieved no arm levitation at all. Participants without any tactile support went more quickly into deeper hypnosis, experienced more involuntariness, less effort, and had higher electrodermal activity. This greater physiological activity seems necessary for hypnotic arm levitation as a form of "attentive hypnosis" in contrast to "relaxation hypnosis." A change in verbal suggestion from "imagine a helium balloon" to "leave levitation to your unconscious mind" revealed no differences. Several issues resulting from this exploratory arm levitation study are discussed. The idea of different proprioceptive-kinesthetic abilities is introduced and the profound need of co-creating an individual suggestion is emphasized.

  14. Electromechanical tactile stimulation system for sensory vision substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Elani, Gal; Azoulay, Eli; Ilani, Dan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Belkin, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A sensory substitution device is developed in which nonretinal stimulus is used to generate input to the brain of blind people to substitute for damage or loss of retinal input. Although the final realization of this technology (direct stimulation of the corneal nerve endings) was not addressed, a device consisting of a contact lens delivering point mechanical or electrical stimulating of the corneal nerves and a camera mounted on a spectacles frame which wirelessly transmit processed image to the contact lens, translating the visual information into tactile sensation is expected to be constructed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the constructed image, the camera will also time multiplex, compress and encode the captured image before transmitting it to the stimulating contact lens. Preliminary devices performing tactile stimulation of the fingers and of the tongue by applying point electrical stimulations, were constructed and tested. Subjects were taught to "see" using the mechanical and the electrical tactile sensory.

  15. Tactile Sensing for Dexterous Robotic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2000-01-01

    Robotic systems will be used as precursors to human exploration to explore the solar system and expand our knowledge of planetary surfaces. Robotic systems will also be used to build habitats and infrastructure required for human presence in space and on other planetary surfaces . Such robots will require a high level of intelligence and automation. The ability to flexibly manipulate their physical environment is one characteristic that makes humans so effective at these building and exploring tasks . The development of a generic autonomous grasp ing capability will greatly enhance the efficiency and ability of robotics to build, maintain and explore. To tele-operate a robot over vast distances of space, with long communication delays, has proven to be troublesome. Having an autonomous grasping capability that can react in real-time to disturbances or adapt to generic objects, without operator intervention, will reduce the probability of mishandled tools and samples and reduce the number of re-grasp attempts due to dropping. One aspect that separates humans from machines is a rich sensor set. We have the ability to feel objects and respond to forces and textures. The development of touch or tactile sensors for use on a robot that emulates human skin and nerves is the basis for this discussion. We will discuss the use of new piezo-electric and resistive materials that have emerged on the market with the intention of developing a touch sensitive sensor. With viable tacti le sensors we will be one step closer to developing an autonomous grasping capability.

  16. Tactile efficiency of insect antennae with two hinge joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andre F; Dürr, Volker

    2004-09-01

    Antennae are the main organs of the arthropod tactile sense. In contrast to other senses that are capable of retrieving spatial information, e.g. vision, spatial sampling of tactile information requires active movement of the sense organ. For a quantitative analysis of basic principles of active tactile sensing, we use a generic model of arbitrary antennae with two hinge joints (revolute joints). This kind of antenna is typical for Orthoptera and Phasmatodea, i.e. insect orders that contain model species for the study of antennal movements, including cricket, locust and stick insect. First, we analyse the significance of morphological properties on workspace and sampling acuity. It is shown how joint axis orientation determines areas out of reach while affecting acuity in the areas within reach. Second, we assume a parametric set of movement strategies, based on empirical data on the stick insect Carausius morosus, and investigate the role of each strategy parameter on tactile sampling performance. A stochastic environment is used to measure sampling density, and a viscous friction model is assumed to introduce energy consumption and, thus, a measure of tactile efficiency. Up to a saturation level, sampling density is proportional to the range or frequency of joint angle modulation. The effect of phase shift is strong if joint angle modulation frequencies are equal, but diminishes for other frequency ratios. Speed of forward progression influences the optimal choice of movement strategy. Finally, for an analysis of environmental effects on tactile performance, we show how efficiency depends on predominant edge direction. For example, with slanted and non-orthogonal joint axis orientations, as present in the stick insect, the optimal sampling strategy is less sensitive to a change from horizontal to vertical edge predominance than with orthogonal and non-slanted joint axes, as present in a cricket.

  17. Tactile acuity charts: a reliable measure of spatial acuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bruns

    Full Text Available For assessing tactile spatial resolution it has recently been recommended to use tactile acuity charts which follow the design principles of the Snellen letter charts for visual acuity and involve active touch. However, it is currently unknown whether acuity thresholds obtained with this newly developed psychophysical procedure are in accordance with established measures of tactile acuity that involve passive contact with fixed duration and control of contact force. Here we directly compared tactile acuity thresholds obtained with the acuity charts to traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds in a group of young healthy adults. For this purpose, two types of charts, using either Braille-like dot patterns or embossed Landolt rings with different orientations, were adapted from previous studies. Measurements with the two types of charts were equivalent, but generally more reliable with the dot pattern chart. A comparison with the two-point and grating orientation task data showed that the test-retest reliability of the acuity chart measurements after one week was superior to that of the passive methods. Individual thresholds obtained with the acuity charts agreed reasonably with the grating orientation threshold, but less so with the two-point threshold that yielded relatively distinct acuity estimates compared to the other methods. This potentially considerable amount of mismatch between different measures of tactile acuity suggests that tactile spatial resolution is a complex entity that should ideally be measured with different methods in parallel. The simple test procedure and high reliability of the acuity charts makes them a promising complement and alternative to the traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds.

  18. Tactile and visual perception of injection moulded plastic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Tobias; Akbas, Erkan; Madsen, Mads

    In today’s world the technical development have reached high levels in many products. This means that the technical specifications are not as high a competition factor as it has been. Therefore the visual appeal (aesthetics) and tactile perception (ergonomics) have become much more important...... appeal (aesthetics) and tactile perception (ergonomics). From this the following thesis has been created: What plastic material and surface texture gives the best combination of aesthetics and ergonomics in the use for buttons on light switches? Throughout the report this thesis will be examined...... in a number of ways including measuring of surface roughness, contact angle, gloss measurement and human perception....

  19. Fluid–Structure Interaction-Based Biomechanical Perception Model for Tactile Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid–structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures. PMID:24260228

  20. Fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical perception model for tactile sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures.

  1. Fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical perception model for tactile sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures.

  2. Artificial ribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J R

    1994-01-01

    Many inorganic and organic compounds promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A. Both the transesterification step, where a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is formed with concomitant cleavage of RNA, and the hydrolysis step, where the 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is converted to a phosphate monoester, may be mimicked with compounds that are readily synthesized in the laboratory. Electrophilic activation of the phosphate ester and charge neutralization are generally important means by which artificial RNases promote phosphate diester displacement reactions. Several artificial RNases operate by a bifunctional general acid/general base mechanism, as does RNase A. Provision of an intramolecular nucleophile appears to be an important pathway for metal complex promoted phosphate diester hydrolysis. In contrast to the successful design of compounds that promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A, there are no artificial nucleases to date that will cleave the 3' P-O bond of RNA or hydrolyze an oligonucleotide of DNA. Artificial RNases based on both metal complexes and organic compounds have been described. Metal complexes may be particularly effective catalysts for both transesterification and hydrolysis reactions of phosphate diesters. Under physiological conditions (37 degrees C and neutral pH), several metal complexes catalyze the transesterification of RNA. Future work should involve the development of metal complexes which are inert to metal ion release but which maintain open coordination sites for catalytic activity. The design of compounds containing multiple amine or imidazole groups that may demonstrate bifunctional catalysis is a promising route to new artificial RNases. Further design of these compounds and careful placement of catalytic groups may yield new RNase mimics that operate under physiological conditions. The attachment of artificial RNases to recognition agents such as oligodeoxynucleotides to create new sequence-specific endoribonucleases is an exciting field of

  3. Tactile Displays for Orientation, Navigation and Communication in Air, Sea and Land Environments (Les systemes d’affichage tactiles pour l’orientation, la navigation et la communication dans les environments aerien, maritime et terrestre)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    assurer le succès de tout nouveau système d’affichage tactile. Les seuils de sensation, la sommation spatiale et temporelle, l’adaptation et les...patterns, much as what happens when viewing pointillist works of art . A prominent example of this type of display is the TACTILE ACTUATOR TECHNOLOGY 4...Tactile displays Tactile modality Tactile sensing Touch Vibration Visual displays 14. Abstract This report describes the state-of-the- art of

  4. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  5. Tactile paths : on and through notation for improvisers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tactile Paths: on and through Notation for Improvisers is an artistic research project that articulates and expands the nexus of notation and improvisation in contemporary and experimental music. The project interweaves direct artistic experience with insights from improvisation studies, the social

  6. Tactile Paths : on and through Notation for Improvisers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tactile Paths: on and through Notation for Improvisers is an artistic research project that articulates and expands the nexus of notation and improvisation in contemporary and experimental music. The project interweaves direct artistic experience with insights from improvisation studies, the social

  7. A Tactile Stimulator for Studying Passive Shape Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John W.; Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Yau, Jeffrey M.; Pembeci, Izzet; Hsiao, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a computer-controlled tactile stimulator for use in human psychophysical and monkey neurophysiological studies of 3-D shape perception. The stimulator is constructed primarily of commercially available parts, as well as a few custom-built pieces for which we will supply diagrams upon request. There are two components to the stimulator: a tactile component and a hand positioner component. The tactile component consists of multiple stimulating units that move about in a Cartesian plane above the restrained hand. Each stimulating unit contains a servo-controlled linear motor with an attached small rotary stepper motor, allowing arbitrary stimulus shapes to contact the skin through vibration, static indentation, or scanning. The hand positioner component modifies the conformation of the restrained hand through a set of mechanical linkages under motorized control. The present design controls the amount of spread between digits two and three, the spread between digits four and three, and the degree to which digit three is flexed or extended, thereby simulating different conformations of the hand in contact with objects. This design is easily modified to suit the needs of the experimenter. Because the two components of the stimulator are independently controlled, the stimulator allows for parametric study of the mechanoreceptive and proprioceptive contributions to 3-D tactile shape perception. PMID:19800916

  8. Bilateral Symmetry of Distortions of Tactile Size Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R; Ghosh, Arko; Yahya, Tasneem

    2015-01-01

    The perceived distance between touches on the limbs is generally bigger for distances oriented across the width of the limb than for distances oriented along the length of the limb. The present study aimed to investigate the coherence of such distortions of tactile size perception across different skin surfaces. We investigated distortions of tactile size perception on the dorsal and palmar surfaces of both the left and right hands as well as the forehead. Participants judged which of two tactile distances felt larger. One distance was aligned with the proximodistal axis (along the body), the other with the mediolateral axis (across the body). Clear distortions were found on all five skin surfaces, with stimuli oriented across the width of the body being perceived as farther apart than those oriented along the length of the body. Consistent with previous results, distortions were smaller on the palmar than on the dorsal hand surface. Distortion on the forehead was intermediate between the dorsal and palmar surfaces. There were clear correlations between distortion on the left and right hands, for both the dorsal and palmar skin surfaces. In contrast, within each hand, there was no significant correlation between the two skin surfaces. Distortion on the forehead was not significantly correlated with that on any of the other skin surfaces. These results provide evidence for bilaterally symmetric representations underlying tactile size perception.

  9. Rich Pinch: Perception of Object Movement with Tactile Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Youngsun; Kim, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    Vibrotactile feedback is an effective and economical approach for enriching interactive feedback. However, its effects are mostly limited to providing supplementary alarms or conveying the sense of simple object presence or contact. In this paper, we propose a novel tactile feedback method, called Rich Pinch, based on the "out of body" tactile illusion for selecting and manipulating a virtual object using a two-finger pinch gesture. Rich Pinch uses vibration motors attached only to the two fingertips, but can induce illusory feedback, such as tactile touch/contact and directional movement, as felt from the space between the fingers. We first experimentally verify that the "out of body" illusion technique does in fact exist when applied between the fingertips. Then we compare three different tactile rendering functions to illustrate different resulting perceptual scales and argue to use the tangent-based interpolation in its actual application for a better user performance and experience due to its near-linear perceptual response. Finally, we assess the user experience (focusing on the perception of the object movement of the selected object) of the proposed pinch method by comparing it to the conventional contact-based method. Our results indicate that, with Rich Pinch, users were able to perceive rich dynamic feedback, and clearly preferred it over the conventional method.

  10. Tactility Factory in the Museum of the Here and Now

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Ruth; Belford, Trish

    2013-01-01

    Tactility Factory Story and Panels on display as part of Showcase of Northern Irish Innovation, Pump House. Organized by Innovation Centre, NI Science Park, Belfast. Showcasing 14 of NI most innovative companies. (Jan 2013-ongoing) presented to HRH Prince Andrew (Jan 2013)

  11. Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

  12. Lateralized ultradian rhythms: evidence from tactile discrimination of either hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Koll, A

    1998-12-01

    Endogenous ultradian rhythms with periods of one or a few hours affect not only on physiological and behavioural functions but also perception and cognition. In particular, lateralized ultradian rhythms which seem to operate separately in the right and left hemispheres of the brain can be monitored by testing the tactile discrimination of the contralateral hand. The present paper is based on two subsequent studies: First, ultradian rhythms in tactile discrimination of either hand were examined in German subjects under laboratory conditions. Considerably different ultradian periods of right and left-handed tactile error rate were found in men but not in women. In a second study, a group of Kenyan Masai shepherds were tested while the subjects were leading herds on daily feeding routes through a savanna habitat. They showed ultradian periods of about 2 hours in tactile discrimination of either hand. Since the right hemisphere is specialized for visuospatial, the left for verbal processing lateralized ultradian rhythms may serve for a long-scale timing of neural processes underlying spatial and semantic mapping of the environment. Sex difference in German subjects and lateral differences found in left-handed (right-hemispheric) ultradian rhythms of German and Masai subjects are discussed from this point of view.

  13. Effects of pitch, level, and tactile cues on speech segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drullman, Rob; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2003-04-01

    Sentence intelligibility for interfering speech was investigated as a function of level difference, pitch difference, and presence of tactile support. A previous study by the present authors [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2432-2433 (2002)] had shown a small benefit of tactile support in the speech-reception threshold measured against a background of one to eight competing talkers. The present experiment focused on the effects of informational and energetic masking for one competing talker. Competing speech was obtained by manipulating the speech of the male target talker (different sentences). The PSOLA technique was used to increase the average pitch of competing speech by 2, 4, 8, or 12 semitones. Level differences between target and competing speech ranged from -16 to +4 dB. Tactile support (B&K 4810 shaker) was given to the index finger by presenting the temporal envelope of the low-pass-filtered speech (0-200 Hz). Sentences were presented diotically and the percentage of correctly perceived words was measured. Results show a significant overall increase in intelligibility score from 71% to 77% due to tactile support. Performance improves monotonically with increasing pitch difference. Louder target speech generally helps perception, but results for level differences are considerably dependent on pitch differences.

  14. Flexible PZT Thin Film Tactile Sensor for Biomedical Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jong Wu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of tactile sensors using the sol-gel process to deposit a PZT thin-film from 250 nm to 1 μm on a flexible stainless steel substrate. The PZT thin-film tactile sensor can be used to measure human pulses from several areas, including carotid, brachial, finger, ankle, radial artery, and the apical region. Flexible PZT tactile sensors can overcome the diverse topology of various human regions and sense the corresponding signals from human bodies. The measured arterial pulse waveform can be used to diagnose hypertension and cardiac failure in patients. The proposed sensors have several advantages, such as flexibility, reliability, high strain, low cost, simple fabrication, and low temperature processing. The PZT thin-film deposition process includes a pyrolysis process at 150 °C/500 °C for 10/5 min, followed by an annealing process at 650 °C for 10 min. Finally, the consistent pulse wave velocity (PWV was demonstrated based on human pulse measurements from apical to radial, brachial to radial, and radial to ankle. It is characterized that the sensitivity of our PZT-based tactile sensor was approximately 0.798 mV/g.

  15. Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

  16. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy-projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace.

  17. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  18. Field-based validation of a tactile navigation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elliott, L.R.; Erp, J. van; Redden, E.S.; Duistermaat, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present three field-based evaluations of a tactile land navigation system. In Experiment 1, we transition from a laboratory setting to rugged terrain used to train US Army soldier land navigation. Navigation in this challenging terrain requires careful attention to one's surroundin

  19. Impact prediction by looming visual stimuli enhances tactile detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléry, Justine; Guipponi, Olivier; Odouard, Soline; Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2015-03-11

    From an ecological point of view, approaching objects are potentially more harmful than receding objects. A predator, a dominant conspecific, or a mere branch coming up at high speed can all be dangerous if one does not detect them and produce the appropriate escape behavior fast enough. And indeed, looming stimuli trigger stereotyped defensive responses in both monkeys and human infants. However, while the heteromodal somatosensory consequences of visual looming stimuli can be fully predicted by their spatiotemporal dynamics, few studies if any have explored whether visual stimuli looming toward the face predictively enhance heteromodal tactile sensitivity around the expected time of impact and at its expected location on the body. In the present study, we report that, in addition to triggering a defensive motor repertoire, looming stimuli toward the face provide the nervous system with predictive cues that enhance tactile sensitivity on the face. Specifically, we describe an enhancement of tactile processes at the expected time and location of impact of the stimulus on the face. We additionally show that a looming stimulus that brushes past the face also enhances tactile sensitivity on the nearby cheek, suggesting that the space close to the face is incorporated into the subjects' body schema. We propose that this cross-modal predictive facilitation involves multisensory convergence areas subserving the representation of a peripersonal space and a safety boundary of self.

  20. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  1. Tactile feedback to the palm using arbitrarily shaped DEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mößinger, Holger; Haus, Henry; Kauer, Michaela; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2014-03-01

    Tactile stimulation enhances user experience and efficiency in human machine interaction by providing information via another sensory channel to the human brain. DEA as tactile interfaces have been in the focus of research in recent years. Examples are (vibro-) tactile keyboards or Braille displays. These applications of DEA focus mainly on interfacing with the user's fingers or fingertips only - demonstrating the high spatial resolution achievable with DEA. Besides providing a high resolution, the flexibility of DEA also allows designing free form surfaces equipped with single actuators or actuator matrices which can be fitted to the surface of the human skin. The actuators can then be used to provide tactile stimuli to different areas of the body, not to the fingertips only. Utilizing and demonstrating this flexibility we designed a free form DEA pad shaped to fit into the inside of the human palm. This pad consists of four single actuators which can provide e.g. directional information such as left, right, up and down. To demonstrate the value of such free form actuators we manufactured a PC-mouse using 3d printing processes. The actuator pad is mounted on the back of the mouse, resting against the palm while operating it. Software on the PC allows control of the vibration patterns displayed by the actuators. This allows helping the user by raising attention to certain directions or by discriminating between different modes like "pick" or "manipulate". Results of first tests of the device show an improved user experience while operating the PC mouse.

  2. ISO's work on guidance for Haptic and tactile interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Kern, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important and is no longer restricted to assistive technologies and special purpose computing environments. The technology has gone through numerous breakthroughs and replications and is now entering a period of developing empiricism, the phase

  3. Tactile Perception and Braille Letter Recognition: Effects of Developmental Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Sally S.

    1978-01-01

    The extent to which a developmental program of tactile perception and braille letter recognition would affect errors in these abilities and reduce scrubbing and backtracking behaviors of 30 legally blind braille users (5-15 years old) was studied. (Author/BD)

  4. To What Extent Do Gestalt Grouping Principles Influence Tactile Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallace, Alberto; Spence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Since their formulation by the Gestalt movement more than a century ago, the principles of perceptual grouping have primarily been investigated in the visual modality and, to a lesser extent, in the auditory modality. The present review addresses the question of whether the same grouping principles also affect the perception of tactile stimuli.…

  5. The Art of Tactile Sensing: A State of Art Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royson Donate D’Souza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes about tactile sensors, its transduction methods, state-of-art and various application areas of these sensors. Here we are taking in consideration the sense of touch. This provides the robots with tactile perception. In most of the robotic application the sense of touch is very helpful. The ability of robots to touch and feel the object, grasping an object by controlled pressure, mainly to categorize the surface textures. Tactile sensors can measure the force been applied on an area of touch. The data which is interpreted from the sensor is accumulated by the array of coordinated group of touch sensors. The sense of touch in human is distributed in four kinds by tactile receptors: Meissner corpuscles, the Merkel cells, the Rufina endings, and the Pacinian corpuscles. There has many innovations done to mimic the behaviour of human touch. The contact forces are measured by the sensor and this data is used to determine the manipulation of the robot.

  6. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  7. [Psychological measurement of tactile-kinesthetic perception in early childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiese-Himmel, C; Höch, J; Liebeck, H

    1998-04-01

    The perception theory of Affolter (1987), the theory of sensory integration of Ayres (1979, 1984) as well as the development theory of Piaget (1973) consider sensorimotor experiences as a basis for the child's cognitive development. Tactile-kinesthetic perception has hereby a central position. In the German-speaking psychology, no standardized tests exist to measure the developmental age of tactile-kinesthetic perception in early childhood. The subtests of neuropsychological batteries have not been primarily constructed for young children, therefore they may not portray the age dependence of tactile-kinesthetic perception exactly. That is why we have collected a pool of items, empirically based descriptors of tactile-kinesthetic behavior, to test this perceptual modality. Then we proved it in a series of pretests. The resulting preliminary developmental test contains 7 functions: Localization of touch, pressure sensibility, two-point-discrimination, finger identification, object stereognosis, stereognosis of object properties, and graphesthesia. It was administered to 111 children aged from 3;2 to 6;5 years in kindergarten. Data of the item analysis demonstrated that many items proved to be to easy. Nevertheless, the instrument is useful and measures reliably. The deficits of the experimental test version will now be corrected by a revision. We will start a detailed analysis again using the revised test.

  8. Artificial blood.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    #Blood substitutes have been developed for almost a century. The various type of artificial blood was continuously available on the market. The theme of this report is to identify the best substitute in emergency situation for some patients and science students. The definition of best is given; thus, as the vital part of the report, the comparison between them is described and discussed. Modified hemoglobin, bovine-based hemoglobin and PFCs are three basic types. In terms of the perfor...

  9. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  10. When vision influences the invisible distractor: tactile response compatibility effects require vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesslein, Ann-Katrin; Spence, Charles; Frings, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Research on the nature of crossmodal interactions between vision and touch has shown that even task-irrelevant visual information can support the processing of tactile targets. In the present study, we implemented a tactile variant of the Eriksen flanker task to investigate the influences of vision on the processing of tactile distractors. In particular, we analyzed whether the size of the flanker effect at the level of perceptual congruency and at the level of response compatibility would differ as a function of the availability of vision (Experiments 1 and 2). Tactile distractors were processed up to the level of response selection only if visual information was provided (i.e., no flanker effects were observed at the level of response compatibility for blindfolded participants). In Experiment 3, we manipulated whether the part of the body receiving the tactile target or distractor was visible, while the other body part was occluded from view. Flanker effects at the level of response compatibility were observed in both conditions, meaning that vision of either the body part receiving the tactile target or the body part receiving the tactile distractor was sufficient to further the processing of tactile distractors from the level of perceptual congruency to the level of response selection. Taken together, these results suggest that vision modulates tactile distractor processing because it results in the processing of tactile distractors up to the level of response selection.

  11. Capacitive wearable tactile sensor based on smart textile substrate with carbon black /silicone rubber composite dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Huang, Ying; Cai, Xia; Liu, Caixia; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    To achieve the wearable comfort of electronic skin (e-skin), a capacitive sensor printed on a flexible textile substrate with a carbon black (CB)/silicone rubber (SR) composite dielectric was demonstrated in this paper. Organo-silicone conductive silver adhesive serves as a flexible electrodes/shielding layer. The structure design, sensing mechanism and the influence of the conductive filler content and temperature variations on the sensor performance were investigated. The proposed device can effectively enhance the flexibility and comfort of wearing the device asthe sensing element has achieved a sensitivity of 0.02536%/KPa, a hysteresis error of 5.6%, and a dynamic response time of ~89 ms at the range of 0-700 KPa. The drift induced by temperature variations has been calibrated by presenting the temperature compensation model. The research on the time-space distribution of plantar pressure information and the experiment of the manipulator soft-grasping were implemented with the introduced device, and the experimental results indicate that the capacitive flexible textile tactile sensor has good stability and tactile perception capacity. This study provides a good candidate for wearable artificial skin.

  12. Artificial ridged skin for slippage speed detection in prosthetic hand applications

    OpenAIRE

    Damian, D.; Martinez, H.; Dermitzakis, K; Hernandez Arieta, A.; Pfeifer, R

    2010-01-01

    The human hand is one of the most complex structures in the body, being involved in dexterous manipulation and fine sensing. Traditional engineering approaches have mostly attempted to match such complexity in robotics without sufficiently stressing on the underlying mechanisms that its morphology encodes. In this work, we propose an artificial skin able to encode, through its morphology, the tactile sense of a robotic hand, characteristic to slippage events. The underlying layout consists of...

  13. Tactile feedback as a sensory subtraction technique in haptics for needle insertion

    CERN Document Server

    Prattichizzo, D; Rosati, G

    2011-01-01

    A sensory substitution technique is presented in which the kinesthetic and tactile feedback are substituted by tactile feedback only provided by two wearable devices able to apply forces to the index finger and thumb holding a handle during a needle insertion task. The force pattern fed back to the user while using the tactile device is similar, in terms of intensity and area of application, to that perceived while interacting with a haptic device providing both tactile and kinesthetic feedback and it can be thought as a subtraction between the complete haptic and kinesthetic feedback. For this reason we refer to this approach as sensory subtraction instead of sensory substitution. A needle insertion scenario is considered. The haptic device is connected to a virtual environment simulating a needle insertion task. Experiments show that the perception of inserting a needle using the tactile feedback only is nearly indistinguishable from the one felt by the user using both tactile and kinesthetic feedback. As m...

  14. Relationship of stimulus and examinee variables to performance on analogous visual and tactile block construction tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph C; Skillman, Gemma D

    2008-01-01

    Nonverbal/spatial tests are unavailable for persons with visual impairments, despite decades of documented need and developmental effort. Because past tactile analogs of block design (BD) tests have not been widely accepted, known BD test parameters were compared across visual and tactile designs to assess the applicability of the test across modalities. Contrary to expectations, edge-cueing of designs with no perceptual cohesiveness (PC) improved tactile and visual performance. The expected PC by cueing and field independence (FI) by PC interactions were found for visual, but not tactile, BD. Uncued tactile designs elicited more errors, tending to occur closer to the center of the designs. These data suggest that visual and tactile BD performance cannot be interpreted similarly. Differences may be due to to modality-specific demand for various encoding and recoding abilities. The standing model is expanded to account for cross-modality differences in BD performance by including both rotation and block segregation.

  15. Stable phase-shift despite quasi-rhythmic movements: a CPG-driven dynamic model of active tactile exploration in an insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin eHarischandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An essential component of autonomous and flexible behaviour in animals is active exploration of the environment, allowing for perception-guided planning and control of actions. An important sensory system involved is active touch. Here, we introduce a general modelling framework of Central Pattern Generators (CPGs for movement generation in active tactile exploration behaviour. The CPG consists of two network levels: (i phase-coupled Hopf oscillators for rhythm generation, and (ii pattern formation networks for capturing the frequency and phase characteristics of individual joint oscillations. The model captured the natural, quasi-rhythmic joint kinematics as observed in coordinated antennal movements of walking stick insects. Moreover, it successfully produced tactile exploration behaviour on a three-dimensional skeletal model of the insect antennal system with physically realistic parameters. The effect of proprioceptor ablations could be simulated by changing the amplitude and offset parameters of the joint oscillators, only. As in the animal, the movement of both antennal joints was coupled with a stable phase difference, despite the quasi-rhythmicity of the joint angle time courses. We found that the phase-lead of the distal scape-pedicel joint relative to the proximal head-scape joint was essential for producing the natural tactile exploration behaviour and, thus, for tactile efficiency. For realistic movement patterns, the phase-lead could vary within a limited range of 10 to 30 degrees only. Tests with artificial movement patterns strongly suggest that this phase sensitivity is not a matter of the frequency composition of the natural movement pattern. Based on our modelling results, we propose that a constant phase difference is coded into the CPG of the antennal motor system and that proprioceptors are acting locally to regulate the joint movement amplitude.

