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Sample records for artificial root-end barriers

  1. Vibration behavior of the artificial barrier system

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    Mikoshiba, Tadashi; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Izuru [National Research Inst. for Earth sceince and Disaster Prevention (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This study aims at production of a mimic specimen of artificial barrier, experimental elucidation of influence of seismic motion due to a vibration experiment on the artificial barrier system, and establishment of an evaluating method on its long-term behavior. The study has been carried out under a cooperative study of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In 1998 fiscal year, an artificial barrier specimen initiated by crosscut road was produced, and their random wave and actual seismic wave vibrations were carried out to acquire their fundamental data. As a result of the both vibrations, it was found that in a Case 2 specimen of which buffer material was swelled by poured water, the material was integrated with a mimic over-pack to vibrate under judgement of eigen-frequency, maximum acceleration ratio, and so forth on the test results. And, in a Case 1 specimen, it was thought that the mimic over-pack showed an extreme non-linear performance (soft spring) because of reducing eigen-frequency with increase of its vibration level. (G.K.)

  2. Ultrasonic root-end preparation, Part 2. Microleakage of EBA root-end fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, W P; Saunders, E M; Gutmann, J L

    1994-11-01

    The effect of three methods of root-end preparation, following apical resection, on the apical seal of root-end fillings, was studied in vitro. Root canals of 116 single-rooted teeth with mature apices were prepared chemomechanically and obturated with gutta-percha and sealer. The root ends were resected with a diamond bur under water coolant and were prepared as follows: group I a size 010 round bur was used to prepare an apical cavity 2-3 mm down the long axis of the root; group II treatment as per group 1 followed by a 60-s rinse with a solution of 10:3 (10% citric acid: 3% Fe2Cl3); and group III an ultrasonic retrotip was used to prepare a 2-3 mm deep apical cavity. The root end was restored with an EBA cement. Apical leakage was determined using India ink after 7 days and 7 months. The teeth were demineralized, rendered transparent and linear dye penetration was recorded. Results showed that there was no significant difference in leakage between the groups at each time interval (P > 0.05) but there was increased leakage after 7 months (P < 0.01). Cracking of the root surface was seen most often with the ultrasonically prepared roots (P < 0.001).

  3. Identification of resected root-end dentinal cracks: a comparative study of transillumination and dyes.

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    Wright, Henry M; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Kimbrough, W Frank; Waller, Jennifer; Pashley, David H

    2004-10-01

    The dilemma of diagnosing and possibly treating dentinal cracks continues to present a challenge in endodontics. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effectiveness of transillumination and dyes in identifying root-end dentinal cracks. Fifty maxillary central incisors were decoronated, and the canals were instrumented to an ISO size 50 at the working length. The apical 3 mm of the roots was resected, and cracks were artificially created in the apical dentin. Four independent examiners evaluated the root ends at x8 magnification with a surgical operating microscope using transillumination (group 1), sodium fluorescein dye (group 2), caries detect dye (group 3), methylene blue dye (group 4), and methylene blue plus transillumination (group 5). The examiners' ability to identify root ends correctly with and without cracks was analyzed by comparing the data with the predetermined standard (cracked and noncracked) using logistic regression analysis. All techniques used were shown to be more effective than random chance at diagnosing cracks. The areas under the curve of the different techniques were as follows: transillumination, 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.93); sodium fluorescein, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.58-0.86); caries detector, 0.76 (95% CI, 0.63-0.89); methylene blue, 0.70 (95% CI, 0.55-0.84); and methylene blue plus transillumination, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70-0.94). Thus, the crack assessment techniques that gave the best discrimination between cracked and noncracked specimens, regardless of rater, was methylene blue plus transillumination. This study emphasizes the usefulness of transillumination along with magnification in detecting dentinal cracks.

  4. Identification of resected root-end dentinal cracks: a comparative study of visual magnification.

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    Slaton, C Cornelious; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Parker, M Harry; Kimbrough, W Frank; Pashley, David H

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of visual enhancements as aids in identifying artificially created dentinal cracks in resected root ends. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were decoronated, and the root canals were instrumented to ISO size 50 at the working length. The apical 3 mm of the roots were resected, and cracks were artificially created in the apical dentin with an average load of 5.6 kg using a cylindrical wedge in a miniature drill press. A video microscope at x65 magnification was used to observe the cracks as they developed. Four independent examiners evaluated the root specimens using unaided/corrected vision (group 1), loupes at x3.3 magnification (group 2), a surgical operating microscope at x10 magnification (group 3), and the Orascope at x35 magnification (group 4). The examiners' proficiency at correctly identifying root ends with and without cracks was evaluated. The data were compared to the predetermined standard (27 cracked, 23 not cracked) with a one-tailed Fisher's exact test (alpha = 0.05). Statistically, the Orascope (p = 0.02) was significantly superior, whereas using unaided/corrected vision (p = 0.99), loupes (p = 0.88), or the microscope (p = 0.14) was not significantly better than guessing. The accuracy of correct identification for unaided/ corrected vision, loupes, the microscope, and the Orascope was 39%, 45%, 53%, and 58%, respectively. A two-way analysis of variance of the accuracy of crack identification showed a significant difference among the four visualization techniques (p = 0.0007) and also among the four evaluators (p = 0.006).

  5. Evaluation of Root-End Resections Performed by Er, Cr: YSGG Laser with and without Placement of a Root-End Filling Material

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    John Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage following root-end resections has a direct influence on the outcome of surgical endodontic procedures. This study compared the microleakage after root-end resections performed by the Er, Cr: YSGG laser or carbide burs with or without the placement of MTA, and evaluated the presence of microcracks and gaps at the interface of GP/MTA and the canal walls. Ninety single-rooted teeth were instrumented, obturated with GP and AH-Plus sealer, and divided into 3 experimental groups: (I root-end resections were performed with the laser and G6 tips (parameters: 4.5 w, 30 pps, 20% water and 50% air; (II Lindeman burs were used, without the placement of MTA; (III the burs were used followed by root-end fillings with MTA, and one control (IV of five unobturated roots resected with the burs. The samples were prepared for microleakage (=20 and SEM (=10 analysis. They were immersed in 1% methylene blue, decalcified, cleared, and evaluated for dye penetration (mm2 with the ImageJ software. Epoxy-resin replicas of the root-ends were analyzed by SEM for gaps (m2 and microcracks. Microleakage results were 0.518±1.059, 0.172±0.223, and 0.158±0.253, for the laser (I, no root-end filling (II, and MTA (III samples, respectively, (ANOVA =.02. The laser (7831.7±2329.2 and no root-end filling (7137.3±1400.7 samples presented gaps. Whereas, none was found in the MTA (ANOVA =.002. Microcracks were not observed. The MTA group demonstrated statistically less leakage and better adaptation to the canal walls when compared to the other groups. There was no correlation between the size of the gaps and the degree of microleakage.

  6. Healing after Root-end Microsurgery by Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and a New Calcium Silicate–based Bioceramic Material as Root-end Filling Materials in Dogs

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    Chen, Ian; Karabucak, Bekir; Wang, Cong; Wang, Han-Guo; Koyama, Eiki; Kohli, Meetu R.; Nah, Hyun-Duck; Kim, Syngcuk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare healing after root-end surgery by using grey mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and EndoSequence Root Repair Material (RRM) as root-end filling material in an animal model. Methods Apical periodontitis was induced in 55 mandibular premolars of 4 healthy beagle dogs. After 6 weeks, root-end surgeries were performed by using modern microsurgical techniques. Two different root-end filling materials were used, grey MTA and RRM. Six months after surgery, healing of the periapical area was assessed by periapical radiographs, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), micro computed tomography (CT), and histology. Results Minimal or no inflammatory response was observed in the majority of periapical areas regardless of the material. The degree of inflammatory infiltration and cortical plate healing were not significantly different between the 2 materials. However, a significantly greater root-end surface area was covered by cementum-like, periodontal ligament–like tissue, and bone in RRM group than in MTA group. When evaluating with periapical radiographs, complete healing rate in RRM and MTA groups was 92.6% and 75%, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (P = .073). However, on CBCT and micro CT images, RRM group demonstrated significantly superior healing on the resected root-end surface and in the periapical area (P = .000 to .027). Conclusions Like MTA, RRM is a biocompatible material with good sealing ability. However, in this animal model RRM achieved a better tissue healing response adjacent to the resected root-end surface histologically. The superior healing tendency associated with RRM could be detected by CBCT and micro CT but not periapical radiography. PMID:25596728

  7. Portland cement versus MTA as a root-end filling material. A pilot study.

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    da Silva, Sérgio Ribeiro; da Silva Neto, José Dias; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-02-01

    To assess periradicular lesions clinically and by computed tomography (CT) after endodontic surgery using either Portland cement or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root-end filling material. Three patients diagnosed with periradicular lesions by cone-beam CT underwent endodontic surgery with root-end filling. Patient A was treated with MTA as the root-end filling material, patient B was treated with Portland cement and patient C had two teeth treated, one with MTA and the other with Portland cement. Six months after surgery, the patients were assessed clinically and by CT scan and the obtained results were compared. Periradicular tissue regeneration was observed in all cases, with no significant differences in bone formation when comparing the use of MTA and Portland cement as root-end filling materials. Both mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement were successful in the treatment of periradicular lesions.

  8. Apical Microleakage of four Materials after Root End Resection (In Vitro Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Radeva E.; Usunov T.; Ivanov I.; Genchev G.

    2016-01-01

    Hermetic sealing of the apical area after root end resection is essential to the success of endodontic surgery. To compare microleakage after root end resection of the two bioceramic sealers without retrograde filling - Total Fill BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex, and two materials for retrograde filling-MTA and Biodentine, using the method of penetration of dye - 2% methylene blue. Forty eight extracted single-rooted human teeth were used in this study. The resection was made at 3 mm from the root...

  9. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

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    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  10. Prognostic factors in apical surgery with root-end filling: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2010-01-01

    Apical surgery has seen continuous development with regard to equipment and surgical technique. However, there is still a shortage of evidence-based information regarding healing determinants. The objective of this meta-analysis was to review clinical articles on apical surgery with root-end fill...

  11. Comparison of Mechanical and Indirect Ultrasonic Placement Technique on Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Retrofill Density in Simulated Root-end Surgery.

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    Friedl, Christopher C; Williamson, Anne E; Dawson, Deborah V; Gomez, Manuel R; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the density of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) root-end filling placed by either manual condensation or manual condensation with indirect ultrasonic activation under simulated root-end surgery conditions in vitro. Extracted human molar teeth were obtained and sectioned to provide single-rooted samples (n = 50). Roots were instrumented to a size of 40 with a .04 taper and obturated with a warm vertical technique. The coronal end of each root was embedded in resin. A root-end resection and root-end preparation were completed on each root. Samples were randomly assigned to receive root-end fillings with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK) by 1 of 2 techniques: manual condensation alone (group M, n = 25) or manual condensation with indirect ultrasonic activation (group U, n = 25). MTA was placed incrementally to the level of the root end using the enumerated technique. Samples were weighed immediately before and after filling placement. MTA was removed from all samples so as not to change the root-end preparation, rinsed, and dried. Each sample then underwent MTA placement by the opposite technique, and weight was again measured immediately before and after MTA placement. MTA filling weights for each technique were analyzed statistically using a technique for repeated measures analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted to account for any carryover or order effects. After adjustment for carryover effects, it was found that regardless of the order of placement, the mean fill weight of MTA produced by the indirect ultrasonic method was on average 4.42 mg heavier than that produced by manual condensation alone. This result was statistically significant (P MTA root-end fillings was shown to produce a filling that was significantly denser than MTA placed by manual condensation alone. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Behavior of nine selected emerging trace organic contaminants in an artificial recharge system supplemented with a reactive barrier.

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    Valhondo, Cristina; Carrera, Jesús; Ayora, Carlos; Barbieri, Manuela; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Huerta, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Artificial recharge improves several water quality parameters, but has only minor effects on recalcitrant pollutants. To improve the removal of these pollutants, we added a reactive barrier at the bottom of an infiltration basin. This barrier contained aquifer sand, vegetable compost, and clay and was covered with iron oxide dust. The goal of the compost was to sorb neutral compounds and release dissolved organic carbon. The release of dissolved organic carbon should generate a broad range of redox conditions to promote the transformation of emerging trace organic contaminants (EOCs). Iron oxides and clay increase the range of sorption site types. In the present study, we examined the effectiveness of this barrier by analyzing the fate of nine EOCs. Water quality was monitored before and after constructing the reactive barrier. Installation of the reactive barrier led to nitrate-, iron-, and manganese-reducing conditions in the unsaturated zone below the basin and within the first few meters of the saturated zone. Thus, the behavior of most EOCs changed after installing the reactive barrier. The reactive barrier enhanced the removal of some EOCs, either markedly (sulfamethoxazole, caffeine, benzoylecgonine) or slightly (trimethoprim) and decreased the removal rates of compounds that are easily degradable under aerobic conditions (ibuprofen, paracetamol). The barrier had no remarkable effect on 1H-benzotriazole and tolyltriazole.

  13. Apical Microleakage of four Materials after Root End Resection (In Vitro Study

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    Radeva E.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hermetic sealing of the apical area after root end resection is essential to the success of endodontic surgery. To compare microleakage after root end resection of the two bioceramic sealers without retrograde filling - Total Fill BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex, and two materials for retrograde filling-MTA and Biodentine, using the method of penetration of dye - 2% methylene blue. Forty eight extracted single-rooted human teeth were used in this study. The resection was made at 3 mm from the root tip at an angle of 90 degree to the long axis of the tooth. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: 1st group (n = 9 - root canal obturation with Total Fill BC Sealer without retrograde filling; 2nd group (n = 8 - root canal obturation with MTA Fillapex without retrograde filling. 3rd group (n = 10 - retrograde ultrasonic cavity preparation and filling with MTA. 4th group (n = 8 - retrograde ultrasonic cavity preparation and filling with Biodentine. The outer surface of the root was covered with two layers of varnish, with the exception of the apical 3 mm and then immersed in 2% methylene blue for 72 h. The degree of penetration of the dye is measured in millimeters. The data was entered and processed with the statistical package IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0. We reject the null hypothesis when p < 0.05. With significantly higher value is the arithmetic mean of the group with the root canal obturation with Total Fill BC Sealer without retrograde filling - 2,01 mm; versus a retrograde filling with MTA - 0,68 mm and Biodentin - 0,51 mm; and no statistically significant difference with the group root canal obturation with MTA Fillapex - 1,76 mm. In the four material microleakage dye was observed, but to varying degrees.

  14. Comparison of the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement used as root-end filling materials.

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    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid R; Rahimi, Saeed; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Shakouei, Sahar; Unchi, Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate apical seal is the major cause of surgical endodontic failure. The root-end filling material used should prevent egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), gray MTA, white Portland cement (PC) and gray PC by dye leakage test. Ninety-six human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha. After resecting the apex, an apical cavity was prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (A: white MTA, B: gray MTA, C: white PC and D: gray PC; n = 20) and two control groups (positive and negative control groups; n = 8). Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. The teeth were exposed to Indian ink for 72 hours. The extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope at 16× magnification. The negative controls showed no dye penetration and dye penetration was seen in the entire root-end cavity of positive controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the four experimental groups (P > 0.05). All retrograde filling materials tested in this study showed the same microleakage in vitro. Given the low cost and apparently similar sealing ability of PC, PC could be considered as a substitute for MTA as a root-end filling material.

  15. A reactive barrier to enhance the removal of emerging organic compounds during artificial recharge of aquifers through infiltration basins

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    Valhondo, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers through infiltration basins (AR) improves water quality and in- creases groundwater resources, which make of it an appropriate technique for the renaturalization of waters affected directly or indirectly by wastewater effluents. Emerging organic compounds (EOCs), typically present in such waters, are mainly reduced during AR by sorption and biotrans- formation. We installed a reactive barrier in an infiltration basin (5000 m2) to enhance the removal of EOCs ...

  16. Prediction of point-defect migration energy barriers in alloys using artificial intelligence for atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castin, N. [Structural Materials Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Studiecentrum voor Kerneenergie Centre d' etude de l' energie nucleaire (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Physique des Solides Irradies et Nanostructures (PSIN), CP234 Boulevard du triomphe, Brussels (Belgium); Malerba, L. [Structural Materials Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Studiecentrum voor Kerneenergie Centre d' etude de l' energie nucleaire (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be

    2009-09-15

    We significantly improved a previously proposed method to take into account chemical and also relaxation effects on point-defect migration energy barriers, as predicted by an interatomic potential, in a rigid lattice atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. Examples of energy barriers are rigorously calculated, including chemical and relaxation effects, as functions of the local atomic configuration, using a nudged elastic bands technique. These examples are then used to train an artificial neural network that provides the barriers on-demand during the simulation for each configuration encountered by the migrating defect. Thanks to a newly developed training method, the configuration can include a large number of neighbour shells, thereby properly including also strain effects. Satisfactory results have been obtained when the configuration includes different chemical species only. The problems encountered in the extension of the method to configurations including any number of point-defects are stated and solutions to tackle them are sketched.

  17. Estimation of biotransformation and sorption of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) during artificial recharge through a reactive barrier.

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    Valhondo, C.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Hidalgo, J. J.; Ayora, C.

    2016-12-01

    The reuse of lesser quality water such as effluents from wastewater treatment plants or effluent-receiving water bodies has been promoted due to the water shortages affecting many regions of the world. Artificial recharge through infiltration basins is known to improve several water quality parameters including the attenuation of emerging organic compounds (EOCs). Many of these contaminants exhibit redox dependent biotransformation because the redox state is one of the factors controlling microbial community development. Together with biotransformation, sorption also affects the behavior of EOCs in their passage through the soil. We studied EOCs attenuation in an infiltration system is located in Sant Vicenç dells Horts on the Llobregat delta (Barcelona, Spain), where the local water agency has an artificial recharge pilot project . The Llobregat river water used for the artificial recharge is affected by treatment plant effluents which contain EOCs. A reactive barrier consisting of vegetable compost, clay, and iron oxide was installed in the bottom of the infiltration basin to enhance biotransformation and sorption of EOCs. The barrier releases dissolved organic carbon, which favors the development of a broad range of redox environments, and supplies neutral, cationic, and anionic surfaces to favor sorption of different types of contaminants. Results were excellent, but quantitative evaluation of the EOCs attenuation requires knowledge of the residence time distribution of infiltrated water. A tracer test was performed by adding tracers to the infiltration water and interpreting the breakthrough curves at diverse monitoring points with a 2D multilayer numerical model. The calibrated model quantify degradation, as a first order law, and sorption through a linear distribution coefficient for ten selected EOCs. Results indicate higher degradation rates and sorption coefficients in the reactive barrier than in the rest of the aquifer for nine and eight of the ten

  18. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials

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    Camila Galletti ESPIR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2, and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE. Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility, and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05. For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05. Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE.

  19. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

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    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

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    Selen Küçükkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P>0.05. MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73% after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  1. Apical root-end filling with tricalcium silicate-based cement in a patient with diabetes mellitus: A case report

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    Biočanin Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The material used for root-end filling has to be biocompatible with adjacent periapical tissue and to stimulate its regenerative processes. Tricalcium silicate cement (TSC, as a new dental material, shows good sealing properties with dentin, high compression strengths and better marginal adaptation than commonly used root-end filling materials. Although optimal postoperative healing of periapical tissues is mainly influenced by characteristics of end-root material used, it could sometimes be affected by the influence of systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (DM. Case report. We presented apical healing of the upper central incisor, retrofilled with TSC, in a diabetic patient (type 2 DM with peripheral neuropathy. Standard root-end resection of upper central incisor was accompanied by retropreparation using ultrasonic retrotips to the depth of 3 mm and retrofilling with TSC. Post-operatively, the surgical wound healed uneventfully. However, the patient reported undefined dull pain in the operated area that could possibly be attributed to undiagnosed intraoral diabetic peripheral neuropathy, what was evaluated clinically. Conclusion. Although TSC presents a suitable material for apical root-end filling in the treatment of chronic periradicular lesions a possible presence of systemic diseases, like type 2 DM, has to be considered in the treatment outcome estimation.

  2. 5-year results comparing mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite for root-end sealing in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2014-01-01

    observers). Two different methods of root-end preparation and filling (primary study parameters) were to be compared (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] vs adhesive resin composite [COMP]) without randomization. RESULTS: A total of 271 patients and teeth from a 1-year follow-up sample of 339 could be re...

  3. Biodentine versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate versus Intermediate Restorative Material for Retrograde Root End Filling: An Invitro Study.

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    Saravanapriyan Soundappan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Biodentine in comparison with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM, as a root end filling material, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM.Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were chemo-mechanically prepared and obturated. Three millimetres of the root end were resected and 3mm retro cavity preparation was done using ultrasonic retrotips. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=10 and were restored with root end filling materials: Group I - MTA, Group II - Biodentine, Group III - IRM. The root ends were sectioned transversely at 1mm and 2mm levels and evaluated for marginal adaptation using SEM. The gap between dentin and retro filling material was measured at four quadrants. The mean gap at 1mm level and 2mm level from the resected root tip and combined mean were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test for intergroup analysis and paired t-test for intragroup analysis.The overall results showed no statistically significant difference between MTA and IRM but both were superior when compared to Biodentine. At 1mm level there was no statistically significant difference among any of the tested materials. At 2mm level MTA was superior to both IRM and Biodentine.In overall comparison, MTA and IRM were significantly superior when compared to Biodentine in terms of marginal adaptation, when used as retrograde filling material.

  4. MICROLEAKAGE ASSOCIATED WITH RETROGRADE FILLING AFTER ROOT END RESECTION (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Radeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to compare microleakage after root end resection of the two materials (MTA and Biodentine for two different apical cavity preparation using the method of penetration of dye - 0, 2 % Rodamine B. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight extracted single-rooted human teeth were used in this study. The resection was made at 3 mm from the root tip with a high speed diamond bur at an angle of 90 degree to the long axis of the tooth. For the retrofilling, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were used. The teeth were divided into 5 groups: 1st group (10 teeth – the apical cavity was prepared with stainless steel fissure bur #10 at 3 mm depth in the root canal parallel to the long axis of the tooth and is filled retrograde with MTA. 3rd group (10 teeth - retrofilling with Biodentine. 2 nd group (10 teeth - with a round bur apical cavity was prepared with a concave shape and cavity along the root canal with a depth of 3 mm and retrograde obturation with MTA. 4th group (10 teeth - retrofilling with Biodentine. 5th group (8 teeth - control group - with preparation of the cavity after resection without retrofilling. The outer surface of the root is covered with two layers of varnish, with the exception of the apical 3 mm then immersed in 0.2% Rodamine B for 72 h. The degree of penetration of the dye is measured in millimeters. Results: Relative highest median value of penetration of the dye in mm is in the control group. MTA group has a higher value in mm versus the Biodentine. The apical preparation with a concave shape and cavity along the root canal with a depth of 3 mm after apicoectomy is important to reduce apical microleakage. Conclusion: Different apical cavity preparations in both types of material have led to the microleakage dye, but to varying degrees.

  5. Artificial barriers prevent genetic recovery of small isolated populations of a low-mobility freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R A; Gauffre, B; Pavlova, A; Beheregaray, L B; Kearns, J; Lyon, J; Sasaki, M; Leblois, R; Sgro, C; Sunnucks, P

    2018-01-12

    Habitat loss and fragmentation often result in small, isolated populations vulnerable to environmental disturbance and loss of genetic diversity. Low genetic diversity can increase extinction risk of small populations by elevating inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and reducing adaptive potential. Due to their linear nature and extensive use by humans, freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. Although the effects of fragmentation on genetic structure have been extensively studied in migratory fishes, they are less understood in low-mobility species. We estimated impacts of instream barriers on genetic structure and diversity of the low-mobility river blackfish (Gadopsis marmoratus) within five streams separated by weirs or dams constructed 45-120 years ago. We found evidence of small-scale (barriers, as expected for a fish with low mobility. Genetic diversity was lower above barriers in small streams only, regardless of barrier age. In particular, one isolated population showed evidence of a recent bottleneck and inbreeding. Differentiation above and below the barrier (F ST  = 0.13) was greatest in this stream, but in other streams did not differ from background levels. Spatially explicit simulations suggest that short-term barrier effects would not be detected with our data set unless effective population sizes were very small (barriers is reduced and requires more genetic markers compared to panmictic populations. We also demonstrate the importance of accounting for natural population genetic structure in fragmentation studies.

  6. Clinical results with two different methods of root-end preparation and filling in apical surgery: mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hanni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgaard

    2010-01-01

    The aim of apical surgery is to hermetically seal the root canal system after root-end resection, thereby enabling periradicular healing. The objective of this nonrandomized prospective clinical study was to report results of 2 different root-end preparation and filling methods, ie, mineral triox...... trioxide aggregate (MTA) and an adhesive resin composite (Retroplast)....

  7. Comparison of antibacterial activities of root-end filling materials by an agar diffusion assay and Alamar blue assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui-Hsien Huang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that both the agar diffusion test and Alamar blue assay gave comparable findings of assessing the antimicrobial activity present in root-end filling materials. No antimicrobial activity was detected for mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium silicate cement, or amalgam after coming into contact with S. mutans, S. sanguinis and E. coli. IRM showed high antimicrobial activity against both S. sanguinis and E. coli.

  8. Biodentine versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate versus Intermediate Restorative Material for Retrograde Root End Filling: An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundappan, Saravanapriyan; Sundaramurthy, Jothi Latha; Raghu, Sandhya; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Biodentine in comparison with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), as a root end filling material, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were chemo-mechanically prepared and obturated. Three millimetres of the root end were resected and 3mm retro cavity preparation was done using ultrasonic retrotips. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) and were restored with root end filling materials: Group I – MTA, Group II – Biodentine, Group III – IRM. The root ends were sectioned transversely at 1mm and 2mm levels and evaluated for marginal adaptation using SEM. The gap between dentin and retro filling material was measured at four quadrants. The mean gap at 1mm level and 2mm level from the resected root tip and combined mean were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test for intergroup analysis and paired t-test for intragroup analysis. Results: The overall results showed no statistically significant difference between MTA and IRM but both were superior when compared to Biodentine. At 1mm level there was no statistically significant difference among any of the tested materials. At 2mm level MTA was superior to both IRM and Biodentine. Conclusion: In overall comparison, MTA and IRM were significantly superior when compared to Biodentine in terms of marginal adaptation, when used as retrograde filling material. PMID:24910689

  9. A comparative evaluation of sealing ability of four root end filling materials using fluid filtration method: Anin vitrostudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shilpa; Hiremath, Geeta; Yeli, Mahantesh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the sealing ability of four root end filling materials mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-Plus, Biodentine, MTA (MTA Angelus) and glass ionomer cement (GIC) using fluid filtration method. Forty-four extracted, human single-rooted teeth were collected. The crown of each tooth was decoronated 2 mm above the cementoenamel junction. Canals were negotiated, instrumented, obturated using lateral compaction method. The access cavities were sealed with Cavit. Root end resection and apical root end cavity preparations of 4 mm were made in each specimen. The selected roots were then randomly divided into four groups ( n = 11) and restored as follows. Group 1 - GIC, Group 2 - MTA (MTA Angelus), Group 3 - Biodentine, and Group 4 - MTA Plus. The apical microleakage of each specimen was assessed using fluid filtration method at 72 h, 1 month and 3 months. Microleakage in each specimen was recorded in mm (millimeter) and converted to μl/min/cm H 2 O. MTA Angelus showed least microleakage followed by Biodentine and MTA Plus. Least sealing ability was seen with GIC. There was statistically significant difference between all the materials at various time intervals. MTA Angelus showed superior sealing ability as a retrograde filling material followed by Biodentine and MTA Plus.

  10. Adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate to dentine walls compared with other root-end filling materials: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Parashos, Peter

    2018-02-16

    This systematic review analysed the literature comparing marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with other filling materials in root-end cavities. The PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science, SCOPUS, and Cochrane library databases were searched using appropriate keywords related to root-end filling materials and adaptation. Of 38 articles assessed, 20 met the inclusion criteria. No in vivo study was identified. In 10 studies, MTA gave the best marginal adaptation results, but no significant differences were found between MTA and any of the tested filling materials in seven studies. There was great variability in the study designs including analysed surface, unit of gap measurement and magnification amount during analysis. On the basis of available evidence, MTA presented good marginal adaptation to dentine walls. This review identified the need for the development of standardised methods to evaluate the adaptation property of root-end filling materials in ex vivo studies as well as in clinical studies evaluating outcome. © 2018 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  11. Effect of Synthetic Tissue Fluid on Microleakage of Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as Root-End Filling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Reyhani, Mohammad Forough; Samiei, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Negin; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Azimi, Shahram; Shokohinejad, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The success of endodontic surgery has been shown to depend partly on the apical seal. Grey mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) produces hydroxyapatite twice as often as white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) when suspended in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage phenomenon of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregates as root-end filling materials after immersion in synthetic tissue fluid (STF). Methods: 55 single-rooted extracted maxillary anterior human teeth were divided into two experimental groups of 20 teeth each, plus 3 groups of 5 teeth each as two negative and one positive control groups. The root canals were cleaned, shaped, and laterally compacted with gutta-percha. The root ends were resected and 3 mm deep cavities were prepared. The root-end preparations were filled with GMTA or WMTA in the experimental groups. Leakage was determined using a dye penetration method. Data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: The mean dye leakage was 0.40 ± 0.1 mm for GMTA and 0.50±0.1 mm for WMTA groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P = 0.14). Conclusion: Despite the different properties and behaviours of GMTA and WMTA in STF, there were no significant differences in microleakage when using GMTA or WMTA. PMID:22912925

  12. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Leal MEDEIROS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05. Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05. No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM.

  13. Microbial leakage of MTA, Portland cement, Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Estrada-Bernabé, Pedro-Felício; de Almeida-Decurcio, Daniel; Almeida-Silva, Julio; Rodrigues-Araújo-Estrela, Cyntia; Poli-Figueiredo, José-Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement (PC), Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) as root-end filling materials. An in vitro microbial leakage test (MLT) with a split chamber was used in this study. A mixture of facultative bacteria and one yeast (S. aureus+E. faecalis+P. aeruginosa+B. subtilis+C. albicans) was placed in the upper chamber and it could only reach the lower chamber containing Brain Heart Infusion broth by way of leakage through the root-end filling. Microbial leakage was observed daily for 60 days. Sixty maxillary anterior human teeth were randomly assigned to different groups--MTA and PC (gray and white), Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE, control groups and subgroups to evaluate the influence of EDTA for smear layer removal. These materials were further evaluated by an agar diffusion test (ADT) to verify their antimicrobial efficacy. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test. In the MLT, Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show evidence of microbial leakage over the 60-day experimental period. The other materials showed leakage from the 15th day. The presence of smear layer influenced microbial leakage. Microbial inhibition zones were not observed in all samples tested by ADT. Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show microbial leakage over the experimental period, whereas it was verified within 15 to 45 days in MTA and Portland cement.