  16. Biomimic Hairy Skin Tactile Sensor Based on Ferromagnetic Microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Hao, Lifeng; Yang, Fan; Jiao, Weicheng; Liu, Wenbo; Li, Yibin; Wang, Rongguo; He, Xiaodong

    2016-12-14

    We present a multifunctional tactile sensor inspired by human hairy skin structure, in which the sensitive hair sensor and the robust skin sensor are integrated into a single device via a pair of Co-based ferromagnetic microwire arrays in a very simple manner. The sensor possesses a self-tunable effective compliance with respect to the magnitude of the stimulus, allowing a wide range of loading force to be measured. The sensor also exhibits some amazing functions, such as air-flow detection, material property characterization, and excellent damage resistance. The novel sensing mechanism and structure provide a new strategy for designing multifunctional tactile sensors and show great potential applications on intelligent robot and sensing in harsh environments.

  17. Acoustic Wave Approach for Multi-Touch Tactile Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; Hafez, Moustapha; Mechbal, Nazih; Vergé, Michel

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, we present a high resolution tactile plate that can localize one or two contact fingers. The localization principle is based on Lamb wave absorption. Fingers' contact will generate absorption signals while Lamb waves are propagating in a thin finite copper plate. These signals can be related to the contact positions and can be calibrated before the use of tactile plate. Fingers' contact positions are calculated by finding the closest calibration signal to the measured signal. Positions are carried out in less than 10 ms with a spatial resolution of 2 mm for one finger localization. Multi-points localization by this technology is developed and a two-point case is initialized and tested. Several optimization methods are also presented in this paper, as the double validation check which could improve the accuracy of single-point localization from 94.63% to 99.5%.

  18. Flexible tactile sensing based on piezoresistive composites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, Stefano; Cauda, Valentina; Canavese, Giancarlo; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio

    2014-03-14

    The large expansion of the robotic field in the last decades has created a growing interest in the research and development of tactile sensing solutions for robot hand and body integration. Piezoresistive composites are one of the most widely employed materials for this purpose, combining simple and low cost preparation with high flexibility and conformability to surfaces, low power consumption, and the use of simple read-out electronics. This work provides a review on the different type of composite materials, classified according to the conduction mechanism and analyzing the physics behind it. In particular piezoresistors, strain gauges, percolative and quantum tunnelling devices are reviewed here, with a perspective overview on the most used filler types and polymeric matrices. A description of the state-of-the-art of the tactile sensor solutions from the point of view of the architecture, the design and the performance is also reviewed, with a perspective outlook on the main promising applications.

  19. Flexible Tactile Sensing Based on Piezoresistive Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stassi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The large expansion of the robotic field in the last decades has created a growing interest in the research and development of tactile sensing solutions for robot hand and body integration. Piezoresistive composites are one of the most widely employed materials for this purpose, combining simple and low cost preparation with high flexibility and conformability to surfaces, low power consumption, and the use of simple read-out electronics. This work provides a review on the different type of composite materials, classified according to the conduction mechanism and analyzing the physics behind it. In particular piezoresistors, strain gauges, percolative and quantum tunnelling devices are reviewed here, with a perspective overview on the most used filler types and polymeric matrices. A description of the state-of-the-art of the tactile sensor solutions from the point of view of the architecture, the design and the performance is also reviewed, with a perspective outlook on the main promising applications.

  20. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alfadhel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  1. Object texture recognition by dynamic tactile sensing using active exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Børlum Petersen, Mikkel; Bilberg, Arne

    For both humans and robots, tactile sensing is important for interaction with the environment: it is the core sensing used for exploration and manipulation of objects. In this paper, we present a method for determining object texture by active exploration with a robotic fingertip equipped with a d...... features and performance of learning algorithms is done and the best method is further used to classify objects by their surface textures with recognition results higher than 90 percent.......For both humans and robots, tactile sensing is important for interaction with the environment: it is the core sensing used for exploration and manipulation of objects. In this paper, we present a method for determining object texture by active exploration with a robotic fingertip equipped...

  2. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-07

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  3. Dynamic interaction of fingertip skin and pin of tactile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigas, Vytautas; Tolocka, Rymantas T.; Ziliukas, Pranas

    2007-12-01

    The present paper deals with investigations performed with the aim to study transmitting tactile information into the area of mechanoreceptors of the fingertip skin segment and to estimate the dynamic properties and behavior of the skin by performing numerical analysis. A computational finite element model consisting of four main layers of skin was used for transient analysis of contact dynamic interaction when loading the skin by a moving pin, as well as for modal analysis of skin and analysis of skin stress-strain state under harmonic loading (a plane strain case was studied). Material properties of the skin were assumed as linear elastic because of a very small excitation signal level. The efficiency of the regime of the skin dynamic loading in terms of the tactile signal level was defined on the basis of the strain level in the dermis zone where mechanoreceptors are placed. The possibilities of using vibratory control signal were analyzed.

  4. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Me...

  5. A Low-cost Soft Tactile Sensing Array using 3D Hall Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.; de Boer, G.; Kow, J; Ghajari, M; Alazmani, A; R. Hewson; Culmer, P

    2016-01-01

    Tactile sensors are essential for robotic systems to safely interact with the external world and to precisely manipulate objects. Existing tactile sensors are typically either expensive or limited by poor performance, and most are not mechanically compliant. This work presents MagTrix, a soft tactile sensor array based on four 3D Hall sensors with corresponding permanent magnets. MagTrix has the capability to precisely measure triaxis force (1 mN resolution) and to determine contact area. In ...

  6. Cross-modal tactile-taste interactions in food evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, B. G.; Carmichael, D.A.; Simner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the taste components within a flavoured substance relies on exposing chemoreceptors within the mouth to the chemical components of ingested food. In our paper, we show that the evaluation of taste components can also be influenced by the tactile quality of the food. We first discuss how multisensory factors might influence taste, flavour and smell for both typical and atypical (synaesthetic) populations and we then present two empirical studies showing tactile-taste interactions in the general population. We asked a group of average adults to evaluate the taste components of flavoured food substances, whilst we presented simultaneous cross-sensory visuo-tactile cues within the eating environment. Specifically, we presented foodstuffs between subjects that were otherwise identical but had a rough versus smooth surface, or were served on a rough versus smooth serving-plate. We found no effect of the serving-plate, but we found the rough/smoothness of the foodstuff itself significantly influenced perception: food was rated as significantly more sour if it had a rough (vs. smooth) surface. In modifying taste perception via ostensibly unrelated dimensions, we demonstrate that the detection of tastes within flavours may be influenced by higher level cross-sensory cues. Finally, we suggest that the direction of our cross-sensory associations may speak to the types of hedonic mapping found both in normal multisensory integration, and in the unusual condition of synaesthesia. PMID:26169315

  7. Investigating the mechanisms of visually-evoked tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kirsten J; Lloyd, Donna M; Brown, Richard J; Plummer, Faye; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    When attempting to detect a near-threshold signal, participants often incorrectly report the presence of a signal, particularly when a stimulus in a different modality is presented. Here we investigated the effect of prior experience of bimodal visuotactile stimuli on the rate of falsely reported touches in the presence of a light. In Experiment 1, participants made more false alarms in light-present than light-absent trials, despite having no experience of the experimental visuotactile pairing. This suggests that light-evoked false alarms are a consequence of an existing association, rather than one learned during the experiment. In Experiment 2, we sought to manipulate the strength of the association through prior training, using supra-threshold tactile stimuli that were given a high or low association with the light. Both groups still exhibited an increased number of false alarms during light-present trials, however, the low association group made significantly fewer false alarms across conditions, and there was no corresponding group difference in the number of tactile stimuli correctly identified. Thus, while training did not affect the boosting of the tactile signal by the visual stimulus, the low association training affected perceptual decision-making more generally, leading to a lower number of illusory touch reports, independent of the light.

  8. A biomimetic tactile sensing system based on polyvinylidene fluoride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Tian, Hongying; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hongshuai; Wang, Peiyuan; Qian, Chenghui; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensing material due to its outstanding properties such as biocompatibility, high thermal stability, good chemical resistance, high piezo-, pyro- and ferro-electric properties. This paper reports on the design, test, and analysis of a biomimetic tactile sensor based on PVDF film. This sensor consists of a PVDF film with aluminum electrodes, a pair of insulating layers, and a "handprint" friction layer with a copper foil. It is designed for easy fabrication and high reliability in outputting signals. In bionics, the fingerprint of the glabrous skin plays an important role during object handling. Therefore, in order to enhance friction and to provide better manipulation, the ridges of the fingertips were introduced into the design of the proposed tactile sensor. And, a basic experimental study on the selection of the high sensitivity fingerprint type for the biomimetic sensor was performed. In addition, we proposed a texture distinguish experiment to verify the sensor sensitivity. The experiment's results show that the novel biomimetic sensor is effective in discriminating object surface characteristics. Furthermore, an efficient visual application program (LabVIEW) and a quantitative evaluation method were proposed for the verification of the biomimetic sensor. The proposed tactile sensor shows great potential for contact force and slip measurements.

  9. Arborealities: The Tactile Ecology of Hardy’s Woodlanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Cohen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article asks what consequences two recent movements in scholarship - affect theory and environmental studies - might have for understanding the Victorian tactile imagination. Thomas Hardy's 1887 novel 'The Woodlanders' provides a means of addressing this question, for it shares with posthumanist critics a view that people are material things in a world of things, and that the world is itself a collection of vital agencies and networked actors. Hardy shows how a tactile modality provides a point of entry into discussions of both affect and ecology, situating the human in a proximate, contiguous relation to both bodily and environmental materialities. 'The Woodlanders' offers a world in which trees, in particular, work on - and are in turn worked on by - human objects; a world in which, one might say, the trees are people and the people are trees. This arboreality is far from a sentimental oneness with nature, nor is it an exercise in anthropomorphization. Instead, it provides a recognition of the inhuman, material, and sensate aspects of the human; or, perhaps better, of the human as rooted, budding, leafy, and abloom. Like some recent theoretical accounts, 'The Woodlanders' disperses agency among human and non-human elements alike, employing a tactile mode of representation to break down distinctions between them. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  10. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  11. The effect of chronic low back pain on tactile suppression during back movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Stefaan; Van Hulle, Lore; Danneels, Lieven; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether tactile suppression, the phenomenon whereby tactile perception is suppressed during movement, would occur in the context of back movements. Of particular interest, it was investigated if tactile suppression in the back would be attenuated in those suffering from chronic low back pain. Individuals with chronic low back pain (N = 30) and a matched control group (N = 24) detected tactile stimuli on three possible locations (back, arm, chest) while performing a back or arm movement, or no movement. We hypothesized that the movements would induce tactile suppression, and that this effect would be largest for low-intense stimuli on the moving body part. We further hypothesized that, during back movements, tactile suppression on the back would be less pronounced in the chronic low back pain group than in the control group. The results showed the expected general tactile suppression effects. The hypothesis of back-specific attenuation of tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was not supported. However, back-specific tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was less pronounced in those who performed the back movements more slowly.

  12. A critical experimental study of the classical tactile threshold theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Leonel E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tactile sense is being used in a variety of applications involving tactile human-machine interfaces. In a significant number of publications the classical threshold concept plays a central role in modelling and explaining psychophysical experimental results such as in stochastic resonance (SR phenomena. In SR, noise enhances detection of sub-threshold stimuli and the phenomenon is explained stating that the required amplitude to exceed the sensory threshold barrier can be reached by adding noise to a sub-threshold stimulus. We designed an experiment to test the validity of the classical vibrotactile threshold. Using a second choice experiment, we show that individuals can order sensorial events below the level known as the classical threshold. If the observer's sensorial system is not activated by stimuli below the threshold, then a second choice could not be above the chance level. Nevertheless, our experimental results are above that chance level contradicting the definition of the classical tactile threshold. Results We performed a three alternative forced choice detection experiment on 6 subjects asking them first and second choices. In each trial, only one of the intervals contained a stimulus and the others contained only noise. According to the classical threshold assumptions, a correct second choice response corresponds to a guess attempt with a statistical frequency of 50%. Results show an average of 67.35% (STD = 1.41% for the second choice response that is not explained by the classical threshold definition. Additionally, for low stimulus amplitudes, second choice correct detection is above chance level for any detectability level. Conclusions Using a second choice experiment, we show that individuals can order sensorial events below the level known as a classical threshold. If the observer's sensorial system is not activated by stimuli below the threshold, then a second choice could not be above the chance

  13. Artificial Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru JIVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to eliminate, a routine in the economic thinking, claimed to be responsible for the negative essence of economic developments, from the point of view, of the ecological implications (employment in the planetary ecosystem. The methodological foundations start from the natural origins of the functionality of the human economic society according to the originary physiocrat liberalism, and from specific natural characteristics of the humankind. This paper begins with a comment-analysis of the difference between natural and artificial within the economy, and then explains some of the most serious diversions from the natural essence of economic liberalism. It shall be explained the original (heterodox interpretation of the Classical political economy (economics, by making calls to the Romanian economic thinking from aggravating past century. Highlighting the destructive impact of the economy - which, under the invoked doctrines, we call unnatural - allows an intuitive presentation of a logical extension of Marshall's market price, based on previous research. Besides the doctrinal arguments presented, the economic realities inventoried along the way (major deficiencies and effects, determined demonstrate the validity of the hypothesis of the unnatural character and therefore necessarily to be corrected, of the concept and of the mechanisms of the current economy.The results of this paper consist of original heterodox methodspresented, intuitive or developed that can be found conclusively within the key proposals for education and regulation.

  14. Tactile roughness perception in the presence of olfactory and trigeminal stimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koijck, Lara A; Toet, Alexander; Van Erp, Jan B F

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that odorants consistently evoke associations with textures and their tactile properties like smoothness and roughness. Also, it has been observed that olfaction can modulate tactile perception. We therefore hypothesized that tactile roughness perception may be biased towards the somatosensory connotation of an ambient odorant. We performed two experiments to test this hypothesis. In the first experiment, we investigated the influence of ambient chemosensory stimuli with different roughness connotations on tactile roughness perception. In addition to a pleasant odor with a connotation of softness (PEA), we also included a trigeminal stimulant with a rough, sharp or prickly connotation (Ethanol). We expected that-compared to a No-odorant control condition-tactile texture perception would be biased towards smoothness in the presence of PEA and towards roughness in the presence of Ethanol. However, our results show no significant interaction between chemosensory stimulation and perceived tactile surface roughness. It could be argued that ambient odors may be less effective in stimulating crossmodal associations, since they are by definition extraneous to the tactile stimuli. In an attempt to optimize the conditions for sensory integration, we therefore performed a second experiment in which the olfactory and tactile stimuli were presented in synchrony and in close spatial proximity. In addition, we included pleasant (Lemon) and unpleasant (Indole) odorants that are known to have the ability to affect tactile perception. We expected that tactile stimuli would be perceived as less rough when simultaneously presented with Lemon or PEA (both associated with softness) than when presented with Ethanol or Indole (odors that can be associated with roughness). Again, we found no significant main effect of chemosensory condition on perceived tactile roughness. We discuss the limitations of this study and we present suggestions for future research.

  15. Tactile roughness perception in the presence of olfactory and trigeminal stimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara A. Koijck

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that odorants consistently evoke associations with textures and their tactile properties like smoothness and roughness. Also, it has been observed that olfaction can modulate tactile perception. We therefore hypothesized that tactile roughness perception may be biased towards the somatosensory connotation of an ambient odorant. We performed two experiments to test this hypothesis. In the first experiment, we investigated the influence of ambient chemosensory stimuli with different roughness connotations on tactile roughness perception. In addition to a pleasant odor with a connotation of softness (PEA, we also included a trigeminal stimulant with a rough, sharp or prickly connotation (Ethanol. We expected that—compared to a No-odorant control condition—tactile texture perception would be biased towards smoothness in the presence of PEA and towards roughness in the presence of Ethanol. However, our results show no significant interaction between chemosensory stimulation and perceived tactile surface roughness. It could be argued that ambient odors may be less effective in stimulating crossmodal associations, since they are by definition extraneous to the tactile stimuli. In an attempt to optimize the conditions for sensory integration, we therefore performed a second experiment in which the olfactory and tactile stimuli were presented in synchrony and in close spatial proximity. In addition, we included pleasant (Lemon and unpleasant (Indole odorants that are known to have the ability to affect tactile perception. We expected that tactile stimuli would be perceived as less rough when simultaneously presented with Lemon or PEA (both associated with softness than when presented with Ethanol or Indole (odors that can be associated with roughness. Again, we found no significant main effect of chemosensory condition on perceived tactile roughness. We discuss the limitations of this study and we present suggestions for

  16. Recruitment of the middle temporal area by tactile motion in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ptito, Maurice; Matteau, Isabelle; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography to investigate whether tactile motion discrimination activates the dorsal visual stream in congenitally blind (CB) participants compared with sighted controls. The tactile stimuli consisted of either static dots, dots moving coherently in one of two possible...

  17. Weber's Illusion and Body Shape: Anisotropy of Tactile Size Perception on the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Haggard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The perceived distance between touches on a single skin surface is larger on regions of high tactile sensitivity than those with lower acuity, an effect known as "Weber's illusion". This illusion suggests that tactile size perception involves a representation of the perceived size of body parts preserving characteristics of the somatosensory…

  18. Perception of Visual-Tactile Colocation in the First Year of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freier, Livia; Mason, Luke; Bremner, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    An ability to perceive tactile and visual stimuli in a common spatial frame of reference is a crucial ingredient in forming a representation of one's own body and the interface between bodily and external space. In this study, the authors investigated young infants' abilities to perceive colocation between tactile and visual stimuli presented on…

  19. Audio-tactile stimulation: A tool to improve health and well-being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.O.; Nijholt, A.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Wolferen, G. van; Kuyper, E.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of the tactile sense or the hearing sense can be used to improve a person's health and well-being. For example, to make someone relax, feel better or sleep better. In this position paper, we present the concept of auditory-tactile stimulation for health and well-being. Through carefully

  20. Tactile picture recognition by early blind children: the effect of illustration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurel, Anne; Witt, Arnaud; Claudet, Philippe; Hatwell, Yvette; Gentaz, Edouard

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated factors that influenced haptic recognition of tactile pictures by early blind children. Such a research is motivated by the difficulty to identify tactile pictures, that is, two-dimensional representations of objects, while it is the most common way to depict the surrounding world to blind people. Thus, it is of great interest to better understand whether an appropriate representative technique can make objects' identification more effective and to what extent a technique is uniformly suitable for all blind individuals. Our objective was to examine the effects of three techniques used to illustrate pictures (raised lines, thermoforming, and textures), and to find out if their effect depended on participants' level of use of tactile pictures. Twenty-three early blind children (half with a regular or moderate level of use of tactile pictures, and half with either no use or infrequent use) were asked to identify 24 pictures of eight objects designed as the pictures currently used in the tactile books and illustrated using these three techniques. Results showed better recognition of textured pictures than of thermoformed and raised line pictures. Participants with regular or moderate use performed better than participants with no or infrequent use. Finally, the effect of illustration technique on picture recognition did not depend on prior use of tactile pictures. To conclude, early and frequent use of tactile material develops haptic proficiency and textures have a facilitating effect on picture recognition whatever the user level. Practical implications for the design of tactile pictures are discussed in the conclusion.

  1. Activation of the hippocampal complex during tactile maze solving in congenitally blind subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Léa; Schneider, Fabien C; Siebner, Hartwig R;

    2012-01-01

    imaging (fMRI) in congenitally blind and blindfolded sighted participants while they navigated through a tactile multiple T-maze. Both groups learned the maze task at a similar pace. In blind participants, tactile maze navigation was associated with increased BOLD responses in the right hippocampus...

  2. How Do Batters Use Visual, Auditory, and Tactile Information about the Success of a Baseball Swing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Bat/ball contact produces visual (the ball leaving the bat), auditory (the "crack" of the bat), and tactile (bat vibration) feedback about the success of the swing. We used a batting simulation to investigate how college baseball players use visual, tactile, and auditory feedback. In Experiment 1, swing accuracy (i.e., the lateral separation…

  3. Beats, Flesh, and Grain : Sonic Tactility and Affect in Electronic Dance Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Luis-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This essay sets out to explore the tactilization of sound in electronic dance music (EDM), which offers an important sensory-affective bridge between touch, sonic experience, and an expansive sense of connection in dancing crowds. EDM events tend to engender spaces of heightened tactility and embodi

  4. Application of tactile displays in sports : where to, how and when to move

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Saturday, I.; Jansen, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we explore the possibilities of tactile displays in sports applications, and report an experiment that shows that a tactile feedback systems improves rowing efficiency compared to traditional feedback systems. Earlier papers have shown that localized vibrations provide intuitive cues f

  5. Vestibulo-tactile interactions regarding motion perception and eye movements in yaw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Groen, E.L.; Veen, H.J. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows that tactile stimulation can override vestibular information regarding spinning sensations and eye movements. However, we conclude that the current data do not support the hypothesis that tactile stimulation controls eye movements directly. To this end, twenty-four subjects were pas

  6. Tactile torso display as countermeasure to reduce night vision goggles induced drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Veltman, J.A.; Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Oving, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The degraded visual infoflllation when hovering with Night Vision Goggles may induce drift that is not noticed by the pilot. We tested the possibilities of counteracting these effects by using a tactile torso display. The display consisted of 64 vibro-tactile elements and presented infoflllation on

  7. Braille and Tactile Graphics: Youths with Visual Impairments Share Their Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, L. Penny; Herzberg, Tina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Data were collected from youths with visual impairment about their experiences with tactile graphics and braille materials used in mathematics and science classes. Methods: Youths answered questions and explored four tactile graphics made using different production methods. They located specific information on each graphic and shared…

  8. Guidelines for the use of vibro-tactile displays in human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2002-01-01

    Vibro-tactile displays convey messages by presenting vibration to the user's skin. In recent years, the interest in and application of vibro-tactile displays is growing. Vibratory displays are introduced in mobile devices, desktop applications and even in aircraft [1]. Despite the growing interest,

  9. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: A behavioral and event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eHauthal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, N200 latencies of somatosensory event-related potentials were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. In deaf but not hearing participants, however, there was a modulation of N200 latencies of visual event-related potentials due to simultaneous tactile stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. P300 amplitudes in response to both stimuli were larger in deaf participants. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. The electroencephalography (EEG results suggest an asymmetry in visuo-tactile interactions between deaf and hearing individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could neither be fully explained by perceptual deficiency nor by inverse effectiveness. Instead, we suggest that results might be explained by a shift in the relative importance of touch and vision in deaf individuals.

  10. Enjoyment of tactile play is associated with lower food neophobia in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Helen; Thakker, Dipti

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has shown that parental reports of food neophobia and tactile sensitivity are associated with lower fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake in children. This study aimed to pilot a behavioral observation measure of tactile play in young children. The primary aim of the study was to see whether children's enjoyment of tactile play was associated with higher F/V consumption, as well as lower food neophobia. Seventy 2- to 5-year-old children (37 males and 33 females) and their parents were recruited through children's centers in the Leicester region of the United Kingdom during July to October 2012. Children's engagement in two tactile play tasks using sticky foods (mashed potatoes and vegetarian gelatin) was observed and rated by both the researcher and parent. Parents were asked to complete a series of questionnaires measuring F/V consumption, food neophobia, and sensory processing. It was found that lower child food neophobia was significantly related to enjoyment of tactile play, whereas child F/V consumption was associated with parental F/V consumption, but not enjoyment of tactile play. The findings strengthen the idea that tactile processing may be associated with the acceptance of food variety, but not the total amount of F/V consumed. Additional research is indicated to determine whether tactile play tasks can be used to lower child food neophobia.

  11. Food neophobia and enjoyment of tactile play: Associations between preschool children and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Helen; Sahota, Simran

    2016-02-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine whether the relationship between enjoyment of tactile play and food neophobia observed in children (Coulthard & Thakker, 2015) would be related to levels seen in their parents. One hundred and twenty six participants were recruited from playgroup centres in the Walsall area of the West Midlands, UK; 63 children (2-5 years; 30 girls and 33 boys) and 63 attendant parents (53 mothers and 10 fathers). Children and their parents' enjoyment of a tactile play task was rated by both the parent and a researcher, and questionnaire measures of food neophobia and tactile sensitivity were completed by the parent for both themselves and their children. Strong associations were found between parent and child scores across all the measures; food neophobia, tactile sensitivity and tactile play enjoyment. The variables most strongly related to child food neophobia were parental neophobia and enjoyment of tactile play (parent and child). These findings indicate that family resemblance exists not only for food neophobia, but for tactile sensory processing as well, and may represent a possible inherited route to neophobia. The findings strengthen the suggestion that tactile processing is associated with food neophobia although the causal nature of this relationship is still not known.

  12. Whisker encoding of mechanical events during active tactile exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves eBoubenec

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rats use their whiskers to extract a wealth of information about their immediate environment, such as the shape, position or texture of an object. The information is conveyed to mechanoreceptors located within the whisker follicle in the form of a sequence of whisker deflections induced by the whisker/object contact interaction. How the whiskers filter and shape the mechanical information and effectively participate in the coding of tactile features remains an open question to date. In the present article, a biomechanical model was developed that provides predictions of the whisker dynamics during active tactile exploration, amenable to quantitative experimental comparison. This model is based on a decomposition of the whisker profile into a slow, quasi-static sequence and rapid resonant small-scale vibrations. It was applied to the typical situation of a rat whisking across an object. Having derived the quasi-static sequence of whisker deformation, the resonant properties of the whisker were analyzed, taking into account the boundary conditions imposed by the whisker/surface contact. We then focused on two elementary mechanical events that are expected to trigger neural responses, namely (i the whisker/object first contact and (ii the whisker detachment from the object. Both events were found to trigger a deflection wave propagating upward to the mystacial pad at constant velocity of 3-5m/s. This yielded a characteristic mechanical signature at the whisker base, in the form of a large peak of negative curvature occurring 4ms after the event was triggered. The dependence in amplitude and lag of this mechanical signal with the main contextual parameters (such as radial or angular distance was investigated. The model was validated experimentally by comparing its predictions to high-speed video recordings of shock-induced whisker deflections performed on anesthetized rats. The consequences of these results on possible tactile encoding schemes are

  13. Whisker encoding of mechanical events during active tactile exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubenec, Yves; Shulz, Daniel E.; Debrégeas, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Rats use their whiskers to extract a wealth of information about their immediate environment, such as the shape, position or texture of an object. The information is conveyed to mechanoreceptors located within the whisker follicle in the form of a sequence of whisker deflections induced by the whisker/object contact interaction. How the whiskers filter and shape the mechanical information and effectively participate in the coding of tactile features remains an open question to date. In the present article, a biomechanical model was developed that provides predictions of the whisker dynamics during active tactile exploration, amenable to quantitative experimental comparison. This model is based on a decomposition of the whisker profile into a slow, quasi-static sequence and rapid resonant small-scale vibrations. It was applied to the typical situation of a rat actively whisking across a solid object. Having derived the quasi-static sequence of whisker deformation, the resonant properties of the whisker were analyzed, taking into account the boundary conditions imposed by the whisker/surface contact. We then focused on two elementary mechanical events that are expected to trigger significant neural responses, namely (1) the whisker/object first contact and (2) the whisker detachment from the object. Both events were found to trigger a deflection wave propagating upward to the mystacial pad at constant velocity of ≈3–5 m/s. This yielded a characteristic mechanical signature at the whisker base, in the form of a large peak of negative curvature occurring ≈4 ms after the event has been triggered. The dependence in amplitude and lag of this mechanical signal with the main contextual parameters (such as radial or angular distance) was investigated. The model was validated experimentally by comparing its predictions to high-speed video recordings of shock-induced whisker deflections performed on anesthetized rats. The consequences of these results on possible tactile

  14. Kinesthetic information facilitates saccades towards proprioceptive-tactile targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, Dimitris; Goettker, Alexander; Mueller, Stefanie; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-05-01

    Saccades to somatosensory targets have longer latencies and are less accurate and precise than saccades to visual targets. Here we examined how different somatosensory information influences the planning and control of saccadic eye movements. Participants fixated a central cross and initiated a saccade as fast as possible in response to a tactile stimulus that was presented to either the index or the middle fingertip of their unseen left hand. In a static condition, the hand remained at a target location for the entire block of trials and the stimulus was presented at a fixed time after an auditory tone. Therefore, the target location was derived only from proprioceptive and tactile information. In a moving condition, the hand was first actively moved to the same target location and the stimulus was then presented immediately. Thus, in the moving condition additional kinesthetic information about the target location was available. We found shorter saccade latencies in the moving compared to the static condition, but no differences in accuracy or precision of saccadic endpoints. In a second experiment, we introduced variable delays after the auditory tone (static condition) or after the end of the hand movement (moving condition) in order to reduce the predictability of the moment of the stimulation and to allow more time to process the kinesthetic information. Again, we found shorter latencies in the moving compared to the static condition but no improvement in saccade accuracy or precision. In a third experiment, we showed that the shorter saccade latencies in the moving condition cannot be explained by the temporal proximity between the relevant event (auditory tone or end of hand movement) and the moment of the stimulation. Our findings suggest that kinesthetic information facilitates planning, but not control, of saccadic eye movements to proprioceptive-tactile targets.