  14. Evaluation of the bond strength of root-end placed mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine in the absence/presence of blood contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Huseyin; Arslan, Hakan; Akcay, Merve; Mese, Merve; Sahin, Naciye Nur

    2016-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been accepted as an appropriate root-end filling material in endodontic microsurgery because of setting ability in the wet environment. The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of root-end placed MTA and Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France) in the absence/presence of blood contamination. Forty-eight single-rooted maxillary incisors were used. subsequent to root-end resection and apical preparation using ultrasonic retro-tips, the specimens were randomly separated into two groups according to the root-end filling materials: MTA (Cerkamed Medical Company, Stalowa, Poland) or Biodentine. The specimens were then separated into two subgroups according to storage condition (absence/presence of blood) (n = 12). After obtaining 2.0 ± 0.1 mm slices, push-out tests were performed. Each slice was examined under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the failure mode. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons. The failure modes were analyzed using the Chi-square test (P = 0.05). The bond strength was significantly affected by the presence of blood contamination and root-end filling material type (P Biodentine had better bond strength than MTA (P Biodentine had better bond strength values compared to MTA, and the bond strength of both MTA and Biodentine as root-end filling materials was negatively affected by the presence of blood.

  15. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-06-06

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen-consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power.

  16. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen–consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power. PMID:26052427

  17. Performance of conventional multi-barrier drinking water treatment plants for the removal of four artificial sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Storck, Florian R; Brauch, Heinz-J; Lange, Frank T

    2010-06-01

    Due to incomplete removal of artificial sweeteners in wastewater treatment plants some of these compounds end up in receiving surface waters, which are used for drinking water production. The sum of removal efficiency of single treatment steps in multi-barrier treatment systems affects the concentrations of these compounds in the provided drinking water. This is the first systematic study revealing the effectiveness of single treatment steps in laboratory experiments and in waterworks. Six full-scale waterworks using surface water influenced raw water were sampled up to ten times to study the fate of acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate and sucralose. For the most important treatment technologies the results were confirmed by laboratory batch experiments. Saccharin and cyclamate proved to play a minor role for drinking water treatment plants as they were eliminated by nearly 100% in all waterworks with biologically active treatment units like river bank filtration (RBF) or artificial groundwater recharge. Acesulfame and sucralose were not biodegraded during RBF and their suitability as wastewater tracers under aerobic conditions was confirmed. Sucralose proved to be persistent against ozone and its transformation was ozone (pseudo first-order rate constant k = 1.3 x 10(-3) s(-1) at 1 mg L(-1) ozone concentration). However, the applied ozone concentrations and contact times under typical waterworks conditions only led to an incomplete removal (18-60%) in the ozonation step. Acesulfame was efficiently removed by subsequent GAC filters with a low throughput of less than 30 m(3) kg(-1), but removal strongly depended on the GAC preload. Thus, acesulfame was detected up to 0.76 microg L(-1) in finished water. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of different radio-opacifying agents on physicochemical and biological properties of a novel root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Zhong; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Gen-Di

    2018-01-01

    Radio-opacity is an essential attribute of ideal root-end filling materials because it is important for clinicians to observe root canal filling and to facilitate the follow-up instructions. The novel root-end filling material (NRFM) has good cytocompatibility and physicochemical properties but low intrinsic radio-opacity value. To improve its radio-opacity value, three novel radio-opaque root-end filling materials (NRRFMs) were developed by adding barium sulphate (NRFM-Ba), bismuth trioxide (NRFM-Bi) and zirconium dioxide (NRFM-Zr) to NRFM, respectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the suitable radio-opacifier for NRFM through evaluating their physicochemical and biological properties, in comparison with NRFM and glass ionomer cement (GIC). NRRFMs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR). Physicochemical properties including setting time, compressive strength, porosity, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance, contact angle and radiopacity were investigated. Cytocompatibility of both freshly mixed and set NRRFMs was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay and alizarin red staining were used to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of NRFM-Zr. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (pH variation, solubility and ALP activity) and one-way ANOVA (for the other variables). (1) NRRFMs were primarily composed of hydroxyapatite, calcium carboxylate salt and the corresponding radio-opacity agents (barium sulphate, bismuth trioxide or zirconium dioxide). (2) Besides similar physicochemical properties in terms of setting time, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance and contact angle to NRFM, NRFM-Bi and NRFM-Zr exhibited lower porosity and greater compressive strength after being set for 7 days and their radio-opacity were greater than the 3 mm aluminium thickness specified in ISO

  19. Effects of different radio-opacifying agents on physicochemical and biological properties of a novel root-end filling material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Zhong Chen

    Full Text Available Radio-opacity is an essential attribute of ideal root-end filling materials because it is important for clinicians to observe root canal filling and to facilitate the follow-up instructions. The novel root-end filling material (NRFM has good cytocompatibility and physicochemical properties but low intrinsic radio-opacity value. To improve its radio-opacity value, three novel radio-opaque root-end filling materials (NRRFMs were developed by adding barium sulphate (NRFM-Ba, bismuth trioxide (NRFM-Bi and zirconium dioxide (NRFM-Zr to NRFM, respectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the suitable radio-opacifier for NRFM through evaluating their physicochemical and biological properties, in comparison with NRFM and glass ionomer cement (GIC.NRRFMs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR. Physicochemical properties including setting time, compressive strength, porosity, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance, contact angle and radiopacity were investigated. Cytocompatibility of both freshly mixed and set NRRFMs was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity assay and alizarin red staining were used to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of NRFM-Zr. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (pH variation, solubility and ALP activity and one-way ANOVA (for the other variables.(1 NRRFMs were primarily composed of hydroxyapatite, calcium carboxylate salt and the corresponding radio-opacity agents (barium sulphate, bismuth trioxide or zirconium dioxide. (2 Besides similar physicochemical properties in terms of setting time, pH variation, solubility, washout resistance and contact angle to NRFM, NRFM-Bi and NRFM-Zr exhibited lower porosity and greater compressive strength after being set for 7 days and their radio-opacity were greater than the 3 mm aluminium thickness specified in ISO

  20. Differences in physical characteristics and sealing ability of three tricalcium silicate-based cements used as root-end-filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmuss, Maximilian; Preis, Carolina Elisabeth; Kist, Stefan; Hickel, Reinhard; Huth, Karin Christine

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate differences in physical characteristics and sealing ability of root-end-fillings made with these materials compared to the gold standard (ProRoot MTA). The physical characteristics of ProRoot MTA, Medcem MTA and Biodentine were evaluated regarding setting time, flow, film thickness, solubility and radiopacity according to the German Institute for Standardization (EN-ISO 6878). To investigate their sealing ability as root-end-fillings, a glucose penetration model was used. 60 human extracted single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated, root-end resections performed and divided in three groups of 20 teeth, using either ProRoot MTA, Medcem MTA or Biodentine as root-end-filling material. After 30 days, glucose concentrations were determined photometrically, followed by statistical analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U-test). Biodentine showed the fastest setting time (Biodentine showed lower leakage than ProRoot MTA (P= 0.031). As Medcem MTA showed significantly lower leakage than the other materials tested, it may be an alternative for root-end-fillings with comparable physical characteristics to the current gold standard. With the exception of the high solubility, Biodentine performed well regarding leakage and setting time.

  1. An investigation on tissue reaction to implanted root-end filling materials in the mandible of guineanpigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrabian M. Associate Professor. Barfehi N. Endodontist

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Different materials have been suggested for endodontic surgeries. One of the most important characteristics of filling materials is their biocompatibiiity."nAim: The aim of this research was to evaluate the biocompatibiiity of four different root end filling materials."nMaterial and Methods: In this study, 20 male Guineanpigs from English short hair breed, weighing"n600-700 grams, were selected. The animals were classified into two groups. In the first group, amalgam"nand composite and in the second group MTA and Glass Ionomer were examined. The testing materials"nwere shaped into cylindrical form with 1 mm diameter and 1.5 mm height. After general anesthesia, two"ncavities with 1mm diameter and 2 mm depth were prepared in parasymphysis area of animal jaw. The"nprepared materials were implanted in these cavities and the flaps were sutured. After 80 days, the animals"nwere sacrificed and the dissected bones, with implanted materials inside them, were sent for histological"nevaluation. The histological findings were statistically analysed by Kruskal Wallis and x'tests."nResults: No significant differences were shown in the degree of inflammation, the type of inflammatory"ncells adjacent to the tested materials and the type of tissue response, induced in the vicinity of these four"nmaterials during 80 days."nConclusion: Regarding biocompatibiiity, there was no significant difference among amalgam,"ncomposite, MTA and glass Ionomer in endodontic surgeries.

  2. Biocompatibility and sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and biodentine as root-end filling material: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Nidhi Pravinchandra; Venkappa, Kishan Karkala; Shah, Nimisha Chinmay

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review intended to compare the biocompatibility and sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and biodentine as root-end filling material. A computerized literature search was performed on March 1, 2016, in MEDLINE, PubMed, and COCHRANE LIBRARY for data published from January 2011 to March 2016. Quality assessment of the selected studies was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines, 2009. A total of 12 in vitro studies were included in this review. Of these, four studies compared the biocompatibility and eight compared the sealing ability. With regard to biocompatibility, two articles showed biodentine to be better and two showed comparable results, while in the case of sealing ability, one article showed MTA to be better, six articles showed biodentine to be better, and the rest one article showed the comparable result. It may be concluded that good sealing ability of biodentine along with its favorable biological properties show that materials can be used competently in clinical practice as a retrograde filling material. However, long-term assessment in clinical situations is necessary for further inferences.

  3. Comparison of Quick-Set and mineral trioxide aggregate root-end fillings for the regeneration of apical tissues in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, George D; He, Jianing; Primus, Carolyn M; Opperman, Lynne A; Woodmansey, Karl F

    2015-02-01

    Quick-Set (Avalon Biomed Inc, Bradenton, FL) is a calcium aluminosilicate cement that is a potential alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with greater acid resistance and faster setting. The purpose of this study was to compare the regeneration of apical tissues after root-end surgery when the apical tissues were exposed to Quick-Set or White ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) by root-end resection. The root canals of 42 mandibular premolars in 7 beagle dogs were accessed, cleaned and shaped, and obturated with Quick-Set or white MTA. Osteotomies and root-end resections were performed immediately. The dogs were sacrificed at 90 days, and the teeth and surrounding tissues were removed and prepared for histologic analysis. The sections of the apical areas were scored for inflammation, new cementum formation, periodontal ligament formation, and bone quality. At 90 days, both materials supported some degree of cementum formation on the surface of the material, periodontal ligament regeneration, and excellent bone quality. The only significant difference was greater inflammation found in the Quick-Set group. Quick-Set and White ProRoot MTA had a similar effect on bone quality, cementum formation, and periodontal ligament formation after root-end surgery in dogs. Quick-Set was associated with greater inflammation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopic Study of the Marginal Adaptation of Four Root-End Filling Materials in Presence and Absence of Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Bolhari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, Biodentine and BioAggregate in presence of normal saline and human blood.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro experimental study, 80 extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented and filled with gutta-percha. After resect- ing the root-end, apical cavity preparation was done and the teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (N=20(a total of 8 subgroups. Root-end filling materials were placed in 3mm root-end cavities prepared ultrasonically. Half the specimens in each group were exposed to normal saline and the other half to fresh whole human blood. After 4 days, epoxy resin replicas of the apical portion of samples were fabricated and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis was performed to find gaps in the adaptation of the root-end filling materials at their interface with dentin. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis of data with P<0.05 as the limit of significance.Results: There were no significant differences in marginal adaptation of the 8 tested groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results, blood contamination does not affect the mar- ginal adaptation of MTA, CEM cement, Biodentine or BioAggregate .

  5. Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, A Salin; Ponnappa, KC; Nanjamma, KK; Ponappa, MC; Girish, Sabari; Nitin, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P < 0.05 (R software version 3.1.0). Results: Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.45 mm for Biodentine, 0.85 mm for MTA, and 1.05 mm for Chitra-CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er:YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Root-end cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and restored with Biodentine showed superior sealing ability compared to those prepared with ultrasonics. PMID:26180420

  6. Comparison of the sealing ability of two root-end filling materials (MTA and CEM cement following retropreparation with ultrasonic or Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmi H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Considering advantages and disadvantages of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, Calcium Enriched Mixture (CEM cement has been developed recently. The purpose of this study was to compare the apical microleakage of the root-end cavities prepared by ultrasonic or Er,Cr:YSGG laser and filled with MTA or CEM cement. "nMaterials and Methods: Eighty single-rooted, extracted human teeth were instrumented and obturated. Root-end resection was made by removing 3 mm of the apex. The teeth were randomly divided into two experimental (n=30 and two positive and negative control (n=10 groups. After that, the retrograde cavities were prepared using ultrasonic or Er,Cr: YSGG Laser. According to the root-end filling materials (MTA or CEM cement, each group was then divided into two subgroups. Finally, specimens were cleared for assessing the amount of apical dye (Indian ink penetration. The data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests. "nResults: Laser/CEM cement group showed significantly the lowest mean apical dye penetration. There were no statistically significant differences between Laser/MTA, ultrasonic/MTA and ultrasonic/CEM cement groups. "nConclusion: Based on the findings of this study, CEM cement demonstrated lower rate of apical leakage compared with MTA, when the root-end cavities prepared with Er,Cr:YSGG Laser. The sealing ability of MTA was not different following root-end preparation by ultrasonic or Er,Cr:YSGG Laser.

  7. Evaluation of the physical properties of an endodontic Portland cement incorporating alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling material.

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    Camilleri, J

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the physical and chemical properties of Portland cement (PC) loaded with alternative radiopacifying materials for use as root-end filling materials in a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like system. Portland cement loaded with barium sulphate, gold and silver/tin alloy was mixed with water, and the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated cements were evaluated. MTA and intermediate restorative material (IRM) were used as controls. The radiopacity was compared to the equivalent thickness of aluminium, and the setting time of the cements was assessed using an indentation technique. The compressive strength and the stress-strain relationship were determined at 28 days. The stress-strain relationship was determined by monitoring the strain generated when the cement was subjected to compressive load. In addition, the pH was determined in water and simulated body fluid for a period of 28 days. The radiopacity of the cements using alternative radiopacifiers was comparable to MTA (P > 0.05). IRM demonstrated a higher radiopacity than all the materials tested (P cements with the exception of IRM exhibited an alkaline pH and had an extended setting time when compared to IRM. MTA had a longer setting time than the PC (P cement (P = 0.159). The addition of a radiopacifier retarded the setting time (P cements had comparable strength to PC (P > 0.05). IRM was the weakest cement tested (P cement loaded with gold radiopacifier had comparable strength to MTA (P = 1). The stress-strain relationship was linear for all the cements with IRM generating more strain on loading. Within the parameters set in this study, bismuth oxide in MTA can be replaced by gold or silver/tin alloy. The physical, mechanical and chemical properties of the cement replaced with alternative radiopacifiers were similar and comparable to ProRoot MTA.

  8. Evaluation of physicochemical properties of root-end filling materials using conventional and Micro-CT tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ferrari Esteves TORRES

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate solubility, dimensional stability, filling ability and volumetric change of root-end filling materials using conventional tests and new Micro-CT-based methods. Material and Methods Solubility (loss of mass after 7 and 30 days, and dimensional stability (in mm were evaluated in accordance with Carvalho-Junior, et al. 7 (2007. The filling ability and volumetric change (in mm3 were evaluated by Micro-CT (Bruker-MicroCT, Kontich, Belgium using resin models with cavities 3 mm deep and 1 mm in diameter. The cavities were filled with materials to evaluate filling ability, and then scanned by Micro-CT. After 7 and 30 days immersed in distilled water, the filled cavities were scanned again to evaluate the volumetric change. MTA Angelus (MTA, Biodentine (BIO and zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE were evaluated. Data were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test with 5% significance level. Results The results suggested correlated or complementary data between the proposed tests. At 7 days, BIO showed higher solubility and at 30 days, showed higher volumetric change in comparison with MTA (p0.05 at 7 days. At 30 days, they presented similar solubility. BIO and MTA showed higher dimensional stability than ZOE (p<0.05. ZOE and BIO showed higher filling ability (p<0.05. Conclusions ZOE presented a higher dimensional change, and BIO had greater solubility after 7 days. BIO presented filling ability and dimensional stability, but greater volumetric change than MTA after 30 days. Micro-CT can provide important data on the physicochemical properties of materials complementing conventional tests.

  9. Evaluation of sphingomyelin, cholester, and phosphatidylcholine-based immobilized artificial membrane liquid chromatography to predict drug penetration across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Mike; Verzele, Dieter; Szucs, Roman; Sandra, Pat; Lynen, Frédéric

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decades, several in vitro methods have been tested for their ability to predict drug penetration across the blood-brain barrier. So far, in high-performance liquid chromatography, most attention has been paid to micellar liquid chromatography and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) LC. IAMLC has been described as a viable approach, since the stationary phase emulates the lipid environment of a cell membrane. However, research in IAMLC has almost exclusively been limited to phosphatidylcholine (PC)-based stationary phases, even though PC is only one of the lipids present in cell membranes. In this article, sphingomyelin and cholester stationary phases have been tested for the first time towards their ability to predict drug penetration across the blood-brain barrier. Upon comparison with the PC stationary phase, the sphingomyelin- and cholester-based columns depict similar predictive performance. Combining data from the different stationary phases did not lead to improvements of the models.

  10. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA.

  11. Assessment of apical seal obtained after irrigation of root end cavity with MTAD followed by subsequent retrofilling with MTA and Biodentine: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Mayuri Mohan; de Ataide, Ida de Noronha; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present study is designed to assess the apical seal obtained after root end cavity irrigation with MTAD and retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted maxillary central incisors were instrumented and obturated. Apical 3 mm of all the roots were resected and retrograde preparations of 3 mm were made in all the teeth using ultrasonic tips. Thirty root end preparations were irrigated with MTAD for 5 min (Group 1), while 30 were irrigated with saline for 5 min (Group 2). Each main group was subdivided into two subgroups containing 15 samples each. Samples under each subgroup were then filled either with MTA (1A and 2A) or Biodentine (1B and 2B). The amount of microleakage was assessed using a UV spectrophotometer. Results: Statistical analysis suggest a significant difference (P Biodentine, but it increased the microleakage in MTA-filled root end cavities. Also the apical seal obtained with Biodentine was superior to that obtained with MTA. PMID:25829692

  12. Comparison of the effects of artificial and natural barriers on large African carnivores: implications for interspecific relationships and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriele; Broekhuis, Femke; McNutt, J Weldon; Schmid, Bernhard

    2013-05-01

    1. Physical barriers contribute to habitat fragmentation, influence species distribution and ranging behaviour, and impact long-term population viability. Barrier permeability varies among species and can potentially impact the competitive balance within animal communities by differentially affecting co-occurring species. The influence of barriers on the spatial distribution of species within whole communities has nonetheless received little attention. 2. During a 4-year period, we studied the influence of a fence and rivers, two landscape features that potentially act as barriers on space use and ranging behaviour of lions Panthera leo, spotted hyenas Crocuta crocuta, African wild dogs Lycaon pictus and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Northern Botswana. We compared the tendencies of these species to cross the barriers using data generated from GPS-radio collars fitted to a total of 35 individuals. Barrier permeability was inferred by calculating the number of times animals crossed a barrier vs. the number of times they did not cross. Finally, based on our results, we produced a map of connectivity for the broader landscape system. 3. Permeability varied significantly between fence and rivers and among species. The fence represented an obstacle for lions (permeability = 7.2%), while it was considerably more permeable for hyenas (35.6%) and wild dogs and cheetahs (≥ 50%). In contrast, the rivers and associated floodplains were relatively permeable to lions (14.4%) while they represented a nearly impassable obstacle for the other species (habitat patch on one side of the fence, which might provide a potential refuge for other species. For instance, the competitively inferior wild dogs used this refuge significantly more intensively than the side of the fence with a high presence of lions. 5. We showed that the influence of a barrier on the distribution of animals could potentially result in a broad-scale modification of community structure and ecology within a guild

  13. Evaluation of bacterial leakage of four root- end filling materials: Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I

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    Zarabian M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Today several materials have been used for root- end filling in endodontic surgery. Optimal properties of Pro Root MTA in in-vitro and in-vivo studies has been proven. On the other hand, based on some studies, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA and Portland cement are similar to Pro Root MTA in physical and biologic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial leakage (amount and mean leakage time of four root- end filling materials. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro study, seventy six extracted single- rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups for root-end filling with gray Pro Root MTA, white Pro Root MTA, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA, Portland Cement (type I and positive and negative control groups. Root canals were instrumented using the step- back technique. Root- end filling materials were placed in 3mm ultra sonic retro preparations. Samples and microleakage model system were sterilized in autoclave. The apical 3-4 mm of the roots were immersed in phenol red with 3% lactose broth culture medium. The coronal access of each specimen was inoculated every 24h with a suspension of Streptococcus sanguis (ATCC 10556. Culture media were observed every 24h for colour change indicating bacterial contamination for 60 days. Statistical analysis was performed using log- rank test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: At the end of study 50%, 56.25%, 56.25% and 50% of specimens filled with Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA. Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I had evidence of leakage respectively. The mean leakage time was 37.19±6.29, 36.44±5.81, 37.69±5.97 and 34.81±6.67 days respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant difference among the leakage (amount and mean leakage time of the four tested root- end filling materials (P=0.9958. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, there were no significant differences in leakage among the four

  14. Determination of in Vitro and in Silico Indexes for the Modeling of Blood-Brain Barrier Partitioning of Drugs via Micellar and Immobilized Artificial Membrane Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giacomo; Grumetto, Lucia; Szucs, Roman; Barbato, Francesco; Lynen, Frederic

    2017-05-11

    In the present work, 79 structurally unrelated analytes were taken into account and their chromatographic retention coefficients, measured by immobilized artificial membrane liquid chromatography (IAM-LC) and by micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) employing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant, were determined. Such indexes, along with topological and physicochemical parameters calculated in silico, were subsequently used for the development of blood-brain barrier passage-predictive statistical models using partial least-squares (PLS) regression. Highly significant relationships were observed either using IAM (r 2 (n - 1) = 0.78) or MLC (r 2 (n - 1) = 0.83) derived indexes along with in silico descriptors. This hybrid approach proved fast and effective in the development of highly predictive BBB passage oriented models, and therefore, it can be of interest for pharmaceutical industries as a high-throughput BBB penetration oriented screening method. Finally, it shed new light into the molecular mechanism involved in the BBB uptake of therapeutics.

  15. In vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug research: state-of-the-art and new perspectives on reconstituting these models on artificial basement membrane platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jayati; Shi, Yejiao; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-09-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are indispensable screening tools for obtaining early information about the brain-penetrating behaviour of promising drug candidates. Until now, in vitro BBB models have focused on investigating the interplay among cellular components of neurovascular units and the effect of fluidic sheer stress in sustaining normal BBB phenotype and functions. However, an area that has received less recognition is the role of the noncellular basement membrane (BM) in modulating BBB physiology. This review describes the state-of-the-art on in vitro BBB models relevant in drug discovery research and highlights their strengths, weaknesses and the utility potential of some of these models in testing the permeability of nanocarriers as vectors for delivering therapeutics to the brain. Importantly, our review also introduces a new concept of engineering artificial BM platforms for reconstituting BBB models in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium phosphate and polymethylmethacrylate bone cements on root ends prepared using an Erbium: Yttriumaluminium garnet laser and ultrasonics evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C Sabari; Ponnappa, KC; Girish, TN; Ponappa, MC

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical endodontic therapy comprises of exposure of the involved root apex, resection of the apical end of the root, preparation of a class I cavity, and insertion of a root end filling material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is now the gold standard among all root end filling materials. MTA is however difficult to handle, expensive and has a very slow setting reaction. Aim: (1) To compare the sealing ability of MTA, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and CHITRA Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root end filling material using Rhodamine B dye evaluated under a confocal laser scanning microscope. (2) To compare the seal of root ends prepared using an ultrasonic retroprep tip and an Er: YAG laser using three different root end filling materials. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and Scheffe's post hoc test using SPSS Version 16 for Windows. Results: All the three materials, namely MTA, PMMA BONE CEMENT and CHITRA CPC, showed microleakage. Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.86 mm for MTA, 0.24 mm for PMMA bone cement and 1.37 mm for CHITRA CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er: YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, but the difference was found to be not statistically significant. Conclusion: PMMA bone cement is a better material as root end filling material to prevent apical microleakage. MTA still continues to be a gold standard root end filling material showing minimum microleakage. Er: YAG laser is a better alternative to ultrasonics for root end preparations. PMID:23956530

  17. Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Potential Neuroprotective Aurones in Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay and Porcine Brain Endothelial Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kok-Fui; Hanapi, Nur Aziah; Chan, Kit-Lam; Yusof, Siti R; Lee, Chong-Yew

    2017-02-01

    Previously, several aurone derivatives were identified with promising neuroprotective activities. In developing these compounds to target the central nervous system (CNS), an assessment of their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was performed using in vitro BBB models: parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB which measures passive permeability and primary porcine brain endothelial cell model which enables determination of the involvement of active transport mechanism. Parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB identified most compounds with high passive permeability, with 3 aurones having exceptional P e values highlighting the importance of basic amine moieties and optimal lipophilicity for good passive permeability. Bidirectional permeability assays with porcine brain endothelial cell showed a significant net influx permeation of the aurones indicating a facilitated uptake mechanism in contrast to donepezil, a CNS drug included in the evaluation which only displayed passive permeation. From pH-dependent permeability assay coupled with data analysis using pCEL-X software, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P o ) of a representative aurone 4-3 was determined, considering factors such as the aqueous boundary layer that may hinder accurate in vitro to in vivo correlation. The P o  value determined supported the in vivo feasibility of the aurone as a CNS-active compound. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography for assessment of the periapical bone defect 1 week and 12 months after root-end resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, R; Kirkevang, L-L; Gotfredsen, E; Wenzel, A

    2009-12-01

    Our aim was to compare periapical radiography and cone beam CT (CBCT) for assessment of the periapical bone defect 1 week and 12 months after root-end resection. 50 patients (58 teeth) with a persisting apical periodontitis in a root-filled tooth (incisor, canine or premolar) were treated with root-end resection. 1 week and 12 months post-operatively, a CBCT scan (NewTom 3G) and a periapical radiograph (Digora) were obtained. Three observers detected and measured the periapical bone defects on periapical radiographs and CBCT images (coronal and sagittal sections). 1 week post-operatively, a periapical bone defect area was measured in all teeth by all observers. The defect was 10% smaller on periapical radiographs (mean = 12.4 mm2, SD = 8.2) than on the CBCT images measured in the coronal plane (mean = 13.0 mm2, SD = 7.8), a difference which was not statistically significant (P = 0.58). 12 months post-operatively (n = 52), there was considerable variation between the observers' detection of a remaining defect on the periapical radiographs and the CBCT images. The average agreement between the periapical radiograph and the CBCT images in the coronal sections was 67%, and more defects were detected on CBCT than on periapical radiographs. On average, the periapical bone defect measured on periapical radiographs was approximately 10% smaller than on coronally sectioned CBCT images 1 week post-operatively. More remaining defects were detected 1 year after periapical surgery on CBCT images than on periapical radiographs, but it is uncertain how this information is related to success or failure after root-end resection.

  19. Detection of dentinal cracks after root-end resection: an ex vivo study comparing microscopy and endoscopy with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Thomas; Kunz, Renato; Schneider, Adrienne Christina; Bürgin, Walter; Lussi, Adrian

    2010-09-01

    Dentinal cracks are occasionally observed at the cut root face after root-end resection in apical surgery. The objective of this ex vivo study was to evaluate and compare the efficiency of visual aids to identify root-end dentinal cracks. Twenty-six extracted human molars were decoronated, and the root canals were instrumented and filled. The apical 3 mm of the roots were resected, and the cut root faces were assessed with microscopy at x16 and x24 magnification and with endoscopy at x8 and x64 magnification (four visual aids). Roots were then duplicated for inspection with scanning electron microscopy. The presence, type, and location of cracks were registered by a blinded observer, with the scanning electron microcopy serving as the reference. The percentages of correct identification of dentinal cracks were then statistically compared among the four test configurations. Endoscopy x64 showed the highest sensitivity for crack identification, irrespective of the applied methodology (ie, per root and per crack). However, higher scores of false-positive cracks (lower specificity) were found with endoscopy x64 than with the other tested visual aids. The correct detection and location of complete canal cracks (55.3%, 52.6%, 68.4%, and 78.9%) were higher than the detection of incomplete canal cracks (42.2%, 42.2%, 52.0%, and 64.7%) using the four tested visual aids (microscopy at x16 and x24 magnification and endoscopy at x8 and x64 magnification, respectively). Only one of five intradentin cracks was identified with endoscopy x64. Overall, endoscopy x64 proved the most accurate visual aid for the identification of dentinal cracks after root-end resection in extracted human teeth; however, it also provided the most false identifications. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Linhares-Farina, Giane; Sposito, Otávio da Silva; Zanchi, César Henrique; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA) based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA) based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA), in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA). The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter) and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique). The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material.

  1. Physical signatures of drug transport through an artificial skin barrier--a proposed model and its validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochowski, Pawel; Szurkowski, Janusz

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to better characterize the system acting as a model for the penetration of a pharmaceutical drug into the skin. With a new mathematical formalism, the transport of the drug (dithranol) from a semisolid vaseline suspension into an artificial membrane was described. In our novel approach, we have taken into account not only diffusion but also other effects dependent on chemical reactivity of drug, medium structure, and drug-matrix interactions. The transport equation was solved with two methods: the Laplace transform and the reflection-and-superposition. Despite the applied method, the three-dimensional calculations were found to be, in major parts, in good agreement with the experimental data resulting from the photoacoustic depth profiling. For the first time, from the depth profiling we were capable of estimating not only the diffusion coefficient but also other parameters of the permeation phenomenon as the pore velocity, the first and the zero order reaction rate coefficients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of the foremost light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement as root-end in oral surgery. Chemical-physical properties, bioactivity and biological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Taddei, Paola; Siboni, Francesco; Modena, Enrico; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Prati, Carlo

    2011-07-01

    An innovative light-curable calcium-silicate cement containing a HEMA-TEGDMA-based resin (lc-MTA) was designed to obtain a bioactive fast setting root-end filling and root repair material. lc-MTA was tested for setting time, solubility, water absorption, calcium release, alkalinizing activity (pH of soaking water), bioactivity (apatite-forming ability) and cell growth-proliferation. The apatite-forming ability was investigated by micro-Raman, ATR-FTIR and ESEM/EDX after immersion at 37°C for 1-28 days in DPBS or DMEM+FBS. The marginal adaptation of cement in root-end cavities of extracted teeth was assessed by ESEM/EDX, and the viability of Saos-2 cell on cements was evaluated. lc-MTA demonstrated a rapid setting time (2min), low solubility, high calcium release (150-200ppm) and alkalinizing power (pH 10-12). lc-MTA proved the formation of bone-like apatite spherulites just after 1 day. Apatite precipitates completely filled the interface porosities and created a perfect marginal adaptation. lc-MTA allowed Saos-2 cell viability and growth and no compromising toxicity was exerted. HEMA-TEGDMA creates a polymeric network able to stabilize the outer surface of the cement and a hydrophilic matrix permeable enough to allow water absorption. SiO(-)/Si-OH groups from the mineral particles induce heterogeneous nucleation of apatite by sorption of calcium and phosphate ions. Oxygen-containing groups from poly-HEMA-TEGDMA provide additional apatite nucleating sites through the formation of calcium chelates. The strong novelty was that the combination of a hydraulic calcium-silicate powder and a poly-HEMA-TEGDMA hydrophilic resin creates the conditions (calcium release and functional groups able to chelate Ca ions) for a bioactive fast setting light-curable material for clinical applications in dental and maxillofacial surgery. The first and unique/exclusive light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement for endodontics and root-end application was created, with a potential

  3. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on apical sealing ability of calcium silicatecontaining endodontic materials in root-end cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onay, Emel Olga; Gogos, Christos; Ungor, Mete; Economides, Nikolaos; Lyssaris, Vasileios; Ogus, Ersin; Lambrianidis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the apical sealing abilities of 60 root-end cavities filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and iRoot BP cements after treated with either 17% EDTA solution or Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. After the filling procedure, apical leakage quantity was measured at 4 weeks using a fluid filtration method. One root from each group was processed for scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses. Both EDTA/MTA and laser irradiation/MTA combinations showed significantly lower microleakage than EDTA/iRoot BP and laser irradiation/iRoot BP combinations (plaser (p>0.05). Both MTA and iRoot-BP demonstrated tag-like structures within the dentinal tubules when used in conjunction with EDTA.