  15. Hand function and tactile perception in a sample of children with myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R A

    1976-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation were to study the relationships between hand function abilities and tactile perception, and the level of spinal cord lesion and status of hydrocephalus in a sample of 17 children with myelomeningocele. Fourteen children showed impaired hand function, and eight showed tactile dysfunction. Statiscally significant differences in hand function scores and graphesthesia scores were obtained for children with increased severity of hydrocephalus and high-level lesions. Of the 48 correlation coefficients computed between the hand function and tactile perception measures used, only one was statistically significant. This lack of correlation may indicate that hand function and tactile perception in children with myelomeningocele are unrelated factors. Clinical implications of impaired hand function and tactile perception were discussed.

  16. Toward Low-Cost Highly Portable Tactile Displays with Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Velázquez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new concept of low-cost, high-resolution, lightweight, compact and highly portable tactile display. The prototype consists of an array of 8 × 8 upward/downward independent moveable pins based on shape memory alloy (SMA technology. Each tactile actuator consists of an antagonist arranged pair of miniature NiTi SMA helical springs capable of developing a 300 mN pull force at 1.5 Hz bandwidth by using simple forced-air convection. The proposed concept allows the development of 200 g weight tactile instruments of compact dimensions which can be easily carried by a visually disabled user. A detailed technical description of the SMA active element, tactile actuator and tactile display is presented and discussed. Preliminary perceptual results confirm the effectiveness of the display on information transmission.

  17. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-17

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated electrodes to make sensor prototypes. The interdigitated electrodes were patterned on the substrate with a laser cutter. Characterization of the prototypes was done to determine their operating frequency followed by experimentation. The prototypes have been used as a tactile sensor showing promising results for using these patches in applications with contact pressures considerably lesser than normal human contact pressure.

  18. Design and image processing for tactile endoscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kenji; Susuki, Yuto; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ken; Ohno, Yuko

    2010-08-01

    We have developed new type tactile endoscope with silicone rubber membrane. The system consists of silicone rubber membrane, image sensor and illumination system. A surface of the Silicone rubber membrane has any patterns which made by nanotechnology. This pattern is deformed by pressing tissue such as cancer, colon and so on. The deformed pattern is captured by image sensor. This pattern is analyzed by image processing. In this paper, the proposed architecture is presented. With several test targets, the characteristics of the prototype systems are evaluated in the computation simulation.

  19. Tactile shoe inlays for high speed pressure monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    pressure sensitive cells and the use of high speed electronics and multiplexing algorithms provides frame rates of 100 Hz. The sensors tolerate overloads while showing a consistent output. The developed prototypes show a high potential not only for robotics, but also for use in sensorised human prosthetics.......This work describes the development of flexible tactile sensor shoe inlays for humanoid robots. Their design is based on a sandwich structure of flexible layers with a thin sheet of piezoresistive rubber as main transducer element. The layout and patterning of top and bottom electrodes give 1024...

  20. Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, L.; Altobelli, N.

    2012-09-01

    In September 2011, the Cassini spacecraft took images of three targets and a challenge was launched to all students: to choose the one target they thought would provide the best science and to write an essay explaining their reasons (more information on the "Cassini Scientist for a Day" essay contest official webpage in: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday10thedition/, run by NASA/JPL) The three targets presented were: Hyperion, Rhea and Titan, and Saturn. The idea behind "Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience" was to transform each of these images into schematic tactile images, highlighting relevant features apprehended through a tactile key, accompanied by a small text in Braille with some additional information. This initial approach would allow reach a broader community of students, more specifically those with visual impairment disabilities. Through proper implementation and careful study cases the adapted images associated with an explanatory key provide more resources in tactile astronomy. As the 2012 edition approaches a new set of targeted objet images will be once again transformed and adapted to visually impaired students and will aim to reach more students into participate in this international competition and to engage them in a quest to expand their knowledge in the amazing Cassini discoveries and the wonders of Saturn and its moons. As the winning essays will be published on the Cassini website and contest winners invited to participate in a dedicated teleconference with Cassini scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this initiative presents a great chance to all visually impaired students and teachers to participate in an exciting experience. These initiatives must be complemented with further information to strengthen the learning experience. However they stand as a good starting point to tackle further astronomical concepts in the classroom, especially this field that sometimes lacks the resources. Although

  1. Preliminary Study on SED Distribution of Tactile Sensation in Fingertip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For investigating the effects of stimuli on the deformations within the soft tissues of fingertips and the dependence of the tactile sensation on the deformations under pressure, in this paper, a finite element model is developed, to simulate the procedure of a fingertip touching a sharp wedge. Characteristics of the strain energy density (SED distribution within the soft issues are analyzed. Simulation results show that the soft tissues of fingertips are very sensitive to stimuli, and the spatial distribution characteristics of strain energy density within soft tissues can best explain the evoked charging rate of mechanoreceptors.

  2. High Resolution Tactile Sensors for Curved Robotic Fingertips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Jankovics, Vince; Gorsic, Matija

    2014-01-01

    Tactile sensing is a key element for various animals that interact with the environment and surrounding objects. Touch provides information about contact forces, torques and pressure distribution and by the means of exploration it provides object properties such as geometry, stiffness and texture[5......]. For humans, extracting high level information from touch provides a better understanding of the objects manipulated while for insects it is essential for locomotion[3]. While robot designers have been using vision systems to provide the robot with information about its surroundings, this is not always...

  3. An Optoelectromechanical Tactile Sensor for Detection of Breast Lumps

    OpenAIRE

    Başdoğan, Çağatay; Ayyıldız, Mehmet; Yıldız, Mustafa Zahid; Güçlü, Burak

    2013-01-01

    We developed a compact tactile imaging (TI) system to guide the clinician or the self-user for noninvasive detection of breast tumors. Our system measures the force distribution based on the difference in stiffness between a palpated object and an abnormality within. The average force resolution, force range, and the spatial resolution of the device are 0.02 N, 0-4 N, and 2.8 mm, respectively. To evaluate the performance of the proposed TI system, compression experiments were performed to mea...

  4. Modelling natural and artificial hands with synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Gabiccini, Marco; Santello, Marco

    2011-11-12

    We report on recent work in modelling the process of grasping and active touch by natural and artificial hands. Starting from observations made in human hands about the correlation of degrees of freedom in patterns of more frequent use (postural synergies), we consider the implications of a geometrical model accounting for such data, which is applicable to the pre-grasping phase occurring when shaping the hand before actual contact with the grasped object. To extend applicability of the synergy model to study force distribution in the actual grasp, we introduce a modified model including the mechanical compliance of the hand's musculotendinous system. Numerical results obtained by this model indicate that the same principal synergies observed from pre-grasp postural data are also fundamental in achieving proper grasp force distribution. To illustrate the concept of synergies in the dual domain of haptic sensing, we provide a review of models of how the complexity and heterogeneity of sensory information from touch can be harnessed in simplified, tractable abstractions. These abstractions are amenable to fast processing to enable quick reflexes as well as elaboration of high-level percepts. Applications of the synergy model to the design and control of artificial hands and tactile sensors are illustrated.

  5. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method.

  6. A miniaturized and flexible optoelectronic sensing system for tactile skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, L.; Corradi, P.; Beccai, L.; Laschi, C.

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid sensing module consisting of a general purpose electro-optical converter and three MEMS force sensors integrated into flexible substrates for tactile skin applications. The features of the converter, namely its flexible and thin substrate and small dimensions, programmability, optical coding and transmission of the information allow this versatile device to host different sensors, locally preprocess signals, translate this diverse information into a 'common language', and transmit it in a parallel, efficient and robust way to the processing unit. After discussing the major technical requirements, the design of the sensing, electrical and optical subsystems is illustrated, as well as the whole process for the module fabrication. A first characterization of a working prototype, hosting three MEMS force sensors and nine independent optical channels was performed. The global performance in terms of sensitivity, bandwidth and spatial sensing resolution make the presented module suitable to be used as basic element of a complete tactile system, conceived for robotic grasping and manipulation. Several solutions for mass production, improved optical properties and more efficient optical transmission are discussed.

  7. A Cross-Platform Tactile Capabilities Interface for Humanoid Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eMa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the core elements of a cross-platform tactile capabilities interface (TCI for humanoid arms. The aim of the interface is to reduce the cost of developing humanoid robot capabilities by supporting reuse through cross-platform deployment. The article presents a comparative analysis of existing robot middleware frameworks, as well as the technical details of the TCI framework that builds on the the existing YARP platform. The TCI framework currently includes robot arm actuators with robot skin sensors. It presents such hardware in a platform independent manner, making it possible to write robot control software that can be executed on different robots through the TCI frameworks. The TCI framework supports multiple humanoid platforms and this article also presents a case study of a cross-platform implementation of a set of tactile protective withdrawal reflexes that have been realised on both the Nao and iCub humanoid robot platforms using the same high-level source code.

  8. Graphesthesia: a test of graphemic movement representations or tactile imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, V; Foster, P S; Edward, D; Wargovich, B; Heilman, K M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBG) often demonstrate agraphesthesia in the same hand they demonstrate apraxia. To recognize letters written in their hand subjects can develop a spatial representation and access graphemic representations. Alternatively, people can use movement working memory and match movement patterns to stored letter movement representations. To learn the method normally used without vision, normal subjects (12) had letters written on their palm either in the normal manner or in a reverse direction. If letters written on the hand are recognized by their spatial features (as when visually reading) direction should not influence letter recognition, but if letters written on the hand are recognized by movement patterns, then in the reverse condition recognition should be impaired. When letters were written normally there were no differences in error between the tactile and visual modality. When letters were written in reverse, however, normal subjects made more errors in the tactile than visual condition. Normally, people identify letters written on their hand by covertly copying (mirroring) the examiner and then access letter movement representations. This might explain why patients with CBG often have agraphesthesia associated with apraxia.

  9. Contact Pressure Level Indication Using Stepped Output Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsuk Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report on a novel diaphragm-type tactile pressure sensor that produces stepwise output currents depending on varying low contact pressures. When contact pressures are applied to the stepped output tactile sensor (SOTS, the sensor’s suspended diaphragm makes contact with the substrate, which completes a circuit by connecting resistive current paths. Then the contact area, and therefore the number of current paths, would determine the stepped output current produced. This mechanism allows SOTS to have high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB in the 3–500 Hz frequency range at contact pressures below 15 kPa. Moreover, since the sensor’s operation does not depend on a material’s pressure-dependent electrical properties, the SOTS is able to demonstrate high reproducibility and reliability. By forming a 4 × 4 array of SOTS with a surface bump structure, we demonstrated shear sensing as well as surface (1 × 1 cm2 pressure mapping capabilities.

  10. Micro-Vibration-Based Slip Detection in Tactile Force Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensing provides critical information, such as force, texture, shape or temperature, in manipulation tasks. In particular, tactile sensors traditionally used in robotics are emphasized in contact force determination for grasping control and object recognition. Nevertheless, slip detection is also crucial to successfully manipulate an object. Several approaches have appeared to detect slipping, the majority being a combination of complex sensors with complex algorithms. In this paper, we deal with simplicity, analyzing how a novel, but simple, algorithm, based on micro-vibration detection, can be used in a simple, but low-cost and durable, force sensor. We also analyze the results of using the same principle to detect slipping in other force sensors based on flexible parts. In particular, we show and compare the slip detection with: (i a flexible finger, designed by the authors, acting as a force sensor; (ii the finger torque sensor of a commercial robotic hand; (iii a commercial six-axis force sensor mounted on the wrist of a robot; and (iv a fingertip piezoresistive matrix sensor.

  11. Micro-vibration-based slip detection in tactile force sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Raul; Payo, Ismael; Vazquez, Andres S; Becedas, Jonathan

    2014-01-03

    Tactile sensing provides critical information, such as force, texture, shape or temperature, in manipulation tasks. In particular, tactile sensors traditionally used in robotics are emphasized in contact force determination for grasping control and object recognition. Nevertheless, slip detection is also crucial to successfully manipulate an object. Several approaches have appeared to detect slipping, the majority being a combination of complex sensors with complex algorithms. In this paper, we deal with simplicity, analyzing how a novel, but simple, algorithm, based on micro-vibration detection, can be used in a simple, but low-cost and durable, force sensor. We also analyze the results of using the same principle to detect slipping in other force sensors based on flexible parts. In particular, we show and compare the slip detection with: (i) a flexible finger, designed by the authors, acting as a force sensor; (ii) the finger torque sensor of a commercial robotic hand; (iii) a commercial six-axis force sensor mounted on the wrist of a robot; and (iv) a fingertip piezoresistive matrix sensor.

  12. Exploration of Tactile Contact in a Haptic Display: Effects of Contact Velocity and Transient Vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, B T; Provancher, W R

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using a novel tactile contact rendering device to explore important factors of the tactile contact event. The effects of contact velocity and event-based transient vibrations were explored. Our research was motivated by a need to better understand the perception of the tactile contact event and to develop a means of rendering stiff surfaces with a nonspecialized haptic device. A passive tactile display, suitable for mounting on a Phantom robot, was developed and is capable of rendering the tactile sensation of contact on a fingertip over a range of velocities commonly experienced during everyday manipulation and tactile exploration. Experiments were conducted with this device to explore how tactile contact dynamics affect the perceived stiffness of a virtual surface. It was found that contact velocity does not have a significant effect on perceived stiffness. These results can be explained by prior research that defines perceived hardness (akin to stiffness) in terms of rate-hardness. However, in agreement with prior literature with stylus-based studies, the addition of transient vibrations to the contact event can, in some cases, increase the perceived stiffness.

  13. Feeling music: integration of auditory and tactile inputs in musical meter perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Gamble, Darik; Sarnlertsophon, Kristine; Wang, Xiaoqin; Hsiao, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Musicians often say that they not only hear, but also "feel" music. To explore the contribution of tactile information in "feeling" musical rhythm, we investigated the degree that auditory and tactile inputs are integrated in humans performing a musical meter recognition task. Subjects discriminated between two types of sequences, 'duple' (march-like rhythms) and 'triple' (waltz-like rhythms) presented in three conditions: 1) Unimodal inputs (auditory or tactile alone), 2) Various combinations of bimodal inputs, where sequences were distributed between the auditory and tactile channels such that a single channel did not produce coherent meter percepts, and 3) Simultaneously presented bimodal inputs where the two channels contained congruent or incongruent meter cues. We first show that meter is perceived similarly well (70%-85%) when tactile or auditory cues are presented alone. We next show in the bimodal experiments that auditory and tactile cues are integrated to produce coherent meter percepts. Performance is high (70%-90%) when all of the metrically important notes are assigned to one channel and is reduced to 60% when half of these notes are assigned to one channel. When the important notes are presented simultaneously to both channels, congruent cues enhance meter recognition (90%). Performance drops dramatically when subjects were presented with incongruent auditory cues (10%), as opposed to incongruent tactile cues (60%), demonstrating that auditory input dominates meter perception. We believe that these results are the first demonstration of cross-modal sensory grouping between any two senses.

  14. Feeling music: integration of auditory and tactile inputs in musical meter perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Huang

    Full Text Available Musicians often say that they not only hear, but also "feel" music. To explore the contribution of tactile information in "feeling" musical rhythm, we investigated the degree that auditory and tactile inputs are integrated in humans performing a musical meter recognition task. Subjects discriminated between two types of sequences, 'duple' (march-like rhythms and 'triple' (waltz-like rhythms presented in three conditions: 1 Unimodal inputs (auditory or tactile alone, 2 Various combinations of bimodal inputs, where sequences were distributed between the auditory and tactile channels such that a single channel did not produce coherent meter percepts, and 3 Simultaneously presented bimodal inputs where the two channels contained congruent or incongruent meter cues. We first show that meter is perceived similarly well (70%-85% when tactile or auditory cues are presented alone. We next show in the bimodal experiments that auditory and tactile cues are integrated to produce coherent meter percepts. Performance is high (70%-90% when all of the metrically important notes are assigned to one channel and is reduced to 60% when half of these notes are assigned to one channel. When the important notes are presented simultaneously to both channels, congruent cues enhance meter recognition (90%. Performance drops dramatically when subjects were presented with incongruent auditory cues (10%, as opposed to incongruent tactile cues (60%, demonstrating that auditory input dominates meter perception. We believe that these results are the first demonstration of cross-modal sensory grouping between any two senses.

  15. Movement Induces the Use of External Spatial Coordinates for Tactile Localization in Congenitally Blind Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heed, Tobias; Möller, Johanna; Röder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    To localize touch, the brain integrates spatial information coded in anatomically based and external spatial reference frames. Sighted humans, by default, use both reference frames in tactile localization. In contrast, congenitally blind individuals have been reported to rely exclusively on anatomical coordinates, suggesting a crucial role of the visual system for tactile spatial processing. We tested whether the use of external spatial information in touch can, alternatively, be induced by a movement context. Sighted and congenitally blind humans performed a tactile temporal order judgment task that indexes the use of external coordinates for tactile localization, while they executed bimanual arm movements with uncrossed and crossed start and end postures. In the sighted, start posture and planned end posture of the arm movement modulated tactile localization for stimuli presented before and during movement, indicating automatic, external recoding of touch. Contrary to previous findings, tactile localization of congenitally blind participants, too, was affected by external coordinates, though only for stimuli presented before movement start. Furthermore, only the movement's start posture, but not the planned end posture affected blind individuals' tactile performance. Thus, integration of external coordinates in touch is established without vision, though more selectively than when vision has developed normally, and possibly restricted to movement contexts. The lack of modulation by the planned posture in congenitally blind participants suggests that external coordinates in this group are not mediated by motor efference copy. Instead the task-related frequent posture changes, that is, movement consequences rather than planning, appear to have induced their use of external coordinates.

  16. A flexible tactile sensitive sheet using a hetero-core fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, S.; Yamazaki, H.; Hosoki, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2014-05-01

    In this report, we have designed a tactile sensitive sheet based on a hetero-core fiber-optic sensor, which realize an areal sensing by using single sensor potion in one optical fiber line. Recently, flexible and wide-area tactile sensing technology is expected to applied to acquired biological information in living space and robot achieve long-term care services such as welfare and nursing-care and humanoid technology. A hetero-core fiber-optic sensor has several advantages such as thin and flexible transmission line, immunity to EMI. Additionally this sensor is sensitive to moderate bending actions with optical loss changes and is independent of temperature fluctuation. Thus, the hetero-core fiber-optic sensor can be suitable for areal tactile sensing. We measure pressure characteristic of the proposed sensitive sheet by changing the pressure position and pinching characteristic on the surface. The proposed tactile sensitive sheet shows monotonic responses on the whole sensitive sheet surface although different sensitivity by the position is observed at the sensitive sheet surface. Moreover, the tactile sensitive sheet could sufficiently detect the pinching motion. In addition, in order to realize the discrimination between pressure and pinch, we fabricated a doubled-over sensor using a set of tactile sensitive sheets, which has different kinds of silicon robbers as a sensitive sheet surface. In conclusion, the flexible material could be given to the tactile sensation which is attached under proposed sensitive sheet.

  17. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  18. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force, good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  19. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design. PMID:27563908

  20. Trends in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the foundations of artificial intelligence as a science and the types of answers that may be given to the question, "What is intelligence?" The paradigms of artificial intelligence and general systems theory are compared. (Author/VT)

  1. Artificiality in Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Rennard, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    This text provides with an introduction to the modern approach of artificiality and simulation in social sciences. It presents the relationship between complexity and artificiality, before introducing the field of artificial societies which greatly benefited from the computer power fast increase, gifting social sciences with formalization and experimentation tools previously owned by "hard" sciences alone. It shows that as "a new way of doing social sciences", artificial societies should undo...

  2. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  3. A systematic approach to the Kansei factors of tactile sense regarding the surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyungmee; Jun, Changrim

    2007-01-01

    Designing products to satisfy customers' emotion requires the information gathered through the human senses, which are visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile senses. By controlling certain design factors, customers' emotion can be evaluated, designed, and satisfied. In this study, a systematic approach is proposed to study the tactile sense regarding the surface roughness. Numerous pairs of antonymous tactile adjectives are collected and clustered. The optimal number of adjective clusters is estimated based on the several criterion functions. The representative average preferences of the final clusters are obtained as the estimates of engineering parameters to control the surface roughness of the commercial polymer-based products.

  4. Sensory prediction on a whiskered robot: a tactile analogy to "optical flow".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christopher L; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2012-01-01

    When an animal moves an array of sensors (e.g., the hand, the eye) through the environment, spatial and temporal gradients of sensory data are related by the velocity of the moving sensory array. In vision, the relationship between spatial and temporal brightness gradients is quantified in the "optical flow" equation. In the present work, we suggest an analog to optical flow for the rodent vibrissal (whisker) array, in which the perceptual intensity that "flows" over the array is bending moment. Changes in bending moment are directly related to radial object distance, defined as the distance between the base of a whisker and the point of contact with the object. Using both simulations and a 1×5 array (row) of artificial whiskers, we demonstrate that local object curvature can be estimated based on differences in radial distance across the array. We then develop two algorithms, both based on tactile flow, to predict the future contact points that will be obtained as the whisker array translates along the object. The translation of the robotic whisker array represents the rat's head velocity. The first algorithm uses a calculation of the local object slope, while the second uses a calculation of the local object curvature. Both algorithms successfully predict future contact points for simple surfaces. The algorithm based on curvature was found to more accurately predict future contact points as surfaces became more irregular. We quantify the inter-related effects of whisker spacing and the object's spatial frequencies, and examine the issues that arise in the presence of real-world noise, friction, and slip.

  5. Sensory prediction on a whiskered robot: A tactile analogy to "optic flow"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Schroeder

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available When an animal moves an array of sensors (e.g., the hand, the eye through the environment, spatial and temporal gradients of sensory data are related by the velocity of the moving sensory array. In vision, the relationship between spatial and temporal brightness gradients is quantified in the optical flow equation. In the present work, we suggest an analog to optical flow for the rodent vibrissal (whisker array, in which the perceptual intensity that flows over the array is bending moment. Changes in bending moment are directly related to radial object distance, defined as the distance between the base of a whisker and the point of contact with the object. Using both simulations and a 1x5 array (row of artificial whiskers, we demonstrate that local object curvature can be estimated based on differences in radial distance across the array. We then develop two algorithms, both based on tactile flow, to predict the future contact points that will be obtained as the whisker array translates along the object. The translation of the robotic whisker array represents the rat's head velocity. The first algorithm uses a calculation of the local object slope, while the second uses a calculation of the local object curvature. Both algorithms successfully predict future contact points for simple surfaces. The algorithm based on curvature was found to more accurately predict future contact points as surfaces became more irregular. We quantify the inter-related effects of whisker spacing and the object’s spatial frequencies, and examine the issues that arise in the presence of real-world noise, friction, and slip.

  6. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  7. Improving tactile sensation in laparoscopic surgery by overcoming size restrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederer C.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic tumors appear as stiff inclusions within the surrounding soft, healthy tissue. In open surgery they are searched for by manual palpation with the gloved fingertip. However, to exploit the benefits of MIS it is mandatory to implement a substitution for the human sense of touch. Therefore, a tactile instrument has been developed with the aim of enlarging the sensing area at the tool tip once it enters the abdominal cavity through the trocar. The provision of a large sensitive surface enables the detection of nearly all sizes of tumors and decreases the time needed for the performance of this task. A prototype was manufactured by laser sintering in PA serving as a carrier for an existing flexible silicone sensor. Automated as well as manual subject palpation tests have shown that a prototypical instrument with a laterally opening lid would be a suitable device for tumor detection in laparoscopic liver surgery.

  8. Tactile feedback display with spatial and temporal resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  9. Tactile Sensors for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Toby B.; Diftler, Myron; Ambrose, Robert O.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Butzer, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Tactile sensors are providing the foundation for developing autonomous grasping skills for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut, a dexterous humanoid robot. The sensors originally developed for the Utah/MIT hand are now incorporated into a rugged glove for Robonaut. These custom gloves compliment the human like dexterity available in the Robonaut hands. The sensors and gloves are discussed showing a progression in using advanced materials and construction techniques to enhance sensitivity and overall sensor coverage. The force data provided by the gloves can be used to improve dexterous, tool and power grasping primitives. Experiments with the latest gloves focus on the use of tools, specifically a power drill used to approximate an astronaut's torque tool.

  10. Tactile perception and working memory in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassihi, Arash; Akrami, Athena; Esmaeili, Vahid; Diamond, Mathew E

    2014-02-11

    Primates can store sensory stimulus parameters in working memory for subsequent manipulation, but until now, there has been no demonstration of this capacity in rodents. Here we report tactile working memory in rats. Each stimulus is a vibration, generated as a series of velocity values sampled from a normal distribution. To perform the task, the rat positions its whiskers to receive two such stimuli, "base" and "comparison," separated by a variable delay. It then judges which stimulus had greater velocity SD. In analogous experiments, humans compare two vibratory stimuli on the fingertip. We demonstrate that the ability of rats to hold base stimulus information (for up to 8 s) and their acuity in assessing stimulus differences overlap the performance demonstrated by humans. This experiment highlights the ability of rats to perceive the statistical structure of vibrations and reveals their previously unknown capacity to store sensory information in working memory.

  11. Visual illusion of tool use recalibrates tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke E; Longo, Matthew R; Saygin, Ayse P

    2017-02-11

    Brief use of a tool recalibrates multisensory representations of the user's body, a phenomenon called tool embodiment. Despite two decades of research, little is known about its boundary conditions. It has been widely argued that embodiment requires active tool use, suggesting a critical role for somatosensory and motor feedback. The present study used a visual illusion to cast doubt on this view. We used a mirror-based setup to induce a visual experience of tool use with an arm that was in fact stationary. Following illusory tool use, tactile perception was recalibrated on this stationary arm, and with equal magnitude as physical use. Recalibration was not found following illusory passive tool holding, and could not be accounted for by sensory conflict or general interhemispheric plasticity. These results suggest visual tool-use signals play a critical role in driving tool embodiment.

  12. Optical fiber based slide tactile sensor for underwater robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ding-zhong; WANG Qi-ming; SONG Rui-han; YAO Xin; GU Yi-hua

    2008-01-01

    In the underwater environment,many visual sensors don't work,and many sensors which work well for robots working in space or on land can not be used underwater.Therefore,an optical fiber slide tactile sensor was designed based on the inner modulation mechanism of optical fibers.The principles and structure of the sensor are explained in detail.Its static and dynamic characteristics were analyzed theoretically and then simulated.A dynamic characteristic model was built and the simulation made using the GA based neural network.In order to improve sensor response,the recognition model of the sensor was designed based on the'inverse solution'principle of neural networks,increasing the control precision and the sensitivity of the manipulator.

  13. Power optimization of ultrasonic friction-modulation tactile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertlewski, Michael; Colgate, J Edward

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic friction-modulation devices provide rich tactile sensation on flat surfaces and have the potential to restore tangibility to touchscreens. To date, their adoption into consumer electronics has been in part limited by relatively high power consumption, incompatible with the requirements of battery-powered devices. This paper introduces a method that optimizes the energy efficiency and performance of this class of devices. It considers optimal energy transfer to the impedance provided by the finger interacting with the surface. Constitutive equations are determined from the mode shape of the interface and the piezoelectric coupling of the actuator. The optimization procedure employs a lumped parameter model to simplify the treatment of the problem. Examples and an experimental study show the evolution of the optimal design as a function of the impedance of the finger.

  14. Modelling the response of a tactile array using electrorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D.; Rensink, D.; Freimuth, H.; Monkman, G. J.; Egersdörfer, S.; Böse, H.; Baumann, M.

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports the first step in the development of a tactile array suitable for the presentation of haptic information in virtual reality. The system is based on the electric field dependence of the viscosity of electrorheological fluids. The simulation, as well as the experimental realization of single tactels is described. The mathematical approach is based on the Eckart model (Eckart W 2000 Continuum Mech. Thermodyn. 12 341-62) and its validity is demonstrated by comparing the resulting yield stress with the experimental results from Wunderlich (2000 Dissertation Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg). Two different tactel designs are realized and the experimental results are compared with numerical simulation. The design of modification B is shown to be applicable for the realization of an actuator array with high spatial resolution.

  15. Modelling the response of a tactile array using electrorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, D [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, D-55129 Mainz (Germany); Rensink, D [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, D-55129 Mainz (Germany); Freimuth, H [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, D-55129 Mainz (Germany); Monkman, G J [Fachhochschule Regensburg, D-93049 Regensburg (Germany); Egersdoerfer, S [Fachhochschule Regensburg, D-93049 Regensburg (Germany); Boese, H [Fraunhofer Institute fuer Silicate Forschung, Wuerzburg (Germany); Baumann, M [Fraunhofer Institute fuer Silicate Forschung, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2004-03-07

    This paper reports the first step in the development of a tactile array suitable for the presentation of haptic information in virtual reality. The system is based on the electric field dependence of the viscosity of electrorheological fluids. The simulation, as well as the experimental realization of single tactels is described. The mathematical approach is based on the Eckart model (Eckart W 2000 Continuum Mech. Thermodyn. 12 341-62) and its validity is demonstrated by comparing the resulting yield stress with the experimental results from Wunderlich (2000 Dissertation Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg). Two different tactel designs are realized and the experimental results are compared with numerical simulation. The design of modification B is shown to be applicable for the realization of an actuator array with high spatial resolution.

  16. Piezoresistive Characteristic of Conductive Rubber for Flexible Tactile Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ying; LIU Ping; ZHANG Yugang; QIU Huaili; GE Yunjian

    2011-01-01

    In the research of 2D flexible tactile sensor matrix, pressure-sensitive conductive rubber was developed and tested in which carbon black was used as its conductive phase and silicon rubber as its matrix layer. Experiments were undertaken and the resultant data were used for its piezoresistive characteristics investigation for two kinds of electrode connection configurations, the surface directive connection and embedded connection. It is found that due to the rather strong nonlinearity of the piezoresistive characteristic curves obtained, a higher correlation relationship can be obtained by means of quadratic polynomial fitting.It also showed that the embedded electrode assembling has higher fitting accuracy while the surface directive connection has better mechanical sensitivity.

  17. Wearable wireless tactile display for virtual interactions with soft bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eFrediani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a wearable, wireless, compact and lightweight tactile display, able to mechanically stimulate the fingertip of users, so as to simulate contact with soft bodies in virtual environments. The device was based on dielectric elastomer actuators, as high-performance electromechanically active polymers. The actuator was arranged at the user’s fingertip, integrated within a plastic case, which also hosted a compact high-voltage circuitry. A custom-made wireless control unit was arranged on the forearm and connected to the display via low-voltage leads. We present the structure of the device and a characterization of it, in terms of electromechanical response and stress relaxation. Furthermore, we present results of a psychophysical test aimed at assessing the ability of the system to generate different levels of force that can be perceived by users.

  18. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  19. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-08-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  20. A Portable Piezoelectric Tactile Terminal for Braille Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel concept on reading assistive technologies for the blind: the TactoBook, a system that is able to translate entire electronic books (eBooks to Braille code and to reproduce them in portable electronic Braille terminals. The TactoBook consists of a computer-based translator that converts fast and automatically any eBook into Braille. The Braille version of the eBook is then encrypted as a file and stored in a USB memory drive which is later inserted and reproduced in a compact, lightweight, and highly-portable tactile terminal. In particular, this paper presents a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuation approach to design and implement such portable Braille terminal. Actuating mechanism, design concept, first prototype, and performance results are presented and discussed.

  1. Spatiotemporal integration of tactile information in human somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumer Johanna M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goal was to examine the spatiotemporal integration of tactile information in the hand representation of human primary somatosensory cortex (anterior parietal somatosensory areas 3b and 1, secondary somatosensory cortex (S2, and the parietal ventral area (PV, using high-resolution whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG. To examine representational overlap and adaptation in bilateral somatosensory cortices, we used an oddball paradigm to characterize the representation of the index finger (D2; deviant stimulus as a function of the location of the standard stimulus in both right- and left-handed subjects. Results We found that responses to deviant stimuli presented in the context of standard stimuli with an interstimulus interval (ISI of 0.33s were significantly and bilaterally attenuated compared to deviant stimulation alone in S2/PV, but not in anterior parietal cortex. This attenuation was dependent upon the distance between the deviant and standard stimuli: greater attenuation was found when the standard was immediately adjacent to the deviant (D3 and D2 respectively, with attenuation decreasing for non-adjacent fingers (D4 and opposite D2. We also found that cutaneous mechanical stimulation consistently elicited not only a strong early contralateral cortical response but also a weak ipsilateral response in anterior parietal cortex. This ipsilateral response appeared an average of 10.7 ± 6.1 ms later than the early contralateral response. In addition, no hemispheric differences either in response amplitude, response latencies or oddball responses were found, independent of handedness. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the large receptive fields and long neuronal recovery cycles that have been described in S2/PV, and suggest that this expression of spatiotemporal integration underlies the complex functions associated with this region. The early ipsilateral response suggests that anterior parietal fields also

  2. Attention modulates visual-tactile interaction in spatial pattern matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göschl, Florian; Engel, Andreas K; Friese, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Factors influencing crossmodal interactions are manifold and operate in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up fashion, as well as via top-down control. Here, we evaluate the interplay of stimulus congruence and attention in a visual-tactile task. To this end, we used a matching paradigm requiring the identification of spatial patterns that were concurrently presented visually on a computer screen and haptically to the fingertips by means of a Braille stimulator. Stimulation in our paradigm was always bimodal with only the allocation of attention being manipulated between conditions. In separate blocks of the experiment, participants were instructed to (a) focus on a single modality to detect a specific target pattern, (b) pay attention to both modalities to detect a specific target pattern, or (c) to explicitly evaluate if the patterns in both modalities were congruent or not. For visual as well as tactile targets, congruent stimulus pairs led to quicker and more accurate detection compared to incongruent stimulation. This congruence facilitation effect was more prominent under divided attention. Incongruent stimulation led to behavioral decrements under divided attention as compared to selectively attending a single sensory channel. Additionally, when participants were asked to evaluate congruence explicitly, congruent stimulation was associated with better performance than incongruent stimulation. Our results extend previous findings from audiovisual studies, showing that stimulus congruence also resulted in behavioral improvements in visuotactile pattern matching. The interplay of stimulus processing and attentional control seems to be organized in a highly flexible fashion, with the integration of signals depending on both bottom-up and top-down factors, rather than occurring in an 'all-or-nothing' manner.

  3. Hysteresis as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Sabrina D; Bitzer, Sebastian; Nierhaus, Till; Kalberlah, Christian; Preusser, Sven; Neumann, Jane; Nikulin, Vadim V; van der Meer, Elke; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Perceptual decisions not only depend on the incoming information from sensory systems but constitute a combination of current sensory evidence and internally accumulated information from past encounters. Although recent evidence emphasizes the fundamental role of prior knowledge for perceptual decision making, only few studies have quantified the relevance of such priors on perceptual decisions and examined their interplay with other decision-relevant factors, such as the stimulus properties. In the present study we asked whether hysteresis, describing the stability of a percept despite a change in stimulus property and known to occur at perceptual thresholds, also acts as a form of an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making, supporting the stability of a decision across successively presented random stimuli (i.e., decision hysteresis). We applied a variant of the classical 2-point discrimination task and found that hysteresis influenced perceptual decision making: Participants were more likely to decide 'same' rather than 'different' on successively presented pin distances. In a direct comparison between the influence of applied pin distances (explicit stimulus property) and hysteresis, we found that on average, stimulus property explained significantly more variance of participants' decisions than hysteresis. However, when focusing on pin distances at threshold, we found a trend for hysteresis to explain more variance. Furthermore, the less variance was explained by the pin distance on a given decision, the more variance was explained by hysteresis, and vice versa. Our findings suggest that hysteresis acts as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making that becomes increasingly important when explicit stimulus properties provide decreasing evidence.

  4. Hysteresis as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina D Thiel

    Full Text Available Perceptual decisions not only depend on the incoming information from sensory systems but constitute a combination of current sensory evidence and internally accumulated information from past encounters. Although recent evidence emphasizes the fundamental role of prior knowledge for perceptual decision making, only few studies have quantified the relevance of such priors on perceptual decisions and examined their interplay with other decision-relevant factors, such as the stimulus properties. In the present study we asked whether hysteresis, describing the stability of a percept despite a change in stimulus property and known to occur at perceptual thresholds, also acts as a form of an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making, supporting the stability of a decision across successively presented random stimuli (i.e., decision hysteresis. We applied a variant of the classical 2-point discrimination task and found that hysteresis influenced perceptual decision making: Participants were more likely to decide 'same' rather than 'different' on successively presented pin distances. In a direct comparison between the influence of applied pin distances (explicit stimulus property and hysteresis, we found that on average, stimulus property explained significantly more variance of participants' decisions than hysteresis. However, when focusing on pin distances at threshold, we found a trend for hysteresis to explain more variance. Furthermore, the less variance was explained by the pin distance on a given decision, the more variance was explained by hysteresis, and vice versa. Our findings suggest that hysteresis acts as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making that becomes increasingly important when explicit stimulus properties provide decreasing evidence.

  5. Attention modulates visual-tactile interaction in spatial pattern matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Göschl

    Full Text Available Factors influencing crossmodal interactions are manifold and operate in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up fashion, as well as via top-down control. Here, we evaluate the interplay of stimulus congruence and attention in a visual-tactile task. To this end, we used a matching paradigm requiring the identification of spatial patterns that were concurrently presented visually on a computer screen and haptically to the fingertips by means of a Braille stimulator. Stimulation in our paradigm was always bimodal with only the allocation of attention being manipulated between conditions. In separate blocks of the experiment, participants were instructed to (a focus on a single modality to detect a specific target pattern, (b pay attention to both modalities to detect a specific target pattern, or (c to explicitly evaluate if the patterns in both modalities were congruent or not. For visual as well as tactile targets, congruent stimulus pairs led to quicker and more accurate detection compared to incongruent stimulation. This congruence facilitation effect was more prominent under divided attention. Incongruent stimulation led to behavioral decrements under divided attention as compared to selectively attending a single sensory channel. Additionally, when participants were asked to evaluate congruence explicitly, congruent stimulation was associated with better performance than incongruent stimulation. Our results extend previous findings from audiovisual studies, showing that stimulus congruence also resulted in behavioral improvements in visuotactile pattern matching. The interplay of stimulus processing and attentional control seems to be organized in a highly flexible fashion, with the integration of signals depending on both bottom-up and top-down factors, rather than occurring in an 'all-or-nothing' manner.

  6. Investigating tactile event recognition in child-robot interaction for use in autism therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirabdollahian, Farshid; Robins, Ben; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Ji, Ze

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is part of our investigation in the ROBOSKIN project. The project aims to develop and demonstrate a range of new robot capabilities based on robot skin tactile feedback from large areas of the robot body. The main objective of the project is to develop cognitive mechanisms exploiting tactile feedback to improve human-robot interaction capabilities. The project aims also to investigate the possible use of this technology in robot-assisted play in the context of autism therapy. This article reports progress made in investigating tactile child-robot interactions where children with autism interacted with the humanoid robot KASPAR equipped with the first prototype of skin patches, introducing a new algorithm for tactile event recognition which will enhance the observational data analysis that has been used in the past.

  7. Increasing top-down suppression from prefrontal cortex facilitates tactile working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Henri; Neuvonen, Tuomas; Savolainen, Petri; Hiltunen, Jaana; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Antila, Hanne; Salonen, Oili; Carlson, Synnöve; Pertovaara, Antti

    2010-01-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and tractography allows investigating functional anatomy of the human brain with high precision. Here we demonstrate that working memory (WM) processing of tactile temporal information is facilitated by delivering a single TMS pulse to the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during memory maintenance. Facilitation was obtained only with a TMS pulse applied to a location of the MFG with anatomical connectivity to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). TMS improved tactile WM also when distractive tactile stimuli interfered with memory maintenance. Moreover, TMS to the same MFG site attenuated somatosensory evoked responses (SEPs). The results suggest that the TMS-induced memory improvement is explained by increased top-down suppression of interfering sensory processing in S1 via the MFG-S1 link. These results demonstrate an anatomical and functional network that is involved in maintenance of tactile temporal WM.

  8. ‘Seeing Touch Anew’: Clothing, Gender, and ‘The Victorian Tactile Imagination’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Tennant

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses upon issues of touch, gender, and perceptions of mid-Victorian 'femininity', produced as a result of 'The Victorian Tactile Imagination' conference at Birkbeck in July 2013.

  9. Microfabrication of Three-Axis Tactile Feedback Actuator for Robot-Assisted Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Eunhyup; Yoo, Jihyung; Lee, Hyungkew; Park, Joonah; Yun, Kwang-Seok

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a three-axis tactile feedback actuator using pneumatic balloons for human perception applications such as robot-assisted surgery systems. A tactile actuator is composed of a center structure having four balloons, sidewalls with one lateral balloon on each sidewall, and a bottom structure supporting the center structure. We fabricated the proposed device using flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) and hard polyurethane with final dimensions of 18 ×18 ×18 mm3. The four balloons on the center structure produce normal tactile display during pneumatic-pressure-assisted inflation. The lateral movement of the center structure driven by sidewall balloons generates a shear tactile display on fingertips. The center deflections of the circular and rectangular balloons were calculated and measured experimentally.

  10. Adult performance on the Southern California Kinesthesis and Tactile Perception Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y T; Nelson, D L

    1981-12-01

    Researchers and clinicians working with various adult populations have no practical, complete, reliable, and valid method of measuring the tactile and kinesthetic functions of their clients. This study gathers preliminary normative information on the performance of adults on the Southern California Kinesthesia and Tactile Tests. Fifty-one normal men and women with a mean age of 26 years were administered the Kinesthesia, Manual Form Perception, Finger Indentification, Graphesthesia, Localization of Tactile Stimuli, and Double Tactile Stimuli Tests in the order in which they were standardized. Test-retest reliability was studied in 41 of these subjects. Results indicated that the assessment of normal adults was hampered by ceiling effects and by low reliability, but that these six tests might well serve a useful function in discriminating between relatively severe dysfunction and normal function in adults. Suggestions were made toward the development of new measurement instruments specifically designed for adults.

  11. In vivo tactile stimulation-evoked responses in Caenorhabditis elegans amphid sheath glia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ding

    Full Text Available Glial cells are important components of the nervous system. However, how they respond to physiological stimuli in vivo remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the electrophysiological activities and Ca2+ responses of the C. elegans amphid sheath glia (AMsh glia to tactile stimulation in vivo. We recorded robust inward currents and Ca2+ elevation in the AMsh cell with the delivery of tactile stimuli of varying displacements to the nose tip of the worm. Compared to the adjacent mechanoreceptor ASH neuron, the AMsh cell showed greater sensitivity to tactile stimulation. Amiloride, an epithelial Na+ channel blocker, blocked the touch-induced currents and Ca2+ signaling in the ASH neuron, but not those in the AMsh cell. Taken together, our results revealed that AMsh glial cells actively respond to in vivo tactile stimulation and likely function cell-autonomously as mechanoreceptors.

  12. Exploring the Invisible Universe: A Tactile and Braille Exhibit of Astronomical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, K. K.; Watzke, M.; de Pree, C.

    2010-06-01

    A tactile/Braille exhibit for the visually impaired community in the USA was launched in July 2009. The exhibit is part of the global From Earth to the Universe (FETTU) project, a Cornerstone of the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The science content of the travelling tactile/Braille exhibit includes explanations of our Sun, Eta Carinae, the Crab Nebula, the Whirlpool Galaxy and the electromagnetic spectrum, and was adapted from the tactile/Braille book Touch the Invisible Sky. We present some of the early observations and findings on the tactile/Braille FETTU exhibit. The new exhibit opens a wider door to experiencing and understanding astronomy for the underserved visually impaired population.

  13. The Effect of Additional Tactile Stimulation in a Perceptual-Motor Treatment Program for School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Elsie H.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the value of a perceptual-motor program using predominantly gross motor activities for children with developmental apraxia and deficits in tactile perception. (Author)

  14. Vision affects tactile target and distractor processing even when space is task-irrelevant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Katrin eWesslein

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The human brain is adapted to integrate the information from multiple sensory modalities into coherent, robust representations of the objects and events in the external world. A large body of empirical research has demonstrated the ubiquitous nature of the interactions that take place between vision and touch, with the former typically dominating over the latter. Many studies have investigated the influence of visual stimuli on the processing of tactile stimuli (and vice versa. Other studies, meanwhile, have investigated the effect of directing a participant’s gaze either toward or else away from the body-part receiving the target tactile stimulation. Other studies, by contrast, have compared performance in those conditions in which the participant’s eyes have been open versus closed. We start by reviewing the research that has been published to date demonstrating the influence of vision on the processing of tactile targets, that is, on those stimuli that have to be attended or responded to. We outline that many – but not all – of the visuotactile interactions that have been observed to date may be attributable to the direction of spatial attention. We then move on to focus on the crossmodal influence of vision, as well as of the direction of gaze, on the processing of tactile distractors. We highlight the results of those studies demonstrating the influence of vision, rather than gaze direction (i.e., the direction of overt spatial attention, on tactile distractor processing (e.g., tactile variants of the negative-priming or flanker task. The conclusion is that no matter how vision of a tactile distractor is engaged, the result would appear to be the same, namely that tactile distractors are processed more thoroughly.

  15. Tactile input and empathy ability modulate the perception of ambiguous biological motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörmetjan eYiltiz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has shown that task-irrelevant auditory cues can bias perceptual decisions regarding directional information associated with biological motion, as indicated in perceptual tasks using point-light walkers (PLWs (Brooks et al., 2007. In the current study, we extended the investigation of cross-modal influences to the tactile domain by asking how tactile input resolves perceptual ambiguity in visual apparent motion, and how empathy ability plays a role in this cross-modal interaction. In Experiment 1, we simulated the tactile feedback on the observers’ fingertips when the (upright or inverted PLWs (comprised of either all red or all green dots were walking (leftwards or rightwards. The temporal periods between tactile events and critical visual events (the PLW’s feet hitting the ground were manipulated so that the tap could lead, synchronize, or lag with the visual foot-hitting-ground event. We found that the temporal structures between tactile (feedback and visual (hitting events systematically modulate the directional perception for upright PLWs, making either leftwards or rightwards more dominant. However, this temporal modulation effect was absent for inverted PLWs. In Experiment 2, we examined how empathy ability modulates cross-modal capture. Instead of generating tactile feedback on participant’s fingertips, we gave taps on their ankles and presented the PLWs with motion directions of approaching (facing towards observer/receding (facing away from observer to resemble normal walking postures. With the same temporal structure, we found that individuals with higher empathic ability were more subject to perceptual bias in the presence of tactile feedback. Taken together, our findings showed that task-irrelevant tactile input can resolve the otherwise ambiguous perception of the directional information of biological motion, whereas cross-modal modulation was mediated by higher level social-cognitive factors, including empathic

  16. Tactile input and empathy modulate the perception of ambiguous biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiltiz, Hörmetjan; Chen, Lihan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that task-irrelevant auditory cues can bias perceptual decisions regarding directional information associated with biological motion, as indicated in perceptual tasks using point-light walkers (PLWs) (Brooks et al., 2007). In the current study, we extended the investigation of cross-modal influences to the tactile domain by asking how tactile input resolves perceptual ambiguity in visual apparent motion, and how empathy plays a role in this cross-modal interaction. In Experiment 1, we simulated the tactile feedback on the observers' fingertips when the (upright or inverted) PLWs (comprised of either all red or all green dots) were walking (leftwards or rightwards). The temporal periods between tactile events and critical visual events (the PLW's feet hitting the ground) were manipulated so that the tap could lead, synchronize, or lag the visual foot-hitting-ground event. We found that the temporal structures between tactile (feedback) and visual (hitting) events systematically biases the directional perception for upright PLWs, making either leftwards or rightwards more dominant. However, this effect was absent for inverted PLWs. In Experiment 2, we examined how empathy modulates cross-modal capture. Instead of giving tactile feedback on participants' fingertips, we gave taps on their ankles and presented the PLWs with motion directions of approaching (facing toward observer)/receding (facing away from observer) to resemble normal walking postures. With the same temporal structure, we found that individuals with higher empathy were more subject to perceptual bias in the presence of tactile feedback. Taken together, our findings showed that task-irrelevant tactile input can resolve the otherwise ambiguous perception of the direction of biological motion, and this cross-modal bias was mediated by higher level social-cognitive factors, including empathy.

  17. Elastomer-Carbon Nanostructure Composites as Prospective Materials for Flexible Robotic Tactile Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Knite, M; Podiņš, G; Zīke, S; Zavickis, J

    2008-01-01

    Our recent achievements in the design, processing and studies of physical properties of elastomer – nano-structured carbon composites as prospective compressive strain sensor materials for robotic tactile elements are presented. Composites made of polyisoprene matrix and high-structured carbon black or multi-wall carbon nano-tube filler have been designed and manufactured to develop completely flexible conductive polymer nano-composites for tactile sensing elements. Electrical resistance of t...

  18. Tactile torso display as countermeasure to reduce night vision goggles induced drift

    OpenAIRE

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Veltman, J A; Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Oving, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The degraded visual infoflllation when hovering with Night Vision Goggles may induce drift that is not noticed by the pilot. We tested the possibilities of counteracting these effects by using a tactile torso display. The display consisted of 64 vibro-tactile elements and presented infoflllation on the desired direction of motion only (simple version), or also included infoflllation on the current motion direction (complex version). The participants flew in a fixed-base helicopter simulator w...

  19. A New Approach in Design and Operating Principle of Silicone Tactile Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakri Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Research and development in tactile sensor are escalating due to the fact that advanced robot needs to interact with surrounding environments which is very complex, dynamic, uncontrolled and difficult to perceive reliably. Recent research has been focusing in development of new tactile sensor that takes advantage of advances in materials, Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS and semiconductor technology. To date, several basic sensing principles are commonly used in tactile sensor such as capacitive sensor, piezoelectric sensor, inductive sensor, opto-electrical and piezo-resistive sensor. However they are still lack of sensitivity and low dynamic range in sensing the changes of forces in 3 axes and not durable enough to perform in various working environments. Approach: Three different designs of optical tactile sensor was proposed and analyzed. The overall design of the test-rig of the system was presented. The working principle was based on the deformation of the silicone tactile sensor. The deformation image will be transferred through high quality medical fiberscope and will be recorded using a CCD camera. The image will be stored in a computer for further analysis to relate the image with the given forces. These data can be used to control a robotic gripper so that it can perform gently and precisely like human tactile sensing capability but with greater strength and durability in various working environments. Results: The sensor had been designed and an experimental test rig was developed. Initial experiment was carried out to check the potential of this technique. Based on results, there is almost a linear relationship between the forces and the deformation of the tactile sensor. The amount of deformation is calculated based on the analyzed image data. Conclusion: The results of the experiment gave a convincing idea and provide a ground for further research to enhance this system to be an alternative tactile sensor in

  20. Introducing the tactile speller: an ERP-based brain-computer interface for communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Marjolein; Severens, Marianne; Geuze, Jeroen; Desain, Peter

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a tactile speller was developed and compared with existing visual speller paradigms in terms of classification performance and elicited event-related potentials (ERPs). The fingertips of healthy participants were stimulated with short mechanical taps while electroencephalographic activity was measured. The letters of the alphabet were allocated to different fingers and subjects could select one of the fingers by silently counting the number of taps on that finger. The offline and online performance of the tactile speller was compared to the overt and covert attention visual matrix speller and the covert attention Hex-o-Spell speller. For the tactile speller, binary target versus non-target classification accuracy was 67% on average. Classification and decoding accuracies of the tactile speller were lower than the overt matrix speller, but higher than the covert matrix speller, and similar to Hex-o-Spell. The average maximum information transfer rate of the tactile speller was 7.8 bits min-1 (1.51 char min-1), with the best subject reaching a bit-rate of 27 bits min-1 (5.22 char min-1). An increased amplitude of the P300 ERP component was found in response to attended stimuli versus unattended stimuli in all speller types. In addition, the tactile and overt matrix spellers also used the N2 component for discriminating between targets and non-targets. Overall, this study shows that it is possible to use a tactile speller for communication. The tactile speller provides a useful alternative to the visual speller, especially for people whose eye gaze is impaired.

  1. Expandable Fully Compliant Capacitive Tactile Sensing Array:Design and Experiment%可拼接式全柔性电容触觉阵列传感器设计与实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄英; 郭小辉; 刘家俊; 马阳洋; 刘彩霞; 刘平; 田合雷

    2015-01-01

    针对现有机器人触觉传感器存在可穿戴性与可移植性差、不易维护及扩展等缺点,提出了一种可用于机器人仿生皮肤的全柔性电容式触觉传感器,并设计成12×12正方形触觉传感阵列和正六边形触觉模块两种可拼接式阵列结构。以炭黑填充硅橡胶作为电容式触觉传感器的弹性电介质,聚酰亚胺为柔性基体,有机硅导电银胶和金属膜为上下两柔性极板,共同构成压力敏感单元。介绍了电容式柔性触觉传感器的工作原理、结构设计及两种与之对应的电容触觉阵列无线数据采集与处理系统。实验结果表明,该全柔性电容式触觉阵列传感器及信号提取系统具有良好的稳定性与灵敏度,可用作人工皮肤实现全触觉感知。%Current robot tactile sensors have shortcomings such as poor wearability and portability, as well as being unpleasant to be maintained and expanded. An expandable, fully compliant capacitive tactile sensor is presented to counteract these shortcomings, which can be used as bio-inspired skin. The structure is designed with two kinds of expandable arrays, the 12×12 square tactile sensing array and the hexagon tactile model. The pressure-sensitive unit is constituted of carbon black filled silicone rubber uniformly as the elastic dielectric of the capacitive sensor, polyimide film as the flexible substrate, as well as silver conductive adhesive and metal film as the flexible parallel-plates of capacitor. In addition, the working principle and the structure design of the capacitive flexible tactile sensor are introduced, and also the wireless signal acquisition and processing systems of two corresponding capacitive arrays are proposed. The experiment results indicate that the fully compliant capacitive sensing array and capacitive signal extraction system has good stability and sensitivity to be used as artificial skin to achieve tactile perception.