  4. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Castilho JACINTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA, in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA. The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique. The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p < 0.05. All of the materials were found to release calcium ions throughout the 30 days of the study. The addition of CHX increased the calcium ion release of E-MTA to levels statistically similar to W-MTA. E-MTA showed shorter initial and final setting time, compared with W-MTA (p < 0.05. The addition of 2% CHX to MTA prevented setting of the material. The addition of CHX to E-MTA increased its pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Study of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Super Ethoxybenzoic Acid as Root-end Filling Materials in Endodontic Microsurgery: Long-term Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunil; Song, Minju; Shin, Su-Jung; Kim, Euiseong

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcome of endodontic microsurgery when mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and super ethoxybenzoic acid (Super EBA; Harry J. Bosworth, Skokie, IL) were used as root-end filling materials. Additionally, this study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of endodontic microsurgery at the 1-year follow-up with that at the 4-year follow-up. Two hundred sixty teeth were randomly assigned to either the MTA or Super EBA group in equal numbers using the minimization method. Endodontic microsurgery was performed according to the Yonsei protocol. The previous study of 192 teeth examined at the 1-year follow-up revealed a success rate of 95.6% for MTA and 93.1% for Super EBA. Patients were recalled 4 years after surgery, and treated teeth were classified as successes or failures with Molven's criteria. The Pearson chi-square test and the McNemar test were conducted to analyze and compare the success rates. A total of 182 teeth were examined at the 4-year follow-up. The success rate was 91.6% for MTA and 89.9% for Super EBA. Statistical analysis of the success rate did not show any significant difference between the 2 materials (P = .8). The overall success rate at the 4-year follow-up was 89.5%, which was slightly lower compared with 94.3% at the 1-year follow-up. However, there was no significant difference between the follow-up periods (P = .063). This study identified no significant difference in the 4-year success rates of MTA and Super EBA as root-end filling materials in endodontic microsurgery. Additionally, compared with short-term outcomes, long-term follow-up outcomes were not significantly different. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immobilized Artificial Membrane HPLC Derived Parameters vs PAMPA-BBB Data in Estimating in Situ Measured Blood-Brain Barrier Permeation of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumetto, Lucia; Russo, Giacomo; Barbato, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The affinity indexes for phospholipids (log kW(IAM)) for 42 compounds were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on two different phospholipid-based stationary phases (immobilized artificial membrane, IAM), i.e., IAM.PC.MG and IAM.PC.DD2. The polar/electrostatic interaction forces between analytes and membrane phospholipids (Δlog kW(IAM)) were calculated as the differences between the experimental values of log kW(IAM) and those expected for isolipophilic neutral compounds having polar surface area (PSA) = 0. The values of passage through a porcine brain lipid extract (PBLE) artificial membrane for 36 out of the 42 compounds considered, measured by the so-called PAMPA-BBB technique, were taken from the literature (P0(PAMPA-BBB)). The values of blood-brain barrier (BBB) passage measured in situ, P0(in situ), for 38 out of the 42 compounds considered, taken from the literature, represented the permeability of the neutral forms on "efflux minimized" rodent models. The present work was aimed at verifying the soundness of Δlog kW(IAM) at describing the potential of passage through the BBB as compared to data achieved by the PAMPA-BBB technique. In a first instance, the values of log P0(PAMPA-BBB) (32 data points) were found significantly related to the n-octanol lipophilicity values of the neutral forms (log P(N)) (r(2) = 0.782) whereas no significant relationship (r(2) = 0.246) was found with lipophilicity values of the mixtures of ionized and neutral forms existing at the experimental pH 7.4 (log D(7.4)) as well as with either log kW(IAM) or Δlog kW(IAM) values. log P0(PAMPA-BBB) related moderately to log P0(in situ) values (r(2) = 0.604). The latter did not relate with either n-octanol lipophilicity indexes (log P(N) and log D(7.4)) or phospholipid affinity indexes (log kW(IAM)). In contrast, significant inverse linear relationships were observed between log P0(in situ) (38 data points) and Δlog kW(IAM) values for all the compounds but

  7. Comparison of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and iRoot BP Plus Root Repair Material as Root-end Filling Materials in Endodontic Microsurgery: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Qinghua; Tan, Xuelian; Song, Dongzhe; Zhang, Lan; Huang, Dingming

    2017-01-01

    This prospective randomized controlled study evaluated the clinical and radiographic outcome of endodontic microsurgery when using iRoot BP Plus Root Repair Material (BP-RRM; Innovative BioCeramix Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as the retrograde filling material and analyzed the relationship between some potential prognostic factors and the outcome of the surgery. By using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, 240 teeth were successfully enrolled and randomly and equally allocated to either the MTA or BP-RRM treatment group. A standardized surgical procedure was performed by a single operator. The patients were followed up at 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months; follow-up included clinical and radiographic examination. Clinical and radiographic evaluations acquired at the 12-month follow-up were taken as the primary outcome. For the identification of prognostic factors, the dichotomous outcome (success vs failure) was taken as the dependent variable. A total of 158 teeth were analyzed at the 12-month follow-up, including 87 teeth in the MTA group and 71 teeth in the BP-RRM group. The success rate in the MTA and BP-RRM groups was 93.1% (81/87 teeth) and 94.4% (67/71 teeth), respectively (P > .05). Three significant outcome predictors were identified: quality of root filling (P MTA in clinical outcome when used as root-end filling materials in endodontic microsurgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  9. Seawater intrusion barrier and artificial recharge in the deltaic Llobregat aquifer (Barcelona, Spain); La barrera hidraulica contra la intrusion marina y la recarga artificial en el acuifero del Llobregat (Barcelona, Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno Gobern, F.; Ninerola Pla, J. M.; Armenter Ferrando, J. L.; Molinero Huguet, J.

    2009-07-01

    The main aquifer of the Llobregat Delta (Barcelona, Spain) is affected by seawater intrusion processes since 1970. The Catalan Water Agency is currently promoting several actions of enhanced aquifer recharge, including the construction of a positive hydraulic barrier in order to stop the advance of the seawater intrusion. Such a positive hydraulic barrier works by injecting reclaimed water in 14 wells. This is the first time that a project of this type is performed in Spain, and it is also pioneer in Europe. The positive hydraulic barrier produces the rise of the groundwater head near the coast and avoids seawater penetration inland. The injected reclaimed water comes from the WWTP of the Baix Llobregat after passing through several treatments (ultrafiltration, osmosis and disinfection). The pilot phase of the project has been working during the last 2 years, showing highly positive results. Substantial improvement of the groundwater quality has been observed in wells surrounding the injection points and no clogging has been appeared. The second phase of the project is currently under construction. (Author) 13 refs.

  10. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  11. Stability and mobility of Cu-vacancy clusters in Fe-Cu alloys: A computational study based on the use of artificial neural networks for energy barrier calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascuet, M. I.; Castin, N.; Becquart, C. S.; Malerba, L.

    2011-05-01

    An atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) method has been applied to study the stability and mobility of copper-vacancy clusters in Fe. This information, which cannot be obtained directly from experimental measurements, is needed to parameterise models describing the nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe alloys (e.g. model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels). The physical reliability of the AKMC method has been improved by employing artificial intelligence techniques for the regression of the activation energies required by the model as input. These energies are calculated allowing for the effects of local chemistry and relaxation, using an interatomic potential fitted to reproduce them as accurately as possible and the nudged-elastic-band method. The model validation was based on comparison with available ab initio calculations for verification of the used cohesive model, as well as with other models and theories.

  12. Screening therapeutics according to their uptake across the blood-brain barrier: A high throughput method based on immobilized artificial membrane liquid chromatography-diode-array-detection coupled to electrospray-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giacomo; Grumetto, Lucia; Szucs, Roman; Barbato, Francesco; Lynen, Frederic

    2018-02-07

    The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) plays an essential role in protecting the brain tissues against possible injurious substances. In the present work, 79 neutral, basic, acidic and amphoteric structurally unrelated analytes were considered and their chromatographic retention coefficients on immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase were determined employing a mass spectrometry (MS) -compatible buffer based on ammonium acetate. Their BBB passage predictive strength was evaluated and the statistical models based on IAM indexes and in silico physico-chemical descriptors showed solid statistics (r 2 (n-1) = 0.78). The predictive strength of the indexes achieved by the MS-compatible method was comparable to that achieved by employing the more "biomimetic" Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline, even if some differences in the elution order were observed. The method was transferred to the MS, employing a diode-array-detection coupled to an electrospray ionization source and a time-of-flight analyzer. This setup allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to eight analytes, yielding a remarkable acceleration of the analysis time. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Spanache Florin

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus a...

  14. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  15. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  16. Artificial Metalloenzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard

    Artificial metalloenzymes have emerged as a promising approach to merge the attractive properties of homogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis. The activity and selectivity, including enantioselectivity, of natural metalloenzymes are due to the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the

  17. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie......-containing sweeteners. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the effect of artificial sweeteners on body weight, appetite, and risk markers for diabetes and CVD in humans....

  18. Sealing ability of MTA, Super EBA, Vitremer and amalgam as root-end filling materials Capacidade de selamento de MTA, Super EBA, Vitremer e amálgama como materiais retrobturadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Luiz Pereira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Angelus, reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Super EBA, resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer and zinc-free amalgam (GS-80 (control. The root canals of eighty human lower molars were accessed, cleansed, shaped and obturated. Apexes were resected and cavities were prepared. Teeth were divided into 4 groups of 40 cavities, root-end filled with the materials, and immersed in methylene blue for 72 h at 37°C. Roots were then sectioned transversally at each millimeter and evaluated under magnification, observing the dye penetration in each section. Data were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5% level of significance, showing the differences among all materials (p Este estudo avaliou a capacidade de selamento do agregado trióxido mineral (MTA Angelus, de um cimento de óxido de zinco e eugenol reforçado (Super EBA, de um cimento de ionômero de vidro reforçado por resina (Vitremer e de um amálgama sem zinco (GS-80 (controle. Os canais radiculares de oitenta molares inferiores humanos foram acessados, limpos, modelados e obturados. Os ápices foram seccionados, e as cavidades, preparadas. Os dentes foram divididos em 4 grupos de 40 cavidades, retrobturados com os materiais e imersos em azul de metileno por 72 h a 37°C. As raízes foram então seccionadas transversalmente a cada milímetro e avaliadas sob aumento, observando-se a penetração de corante a cada corte. Os dados foram avaliados usando-se o teste de Kruskal-Wallis (5%, que mostrou diferenças entre todos os materiais (p < 0,001. A ordem crescente de infiltração marginal foi MTA < Vitremer < Super EBA < amálgama. Níveis mais altos de infiltração foram observados nos cortes de primeiro milímetro de amálgama, Vitremer e MTA, quando comparados com o terceiro milímetro (p < 0,05.

  19. Evaluation of pH and calcium ion release of a dual-cure bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate/mineral trioxide aggregate-based root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Giane da Silva; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Knabach, César Blaas; Oliz, Camila Mizette; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Zanchi, César Henrique; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho

    2013-12-01

    The incorporation of light-curable resins has been proposed for mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to improve its properties and reduce its setting time. The aim of the present study was to assess the pH and calcium ion release of an experimental bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate/MTA-based root-end filling material (E-MTA) in comparison with white MTA Angelus (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil) (W-MTA) and to evaluate the influence of the addition of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on these properties. Polyethylene tubes filled with the materials were immersed in deionized water for the measurement of pH (digital pH meter) and calcium release (atomic absorption spectrophotometry). The evaluations were performed at 3 and 24 hours and 7, 15, and 30 days. Data were measured using 2-way repeated measures of variance followed by the Holm-Sidak method (P MTA showed a significantly lower calcium ion release capacity when compared with W-MTA (P MTA + 5% CaCl2 was similar to W-MTA (P > .05). The monomer bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate added to MTA formed a material with a lower capacity of calcium release than W-MTA despite maintaining a similar pH. However, the addition of CaCl2 improved the calcium release of this material. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret-Galix, D.

    1992-01-01

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  1. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  2. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  3. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  4. Artificial intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract : Issue of this work is to acquaint the reader with the history of artificial inteligence, esspecialy branch of chess computing. Main attention is given to progress from fifties to the present. The work also deals with fighting chess programs against each other, and against human opponents. The greatest attention is focused on 1997 and duel Garry Kasparov against chess program Deep Blue. The work is divided into chapters according to chronological order.

  5. Artificial Wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Kirillov, A. A.; Savelova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that recently reported result by the OPERA Collaboration (arXive:1109.4897) of an early arrival time of muon neutrinos with respect to the speed of light in vacuum does not violate standard physical laws. We show that vacuum polarization effects in intensive external fields may form a wormhole-like object. The simplest theory of such an effect is presented and basic principles of formation of an artificial wormhole are also considered.

  6. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  7. Building barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, Kursad

    2017-10-02

    Formation of tissue barriers starts in early development where it is critical for normal cell fate selection, differentiation and organogenesis. Barrier maintenance is critical to the ongoing function of organs during adulthood and aging. Dysfunctional tissue barrier formation and function at any stage of the organismal life cycle underlies many disease states.

  8. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  9. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  10. The implantable artificial kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    The confluence of an increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), clinical trial data suggestive of benefit from quotidian dialysis, and ongoing cost/benefit reanalysis of healthcare spending have stimulated interest in technological improvements in provision of ESRD care. For the last decade, our group has focused on enabling technologies that would permit a paradigm shift in dialysis care similar to that brought by implantable defibrillators to arrhythmia management. Two significant barriers to wearable or implantable dialysis persist: package size of the dialyzer and water requirements for preparation of dialysate. Decades of independent research into highly efficient membranes and cell-based bioreactors culminated in a team effort to develop an implantable version of the University of Michigan Renal Assist Device. In this review, the rationale for the design of the implantable artificial kidney is described.

  11. Artificial rheotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes.

  12. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures to treat urine leakage and incontinence include: Anterior vaginal wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material ... urinary incontinence Images Inflatable artificial sphincter Anal sphincter anatomy Inflatable artificial sphincter - series References Adams MC, Joseph ...

  13. The impact of artificial intelligence on the world economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kuprevich, T. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the article the potential benefits and opportunities offered by AI in the world economy are considered. In the course of the research benefits and tendencies of artificial intelligence in the world economy were revealed, the main directions of development and barriers of artificial intelligence adoption are analyzed and revealed. Nowadays artificial intelligence (AI) is going mainstream, driven by machine learning, big data and cloud computing.

  14. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  15. Artificial Disc Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR) Patient Education Committee Jamie Baisden The disc ... Disc An artificial disc (also called a disc replacement, disc prosthesis or spine arthroplasty device) is a ...

  16. Trends in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the foundations of artificial intelligence as a science and the types of answers that may be given to the question, "What is intelligence?" The paradigms of artificial intelligence and general systems theory are compared. (Author/VT)

  17. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  18. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  19. Use of a matrix for apexification procedure with mineral trioxide aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatavkar, Roheet A; Hegde, Vivek S

    2010-01-01

    This articles describes a technique for placement of a matrix barrier prior to use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an artificial root-end barrier. The technique also demonstrates the use of a delivery system utilizing large-bore needles for the predictable and precise placement of the barrier materials at the apex of the tooth. PMID:20582221

  20. artificial neural network (ann)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-08-18

    Aug 18, 2004 ... forecasting models and artificial intelligence techniques and have become one of the major research fields (Kher and Joshin, 2003). (a) Artificial Neural Network and Electrical Load. Prediction. Neural network analysis is an Artificial Intelligence. (AI) approach to mathematical modeling. Neural. Networks ...

  1. Synthetic Biology: A Bridge between Artificial and Natural Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunfeng; Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial cells are simple cell-like entities that possess certain properties of natural cells. In general, artificial cells are constructed using three parts: (1) biological membranes that serve as protective barriers, while allowing communication between the cells and the environment; (2) transcription and translation machinery that synthesize proteins based on genetic sequences; and (3) genetic modules that control the dynamics of the whole cell. Artificial cells are minimal and well-defined systems that can be more easily engineered and controlled when compared to natural cells. Artificial cells can be used as biomimetic systems to study and understand natural dynamics of cells with minimal interference from cellular complexity. However, there remain significant gaps between artificial and natural cells. How much information can we encode into artificial cells? What is the minimal number of factors that are necessary to achieve robust functioning of artificial cells? Can artificial cells communicate with their environments efficiently? Can artificial cells replicate, divide or even evolve? Here, we review synthetic biological methods that could shrink the gaps between artificial and natural cells. The closure of these gaps will lead to advancement in synthetic biology, cellular biology and biomedical applications. PMID:25532531

  2. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  3. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    OpenAIRE

    Berrar, Daniel; Sato, Naoyuki; Schuster, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervou...

  4. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  5. An artificial muscle computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  6. Use of electrical barriers to deter movement of round goby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Jude, David J.; Kostich, Melissa J.; Coutant, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    An electrical barrier was chosen as a possible means to deter movement of round goby Neogobius melanostomus. Feasibility studies in a 2.1-m donut-shaped tank determined the electrical parameters necessary to inhibit round goby from crossing the 1-m stretch of the benthic, electrical barrier. Increasing electrical pulse duration and voltage increased effectiveness of the barrier in deterring round goby movement through the barrier. Differences in activity of round goby during daytime and nocturnal tests did not change the effectiveness of the barrier. In field verification studies, an electrical barrier was placed between two blocking nets in the Shiawassee River, Michigan. The barrier consisted of a 6-m wide canvas on which were laid four cables carrying the electrical current. Seven experiments were conducted, wherein 25 latex paint-marked round goby were introduced upstream of the electrical barrier and recovered 24 h later upstream, on, and downstream of the barrier. During control studies, round goby moved across the barrier within 20 min from release upstream. With the barrier on and using the prescribed electrical settings shown to inhibit passage in the laboratory, the only marked round goby found below the barrier were dead. At reduced pulse durations, a few round goby (mean one/test) were found alive, but debilitated, below the barrier. The electrical barrier could be incorporated as part of a program in reducing movement of adult round goby through artificial connections between watersheds.

  7. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  8. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  9. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A N; Kambhampati, C; Monson, J R T; Drew, P J

    2004-09-01

    Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting.

  10. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  11. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Berrar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervous systems of biological organisms and systems biology with its longing to comprehend, holistically, the multitude of complex interactions in biological systems are two such fields. They target ideals artificial intelligence has dreamt about for a long time including the computer simulation of an entire biological brain or the creation of new life forms from manipulations of cellular and genetic information in the laboratory. The scope for artificial intelligence in neuroscience and systems biology is extremely wide. This article investigates the standing of artificial intelligence in relation to neuroscience and systems biology and provides an outlook at new and exciting challenges for artificial intelligence in these fields. These challenges include, but are not necessarily limited to, the ability to learn from other projects and to be inventive, to understand the potential and exploit novel computing paradigms and environments, to specify and adhere to stringent standards and robust statistical frameworks, to be integrative, and to embrace openness principles.

  12. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  13. Principles of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  14. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Summary Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiol...

  15. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of ...

  16. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  17. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  18. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines. (topical review)

  19. Artificial organ engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annesini, Maria Cristina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Artificial organs may be considered as small-scale process plants, in which heat, mass and momentum transfer operations and, possibly, chemical transformations are carried out. This book proposes a novel analysis of artificial organs based on the typical bottom-up approach used in process engineering. Starting from a description of the fundamental physico-chemical phenomena involved in the process, the whole system is rebuilt as an interconnected ensemble of elemental unit operations. Each artificial organ is presented with a short introduction provided by expert clinicians. Devices commonly used in clinical practice are reviewed and their performance is assessed and compared by using a mathematical model based approach. Whilst mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool for quantitative descriptions of clinical devices, models are kept simple to remain focused on the essential features of each process. Postgraduate students and researchers in the field of chemical and biomedical engineering will find that t...

  20. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  1. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  2. Artificial intelligence executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamsley, S.J.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1984-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a high technology field that can be used to provide problem solving diagnosis, guidance and for support resolution of problems. It is not a stand alone discipline, but can also be applied to develop data bases for retention of the expertise that is required for its own knowledge base. This provides a way to retain knowledge that otherwise may be lost. Artificial Intelligence Methodology can provide an automated construction management decision support system, thereby restoring the manager's emphasis to project management

  3. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Korb, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    As the power of Bayesian techniques has become more fully realized, the field of artificial intelligence has embraced Bayesian methodology and integrated it to the point where an introduction to Bayesian techniques is now a core course in many computer science programs. Unlike other books on the subject, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence keeps mathematical detail to a minimum and covers a broad range of topics. The authors integrate all of Bayesian net technology and learning Bayesian net technology and apply them both to knowledge engineering. They emphasize understanding and intuition but also provide the algorithms and technical background needed for applications. Software, exercises, and solutions are available on the authors' website.

  4. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  5. Barriers to sustainable consumption attenuated by foreign language use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Geipel (Janet); C. Hadjichristidis (Constantinos); A.K. Klesse (Anne Kathrin)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The adoption of certain innovative products, such as recycled water, artificial meat, and insect-based food, could help promote sustainability. However, the disgust these products elicit acts as a barrier to their consumption. Here, we show that describing such products in a

  6. Barriers to the universal application of the portograph for labour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between the alert and action lines; use of the alert and action line in a tertiary centre; the time for artificial rupture of fetal membrane and the time for commencement of oxytocin augmentation to correct slow labour. These debates which constitute the barriers are all unnecessary because the facts which should guide opinion ...

  7. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  8. Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Generality in Artificial Intelligence. John McCarthy. Classics Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 283-296. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/03/0283-0296. Author Affiliations.

  9. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  10. Artificial Intelligence and CALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, John H.

    The potential application of artificial intelligence (AI) to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is explored. Two areas of AI that hold particular interest to those who deal with language meaning--knowledge representation and expert systems, and natural-language processing--are described and examples of each are presented. AI contribution…

  11. Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Generality in Artificial Intelligence. John McCarthy. Classics Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 283-296. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/03/0283-0296. Author Affiliations.

  12. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  13. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk...

  14. Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmanová, Leona

    2016-01-01

    Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion This diploma thesis deals with the issue of artificial abortion, especially its criminal aspects. Legal aspects are not the most important aspects of artificial abortion. Social, ethical or ideological aspects are of the same importance but this diploma thesis cannot analyse all of them. The main issue with artificial abortion is whether it is possible to force a pregnant woman to carry a child and give birth to a child when she cannot or does not want ...

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Ioana

    1987-01-01

    Compares artificial intelligence and information retrieval paradigms for natural language understanding, reviews progress to date, and outlines the applicability of artificial intelligence to question answering systems. A list of principal artificial intelligence software for database front end systems is appended. (CLB)

  16. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    barrier integrity, factors influencing the penetration of the skin, influence of wet work, and guidance for prevention and saving the barrier. Distinguished researchers have contributed to this book, providing a comprehensive and thorough overview of the skin barrier function. Researchers in the field...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  17. Safety- barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2008-01-01

    trees and Bayesian networks is discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management.......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called 'bow-tie' diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation of safety-barrier diagrams to other methods such as fault...

  18. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian network...... analysis with operational safety management.......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk...

  19. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction....... It reviews calibration procedures, outlines the computational algorithms, and summarizes examplary applications. Four different platforms for BD and DPD simulations are presented that differ in their focus, features, and complexity....

  20. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  1. Artificial structures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Flandern, T.

    2002-05-01

    Approximately 70,000 images of the surface of Mars at a resolution of up to 1.4 meters per pixel, taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, are now in public archives. Approximately 1% of those images show features that can be broadly described as `special shapes', `tracks, trails, and possible vegetation', `spots, stripes, and tubes', `artistic imagery', and `patterns and symbols'. Rather than optical illusions and tricks of light and shadow, most of these have the character that, if photographed on Earth, no one would doubt that they were the products of large biology and intelligence. In a few cases, relationships, context, and fulfillment of a priori predictions provide objective evidence of artificiality that is exempt from the influence of experimenter biases. Only controlled test results can be trusted because biases are strong and operate both for and against artificiality.

  2. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  3. Intelligence in Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Shoumen Palit Austin

    2016-01-01

    The elusive quest for intelligence in artificial intelligence prompts us to consider that instituting human-level intelligence in systems may be (still) in the realm of utopia. In about a quarter century, we have witnessed the winter of AI (1990) being transformed and transported to the zenith of tabloid fodder about AI (2015). The discussion at hand is about the elements that constitute the canonical idea of intelligence. The delivery of intelligence as a pay-per-use-service, popping out of ...

  4. Intelligence, Artificial and Otherwise

    OpenAIRE

    Chace, William M.

    1984-01-01

    I rise now to speak with the assumption that all of you know very well what I am going to say. I am the humanist here, the professor of English. We humanists, when asked to speak on questions of science and technology, are notorious for offering an embarrassed and ignorant respect toward those matters, a respect, however, which can all too quickly degenerate into insolent condescension. Face to face with the reality of computer technology, say, or with "artificial intelligence," we humanists ...

  5. Impacts of Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Trappl, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book, which is intended to serve as the first stage in an iterative process of detecting, predicting, and assessing the impacts of Artificial Intelligence opens with a short "one-hour course" in AI, which is intended to provide a nontechnical informative introduction to the material which follows. Next comes an overview chapter which is based on an extensive literature search, the position papers, and discussions. The next section of the book contains position papers whose richness...

  6. Ethical Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Hibbard, Bill

    2014-01-01

    This book-length article combines several peer reviewed papers and new material to analyze the issues of ethical artificial intelligence (AI). The behavior of future AI systems can be described by mathematical equations, which are adapted to analyze possible unintended AI behaviors and ways that AI designs can avoid them. This article makes the case for utility-maximizing agents and for avoiding infinite sets in agent definitions. It shows how to avoid agent self-delusion using model-based ut...

  7. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  8. Modeling artificial leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Raucci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient artificial leaves relies on the subtle combination of the electronic structure of molecular assemblies able to absorbing sunlight, converting light energy into electrochemical potential energy and finally transducing it into chemical accessible energy. The electronical design of these charge transfer molecular machine is crucial to build up a complex supramolecular architecture for the light energy conversion. The theoretical computational approach represent...

  9. Artificial perception and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John; Johnson, John L.

    2000-06-01

    Perception has both unconscious and conscious aspects. In all cases, however, what we perceive is a model of reality. By brain construction through evolution, we divide the world into two parts--our body and the outside world. But the process is the same in both cases. We perceive a construct usually governed by sensed data but always involving memory, goals, fears, expectations, etc. As a first step toward Artificial Perception in man-made systems, we examine perception in general here.

  10. Artificial sweetener; Jinko kanmiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The patents related to the artificial sweetener that it is introduced to the public in 3 years from 1996 until 1998 are 115 cases. The sugar quality which makes an oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol the subject is greatly over 28 cases of the non-sugar quality in the one by the kind as a general tendency of these patents at 73 cases in such cases as the Aspartame. The method of manufacture patent, which included new material around other peptides, the oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol isn`t inferior to 56 cases of the formation thing patent at 43 cases, and pays attention to the thing, which is many by the method of manufacture, formation. There is most improvement of the quality of sweetness with 31 cases in badness of the aftertaste which is characteristic of the artificial sweetener and so on, and much stability including the improvement in the flavor of food by the artificial sweetener, a long time and dissolution, fluid nature and productivity and improvement of the economy such as a cost are seen with effect on a purpose. (NEDO)

  11. Dentin penetrability evaluation of three different dyes in root-end cavities filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Avaliação da penetração dentinária de três diferentes corantes em retrocavidades obturadas com agregado trióxido mineral (MTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Farias Vogt

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of three dyes in MTA root-end fillings. In 30 single-rooted teeth, cavities for retrofilling were prepared with an ultrasound appliance and filled with MTA. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups (n = 10 and immersed in the following solutions: 2% methylene blue (MET, 50% silver nitrate (NIT and 0.2% rhodamine B (ROD. Two transversal slices (1 mm of the retrofilling region were obtained and evaluated using the Image Tool 3.0 software to obtain a quantitative evaluation (in mm² of the dye penetration around the retrofillings. Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Student’s t-test. The lowest degree of dye penetration was observed for the NIT group, in both slices (p A proposta deste trabalho foi avaliar a penetração de três corantes em retrocavidades obturadas com MTA. As retrocavidades foram confeccionadas com aparelho de ultra-som em 30 dentes unirradiculares e obturadas com MTA. Os espécimes foram divididos aleatoriamente em três grupos (n = 10 e imersos nas seguintes soluções corantes: azul de metileno a 2% (MET, nitrato de prata a 50% (NIT e rodamina B a 0,2% (ROD. Duas fatias transversais (1 mm da região retrobturada foram obtidas e avaliadas através do software Image Tool 3.0, objetivando quantificar a área (em mm² de penetração do corante ao redor das retrobturações. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, utilizando o teste t de Student. A menor área de penetração foi observada no grupo NIT, nas duas fatias (p < 0.05. A penetração de corante foi significativamente maior no grupo ROD quando comparado ao grupo NIT, nas duas fatias (p < 0.05, e ao grupo MET, somente na fatia 1 (p < 0.05. Dentro das limitações desta pesquisa, concluiu-se que a escolha da solução corante pode influenciar a avaliação da penetração em estudos sobre retrobturações e que o grupo NIT teve a menor capacidade de penetração na dentina

  12. Multilayer moisture barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  13. Thermal barriers for compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Cory J.; Lustbader, Jason A.

    2017-10-17

    An aspect of the present disclosure is a thermal barrier that includes a core layer having a first surface, a second surface, and a first edge, and a first outer layer that includes a third surface and a second edge, where the third surface substantially contacts the first surface, the core layer is configured to minimize conductive heat transfer through the barrier, and the first outer layer is configured to maximize reflection of light away from the barrier.

  14. Challenges facing the distribution of an artificial-intelligence-based system for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S

    1985-04-01

    The marketing and successful distribution of artificial-intelligence-based decision-support systems for nursing face special barriers and challenges. Issues that must be confronted arise particularly from the present culture of the nursing profession as well as the typical organizational structures in which nurses predominantly work. Generalizations in the literature based on the limited experience of physician-oriented artificial intelligence applications (predominantly in diagnosis and pharmacologic treatment) must be modified for applicability to other health professions.

  15. Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    demonstration that the conversion efficiency of CO2 to formic acid in a photo reduction reactor combining a photosensitizer and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was...We believe that this contribution is theoretically and practically relevant because the artificial photosynthetic system developed has potential...based on the artificial photosynthesis, “artificial leaf” are proposed as for an example illustrated in Scheme 1: 1) CO2 reduction to chemical

  16. Tunnel barrier schottky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Rongming; Cao, Yu; Li, Zijian; Williams, Adam J.

    2018-02-20

    A diode includes: a semiconductor substrate; a cathode metal layer contacting a bottom of the substrate; a semiconductor drift layer on the substrate; a graded aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor barrier layer on the drift layer and having a larger bandgap than the drift layer, the barrier layer having a top surface and a bottom surface between the drift layer and the top surface, the barrier layer having an increasing aluminum composition from the bottom surface to the top surface; and an anode metal layer directly contacting the top surface of the barrier layer.

  17. Artificial Intelligence for the Artificial Kidney: Pointers to the Future of a Personalized Hemodialysis Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Miguel; Vellido, Alfredo; Montero, Nuria; Barbieri, Carlo; Ramos, Rosa; Angoso, Manuel; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Jonsson, Anders

    2018-02-01

    Current dialysis devices are not able to react when unexpected changes occur during dialysis treatment or to learn about experience for therapy personalization. Furthermore, great efforts are dedicated to develop miniaturized artificial kidneys to achieve a continuous and personalized dialysis therapy, in order to improve the patient's quality of life. These innovative dialysis devices will require a real-time monitoring of equipment alarms, dialysis parameters, and patient-related data to ensure patient safety and to allow instantaneous changes of the dialysis prescription for the assessment of their adequacy. The analysis and evaluation of the resulting large-scale data sets enters the realm of "big data" and will require real-time predictive models. These may come from the fields of machine learning and computational intelligence, both included in artificial intelligence, a branch of engineering involved with the creation of devices that simulate intelligent behavior. The incorporation of artificial intelligence should provide a fully new approach to data analysis, enabling future advances in personalized dialysis therapies. With the purpose to learn about the present and potential future impact on medicine from experts in artificial intelligence and machine learning, a scientific meeting was organized in the Hospital Universitari Bellvitge (L'Hospitalet, Barcelona). As an outcome of that meeting, the aim of this review is to investigate artificial intel ligence experiences on dialysis, with a focus on potential barriers, challenges, and prospects for future applications of these technologies. Artificial intelligence research on dialysis is still in an early stage, and the main challenge relies on interpretability and/or comprehensibility of data models when applied to decision making. Artificial neural networks and medical decision support systems have been used to make predictions about anemia, total body water, or intradialysis hypotension and are promising

  18. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems.

  19. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  20. Uncertainty in artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Kanal, LN

    1986-01-01

    How to deal with uncertainty is a subject of much controversy in Artificial Intelligence. This volume brings together a wide range of perspectives on uncertainty, many of the contributors being the principal proponents in the controversy.Some of the notable issues which emerge from these papers revolve around an interval-based calculus of uncertainty, the Dempster-Shafer Theory, and probability as the best numeric model for uncertainty. There remain strong dissenting opinions not only about probability but even about the utility of any numeric method in this context.

  1. The artificial bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrandchamps, F; Griffith, D P

    1999-04-01

    An artificial bladder should provide adequate urine storage, allow volitional complete evacuation of urine and preserve renal function. Moreover, its structure has to be biocompatible, resistant to urinary encrustation and tolerant to bacterial infection. Various solutions have been proposed over the years to achieve these multiple requirements. However, most of these solutions and their corresponding prototypes did not advance beyond the stage of a preliminary report of experimental data. This review will bring out the 'proof of principal' in alloplastic prosthetic bladder, including type of alloplast and design concept and the recent development in tissue engineering approaches.

  2. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Korb, Kevin B

    2010-01-01

    Updated and expanded, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence, Second Edition provides a practical and accessible introduction to the main concepts, foundation, and applications of Bayesian networks. It focuses on both the causal discovery of networks and Bayesian inference procedures. Adopting a causal interpretation of Bayesian networks, the authors discuss the use of Bayesian networks for causal modeling. They also draw on their own applied research to illustrate various applications of the technology.New to the Second EditionNew chapter on Bayesian network classifiersNew section on object-oriente

  3. Mechanism of artificial heart

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  4. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...

  5. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishti Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence (AI provides machines with the ability to learn and respond the way humans do and is also referred to as machine learning. The step to building an AI system is to provide the data to learn from so that it can map relations between inputs and outputs and set up parameters such as “weights”/decision boundaries to predict responses for inputs in the future. Then, the model is tested on a second data set. This article outlines the promise this analytic approach has in medicine and cardiology.

  6. Artificial Intelligence and Economic Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Marwala, Tshilidzi; Hurwitz, Evan

    2017-01-01

    The advent of artificial intelligence has changed many disciplines such as engineering, social science and economics. Artificial intelligence is a computational technique which is inspired by natural intelligence such as the swarming of birds, the working of the brain and the pathfinding of the ants. These techniques have impact on economic theories. This book studies the impact of artificial intelligence on economic theories, a subject that has not been extensively studied. The theories that...

  7. Artificial Intelligence in Space Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    computer algorithms, there still appears to be a need for Artificial Inteligence techniques in the navigation area. The reason is that navigaion, in...RD-RI32 679 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPACE PLRTFORNSMU AIR FORCE 1/𔃼 INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PRTTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING M A WRIGHT DEC 94...i4 Preface The purpose of this study was to analyze the feasibility of implementing Artificial Intelligence techniques to increase autonomy for

  8. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  9. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  10. Artificial Blood for Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kana; Yokomaku, Kyoko; Kureishi, Moeka; Akiyama, Motofusa; Kihira, Kiyohito; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2016-11-10

    There is no blood bank for pet animals. Consequently, veterinarians themselves must obtain "blood" for transfusion therapy. Among the blood components, serum albumin and red blood cells (RBCs) are particularly important to save lives. This paper reports the synthesis, structure, and properties of artificial blood for the exclusive use of dogs. First, recombinant canine serum albumin (rCSA) was produced using genetic engineering with Pichia yeast. The proteins showed identical features to those of the native CSA derived from canine plasma. Furthermore, we ascertained the crystal structure of rCSA at 3.2 Å resolution. Pure rCSA can be used widely for numerous clinical and pharmaceutical applications. Second, hemoglobin wrapped covalently with rCSA, hemoglobin-albumin cluster (Hb-rCSA 3 ), was synthesized as an artificial O 2 -carrier for the RBC substitute. This cluster possesses satisfactorily negative surface net charge (pI = 4.7), which supports enfolding of the Hb core by rCSA shells. The anti-CSA antibody recognized the rCSA exterior quantitatively. The O 2 -binding affinity was high (P 50  = 9 Torr) compared to that of the native Hb. The Hb-rCSA 3 cluster is anticipated for use as an alternative material for RBC transfusion, and as an O 2 therapeutic reagent that can be exploited in various veterinary medicine situations.

  11. Transforming Education: Overcoming Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jane L.; Goren, Paul D.

    Barriers to progress in educational reform exist inside and outside the education system. Some arise where new practices encounter traditional expectations and boundaries, but others go much deeper than education, such as poverty, racism, local political conflicts, and human resistance to change. The following five categories of barriers are…

  12. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  13. Generative Artificial Intelligence : Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zant, Tijn; Kouw, Matthijs; Schomaker, Lambertus; Mueller, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    The closed systems of contemporary Artificial Intelligence do not seem to lead to intelligent machines in the near future. What is needed are open-ended systems with non-linear properties in order to create interesting properties for the scaffolding of an artificial mind. Using post-structuralistic

  14. Artificial organs: recent progress in artificial hearing and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifukube, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    Artificial sensory organs are a prosthetic means of sending visual or auditory information to the brain by electrical stimulation of the optic or auditory nerves to assist visually impaired or hearing-impaired people. However, clinical application of artificial sensory organs, except for cochlear implants, is still a trial-and-error process. This is because how and where the information transmitted to the brain is processed is still unknown, and also because changes in brain function (plasticity) remain unknown, even though brain plasticity plays an important role in meaningful interpretation of new sensory stimuli. This article discusses some basic unresolved issues and potential solutions in the development of artificial sensory organs such as cochlear implants, brainstem implants, artificial vision, and artificial retinas.

  15. Artificial Intelligence and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapshak, Paul

    2018-01-01

    From the start, Kurt Godel observed that computer and brain paradigms were considered on a par by researchers and that researchers had misunderstood his theorems. He hailed with displeasure that the brain transcends computers. In this brief article, we point out that Artificial Intelligence (AI) comprises multitudes of human-made methodologies, systems, and languages, and implemented with computer technology. These advances enhance development in the electron and quantum realms. In the biological realm, animal neurons function, also utilizing electron flow, and are products of evolution. Mirror neurons are an important paradigm in neuroscience research. Moreover, the paradigm shift proposed here - 'hall of mirror neurons' - is a potentially further productive research tactic. These concepts further expand AI and brain research.

  16. Artificial Diets for Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina K. Gonzales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for more than a million human deaths every year. Modern mosquito control strategies such as sterile insect technique (SIT, release of insects carrying a dominant lethal (RIDL, population replacement strategies (PR, and Wolbachia-based strategies require the rearing of large numbers of mosquitoes in culture for continuous release over an extended period of time. Anautogenous mosquitoes require essential nutrients for egg production, which they obtain through the acquisition and digestion of a protein-rich blood meal. Therefore, mosquito mass production in laboratories and other facilities relies on vertebrate blood from live animal hosts. However, vertebrate blood is expensive to acquire and hard to store for longer times especially under field conditions. This review discusses older and recent studies that were aimed at the development of artificial diets for mosquitoes in order to replace vertebrate blood.

  17. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  18. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  19. A programmable artificial retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.M.; Zavidovique, B.Y.; Devos, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm 2 CMOS 2-μm circuit are presented

  20. Artificial resuspension studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.M.; Marchall, K.B.; Thomas, K.A.; Tracy, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial resuspension studies on a range of Taranaki and other major trial site soils were performed by use of a mechanical dust-raising apparatus. A cascade impactor was used to analyse airborne dust in terms of mass and 241 Am activities for particle sizes less than 7 μm. Plutonium and americium activities were found to be enhanced in the respirable fraction. Reported enhancement factors (defined as the ratio of activity concentration of the respirable fraction to that of the total soil) ranged from 3.7 to 32.5 for Taranaki soils with an average value of 6 appearing reasonable for general application in outer (plume) areas. Values close to unity were measured at major trial sites , One Tree and Tadje. Results of some experiments where uncontamined dust was raised by activities such as walking and driving over dusty ground are also presented. 7 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs

  1. Vehicle barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper

  2. In Pursuit of Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watstein, Sarah; Kesselman, Martin

    1986-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence and reviews current research in natural language processing, expert systems, and robotics and sensory systems. Discussion covers current commercial applications of artificial intelligence and projections of uses and limitations in library technical and public services, e.g., in cataloging and online information and…

  3. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  4. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (UHMWPE) has been choice of orthopaedic bearing material in total joint replacement surgery since 1962, but wear of UHMWPE remains major problem facing the long term success and survival of the artificial joint. One of the main reasons of failure of the artificial joint fixation into the host bone is cellular reaction against ...

  5. Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lone Brinkmann; Vasilaras, Tatjana H; Astrup, Arne

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of appetite studies in free-living subjects supplying the habitual diet with either sucrose or artificially sweetened beverages and foods. Furthermore, the focus of artificial sweeteners has only been on the energy intake (EI) side of the energy-balance equation. The data are from...

  6. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  7. Instructional Applications of Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halff, Henry M.

    1986-01-01

    Surveys artificial intelligence and the development of computer-based tutors and speculates on the future of artificial intelligence in education. Includes discussion of the definitions of knowledge, expert systems (computer systems that solve tough technical problems), intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), and specific ITSs such as GUIDON, MYCIN,…

  8. Artificial neural network for violation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Polet, P.; Vanderhaegen, F.; Millot, P.

    2004-01-01

    Barrier removal (BR) is a safety-related violation, and it can be analyzed in terms of benefits, costs, and potential deficits. In order to allow designers to integrate BR into the risk analysis during the initial design phase or during re-design work, we propose a connectionist method integrating self-organizing maps (SOM). The basic SOM is an artificial neural network that, on the basis of the information contained in a multi-dimensional space, generates a space of lesser dimensions. Three algorithms--Unsupervised SOM, Supervised SOM, and Hierarchical SOM--have been developed to permit BR classification and prediction in terms of the different criteria. The proposed method can be used, on the one hand, to foresee/predict the possibility level of a new/changed barrier (prospective analysis), and on the other hand, to synthetically regroup/rearrange the BR of a given human-machine system (retrospective analysis). We applied this method to the BR analysis of an experimental railway simulator, and our preliminary results are presented here

  9. Beyond AI: Artificial Dreams Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Zackova, Eva; Kelemen, Jozef; Beyond Artificial Intelligence : The Disappearing Human-Machine Divide

    2015-01-01

    This book is an edited collection of chapters based on the papers presented at the conference “Beyond AI: Artificial Dreams” held in Pilsen in November 2012. The aim of the conference was to question deep-rooted ideas of artificial intelligence and cast critical reflection on methods standing at its foundations.  Artificial Dreams epitomize our controversial quest for non-biological intelligence, and therefore the contributors of this book tried to fully exploit such a controversy in their respective chapters, which resulted in an interdisciplinary dialogue between experts from engineering, natural sciences and humanities.   While pursuing the Artificial Dreams, it has become clear that it is still more and more difficult to draw a clear divide between human and machine. And therefore this book tries to portrait such an image of what lies beyond artificial intelligence: we can see the disappearing human-machine divide, a very important phenomenon of nowadays technological society, the phenomenon which i...

  10. Soft computing in artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Matson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the concept of artificial intelligence based on knowledge-based algorithms. Given the current hardware and software technologies and artificial intelligence theories, we can think of how efficient to provide a solution, how best to implement a model and how successful to achieve it. This edition provides readers with the most recent progress and novel solutions in artificial intelligence. This book aims at presenting the research results and solutions of applications in relevance with artificial intelligence technologies. We propose to researchers and practitioners some methods to advance the intelligent systems and apply artificial intelligence to specific or general purpose. This book consists of 13 contributions that feature fuzzy (r, s)-minimal pre- and β-open sets, handling big coocurrence matrices, Xie-Beni-type fuzzy cluster validation, fuzzy c-regression models, combination of genetic algorithm and ant colony optimization, building expert system, fuzzy logic and neural network, ind...

  11. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  12. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  13. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither...... singular points nor closed orbits. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with dynamical systems with multiple singular elements. Hereafter, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorems and highlight the differences between our results and previous work by a number...

  14. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  15. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  16. Protective barrier development: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, N.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    Protective barrier and warning marker systems are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth's surface at the Hanford Site. The barrier is designed to function in an arid to semiarid climate, to limit infiltration and percolation of water through the waste zone to near-zero, to be maintenance free, and to last up to 10,000 yr. Natural materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, clay, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity and to create an integrated structure with redundant features. These materials isolate wastes by limiting water drainage; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling emission of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion. Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory efforts to assess the performance of various barrier and marker designs will be discussed

  17. Ultralow power artificial synapses using nanotextured magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael L.; Donnelly, Christine A.; Russek, Stephen E.; Baek, Burm; Pufall, Matthew R.; Hopkins, Peter F.; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.; Rippard, William H.

    2018-01-01

    Neuromorphic computing promises to markedly improve the efficiency of certain computational tasks, such as perception and decision-making. Although software and specialized hardware implementations of neural networks have made tremendous accomplishments, both implementations are still many orders of magnitude less energy efficient than the human brain. We demonstrate a new form of artificial synapse based on dynamically reconfigurable superconducting Josephson junctions with magnetic nanoclusters in the barrier. The spiking energy per pulse varies with the magnetic configuration, but in our demonstration devices, the spiking energy is always less than 1 aJ. This compares very favorably with the roughly 10 fJ per synaptic event in the human brain. Each artificial synapse is composed of a Si barrier containing Mn nanoclusters with superconducting Nb electrodes. The critical current of each synapse junction, which is analogous to the synaptic weight, can be tuned using input voltage spikes that change the spin alignment of Mn nanoclusters. We demonstrate synaptic weight training with electrical pulses as small as 3 aJ. Further, the Josephson plasma frequencies of the devices, which determine the dynamical time scales, all exceed 100 GHz. These new artificial synapses provide a significant step toward a neuromorphic platform that is faster, more energy-efficient, and thus can attain far greater complexity than has been demonstrated with other technologies. PMID:29387787

  18. Economic Valuation and Optimisation of River Barrier Mitigation Actions

    OpenAIRE

    King, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as dams, weirs and culverts, disrupt the longitudinal connectivity of rivers, causing adverse impacts on fish and other species. This compromises the ability of river ecosystems to provide a range of services that contribute to human well-being. Improving fish passage at artificial barriers is an economic river restoration policy option that can improve the delivery of river ecosystem services provision. Whilst a number of methodologies exist to cost-effectively prioritiz...

  19. The artificial leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  20. natural or artificial diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Meyer-Willerer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se probaron alimentos artificiales y naturales con larva de camarón (Litopenaeus vannamei cultivados en diferentes recipientes. Estos fueron ocho frascos cónicos con 15L, ocho acuarios con 50L y como grupo control, seis tanques de fibra de vidrio con 1500L; todos con agua marina fresca y filtrada. La densidad inicial en todos los recipientes fue de 70 nauplios/L. Aquellos en frascos y acuarios recibieron ya sea dieta natural o artificial. El grupo control fue cultivado con dieta natural en los tanques grandes que utilizan los laboratorios para la producción masiva de postlarvas. El principal producto de excreción de larva de camarón es el ión amonio, que es tóxico cuando está presente en concentraciones elevadas. Se determinó diariamente con el método colorimétrico del indofenol. Los resultados muestran diferencias en la concentración del ión amonio y en la sobrevivencia de larvas entre las diferentes dietas y también entre los diferentes recipientes. En aquellos con volúmenes pequeños comparados con los grandes, se presentó mayor concentración de amonio (500 a 750µg/L, en aquellos con dietas naturales, debido a que este ión sirve de fertilizante a las algas adicionadas, necesitando efectuar recambios diarios de agua posteriores al noveno día de cultivo para mantener este ión a una concentración subletal. Se obtuvo una baja cosecha de postlarvas (menor a 15% con el alimento artificial larvario, debido a la presencia de protozoarios, alimentándose con el producto comercial precipitado en el fondo de los frascos o acuarios. Los acuarios con larvas alimentadas con dieta natural también mostraron concentraciones subletales de amonio al noveno día; sin embargo, la sobrevivencia fue cuatro veces mayor que con dietas artificiales. Los tanques control con dietas naturales presentaron tasas de sobrevivencia (70 ± 5% similares a la reportada por otros laboratorios.

  1. [The artificial heart. Current experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Deleuze, P

    1989-06-01

    Various assistance or replacement systems, usually including pneumatic pumps, are now used in human medicine to treat irreversible shocks. These systems are still very far from the ideal artificial heart, but they enable the ventricular work to be partially or totally achieved for a limited length of time, thus ensuring the patient's survival pending heart transplantation. The two systems most frequently used nowadays, i.e. orthotopic ventricular prosthesis or "internal artificial heart" and ventricular shunt or "external artificial heart" are described. The clinical experience available provides a first evaluation of the true performance of these systems.

  2. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2017-04-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a general term that implies the use of a computer to model intelligent behavior with minimal human intervention. AI is generally accepted as having started with the invention of robots. The term derives from the Czech word robota, meaning biosynthetic machines used as forced labor. In this field, Leonardo Da Vinci's lasting heritage is today's burgeoning use of robotic-assisted surgery, named after him, for complex urologic and gynecologic procedures. Da Vinci's sketchbooks of robots helped set the stage for this innovation. AI, described as the science and engineering of making intelligent machines, was officially born in 1956. The term is applicable to a broad range of items in medicine such as robotics, medical diagnosis, medical statistics, and human biology-up to and including today's "omics". AI in medicine, which is the focus of this review, has two main branches: virtual and physical. The virtual branch includes informatics approaches from deep learning information management to control of health management systems, including electronic health records, and active guidance of physicians in their treatment decisions. The physical branch is best represented by robots used to assist the elderly patient or the attending surgeon. Also embodied in this branch are targeted nanorobots, a unique new drug delivery system. The societal and ethical complexities of these applications require further reflection, proof of their medical utility, economic value, and development of interdisciplinary strategies for their wider application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Nanostructured artificial nacre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiyong; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Magonov, Sergei; Ozturk, Birol

    2003-06-01

    Finding a synthetic pathway to artificial analogs of nacre and bones represents a fundamental milestone in the development of composite materials. The ordered brick-and-mortar arrangement of organic and inorganic layers is believed to be the most essential strength- and toughness-determining structural feature of nacre. It has also been found that the ionic crosslinking of tightly folded macromolecules is equally important. Here, we demonstrate that both structural features can be reproduced by sequential deposition of polyelectrolytes and clays. This simple process results in a nanoscale version of nacre with alternating organic and inorganic layers. The macromolecular folding effect reveals itself in the unique saw-tooth pattern of differential stretching curves attributed to the gradual breakage of ionic crosslinks in polyelectrolyte chains. The tensile strength of the prepared multilayers approached that of nacre, whereas their ultimate Young modulus was similar to that of lamellar bones. Structural and functional resemblance makes clay- polyelectrolyte multilayers a close replica of natural biocomposites. Their nanoscale nature enables elucidation of molecular processes occurring under stress.

  4. BioArtificial polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szałata, Kamila; Gumi, Tania

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the polymer science has impact in practically all life areas. Countless benefits coming from the usage of materials with high mechanical and chemical resistance, variety of functionalities and potentiality of modification drive to the development of new application fields. Novel approaches of combining these synthetic substances with biomolecules lead to obtain multifunctional hybrid conjugates which merge the bioactivity of natural component with outstanding properties of artificial polymer. Over the decades, an immense progress in bioartificial composites domain allowed to reach a high level of knowledge in terms of natural-like systems engineering, leading to diverse strategies of biomolecule immobilization. Together with different available options, including covalent and noncovalent attachment, come various challenges, related mainly with maintaining the biological activity of fixed molecules. Even though the amount of applications that achieve commercial status is still not substantial, and is expanding continuously in the disciplines like "smart materials," biosensors, delivery systems, nanoreactors and many others. A huge number of remarkable developments reported in the literature present a potential of bioartificial conjugates as a fabrics with highly controllable structure and multiple functionalities, serving as a powerful nanotechnological tool. This novel approach brings closer biologists, chemists and engineers, who sharing their effort and complementing the knowledge can revolutionize the field of bioartificial polymer science.

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Harold O.; Burford, Anna Marie

    1990-01-01

    Delineates artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts; provides an exposition of some business application areas; relates progress; and creates an awareness of the benefits, limitations, and reservations of AI/ES. (Author)

  6. Artificial Intelligence in Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science, involved in the research, design, and application of intelligent computer. Traditional methods for modeling and optimizing complex structure systems require huge amounts of computing resources, and artificial-intelligence-based solutions can often provide valuable alternatives for efficiently solving problems in the civil engineering. This paper summarizes recently developed methods and theories in the developing direction for applications of artificial intelligence in civil engineering, including evolutionary computation, neural networks, fuzzy systems, expert system, reasoning, classification, and learning, as well as others like chaos theory, cuckoo search, firefly algorithm, knowledge-based engineering, and simulated annealing. The main research trends are also pointed out in the end. The paper provides an overview of the advances of artificial intelligence applied in civil engineering.

  7. What are artificial neural networks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb......Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  8. The handbook of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Avron

    1982-01-01

    The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence, Volume II focuses on the improvements in artificial intelligence (AI) and its increasing applications, including programming languages, intelligent CAI systems, and the employment of AI in medicine, science, and education. The book first elaborates on programming languages for AI research and applications-oriented AI research. Discussions cover scientific applications, teiresias, applications in chemistry, dependencies and assumptions, AI programming-language features, and LISP. The manuscript then examines applications-oriented AI research in medicine

  9. Artificial Intelligence in Civil Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Pengzhen; Chen, Shengyong; Zheng, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science, involved in the research, design, and application of intelligent computer. Traditional methods for modeling and optimizing complex structure systems require huge amounts of computing resources, and artificial-intelligence-based solutions can often provide valuable alternatives for efficiently solving problems in the civil engineering. This paper summarizes recently developed methods and theories in the developing direction for applicati...

  10. Medical applications of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Agah, Arvin

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced, more reliable, and better understood than in the past, artificial intelligence (AI) systems can make providing healthcare more accurate, affordable, accessible, consistent, and efficient. However, AI technologies have not been as well integrated into medicine as predicted. In order to succeed, medical and computational scientists must develop hybrid systems that can effectively and efficiently integrate the experience of medical care professionals with capabilities of AI systems. After providing a general overview of artificial intelligence concepts, tools, and techniques, Medical Ap

  11. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  13. Health Barriers to Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delaney Gracy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the results from a 2013 online survey with 408 principals and assistant principals in New York City public elementary and middle schools. The survey assessed three primary areas: health issues in the school, health issues perceived as barriers to learning for affected students, and resources needed to address these barriers. Eighteen of the 22 health conditions listed in the survey were considered a moderate or serious issue within their schools by at least 10% of respondents. All 22 of the health issues were perceived as a barrier to learning by between 12% and 87% of the respondents. Representatives from schools that serve a higher percentage of low-income students reported significantly higher levels of concern about the extent of health issues and their impact on learning. Respondents most often said they need linkages with organizations that can provide additional services and resources at the school, especially for mental health.

  14. Crossing the Salt Barrier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fry. RIVER. To cross the salt barrier is, therefore, an obligatory part of every amphihaline fish cycle. Figure 2a. Life Cycle of. Salmon. Adult salmon migrate from sea towards the river. After reaching their hatching ground, the eggs are laid in the gravel. The spawned fishes are called kelts. Alevin is a stage from hatching to fry.

  15. Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  16. Sound trapping and dredging barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Yu, Wuzhou; Jiang, Zaixiu; Mao, Dongxing

    2017-06-01

    When sound barriers are installed on both sides of a noise source, degradation in performance is observed. Barriers having negative-phase-gradient surfaces successfully eliminate this drawback by trapping sound energy in between the barriers. In contrast, barriers can also be designed to "dredge" the energy flux out. An extended model considering higher-order diffractions, which resulted from the interplay of the induced surface wave and barrier surface periodicity, is presented. It is found that the sound dredging barriers provide a remarkable enhancement over the trapping ones, and hence have the potential to be widely used in noise control engineering.

  17. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  18. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  19. Artificial sweeteners: safe or unsafe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurrat-ul-Ain; Khan, Sohaib Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Artificial sweeteners or intense sweeteners are sugar substitutes that are used as an alternative to table sugar. They are many times sweeter than natural sugar and as they contain no calories, they may be used to control weight and obesity. Extensive scientific research has demonstrated the safety of the six low-calorie sweeteners currently approved for use in foods in the U.S. and Europe (stevia, acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose), if taken in acceptable quantities daily. There is some ongoing debate over whether artificial sweetener usage poses a health threat .This review article aims to cover thehealth benefits, and risks, of consuming artificial sweeteners, and discusses natural sweeteners which can be used as alternatives.

  20. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  1. The effect of tides and storms on the sediment transport across a Dutch barrier island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselman, D.A.; de Winter, R.C.; Engelstad, A.C.; McCall, Robert; van Dongeren, Ap; Hoekstra, P.; Oost, Albert; van der Vegt, M.

    2017-01-01

    Under natural conditions, barrier islands might grow vertically and migrate onshore under the influence of long-term sea level rise. Sediment is transported onshore during storm-induced overwash and inundation. However, on many Dutch Wadden Islands, dune openings are closed off by artificial

  2. Fecundación artificial

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa., Fidel

    2013-01-01

    Por Fecundación artificial se entiende, la fecundación de una hembra sin el servicio directo del macho, es decir la introducción al aparato genital femenino, del esperma que se ha recogido por medios artificiales. Esta fecundación, practicada en debidas condiciones, tiene el mismo efecto de la fecundación natural, con las ventajas que veremos más adelante. La fecundación artificial permite explotar un reproductor a su máximum de capacidad, ya que se considera, para no hacer cálculo...

  3. The reality of artificial viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, L. G.

    2018-02-01

    Artificial viscosity is used in the computer simulation of high Reynolds number flows and is one of the oldest numerical artifices. In this paper, I will describe the origin and the interpretation of artificial viscosity as a physical phenomenon. The basis of this interpretation is the finite scale theory, which describes the evolution of integral averages of the fluid solution over finite (length) scales. I will outline the derivation of finite scale Navier-Stokes equations and highlight the particular properties of the equations that depend on the finite scales. Those properties include enslavement, inviscid dissipation, and a law concerning the partition of total flux of conserved quantities into advective and diffusive components.

  4. Artificial radioactivity in Lough Foyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.D.; Ryan, T.P.; Lyons, S.; Smith, V.; McGarry, A.; Mitchell, P.I.; Leon Vintro, L.; Larmour, R.A.; Ledgerwood, F.K.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which the marine environment of Lough Foyle, situated on the north coast of Ireland, has been affected by artificial radioactivity released from Sellafield. Although traces of plutonium, americium and radiocaesium from Sellafield are detectable in Lough Foyle, the concentrations in various marine media are significantly lower than those found along the NE coast of Ireland and in the western Irish Sea. The minute quantities of artificial radioactivity found in Lough Foyle are of negligible radiological significance

  5. Artificial Promoters for Metabolic Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    In this article, we review some of the expression systems that are available for Metabolic Control Analysis and Metabolic Engineering, and examine their advantages and disadvantages in different contexts. In a recent approach, artificial promoters for modulating gene expression in micro-organisms......In this article, we review some of the expression systems that are available for Metabolic Control Analysis and Metabolic Engineering, and examine their advantages and disadvantages in different contexts. In a recent approach, artificial promoters for modulating gene expression in micro...

  6. Artificial neural/chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2001-11-01

    What strikes the attention of a neural network designer is that the chemicals seem to work not so much on individual neural circuits as on neural cell assemblies. These are large blocks of neural networks that carry out high level tasks using their constituent networks as needed. It follows to us that we might seek ways of achieving that same sort of behavior in an artificial neural network. In what follows, we provide two examples of how that might be done in an artificial system.

  7. Artificial intelligence techniques in Prolog

    CERN Document Server

    Shoham, Yoav

    1993-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence Techniques in Prolog introduces the reader to the use of well-established algorithmic techniques in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), with Prolog as the implementation language. The techniques considered cover general areas such as search, rule-based systems, and truth maintenance, as well as constraint satisfaction and uncertainty management. Specific application domains such as temporal reasoning, machine learning, and natural language are also discussed.Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of Prolog, paying particular attention to Prol

  8. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  9. Performance of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, V.; Dean, P.V.; McLellan, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Engineered barriers, both vertical and horizontal, have been used to isolate hazardous wastes from contact, precipitation, surface water and groundwater. The primary objective of this study was to determine the performance of subsurface barriers installed throughout the U.S. over the past 20 years to contain hazardous wastes. Evaluation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C or equivalent caps was a secondary objective. A nationwide search was launched to select hazardous waste sites at which vertical barrier walls and/or caps had been used as the containment method. None of the sites selected had an engineered floor. From an initial list of 130 sites, 34 sites were selected on the basis of availability of monitoring data for detailed analysis of actual field performance. This paper will briefly discuss preliminary findings regarding the design, construction quality assurance/construction quality control (CQA/CQC), and monitoring at the 34 sites. In addition, the short-term performance of these sites (less than 5 years) is presented since very little long-term performance data was available

  10. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Artificial Neural Networks A Brief Introduction. Jitendra R Raol Sunilkumar S Mankame. General Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 47-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. CLASSICS Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    My 1971 Turing Award Lecture was entitled “Generality in Artificial Intelligence.” The topic turned out to have been overambitious in that I discovered I was unable to put my thoughts on the subject in a satisfactory written form at that time. It would have been better to have reviewed my previous work rather than attempt ...