  2. Neural correlates associated with superior tactile symmetry perception in the early blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Corinna; Yazzolino, Lindsay; Hirsch, Gabriella; Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2015-02-01

    Symmetry is an organizational principle that is ubiquitous throughout the visual world. However, this property can also be detected through non-visual modalities such as touch. The role of prior visual experience on detecting tactile patterns containing symmetry remains unclear. We compared the behavioral performance of early blind and sighted (blindfolded) controls on a tactile symmetry detection task. The tactile patterns used were similar in design and complexity as in previous visual perceptual studies. The neural correlates associated with this behavioral task were identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In line with growing evidence demonstrating enhanced tactile processing abilities in the blind, we found that early blind individuals showed significantly superior performance in detecting tactile symmetric patterns compared to sighted controls. Furthermore, comparing patterns of activation between these two groups identified common areas of activation (e.g. superior parietal cortex) but key differences also emerged. In particular, tactile symmetry detection in the early blind was also associated with activation that included peri-calcarine cortex, lateral occipital (LO), and middle temporal (MT) cortex, as well as inferior temporal and fusiform cortex. These results contribute to the growing evidence supporting superior behavioral abilities in the blind, and the neural correlates associated with crossmodal neuroplasticity following visual deprivation.

  3. Brain process for perception of the "out of the body" tactile illusion for virtual object interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Chi Jung; Kim, Gerard J; Kim, Eun-Soo; Whang, Mincheol

    2015-04-01

    "Out of the body" tactile illusion refers to the phenomenon in which one can perceive tactility as if emanating from a location external to the body without any stimulator present there. Taking advantage of such a tactile illusion is one way to provide and realize richer interaction feedback without employing and placing actuators directly at all stimulation target points. However, to further explore its potential, it is important to better understand the underlying physiological and neural mechanism. As such, we measured the brain wave patterns during such tactile illusion and mapped out the corresponding brain activation areas. Participants were given stimulations at different levels with the intention to create veridical (i.e., non-illusory) and phantom sensations at different locations along an external hand-held virtual ruler. The experimental data and analysis indicate that both veridical and illusory sensations involve, among others, the parietal lobe, one of the most important components in the tactile information pathway. In addition, we found that as for the illusory sensation, there is an additional processing resulting in the delay for the ERP (event-related potential) and involvement by the limbic lobe. These point to regarding illusion as a memory and recognition task as a possible explanation. The present study demonstrated some basic understanding; how humans process "virtual" objects and the way associated tactile illusion is generated will be valuable for HCI (Human-Computer Interaction).

  4. Impact of tactile function on upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lauren E; Harris, Elizabeth C; Auld, Megan L; Johnston, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of, and relationship between tactile dysfunction and upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) compared to typical developing (TD) children. Participants were 36 children aged 6-12 years. Presence of DCD (n=20) or TD (n=16) was confirmed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, second edition. All children participated in a comprehensive assessment of tactile registration (Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments); tactile spatial perception (Single Point Localisation (SPL) and two-point discrimination (2PD)); haptic perception (Stereognosis); speed of simple everyday manual tasks (Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF)); and handwriting speed and accuracy (Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting (ETCH)). Compared to TD children, children with DCD demonstrated poorer localisation of touch in the non-dominant hand (p=0.04), slower speed of alphabet writing (p0.05). Regression analysis showed that spatial tactile perception (SPL) predicted handwriting legibility (ETCH: r=0.11) and speed of functional tasks (JTTHF: r=0.33). These results suggest that tactile function, specifically single point localisation, should be a primary tactile assessment employed to determine reasons for upper limb motor difficulties experienced by children with DCD.

  5. Nano opto-mechanical systems (NOMS) as a proposal for tactile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, E. M.; Roig, J.; Roeder, B.; Wenn, D.; Mamojka, B.; Omastova, M.; Terentjev, E. M.; Esteve, J.

    2011-10-01

    For over a decade, special emphasis has been placed in the convergence of different fields of science and technology, in an effort to serve human needs by way of enhancing human capabilities. The convergence of the Nano-Bio-Info-Cogni (NBIC) quartet will provide unique solutions to specific needs. This is the case of, Nano-opto mechanical Systems (NOMS), presented as a solution to tactile perception, both for the visually-impaired and for the general public. NOMS, based on photoactive polymer actuators and devices, is a much sought-after technology. In this scheme, light sources promote mechanical actuation producing a variety of nano-opto mechanical systems such as nano-grippers. In this paper, we will provide a series of specifications that the NOMS team is targeting towards the development of a tactile display using optically-activated smart materials. Indeed, tactile displays remain mainly mechanical, compromising reload speeds and resolution which inhibit 3D tactile representation of web interfaces. We will also discuss how advantageous NOMS tactile displays could be for the general public. Tactile processing based on stimulation delivered through the NOMS tablet, will be tested using neuropsychology methods, in particular event-related brain potentials. Additionally, the NOMS tablet will be instrumental to the development of basic neuroscience research.

  6. Tactile-Foot Stimulation Can Assist the Navigation of People with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Ramiro; Pissaloux, Edwige; Lay-Ekuakille, Aimé

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tactile interfaces that stimulate the plantar surface with vibrations could represent a step forward toward the development of wearable, inconspicuous, unobtrusive, and inexpensive assistive devices for people with visual impairments. Objective. To study how people understand information through their feet and to maximize the capabilities of tactile-foot perception for assisting human navigation. Methods. Based on the physiology of the plantar surface, three prototypes of electronic tactile interfaces for the foot have been developed. With important technological improvements between them, all three prototypes essentially consist of a set of vibrating actuators embedded in a foam shoe-insole. Perceptual experiments involving direction recognition and real-time navigation in space were conducted with a total of 60 voluntary subjects. Results. The developed prototypes demonstrated that they are capable of transmitting tactile information that is easy and fast to understand. Average direction recognition rates were 76%, 88.3%, and 94.2% for subjects wearing the first, second, and third prototype, respectively. Exhibiting significant advances in tactile-foot stimulation, the third prototype was evaluated in navigation tasks. Results show that subjects were capable of following directional instructions useful for navigating spaces. Conclusion. Footwear providing tactile stimulation can be considered for assisting the navigation of people with visual impairments. PMID:27019593

  7. Tactile-Foot Stimulation Can Assist the Navigation of People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tactile interfaces that stimulate the plantar surface with vibrations could represent a step forward toward the development of wearable, inconspicuous, unobtrusive, and inexpensive assistive devices for people with visual impairments. Objective. To study how people understand information through their feet and to maximize the capabilities of tactile-foot perception for assisting human navigation. Methods. Based on the physiology of the plantar surface, three prototypes of electronic tactile interfaces for the foot have been developed. With important technological improvements between them, all three prototypes essentially consist of a set of vibrating actuators embedded in a foam shoe-insole. Perceptual experiments involving direction recognition and real-time navigation in space were conducted with a total of 60 voluntary subjects. Results. The developed prototypes demonstrated that they are capable of transmitting tactile information that is easy and fast to understand. Average direction recognition rates were 76%, 88.3%, and 94.2% for subjects wearing the first, second, and third prototype, respectively. Exhibiting significant advances in tactile-foot stimulation, the third prototype was evaluated in navigation tasks. Results show that subjects were capable of following directional instructions useful for navigating spaces. Conclusion. Footwear providing tactile stimulation can be considered for assisting the navigation of people with visual impairments.

  8. Short-term visual deprivation, tactile acuity, and haptic solid shape discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Charles E; Norman, J Farley

    2014-01-01

    Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity. Some studies have found that 45 to 90 minutes of total light deprivation produce significant improvements in participants' tactile acuity as measured with a grating orientation discrimination task. In contrast, a single 2011 study found no such improvement while attempting to replicate these earlier findings. A primary goal of the current experiment was to resolve this discrepancy in the literature by evaluating the effects of a 90-minute period of total light deprivation upon tactile grating orientation discrimination. We also evaluated the potential effect of short-term deprivation upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination using a set of naturally-shaped solid objects. According to previous research, short-term deprivation enhances performance in a tactile 2-D shape discrimination task - perhaps a similar improvement also occurs for haptic 3-D shape discrimination. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination. While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task - the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation.

  9. Tactile learning by a whip spider, Phrynus marginemaculatus C.L. Koch (Arachnida, Amblypygi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Roger D; Hebets, Eileen A

    2009-04-01

    The ability of animals to learn and remember underpins many behavioural actions and can be crucial for survival in certain contexts, for example in finding and recognising a habitual refuge. The sensory cues that an animal learns in such situations are to an extent determined by its own sensory specialisations. Whip spiders (Arachnida, Amblypygi) are nocturnal and possess uniquely specialised sensory systems that include elongated 'antenniform' forelegs specialised for use as chemo- and mechanosensory feelers. We tested the tactile learning abilities of the whip spider Phrynus marginemaculatus in a maze learning task with two tactile cues of different texture--one associated with an accessible refuge, and the other with an inaccessible refuge. Over ten training trials, whip spiders got faster and more accurate at finding the accessible refuge. During a subsequent test trial where both refuges were inaccessible, whip spiders searched for significantly longer at the tactile cue previously associated with the accessible refuge. Using high-speed cinematography, we describe three distinct antenniform leg movements used by whip spiders during tactile examination. We discuss the potential importance of tactile learning in whip spider behaviour and a possible role for their unique giant sensory neurons in accessing tactile information.

  10. Behavioral and neurophysiological investigation of the influence of verbal suggestion on tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio, M; Recchia, S; Corrà, F; Tinazzi, M

    2014-01-31

    Recently we demonstrated that it is possible to influence tactile perception by applying a placebo manipulation consisting of verbal suggestion and conditioning and that this influence is associated to changes in the late components (N140 and P200) of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) (Fiorio et al., 2012). Due to the powerful effects of words in changing symptoms perception in the clinical domain, aim of this study was to investigate whether even in the tactile modality, perception can be changed by the mere use of persuasive words in a specific context. To this purpose, we adopted the same experimental setting of our previous study, apart from the conditioning procedure. A group of subjects (experimental group) has been verbally suggested about the effect of an inert cream in enhancing tactile perception, while a control group was informed about the inefficacy of the cream. In order to unveil the neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect, we compared the amplitude of late SEPs (P100, N140, P200), before and after treatment. Results showed that the experimental group did not perceive an increase of tactile sensation after the treatment and no modification occurred in the late SEPs. This study proves that verbal suggestion alone is not sufficient to induce enhanced tactile perception (at least with this experimental setting), suggesting that a conditioning procedure may be necessary in the tactile modality. The absence of changes in the late SEP components could reflect the lack of strong expectation following the placebo procedure.

  11. Development of tactile floor plan for the blind and the visually impaired by 3D printing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raša Urbas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to produce tactile floor plans for blind and visually impaired people for the use in the museum. For the production of tactile floor plans 3D printing technique was selected among three different techniques. 3D prints were made of white and colored ABS polymer materials. Development of different elements of tactile floor plans, as well as the problems and the solutions during 3D printing, are described in the paper.

  12. Facilitation of tactile working memory by top-down suppression from prefrontal to primary somatosensory cortex during sensory interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Petri; Carlson, Synnöve; Boldt, Robert; Neuvonen, Tuomas; Hannula, Henri; Hiltunen, Jaana; Salonen, Oili; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Pertovaara, Antti

    2011-06-01

    Tactile working memory (WM) is improved by increasing top-down suppression of interfering sensory processing in S1 via a link from the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) to S1. Here we studied in healthy subjects whether the efficacy of top-down suppression varies with submodality of sensory interference. Navigated stimulation of the MFG-S1 link significantly improved tactile WM performance when accompanied by tactile but not visual interference of memory maintenance.

  13. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  14. Stimulus-dependent effects on tactile spatial acuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommerdahl M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that spatio-tactile acuity is influenced by the clarity of the cortical response in primary somatosensory cortex (SI. Stimulus characteristics such as frequency, amplitude, and location of tactile stimuli presented to the skin have been shown to have a significant effect on the response in SI. The present study observes the effect of changing stimulus parameters of 25 Hz sinusoidal vertical skin displacement stimulation ("flutter" on a human subject's ability to discriminate between two adjacent or near-adjacent skin sites. Based on results obtained from recent neurophysiological studies of the SI response to different conditions of vibrotactile stimulation, we predicted that the addition of 200 Hz vibration to the same site that a two-point flutter stimulus was delivered on the skin would improve a subject's spatio-tactile acuity over that measured with flutter alone. Additionally, similar neurophysiological studies predict that the presence of either a 25 Hz flutter or 200 Hz vibration stimulus on the unattended hand (on the opposite side of the body from the site of two-point limen testing – the condition of bilateral stimulation – which has been shown to evoke less SI cortical activity than the contralateral-only stimulus condition would decrease a subject's ability to discriminate between two points on the skin. Results A Bekesy tracking method was employed to track a subject's ability to discriminate between two-point stimuli delivered to the skin. The distance between the two points of stimulation was varied on a trial-by-trial basis, and several different stimulus conditions were examined: (1 The "control" condition, in which 25 Hz flutter stimuli were delivered simultaneously to the two points on the skin of the attended hand, (2 the "complex" condition, in which a combination of 25 Hz flutter and 200 Hz vibration stimuli were delivered to the two points on the attended hand, and (3 a

  15. Extensive occupational finger use delays age effects in tactile perception-an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Eva-Maria; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Vieluf, Solveig; Winneke, Axel H; Godde, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Tactile expertise, resulting from extensive use of hands, has previously been shown to improve tactile perception in blind people and musicians and to be associated with changes in the central processing of tactile information. This study investigated whether expertise, due to precise and deliberate use of the fingers at work, relates to improved tactile perception and whether this expertise interacts with age. A tactile pattern and a frequency discrimination task were conducted while ERPs were measured in experts and nonexperts of two age groups within middle adulthood. Independently of age, accuracy was better in experts than in nonexperts in both tasks. Somatosensory N70 amplitudes were larger with increasing age and for experts than for nonexperts. P100 amplitudes were smaller in experts than in nonexperts in the frequency discrimination task. In the pattern discrimination task, P300 difference wave amplitude was reduced in experts and late middle-aged adults. In the frequency discrimination task, P300 was more equally distributed in late middle-aged adults. We conclude that extensive, dexterous manual work leads to acquisition of tactile expertise and that this expertise might delay, but not counteract, age effects on tactile perception. Comparable neurophysiological changes induced by age and expertise presumably have different underlying mechanisms. Enlarged somatosensory N70 amplitudes might result from reduced inhibition in older adults but from enhanced, specific excitability of the somatosensory cortex in experts. Regarding P300, smaller amplitudes might indicate fewer available resources in older adults and, by contrast, a reduced need to engage as much cognitive effort to the task in experts.

  16. Detection of fever in children emergency care: comparisons of tactile and rectal temperatures in Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okafor Olubukola O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical thermometry is the objective method for temperature measurements but tactile assessment of fever at home is usually the basis for seeking medical attention especially where the cost and level of literacy preclude the use of thermometers. This study was carried out to determine the reliability of tactile perception of fever by caregivers, nurses and house physicians in comparison to rectal thermometry and also the use of commonly practiced surface of the hand in the care of ill children. All caregivers of children aged 6 to 59 months who presented to the emergency department were approached consecutively at the triage stage but 182 children participated. Each child had tactile assessment of fever using palmar and dorsal surfaces of the hand by the caregivers, House Physicians and Nursing Officers. Rectal temperature was also measured and read independently by nurses and house physicians. Comparisons were made between tactile assessments and thermometer readings using a cut-off for fever, 38.0°C and above. Findings The caregivers' perception of fever had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 95%, 23%, 66% and 73%, respectively compared with 93%, 26%, 67% and 69%, respectively for nursing officers. Irrespective of the groups studied, 77.1% of 336 assessors opined that the dorsal surface of the hand was more sensitive in tactile assessment of temperature and the frequently used site for assessment of fever were the head (35.6% and neck (33.3%. Tactile assessment of temperature over-detected fever in ≥ 24% of cases among the three groups of assessors. Conclusions The present study suggests that tactile assessment of temperature may over estimate the prevalence of fever, it does not detect some cases and the need for objective measurement of temperature is emphasised in paediatric emergency care.

  17. Inert gas narcosis has no influence on thermo-tactile sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, Miroljub; Vidmar, Gaj; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2012-05-01

    Contribution of skin thermal sensors under inert gas narcosis to the raising hypothermia is not known. Such information is vital for understanding the impact of narcosis on behavioural thermoregulation, diver safety and judgment of thermal (dis)comfort in the hyperbaric environment. So this study aimed at establishing the effects of normoxic concentration of 30% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) on thermo-tactile threshold sensation by studying 16 subjects [eight females and eight males; eight sensitive (S) and eight non-sensitive (NS) to N(2)O]. Their mean (SD) age was 22.1 (1.8) years, weight 72.8 (15.3) kg, height 1.75 (0.10) m and body mass index 23.8 (3.8) kg m(-2). Quantitative thermo-tactile sensory testing was performed on forearm, upper arm and thigh under two experimental conditions: breathing air (air trial) and breathing normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O (N(2)O trial) in the mixed sequence. Difference in thermo-tactile sensitivity thresholds between two groups of subjects in two experimental conditions was analysed by 3-way mixed-model analysis of covariance. There were no statistically significant differences in thermo-tactile thresholds either between the Air and N(2)O trials, or between S and NS groups, or between females and males, or with respect to body mass index. Some clinically insignificant lowering of thermo-tactile thresholds occurred only for warm thermo-tactile thresholds on upper arm and thigh. The results indicated that normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O had no influence on thermo-tactile sensation in normothermia.

  18. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  19. Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Alonso, Tomás; Santos, Juan Matías; Ortiz Terán, Laura; Borrego Hernández, Mayelin; Poch Broto, Joaquín; de Erausquin, Gabriel Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision. PMID:26225827

  20. Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Alonso, Tomás; Santos, Juan Matías; Ortiz Terán, Laura; Borrego Hernández, Mayelin; Poch Broto, Joaquín; de Erausquin, Gabriel Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision.

  1. Representation of tactile curvature in macaque somatosensory area 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Connor, Charles E; Hsiao, Steven S

    2013-06-01

    Tactile shape information is elaborated in a cortical hierarchy spanning primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory cortex (SII). Indeed, SI neurons in areas 3b and 1 encode simple contour features such as small oriented bars and edges, whereas higher order SII neurons represent large curved contour features such as angles and arcs. However, neural coding of these contour features has not been systematically characterized in area 2, the most caudal SI subdivision in the postcentral gyrus. In the present study, we analyzed area 2 neural responses to embossed oriented bars and curved contour fragments to establish whether curvature representations are generated in the postcentral gyrus. We found that many area 2 neurons (26 of 112) exhibit clear curvature tuning, preferring contours pointing in a particular direction. Fewer area 2 neurons (15 of 112) show preferences for oriented bars. Because area 2 response patterns closely resembled SII patterns, we also compared area 2 and SII response time courses to characterize the temporal dynamics of curvature synthesis in the somatosensory system. We found that curvature representations develop and peak concurrently in area 2 and SII. These results reveal that transitions from orientation tuning to curvature selectivity in the somatosensory cortical hierarchy occur within SI rather than between SI and SII.

  2. Mutual capacitance of liquid conductors in deformable tactile sensing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Fontecchio, Adam K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Departments, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Visell, Yon [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Media Arts and Technology, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Advances in highly deformable electronics are needed in order to enable emerging categories of soft computing devices ranging from wearable electronics, to medical devices, and soft robotic components. The combination of highly elastic substrates with intrinsically stretchable conductors holds the promise of enabling electronic sensors that can conform to curved objects, reconfigurable displays, or soft biological tissues, including the skin. Here, we contribute sensing principles for tactile (mechanical image) sensors based on very low modulus polymer substrates with embedded liquid metal microfluidic arrays. The sensors are fabricated using a single-step casting method that utilizes fine nylon filaments to produce arrays of cylindrical channels on two layers. The liquid metal (gallium indium alloy) conductors that fill these channels readily adopt the shape of the embedding membrane, yielding levels of deformability greater than 400%, due to the use of soft polymer substrates. We modeled the sensor performance using electrostatic theory and continuum mechanics, yielding excellent agreement with experiments. Using a matrix-addressed capacitance measurement technique, we are able to resolve strain distributions with millimeter resolution over areas of several square centimeters.

  3. Flexible Electronics Sensors for Tactile Multi-Touching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hsing Yeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Flexible electronics sensors for tactile applications in multi-touch sensing and large scale manufacturing were designed and fabricated. The sensors are based on polyimide substrates, with thixotropy materials used to print organic resistances and a bump on the top polyimide layer. The gap between the bottom electrode layer and the resistance layer provides a buffer distance to reduce erroneous contact during large bending. Experimental results show that the top membrane with a bump protrusion and a resistance layer had a large deflection and a quick sensitive response. The bump and resistance layer provided a concentrated von Mises stress force and inertial force on the top membrane center. When the top membrane had no bump, it had a transient response delay time and took longer to reach steady-state. For printing thick structures of flexible electronics sensors, diffusion effects and dimensional shrinkages can be improved by using a paste material with a high viscosity. Linear algorithm matrixes with Gaussian elimination and control system scanning were used for multi-touch detection. Flexible electronics sensors were printed with a resistance thickness of about 32 µm and a bump thickness of about 0.2 mm. Feasibility studies show that printing technology is appropriate for large scale manufacturing, producing sensors at a low cost.

  4. Tactile thermal oral stimulation increases the cortical representation of swallowing

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    Suntrup Sonja

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a leading complication in stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and increased mortality. Current strategies of swallowing therapy involve on the one hand modification of eating behaviour or swallowing technique and on the other hand facilitation of swallowing with the use of pharyngeal sensory stimulation. Thermal tactile oral stimulation (TTOS is an established method to treat patients with neurogenic dysphagia especially if caused by sensory deficits. Little is known about the possible mechanisms by which this interventional therapy may work. We employed whole-head MEG to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced volitional swallowing in fifteen healthy subjects with and without TTOS. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM and the group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. Results Compared to the normal swallowing task a significantly increased bilateral cortical activation was seen after oropharyngeal stimulation. Analysis of the chronological changes during swallowing suggests facilitation of both the oral and the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Conclusion In the present study functional cortical changes elicited by oral sensory stimulation could be demonstrated. We suggest that these results reflect short-term cortical plasticity of sensory swallowing areas. These findings facilitate our understanding of the role of cortical reorganization in dysphagia treatment and recovery.

  5. Liquid cooling system for the vibro-tactile threshold device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Erin M; Redd, Christian; Gandhi, Minu S; Tuckett, Robert P; Bamberg, Stacy J Morris

    2011-01-01

    Vibrotactile threshold testing has been used to investigate activation of human somatosensory pathways. A portable vibrotactile threshold testing device called the Vibrotactile Threshold Evaluator for the Workplace (VTEW) was designed for screening of carpal tunnel syndrome in the workplace, and initially contained a small fan for cooling. During subject testing, the device is operated intermittently, which causes the linear actuator to warm the tactile probe. The probe causes discomfort for some subjects. During testing, the probe heated to 42 °C within 90 seconds of continuous operation. A liquid cooling system was implemented to dissipate heat from the probe. The liquid cooling system maintains a steady state temperature of 36 °C for continuous actuation of the probe. The liquid cooling system is capable of maintaining a safe operating temperature, without adding erroneous vibrations to the device. However, the cooling system deters the portability of the device. Further research will investigate how to make the liquid cooling system portable and implements vibrotactile threshold testing in the workplace to quickly evaluate whether or not a person has early symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  6. Object Recognition and Localization: The Role of Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achint Aggarwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors, because of their intrinsic insensitivity to lighting conditions and water turbidity, provide promising opportunities for augmenting the capabilities of vision sensors in applications involving object recognition and localization. This paper presents two approaches for haptic object recognition and localization for ground and underwater environments. The first approach called Batch Ransac and Iterative Closest Point augmented Particle Filter (BRICPPF is based on an innovative combination of particle filters, Iterative-Closest-Point algorithm, and a feature-based Random Sampling and Consensus (RANSAC algorithm for database matching. It can handle a large database of 3D-objects of complex shapes and performs a complete six-degree-of-freedom localization of static objects. The algorithms are validated by experimentation in ground and underwater environments using real hardware. To our knowledge this is the first instance of haptic object recognition and localization in underwater environments. The second approach is biologically inspired, and provides a close integration between exploration and recognition. An edge following exploration strategy is developed that receives feedback from the current state of recognition. A recognition by parts approach is developed which uses the BRICPPF for object sub-part recognition. Object exploration is either directed to explore a part until it is successfully recognized, or is directed towards new parts to endorse the current recognition belief. This approach is validated by simulation experiments.

  7. Sensitivity to tactile novelty in the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio scaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselme, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Invertebrates have been studied at biochemical, ecological, and behavioural levels, but current knowledge about the impact that learning may have on behaviour is rather sparse. The present study aimed to examine the sensitivity of isolated rough woodlice (Porcellio scaber, Latreille, 1804) to the tactile novelty of their environment. A simple way to test this issue was to refer to the place preference paradigm, traditionally used in vertebrates. In Experiment 1, woodlice were placed in a compartment for 30 min in order to assess their ability to develop habituation in the absence of reward. In Experiment 2, woodlice were exposed to a compartment for 20 min (habituation phase) and were then given free choice between that compartment and a novel compartment for 2 min (preference phase). Depending on test conditions, rewards (humidity and/or shelter) were present or absent in the familiar compartment. The familiar and novel compartments differed with respect to the texture of the floor. In Experiment 3, the floor texture was the same in the two compartments in order to control for a novelty effect. The main results indicate that woodlice exhibited increased locomotion time, increased distance travelled, and increased speed in the novel compartment compared to the familiar compartment. There was no preference for either compartment when the floor textures of both were identical.

  8. Onion artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  9. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  10. Hearing shapes our perception of time: temporal discrimination of tactile stimuli in deaf people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, Nadia; Cecchetto, Carlo; Geraci, Carlo; Maravita, Angelo; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Papagno, Costanza

    2012-02-01

    Confronted with the loss of one type of sensory input, we compensate using information conveyed by other senses. However, losing one type of sensory information at specific developmental times may lead to deficits across all sensory modalities. We addressed the effect of auditory deprivation on the development of tactile abilities, taking into account changes occurring at the behavioral and cortical level. Congenitally deaf and hearing individuals performed two tactile tasks, the first requiring the discrimination of the temporal duration of touches and the second requiring the discrimination of their spatial length. Compared with hearing individuals, deaf individuals were impaired only in tactile temporal processing. To explore the neural substrate of this difference, we ran a TMS experiment. In deaf individuals, the auditory association cortex was involved in temporal and spatial tactile processing, with the same chronometry as the primary somatosensory cortex. In hearing participants, the involvement of auditory association cortex occurred at a later stage and selectively for temporal discrimination. The different chronometry in the recruitment of the auditory cortex in deaf individuals correlated with the tactile temporal impairment. Thus, early hearing experience seems to be crucial to develop an efficient temporal processing across modalities, suggesting that plasticity does not necessarily result in behavioral compensation.