  12. Artificial Intelligence and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence (AI) in relation to intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) and science education. Provides a brief background of AI work, examples of expert systems, examples of ICAI work, and addresses problems facing AI workers that have implications for science education. Proposes a revised model of the Karplus/Renner…

  13. Artificial Intelligence and Authority Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    Four artificial intelligence (AI) concepts that have relevance for information retrieval systems are discussed and applied to area of authority control in automated catalogs--pattern recognition, representation, problem solving, learning. Existing automated authority control systems are analyzed using two other AI concepts, augmentation and…

  14. Artificial Seeds and their Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ripening in mango and banana and on molecular markets. G V S Saiprasad. Plant propagation using artificial or synthetic seeds devel- oped from somatic and not zygotic embryos opens up new ... Somatic embryos are structurally similar to zygotic embryos ... somatic embryos, are not the limiting factors for development of.

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Joseph

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with designing machine systems that can simulate human mental processes. The field draws upon theoretical constructs from a wide variety of disciplines, including mathematics, psychology, linguistics, neurophysiology, computer science, and electronic engineering. Some of the…

  16. Artificial Seeds and their Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 5. Artificial Seeds and their Applications. G V S Saiprasad. General Article Volume 6 Issue 5 May 2001 pp 39-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/05/0039-0047. Author Affiliations.

  17. Hybrid Applications Of Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Gary C.

    1988-01-01

    STAR, Simple Tool for Automated Reasoning, is interactive, interpreted programming language for development and operation of artificial-intelligence application systems. Couples symbolic processing with compiled-language functions and data structures. Written in C language and currently available in UNIX version (NPO-16832), and VMS version (NPO-16965).

  18. Artificial Intelligence: Applications in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorkildsen, Ron J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Artificial intelligence techniques are used in computer programs to search out rapidly and retrieve information from very large databases. Programing advances have also led to the development of systems that provide expert consultation (expert systems). These systems, as applied to education, are the primary emphasis of this article. (LMO)

  19. Backchannel Strategies for Artificial Listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter; Truong, Khiet Phuong; Reidsma, Dennis; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Allbeck, Jan; Badler, Norman; Bickmore, Timothy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Safonova, Alla

    We evaluate multimodal rule-based strategies for backchannel (BC) generation in face-to-face conversations. Such strategies can be used by artificial listeners to determine when to produce a BC in dialogs with human speakers. In this research, we consider features from the speaker’s speech and gaze.

  20. What Is Artificial Intelligence Anyway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzweil, Raymond

    1985-01-01

    Examines the past, present, and future status of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Acknowledges the limitations of AI but proposes possible areas of application and further development. Urges a concentration on the unique strengths of machine intelligence rather than a copying of human intelligence. (ML)

  1. Artificial life, the new paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Paez, Jose Jesus

    1998-01-01

    A chronological synthesis of the most important facts is presented in the theoretical development and computational simulation that they have taken to the formation of a new paradigm that is known as artificial life; their characteristics and their main investigation lines are analyzed. Finally, a description of its work is made in the National University of Colombia

  2. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  3. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    works. They have the ability to learn from empirical datal information. They find use in computer science and control engineering fields. In recent years artificial ... However there are vast differences between biological neural networks (BNNs) of the brain and ANN s. A thorough understanding of biologically derived NNs ...

  4. Artificial intelligence approaches in statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.I.; Musgrove, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    The role of pattern recognition and knowledge representation methods from Artificial Intelligence within statistics is considered. Two areas of potential use are identified and one, data exploration, is used to illustrate the possibilities. A method is presented to identify and separate overlapping groups within cluster analysis, using an AI approach. The potential of such ''intelligent'' approaches is stressed

  5. Artificial Seeds and their Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and nutrition for zygotic embryos in developing seeds. To augment these deficiencies, addition of nutrients and growth regulators to the encapsulation matrix is desired, which serves as an artificial endosperm. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Principle and Conditions for Encapsulation with. Alginate Matrix. Alginate is a straight chain, ...

  6. Personal daily dialysis: the evolution of the artificial kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Chul; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    To improve hemodialysis (HD) patients' clinical tolerance and quality of life, a new paradigm of technological evolution of the artificial kidney needs to be addressed at this point. Compared to the second law of thermodynamics, if HD is a barrier against entropy increase, personal daily dialysis (PDD), taking account of multidimensional treatment parameters specific to the patient, can be a new treatment option. Here, we review currently used HD equipment and competing technologies of the wearable artificial kidney (WAK) for future application to PDD. Biofeedback control during HD personalizes treatment parameters such as blood volume changes, thermal energy balance and biochemical variables in well-defined ranges and tries to deliver the targeted treatment dose without intradialytic hypotension. Miniaturized devices such as WAK could also meet the needs of patients by providing mobility, the possibility of normal social activities and flexibility of treatment schedule. So far, many studies have shown the future direction of renal replacement therapy for chronic patients: personalization and daily treatment. PDD might require a new index including a biological plan for recovery of homeostasis and a strategy toward long-term rehabilitation of the patient. The concept of entropy includes these multidimensional factors, and the artificial kidney should be evolved to minimize the increase in entropy of the patient. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Skin friction related behaviour of artificial turf systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sock Peng; Fleming, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Forrester, Steph

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of skin friction related injuries is an issue for artificial turf sports pitches and remains a barrier to their acceptance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current industry standard Securisport® Sports Surface Tester that measures skin surface related frictional behaviour of artificial turf. Little research has been published about the device and its efficacy, despite its widespread use as a standard FIFA test instrument. To achieve a range of frictional behaviours, several "third generation" (3G) carpet and infill combinations were investigated; friction time profiles throughout the Securisport rotations were assessed in combination with independent measurements of skin roughness before and after friction testing via 3D surface scanning. The results indicated that carpets without infill had greatest friction (coefficients of friction 0.97-1.20) while those completely filled with sand or rubber had similar and lower values independent of carpet type (coefficient of friction (COF) ≈0.57). Surface roughness of a silicone skin (s-skin) decreased after friction testing, with the largest change on sand infilled surfaces, indicating an "abrasive" polishing effect. The combined data show that the s-skin is damaged in a surface-specific manner, thus the Securisport COF values appear to be a poor measure of the potential for skin abrasion. It is proposed that the change in s-skin roughness improves assessment of the potential for skin damage when players slide on artificial turf.

  8. Artificial humidification for the mechanically ventilated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, N

    Caring for patients who are mechanically ventilated poses many challenges for critical care nurses. It is important to humidify the patient's airways artificially to prevent complications such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. There is no gold standard to determine which type of humidification is best for patients who are artificially ventilated. This article provides an overview of commonly used artificial humidification for mechanically ventilated patients and discusses nurses' responsibilities in caring for patients receiving artificial humidification.

  9. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    OpenAIRE

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adap...

  10. Introduction to Concepts in Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebur, Dagmar

    1995-01-01

    This introduction to artificial neural networks summarizes some basic concepts of computational neuroscience and the resulting models of artificial neurons. The terminology of biological and artificial neurons, biological and machine learning and neural processing is introduced. The concepts of supervised and unsupervised learning are explained with examples from the power system area. Finally, a taxonomy of different types of neurons and different classes of artificial neural networks is presented.

  11. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  12. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to be...

  13. Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Economic Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2015-01-01

    Artificial intelligence has impacted many aspects of human life. This paper studies the impact of artificial intelligence on economic theory. In particular we study the impact of artificial intelligence on the theory of bounded rationality, efficient market hypothesis and prospect theory.

  14. Artificial Intelligence and Its Importance in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmann, Martha J.

    Artificial intelligence, or the study of ideas that enable computers to be intelligent, is discussed in terms of what it is, what it has done, what it can do, and how it may affect the teaching of tomorrow. An extensive overview of artificial intelligence examines its goals and applications and types of artificial intelligence including (1) expert…

  15. Modified Artificial Viscosity in Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Selhammar, Magnus

    1996-01-01

    Artificial viscosity is needed in Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics to prevent interparticle penetration, to allow shocks to form and to damp post shock oscillations. Artificial viscosity may, however, lead to problems such as unwanted heating and unphysical solutions. A modification of the standard artificial viscosity recipe is proposed which reduces these problems. Some test cases discussed.

  16. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report. 1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition. Volume 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition Syracuse University Harvey E. Rhody, Thomas R. Ridley, John A. ,les DTIC S ELECTE FEB...Include Security Oiewftction) NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT - 1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech...Intelligence Consortium 1988 Annual Report Volume 8 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition Harvey E. Rhody Thomas R. Ridley John A

  17. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst...... communication related to collaboration and ‘small talk’ may provide linguistic bridges to social capital formation....

  18. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  19. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us......This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  20. Artificial Intelligence Information Sources for the Beginner and Expert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Electronics Engineers) sponsors a number of artificial intelli- gence conferences, including the Conference on Artificial Intelligence Applications and the...Artificial Intelligence and Legal Reasoning Intelligent Tutoring Systems Artificial Intelligence Applications for Nil- Technologies itary Logistics

  1. Computer automation and artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    Rapid advances in computing, resulting from micro chip revolution has increased its application manifold particularly for computer automation. Yet the level of automation available, has limited its application to more complex and dynamic systems which require an intelligent computer control. In this paper a review of Artificial intelligence techniques used to augment automation is presented. The current sequential processing approach usually adopted in artificial intelligence has succeeded in emulating the symbolic processing part of intelligence, but the processing power required to get more elusive aspects of intelligence leads towards parallel processing. An overview of parallel processing with emphasis on transputer is also provided. A Fuzzy knowledge based controller for amination drug delivery in muscle relaxant anesthesia on transputer is described. 4 figs. (author)

  2. Important Themas in Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Šudoma, Petr

    2013-01-01

    The paper studies description logics as a method of field of artificial intelligence, describes history of knowledge representation as series of events leading to founding of description logics. Furthermore the paper compares description logics with their predecessor, the frame systems. Syntax, semantics and description logics naming convention is also presented and algorithms solving common knowledge representation tasks with usage of description logics are described. Paper compares computat...

  3. Anesthesiology, automation, and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John C; Joshi, Girish P

    2018-01-01

    There have been many attempts to incorporate automation into the practice of anesthesiology, though none have been successful. Fundamentally, these failures are due to the underlying complexity of anesthesia practice and the inability of rule-based feedback loops to fully master it. Recent innovations in artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, may usher in a new era of automation across many industries, including anesthesiology. It would be wise to consider the implications of such potential changes before they have been fully realized.

  4. Artificial Intelligence, Employment, and Income

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Nils J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) will have profound societal effects. It promises potential benefits (and may also pose risks) in education, defense, business, law and science. In this article we explore how AI is likely to affect employment and the distribution of income. We argue that AI will indeed reduce drastically the need of human toil. We also note that some people fear the automation of work by machines and the resulting of unemployment. Yet, since the majority of us probably would rathe...

  5. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  6. Artificial wetlands - yes or no?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Václav; Lusk, Stanislav; Halačka, Karel; Lusková, Věra

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2004), s. 119-127 ISSN 1642-3593. [International Symposium on the Ecology of Fluvial Fishes /9./. Lodz, 23.06.2003-26.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS6093007; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : floodplain * artificial wetlands * fish communities Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Artificial Sweeteners versus Natural Sweeteners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu, N.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are an important dietary nutrient which is mostly used to supply energy to the body, as well as a carbon source for synthesis of other needed chemicals. In addition, mono- and disaccharides are craved because of their sweetness. We present different types of sweeteners, which are the basic contents of foods which we consume every day and are demonstrated the positive and negative effects of natural and artificial sweeteners.

  8. An Artificial Muscle Ring Oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Benjamin Marc; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer artificialmuscles have great potential for the creation of novel pumps, motors, and circuitry. Control of these devices requires an oscillator, either as a driver or clock circuit, which is typically provided as part of bulky, rigid, and costly external electronics. Oscillator circuits based on piezo-resistive dielectric elastomer switch technology provide a way to embed oscillatory behavior into artificial muscle devices. Previous oscillator circuits were not digital, ab...

  9. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazaridès, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  10. Artificial intelligence and computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    This edited book presents essential findings in the research fields of artificial intelligence and computer vision, with a primary focus on new research ideas and results for mathematical problems involved in computer vision systems. The book provides an international forum for researchers to summarize the most recent developments and ideas in the field, with a special emphasis on the technical and observational results obtained in the past few years.

  11. Artificial Neural Networks for Beginners

    OpenAIRE

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The scope of this teaching package is to make a brief induction to Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for people who have no previous knowledge of them. We first make a brief introduction to models of networks, for then describing in general terms ANNs. As an application, we explain the backpropagation algorithm, since it is widely used and many other algorithms are derived from it. The user should know algebra and the handling of functions and vectors. Differential calculus is recommendable, ...

  12. Effect of tannic acid on skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Yoshida, Naoki; Yasoshima, Mitsue; Kojima, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-06

    In this study, we investigated how tannic acid (TA) protects the skin from inflammation caused by external irritation. The effects of TA were evaluated using a mouse 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation model and a reconstructed human epidermal model. We then used Lucifer Yellow for visual confirmation of TA's suppression effect at the stratum corneum (SC) surface. TA treatment of the skin prevented Lucifer Yellow from permeating the skin. This result suggests that TA acts as a barrier against external stimulants such as TPA and artificial sweat on the SC surface. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Artificial life: The coming evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Santa Fe Inst., NM (USA)); Belin, A.d' A. (Shute, Mihaly, and Weinberger, Santa Fe, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Within fifty to a hundred years a new class of organisms is likely to emerge. These organisms will be artificial in the sense that they will originally be designed by humans. However, they will reproduce, and will evolve into something other than their initial form; they will be alive'' under any reasonable definition of the word. These organisms will evolve in a fundamentally different manner than contemporary biological organisms, since their reproduction will be under at least partial conscious control, giving it a Lamarckian component. The pace of evolutionary change consequently will be extremely rapid. The advent of artificial life will be the most significant historical event since the emergence of human beings. The impact on humanity and the biosphere could be enormous, larger than the industrial revolution, nuclear weapons, or environmental pollution. We must take steps now to shape the emergence of artificial organisms; they have potential to be either the ugliest terrestrial disaster, or the most beautiful creation of humanity. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  14. PIXE Analysis of Artificial Turf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Skye; Chalise, Sajju; Porat, Zachary; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, there has been debate regarding the use of the crumb rubber infill in artificial turf on high school and college campuses due to the potential presence of heavy metals and carcinogenic chemicals. We performed Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis of artificial turf infill and blade samples collected from high school and college campuses around the Capital District of NYS to search for potentially toxic substances. Crumb rubber pellets were made by mixing 1g of rubber infill and 1g of epoxy. The pellets and the turf blades were bombarded with 2.2 MeV proton beams from a 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory and x-ray energy spectra were collected with an Amptek silicon drift detector. We analyzed the spectra using GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the samples. The turf infill showed significant levels of Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, and Pb. The highest concentration of Br in the crumb rubber was 1500 +/-100 ppm while the highest detectable amount of Pb concentration was 110 +/-20 ppm. The artificial turf blades showed significant levels of Ti, Fe, and Zn with only the yellow blade showing concentrations of V and Bi.

  15. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, W; Van Robays, J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones.

  16. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today’s common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  17. Performing a local barrier operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  18. Reactive barriers for 137Cs retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James L.; Brady, Patrick V.; Anderson, Howard L.

    2000-01-01

    137 Cs was dispersed globally by cold war activities and, more recently, by the Chernobyl accident. Engineered extraction of 137 Cs from soils and groundwaters is exceedingly difficult. Because the half life of 137 Cs is only 30.2 years, remediation might be more effective (and less costly) if 137 Cs bioavailability could be demonstrably limited for even a few decades by use of a reactive barrier. Essentially permanent isolation must be demonstrated in those few settings where high nuclear level wastes contaminated the environment with 135 Cs (half life 2.3x10 6 years) in addition to 137 Cs. Clays are potentially a low-cost barrier to Cs movement, though their long-term effectiveness remains untested. To identify optimal clays for Cs retention Cs resorption was measured for five common clays: Wyoming Montmorillonite (SWy-1), Georgia Kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-2), Fithian Illite (F-Ill), and K-Metabentonite (K-Mbt). Exchange sites were pre-saturated with 0.16 M CsCl for 14 days and readily exchangeable Cs was removed by a series of LiNO 3 and LiCl washes. Washed clay were then placed into dialysis bags and the Cs release to the deionized water outside the bags measured. Release rates from 75 to 139 days for SWy-1, K-Mbt and F- 111 were similar; 0.017 to 0.021% sorbed Cs released per day. Both kaolinites released Cs more rapidly (0.12 to 0.05% of the sorbed Cs per day). In a second set of experiments, clays were doped for 110 days and subjected to an extreme and prolonged rinsing process. All the clays exhibited some capacity for irreversible Cs uptake so most soils have some limited ability to act as a natural barrier to Cs migration. However, the residual loading was greatest on K-Mbt (∼ 0.33 wt% Cs). Thus, this clay would be the optimal material for constructing artificial reactive barriers

  19. Fecundación Artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa. Fidel

    1939-10-01

    Full Text Available Por Fecundación artificial se entiende, la fecundación de una hembra sin el servicio directo del macho, es decir la introducción al aparato genital femenino, del esperma que se ha recogido por medios artificiales. Esta fecundación, practicada en debidas condiciones, tiene el mismo efecto de la fecundación natural, con las ventajas que veremos más adelante. La fecundación artificial permite explotar un reproductor a su máximum de capacidad, ya que se considera, para no hacer cálculos alegres, que un servicio de un caballo puede servir, diluido, por lo menos para cuatro yeguas, según los autores americanos, y para 10 a 15, según otros autores. El toro y el carnero pueden dar esperma suficiente en un servicio para fecundar de 10 a 12 hembras, según,los americanos, y según otros autores, hasta para 40. Los investigadores rusos han podido fecundar hasta 60 vacas con un solo servicio y han logrado con reproductores valiosos, fecundar 10.263 vacas por toro, a pesar de que éstos sólo han servido, durante un periodo de monta de sólo dos meses. Estos mismos han logrado fecundar artificialmente 2.733 ovejas con un solo carnero, y 1.403 con otro Los investigadores americanos han contado 22 servicios a un carnero vigoroso en un periodo de ocho horas, y durante este tiempo produjo esperma suficiente para haber fecundado 200 ovejas artificialmente. La fecundación artificial sirve para evitar la trasmisión de enfermedades que se contagian por el coito, tales como la durina, enfermedad ésta producida por un tripanosoma que por fortuna no existe entre nosotros. A las estaciones de monta llevan con frecuencia hembras afectadas de enfermedades como la vaginitis granulosa de la vaca, que se contagia al toro y de éste a otras hembras. Como el control sanitario de toda hembra llevada al servicio de un reproductor de estas estaciones de monta no siempre puede efectuarse por dificultades de distinta índole, mediante la fecundación artificial

  20. Exposure, Uptake, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Lanone, Sophie

    The nanotechnologies market is booming, e.g., in the food industry (powder additives, etc.) and in medical applications (drug delivery, prosthetics, diagnostic imaging, etc.), but also in other industrial sectors, such as sports, construction, cosmetics, and so on. In this context, with an exponential increase in the number of current and future applications, it is particularly important to evaluate the problem of unintentional (i.e., non-medical) exposure to manufactured nanoparticles (so excluding nanoparticles found naturally in the environment). In this chapter, we begin by discussing the various parameters that must be taken into account in any serious assessment of exposure to man-made nanoparticles. We then list the potential routes by which nanoparticles might enter into the organism, and outline the mechanisms whereby they could get past the different biological barriers. Finally, we describe the biodistribution of nanoparticles in the organism and the way they are eliminated.

  1. Countermeasures and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  2. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  3. Thames barrier (flood protection barriers on the Thames)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the flood protection barriers on the Thames are presented. The flood protection system on the Thames in 1984 was commissioned. During two decades this barrier was used 54 times against to the high water and 34 times against storm-sewage. There is installed buttress type hydroelectric power plant

  4. Internet advertising of artificial tanning in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Markovic, Milica

    2006-08-01

    Artificial tanning, defined as deliberate exposure to ultraviolet rays produced by artificial tanning devices, is a new and emerging public health issue in Australia and globally. Epidemiological research suggests that artificial tanning may contribute to the incidence of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as other health problems. Given that Australia has a high incidence of skin cancer, we have undertaken a study to explore how artificial tanning has been promoted to its users. The aim was to analyze the completeness and accuracy of information about artificial tanning. A content analysis of web sites of tanning salons and distributors of tanning equipment in Australia was conducted. A total of 22 web sites were analyzed. None of the solarium operators or distributors of equipment provided full information about the risks of artificial tanning. Fifty-nine percent of web advertisements had no information and 41% provided only partial information regarding the risks of artificial tanning. Pictures with the image of bronze-tanned bodies, predominantly women, were used by all web advertisers. In light of the success of sun-safety campaigns in Australia, the findings of future epidemiological research on the prevalence of artificial tanning and sociological and anthropological research on why people utilize artificial tanning should be a basis for developing effective targeted health promotion on the elimination of artificial tanning in the country.

  5. Artificial organic networks artificial intelligence based on carbon networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ponce-Espinosa, Hiram; Molina, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    This monograph describes the synthesis and use of biologically-inspired artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHNs) for approximation models associated with machine learning and a novel computational algorithm with which to exploit them. The reader is first introduced to various kinds of algorithms designed to deal with approximation problems and then, via some conventional ideas of organic chemistry, to the creation and characterization of artificial organic networks and AHNs in particular. The advantages of using organic networks are discussed with the rules to be followed to adapt the network to its objectives. Graph theory is used as the basis of the necessary formalism. Simulated and experimental examples of the use of fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms with organic neural networks are presented and a number of modeling problems suitable for treatment by AHNs are described: ·        approximation; ·        inference; ·        clustering; ·        control; ·        class...

  6. Informal export barriers and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Guido G.

    2004-01-01

    The author investigates the poverty impacts of informal export barriers like transport costs, cumbersome customs practices, costly regulations, and bribes. He models these informal barriers as export taxes that distort the efficient allocation of resources. In low-income agricultural economies, this distortion lowers wages and household agricultural income, thereby leading to higher pover...

  7. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  8. Seismic waves and seismic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S. V.

    2011-05-01

    The basic idea of seismic barrier is to protect an area occupied by a building or a group of buildings from seismic waves. Depending on nature of seismic waves that are most probable in a specific region, different kinds of seismic barriers are suggested. For example, vertical barriers resembling a wall in a soil can protect from Rayleigh and bulk waves. The FEM simulation reveals that to be effective, such a barrier should be (i) composed of layers with contrast physical properties allowing "trapping" of the wave energy inside some of the layers, and (ii) depth of the barrier should be comparable or greater than the considered seismic wave length. Another type of seismic barrier represents a relatively thin surface layer that prevents some types of surface seismic waves from propagating. The ideas for these barriers are based on one Chadwick's result concerning non-propagation condition for Rayleigh waves in a clamped half-space, and Love's theorem that describes condition of non-existence for Love waves. The numerical simulations reveal that to be effective the length of the horizontal barriers should be comparable to the typical wavelength.

  9. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a 'fingerprint' of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled ...

  10. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  11. Organizational Barriers to Transition: Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John; Justice, Thomas I., Ed.

    This study sought to identify the barriers that negatively impact the ability of disabled youth to successfully make a transition from school into employment and a quality adult life, and sought to specifically define organizational disincentives to successful transition. Current research is reviewed relating to organizational barriers to…

  12. FPGA controlled artificial vascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laqua D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the oxygen saturation of an unborn child is an invasive procedure, so far. Transabdominal fetal pulse oximetry is a promising method under research, used to estimate the oxygen saturation of a fetus noninvasively. Due to the nature of the method, the fetal information needs to be extracted from a mixed signal. To properly evaluate signal processing algorithms, a phantom modeling fetal and maternal blood circuits and tissue layers is necessary. This paper presents an improved hardware concept for an artificial vascular system, utilizing an FPGA based CompactRIO System from National Instruments. The experimental model to simulate the maternal and fetal blood pressure curve consists of two identical hydraulic circuits. Each of these circuits consists of a pre-pressure system and an artificial vascular system. Pulse curves are generated by proportional valves, separating these two systems. The dilation of the fetal and maternal artificial vessels in tissue substitutes is measured by transmissive and reflective photoplethysmography. The measurement results from the pressure sensors and the transmissive optical sensors are visualized to show the functionality of the pulse generating systems. The trigger frequency for the maternal valve was set to 1 per second, the fetal valve was actuated at 0.7 per second for validation. The reflective curve, capturing pulsations of the fetal and maternal circuit, was obtained with a high power LED (905 nm as light source. The results show that the system generates pulse curves, similar to its physiological equivalent. Further, the acquired reflective optical signal is modulated by the alternating diameter of the tubes of both circuits, allowing for tests of signal processing algorithms.

  13. Artificial intelligence a beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whitby, Blay

    2012-01-01

    Tomorrow begins right here as we embark on an enthralling and jargon-free journey into the world of computers and the inner recesses of the human mind. Readers encounter everything from the nanotechnology used to make insect-like robots, to computers that perform surgery, in addition to discovering the biggest controversies to dog the field of AI. Blay Whitby is a Lecturer on Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence at the University of Sussex UK. He is the author of two books and numerous papers.

  14. Neuroscience-Inspired Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassabis, Demis; Kumaran, Dharshan; Summerfield, Christopher; Botvinick, Matthew

    2017-07-19

    The fields of neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI) have a long and intertwined history. In more recent times, however, communication and collaboration between the two fields has become less commonplace. In this article, we argue that better understanding biological brains could play a vital role in building intelligent machines. We survey historical interactions between the AI and neuroscience fields and emphasize current advances in AI that have been inspired by the study of neural computation in humans and other animals. We conclude by highlighting shared themes that may be key for advancing future research in both fields. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Slope protection for artificial island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, M.T.; Collins, J.I.; Shak, A.T.

    1981-08-01

    The technology under development to protect artificial-island production platforms from Arctic sea and ice damage involves three major considerations: (1) sea conditions during the ice-free season, (2) ice conditions during winter, and (3) construction constraints imposed by material availability, transportation problems, and length of the construction season. So far, researchers have evaluated 15 different slope-protection systems on the basis of reliability, construction-cost, and maintenance-cost factors, choosing 8 candidates for wave and ice model testing. The cases of interest involve exploration and production islands in shallow and deeper water applications.

  16. Improving designer productivity. [artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gary C.

    1992-01-01

    Designer and design team productivity improves with skill, experience, and the tools available. The design process involves numerous trials and errors, analyses, refinements, and addition of details. Computerized tools have greatly speeded the analysis, and now new theories and methods, emerging under the label Artificial Intelligence (AI), are being used to automate skill and experience. These tools improve designer productivity by capturing experience, emulating recognized skillful designers, and making the essence of complex programs easier to grasp. This paper outlines the aircraft design process in today's technology and business climate, presenting some of the challenges ahead and some of the promising AI methods for meeting these challenges.

  17. Vida artificial, el nuevo paradigma

    OpenAIRE

    José Jesús Martínez Páez

    2011-01-01

    Se presenta una síntesis cronológica de los hechos más importantes en el desarrollo teórico y de simulación computacional, que han llevado a la formación de un nuevo paradigma que se conoce como vida artificial; se analizan sus características y sus príncipales líneas de investigación. Finalmente, se hace una descripción de su trabajo en laUniversidad Nacional.

  18. Vida artificial, el nuevo paradigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jesús Martínez Páez

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una síntesis cronológica de los hechos más importantes en el desarrollo teórico y de simulación computacional, que han llevado a la formación de un nuevo paradigma que se conoce como vida artificial; se analizan sus características y sus príncipales líneas de investigación. Finalmente, se hace una descripción de su trabajo en la Universidad Nacional.

  19. Logical Foundations Of Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The procedures of searching solutions to problems, in Artificial Intelligence, can be brought about, in many occasions, without knowledge of the Domain, and in other situations, with knowledge of it. This last procedure is usually called Heuristic Search. In such methods the matrix techniques reveal themselves as essential. Their introduction can give us an easy and precise way in the search of solution. Our paper explains how the matrix theory appears and fruitfully participates in A I, with feasible applications to Game Theory.

  20. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity.

  1. Artificial intelligence methods for diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourgnon-Hanoune, A.; Porcheron, M.; Ricard, B.

    1996-01-01

    To assist in diagnosis of its nuclear power plants, the Research and Development Division of Electricite de France has been developing skills in Artificial Intelligence for about a decade. Different diagnostic expert systems have been designed. Among them, SILEX for control rods cabinet troubleshooting, DIVA for turbine generator diagnosis, DIAPO for reactor coolant pump diagnosis. This know how in expert knowledge modeling and acquisition is direct result of experience gained during developments and of a more general reflection on knowledge based system development. We have been able to reuse this results for other developments such as a guide for auxiliary rotating machines diagnosis. (authors)

  2. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  3. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  4. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    . This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. RESULTS: The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys......BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools...

  5. Artificial Seeds (Principle, Aspects and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hail Z. Rihan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Artificial seeds are artificially encapsulated somatic embryos (usually or other vegetative parts such as shoot buds, cell aggregates, auxiliary buds, or any other micropropagules which can be sown as a seed and converted into a plant under in vitro or in vivo conditions. An improved artificial seed production technique is considered a valuable alternate technology of propagation in many commercially important crops and a significant method for mass propagation of elite plant genotypes. The production of plant clones multiplied by tissue culture and distributed as artificial seeds could be a useful alternative to the costly F1 hybrids for different plant crops. The delivery of artificial seeds also facilitates issues such as undertaking several ways for scaling up in vitro cultures and acclimatization to ex vitro conditions. The development of an artificial seed technique also provides a great approach for the improvement of various plant species such as trees and crops.

  6. Hanford Protective Barriers Program asphalt barrier studies -- FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1989-05-01

    The Hanford Protective Barrier (HPB) Program is evaluating alternative barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternative barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick, which has been shown to be very effective as a barrier for radon gas and, hence, should be equally effective as a barrier for the larger molecules of water. Fiscal Year 1988 studies focused on the selection and formulation of the most promising asphalt materials for further testing in small-tube lysimeters. Results of laboratory-scale formulation and hydraulic conductivity tests led to the selection of a rubberized asphalt material and an admixture of 24 wt% asphalt emulsion and concrete sand as the two barriers for lysimeter testing. Eight lysimeters, four each containing the two asphalt treatments, were installed in the Small Tube Lysimeter Facility on the Hanford Site. The lysimeter tests allow the performance of these barrier formulations to be evaluated under more natural environmental conditions

  7. Barrier holes and trench application to reduce blast induced vibration in Seyitomer coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erarslan, Kaan; Uysal, Önder; Arpaz, Ercan; Cebi, M. Akif

    2008-05-01

    In this research, experimental applications have been performed to reduce blast induced vibrations in open pit mines. For this purpose, artificial discontinuity zones such as barrier holes and trench were opened in a dragline panel of Seyitomer Lignite Enterprise, Kutahya, Turkey. Peak particle velocities in front of and behind them were measured by seismographs. In this way, their effect against vibration was observed and compared. Barrier holes were opened 24 m deep through 3 parallel lines and aligned at 1 m spacing. On the other hand, the trench had 8 m depth and 4 m width. During the research, 209 measurements were taken belonging to 105 explosions. Twenty-eight explosions were carried out in the barrier holes experiments and 77 explosions were carried out in the trench experiments. A decrease in vibration of 14.3 18.5% was obtained behind the barrier holes while a decrease of 24.8 58.1% was provided by the trench.

  8. Artificial humidification for the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Caring for patients who are mechanically ventilated poses many\\ud challenges for critical care nurses. It is important to humidify the\\ud patient’s airways artificially to prevent complications such as\\ud ventilator-associated pneumonia. There is no gold standard to\\ud determine which type of humidification is best for patients who\\ud are artificially ventilated. This article provides an overview of\\ud commonly used artificial humidification for mechanically ventilated\\ud patients and discuss...

  9. Readings in artificial intelligence and software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Readings in Artificial Intelligence and Software Engineering covers the main techniques and application of artificial intelligence and software engineering. The ultimate goal of artificial intelligence applied to software engineering is automatic programming. Automatic programming would allow a user to simply say what is wanted and have a program produced completely automatically. This book is organized into 11 parts encompassing 34 chapters that specifically tackle the topics of deductive synthesis, program transformations, program verification, and programming tutors. The opening parts p

  10. Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Emanuelle; Goldsmith, Judy; Koenig, Sven; Kuipers, Benjamin; Mattei, Nicholas; Walsh, Toby

    2017-01-01

    The recent surge in interest in ethics in artificial intelligence may leave many educators wondering how to address moral, ethical, and philosophical issues in their AI courses. As instructors we want to develop curriculum that not only prepares students to be artificial intelligence practitioners, but also to understand the moral, ethical, and philosophical impacts that artificial intelligence will have on society. In this article we provide practical case studies and links to resources for ...

  11. Artificial Immune Networks: Models and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Shen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Immune Systems (AIS, which is inspired by the nature immune system, has been applied for solving complex computational problems in classification, pattern rec- ognition, and optimization. In this paper, the theory of the natural immune system is first briefly introduced. Next, we compare some well-known AIS and their applications. Several representative artificial immune networks models are also dis- cussed. Moreover, we demonstrate the applications of artificial immune networks in various engineering fields.

  12. The Nexus between Artificial Intelligence and Economics

    OpenAIRE

    van de Gevel, A.J.W.; Noussair, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    This book is organized as follows. Section 2 introduces the notion of the Singularity, a stage in development in which technological progress and economic growth increase at a near-infinite rate. Section 3 describes what artificial intelligence is and how it has been applied. Section 4 considers artificial happiness and the likelihood that artificial intelligence might increase human happiness. Section 5 discusses some prominent related concepts and issues. Section 6 describes the use of arti...

  13. Of Artificial Intelligence and Legal Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert

    2014-01-01

    Can computers, or artificial intelligence, reason by analogy? This essay urges that they cannot, because they are unable to engage in the crucial task of identifying the normative principle that links or separates cases. Current claims, about the ability of artificial intelligence to reason analogically, rest on an inadequate picture of what legal reasoning actually is. For the most part, artificial intelligence now operates as a kind of advanced version of LEXIS, offering research assistance...

  14. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  15. Alternative geochemical barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Previous investigations of the effects of neutralization and reduction on uranium mill tailings pore fluids by the Technical Support Contractor indicated that arsenic, selenium, and molybdenum continue to remain in solution in all but reducing conditions. These hazardous constituents are present in groundwaters as oxyanions and, therefore, are not expected to be removed by adsorption into clays and most other soil constituents. It was decided to investigate the attenuation capacity of two commonly available crystalline iron oxides, taconite and scoria, and a zeolite, a network aluminosilicate with a cage structure. Columns of the candidate materials were exposed to solutions of individual constituents, including arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and, uranium, and to the spiked tailings pore fluid from the Bodo Canyon disposal cell near Durango, Colorado. In addition to the single material columns, a homogeneous blend of the three materials and layers of the materials were exposed to spiked tailings pore fluids. The results of these experiments indicate that with the exception of molybdenum, the constituents of concern are attenuated by the taconite; however, they are not sufficiently attenuated to meet the groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project. Therefore, the candidate barrier materials did not prove to be useful to the UMTRA Project for the cleanup of groundwaters

  16. Omnidirectional ventilated acoustic barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-long; Zhu, Yi-fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-11-01

    As an important problem in acoustics, sound insulation finds applications in a great variety of situations. In the existing schemes, however, there has always been a trade-off between the thinness of sound-insulating devices and their ventilating capabilities, limiting their potentials in the control of low-frequency sound in high ventilation environments. Here, we design and experimentally implement an omnidirectional acoustic barrier with a planar profile, subwavelength thickness ( 0.18 λ ), yet high ventilation. The proposed mechanism is based on the interference between the resonant scattering of discrete states and the background scattering of continuous states which induces a Fano-like asymmetric transmission profile. Benefitting from the binary-structured design of the coiled unit and hollow pipe, it maximally simplifies the design and fabrication while ensuring the ventilation for all the non-resonant units with open tubes. The simulated and measured results agree well, showing the effectiveness of our proposed mechanism to block low frequency sound coming from various directions while allowing 63% of the air flow to pass. We anticipate our design to open routes to design sound insulators and to enable applications in traditionally unattainable cases such as those calling for noise reduction and cooling simultaneously.

  17. Artificial Neural Networks and Concentration Residual Augmented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial Neural Networks and Concentration Residual Augmented Classical Least Squares for the Simultaneous Determination of Diphenhydramine, Benzonatate, Guaifenesin and Phenylephrine in their Quaternary Mixture.

  18. Artificial reefs: “Attraction versus Production”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barros Fagundes Netto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of fish is the most common reason for the construction and installation of an artificial reef. More recently, environmental concerns and conservation of biological resources have been instrumental to the formulation of new goals of the research. One of the issues to be resolved is the biological function of “attraction vs. production” as a result of the use of artificial reefs. The uncertainty as to the answer to the question whether the artificial reefs will or not benefit the development of fish stocks could be solved if the artificial reefs would be managed as marine protected areas.

  19. Economic reasoning and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, David C; Wellman, Michael P

    2015-07-17

    The field of artificial intelligence (AI) strives to build rational agents capable of perceiving the world around them and taking actions to advance specified goals. Put another way, AI researchers aim to construct a synthetic homo economicus, the mythical perfectly rational agent of neoclassical economics. We review progress toward creating this new species of machine, machina economicus, and discuss some challenges in designing AIs that can reason effectively in economic contexts. Supposing that AI succeeds in this quest, or at least comes close enough that it is useful to think about AIs in rationalistic terms, we ask how to design the rules of interaction in multi-agent systems that come to represent an economy of AIs. Theories of normative design from economics may prove more relevant for artificial agents than human agents, with AIs that better respect idealized assumptions of rationality than people, interacting through novel rules and incentive systems quite distinct from those tailored for people. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. [Kolff and the artificial kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P; Nurmohamed, S Azam

    2013-01-01

    Willem Kolff (1911-2009), son of a physician, studied medicine in Leiden and specialised in internal medicine in Groningen. It was there that he started attempts to apply the phenomenon of dialysis in patients suffering from renal failure. He built the first prototypes of dialysis machines after his appointment as an internist in the municipal hospital in Kampen, during the Second World War. Indeed, in the first 15 patients he managed to decrease urea levels, resulting in temporary clinical improvement, but eventually they all died. It was not until after the war that dialysis helped a patient survive an episode of acute glomerulonephritis. After 1950 he continued his work on artificial organs in the United States (first in Cleveland and later, after 1967, in Salt Lake City). Although most of his work from then on revolved around the development of an artificial heart, he also contributed to the design of a compact, disposable apparatus for dialysis, the 'twin coil'. Haemodialysis also became feasible for patients with chronic renal failure after the 'Scribner shunt' (1960) provided easy access to the circulation. Peritoneal dialysis is another option. Excess mortality, mainly from cardiovascular disease, is still a largely unsolved problem.

  1. Artificial Organisms with Human Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Domenico

    If artificial organisms are constructed with the goal to better understand the behaviour of real organisms, artificial organisms that resemble human beings should possess a communication system with the same properties of human language. This chapter tries to identify nine such properties and for each of them to describe what has been done and what has to be done. Human language: (1) is made up of signals which are arbitrarily connected to their meanings, (2) has syntax and, more generally, its signals are made up of smaller signals, (3) is culturally transmitted and culturally evolved, (4) is used to communicate with oneself and not only with others, (5) is particularly sophisticated for communicating information about the external environment, (6) uses displaced signals, (7) is intentional and requires recognition of intentions in others, (8) is the product of a complex nervous system, (9) influences human cognition. Communication presupposes a shared worldview which depends on the brain, body, and adaptive pattern of the organisms that want to communicate, and this represents a critical challenge also for communication between robots and us.

  2. Artificial vision: principles and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooley, Michael J; Acheson, James

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this article is to give an overview of the strategies and technologies currently under development to return vision to blind patients and will answer the question: What options exist for artificial vision in patients blind from retinal disease; how close are these to clinical practice? Retinal approaches will be the focus of this review as they are most advanced in terms not only of development, but entry into the imagination of the general public; they are technologies patients ask about, but may be less familiar to practicing neurologists.The prerequisites for retinal survivor cell stimulation are discussed, followed by consideration of the state of the art of four promising methods making use of this principle: electronic prostheses, stem cells, gene therapy and the developing field of ophthalmic optogenetics. Human applications of artificial vision by survivor cell stimulation are certainly with us in the research clinic and very close to commercialization and general use. This, together with their place in the public consciousness, makes the overview provided by this review particularly helpful to practicing neurologists.

  3. Development of artificial soft rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kiyoshi

    1995-01-01

    When foundation base rocks are deeper than the level of installing structures or there exist weathered rocks and crushed rocks in a part of base rocks, often sound artificial base rocks are made by substituting the part with concrete. But in the construction of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., the foundation base rocks consist of mudstone, and the stiffness of concrete is large as compared with the surrounding base rocks. As the quality of the substituting material, the nearly same stiffness as that of the surrounding soft rocks and long term stability are suitable, and the excellent workability and economical efficiency are required, therefore, artificial soft rocks were developed. As the substituting material, the soil mortar that can obtain the physical property values in stable form, which are similar to those of Nishiyama mudstone, was selected. The mechanism of its hardening and the long term stability, and the manufacturing plant are reported. As for its application to the base rocks of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the verification test at the site and the application to the base rocks for No. 7 plant reactor building and other places are described. (K.I.)

  4. Artificial Flora (AF Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the process of migration and reproduction of flora, this paper proposes a novel artificial flora (AF algorithm. This algorithm can be used to solve some complex, non-linear, discrete optimization problems. Although a plant cannot move, it can spread seeds within a certain range to let offspring to find the most suitable environment. The stochastic process is easy to copy, and the spreading space is vast; therefore, it is suitable for applying in intelligent optimization algorithm. First, the algorithm randomly generates the original plant, including its position and the propagation distance. Then, the position and the propagation distance of the original plant as parameters are substituted in the propagation function to generate offspring plants. Finally, the optimal offspring is selected as a new original plant through the selection function. The previous original plant becomes the former plant. The iteration continues until we find out optimal solution. In this paper, six classical evaluation functions are used as the benchmark functions. The simulation results show that proposed algorithm has high accuracy and stability compared with the classical particle swarm optimization and artificial bee colony algorithm.

  5. A Pathway to Artificial Metalloenzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of catalytic systems and the application thereof has proven to be the key to overcome traditional limitations of industrial-scale synthetic processes. Converging organometallic and biocatalytic principles lead to the development of Artificial Metalloenzymes (ArMs) that comprise a synthetic metal catalyst embedded in a protein scaffold, thereby combining the reactivity of the former with the versatility of the latter. This synergistic approach introduces rationally designed building blocks for the catalytic site and the host protein to assemble enzyme-like structures that follow regio-, chemo-, enantio- and substrate-selective principles. Yet, the identification of suitable protein scaffolds has thus far been challenging. Herein we report a rationally optimized fluorescent protein host, mTFP*, that was engineered to have no intrinsic metal binding capability and, owing to its robust nature, can act as scaffold for the design of novel ArMs. We demonstrate the potential of site-specific modifications within the protein host, use protein X-Ray analysis to validate the respective scaffolds and show how artificial mutant binding sites can be introduced. Transition metal Förster Resonance Energy transfer (tmFRET) methodologies help to evaluate micromolar dissociation constants and reveal structural rearrangements upon coordination of the metal centers. In conjunction with molecular insights from X-Ray crystallographic structure determination, dynamics of the binding pocket can be inferred. The versatile subset of different binding motifs paired with transition metal catalysts create artificial metalloenzymes that provide reactivities which otherwise do not exist in nature. As a proof of concept, Diels-Alder cycloadditions highlight the potential of the present mTFP* based catalysts by stereoselectively converting azachalcone and cyclopentadiene substrates. Screens indicate an enantiomeric excess of up to 60% and provide insights into the electronic and

  6. Engineered barrier experiment Mont Terri underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J.C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E. [Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (UPC-CIMNE), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J.L. [AITEMIN, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment is being carried out at the Mont Terri underground laboratory (Switzerland). The aim of the EB experiment is the demonstration of a new concept for the buffer construction of HLW repositories in horizontal drifts, in competent clay formations. The principle of this new buffer construction method is based on the combined use of a lower bed made of compacted bentonite blocks, and an upper backfill made with a bentonite pellets based material. The emplacement layout proposed in this project represents an important innovation for repositories in horizontal drifts. The fact of filling the upper part of the gap between the canister and the rock with a pellets-based type of material makes the emplacement operation much simpler, eliminating some of the most critical aspects of such operation. The experiment is carried out in a gallery excavated in the shaly facies of the Opalinus clay of Mont Terri. The geometry of the test site is a horseshoe section, 2,55 m high, 3 m wide and 15 m long. A dummy canister of the same dimensions and weight than the reference one was installed on the top of a compacted bentonite blocks bed, and the gap canister-rock was backfilled with compacted bentonite pellets. The experimental area was isolated by a concrete plug. An artificial hydration system was installed to accelerate the hydration process. In order to monitor the evolution of the system and record the values of different parameters, a data acquisition system was installed. (authors)

  7. Differences in predators of artificial and real songbirds nests: Evidence of bias in artificial nest studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank R. Thompson; Dirk E. Burhans

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, many researchers have used artificial nest to measure relative rates of nest predation. Recent comparisons show that real and artificial nests may not be depredated at the same rate, but no one has examined the mechanisms underlying these patterns. We determined differences in predator-specific predation rates of real and artificial nests. we...

  8. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report 1987. Volume 6. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE’CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT 1987 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) H. E. Rhody, J. A...obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED 6 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE APPLICATIONS TO SPEECH RECOGNITION Report submitted by: Harvey E

  9. Fusion barrier characteristics of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Sridhar, K. N.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied fusion barrier characteristics of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations. After the calculation of fusion barrier heights and positions, we have searched for their parameterization. We have achieved the empirical formula for fusion barrier heights (VB), positions (RB), curvature of the inverted parabola (ħω) of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations (6 actinides with the simple inputs of mass number (A) and atomic number (Z) of projectile-targets.

  10. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    -through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous......The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates...

  11. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  12. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  13. The application and development of artificial intelligence in smart clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiong

    2018-03-01

    This paper mainly introduces the application of artificial intelligence in intelligent clothing. Starting from the development trend of artificial intelligence, analysis the prospects for development in smart clothing with artificial intelligence. Summarize the design key of artificial intelligence in smart clothing. Analysis the feasibility of artificial intelligence in smart clothing.

  14. Artificial intelligence and process management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epton, J.B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques derived from work in artificial intelligence over the past few decades are beginning to change the approach in applying computers to process management. To explore this new approach and gain real practical experience of its potential a programme of experimental applications was initiated by Sira in collaboration with the process industry. This programme encompassed a family of experimental applications ranging from process monitoring, through supervisory control and troubleshooting to planning and scheduling. The experience gained has led to a number of conclusions regarding the present level of maturity of the technology, the potential for further developments and the measures required to secure the levels of system integrity necessary in on-line applications to critical processes. (author)

  15. [Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Kamada, Mayumi; Okuno, Yasushi

    2018-04-01

    According to the increase of data generated from analytical instruments, application of artificial intelligence(AI)technology in medical field is indispensable. In particular, practical application of AI technology is strongly required in "genomic medicine" and "genomic drug discovery" that conduct medical practice and novel drug development based on individual genomic information. In our laboratory, we have been developing a database to integrate genome data and clinical information obtained by clinical genome analysis and a computational support system for clinical interpretation of variants using AI. In addition, with the aim of creating new therapeutic targets in genomic drug discovery, we have been also working on the development of a binding affinity prediction system for mutated proteins and drugs by molecular dynamics simulation using supercomputer "Kei". We also have tackled for problems in a drug virtual screening. Our developed AI technology has successfully generated virtual compound library, and deep learning method has enabled us to predict interaction between compound and target protein.

  16. Perspectives on artificial intelligence programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, D G; Stefik, M J

    1986-02-28

    Programs are judged not only by whether they faithfully carry out the intended processing but also by whether they are understandable and easily changed. Programming systems for artificial intelligence applications use specialized languages, environments, and knowledge-based tools to reduce the complexity of the programming task. Language styles based on procedures, objects, logic, rules, and constraints reflect different models for organizing programs and facilitate program evolution and understandability. To make programming easier, multiple styles can be integrated as sublanguages in a programming environment. Programming environments provide tools that analyze programs and create informative displays of their structure. Programs can be modified by direct interaction with these displays. These tools and languages are helping computer scientists to regain a sense of control over systems that have become increasingly complex.

  17. An artificial neuro-anatomist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    The fact that the human brain visual system is based on stereo-vision is a real handicap when analysing dense 3D representations of the human brain. The success of the methods of analysis based on the 3D proportional system has shown the advantage of using computer based system to interpret such complex images. The underlying strategy, however, is restricted to low level vision, which can not address any issue. Our approach advocates for the development of complete computer vision systems dedicated to the brain, which may be of great help for the future of neuroimaging. In our opinion, indeed, brain imaging is sufficiently focused to be a promising niche for the development of artificial intelligence. (N.C.)

  18. Innovative applications of artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Herbert; Rappaport, Alain

    Papers concerning applications of artificial intelligence are presented, covering applications in aerospace technology, banking and finance, biotechnology, emergency services, law, media planning, music, the military, operations management, personnel management, retail packaging, and manufacturing assembly and design. Specific topics include Space Shuttle telemetry monitoring, an intelligent training system for Space Shuttle flight controllers, an expert system for the diagnostics of manufacturing equipment, a logistics management system, a cooling systems design assistant, and a knowledge-based integrated circuit design critic. Additional topics include a hydraulic circuit design assistant, the use of a connector assembly specification expert system to harness detailed assembly process knowledge, a mixed initiative approach to airlift planning, naval battle management decision aids, an inventory simulation tool, a peptide synthesis expert system, and a system for planning the discharging and loading of container ships.

  19. Apartes desde la inteligencia artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Torres Soler

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available El estudio y desarrollo de la inteligencia artificial no debe centrarse sólo en la creación de software o hardware que permita realizar procesos algorítmicos o heurísticos en el computador, de tal forma que produzcan soluciones óptimas y eficientes al resolver un problema complejo, ya sea de manejo de información o de toma de decisiones, o crear máquinas que tengan buena apariencia del ser humano; se debe, sobre todo, analizar la parte neurológica y sicológica que presenta el individuo al solucionar problemas. Además, es importante conocer la capacidad intelectual de la persona, de ahí la variedad de carreras profesionales que existen; no puede quedar por fuera de los sistemas inteligentes la concepción del amor o admiración.

  20. Theories of artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothos, Emmanuel M

    2007-03-01

    Artificial grammar learning (AGL) is one of the most commonly used paradigms for the study of implicit learning and the contrast between rules, similarity, and associative learning. Despite five decades of extensive research, however, a satisfactory theoretical consensus has not been forthcoming. Theoretical accounts of AGL are reviewed, together with relevant human experimental and neuroscience data. The author concludes that satisfactory understanding of AGL requires (a) an understanding of implicit knowledge as knowledge that is not consciously activated at the time of a cognitive operation; this could be because the corresponding representations are impoverished or they cannot be concurrently supported in working memory with other representations or operations, and (b) adopting a frequency-independent view of rule knowledge and contrasting rule knowledge with specific similarity and associative learning (co-occurrence) knowledge.

  1. Time as a trade barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    International trade occurs in physical space and moving goods requires time. This paper examines the importance of time as a trade barrier, estimates the magnitude of time costs, and relates these to patterns of trade and the international organizati...

  2. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  3. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  4. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  5. Engineered barriers: current status 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Marsh, G.B.

    1989-06-01

    This report summarises the current state of research relevant to assessing the performance of engineered barriers made of steel and concrete in radioactive waste repositories. The objective of these barriers is to contain substantially the radionuclides within them by providing both physical and chemical impediment to their release. The physical barriers are of most value for highly soluble isotopes with relatively short half-lives (eg 137 Cs), since they can provide a measure of containment until a large fraction of the activity has decayed. In addition they can facilitate retrievability for some period after disposal. The chemical barriers operate by beneficial conditioning of the near field groundwater and providing sites for sorption of radionuclides. Both of these reduce the aqueous concentration of radionuclides in the near field. (author)

  6. Web Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devedzic, Vladan

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys important aspects of Web Intelligence (WI) in the context of Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) research. WI explores the fundamental roles as well as practical impacts of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced Information Technology (IT) on the next generation of Web-related products, systems, services, and…

  7. (Bunaji) breeds of cattle following artificial insemination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to evaluate the fertility rate of white Fulani (Bunaji) and Friesian breeds of cattle following artificial insemination (A. I). Artificial insemination was performed following Oestrus synchronization using prostaglandin F2a (PGF2a) in 368 white Fulani and 230 Friesian cows at West Africa Milk Company ...

  8. Effects of timed artificial insemination following estrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate estrus response and pregnancy rates resulting from timed artificial insemination (AI) following estrus synchronization using CIDR in postpartum beef cattle. A total of 100 cows were randomly divided into three groups. Groups 1, 2 and 3 were artificially inseminated at 48-50 h ...

  9. Artificial Intelligence Approaches To UCAV Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Husain, Amir; Porter, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This paper covers a number of approaches that leverage Artificial Intelligence algorithms and techniques to aid Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV) autonomy. An analysis of current approaches to autonomous control is provided followed by an exploration of how these techniques can be extended and enriched with AI techniques including Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Ensembling and Reinforcement Learning (RL) to evolve control strategies for UCAVs.

  10. Artificial Intelligence Applications for Nuclear Survivability Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    AD-A259 394 IIIIIt~l111 11 11 11 1 1hIf L- E, Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 DNA-TR-92-82 Artificial Intelligence Applications for...TYPE AND DATES COVERED 921101 Technical 920101 -920408 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5, FUNDING NUMBERS Artificial Intelligence Applications for Nuclear

  11. A Hierarchical Artificial Intelligence Maintenance Advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-08

    Lee Kline, and Mr. Thomas Gattis for their enthusiasm for the project. 7 Appendix ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE APPLICATIONS FOR MILITARY LOGISTICS This...Appendix contains the visuals and summarizes commentary presented at the Defense Preparedness Association conference on " Artificial Intelligence Applications for

  12. The artificial pancreas : From logic to life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropff, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the efficacy of real-life use of an artificial pancreas starting with use of these systems in a hotel setting and finally 24/7 long-term use at home. We investigated the accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems that act as input for the artificial

  13. The Education Professorate: Teaching an "Artificial" Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, James W.

    This paper argues that conceiving the education professor's role in higher education as that of teaching an "artificial" science is a helpful metaphor for re-contextualizing this mission. How the use of the metaphor of an artificial science bears on the role of the education professorate is examined by applying the purposive-inner…

  14. Artificial Intelligence--Applications in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, James L.; Norris, Cathleen A.

    1987-01-01

    This first in a projected series of five articles discusses artificial intelligence and its impact on education. Highlights include the history of artificial intelligence and the impact of microcomputers; learning processes; human factors and interfaces; computer assisted instruction and intelligent tutoring systems; logic programing; and expert…

  15. The Artificial Intelligence Applications to Learning Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Noel

    1992-01-01

    Explains the Artificial Intelligence Applications to Learning Programme, which was developed in the United Kingdom to explore and accelerate the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in learning in both the educational and industrial sectors. Highlights include program evaluation, marketing, ownership of information, consortia, and cost…

  16. Artificial Astrocytes Improve Neural Network Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B.; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  17. Contribution of artificial intelligence to operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvache, P.; Mourlevat, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence techniques are already used in nuclear plants for assistance to operation: synthesis from numerous information sources may be then derived, based on expert knowledge. Artificial intelligence may be used also for quality and reliability assessment of software-based control-command systems. Various expert systems developed by CEA, EDF and Framatome are presented

  18. On the Design of Artificial Stock Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Boer-Sorban (Katalin); A. de Bruin (Arie); U. Kaymak (Uzay)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractArtificial stock markets are designed with the aim to study and understand market dynamics by representing (part of) real stock markets. Since there is a large variety of real stock markets with several partially observable elements and hidden processes, artificial markets differ

  19. Artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Porto-Pazos

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function.

  20. The Nexus Between Artificial Intellgence and Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Gevel, A.J.W.; Noussair, C.N.

    2013-01-01

    The manuscript reviews some key ideas about artificial intelligence, and relates them to economics. These include its relation to robotics, and the concepts of synthetic emotions, consciousness, and life. The economic implications of the advent of artificial intelligence, such as its effect on

  1. Artificial neural networks and support vector mac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    number of independent, in this case the chemical features, and by the number of dependent variables, in this study, the electroluminescence. The software WEKA (Hall et al. 2009) was used to develop artificial neural networks models that could predict electroluminescence with good accuracy. It generated five artificial ...

  2. Artificial intelligence and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clocksin, William F

    2003-08-15

    We consider some of the ideas influencing current artificial-intelligence research and outline an alternative conceptual framework that gives priority to social relationships as a key component and constructor of intelligent behaviour. The framework starts from Weizenbaum's observation that intelligence manifests itself only relative to specific social and cultural contexts. This is in contrast to a prevailing view, which sees intelligence as an abstract capability of the individual mind based on a mechanism for rational thought. The new approach is not based on the conventional idea that the mind is a rational processor of symbolic information, nor does it require the idea that thought is a kind of abstract problem solving with a semantics that is independent of its embodiment. Instead, priority is given to affective and social responses that serve to engage the whole agent in the life of the communities in which it participates. Intelligence is seen not as the deployment of capabilities for problem solving, but as constructed by the continual, ever-changing and unfinished engagement with the social group within the environment. The construction of the identity of the intelligent agent involves the appropriation or 'taking up' of positions within the conversations and narratives in which it participates. Thus, the new approach argues that the intelligent agent is shaped by the meaning ascribed to experience, by its situation in the social matrix, and by practices of self and of relationship into which intelligent life is recruited. This has implications for the technology of the future, as, for example, classic artificial intelligence models such as goal-directed problem solving are seen as special cases of narrative practices instead of as ontological foundations.

  3. Artificial neural networks in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Hasan Reza; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) effectively analyze non-linear data sets. The aimed was A review of the relevant published articles that focused on the application of ANNs as a tool for assisting clinical decision-making in neurosurgery. A literature review of all full publications in English biomedical journals (1993-2013) was undertaken. The strategy included a combination of key words 'artificial neural networks', 'prognostic', 'brain', 'tumor tracking', 'head', 'tumor', 'spine', 'classification' and 'back pain' in the title and abstract of the manuscripts using the PubMed search engine. The major findings are summarized, with a focus on the application of ANNs for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Finally, the future of ANNs in neurosurgery is explored. A total of 1093 citations were identified and screened. In all, 57 citations were found to be relevant. Of these, 50 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The synthesis of the data showed several applications of ANN in neurosurgery, including: (1) diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in low back pain, brain tumours and primary epilepsy; (2) enhancing clinically relevant information extraction from radiographic images, intracranial pressure processing, low back pain and real-time tumour tracking; (3) outcome prediction in epilepsy, brain metastases, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbar disc herniation, childhood hydrocephalus, trauma mortality, and the occurrence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage; (4) the use in the biomechanical assessments of spinal disease. ANNs can be effectively employed for diagnosis, prognosis and outcome prediction in neurosurgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This detailed view of the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (19.5S, 149.5E) shows several small patch reefs within the overall reef system. The Great Barrier Reef, largest in the world, comprises thousands of individual reefs of great variety and are closely monitored by marine ecologists. These reefs are about 6000 years old and sit on top of much older reefs. The most rapid coral growth occurs on the landward side of the reefs.

  5. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    OpenAIRE

    Nikravesh Mansoure; Ahmadi Fazlollah; Oskouie Fatemeh; Negarandeh Reza; Hallberg Ingalill

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among ...

  6. Barriers to Cyber Information Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    finding out relationships or no relationships. It is more equivalent with this study’s epistemology and methodology than free-mapping or pure...and industry remain educated on and sensitive to methods that can mitigate this concern and ensure antitrust compliance.151 4. Technology...legal scholars. One way to overcome the legal barriers is through education and clarity about the laws that are currently barriers such as anti-trust

  7. Tissue engineering scheming by artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Ge, H; Zhou, X; Yang, D

    2005-01-01

    Tissue engineers are often confused when seeking the most effective, economical and secure scheme for tissue engineering. The aim of this study is to generate tissue engineering schemes with artificial intelligence instead of human intelligence. The experimental data of tissue engineered cartilage were integrated and standardized with a centralized database, and a scheme engine was developed using artificial intelligent methods (artificial neural networks and decision trees). The scheme engine was trained with existing cases in the database, and then was used to generate tissue engineering schemes for new experimental animals. Following the schemes generated by the artificial intelligent system, we cured 18 of the 20 experimental animals. In conclusion, artificial intelligence is a powerful method for decision making in the tissue engineering realm.

  8. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  9. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karakose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method.

  10. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakose, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. PMID:23935424

  11. A DISTRIBUTED SMART HOME ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    2013-01-01

    A majority of the research performed today explore artificial intelligence in smart homes by using a centralized approach where a smart home server performs the necessary calculations. This approach has some disadvantages that can be overcome by shifting focus to a distributed approach where...... the artificial intelligence system is implemented as distributed as agents running parts of the artificial intelligence system. This paper presents a distributed smart home architecture that distributes artificial intelligence in smart homes and discusses the pros and cons of such a concept. The presented...... distributed model is a layered model. Each layer offers a different complexity level of the embedded distributed artificial intelligence. At the lowest layer smart objects exists, they are small cheap embedded microcontroller based smart devices that are powered by batteries. The next layer contains a more...