  11. Tactile Perception and Friction-Induced Vibrations: Discrimination of Similarly Patterned Wood-Like Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacleu Ndengue, Jessica; Cesini, B Ilaria; Faucheu, C Jenny; Chatelet, D Eric; Zahouani, E Hassan; Delafosse, F David; Massi, G Francesco

    2016-12-22

    The tactile perception of a surface texture is mediated by factors such as material, topography and vibrations induced by the sliding contact. In this paper, sensory characterizations are developed together with topographical and tribo-tactile characterizations to relate perceived features with objective measurements of tribological and dynamic signals. Two sets of surface samples are used in this study: the first set is made of a commercial floor covering tiles that aim at counter-typing natural wood flooring, with both a visual and a tactile texture mimicking wood. A second set is custom-made by replicating the first set using a plain purple polyurethane resin. The comparison between tribo-tactile signals and sensory analysis allowed the identification of objective indices for textures with slight topographical differences. Even though the topography of the replicated samples is the same as their corresponding commercial products, the fact that the material is different, induces differences in the contact and vibrational parameters. This in turn modifies the discrimination performances during the sensory experiment. Tactile characteristics collected during sensory procedures are found to be in agreement with objective indices such as friction coefficients and induced vibrations.

  12. Neural correlates of tactile perception during pre-, peri-, and post-movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; Heed, Tobias; Spence, Charles; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    Tactile information is differentially processed over the various phases of goal-directed movements. Here, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate the neural correlates of tactile and visual information processing during movement. Participants performed goal-directed reaches for an object placed centrally on the table in front of them. Tactile and visual stimulation (100 ms) was presented in separate trials during the different phases of the movement (i.e. preparation, execution, and post-movement). These stimuli were independently delivered to either the moving or resting hand. In a control condition, the participants only performed the movement, while omission (i.e. movement-only) ERPs were recorded. Participants were instructed to ignore the presence or absence of any sensory events and to concentrate solely on the execution of the movement. Enhanced ERPs were observed 80-200 ms after tactile stimulation, as well as 100-250 ms after visual stimulation: These modulations were greatest during the execution of the goal-directed movement, and they were effector based (i.e. significantly more negative for stimuli presented to the moving hand). Furthermore, ERPs revealed enhanced sensory processing during goal-directed movements for visual stimuli as well. Such enhanced processing of both tactile and visual information during the execution phase suggests that incoming sensory information is continuously monitored for a potential adjustment of the current motor plan. Furthermore, the results reported here also highlight a tight coupling between spatial attention and the execution of motor actions.

  13. Touching motion: rTMS on the human middle temporal complex interferes with tactile speed perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Demis; Pavan, Andrea; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Fagioli, Sabrina; Vecchi, Tomaso; Miniussi, Carlo; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-10-01

    Brain functional and psychophysical studies have clearly demonstrated that visual motion perception relies on the activity of the middle temporal complex (hMT+). However, recent studies have shown that hMT+ seems to be also activated during tactile motion perception, suggesting that this visual extrastriate area is involved in the processing and integration of motion, irrespective of the sensorial modality. In the present study, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to assess whether hMT+ plays a causal role in tactile motion processing. Blindfolded participants detected changes in the speed of a grid of tactile moving points with their finger (i.e. tactile modality). The experiment included three different conditions: a control condition with no TMS and two TMS conditions, i.e. hMT+-rTMS and posterior parietal cortex (PPC)-rTMS. Accuracies were significantly impaired during hMT+-rTMS but not in the other two conditions (No-rTMS or PPC-rTMS), moreover, thresholds for detecting speed changes were significantly higher in the hMT+-rTMS with respect to the control TMS conditions. These findings provide stronger evidence that the activity of the hMT+ area is involved in tactile speed processing, which may be consistent with the hypothesis of a supramodal role for that cortical region in motion processing.

  14. The effects of negative emotions on sensory perception: fear but not anger decreases tactile sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2014-01-01

    Emotions and sensory perceptions are closely intertwined. Of the five senses, sight has been by far the most extensively studied sense in emotion research. Relatively less is known about how emotions influence the other four senses. Touch is essential for nonverbal communication in both humans and other animals. The current investigation tested competing hypotheses about the effect of fear on tactile perception. One hypothesis based on evolutionary considerations predicts that fear enhances sensory perception, including tactile sensitivity. A competing hypothesis based on research on peripheral psychophysiology predicts that fear should decrease tactile sensitivity. Two experiments that induced negative emotional states and measured two-point discrimination ability at the fingertip found that fear reduces tactile sensitivity relative to anger or a neutral control condition (Studies 1 and 2). These findings did not appear to be driven by participants' naïve beliefs about the influence of emotions on touch (Study 3). The results represent the first evidence of the causal impact of emotional states on tactile sensitivity, are consistent with prior evidence for the peripheral physiological effects of fear, and offer novel empirical grounds for developing and advancing theories of emotional influences on sensory perception.

  15. The attentive homunculus: ERP evidence for somatotopic allocation of attention in tactile search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Bettina; Tziraki, Maria; Jones, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Our brain constantly receives tactile information from the body's surface. We often only become aware of this information when directing our attention towards the body. Here, we report a study investigating the behavioural and neural response when selecting a target amongst distractor vibrations presented simultaneously to several locations either across the hands or body. Comparable visual search studies have revealed the N2pc as the neural correlate of visual selective attention. Analogously, we describe an enhanced negativity contralateral to the tactile target side. This effect is strongest over somatosensory areas and lasts approximately 200ms from the onset of the somatosensory N140 ERP component. Based on these characteristics we named this electrophysiological signature of attentional tactile target selection during tactile search the N140-central-contralateral (N140cc). Furthermore, we present supporting evince that the N140cc reflects attentional enhancement of target rather than suppression of distractor locations; the component was not reliably altered by distractor but rather by target location changes. Taken together, our findings present a novel electrophysiological marker of tactile search and show how attentional selection of touch operates by mainly enhancing task relevant locations within the somatosensory homunculus.

  16. Development of a biomimetic roughness sensor for tactile information with an elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Sung Joon; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2016-04-01

    Human uses various sensational information for identifying an object. When contacting an unidentified object with no vision, tactile sensation provides a variety of information to perceive. Tactile sensation plays an important role to recognize a shape of surfaces from touching. In robotic fields, tactile sensation is especially meaningful. Robots can perform more accurate job using comprehensive tactile information. And in case of using sensors made by soft material like silicone, sensors can be used in various situations. So we are developing a tactile sensor with soft materials. As the conventional robot operates in a controlled environment, it is a good model to make robots more available at any circumstance that sensory systems of living things. For example, there are lots of mechanoreceptors that each of them has different roles detecting simulation in side of human skin tissue. By mimicking the mechanoreceptor, a sensory system can be realized more closely to human being. It is known that human obtains roughness information through scanning the surface with fingertips. During that times, subcutaneous mechanoreceptors detect vibration. In the same way, while a robot is scanning a surface of object, a roughness sensor developed detects vibrations generated between contacting two surfaces. In this research, a roughness sensor made by an elastomer was developed and experiment for perception of objects was conducted. We describe means to compare the roughness of objects with a newly developed sensor.

  17. [The effect of passive tactile stimulation in the brain activity of children with attention deficit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Claros, M; Serrano-Marugan, I; Quintero, J; Ortiz, T

    2016-01-01

    Introduccion. Los potenciales evocados N200 y P300 han demostrado ser una herramienta de gran utilidad en el seguimiento de niños con trastorno por deficit de atencion (TDA). Objetivo. Evaluar el procesamiento cerebral de la informacion mediante los componentes N200 y P300 en modalidad tactil en niños con TDA. Sujetos y metodos. Se registraron los componentes N200 y P300 de los potenciales evocados durante una tarea oddball de estimulacion tactil en un grupo experimental de 17 niños con TDA al principio y al final de un entrenamiento mediante estimulacion tactil diaria, en otro de 12 niños con TDA y en 21 niños control sin TDA que no recibieron estimulacion tactil. Los tres grupos tenian edades comprendidas entre 7 y 11 años. Resultados. Los resultados indican una disminucion significativa de la latencia de las ondas N200 y P300 en el grupo experimental al final del estudio. Se encontraron diferencias significativas en la N200 en el grupo experimental en areas temporales parietales y occipitales, mientras que, en la P300, las diferencias se localizan en areas poscentrales y parietales. Conclusion. La estimulacion tactil de manera sistematica, ordenada y organizada en niños con TDA puede ser efectiva para la mejora de la latencia de los potenciales evocados N200 y P300, asi como para una mayor plasticidad cerebral parietal, asociada a la atencion perceptiva.

  18. Pioglitazone attenuates tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice subjected to peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takehiko; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Ozaki, Masanobu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2008-11-01

    To clarify the role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in neuropathic pain, we examined the effect of pioglitazone, a PPARgamma agonist, on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model. Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) and given pioglitazone (1 - 25 mg/kg, p.o.) once daily. PPARgamma was distributed in the neurons of the dorsal root ganglion and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the adipocytes at the epineurium of the sciatic nerve in naive mice. PSL elicited tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia for two weeks. Administration of pioglitazone for the first week after PSL attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia, which was dose-dependent and blocked by GW9662 (2 mg/kg, i.p.), a PPARgamma antagonist. Administration of pioglitazone for the second week also relieved tactile allodynia, but administration one week before PSL had no effect. A single administration of pioglitazone to mice on day 7 of PSL did not alter tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. PSL-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6, which are essential for neuropathic pain, was suppressed by pioglitazone for the first week. This suggests that pioglitazone alleviates neuropathic pain through attenuation of proinflammatory cytokine upregulation by PPARgamma stimulation.

  19. The effects of negative emotions on sensory perception: Fear but not anger decreases tactile sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Kelley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotions and sensory perceptions are closely intertwined. Of the five senses sight has been by far the most extensively studied sense in emotion research. Relatively less is known about how emotions influence the other four senses. Touch is essential for nonverbal communication in both humans and other animals. The current investigation tested competing hypotheses about the effect of fear on tactile perception. One hypothesis based on evolutionary considerations predicts that fear enhances sensory perception, including tactile sensitivity. A competing hypothesis based on research on peripheral psychophysiology predicts that fear should decrease tactile sensitivity. Two experiments that induced negative emotional states and measured two-point discrimination ability found that fear reduces tactile sensitivity relative to anger or a neutral control condition (Studies 1 and 2. These findings did not appear to be driven by participants’ naïve beliefs about the influence of emotions on touch (Study 3. The results represent the first evidence of the causal impact of emotional states on tactile sensitivity, are consistent with prior evidence for the peripheral physiological effects of fear, and offer novel empirical grounds for developing and advancing theories of emotional influences on sensory perception.

  20. A Feeling for Numbers: Shared Metric for Symbolic and Tactile Numerosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eKrause

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for an approximate analogue system of numbers has been provided by the finding that the comparison of two numerals takes longer and is more error prone if the semantic distance between the numbers becomes smaller (so-called numerical distance effect. Recent embodied theories suggest that analogue number representations are based on previous sensory experiences and constitute therefore a common magnitude metric shared by multiple domains. Here we demonstrate the existence of a cross-modal semantic distance effect between symbolic and tactile numerosities. Participants received tactile stimulations of different amounts of fingers while reading Arabic digits and indicated verbally whether the amount of stimulated fingers was different from the simultaneously presented digit or not. The larger the semantic distance was between the two numerosities, the faster and more accurate participants made their judgements. This cross-modal numerosity distance effect suggests a direct connection between tactile sensations and the concept of numerical magnitude. A second experiment replicated the interaction between symbolic and tactile numerosities and showed that this effect is not modulated by the participants' finger counting habits. Taken together, our data provide novel evidence for a shared metric for symbolic and tactile numerosites as an instance of an embodied representation of numbers.

  1. VARIATIONS IN TACTILE SIGNING – THE CASE OF ONE-HANDED SIGNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mesch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sign language is a variety of a national sign language. Tactile signing among persons with deafblindness also includes some minor variations. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language (e.g. Mesch 1998, 2001 show how interactants use both their hands in tactile communication in two different positions: dialogue position and monologue position. This paper examines the signing variations that partially or functionally blind signers encounter when using one hand to communicate with each other in a conversation dyad in what is one of the most advanced types of sign language communication. In tactile one-handed signing, the signer uses her right hand both for producing and receiving signs, while the addressee uses her left hand not only for receiving but also for producing signs after turn-taking, even though it is the non-dominant hand and, therefore, is not normally used to produce one-handed signs. In this study, conversation analysis was conducted on the discourse of four groups. The results show that some variations depend on the linguistic background of individuals and their everyday communication. A comparative study of a two-handed and a one-handed system is then presented, focusing on issues of simplicity, flexibility, turn-taking, and feedback. Some results showing changes in the sign structures of both communication types are also presented.

  2. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  3. Adapting the Crossmodal Congruency Task for Measuring the Limits of Visual-Tactile Interactions Within and Between Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Daniel; Couth, Samuel; Gowen, Emma; Warren, Paul A; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The crossmodal congruency task (CCT) is a commonly used paradigm for measuring visual-tactile interactions and how these may be influenced by discrepancies in space and time between the tactile target and visual distractors. The majority of studies which have used this paradigm have neither measured, nor attempted to control, individual variability in unisensory (tactile) performance. We have developed a version of the CCT in which unisensory baseline performance is constrained to enable comparisons within and between participant groups. Participants were instructed to discriminate between single and double tactile pulses presented to their dominant hand, at their own approximate threshold level. In Experiment 1, visual distractors were presented at -30 ms, 100 ms, 200 ms and 400 ms stimulus onset asynchronies. In Experiment 2, ipsilateral visual distractors were presented 0 cm, 21 cm, and 42 cm vertically from the target hand, and 42 cm in a symmetrical, contralateral position. Distractors presented -30 ms and 0 cm from the target produced a significantly larger congruency effect than at other time points and spatial locations. Thus, the typical limits of visual-tactile interactions were replicated using a version of the task in which baseline performance can be constrained. The usefulness of this approach is supported by the observation that tactile thresholds correlated with self-reported autistic traits in this non-clinical sample. We discuss the suitability of this adapted version of the CCT for measuring visual-tactile interactions in populations where unisensory tactile ability may differ within and between groups.

  4. Practice makes perfect: the neural substrates of tactile discrimination by Mah-Jong experts include the primary visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Manabu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has yet to be determined whether visual-tactile cross-modal plasticity due to visual deprivation, particularly in the primary visual cortex (V1, is solely due to visual deprivation or if it is a result of long-term tactile training. Here we conducted an fMRI study with normally-sighted participants who had undergone long-term training on the tactile shape discrimination of the two dimensional (2D shapes on Mah-Jong tiles (Mah-Jong experts. Eight Mah-Jong experts and twelve healthy volunteers who were naïve to Mah-Jong performed a tactile shape matching task using Mah-Jong tiles with no visual input. Furthermore, seven out of eight experts performed a tactile shape matching task with unfamiliar 2D Braille characters. Results When participants performed tactile discrimination of Mah-Jong tiles, the left lateral occipital cortex (LO and V1 were activated in the well-trained subjects. In the naïve subjects, the LO was activated but V1 was not activated. Both the LO and V1 of the well-trained subjects were activated during Braille tactile discrimination tasks. Conclusion The activation of V1 in subjects trained in tactile discrimination may represent altered cross-modal responses as a result of long-term training.

  5. Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

    2014-01-01

    Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

  6. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhangping; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Huicong; Liu, Nan; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2016-11-25

    In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates with copper (Cu) electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves) atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0-1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance.

  7. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p iontophoresis using interferential current (p iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  8. A case of tactile agnosia with a lesion restricted to the post-central gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estanol Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile agnosia has been described after lesions of the primary sensory cortex but the exact location and extension of those lesions is not clear. We report the clinical features and imaging findings in a patient with an acute ischemic stroke restricted to the primary sensory area (S1. A 73-year-old man had a sudden onset of a left alien hand, without left hemiparesis. Neurological examination showed intact primary sensory functions, but impaired recognition of shape, size (macrogeometrical and texture (microgeometrical of objects; damage confined to the post-central gyrus, sparing the posterior parietal cortex was demonstrated on MRI. An embolic occlusion of the anterior parietal artery was suspected as mechanism of stroke. Tactile agnosia with impaired microgeometrical and macrogeometrical features′ recognition can result from a single lesion in the primary sensory cortex (S1 in the right parietal hemisphere, sparing other regions of the cerebral cortex which presumably participate in tactile object recognition.

  9. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhangping; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Huicong; Liu, Nan; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates with copper (Cu) electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves) atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0–1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance. PMID:27897993

  10. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangping Ji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET substrates with copper (Cu electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0–1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance.

  11. Evaluation of Circle Diameter by Distributed Tactile Information in Active Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active touch with voluntary movement on the surface of an object is important for human to obtain the local and detailed features on it. In addition, the active touch is considered to enhance the human spatial resolution. In order to improve dexterity performance of multifinger robotic hands, it is necessary to study an active touch method for robotic hands. In this paper, first, we define four requirements of a tactile sensor for active touch and design a distributed tactile sensor model, which can measure a distribution of compressive deformation. Second, we suggest a measurement process with the sensor model, a synthesis method of distributed deformations. In the experiments, a five-finger robotic hand with tactile sensors traces on the surface of cylindrical objects and evaluates the diameters. We confirm that the hand can obtain more information of the diameters by tracing the finger.

  12. Ergonomic design criteria for a novel laparoscopic tool handle with tactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårvik, R; Nesbakken, R; Langø, T; Yavuz, Y; Vanhauwaert Bjelland, H; Ottermo, M V; Stavdahl, O

    2006-10-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has many ergonomic disadvantages often not considered in the design of instruments. The poorly designed surgical tools produce inconveniences in both functional and cognitive aspects; including tactile sensation and visual-motor space coordination. The aim of this article is to find out how laparoscopic handle design can be improved by combining classical ergonomic guidelines with tactile feedback related to handle design. The article briefly discusses how the human hand and hand-held tools are used to perform tasks. An ergonomic handle for laparoscopic grasping, with a built-in tactile sensation display, is presented. Our review of laparoscopic instruments reveals important aspects for handle design. It is concluded that there is a need for greater awareness of ergonomic guidelines for users' sensory requirements when designing and manufacturing laparoscopic instruments.

  13. Development of a tactile sensing system using piezoelectric robot skin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. K.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Since service robots perform their functions in close proximity to humans, they are much more likely than other types of robot to come into contact with humans. This means that safety regarding robot-human interaction is of particular concern and requires investigation. Existing tactile sensing methods are very effective at detecting external dangerous loadings; however, until now, they have been very expensive. Recently, a new type of self-sensing tactile technology for service robots has been introduced, which harnesses the piezoelectric effect of several robot skin materials. In these kinds of system, relatively cheap materials are used as sensors themselves. In this research, a robot system with a self-sensing tactile technology was developed using piezoelectric robot skin materials. The test results indicate that this type of system is appropriate for application to service robots.

  14. The Effect of Tactile Cues on Auditory Stream Segregation Ability of Musicians and Nonmusicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slater, Kyle D.; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Difficulty perceiving music is often cited as one of the main problems facing hearing-impaired listeners. It has been suggested that musical enjoyment could be enhanced if sound information absent due to impairment is transmitted via other sensory modalities such as vision or touch. In this study......, we test whether tactile cues can be used to segregate 2 interleaved melodies. Twelve musicians and 12 nonmusicians were asked to detect changes in a 4-note repeated melody interleaved with a random melody. In order to perform this task, the listener must be able to segregate the target melody from...... the random melody. Tactile cues were applied to the listener’s fingers on half of the blocks. Results showed that tactile cues can significantly improve the melodic segregation ability in both musician and nonmusician groups in challenging listening conditions. Overall, the musician group performance...

  15. Investigation of the touch sensitivity of ER fluid based tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Davidson, Rob; Taylor, Paul

    2005-05-01

    A tactile display is programmable device whose controlled surface is intended to be investigated by human touch. It has a great number of potential applications in the field of virtual reality and elsewhere. In this research, a 5x5 touch sensitive tactile display array including electrorheological (ER) fluid has been developed and investigated. Experimental results show that the sensed surface information could be controlled effectively by adjusting the voltage activation pattern imposed on the tactels. In the meantime, it is possible to sense the touching force normal to the display"s surface by monitoring the change of current passing through the ER fluid. These encouraging results are helpful for constructing a new type of tactile display based on ER fluid which can act as both sensor and actuator at the same time.

  16. The role of fingerprints in the coding of tactile information probed with a biomimetic sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Scheibert, J; Prevost, A; Debrégeas, G; 10.1126/science.1166467

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the tactile perception of fine textures (spatial scale <200 micrometers) is mediated by skin vibrations generated as the finger scans the surface. To establish the relationship between texture characteristics and subcutaneous vibrations, a biomimetic tactile sensor has been designed whose dimensions match those of the fingertip. When the sensor surface is patterned with parallel ridges mimicking the fingerprints, the spectrum of vibrations elicited by randomly textured substrates is dominated by one frequency set by the ratio of the scanning speed to the interridge distance. For human touch, this frequency falls within the optimal range of sensitivity of Pacinian afferents, which mediate the coding of fine textures. Thus, fingerprints may perform spectral selection and amplification of tactile information that facilitate its processing by specific mechanoreceptors.

  17. Method of estimating motion from change of tactile images; Sesshokuatsu bunpu henka kara no undo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emura, S. [Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tachi, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-05-31

    Tactile sensing has received an increasing amount of attention since 1980s, and some works for the detection of a target shape through contact point sensing from tactile and proprioceptive information have been done. However, all of them are based on the assumption that the target is static and rigid. In this paper, we derive the relation between the motion of the target object and the changes of contact oval parameters, and analyze the conditions for estimating the motion of the target object. On the numerical verification of regularity of this relation for a target model, it is shown that the change of tactile images and the relative velocity on two sites are enough for estimating the motion, compliance, and curvature of the target object. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  18. The Invisible Universe: A Tactile and Braille Exhibit of Astronomical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, Kimberly; Lestition, K.; Watzke, M.; Steel, S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the "From Earth to the Universe" (FETTU) project, a NASA-funded tactile exhibit for the visually impaired community was launched in July 2009 at the Martin Luther King Library in D.C. The exhibit is part of the global FETTU exhibit, a project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The science content of the exhibit includes explanations of our Sun, Eta Carinae, Crab Nebula, Whirlpool Galaxy, and the electromagnetic spectrum, and was adapted from the NASA-funded Braille/tactile book Touch the Invisible Sky. Multiple geographic locations and venue types have been targeted for the displays. The FETTU-tactile exhibit opens a wider door to experiencing and understanding astronomy, bridging a gap in learning. This exhibit is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under proposal 08-EPO08-0068 issued through the Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Tactile perception recruits functionally related visual areas in the late-blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Manu S; Hansen, Peter J; Blakemore, Colin B

    2006-09-18

    When blind people touch Braille characters, blood flow increases in visual areas, leading to speculation that visual circuitry assists tactile discrimination in the blind. We tested this hypothesis in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study designed to reveal activation appropriate to the nature of tactile stimulation. In late-blind individuals, hMT/V5 and fusiform face area activated during visual imagery of moving patterns or faces. When they touched a doll's face, right fusiform face area was again activated. Equally, hMT/V5 was activated when objects moved over the skin. We saw no difference in hMT/V5 or fusiform face area activity during motion or face perception in the congenitally blind. We conclude that specialized visual areas, once established through visual experience, assist equivalent tactile identification tasks years after the onset of blindness.

  20. Acquisition of multiple prior distributions in tactile temporal order judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNagai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Bayesian estimation theory proposes that the brain acquires the prior distribution of a task and integrates it with sensory signals to minimize the effect of sensory noise. Psychophysical studies have demonstrated that our brain actually implements Bayesian estimation in a variety of sensory-motor tasks. However, these studies only imposed one prior distribution on participants within a task period. In this study, we investigated the conditions that enable the acquisition of multiple prior distributions in temporal order judgment (TOJ of two tactile stimuli across the hands. In Experiment 1, stimulation intervals were randomly selected from one of two prior distributions (biased to right hand earlier and biased to left hand earlier in association with color cues (green and red, respectively. Although the acquisition of the two priors was not enabled by the color cues alone, it was significant when participants shifted their gaze (above or below in response to the color cues. However, the acquisition of multiple priors was not significant when participants moved their mouths (opened or closed. In Experiment 2, the spatial cues (above and below were used to identify which eye position or retinal cue position was crucial for the eye-movement-dependent acquisition of multiple priors in Experiment 1. The acquisition of the two priors was significant when participants moved their gaze to the cues (i.e., the cue positions on the retina were constant across the priors, as well as when participants did not shift their gazes (i.e., the cue positions on the retina changed according to the priors. Thus, both eye and retinal cue positions were effective in acquiring multiple priors. Based on previous neurophysiological reports, we discuss possible neural correlates that contribute to the acquisition of multiple priors.

  1. The Influence of Tactile Cognitive Maps on Auditory Space Perception in Sighted Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Alessia; Gori, Monica; Brayda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that vision is important to improve spatial auditory cognition. In this study, we investigate whether touch is as effective as vision to create a cognitive map of a soundscape. In particular, we tested whether the creation of a mental representation of a room, obtained through tactile exploration of a 3D model, can influence the perception of a complex auditory task in sighted people. We tested two groups of blindfolded sighted people - one experimental and one control group - in an auditory space bisection task. In the first group, the bisection task was performed three times: specifically, the participants explored with their hands the 3D tactile model of the room and were led along the perimeter of the room between the first and the second execution of the space bisection. Then, they were allowed to remove the blindfold for a few minutes and look at the room between the second and third execution of the space bisection. Instead, the control group repeated for two consecutive times the space bisection task without performing any environmental exploration in between. Considering the first execution as a baseline, we found an improvement in the precision after the tactile exploration of the 3D model. Interestingly, no additional gain was obtained when room observation followed the tactile exploration, suggesting that no additional gain was obtained by vision cues after spatial tactile cues were internalized. No improvement was found between the first and the second execution of the space bisection without environmental exploration in the control group, suggesting that the improvement was not due to task learning. Our results show that tactile information modulates the precision of an ongoing space auditory task as well as visual information. This suggests that cognitive maps elicited by touch may participate in cross-modal calibration and supra-modal representations of space that increase implicit knowledge about sound propagation.

  2. The influence of tactile cognitive maps on auditory space perception in sighted persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Tonelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that vision is important to improve spatial auditory cognition. In this study we investigate whether touch is as effective as vision to create a cognitive map of a soundscape. In particular we tested whether the creation of a mental representation of a room, obtained through tactile exploration of a 3D model, can influence the perception of a complex auditory task in sighted people. We tested two groups of blindfolded sighted people – one experimental and one control group – in an auditory space bisection task. In the first group the bisection task was performed three times: specifically, the participants explored with their hands the 3D tactile model of the room and were led along the perimeter of the room between the first and the second execution of the space bisection. Then, they were allowed to remove the blindfold for a few minutes and look at the room between the second and third execution of the space bisection. Instead, the control group repeated for two consecutive times the space bisection task without performing any environmental exploration in between. Considering the first execution as a baseline, we found an improvement in the precision after the tactile exploration of the 3D model. Interestingly, no additional gain was obtained when room observation followed the tactile exploration, suggesting that no additional gain was obtained by vision cues after spatial tactile cues were internalized. No improvement was found between the first and the second execution of the space bisection without environmental exploration in the control group, suggesting that the improvement was not due to task learning. Our results show that tactile information modulates the precision of an ongoing space auditory task as well as visual information. This suggests that cognitive maps elicited by touch may participate in cross-modal calibration and supra-modal representations of space that increase implicit knowledge about sound

  3. A New Dynamic Tactile Display for Reconfigurable Braille: Implementation and Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eMotto Ros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction.We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8×8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7 mm as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50 s-1. It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs.Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p< 0.01, obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p< 0.05. Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed

  4. Leg muscle vibration modulates bodily self-consciousness: integration of proprioceptive, visual, and tactile signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluel, Estelle; Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Behavioral studies have used visuo-tactile conflicts between a participant's body and a visually presented fake or virtual body to investigate the importance of bodily perception for self-consciousness (bodily self-consciousness). Illusory self-identification with a fake body and changes in tactile processing--modulation of visuo-tactile cross-modal congruency effects (CCEs)--were reported in previous findings. Although proprioceptive signals are deemed important for bodily self-consciousness, their contribution to the representation of the full body has not been studied. Here we investigated whether and how self-identification and tactile processing (CCE magnitude) could be modified by altering proprioceptive signals with 80-Hz vibrations at the legs. Participants made elevation judgments of tactile cues (while ignoring nearby lights) during synchronous and asynchronous stroking of a seen fake body. We found that proprioceptive signals during vibrations altered the magnitude of self-identification and mislocalization of touch (CCE) in a synchrony-dependent fashion: we observed an increase of self-identification and CCE magnitude during asynchronous stroking. In a second control experiment we studied whether proprioceptive signals per se, or those from the lower limbs in particular, were essential for these changes. We applied vibrations at the upper limbs (which provide no information about the position of the participant's body in space) and in this case observed no modulation of bodily self-consciousness or tactile perception. These data link proprioceptive signals from the legs that are conveyed through the dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathway to bodily self-consciousness. We discuss their integration with bodily signals from vision and touch for full-body representations.