  12. Air barrier systems: Construction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrault, J.C

    1989-01-01

    An examination is presented of how ordinary building materials can be used in an innovative manner to design, detail, and construct effective air barrier systems for common types of walls. For residential construction, the air drywall approach uses the interior gypsum board as the main component of the wall air barrier system. Joints between the gypsum board and adjacent materials or assemblies are sealed by gaskets. In commercial construction, two different techniques are employed for using gypsum board as air barrier material: the accessible drywall and non-accessible drywall approaches. The former is similar to the air drywall approach except that high performance sealants are used instead of gaskets. In the latter approach, exterior drywall sheathing is the main component of the air barrier system; joints between boards are taped and joints between boards and other components are sealed using elastomeric membrane strips. For various types of commercial and institutional buildings, metal air barrier systems are widely used and include pre-engineered curtain walls or sheet metal walls. Masonry wall systems are regarded as still the most durable, fireproof, and soundproof wall type available but an effective air barrier system has typically been difficult to implement. Factory-made elastomeric membranes offer the potential to provide airtightness to masonry walls. These membranes are applied on the entire masonry wall surface and are used to make airtight connections with other building components. Two types of product are available: thermofusible and peel-and-stick membranes. 5 figs.

  13. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control

  14. Artificial pinning centers using the barrier layer of ordered nanoporous alumina templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallet, X.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.

    2009-01-01

    of approximately 50nm. Using this surface as a template for controlling the pinning in thin superconducting films, superconducting Nb was deposited with different thicknesses and under different deposition angles. The evaporation under a 30° angle shows an asymmetric pinning potential composed of two triangular...

  15. Emergent Behavior of Coupled Barrier Island - Resort Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    Barrier islands are attractive sites for resorts. Natural barrier islands experience beach erosion and island overwash during storms, beach accretion and dune building during inter-storm periods, and migration up the continental shelf as sea level rises. Beach replenishment, artificial dune building, seawalls, jetties and groins have been somewhat effective in protecting resorts against erosion and overwash during storms, but it is unknown how the coupled system will respond to long-term sea level rise. We investigate coupled barrier island - resort systems using an agent-based model with three components: natural barrier islands divided into a series of alongshore cells; resorts controlled by markets for tourism and hotel purchases; and coupling via storm damage to resorts and resort protection by government agents. Modeled barrier islands change by beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms. In the resort hotel market, developer agents build hotels and hotel owning agents purchase them using predictions of future revenue and property appreciation, with the goal of maximizing discounted utility. In the tourism market, hotel owning agents set room rental prices to maximize profit and tourist agents choose vacation destinations maximizing a utility based on beach width, price and word-of-mouth. Government agents build seawalls, groins and jetties, and widen the beach and build up dunes by adding sand to protect resorts from storms, enhance beach quality, and maximize resort revenue. Results indicate that barrier islands and resorts evolve in a coupled manner to resort size saturation, with resorts protected against small-to-intermediate-scale storms under fairly stable sea level. Under extended, rapidly rising sea level, protection measures enhance the effect of large storms, leading to emergent behavior in the form of limit cycles or barrier submergence

  16. The Association Between Artificial Sweeteners and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Michelle; Obert, Jon; Casey, Lisa

    2017-11-21

    The purpose of this paper is to review the epidemiology of obesity and the evolution of artificial sweeteners; to examine the latest research on the effects of artificial sweeteners on the host microbiome, the gut-brain axis, glucose homeostasis, and energy consumption; and to discuss how all of these changes ultimately contribute to obesity. Although artificial sweeteners were developed as a sugar substitute to help reduce insulin resistance and obesity, data in both animal models and humans suggest that the effects of artificial sweeteners may contribute to metabolic syndrome and the obesity epidemic. Artificial sweeteners appear to change the host microbiome, lead to decreased satiety, and alter glucose homeostasis, and are associated with increased caloric consumption and weight gain. Artificial sweeteners are marketed as a healthy alternative to sugar and as a tool for weight loss. Data however suggests that the intended effects do not correlate with what is seen in clinical practice. Future research should focus on the newer plant-based sweeteners, incorporate extended study durations to determine the long-term effects of artificial sweetener consumption, and focus on changes in the microbiome, as that seems to be one of the main driving forces behind nutrient absorption and glucose metabolism.

  17. From natural to artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James; Tran, Phong D.

    2013-01-01

    Demand for energy is projected to increase at least twofold by mid-century relative to the present global consumption because of predicted population and economic growth. This demand could be met, in principle, from fossil energy resources, particularly coal. However, the cumulative nature of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions demands that stabilizing the atmospheric CO2 levels to just twice their pre-anthropogenic values by mid-century will be extremely challenging, requiring invention, development and deployment of schemes for carbon-neutral energy production on a scale commensurate with, or larger than, the entire present-day energy supply from all sources combined. Among renewable and exploitable energy resources, nuclear fusion energy or solar energy are by far the largest. However, in both cases, technological breakthroughs are required with nuclear fusion being very difficult, if not impossible on the scale required. On the other hand, 1 h of sunlight falling on our planet is equivalent to all the energy consumed by humans in an entire year. If solar energy is to be a major primary energy source, then it must be stored and despatched on demand to the end user. An especially attractive approach is to store solar energy in the form of chemical bonds as occurs in natural photosynthesis. However, a technology is needed which has a year-round average conversion efficiency significantly higher than currently available by natural photosynthesis so as to reduce land-area requirements and to be independent of food production. Therefore, the scientific challenge is to construct an ‘artificial leaf’ able to efficiently capture and convert solar energy and then store it in the form of chemical bonds of a high-energy density fuel such as hydrogen while at the same time producing oxygen from water. Realistically, the efficiency target for such a technology must be 10 per cent or better. Here, we review the molecular details of the energy capturing reactions of natural

  18. Comparison of the Radiopacities of Different Root-End Filling and Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Karapınar-Kazandağ, Meriç; Kayahan, Mehmet Baybora

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of 3 repair materials, Biodentine, MM-MTA, and MTA Angelus. Standardized cylindrical rings were prepared. Samples of Biodentine MM-MTA and MTA Angelus were prepared (n = 10 in each group), filled into the rings, and preserved at 37°C until setting. A 1 mm thick dentin slice was used as control. All set specimens were removed and radiographed along with the dentine slice and a graduated aluminium step wedge. Digital images were transferred to the computer using a software. The radiographic densities of the specimens were determined, and the values were converted into millimetres of aluminium (mm Al). One-way ANOVA was used for intergroup comparison, whereas Tukey HSD test was used for detecting the group with the difference. The mean radiopacities of Biodentine, MTA Angelus, and MM-MTA were 2.8 ± 0.48, 4.72 ± 0.45, and 5.18 ± 0.51 mm Al, respectively. The radiopacity of Biodentine was significantly lower compared to other materials (P = 0.001), whereas no significant difference was noted between MTA Angelus and MM-MTA (P = 0.109). All materials had significantly higher radiopacities compared to dentine. The relatively lower radiopacity of Biodentine can be improved to achieve more reliable results in procedures such as retrograde fillings. PMID:24260018

  19. Comparison of the Radiopacities of Different Root-End Filling and Repair Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jale Tanalp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the radiopacity of 3 repair materials, Biodentine, MM-MTA, and MTA Angelus. Standardized cylindrical rings were prepared. Samples of Biodentine MM-MTA and MTA Angelus were prepared ( in each group, filled into the rings, and preserved at 37°C until setting. A 1 mm thick dentin slice was used as control. All set specimens were removed and radiographed along with the dentine slice and a graduated aluminium step wedge. Digital images were transferred to the computer using a software. The radiographic densities of the specimens were determined, and the values were converted into millimetres of aluminium (mm Al. One-way ANOVA was used for intergroup comparison, whereas Tukey HSD test was used for detecting the group with the difference. The mean radiopacities of Biodentine, MTA Angelus, and MM-MTA were 2.8 ± 0.48, 4.72 ± 0.45, and 5.18 ± 0.51 mm Al, respectively. The radiopacity of Biodentine was significantly lower compared to other materials (, whereas no significant difference was noted between MTA Angelus and MM-MTA (. All materials had significantly higher radiopacities compared to dentine. The relatively lower radiopacity of Biodentine can be improved to achieve more reliable results in procedures such as retrograde fillings.

  20. Diabetes and diet : managing dietary barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of

  1. Abstraction in artificial intelligence and complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Saitta, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    Abstraction is a fundamental mechanism underlying both human and artificial perception, representation of knowledge, reasoning and learning. This mechanism plays a crucial role in many disciplines, notably Computer Programming, Natural and Artificial Vision, Complex Systems, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Art, and Cognitive Sciences. This book first provides the reader with an overview of the notions of abstraction proposed in various disciplines by comparing both commonalities and differences.  After discussing the characterizing properties of abstraction, a formal model, the K

  2. Artificial intelligence in radiology: decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, C E

    1994-07-01

    Computer-based systems that incorporate artificial intelligence techniques can help physicians make decisions about their patients' care. In radiology, systems have been developed to help physicians choose appropriate radiologic procedures and to formulate accurate diagnoses. These decision support systems use techniques such as rule-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, hypertext, Bayesian networks, and case-based reasoning. This article reviews these artificial intelligence techniques, describes their application in radiology, and discusses the role that decision support systems may play in radiology's future.

  3. Bringing Artificial Gravity into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Grant; Aning, Isaac

    2018-01-01

    We recently conducted an experimental test of artificial gravity by placing various species of plants in centrifuges and analyzed the plants’ germination and growth. This research project incorporated several topics covered in undergraduate astronomy, biology, and physics courses. Given the interest of introductory astronomy students in artificial gravity and their pre-existing images of applications such as rotating spacecraft from pop culture, the results of the experiment may provide a gateway to discuss artificial gravity beyond teaching the traditional examples of Newton’s laws. We will discuss the experiment in detail and provide suggestions for how the experiment could be incorporated into your classroom.

  4. Artificial intelligence in power system optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Ongsakul, Weerakorn

    2013-01-01

    With the considerable increase of AI applications, AI is being increasingly used to solve optimization problems in engineering. In the past two decades, the applications of artificial intelligence in power systems have attracted much research. This book covers the current level of applications of artificial intelligence to the optimization problems in power systems. This book serves as a textbook for graduate students in electric power system management and is also be useful for those who are interested in using artificial intelligence in power system optimization.

  5. Natural and Artificial Antifreeze Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Soichi; Hirao, Noriko

    In the blood of winter polar fish an antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) occurs which acts to protect the fish from freezing to death. The AFGP has a unique hydrophilic hydrophobic conformation, involved in non-colligative depression of the freezing temperature of water without altering the melting point of ice. This phenomenon is reportedly a reflection of the ice crystal growth inhibition by the adsorption of the AFGP onto a-axial surfaces of the ice crystal. The authors, on the other hand, have developed an enzymatically modified protein (EMG-12) by covalent attachment of leucine dodecyl ester to the C-terminal position of gelation with the aid of a reverse reaction catalyzed by a protease. EMG-12, having a hydrophilic-hydrophobic structure, is highly surface-active and acts to stabilize a supercooling state of water by antinucleation. Discussions are made on similarities and dissimilarities of structure-function relationships of these natural and artificial antifreeze proteins. The significance of using them as antifreeze agents is also discussed.

  6. Improving Tools in Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical origin of the Artificial Intelligence (AI is usually established in the Dartmouth Conference, of 1956. But we can find many more arcane origins [1]. Also, we can consider, in more recent times, very great thinkers, as Janos Neumann (then, John von Neumann, arrived in USA, Norbert Wiener, Alan Mathison Turing, or Lofti Zadeh, for instance [12, 14]. Frequently AI requires Logic. But its Classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it was necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, as Fuzzy Logic, Modal Logic, Non-Monotonic Logic and so on [1, 2]. Among the things that AI needs to represent are categories, objects, properties, relations between objects, situations, states, time, events, causes and effects, knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in AI can be classified in two general types [3, 5], search problems and representation problems. On this last "peak", there exist different ways to reach their summit. So, we have [4] Logics, Rules, Frames, Associative Nets, Scripts, and so on, many times connected among them. We attempt, in this paper, a panoramic vision of the scope of application of such representation methods in AI. The two more disputable questions of both modern philosophy of mind and AI will be perhaps the Turing Test and the Chinese Room Argument. To elucidate these very difficult questions, see our final note.

  7. Artificial insemination in pigs today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, R V

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial insemination (AI) for breeding pigs has been instrumental for facilitating global improvements in fertility, genetics, labor, and herd health. The establishment of AI centers for management of boars and production of semen has allowed for selection of boars for fertility and sperm production using in vitro and in vivo measures. Today, boars can be managed for production of 20 to 40 traditional AI doses containing 2.5 to 3.0 billion motile sperm in 75 to 100 mL of extender or 40 to 60 doses with 1.5 to 2.0 billion sperm in similar or reduced volumes for use in cervical or intrauterine AI. Regardless of the sperm dose, in liquid form, extenders are designed to sustain sperm fertility for 3 to 7 days. On farm, AI is the predominant form for commercial sow breeding and relies on manual detection of estrus with sows receiving two cervical or two intrauterine inseminations of the traditional or low sperm doses on each day detected in standing estrus. New approaches for increasing rates of genetic improvement through use of AI are aimed at methods to continue to lower the number of sperm in an AI dose and reducing the number of inseminations through use of a single, fixed-time AI after ovulation induction. Both approaches allow greater selection pressure for economically important swine traits in the sires and help extend the genetic advantages through AI on to more production farms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Artificial Intelligence and Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Teruo

    After reviewing the recent popularization of the information transmission and processing technologies, which are supported by the progress of electronics, the authors describe that by the introduction of the opto-electronics into the information technology, the possibility of applying the artificial intelligence (AI) technique to the mechanization of the information management has emerged. It is pointed out that althuogh AI deals with problems in the mental world, its basic methodology relies upon the verification by evidence, so the experiment on computers become indispensable for the study of AI. The authors also describe that as computers operate by the program, the basic intelligence which is concerned in AI is that expressed by languages. This results in the fact that the main tool of AI is the logical proof and it involves an intrinsic limitation. To answer a question “Why do you employ AI in your problem solving”, one must have ill-structured problems and intend to conduct deep studies on the thinking and the inference, and the memory and the knowledge-representation. Finally the authors discuss the application of AI technique to the information management. The possibility of the expert-system, processing of the query, and the necessity of document knowledge-base are stated.

  9. Onycomycosis due to artificial nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, A; Trau, H; Davidovici, B; Grunwald, M H; Amichai, B

    2008-08-01

    The use of artificial nails (ANs) as part of nail-care cosmetics is very popular. Several side effects and complications, such as contact dermatitis and bacterial and fungal infections, have been reported in patients using ANs. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the fungal pathogens in nail abnormalities appearing in patients with ANs. We evaluated 68 patients suffering from nail changes and paronychia, which appear after removal of ANs. Mycological samples were obtained from two sites: distal parts of the involved nail and the proximal nail fold. KOH examination and fungal culture were used for detection and identification of fungal infection. Mycological results from the distal part of the nail showed positive KOH test in 57 cases (83.8%), and culture was positive in 67 patients (98.5%). Mycological results obtained from the proximal nail fold showed positive KOH test in 36 patients (52.9%); in 36 of the cases, culture was positive. Candida spp. were the most common pathogen. Both KOH and culture results were significantly better while sampling from the distal part of the nail compared with sampling from the proximal nail fold (P = 0.0001). Onychomycosis was found to be very common in nail changes due to ANs, leading to an increased risk of transmitting microbial infections. Therefore, health care personnel and workers in the food industry should avoid using ANs.

  10. Artificial Intelligence in planetary spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2017-10-01

    The field of exoplanetary spectroscopy is as fast moving as it is new. Analysing currently available observations of exoplanetary atmospheres often invoke large and correlated parameter spaces that can be difficult to map or constrain. This is true for both: the data analysis of observations as well as the theoretical modelling of their atmospheres.Issues of low signal-to-noise data and large, non-linear parameter spaces are nothing new and commonly found in many fields of engineering and the physical sciences. Recent years have seen vast improvements in statistical data analysis and machine learning that have revolutionised fields as diverse as telecommunication, pattern recognition, medical physics and cosmology.In many aspects, data mining and non-linearity challenges encountered in other data intensive fields are directly transferable to the field of extrasolar planets. In this conference, I will discuss how deep neural networks can be designed to facilitate solving said issues both in exoplanet atmospheres as well as for atmospheres in our own solar system. I will present a deep belief network, RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition), able to learn to recognise exoplanetary spectra and provide artificial intelligences to state-of-the-art atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Furthermore, I will present a new deep convolutional network that is able to map planetary surface compositions using hyper-spectral imaging and demonstrate its uses on Cassini-VIMS data of Saturn.

  11. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected. Copyright IWA Publishing 2008.

  12. The Discovery of Artificial Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2012-03-01

    We reconstruct Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie's discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 based in part on documents preserved in the Joliot-Curie Archives in Paris, France. We argue that their discovery followed from the convergence of two parallel lines of research, on the neutron and on the positron, that were focused on a well-defined experimental problem, the nuclear transmutation of aluminum and other light elements. We suggest that a key role was played by a suggestion that Francis Perrin made at the seventh Solvay Conference at the end of October 1933, that the alpha-particle bombardment of aluminum produces an intermediate unstable isotope of phosphorus, which then decays by positron emission. We also suggest that a further idea that Perrin published in December 1933, and the pioneering theory of beta decay that Enrico Fermi also first published in December 1933, established a new theoretical framework that stimulated Joliot to resume the researches that he and Curie had interrupted after the Solvay Conference, now for the first time using a Geiger-Müller counter to detect the positrons emitted when he bombarded aluminum with polonium alpha particles.

  13. Multilevel hierarchically ordered artificial biomineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguo; Lin, Kaili; Wu, Chengtie; Wang, Yueyue; Zou, Zhaoyong; Chang, Jiang

    2014-01-15

    Living organisms are known for creating complex organic-inorganic hybrid materials such as bone, teeth, and shells, which possess outstanding functions as compared to their simple mineral forms. This has inspired many attempts to mimic such structures, but has yielded few practical advances. In this study, a multilevel hierarchically ordered artificial biomineral (a composite of hydroxyapatite and gelatine) with favorable nanomechanical properties is reported. A typical optimized HAp/gelatin hybrid material in the perpendicular direction of the HAp c-axis has a modulus of 25.91 + 1.78 GPa and hardness of 0.90 + 0.10 GPa, which well matches that of human cortical bone (modulus 24.3 + 1.4 GPa, hardness 0.69 + 0.05 GPa). The bottom-up crystal constructions (from nano- to micro- to macroscale) of this material are achieved through a hard template approach by the phase transformation from DCP to HAp. The structural biomimetic material shows another way to mimic the complex hierarchical designs of sclerous tissues which have potential value for application in hard tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  15. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due......The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... to increased levels of Th17 cells and its associated cytokines. As for AD, a positive association to CS has been established in epidemiological studies, but is still unresolved. Experimental studies show, however, an inverse relationship between AD and CS. The opposing and antagonistic influences of Th1 (CS...

  16. Efficient inhibition of HIV-1 replication by an artificial polycistronic miRNA construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi has been used as a promising approach to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication for both in vitro and in vivo animal models. However, HIV-1 escape mutants after RNAi treatment have been reported. Expressing multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against conserved viral sequences can serve as a genetic barrier for viral escape, and optimization of the efficiency of this process was the aim of this study. Results An artificial polycistronic transcript driven by a CMV promoter was designed to inhibit HIV-1 replication. The artificial polycistronic transcript contained two pre-miR-30a backbones and one pre-miR-155 backbone, which are linked by a sequence derived from antisense RNA sequence targeting the HIV-1 env gene. Our results demonstrated that this artificial polycistronic transcript simultaneously expresses three anti-HIV siRNAs and efficiently inhibits HIV-1 replication. In addition, the biosafety of MT-4 cells expressing this polycistronic miRNA transcript was evaluated, and no apparent impacts on cell proliferation rate, interferon response, and interruption of native miRNA processing were observed. Conclusions The strategy described here to generate an artificial polycistronic transcript to inhibit viral replication provided an opportunity to select and optimize many factors to yield highly efficient constructs expressing multiple siRNAs against viral infection.

  17. The development of an artificial organic networks toolkit for LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Ponce, Pedro; Molina, Arturo

    2015-03-15

    Two of the most challenging problems that scientists and researchers face when they want to experiment with new cutting-edge algorithms are the time-consuming for encoding and the difficulties for linking them with other technologies and devices. In that sense, this article introduces the artificial organic networks toolkit for LabVIEW™ (AON-TL) from the implementation point of view. The toolkit is based on the framework provided by the artificial organic networks technique, giving it the potential to add new algorithms in the future based on this technique. Moreover, the toolkit inherits both the rapid prototyping and the easy-to-use characteristics of the LabVIEW™ software (e.g., graphical programming, transparent usage of other softwares and devices, built-in programming event-driven for user interfaces), to make it simple for the end-user. In fact, the article describes the global architecture of the toolkit, with particular emphasis in the software implementation of the so-called artificial hydrocarbon networks algorithm. Lastly, the article includes two case studies for engineering purposes (i.e., sensor characterization) and chemistry applications (i.e., blood-brain barrier partitioning data model) to show the usage of the toolkit and the potential scalability of the artificial organic networks technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Population Dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-Associated Bacteria in Natural and Artificial Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUSAN SOKA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendronephthya sp. is a soft coral that has huge distribution starting from Indopacific, Tonga, Solomon Islands to Great Barrier Reef in Australia. However, this soft corals survive only in short period after cultivation in artificial habitat (aquarium. Recent study showed that the soft coral Dendronephtya sp. has an association or symbiotic relationship with several bacteria, commonly known as coral associated bacteria (CAB. In this study, we compared the population dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-associated bacteria in natural and artificial habitat, resulting different bacterial community profiles using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis of bacterial community DNA. There were 15 main classes of bacterial population identified along with uncultured microorganism, uncultured organism, uncultured bacteria and unidentified organism. Members of Actinobacteria, Arthrobacteria, Chlorobia, Caldilineae, Δ-proteobacteria and Proteobacteria were predicted to give contributions in the survival ability of both Dendronephthya sp. The cultivation of soft corals after 2 weeks in artificial habitat increases bacterial population similarity on 2 different samples by 10%. Bacterial population similarity in artificial habitat would increase along with the longer cultivation time of soft corals.

  19. Population Dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-Associated Bacteria in Natural and Artificial Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUSAN SOKA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendronephthya sp. is a soft coral that has huge distribution starting from Indopacific, Tonga, Solomon Islands to Great Barrier Reef in Australia. However, this soft corals survive only in short period after cultivation in artificial habitat (aquarium. Recent study showed that the soft coral Dendronephtya sp. has an association or symbiotic relationship with several bacteria, commonly known as coral associated bacteria (CAB. In this study, we compared the population dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-associated bacteria in natural and artificial habitat, resulting different bacterial community profiles using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis of bacterial community DNA. There were 15 main classes of bacterial population identified along with uncultured microorganism, uncultured organism, uncultured bacteria and unidentified organism. Members of Actinobacteria, Arthrobacteria, Chlorobia, Caldilineae, -proteobacteria and Proteobacteria were predicted to give contributions in the survival ability of both Dendronephthya sp. The cultivation of soft corals after 2 weeks in artificial habitat increases bacterial population similarity on 2 different samples by 10%. Bacterial population similarity in artificial habitat would increase along with the longer cultivation time of soft corals.

  20. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Bainton, Roland J

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through G-protein coupled receptor signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate BBB has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many BBB mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the BBB can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of BBB gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of BBB secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate BBB anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  1. Communication barriers in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBARA KOC-KOZŁOWIEC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The art of communication – listening and speaking – is a major life skill, with a thorough influence on every human life. Remaining silent while the interlocutor speaks is not all that there is to the act of listening to messages. True listening is based on an intention to get involved in understanding of the other person, enjoying his or her presence, learning something from the conversation, giving assistance, or comforting the interlocutor. In the article the author describes obstacles (barriers, which render true listening impossible. These barriers have been identified by a group of young adults.

  2. Volcanic risk: mitigation of lava flow invasion hazard through optimized barrier configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scifoni, S.; Coltelli, M.; Marsella, M.; Napoleoni, Q.; Del Negro, C.; Proietti, C.; Vicari, A.

    2009-04-01

    In order to mitigate the destructive effects of lava flows along volcanic slopes, the building of artificial barriers is a fundamental action for controlling and slowing down the lava flow advance, as experienced during a few recent eruptions of Etna. The simulated lava path can be used to define an optimize project to locate the work but for a timely action it is also necessary to quickly construct a barrier. Therefore this work investigates different type of engineering work that can be adopted to build up a lava containing barrier for improving the efficiency of the structure. From the analysis of historical cases it is clear that barriers were generally constructed by building up earth, lava blocks and incoherent, low density material. This solution implies complex operational constraints and logistical problems that justify the effort of looking for alternative design. Moreover for optimizing the barrier construction an alternative project of gabion-made barrier was here proposed. In this way the volume of mobilized material is lower than that for a earth barrier, thus reducing the time needed for build up the structure. A second crucial aspect to be considered is the geometry of the barrier which, is one of the few parameters that can be modulated, the others being linked to the morphological and topographical characteristics of the ground. Once the walls have been realized, it may be necessary to be able to expand the structure vertically. The use of gabion has many advantages over loose riprap (earthen walls) owing to their modularity and capability to be stacked in various shapes. Furthermore, the elements which are not inundated by lava can be removed and rapidly used for other barriers. The combination between numerical simulations and gabions will allow a quicker mitigation of risk on lava flows and this is an important aspect for a civil protection intervention in emergency cases.

  3. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO 2 geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  4. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  5. Artificial Intelligence, Robots and Education: Selected Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Pat

    1987-01-01

    This annotated bibliography describes 12 books, 10 ERIC publications, and 7 periodical articles about artificial intelligence and robotics that were selected by the author as resources for educators. (CLB)

  6. An intraoral self-contained artificial larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, L D; Katz, P A; Brenman, H S; Schwartz, H L

    1982-01-01

    It has been estimated that approximately one third to one half of persons undergoing total laryngectomy do not obtain a satisfactory voice. These patients remain aphonic or use artificial larynges to facilitate their communication. A multidisciplinary group at Thomas Jefferson University has developed a miniaturized artificial larynx that fits on a dental prosthesis or dental plate which has over a 100-dB sound pressure level output at the source and is powered by two hearing aid batteries with a life expectancy of over 100 hours of continuous use. Clinical trials have shown that persons using other artificial devices quickly adapt to this new artificial larynx, and the first person who began using the device, an Italian, commented that he could now use both hands; and felt that this was a great help because of his ethnic background.

  7. Artificial Muscles: Mechanisms, Applications, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M; Hunter, Ian W

    2018-02-01

    The area of artificial muscle is a highly interdisciplinary field of research that has evolved rapidly in the last 30 years. Recent advances in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization, specifically carbon nanotubes and nanowires, have had major contributions in the development of artificial muscles. However, what can artificial muscles really do for humans? This question is considered here by first examining nature's solutions to this design problem and then discussing the structure, actuation mechanism, applications, and limitations of recently developed artificial muscles, including highly oriented semicrystalline polymer fibers; nanocomposite actuators; twisted nanofiber yarns; thermally activated shape-memory alloys; ionic-polymer/metal composites; dielectric-elastomer actuators; conducting polymers; stimuli-responsive gels; piezoelectric, electrostrictive, magnetostrictive, and photostrictive actuators; photoexcited actuators; electrostatic actuators; and pneumatic actuators. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. What Artificial Intelligence Is Doing for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Peter R.; Kirrane, Diane E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the three areas of research and application of artificial intelligence: (1) robotics, (2) natural language processing, and (3) knowledge-based or expert systems. Focuses on what expert systems can do, especially in the area of training. (JOW)

  9. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Remarkable progress towards realizing quantum computation has been achieved using natural and artificial atoms as qubits. This paper presents a brief overview of the current status of different types of qubits. On the one hand, natural atoms (such as neutral atoms and ions) have long coherence times, and could be stored in large arrays, providing ideal 'quantum memories'. On the other hand, artificial atoms (such as superconducting circuits or semiconductor quantum dots) have the advantage of custom-designed features and could be used as 'quantum processing units'. Natural and artificial atoms can be coupled with each other and can also be interfaced with photons for long-distance communications. Hybrid devices made of natural/artificial atoms and photons may provide the next-generation design for quantum computers.

  10. Artificial infestations of Tapinanthus ogowensis (Engler) Danser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial infestations of Tapinanthus ogowensis (Engler) Danser (Loranthaceae) on three host species in the Logbessou Plateau (Douala, Cameroon). DS Didier, EON Laurier, N Din, PR Jules, T Victor, F Henri, S Georges, A Akoa ...

  11. Artificial Intelligence and Public Healthcare Service Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tara Qian; Medaglia, Rony

    Public healthcare ecosystems are complex networks of diverse actors that are subject to pressures to innovate, also a result of technological advancements. Artificial Intelligence (AI), in particular, has the potential to transform the way hospitals, doctors, patients, government agencies...

  12. Design of artificial human joints & organs

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    This book covers the design science and methodology of artificial joints and organs.  It presents the mechanical characterization of the hard and soft tissues as well as the viscoelastic properties of the tissue.

  13. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed

  14. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  16. Brain Intelligence: Go Beyond Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Huimin; Li, Yujie; Chen, Min; Kim, Hyoungseop; Serikawa, Seiichi

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is an important technology that supports daily social life and economic activities. It contributes greatly to the sustainable growth of Japan's economy and solves various social problems. In recent years, AI has attracted attention as a key for growth in developed countries such as Europe and the United States and developing countries such as China and India. The attention has been focused mainly on developing new artificial intelligence information communication ...

  17. Artificial intelligence approaches to astronomical observation scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Miller, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Automated scheduling will play an increasing role in future ground- and space-based observatory operations. Due to the complexity of the problem, artificial intelligence technology currently offers the greatest potential for the development of scheduling tools with sufficient power and flexibility to handle realistic scheduling situations. Summarized here are the main features of the observatory scheduling problem, how artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can be applied, and recent progress in AI scheduling for Hubble Space Telescope.

  18. Artificial Intelligence Implications for Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    data entry, and (4) active memory techniques. In the remainder of this section we will describe each of these areas briefly. Artificial Intelligence applications In... Intelligence applications to information retrieval fall into four broad categories: (1) human-database interfaces, (2) conceptual Indexing, (3) automatic...the fact that some of the most difficult of intelligent behavior (i.e. common sense) seems intuitively easy. z. =2atgarIa at Al AiA1AnA Artificial

  19. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, V. E.; Alqarni, A.; Alshamari, S.; Siddig, A.; Aldossary, O. M.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  20. Artificial Organs 2013: a year in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchesky, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    In this Editor's Review, articles published in 2013 are organized by category and briefly summarized. We aim to provide a brief reflection of the currently available worldwide knowledge that is intended to advance and better human life while providing insight for continued application of technologies and methods of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration. As the official journal of The International Federation for Artificial Organs, The International Faculty for Artificial Organs, the International Society for Rotary Blood Pumps, the International Society for Pediatric Mechanical Cardiopulmonary Support, and the Vienna International Workshop on Functional Electrical Stimulation, Artificial Organs continues in the original mission of its founders "to foster communications in the field of artificial organs on an international level". Artificial Organs continues to publish developments and clinical applications of artificial organ technologies in this broad and expanding field of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration from all over the world. We take this time also to express our gratitude to our authors for offering their work to this journal. We offer our very special thanks to our reviewers who give so generously of time and expertise to review, critique, and especially provide so meaningful suggestions to the author's work whether eventually accepted or rejected and especially to those whose native tongue is not English. Without these excellent and dedicated reviewers the quality expected from such a journal could not be possible. We also express our special thanks to our Publisher, Wiley Periodicals, for their expert attention and support in the production and marketing of Artificial Organs. We look forward to recording further advances in the coming years. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  1. Exploring Artificial Intelligence Utilizing BioArt

    OpenAIRE

    Simou , Panagiota; Tiligadis , Konstantinos; Alexiou , Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Part 15: First Workshop on Ethics and Philosophy in Artificial Intelligence (EPAI 2013); International audience; While artificial intelligence combined with Bioinformatics and Nanotechnology offers a variety of improvements and a technological and healthcare revolution, Bioartists attempt to replace the traditional artistic medium with biological materials, bio-imaging techniques, bioreactors and several times to treat their own body as an alive canvas. BioArt seems to play the role of a new ...