  5. A new dynamic tactile display for reconfigurable braille: implementation and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motto Ros, Paolo; Dante, Vittorio; Mesin, Luca; Petetti, Erminio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-01-01

    Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille) or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users' preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction. We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8 × 8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7mm) as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50s(-1). It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs. Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p < 0.01), obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p < 0.05). Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  6. Short-term visual deprivation does not enhance passive tactile spatial acuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wong

    Full Text Available An important unresolved question in sensory neuroscience is whether, and if so with what time course, tactile perception is enhanced by visual deprivation. In three experiments involving 158 normally sighted human participants, we assessed whether tactile spatial acuity improves with short-term visual deprivation over periods ranging from under 10 to over 110 minutes. We used an automated, precisely controlled two-interval forced-choice grating orientation task to assess each participant's ability to discern the orientation of square-wave gratings pressed against the stationary index finger pad of the dominant hand. A two-down one-up staircase (Experiment 1 or a Bayesian adaptive procedure (Experiments 2 and 3 was used to determine the groove width of the grating whose orientation each participant could reliably discriminate. The experiments consistently showed that tactile grating orientation discrimination does not improve with short-term visual deprivation. In fact, we found that tactile performance degraded slightly but significantly upon a brief period of visual deprivation (Experiment 1 and did not improve over periods of up to 110 minutes of deprivation (Experiments 2 and 3. The results additionally showed that grating orientation discrimination tends to improve upon repeated testing, and confirmed that women significantly outperform men on the grating orientation task. We conclude that, contrary to two recent reports but consistent with an earlier literature, passive tactile spatial acuity is not enhanced by short-term visual deprivation. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. On the theoretical side, the findings set limits on the time course over which neural mechanisms such as crossmodal plasticity may operate to drive sensory changes; on the practical side, the findings suggest that researchers who compare tactile acuity of blind and sighted participants should not blindfold the sighted participants.

  7. Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Ming Kuan

    2006-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) constitute a class of flexible nonlinear models designed to mimic biological neural systems. In this entry, we introduce ANN using familiar econometric terminology and provide an overview of ANN modeling approach and its implementation methods.

  8. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, P.; Gevarter, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory view of Artificial Intelligence (AI). In addition to defining AI, it discusses the foundations on which it rests, research in the field, and current and potential applications.

  9. Now you feel both: Galvanic vestibular stimulation induces lasting improvements in the rehabilitation of chronic tactile extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eSchmidt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tactile extinction is frequent, debilitating and often persistent after brain damage. Currently, there is no treatment available for this disorder. In two previous case studies we showed an influence of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS on tactile extinction. Here, we evaluated in further patients the immediate and lasting effects of GVS on tactile extinction. GVS is known to induce polarity-specific changes in cerebral excitability in the vestibular cortices and adjacent cortical areas. Tactile extinction was examined with the Quality Extinction Test (QET where subjects have to discriminate six different tactile fabrics in bilateral, double simultaneous stimulations (DSS on their dorsum of hands with identical or different tactile fabrics. Twelve patients with stable left-sided tactile extinction after unilateral right-hemisphere lesions were divided into two groups. The GVS group (N=6 performed the QET under six different experimental conditions (two Baselines, Sham-GVS, left-cathodal/right-anodal GVS, right-cathodal/left-anodal GVS, and a follow-up test. The second group of patients with left-sided extinction (N=6 performed the QET six times repetitively, but without receiving GVS (control group. Both right-cathodal/left-anodal as well as left-cathodal/right-anodal GVS (mean: 0.67 mA improved tactile identification of identical and different stimuli in the experimental group. These results show a generic effect of GVS on tactile extinction, but not in a polarity-specific way. These observed effects persisted at Follow-up. Sham-GVS had no significant effect on extinction. In the control group, no significant improvements were seen in the QET after the six measurements of the QET, thus ruling out test repetition effects. In conclusion, GVS improved bodily awareness permanently for the contralesional body side in patients with tactile extinction and thus offers a novel treatment option for these patients.

  10. Pure associative tactile agnosia for the left hand: clinical and anatomo-functional correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronelli, Laura; Ginex, Valeria; Dinacci, Daria; Cappa, Stefano F; Corbo, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Associative tactile agnosia (TA) is defined as the inability to associate information about object sensory properties derived through tactile modality with previously acquired knowledge about object identity. The impairment is often described after a lesion involving the parietal cortex (Caselli, 1997; Platz, 1996). We report the case of SA, a right-handed 61-year-old man affected by first ever right hemispheric hemorrhagic stroke. The neurological examination was normal, excluding major somaesthetic and motor impairment; a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the presence of a right subacute hemorrhagic lesion limited to the post-central and supra-marginal gyri. A comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation detected a selective inability to name objects when handled with the left hand in the absence of other cognitive deficits. A series of experiments were conducted in order to assess each stage of tactile recognition processing using the same stimulus sets: materials, 3D geometrical shapes, real objects and letters. SA and seven matched controls underwent the same experimental tasks during four sessions in consecutive days. Tactile discrimination, recognition, pantomime, drawing after haptic exploration out of vision and tactile-visual matching abilities were assessed. In addition, we looked for the presence of a supra-modal impairment of spatial perception and of specific difficulties in programming exploratory movements during recognition. Tactile discrimination was intact for all the stimuli tested. In contrast, SA was able neither to recognize nor to pantomime real objects manipulated with the left hand out of vision, while he identified them with the right hand without hesitations. Tactile-visual matching was intact. Furthermore, SA was able to grossly reproduce the global shape in drawings but failed to extract details of objects after left-hand manipulation, and he could not identify objects after looking at his own drawings. This case

  11. Design of a flexible tactile sensor for classification of rigid and deformable objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Kootstra, Gert; Bilberg, Arne

    2014-01-01

    of the sensor in an active object-classification system. A robotic gripper with two sensors mounted on its fingers performs a palpation procedure on a set of objects. By squeezing an object, the robot actively explores the material properties, and the system acquires tactile information corresponding...... to the resulting pressure. Based on a k-nearest neighbor classifier and using dynamic time warping to calculate the distance between different time series, the system is able to successfully classify objects. Our sensor demonstrates similar classification performance to the Weiss Robotics tactile sensor, while...

  12. Tactile Reflex Development Through Wing Tsun’s “Sticking Hands” Practice, by Jeff Webb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Webb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It was the late Bruce Lee who first demonstrated Wing Tsun gongfu’s “sticking hands” (chi-sau exercise in the US, during the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships. Forty-four years later, very few outside of the art truly understand the purpose of chi-sau let alone how it develops tactile reflexes. This article will describe both the fundamental and complex methods of chi-sau training in detail. It will also explain the rationale and theories behind this method as well as discuss a variety of factors that can either improve or retard the acquisition of tactile reflexes.

  13. Principles of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  14. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  15. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  16. Sleep dissolves illusion: sleep withstands learning of visuo-tactile-proprioceptive integration induced by repeated days of rubber hand illusion training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyasu Honma

    Full Text Available Multisensory integration is a key factor in establishing bodily self-consciousness and in adapting humans to novel environments. The rubber hand illusion paradigm, in which humans can immediately perceive illusory ownership to an artificial hand, is a traditional technique for investigating multisensory integration and the feeling of illusory ownership. However, the long-term learning properties of the rubber hand illusion have not been previously investigated. Moreover, although sleep contributes to various aspects of cognition, including learning and memory, its influence on illusory learning of the artificial hand has not yet been assessed. We determined the effects of daily repetitive training and sleep on learning visuo-tactile-proprioceptive sensory integration and illusory ownership in healthy adult participants by using the traditional rubber hand illusion paradigm. Subjective ownership of the rubber hand, proprioceptive drift, and galvanic skin response were measured to assess learning indexes. Subjective ownership was maintained and proprioceptive drift increased with daily training. Proprioceptive drift, but not subjective ownership, was significantly attenuated after sleep. A significantly greater reduction in galvanic skin response was observed after wakefulness compared to after sleep. Our results suggest that although repetitive rubber hand illusion training facilitates multisensory integration and physiological habituation of a multisensory incongruent environment, sleep corrects illusional integration and habituation based on experiences in a multisensory incongruent environment. These findings may increase our understanding of adaptive neural processes to novel environments, specifically, bodily self-consciousness and sleep-dependent neuroplasticity.

  17. Sleep dissolves illusion: sleep withstands learning of visuo-tactile-proprioceptive integration induced by repeated days of rubber hand illusion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Yoshiike, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a key factor in establishing bodily self-consciousness and in adapting humans to novel environments. The rubber hand illusion paradigm, in which humans can immediately perceive illusory ownership to an artificial hand, is a traditional technique for investigating multisensory integration and the feeling of illusory ownership. However, the long-term learning properties of the rubber hand illusion have not been previously investigated. Moreover, although sleep contributes to various aspects of cognition, including learning and memory, its influence on illusory learning of the artificial hand has not yet been assessed. We determined the effects of daily repetitive training and sleep on learning visuo-tactile-proprioceptive sensory integration and illusory ownership in healthy adult participants by using the traditional rubber hand illusion paradigm. Subjective ownership of the rubber hand, proprioceptive drift, and galvanic skin response were measured to assess learning indexes. Subjective ownership was maintained and proprioceptive drift increased with daily training. Proprioceptive drift, but not subjective ownership, was significantly attenuated after sleep. A significantly greater reduction in galvanic skin response was observed after wakefulness compared to after sleep. Our results suggest that although repetitive rubber hand illusion training facilitates multisensory integration and physiological habituation of a multisensory incongruent environment, sleep corrects illusional integration and habituation based on experiences in a multisensory incongruent environment. These findings may increase our understanding of adaptive neural processes to novel environments, specifically, bodily self-consciousness and sleep-dependent neuroplasticity.

  18. A MEMS-based tactile sensor to study human digital touch: mechanical transduction of the tactile information and role of fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheibert J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present recent results showing that human epidermal ridges (fingerprints could play a central role in fine texture discrimination tasks by spatially modulating the contact stress field between the fingertip and the substrate. Using an original biomimetic finger whose surface is patterned with parallel ridges, we demonstrate that the subsurface stress signals elicited by continuous rubbing of randomly textured substrates is dominated by fluctuations at a frequency defined by the inter-ridge distance divided by the rubbing velocity. In natural exploratory conditions, this frequency matches the best frequency of one type of mechanoreceptors, namely the Pacinian corpuscles, which are specifically involved in the tactile coding of fine textures. The use of white-noise patterned stimuli has alloowed us to extract, using a reverse-correlation analysis, the stimulus-signal response function associated with roughness modality. Its shape could provides spectral, spatial and directional selectivity to the digital tactile system. It offers a physiological basis for the recently proposed hypothesis of a dual-coding (spatio-temporal and vibratory of tactile information.

  19. A MEMS-based tactile sensor to study human digital touch: mechanical transduction of the tactile information and role of fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibert, J.; Debregeas, G.; Prevost, A.

    2010-06-01

    We present recent results showing that human epidermal ridges (fingerprints) could play a central role in fine texture discrimination tasks by spatially modulating the contact stress field between the fingertip and the substrate. Using an original biomimetic finger whose surface is patterned with parallel ridges, we demonstrate that the subsurface stress signals elicited by continuous rubbing of randomly textured substrates is dominated by fluctuations at a frequency defined by the inter-ridge distance divided by the rubbing velocity. In natural exploratory conditions, this frequency matches the best frequency of one type of mechanoreceptors, namely the Pacinian corpuscles, which are specifically involved in the tactile coding of fine textures. The use of white-noise patterned stimuli has alloowed us to extract, using a reverse-correlation analysis, the stimulus-signal response function associated with roughness modality. Its shape could provides spectral, spatial and directional selectivity to the digital tactile system. It offers a physiological basis for the recently proposed hypothesis of a dual-coding (spatio-temporal and vibratory) of tactile information.

  20. DF's visual brain in action: the role of tactile cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L; Milner, A David; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Byrne, Caitlin M; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2014-03-01

    Patient DF, an extensively-tested woman with visual form agnosia from ventral-stream damage, is able to scale her grip aperture to match a goal object's geometry when reaching out to pick it up, despite being unable to explicitly distinguish amongst objects on the basis of their different geometries. Using evidence from a range of sources, including functional MRI, we have proposed that she does this through a functionally intact visuomotor system housed within the dorsal stream of the posterior parietal lobe. More recently, however, Schenk (2012a). The Journal of Neuroscience, 32(6), 2013-2017; Schenk (2012b). Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 16(5), 258-259. has argued that DF performs well in visually guided grasping, not through spared and functioning visuomotor networks in the dorsal stream, but because haptic feedback about the locations of the edges of the target is available to calibrate her grasps in such tasks, whereas it is not available in standard visual perceptual tasks. We have tested this 'calibration hypothesis' directly, by presenting DF with a grasping task in which the visible width of a target varied from trial to trial while its actual width remained the same. According to the calibration hypothesis, because haptic feedback was completely uninformative, DF should be unable to calibrate her grip aperture in this task. Contrary to this prediction, we found that DF continued to scale her grip aperture to the visual width of the targets and did so well within the range of healthy controls. We also found that DF's inability to distinguish shapes perceptually is not improved by providing haptic feedback. These findings strengthen the notion that DF's spared visuomotor abilities are driven largely by visual feedforward processing of the geometric properties of the target. Crucially, these findings also indicate that simple tactile contact with an object is needed for the visuomotor dorsal stream to be engaged, and accordingly enables DF to execute

  1. Effects of the Artificial Skin Thickness on the Subsurface Pressure Profiles of Flat, Curved, and Braille Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Suresh, Shruthi

    2014-01-01

    The primary interface of contact between a robotic or prosthetic hand and the external world is through the artificial skin. To make sense of that contact, tactile sensors are needed. These sensors are normally embedded in soft, synthetic materials for protecting the subsurface sensor from damage or for better hand-to-object contact. It is important to understand how the mechanical signals transmit from the artificial skin to the embedded tactile sensors. In this paper, we made use of a finite element model of an artificial fingertip with viscoelastic and hyperelastic behaviors to investigate the subsurface pressure profiles when flat, curved, and Braille surfaces were indented on the surface of the model. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of 1, 3 and 5 mm thickness of the skin on the subsurface pressure profiles. The simulation results were experimentally validated using a 25.4 {\\mu}m thin pressure detecting film that was able to follow the contours of a non-planar surface, which is analogous to an ar...

  2. Visual area V5/hMT+ contributes to perception of tactile motion direction: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Beck, Brianna; Walsh, Vincent; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-01-20

    Human imaging studies have reported activations associated with tactile motion perception in visual motion area V5/hMT+, primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC; Brodmann areas 7/40). However, such studies cannot establish whether these areas are causally involved in tactile motion perception. We delivered double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while moving a single tactile point across the fingertip, and used signal detection theory to quantify perceptual sensitivity to motion direction. TMS over both SI and V5/hMT+, but not the PPC site, significantly reduced tactile direction discrimination. Our results show that V5/hMT+ plays a causal role in tactile direction processing, and strengthen the case for V5/hMT+ serving multimodal motion perception. Further, our findings are consistent with a serial model of cortical tactile processing, in which higher-order perceptual processing depends upon information received from SI. By contrast, our results do not provide clear evidence that the PPC site we targeted (Brodmann areas 7/40) contributes to tactile direction perception.

  3. [Passive tactile stimulation and its clinical and neurophysiological repercussions (P300) in blind children with symptoms of attention deficit disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Marugán, Isabel; Herrera, Begoña; Romero, Sara; Nogales, Ramón; Poch-Broto, Joaquín; Quintero, Javier; Ortiz, Tomás

    2014-02-24

    Introduccion. La estimulacion tactil es clave en la reorganizacion de la actividad cerebral y en los procesos de atencion, pero todavia no esta clara su eficacia en trastornos por deficit de atencion (TDA) en niños ciegos. Sujetos y metodos. Para valorar la eficacia de la estimulacion tactil realizamos un estudio en niños ciegos con TDA y sin TDA, consistente en un protocolo de estimulacion tactil diaria en dos sesiones (mañana y tarde), de media hora por sesion, durante seis meses. Se midio la capacidad para detectar un estimulo tactil infrecuente, el tiempo de reaccion, la latencia P300, las fuentes de actividad cerebral y la sintomatologia del TDA, tanto al inicio como al final del entrenamiento. Resultados. La estimulacion tactil en los niños ciegos con TDA mejora significativamente la sintomatologia del TDA, especialmente la atencion, la conducta y el autocontrol de los movimientos involuntarios y tics. Ademas, se observa que el entrenamiento tactil en niños ciegos con TDA cambia el patron de actividad cerebral induciendo una mayor actividad en las areas frontales y occipitales, que podrian estar asociadas a una compensacion del deficit de atencion. Conclusion. La estimulacion tactil pasiva diaria mejora la sintomatologia clinica y reorganiza la actividad cerebral en areas frontooccipitales de niños ciegos con TDA.

  4. Can you see what you feel? Color and folding properties affect visual-tactile material discrimination of fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bei; Bi, Wenyan; Jia, Xiaodan; Wei, Hanhan; Adelson, Edward H

    2016-01-01

    Humans can often estimate tactile properties of objects from vision alone. For example, during online shopping, we can often infer material properties of clothing from images and judge how the material would feel against our skin. What visual information is important for tactile perception? Previous studies in material perception have focused on measuring surface appearance, such as gloss and roughness, and using verbal reports of material attributes and categories. However, in real life, predicting tactile properties of an object might not require accurate verbal descriptions of its surface attributes or categories. In this paper, we use tactile perception as ground truth to measure visual material perception. Using fabrics as our stimuli, we measure how observers match what they see (photographs of fabric samples) with what they feel (physical fabric samples). The data shows that color has a significant main effect in that removing color significantly reduces accuracy, especially when the images contain 3-D folds. We also find that images of draped fabrics, which revealed 3-D shape information, achieved better matching accuracy than images with flattened fabrics. The data shows a strong interaction between color and folding conditions on matching accuracy, suggesting that, in 3-D folding conditions, the visual system takes advantage of chromatic gradients to infer tactile properties but not in flattened conditions. Together, using a visual-tactile matching task, we show that humans use folding and color information in matching the visual and tactile properties of fabrics.

  5. The multi-dimensional nature of encoding tactile and haptic interactions : from psychophysics to design guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2006-01-01

    Designers are very well aware of the multi-dimensionality of visual stimuli and extensively use dimensions such as color, form and contrast to encode information. An analogous multi-dimensionality applies to haptic and tactile stimuli. Based on the fact that the human visual system only has two rece

  6. Sensor chip and apparatus for tactile and/or flow sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sensor chip, comprising a flexible, polymer-based substrate, and at least one microfabricated sensor disposed on the substrate and including a conductive element. The at least one sensor comprises at least one of a tactile sensor and a flow sensor. Other embodiments of the present invention include sensors and/or multi-modal sensor nodes.

  7. Using Captioned Tactile Jigsaw Flashcards in Teaching Vocabulary to Children with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król-Gierat, Werona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how captioned tactile jigsaw flashcards (CTJF) can be used in teaching English vocabulary to children with special educational needs. The idea of the following technique, inspired by Montessori's Three Period Lesson (1964, 1967a, 1967b), was presented by this author and colleague Dorota Beltkiewicz in March…

  8. Effects of auditory and tactile warning on response to visual hazards under a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Atsuo; Kuroda, Takashi; Karwowski, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    A warning signal presented via a visual or an auditory cue might interfere with auditory or visual information inside and outside a vehicle. On the other hand, such interference would be certainly reduced if a tactile cue is used. Therefore, it is expected that tactile cues would be promising as warning signals, especially in a noisy environment. In order to determine the most suitable modality of cue (warning) to a visual hazard in noisy environments, auditory and tactile cues were examined in this study. The condition of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was set to 0ms, 500ms, and 1000ms. Two types of noises were used: white noise and noise outside a vehicle recorded in a real-world driving environment. The noise level LAeq (equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level) inside the experimental chamber of each type of noise was adjusted to approximately 60 dB (A), 70 dB (A), and 80 dB (A). As a result, it was verified that tactile warning was more effective than auditory warning. When the noise outside a vehicle from a real-driving environment was used as the noise inside the experimental chamber, the reaction time to the auditory warning was not affected by the noise level.

  9. Chills in Different Sensory Domains: Frisson Elicited by Acoustical, Visual, Tactile and Gustatory Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Oliver; Katzur, Bjorn; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmuller, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    "Chills" (frisson manifested as goose bumps or shivers) have been used in an increasing number of studies as indicators of emotions in response to music (e.g., Craig, 2005; Guhn, Hamm, & Zentner, 2007; McCrae, 2007; Panksepp, 1995; Sloboda, 1991). In this study we present evidence that chills can be induced through aural, visual, tactile, and…

  10. The simultaneous perception of auditory-tactile stimuli in voluntary movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiao; Ogata, Taiki; Ogawa, Ken-Ichiro; Kwon, Jinhwan; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

  11. The simultaneous perception of auditory–tactile stimuli in voluntary movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiao; Ogata, Taiki; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Kwon, Jinhwan; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory–tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy. PMID:26441799

  12. Functional consequences of experience-dependent plasticity on tactile perception following perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcinski, Natalie K; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Hsiao, Steven S

    2016-09-01

    Continuous training enhances perceptual discrimination and promotes neural changes in areas encoding the experienced stimuli. This type of experience-dependent plasticity has been demonstrated in several sensory and motor systems. Particularly, non-human primates trained to detect consecutive tactile bar indentations across multiple digits showed expanded excitatory receptive fields (RFs) in somatosensory cortex. However, the perceptual implications of these anatomical changes remain undetermined. Here, we trained human participants for 9 days on a tactile task that promoted expansion of multi-digit RFs. Participants were required to detect consecutive indentations of bar stimuli spanning multiple digits. Throughout the training regime we tracked participants' discrimination thresholds on spatial (grating orientation) and temporal tasks on the trained and untrained hands in separate sessions. We hypothesized that training on the multi-digit task would decrease perceptual thresholds on tasks that require stimulus processing across multiple digits, while also increasing thresholds on tasks requiring discrimination on single digits. We observed an increase in orientation thresholds on a single digit. Importantly, this effect was selective for the stimulus orientation and hand used during multi-digit training. We also found that temporal acuity between digits improved across trained digits, suggesting that discriminating the temporal order of multi-digit stimuli can transfer to temporal discrimination of other tactile stimuli. These results suggest that experience-dependent plasticity following perceptual learning improves and interferes with tactile abilities in manners predictive of the task and stimulus features used during training.

  13. The simultaneous perception of auditory–tactile stimuli in voluntary movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao eHao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND, an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory–tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

  14. Setting the Standards for Haptic and Tactile Interactions : ISO’s Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Kyung, K.; Kassner, S.; Carter, J.; Brewster, S.; Weber, G.; Andrew, I.

    2010-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important and ergonomic standards can ensure that systems are designed with sufficient concerns for ergonomics and interoperability. ISO (through working group TC159/SC4/WG9) is working toward international standards, which are being dual-track

  15. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  16. Comparing Tactile Maps and Haptic Digital Representations of a Maritime Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Mathieu; Vieilledent, Steephane; Jacobson, R. Daniel; Tisseau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    A map exploration and representation exercise was conducted with participants who were totally blind. Representations of maritime environments were presented either with a tactile map or with a digital haptic virtual map. We assessed the knowledge of spatial configurations using a triangulation technique. The results revealed that both types of…

  17. Functional and Structural Neuroplasticity Induced by Short-Term Tactile Training Based on Braille Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowska, Weronika; Wolak, Tomasz; Nowicka, Anna; Kozak, Anna; Szwed, Marcin; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes induced by sensory learning have been recognized within the cortices of specific modalities as well as within higher ordered multimodal areas. The interplay between these areas is not fully understood, particularly in the case of somatosensory learning. Here we examined functional and structural changes induced by short-term tactile training based of Braille reading, a task that requires both significant tactile expertise and mapping of tactile input onto multimodal representations. Subjects with normal vision were trained for 3 weeks to read Braille exclusively by touch and scanned before and after training, while performing a same-different discrimination task on Braille characters and meaningless characters. Functional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences were used to assess resulting changes. The strongest training-induced effect was found in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), where we observed bilateral augmentation in activity accompanied by an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) within the contralateral SI. Increases of white matter fractional anisotropy were also observed in the secondary somatosensory area (SII) and the thalamus. Outside of somatosensory system, changes in both structure and function were found in i.e., the fusiform gyrus, the medial frontal gyri and the inferior parietal lobule. Our results provide evidence for functional remodeling of the somatosensory pathway and higher ordered multimodal brain areas occurring as a result of short-lasting tactile learning, and add to them a novel picture of extensive white matter plasticity.

  18. Human spatial navigation via a visuo-tactile sensory substitution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segond, Hervé; Weiss, Déborah; Sampaio, Eliana

    2005-01-01

    Spatial navigation within a real 3-D maze was investigated to study space perception on the sole basis of tactile information transmitted by means of a 'tactile vision substitution system' (TVSS) allowing the conversion of optical images-collected by a micro camera-into 'tactile images' via a matrix in contact with the skin. The development of such a device is based on concepts of cerebral and functional plasticity, enabling subjective reproduction of visual images from tactile data processing. Blindfolded sighted subjects had to remotely control the movements of a robot on which the TVSS camera was mounted. Once familiarised with the cues in the maze, the subjects were given two exploration sessions. Performance was analysed according to an objective point of view (exploration time, discrimination capacity), as well as a subjective one (speech). The task was successfully carried out from the very first session. As the subjects took a different path during each navigation, a gradual improvement in performance (discrimination and exploration time) was noted, generating a phenomenon of learning. Moreover, subjective analysis revealed an evolution of the spatialisation process towards distal attribution. Finally, some emotional expressions seemed to reflect the genesis of 'qualia' (emotional qualities of stimulation).

  19. Tactile hairs on the postcranial body in Florida manatees: a Mammalian lateral line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, R L; Marshall, C D; Stoll, M L

    2002-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the sparsely distributed hairs found on the entire postcranial body of sirenians are all sinus type tactile hairs. This would represent a unique arrangement because no other mammal has been reported to possess tactile hairs except on restricted regions of the body, primarily the face. In order to investigate this issue further, hair counts were made systematically in three Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), and hair follicle microanatomy was studied in 110 specimens gathered from 9 animals. We found that the postcranial body possesses approximately 1500 hairs per side, and hair density decreases from dorsal to ventral. External hair length ranged from 2-9 mm, and most hairs were separated from their nearest neighbor by 20-40 mm, resulting in an independent domain of movement for each hair. All hairs exhibited the anatomical characteristics of follicle-sinus complexes typical of tactile hairs, including a dense connective tissue capsule containing an elongated circumferential blood sinus and innervation by 20-50 axons which ascend the mesenchymal sheath. We conclude that this represents a unique distributed underwater tactile system capable of conveying detailed and significant external information concerning approaching animals, water currents and possibly the presence of large stationary features of the environment. Such a system would be analogous to the lateral line in fish, and would be particularly useful in the turbid habitat frequented by Florida manatees.

  20. Aesthetic appreciation of tactile unity-in-variety in product designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.A.G.; Blijlevens, J.; Hekkert, P.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of unity-in-variety has recently been shown to affect visual aesthetic appreciation of product designs. We investigated whether this principle can also account for tactile aesthetic appreciation of products. Design students rated nine car keys on unity, variety and aesthetic appreciati

  1. Investigating Visual-Tactile Interactions over Time and Space in Adults with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Daniel; Gowen, Emma; Warren, Paul A.; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the sensory symptoms which affect many people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) may be related to alterations in multisensory processing. Typically, the likelihood of interactions between the senses increases when information is temporally and spatially coincident. We explored visual-tactile interactions in adults…

  2. Tactile spatial acuity varies with site and axis in the human upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Frederick W J; Garside, Rebecca A D; Lloyd, Donna; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2008-03-12

    Historically, beginning with Weber's [E.H. Weber, On the sensitivity of the tactile senses, in: H.E. Ross, D.J. Murray (Eds. and Trans.), E.H. Weber on the Tactile Senses, Erlbaum (UK) Taylor & Francis, Hove, 1996 (Original work published in 1834), pp. 21-136] classical studies, regional variations in the accuracy of localisation of tactile stimuli applied to a limb have been recognised. However, important questions remain concerning both the map of localisation resolution and its neuroscientific basis since methodological confounds have militated against an unambiguous, unified interpretation of the diverse findings. To test the hypotheses that localisation precision on the upper limb varies with site (hand, wrist, forearm) and limb axis (transverse, longitudinal), regional differences in locognosic acuity were quantified in psychophysical experiments. Participants identified the perceived direction (e.g. medial or lateral) relative to a central reference locus of brief tactile test stimuli applied to a cruciform array of loci. Acuity was greater in the transverse than longitudinal axis. This effect probably arises from the asymmetry of receptive fields of upper limb first-order sensory units and their higher-order projection neurons. Additionally, acuity was greater on the dorsal surface at the wrist than either the hand or forearm sites, in the longitudinal axis, supporting an enhancement of resolution at joints (anchor points). This effect may contribute to improved proprioceptive guidance of active wrist movements.

  3. Cross-Modal Congruency Benefits for Combined Tactile and Visual Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    by tactor actuation. Be- cause this issue has caused controversy, we were careful to control for this potential artifact here ( cf. Broadbent , 1978...lnOu- ence of visual motiou on tactile motion perception. Jour- nal of.Neurophysiology, g6, 1625- •6:J7. Broadbent , D. E. (1978). The current state

  4. Demonstrating the application of dielectric polymer actuators for tactile feedback in a mobile consumer device.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moessinger, H.M.; Brokken, D.

    2010-01-01

    User interfaces of mobile consumer devices are becoming increasingly complex. To address this complexity touch-screen interfaces are used. They allow flexible design of the user interfaces but lack the tactile feedback mechanical buttons provide, limiting ease of use. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (

  5. Speech perception and talker segregation: Effects of level, pitch, and tactile support with multiple simultaneous talkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drullman, Rob; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2004-11-01

    Speech intelligibility was investigated by varying the number of interfering talkers, level, and mean pitch differences between target and interfering speech, and the presence of tactile support. In a first experiment the speech-reception threshold (SRT) for sentences was measured for a male talker against a background of one to eight interfering male talkers or speech noise. Speech was presented diotically and vibro-tactile support was given by presenting the low-pass-filtered signal (0-200 Hz) to the index finger. The benefit in the SRT resulting from tactile support ranged from 0 to 2.4 dB and was largest for one or two interfering talkers. A second experiment focused on masking effects of one interfering talker. The interference was the target talker's own voice with an increased mean pitch by 2, 4, 8, or 12 semitones. Level differences between target and interfering speech ranged from -16 to +4 dB. Results from measurements of correctly perceived words in sentences show an intelligibility increase of up to 27% due to tactile support. Performance gradually improves with increasing pitch difference. Louder target speech generally helps perception, but results for level differences are considerably dependent on pitch differences. Differences in performance between noise and speech maskers and between speech maskers with various mean pitches are explained by the effect of informational masking. .

  6. Speech perception and talker segregation : effects of level, pitch, and tactile support with multiple simultaneous talkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drullman, R.; Bronkhorst, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    Speech intelligibility was investigated by varying the number of interfering talkers, level, and mean pitch differences between target and interfering speech, and the presence of tactile support. In a first experiment the speech-reception threshold (SRT) for sentences was measured for a male talker

  7. Highly Flexible Graphene Oxide Nanosuspension Liquid-Based Microfluidic Tactile Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenry; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Shang, Menglin; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-03-23

    A novel graphene oxide (GO) nanosuspension liquid-based microfluidic tactile sensor is developed. It comprises a UV ozone-bonded Ecoflex-polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic assembly filled with GO nanosuspension, which serves as the working fluid of the tactile sensor. This device is highly flexible and able to withstand numerous modes of deformation as well as distinguish various user-applied mechanical forces it is subjected to, including pressing, stretching, and bending. This tactile sensor is also highly deformable and wearable, and capable of recognizing and differentiating distinct hand muscle-induced motions, such as finger flexing and fist clenching. Moreover, subtle differences in the handgrip strength derived from the first clenching gesture can be identified based on the electrical response of our device. This work highlights the potential application of the GO nanosuspension liquid-based flexible microfluidic tactile sensing platform as a wearable diagnostic and prognostic device for real-time health monitoring. Also importantly, this work can further facilitate the exploration and potential realization of a functional liquid-state device technology with superior mechanical flexibility and conformability.

  8. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Han, Haijun; Liu, Tao; Yi, Jingang; Li, Qingguo; Inoue, Yoshio

    2016-03-24

    Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  9. Tactile stimulation during sleep alters slow oscillation and spindle densities but not motor skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sofia Isabel Ribeiro; Beijamini, Felipe; Weber, Frederik D; Vincenzi, Roberta Almeida; da Silva, Felipe Augusto Cini; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2017-02-01

    Studies using targeted memory reactivation have shown that presentation of auditory or olfactory contextual cues during sleep can bias hippocampal reactivations towards the preferential replay of the cue-associated material, thereby resulting in enhanced consolidation of that information. If the same cortical ensembles are indeed used for encoding and storage of a given piece of information, forcing the sleeping brain to re-engage in task-intrinsic information processing should disturb the natural ongoing consolidation processes and therefore impair possible sleep benefits. Here we aimed at recreating an integral part of the sensory experience of a motor skill in a daytime nap, by means of a tactile stimulation. We hypothesized that tampering with the tactile component of a motor skill during sleep would result in hindered performance at retest, due to interference between the highly congruent incoming stimuli and the core skill trace. Contrary to our predictions, the tactile stimulation did not influence neither speed nor accuracy, when compared to natural sleep. However, an exploratory sleep EEG analysis revealed stimulation-induced alterations in the abundance and cortical topography of slow oscillations and spindles. These findings suggest that despite the lack of a significant effect on motor behavior, tactile stimulation induced changes in EEG features suggestive of a possible uncoupling between the sleep oscillations thought to underlie consolidation processes, i.e. slow oscillations and sleep spindles.

  10. Gestalt grouping effects on tactile information processing: when touching hands override spatial proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frings, Christian; Spence, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Using a tactile variant of the negative-priming paradigm, we analyzed the influence of Gestalt grouping on the ability of participants to ignore distracting tactile information. The distance between participants' hands, to which the target and distractor stimuli were simultaneously delivered, was varied (near/touching hands vs. hands far apart). In addition, the influence of touching hands was controlled, as participants wore gloves and their hands were blocked from vision by a cover. The magnitude of the tactile negative-priming effect was modulated by the interaction between hand separation and whether or not gloves were worn. When the hands were touching, negative priming emerged only while wearing gloves that prevented direct skin-to-skin contact. In contrast, when the separation between the participants' hands was larger, negative priming emerged only when gloves were not worn. This pattern of results is interpreted in terms of the competing influences of two interacting Gestalt principles--namely, connectedness and proximity--on the processing of tactile distractors.

  11. A tactile cockpit instrument supports the control of self-motion during spatial disorientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Veen, H.A.H.C. van

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effectiveness of a tactile torso display as a countermeasure to spatial disorientation (SD) and compared inside-out and outside-in codings. Background: SD is a serious threat to military as well as civilian pilots and aircraft. Considerable effort has been put into SD

  12. Method and device for producing a tactile display using an electrorheological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H. Douglas (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A tactile display device utilizes an electrorheological fluid to activate a plurality of tactile dots. A voltage is selectively produced uniformly across an electrorheological fluid flowing between a common ground electrode and a plurality of conductive dot electrodes, thereby producing an increase in the fluid's viscosity to the extent that fluid flow between the two electrodes is restricted. The flow restriction produces a build-up of electrorheological fluid in a corresponding dot actuator chamber. The resulting pressure increase in the chamber displaces an elastic diaphragm fixed to a display surface to form a lump which can be perceived by the reader as one dot in a Braille character cell. A flow regulation system provides a continually pressurized flow system and provides for free flow of the electrorheological fluid through the plurality of dot actuator chambers when they are not activated. The device is adaptable to printed circuit techniques and can simultaneously display tactile dots representative of a full page of Braille characters stored on a medium such as a tape cassette or to display tactile dots representative of non-Braille data appearing on a computer monitor or contained on another data storage medium. In an alternate embodiment, the elastic diaphragm drives a plurality of spring-loaded pins provided with positive stops to maintain consistent displacements of the pins in both their actuated and nonactuated positions.

  13. Functionalization of Tactile Sensation for Robot Based on Haptograph and Modal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokura, Yuki; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    In the real world, robots should be able to recognize the environment in order to be of help to humans. A video camera and a laser range finder are devices that can help robots recognize the environment. However, these devices cannot obtain tactile information from environments. Future human-assisting-robots should have the ability to recognize haptic signals, and a disturbance observer can possibly be used to provide the robot with this ability. In this study, a disturbance observer is employed in a mobile robot to functionalize the tactile sensation. This paper proposes a method that involves the use of haptograph and modal decomposition for the haptic recognition of road environments. The haptograph presents a graphic view of the tactile information. It is possible to classify road conditions intuitively. The robot controller is designed by considering the decoupled modal coordinate system, which consists of translational and rotational modes. Modal decomposition is performed by using a quarry matrix. Once the robot is provided with the ability to recognize tactile sensations, its usefulness to humans will increase.

  14. Tactile expectation modulates pre-stimulus beta-band oscillations in human sensorimotor cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ede, F. van; Jensen, O.; Maris, E.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are postulated to play a fundamental role in top-down processes of expectation. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether expectation of a tactile event involves a pre-stimulus modulation of neuronal oscillations in human somatosensory cortex. In a bimodal att

  15. Intermodal auditory, visual, and tactile attention modulates early stages of neural processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karns, Christina M; Knight, Robert T

    2009-04-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) and gamma band oscillatory responses (GBRs) to examine whether intermodal attention operates early in the auditory, visual, and tactile modalities. To control for the effects of spatial attention, we spatially coregistered all stimuli and varied the attended modality across counterbalanced blocks in an intermodal selection task. In each block, participants selectively responded to either auditory, visual, or vibrotactile stimuli from the stream of intermodal events. Auditory and visual ERPs were modulated at the latencies of early cortical processing, but attention manifested later for tactile ERPs. For ERPs, auditory processing was modulated at the latency of the Na (29 msec), which indexes early cortical or thalamocortical processing and the subsequent P1 (90 msec) ERP components. Visual processing was modulated at the latency of the early phase of the C1 (62-72 msec) thought to be generated in the primary visual cortex and the subsequent P1 and N1 (176 msec). Tactile processing was modulated at the latency of the N160 (165 msec) likely generated in the secondary association cortex. Intermodal attention enhanced early sensory GBRs for all three modalities: auditory (onset 57 msec), visual (onset 47 msec), and tactile (onset 27 msec). Together, these results suggest that intermodal attention enhances neural processing relatively early in the sensory stream independent from differential effects of spatial and intramodal selective attention.

  16. Effects of Tactile Sensations during Finger Painting on Mindfulness, Emotions, and Scope of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko-Kaczmarek, Maja; Kaczmarek, Lukasz D.

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that creative performance, such as painting, influences affective and cognitive processes. Yet little is known about how tactile sensations experienced during painting determine what individuals feel and how they think while they create. Based on prior research, finger painting (compared to brush painting) was expected to…

  17. Functional and Structural Neuroplasticity Induced by Short-Term Tactile Training Based on Braille Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowska, Weronika; Wolak, Tomasz; Nowicka, Anna; Kozak, Anna; Szwed, Marcin; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes induced by sensory learning have been recognized within the cortices of specific modalities as well as within higher ordered multimodal areas. The interplay between these areas is not fully understood, particularly in the case of somatosensory learning. Here we examined functional and structural changes induced by short-term tactile training based of Braille reading, a task that requires both significant tactile expertise and mapping of tactile input onto multimodal representations. Subjects with normal vision were trained for 3 weeks to read Braille exclusively by touch and scanned before and after training, while performing a same-different discrimination task on Braille characters and meaningless characters. Functional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences were used to assess resulting changes. The strongest training-induced effect was found in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), where we observed bilateral augmentation in activity accompanied by an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) within the contralateral SI. Increases of white matter fractional anisotropy were also observed in the secondary somatosensory area (SII) and the thalamus. Outside of somatosensory system, changes in both structure and function were found in i.e., the fusiform gyrus, the medial frontal gyri and the inferior parietal lobule. Our results provide evidence for functional remodeling of the somatosensory pathway and higher ordered multimodal brain areas occurring as a result of short-lasting tactile learning, and add to them a novel picture of extensive white matter plasticity.

  18. Tactile Sensitivity and Braille Reading in People with Early Blindness and Late Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kensuke; Arai, Tetsuya; Ichihara, Shigeru; Nakano, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The inability to read quickly can be a disadvantage throughout life. This study focused on the associations of braille reading fluency and individual factors, such as the age at onset of blindness and number of years reading braille, and the tactile sensitivity of people with early and late blindness. The relationship between reading…

  19. Effects of sound on the tactile perception of roughness in peri-head space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuika; Gyoba, Jiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not spatial congruency between tactile and auditory stimuli would influence the tactile roughness discrimination of stimuli presented to the fingers or cheeks. In the experiment, when abrasive films were passively presented to the participants, white noise bursts were simultaneously presented from the same or different side, either near or far from the head. The results showed that when white noise was presented from the same side as the tactile stimuli, especially from near the head, the discrimination sensitivity on the cheeks was higher than when sound was absent or presented from a different side. A similar pattern was observed in discrimination by the fingers but it was not significant. The roughness discrimination by the fingers was also influenced by the presentation of sound close to the head, but significant differences between conditions with and without sounds were observed at the decisional level. Thus, the spatial congruency between tactile and auditory information selectively modulated the roughness sensitivity of the skin on the cheek, especially when the sound source was close to the head.

  20. Effects of speech versus tactile driver support messages on driving behaviour and workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.H.; Winsum, W. van

    2001-01-01

    In a driving simulator experiment, effects were tested of an integrated support system on driving behaviour, user acceptance and workload. An alternative workload measure was used based upon peripheral vision. Two modes of support (tactile and speech messages) were compared to a control condition wi

  1. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM. The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures.

  2. The Advantage of Encoding Tactile Information for a Woman with Congenital Deaf-Blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J.; Nota, S.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Parents, caregivers and teachers feel a strong need to learn more about tactile information processing of deaf-blind persons, primarily in order to be able to offer adequate intervention strategies in their daily interactions and activities. The present study investigates perception and memory of ta

  3. The Role of Exploratory Conditions in Bio-Inspired Tactile Sensing of Single Topogical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Debrégeas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the mechanism of tactile transduction during active exploration of finely textured surfaces using a tactile sensor mimicking the human fingertip. We focus in particular on the role of exploratory conditions in shaping the subcutaneous mechanical signals. The sensor has been designed by integrating a linear array of MEMS micro-force sensors in an elastomer layer. We measure the response of the sensors to the passage of elementary topographical features at constant velocity and normal load, such as a small hole on a flat substrate. Each sensor’s response is found to strongly depend on its relative location with respect to the substrate/skin contact zone, a result which can be quantitatively understood within the scope of a linear model of tactile transduction. The modification of the response induced by varying other parameters, such as the thickness of the elastic layer and the confining load, are also correctly captured by this model. We further demonstrate that the knowledge of these characteristic responses allows one to dynamically evaluate the position of a small hole within the contact zone, based on the micro-force sensors signals, with a spatial resolution an order of magnitude better than the intrinsic resolution of individual sensors. Consequences of these observations on robotic tactile sensing are briefly discussed.

  4. Spatiotemporal integration for tactile localization during arm movements: a probabilistic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maij, F.; Wing, A.M.; Medendorp, W.P.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that people make systematic errors in the localization of a brief tactile stimulus that is delivered to the index finger while they are making an arm movement. Here we modeled these spatial errors with a probabilistic approach, assuming that they follow from temporal uncertainty ab

  5. Perceptual grouping over time within and across auditory and tactile modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fan Lin

    Full Text Available In auditory scene analysis, population separation and temporal coherence have been proposed to explain how auditory features are grouped together and streamed over time. The present study investigated whether these two theories can be applied to tactile streaming and whether temporal coherence theory can be applied to crossmodal streaming. The results show that synchrony detection between two tones/taps at different frequencies/locations became difficult when one of the tones/taps was embedded in a perceptual stream. While the taps applied to the same location were streamed over time, the taps applied to different locations were not. This observation suggests that tactile stream formation can be explained by population-separation theory. On the other hand, temporally coherent auditory stimuli at different frequencies were streamed over time, but temporally coherent tactile stimuli applied to different locations were not. When there was within-modality streaming, temporally coherent auditory stimuli and tactile stimuli were not streamed over time, either. This observation suggests the limitation of temporal coherence theory when it is applied to perceptual grouping over time.

  6. Impact of Tactile Stimulation on Neurobehavioral Development of Premature Infants in Assiut City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Atyat Mohammed Hassan; Youssef, Magda Mohamed E.; Hassanein, Farouk El-Sayed; Mobarak, Amal Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess impact of tactile stimulation on neurobehavioral development of premature infants in Assiut City. Design: Quasi-experimental research design. Setting: The study was conducted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Assiut University Children Hospital, Assiut General Hospital, Health Insurance Hospital (ElMabarah Hospital) and…

  7. Tactile-dependant corticomotor facilitation is influenced by discrimination performance in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay François

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active contraction leads to facilitation of motor responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. In small hand muscles, motor facilitation is known to be also influenced by the nature of the task. Recently, we showed that corticomotor facilitation was selectively enhanced when young participants actively discriminated tactile symbols with the tip of their index or little finger. This tactile-dependant motor facilitation reflected, for the large part, attentional influences associated with performing tactile discrimination, since execution of a concomitant distraction task abolished facilitation. In the present report, we extend these observations to examine the influence of age on the ability to produce extra motor facilitation when the hand is used for sensory exploration. Methods Corticomotor excitability was tested in 16 healthy seniors (58-83 years while they actively moved their right index finger over a surface under two task conditions. In the tactile discrimination (TD condition, participants attended to the spatial location of two tactile symbols on the explored surface, while in the non discrimination (ND condition, participants simply moved their finger over a blank surface. Changes in amplitude, in latency and in the silent period (SP duration were measured from recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEP in the right first dorsal interosseous muscle in response to TMS of the left motor cortex. Results Healthy seniors exhibited widely varying levels of performance with the TD task, older age being associated with lower accuracy and vice-versa. Large inter-individual variations were also observed in terms of tactile-specific corticomotor facilitation. Regrouping seniors into higher (n = 6 and lower performance groups (n = 10 revealed a significant task by performance interaction. This latter interaction reflected differences between higher and lower performance groups; tactile-related facilitation being

  8. Artificial vision workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, P

    1997-01-01

    Machine vision is an important component of medical systems engineering. Inexpensive miniature solid state cameras are now available. This paper describes how these devices can be used as artificial retinas, to take snapshots and moving pictures in monochrome or color. Used in pairs, they produce a stereoscopic field of vision and enable depth perception. Macular and peripheral vision can be simulated electronically. This paper also presents the author's design of an artificial orbit for this synthetic eye. The orbit supports the eye, protects it, and provides attachment points for the ocular motion control system. Convergence and image fusion can be produced, and saccades simulated, along with the other ocular motions. The use of lenses, filters, irises and focusing mechanisms are also discussed. Typical camera-computer interfaces are described, including the use of "frame grabbers" and analog-to-digital image conversion. Software programs for eye positioning, image manipulation, feature extraction and object recognition are discussed, including the application of artificial neural networks.

  9. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  10. Artificial muscles on heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  11. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  12. Artificial organ engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annesini, Maria Cristina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Artificial organs may be considered as small-scale process plants, in which heat, mass and momentum transfer operations and, possibly, chemical transformations are carried out. This book proposes a novel analysis of artificial organs based on the typical bottom-up approach used in process engineering. Starting from a description of the fundamental physico-chemical phenomena involved in the process, the whole system is rebuilt as an interconnected ensemble of elemental unit operations. Each artificial organ is presented with a short introduction provided by expert clinicians. Devices commonly used in clinical practice are reviewed and their performance is assessed and compared by using a mathematical model based approach. Whilst mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool for quantitative descriptions of clinical devices, models are kept simple to remain focused on the essential features of each process. Postgraduate students and researchers in the field of chemical and biomedical engineering will find that t...

  13. Reactive conducting polymers as actuating sensors and tactile muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, T F

    2008-09-01

    Films of conducting polymers when used as electrodes in an electrolytic solution oxidize and reduce under the flow of anodic and cathodic currents, respectively. The electrochemical reactions induce conformational movements of the chains, generation or destruction of free volume and interchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte giving a gel that reacts, swells or shrinks. Electric pulses acting on reactive gels constituted by polymers, solvent and ions are the closest artificial materials to those that constitute actuating biological organs. The electrochemical reaction under the flow of a constant current promotes a progressive change of color, volume, porosity, stored charge and storage or release of ions. The reaction is kinetically controlled by the conformational movements or by the diffusion of counterions through the gel; it works under electrochemical equilibrium and defines, at any intermediate oxidation state, equilibrium potentials. Any variable (mechanical, chemical, optical, magnetic, etc) acting on the equilibrium will induce a change in the working potential of any device, driven by a constant current, based on this reaction; actuating-sensing devices based on the electrochemical properties are expected. Artificial muscles able to sense pushed weights, electrolyte concentration or ambient temperature during actuation are described. The activation energy of the reaction includes structural information and allows the obtention of the conformational energy, the heart of both actuating and sensing properties.

  14. Memory delay and haptic feedback influence the dissociation of tactile cues for perception and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah Jazi, Shirin; Hosang, Stephanie; Heath, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The somatosensory processing model (SPM) asserts that dissociable cortical processing streams mediate tactile perceptions and actions via relative and absolute cues, respectively (Dijkerman and de Haan, 2007). Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the introduction of a memory delay and/or physically touching a target object (i.e., haptic feedback) differentially influences the cues supporting tactile perceptions and actions. Participants used their right hand to manually estimate (i.e., perceptual task) or grasp (i.e., action task) differently sized objects placed on the palm of their left limb in conditions wherein the target object was available for the duration of the response (i.e., closed-loop condition), or was removed prior to response cuing (i.e., memory-guided condition). As well, trials were performed in conditions wherein the physical object was available (i.e., haptic feedback) or unavailable (i.e., no haptic feedback) to touch. Notably, we computed just-noticeable-difference (JND) scores to determine whether the aforementioned tasks and conditions adhered to - or violated - the relative properties of Weber's law. JNDs for manual estimations adhered to Weber's law across each condition - a finding supporting the SPM's contention that an immutable and relative percept supports tactile perceptions. In turn, JNDs for grasping violated Weber's law only when haptic feedback was available. Such a finding indicates that haptic feedback supports the absolute calibration between a tactile defined object and the required motor output. What is more, our study highlights that multiple somatosensory cues (i.e., tactile and haptic) support goal-directed grasping.

  15. Cognitive and tactile factors affecting human haptic performance in later life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kalisch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vision and haptics are the key modalities by which humans perceive objects and interact with their environment in a target-oriented manner. Both modalities share higher-order neural resources and the mechanisms required for object exploration. Compared to vision, the understanding of haptic information processing is still rudimentary. Although it is known that haptic performance, similar to many other skills, decreases in old age, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. It is yet to be determined to what extent this decrease is related to the age-related loss of tactile acuity or cognitive capacity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the haptic performance of 81 older adults by means of a cross-modal object recognition test. Additionally, we assessed the subjects' tactile acuity with an apparatus-based two-point discrimination paradigm, and their cognitive performance by means of the non-verbal Raven-Standard-Progressive matrices test. As expected, there was a significant age-related decline in performance on all 3 tests. With the exception of tactile acuity, this decline was found to be more distinct in female subjects. Correlation analyses revealed a strong relationship between haptic and cognitive performance for all subjects. Tactile performance, on the contrary, was only significantly correlated with male subjects' haptic performance. CONCLUSIONS: Haptic object recognition is a demanding task in old age, especially when it comes to the exploration of complex, unfamiliar objects. Our data support a disproportionately higher impact of cognition on haptic performance as compared to the impact of tactile acuity. Our findings are in agreement with studies reporting an increase in co-variation between individual sensory performance and general cognitive functioning in old age.

  16. Proposed use of a digital signal processor in an experimental tactile hearing aid for the profoundly deaf: preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, R W; Leliveld, W H

    1989-01-01

    An experimental system for a tactile hearing aid using a digital signal processor (DSP) is being developed. This system can be used to test and evaluate not only the familiar techniques for a tactile hearing aid, such as energy level display, filterbank analysis, etc., but also novel techniques. The system is being developed especially to try out new recognition strategies, because the currently available strategies are not satisfactory. A portable tactile hearing aid that can recognize certain environmental sounds (alarm sounds) and certain features from the speech signal (such as pitch, voiced/voiceless, or even complete phonemes), being a good support for lipreading, should be the final result of the experiments.

  17. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Korb, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    As the power of Bayesian techniques has become more fully realized, the field of artificial intelligence has embraced Bayesian methodology and integrated it to the point where an introduction to Bayesian techniques is now a core course in many computer science programs. Unlike other books on the subject, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence keeps mathematical detail to a minimum and covers a broad range of topics. The authors integrate all of Bayesian net technology and learning Bayesian net technology and apply them both to knowledge engineering. They emphasize understanding and intuition but also provide the algorithms and technical background needed for applications. Software, exercises, and solutions are available on the authors' website.

  18. Artificial human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  19. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  20. General artificial neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeratu, Vasile; Schiopu, Paul; Degeratu, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the authors present a model of artificial neuron named the general artificial neuron. Depending on application this neuron can change self number of inputs, the type of inputs (from excitatory in inhibitory or vice versa), the synaptic weights, the threshold, the type of intensifying functions. It is achieved into optoelectronic technology. Also, into optoelectronic technology a model of general McCulloch-Pitts neuron is showed. The advantages of these neurons are very high because we have to solve different applications with the same neural network, achieved from these neurons, named general neural network.