  2. Ethical Issues of Artificial Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Psixa, Maria; Vlamos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Part 12: Medical Applications of ANN and Ethics of AI; International audience; While the plethora of artificial biomedical applications is enriched and combined with the possibilities of artificial intelligence, bioinformatics and nanotechnology, the variability in the ideological use of such concepts is associated with bioethical issues and several legal aspects. The convergence of bioethics and computer ethics, attempts to illustrate and approach problems, occurring by the fusion of human a...

  3. The 2002 Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI-02) was introduced the Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium STAIRS), the first-ever international symposium specifically aimed at Ph.D. students in AI. The outcome was a thorough, high-quality, and successful event, with all the features one usually finds in the best international conferences: large international committees, comprehensive coverage, published proceedings, renowned speakers and panelists, sub...

  4. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE- BENEFITS, CHALLENGES AND ETHICAL ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Juganaru Andreou

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, all big companies and most of small businesses are focused on increasing profitability and improving competitiveness. With this goal in mind, many of them turned to replace many tasks performed by humans with Artificial Intelligence. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is receiving an increasing attention lately and the debate is fiercely growing with a question not being answered yet: will it change the world for the better or for worse?

  5. Artificial Organs 2017: A Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchesky, Paul S

    2018-03-01

    In this Editor's Review, articles published in 2017 are organized by category and summarized. We provide a brief reflection of the research and progress in artificial organs intended to advance and better human life while providing insight for continued application of these technologies and methods. Artificial Organs continues in the original mission of its founders "to foster communications in the field of artificial organs on an international level." Artificial Organs continues to publish developments and clinical applications of artificial organ technologies in this broad and expanding field of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration from all over the world. Peer-reviewed Special Issues this year included contributions from the 12th International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion edited by Dr. Akif Undar, Artificial Oxygen Carriers edited by Drs. Akira Kawaguchi and Jan Simoni, the 24th Congress of the International Society for Mechanical Circulatory Support edited by Dr. Toru Masuzawa, Challenges in the Field of Biomedical Devices: A Multidisciplinary Perspective edited by Dr. Vincenzo Piemonte and colleagues and Functional Electrical Stimulation edited by Dr. Winfried Mayr and colleagues. We take this time also to express our gratitude to our authors for offering their work to this journal. We offer our very special thanks to our reviewers who give so generously of time and expertise to review, critique, and especially provide meaningful suggestions to the author's work whether eventually accepted or rejected. Without these excellent and dedicated reviewers the quality expected from such a journal could not be possible. We also express our special thanks to our Publisher, John Wiley & Sons for their expert attention and support in the production and marketing of Artificial Organs. We look forward to reporting further advances in the coming years. © 2018 International Center for

  6. FLUID MECHANICS OF ARTIFICIAL HEART VALVES

    OpenAIRE

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simon, Helene A; Sucosky, Philippe; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    1. Artificial heart valves have been in use for over five decades to replace diseased heart valves. Since the first heart valve replacement performed with a caged-ball valve, more than 50 valve designs have been developed, differing principally in valve geometry, number of leaflets and material. To date, all artificial heart valves are plagued with complications associated with haemolysis, coagulation for mechanical heart valves and leaflet tearing for tissue-based valve prosthesis. For mecha...

  7. Artificial hammerhead ribozymes: engineering and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjeva, M. A.; Davydova, A. S.; Venyaminova, Aliya G.

    2011-02-01

    The properties of hammerhead ribozymes are described. Various hammerhead ribozyme constructs for target RNA cleavage were considered. Approaches to enhancement of the stability of artificial ribozymes in biological media and to regulation of the catalytic activity of hammerhead ribozymes using effector molecules are described. The effect of ribozymes on extended structured natural RNAs is discussed. Applications of artificial hammerhead ribozymes as inhibitors of gene expression at matrix RNA level were considered.

  8. Self-Monitoring Artificial Red Cells with Sufficient Oxygen Supply for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenyu; Zheng, Mingbin; Zhao, Pengfei; Chen, Ze; Siu, Fungming; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been increasingly applied in clinical cancer treatments. However, native hypoxic tumoural microenvironment and lacking oxygen supply are the major barriers hindering photodynamic reactions. To solve this problem, we have developed biomimetic artificial red cells by loading complexes of oxygen-carrier (hemoglobin) and photosensitizer (indocyanine green) for boosted photodynamic strategy. Such nanosystem provides a coupling structure with stable self-oxygen supply and acting as an ideal fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging probe, dynamically monitoring the nanoparticle biodistribution and the treatment of PDT. Upon exposure to near-infrared laser, the remote-triggered photosensitizer generates massive cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) with sufficient oxygen supply. Importantly, hemoglobin is simultaneously oxidized into the more active and resident ferryl-hemoglobin leading to persistent cytotoxicity. ROS and ferryl-hemoglobin synergistically trigger the oxidative damage of xenograft tumour resulting in complete suppression. The artificial red cells with self-monitoring and boosted photodynamic efficacy could serve as a versatile theranostic platform.

  9. Anaphylactic reaction after artificial insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta, Marta; Ordoqui, Elena; Aranzábal, Ascensión; Fernández, Cristina; Bartolomé, Borja; Sanz, Maria Luisa

    2003-04-01

    Bovine seroalbumin is known as an allergen for human beings, but reactions to it in an artificial insemination procedure are much rarer. We report a case of anaphylaxis after intrauterine insemination (IUI) in which sensitization to bovine serum albumin (BSA) is demonstrated. Report the allergy evaluation performed in a patient who suffered a severe reaction immediately after an IUI procedure. A 33-year-old woman was referred because of an anaphylactic reaction after a second trial of IUI. She developed pruritus, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, bronchospasm, and generalized urticaria. She had an atopic medical history of pollen allergy and sensitization to cat epithelium. She had never had trouble with minor surgery and she usually uses latex material. She had never received heterologous sera before. Her husband's semen for the IUI was processed in a standard fluid medium called upgraded INRA B 2 (Laboratoires CCD, Paris, France), which contains amino acids, lipids, vitamins, BSA, penicillin, and streptomycin in addition to inorganic salts. Skin prick tests with the medium and BSA 10 mg/mL were positive. In vitro studies demonstrated an immunoglobulin E binding protein of 60 to 65 kDa and mast cells and basophil activation (CD63 expression) against BSA contained in the medium. Cutaneous and challenge tests with penicillin and streptomycin were negative. We consider the BSA in the semen culture medium to be the factor which triggered the anaphylactic reaction. This case supports the authors who state that media free from heterologous proteins should be used for human application, especially on atopic patients, to avoid sensitization.

  10. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  11. Artificial Psychology: The Psychology of AI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Crowder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Having artificially intelligent machines that think, learn, reason, experience, and can function autonomously, without supervision, is one of the most intriguing goals in all of Computer Science. As the types of problems we would like machines to solve get more complex, it is becoming a necessary goal as well. One of the many problems associated with this goal is that what learning and reasoning are have so many possible meanings that the solution can easily get lost in the sea of opinions and options. The goal of this paper is to establish some foundational principles, theory, and concepts that we feel are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. With this fully autonomous, learning, reasoning, artificially intelligent system (an artificial brain, comes the need to possess constructs in its hardware and software that mimic processes and subsystems that exist within the human brain, including intuitive and emotional memory concepts. Presented here is a discussion of the psychological constructs of artificial intelligence and how they might play out in an artificial mind.

  12. Barriers against psychosocial communication: oncologists' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlind, Hanna; Kettis, Åsa; Glimelius, Bengt; Ring, Lena

    2013-10-20

    To explore oncologists' psychosocial attitudes and beliefs and their perceptions regarding barriers against psychosocial communication. A questionnaire was distributed to oncologists in Sweden (n = 537). Questions covered demography, the Physician Psychosocial Beliefs Scale (PPBS), and barriers against psychosocial communication. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine what factors contribute the most to the PPBS score and the total number of barriers and barriers affecting clinical practice, respectively. Spearman rank-order correlation was used to determine correlation between PPBS score and number of barriers. Questionnaire response rate was 64%. Mean PPBS value was 85.5 (range, 49 to 123; SD, 13.0). Most oncologists (93%) perceived one or more barriers in communicating psychosocial aspects with patients. On average, five different communication barriers were perceived, of which most were perceived to affect clinical practice. These barriers included insufficient consultation time, lack of resources for taking care of problems discovered, and lack of methods to evaluate patients' psychosocial health in clinical practice. There was a positive correlation (rs = 0.490; P barriers (ie, less psychosocially oriented oncologists perceived more barriers). Oncologists with supplementary education with a psychosocial focus perceived fewer barriers/barriers affecting clinical practice (P barriers affecting psychosocial communication in clinical practice. Interventions aiming to improve psychosocial communication must therefore be multifaceted and individualized to clinics and individual oncologists. It is important to minimize barriers to facilitate optimal care and treatment of patients with cancer.

  13. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  14. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    test or a 'fingerprint' of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for. ½. O+ ѕј. Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed.

  15. Functional barriers: Properties and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Dole, P.; Aucejo, S.; Dainelli, D.; Cruz Garcia, C. de la; Hankemeier, T.; N'Gono, Y.; Papaspyrides, C.D.; Paseiro, P.; Pastorelli, S.; Pavlidou, S.; Pennarun, P.Y.; Saillard, P.; Vidal, L.; Vitrac, O.; Voulzatis, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of

  16. FX barriers with smile dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Glyn; Beneder, Reimer; Zilber, A.

    2004-01-01

    Our mandate in this work has been to isolate the features of smile consistent models that are most relevant to the pricing of barrier options. We consider the two classical approaches of stochastic and (parametric) local volatility. Although neither has been particularly successful in practice their

  17. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously. Keywords. Heavy ion fusion; fusion barrier distributions; nuclear structure; coupled reaction chan- nel calculations. PACS Nos 25.70.Bc; 25.70.

  18. Results of falling barrier analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document assesses the consequences if the isolation barrier plate is dropped and falls over on the fuel stored in the water-filled K-East basin. The water slows the rate of fall and some canister bending is expected but only a few rods, if any, would get crushed. The basin criticality calculations will not be affected

  19. Seasonal breaching of coastal barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, Thieu Quang

    2007-01-01

    Natural or unintended breaching can be catastrophic, causing loss of human lives and damage to infrastructures, buildings and natural habitats. Quantitative understand-ing of coastal barrier breaching is therefore of great importance to vulnerability as-sessment of protection works as well as to

  20. Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate : a path integral approach / P. Hänggi and P. Reimann. - In: International Conference on Path Integrals from peV to TeV : Proceedings of the ... / eds.: R. Casalbuoni ... - Singapore u.a. : World Scientific, 1999. - S. 407-409

  1. Barrier island facies models and recognition criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier island outcrops record transgressive shoreline motion at geologic timescales, providing integral clues to understanding how coastlines respond to rising sea levels. However, barrier island deposits are difficult to recognize. While significant progress has been made in understanding the modern coastal morphodynamics, this insight is not fully leveraged in existing barrier island facies models. Excellent outcrop exposures of the paralic Upper Cretaceous Straight Cliffs Formation of southern Utah provide an opportunity to revise facies models and recognition criteria for barrier island deposits. Preserved barrier islands are composed of three main architectural elements (shorefaces, tidal inlets, and tidal channels) which occur independently or in combination to create larger-scale barrier island deposits. Barrier island shorefaces record progradation, while barrier island tidal inlets record lateral migration, and barrier island tidal channels record aggradation within the tidal inlet. Four facies associations are used to describe and characterize these barrier island architectural elements. Barrier islands occur in association with backarrier fill and internally contain lower and upper shoreface, high-energy upper shoreface, and tidal channel facies. Barrier islands bound lagoons or estuaries, and are distinguished from other shoreface deposits by their internal facies and geometry, association with backbarrier facies, and position within transgressive successions. Tidal processes, in particular tidal inlet migration and reworking of the upper shoreface, also distinguish barrier island deposits. Existing barrier island models highlight the short term heterogeneous and dynamic nature of barrier island systems, yet overlook processes tied to geologic time scales, such as multi-directional motion, erosion, and reworking, and their expressions in preserved barrier island strata. This study uses characteristic outcrop expressions of barrier island successions to

  2. Altered permeability barrier structure in cholesteatoma matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars; Rasmussen, Gurli

    2002-01-01

    lipid structures filling the intercellular spaces mainly control the barrier function. The barrier in cholesteatoma epithelium is several times thicker than in unaffected skin but presents distinctive features of a defective barrier as seen in other scaling skin diseases. The intercellular spaces appear...... frequently occur. The corneocytes are shed in clusters, not as single cells. Further, lipid droplets and intracellular membranous material are occasionally seen. In spite of these clear signs of barrier dysfunction, it is unknown whether the thickness of the barrier compensates for the defect in barrier...

  3. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 8. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    AD-A234 887 RADC-TR-90-404, Vol VIII (of 18) Final Technical Report December 1990 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE APPLICATIONS TO SPEECH RECOGNITION...AND SUBl7TLE 5. FUNIOING NUMBERS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE APPLICATIONS TO SPEECH C - F30602-85-C-0008 RECOGNITION eE - b2702F AUTHOR(S) PR - 5581 TA - 27

  4. Rearing the southern green stink bug using an artificial dry diet and an artificial plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizzi, Antonio Ricardo [EMBRAPA, Londrina, PR (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Soja]. E-mail: Panizzi@cnpso.embrapa.br; Parra, Jose Roberto Postali; Carvalho, Diogo Rodrigues [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ). Dept. Entomologia, Fitopatologia e Zoologia Agricola]. E-mail: jrpparra@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; E-mail: drcarval@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; Santos, Claudia Hirt [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba (Brazil)]. E-mail: clauhirt@yahoo.com.br

    2000-09-15

    Laboratory and greenhouse studies were conducted with an artificial dry diet to rear nymphs, and with an artificial plant as substrate for egg laying by the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.). The artificial diet was composed of: soybean protein (15 g); potato starch (7.5 g); dextrose (7.5 g); sucrose (2.5 g); cellulose (12.5 g); vitamin mixture (niacinamide 1 g, calcium pantothenate 1 g, thiamine 0.25 g, riboflavin 0.5 g, pyridoxine 0.25 g, folic acid 0.25 g, biotin 0.02 mL, vitamin B12 1 g - added to 1,000 mL of distilled water) (5.0 mL); soybean oil (20 mL); wheat germ (17.9 g); and water (30 mL). Nymphs showed normal feeding behavior when fed on the artificial diet. Nymphal development time was longer than or similar to that of nymphs fed on soybean pods. Total nymphal mortality was low (ca. 30%), both for nymphs reared on the artificial diet, and for nymphs fed on soybean pods. At adult emergence, fresh body weights were significantly (P<0.01) less on the artificial diet than on soybean pods. Despite the lower adult survivorship and fecundity on artificial plants than on soybean plants, it was demonstrated for the first time that a model simulating a natural plant, can be used as a substrate for egg mass laying, in conjunction with the artificial diet. (author)

  5. Preparation of Artificial Blood from the Extract of Legume Root Nodules, and the Creation of Artificial Latent Fingermarks in Blood Using Artificial Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungwook; Kim, Chaewon; Jeon, Soyoung; Lee, Eunhye

    2018-01-01

    Distribution of homogeneous fingermarks in blood is essential for conducting proficiency tests in forensic science. Hence, the artificial blood was prepared using the root nodule extract of Glycine max plants. The reactivity of the artificial blood with widely used human blood detection reagents was tested. Artificial latent fingermarks in blood were printed using an inkjet cartridge case filled with artificial blood solution. The artificial latent fingermarks in blood were developed with amino acid-sensitive reagents and could obtain development as prominent as the image of the master fingermark saved on the computer. Therefore, it has been confirmed that the extract of legume root nodules can be used as artificial blood, and the artificial blood can be used for the preparation of artificial latent fingermarks or footmarks in blood. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Properties of materials dedicated for the construction of isolation plugs-barriers in underground workings connecting an underground nuclear waste repository with a ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Plewa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of tests of basic properties of selected materials dedicated for the construction of artificial isolation barriers in underground workings, which connect an underground disposal site with a surface of the ground. The modified waste from coal fired power generation plants have been considered as a potentially useful materials for this application.

  7. Highway renewable energy : photovoltaic noise barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Highway photovoltaic noise barriers (PVNBs) represent the combination of noise barrier systems and photovoltaic systems in order to mitigate traffic noise while simultaneously producing renewable energy. First deployed in Switzerland in 1989, PVNBs a...

  8. Prototype Hanford Surface Barrier: Design basis document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.; Duranceau, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized in 1985 to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site and other arid sites. This document provides the basis of the prototype barrier. Engineers and scientists have momentarily frozen evolving barrier designs and incorporated the latest findings from BDP tasks. The design and construction of the prototype barrier has required that all of the various components of the barrier be brought together into an integrated system. This integration is particularly important because some of the components of the protective barreir have been developed independently of other barreir components. This document serves as the baseline by which future modifications or other barrier designs can be compared. Also, this document contains the minutes of meeting convened during the definitive design process in which critical decisions affecting the prototype barrier's design were made and the construction drawings

  9. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K. Perkin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month’s exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.

  10. Numerical modelling of barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, K.V.

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of the theory of the barrier discharge in oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The discharge consists of a number of randomly distributed microdischarges of nanosecond duration. This complicated space-time structure must be taken into account in any numerical model of the barrier discharge. In a single discharge channel, three consequent phases can be distinguished; 1) electric breakdown and electron-time-scale processes; 2) ion drift and ion-time-scale processes; 3) slow chemical processes, diffusion of chemical products and heat transfer. The scheme of such a three-phase model is presented and the results of simulation are discussed and compared with experimental data. (J.U.) 9 figs., 15 refs

  11. Security barriers with automated reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James O; Baird, Adam D; Tullis, Barclay J; Nolte, Roger Allen

    2015-04-07

    An intrusion delaying barrier includes primary and secondary physical structures and can be instrumented with multiple sensors incorporated into an electronic monitoring and alarm system. Such an instrumented intrusion delaying barrier may be used as a perimeter intrusion defense and assessment system (PIDAS). Problems with not providing effective delay to breaches by intentional intruders and/or terrorists who would otherwise evade detection are solved by attaching the secondary structures to the primary structure, and attaching at least some of the sensors to the secondary structures. By having multiple sensors of various types physically interconnected serves to enable sensors on different parts of the overall structure to respond to common disturbances and thereby provide effective corroboration that a disturbance is not merely a nuisance or false alarm. Use of a machine learning network such as a neural network exploits such corroboration.

  12. Barriers to nursing advocacy: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    Advocacy for clients is viewed as an essential function of nursing; however, to be effective advocates for patients, the nurse must often overcome barriers to being an effective advocate. This concept analysis of barriers to nursing advocacy uses the Walker and Avant method of concept analysis. By analyzing the barriers to effective nursing advocacy for clients, nursing can then find strategies to manage those barriers and maximize the nurse's advocacy efforts.

  13. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, C.H.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Dijkstra, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on the seven generic factors, a conjoint analysis is carried out to identify the most important factors perceived by firms. The conjoint analysis shows that in particular the barriers rooted in three ...

  14. Sea sand for reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.; Ordonez R, E.; Ordonez R, En.

    2002-01-01

    Some phosphates have the property to suck in radioactive metals in solution, what it is taken in advance to make reactive barriers which are placed in the nuclear waste repositories. In an effort for contributing to the study of this type of materials, it has been obtained the zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ) and the alpha zirconium hydrogen phosphate (Zr(HPO 4 ) 2H 2 O) starting from sea sand in an easy and economic way. (Author)

  15. Improved performance thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Stecura, S.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings offer an attractive approach to improving the durability and efficiency of the hot section of heat engines. The coatings typically consist of an inner alloy bond coating about 0.01 cm thick resistant to oxidation and hot corrosion and an outer ceramic layer, usually a stabilized zirconia, 0.01-0.05 cm thick. Here, the materials, thermomechanical stress, and hot corrosion problems associated with thermal barrier coatings are reviewed along with the capabilities and limitations of current technology. The coatings discussed include ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY, ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCoCrAlY, ZrO2-MgO/NiCoCrAlY, CaO-SiO2/Co-Cr-Al-Y, and CaO-SiO2/NiCrAlY systems. It is emphasized that the performance of thermal barrier coatings is governed by many complex and interrelated factors, so that optimization of these coatings always involves certain tradeoffs. 27 references

  16. Addressing barriers to safe abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culwell, Kelly R; Hurwitz, Manuelle

    2013-05-01

    The latest World Health Organization data estimate that the total number of unsafe abortions globally has increased to 21.6 million in 2008. There is increasing recognition by the international community of the importance of the contribution of unsafe abortion to maternal mortality. However, the barriers to delivery of safe abortion services are many. In 68 countries, home to 26% of the world's population, abortion is prohibited altogether or only permitted to save a woman's life. Even in countries with more liberal abortion legal frameworks, additional social, economic, and health systems barriers and the stigma surrounding abortion prevent adequate access to safe abortion services and postabortion care. While much has been achieved to reduce the barriers to comprehensive abortion care, much remains to be done. Only through the concerted action of public, private, and civil society partners can we ensure that women have access to services that are safe, affordable, confidential, and stigma free. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price

  18. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  19. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, C.H.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Dijkstra, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  20. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, Clemens H. M.; Kemp, Ron G. M.; Dijkstra, S. Gerhard

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  1. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  2. The Barriers and Needs of Online Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated some specific barriers and needs that online students are facing when learning English through WebEx system. It compared students' barriers and needs with their background including gender, computer ownership, and monthly allowance. It also investigated the relationship among computer aptitude, barriers and needs of online…

  3. Folding pathways explored with artificial potential functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulutaş, B; Bozma, I; Haliloglu, T

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the generation of trajectories to a given protein conformation and presents a novel approach based on artificial potential functions—originally proposed for multi-robot navigation. The artificial potential function corresponds to a simplified energy model, but with the novelty that—motivated by work on robotic navigation—a nonlinear compositional scheme of constructing the energy model is adapted instead of an additive formulation. The artificial potential naturally gives rise to a dynamic system for the protein structure that ensures collision-free motion to an equilibrium point. In cases where the equilibrium point is the native conformation, the motion trajectory corresponds to the folding pathway. This framework is used to investigate folding in a variety of protein structures, and the results are compared with those of other approaches including experimental studies

  4. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  5. The potential toxicity of artificial sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Christina R; Boullata, Joseph; McCauley, Linda A

    2008-06-01

    Since their discovery, the safety of artificial sweeteners has been controversial. Artificial sweeteners provide the sweetness of sugar without the calories. As public health attention has turned to reversing the obesity epidemic in the United States, more individuals of all ages are choosing to use these products. These choices may be beneficial for those who cannot tolerate sugar in their diets (e.g., diabetics). However, scientists disagree about the relationships between sweeteners and lymphomas, leukemias, cancers of the bladder and brain, chronic fatigue syndrome, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, and systemic lupus. Recently these substances have received increased attention due to their effects on glucose regulation. Occupational health nurses need accurate and timely information to counsel individuals regarding the use of these substances. This article provides an overview of types of artificial sweeteners, sweetener history, chemical structure, biological fate, physiological effects, published animal and human studies, and current standards and regulations.

  6. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.

  7. USE OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT IN MUSHROOM CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Poyedinok

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial light is used in greenhouses to increase productivity and quality of agricultural and ornamental plants. Despite the awareness of the fact that light also plays important role in the life of nonhotosynthetic organisms, such as fungi, its using in their biotechnology cultivation is currently limited. Science has quite a large amount information about the influence of artificial light of different nature on morphogenesis, metabolic processes and productivity of more than 100 species of fungi, many of which are valuable producers of biologically active compounds. Themechanisms of photoreactions of various fungi, which is an integral part of a purposeful photoregulation their activity in biotechnological processes are described. The analysis of the researches and of the experience of their practical application allows predicting potential of using artificial light in mushroom growing industry, as well as in creating highly productive, environmentally clean technologies of targeted synthesis of the final product.

  8. Artificial knowing gender and the thinking machine

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Alison

    1998-01-01

    Artificial Knowing challenges the masculine slant in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) view of the world. Alison Adam admirably fills the large gap in science and technology studies by showing us that gender bias is inscribed in AI-based computer systems. Her treatment of feminist epistemology, focusing on the ideas of the knowing subject, the nature of knowledge, rationality and language, are bound to make a significant and powerful contribution to AI studies. Drawing from theories by Donna Haraway and Sherry Turkle, and using tools of feminist epistemology, Adam provides a sustained critique of AI which interestingly re-enforces many of the traditional criticisms of the AI project. Artificial Knowing is an esential read for those interested in gender studies, science and technology studies, and philosophical debates in AI.

  9. International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN)

    CERN Document Server

    Mladenov, Valeri; Kasabov, Nikola; Artificial Neural Networks : Methods and Applications in Bio-/Neuroinformatics

    2015-01-01

    The book reports on the latest theories on artificial neural networks, with a special emphasis on bio-neuroinformatics methods. It includes twenty-three papers selected from among the best contributions on bio-neuroinformatics-related issues, which were presented at the International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, held in Sofia, Bulgaria, on September 10-13, 2013 (ICANN 2013). The book covers a broad range of topics concerning the theory and applications of artificial neural networks, including recurrent neural networks, super-Turing computation and reservoir computing, double-layer vector perceptrons, nonnegative matrix factorization, bio-inspired models of cell communities, Gestalt laws, embodied theory of language understanding, saccadic gaze shifts and memory formation, and new training algorithms for Deep Boltzmann Machines, as well as dynamic neural networks and kernel machines. It also reports on new approaches to reinforcement learning, optimal control of discrete time-delay systems, new al...

  10. Kant, Xunzi and the Artificiality of Manners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja BERNINGER

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both Chinese and Western philosophers have argued for the ethical importance of manners. Their approaches are sometimes criticized on the grounds that manners are artificial. I compare Xunzi’s and Kant’s responses to this claim, and discuss the relevance of both positions for the development of a theory of manners. I show that there is no single artificiality claim, but rather four different claims: the claim that polite behavior lacks spontaneity, the claim that it is insincere, the claim that it goes against human nature, and the claim that it is arbitrary. While Kant is mainly concerned with the insincerity claim, Xunzi focusses on the claim that manners are arbitrary rules. Because of their different understandings of the function of manners both authors only provide a partial answer to the artificiality claim. To arrive at a full account of manners both perspectives must be combined.

  11. Control performance of pneumatic artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Norihiko; Chonan, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The robot in the future will be lightened and, in addition, the complex tasks will be done by the consumption of less energy. To achieve this, the development of an artificial muscle actuator which is as soft as a human-being becomes indispensable. At present, the artificial muscle actuator used is the McKibben type, but the heat and mechanical loss of this actuator are large because of the friction caused by the expansion and contraction of the sleeve. Therefore, we developed the artificial muscle tube where the Carbon fiber of the high intensity had been built into the silicon tube. In this report, the results of the examined the mechanical property of silicone rubber is reported, and the shrinking characteristics, response characteristics, and control performance as a pneumatic actuator are reported.

  12. Knowledge representation an approach to artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Bench-Capon, TJM

    1990-01-01

    Although many texts exist offering an introduction to artificial intelligence (AI), this book is unique in that it places an emphasis on knowledge representation (KR) concepts. It includes small-scale implementations in PROLOG to illustrate the major KR paradigms and their developments.****back cover copy:**Knowledge representation is at the heart of the artificial intelligence enterprise: anyone writing a program which seeks to work by encoding and manipulating knowledge needs to pay attention to the scheme whereby he will represent the knowledge, and to be aware of the consequences of the ch

  13. Integrated Artificial Intelligence Approaches for Disease Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashistha, Rajat; Chhabra, Deepak; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2018-06-01

    Mechanocomputational techniques in conjunction with artificial intelligence (AI) are revolutionizing the interpretations of the crucial information from the medical data and converting it into optimized and organized information for diagnostics. It is possible due to valuable perfection in artificial intelligence, computer aided diagnostics, virtual assistant, robotic surgery, augmented reality and genome editing (based on AI) technologies. Such techniques are serving as the products for diagnosing emerging microbial or non microbial diseases. This article represents a combinatory approach of using such approaches and providing therapeutic solutions towards utilizing these techniques in disease diagnostics.

  14. Artificial radioactivity is fifty: 1934-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, E.; Biquard, P.; Goldstein, L.

    1984-01-01

    This book has been published on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the artificial radioactivity discovery; contributions from men who have been near the Joliot at the beginning of the artificial radioactivity, or whose work have been marked by this discovery are gathered in this book. Subjects have been choosed very freely by the authors; that explains their great diversity. The reader will find precious memories from direct witnesses of this great time; he will find also descriptions of the following works; he will even find audacious dreams on matter utilization possibilities, which may rise to-morrow [fr

  15. Artificial Organs 2016: A Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadsell, Angela T; Malchesky, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    In this Editor's Review, articles published in 2016 are organized by category and briefly summarized. We aim to provide a brief reflection of the currently available worldwide knowledge that is intended to advance and better human life while providing insight for continued application of technologies and methods of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration. As the official journal of The International Federation for Artificial Organs, The International Faculty for Artificial Organs, the International Society for Mechanical Circulatory Support, the International Society for Pediatric Mechanical Cardiopulmonary Support, and the Vienna International Workshop on Functional Electrical Stimulation, Artificial Organs continues in the original mission of its founders "to foster communications in the field of artificial organs on an international level." Artificial Organs continues to publish developments and clinical applications of artificial organ technologies in this broad and expanding field of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration from all over the world. We were pleased to publish our second Virtual Issue in April 2016 on "Tissue Engineering in Bone" by Professor Tsuyoshi Takato. Our first was published in 2011 titled "Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping" by Dr. Ashraf Khir. Other peer-reviewed Special Issues this year included contributions from the 11th International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion edited by Dr. Akif Ündar and selections from the 23rd Congress of the International Society for Rotary Blood Pumps edited by Dr. Bojan Biocina. We take this time also to express our gratitude to our authors for offering their work to this journal. We offer our very special thanks to our reviewers who give so generously of time and expertise to review, critique, and especially provide meaningful suggestions to the author's work whether eventually accepted or rejected. Without these excellent and

  16. A Transitive Model For Artificial Intelligence Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, John

    1986-03-01

    A wide range of mathematical techniques have been applied to artificial intelligence problems and some techniques have proved more suitable than others for certain types of problem. We formally define a mathematical model which incorporates some of these successful techniques and we discuss its intrinsic properties. Universal applicability of the model is demonstrated through specific applications to problems drawn from rule-based systems, digital hardware design and constraint satisfaction networks. We also give indications of potential applications to other artificial intelligence problems, including knowledge engineering.

  17. Metatheases: artificial metalloproteins for olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, D F; Gotzen, S; Okuda, J

    2016-10-21

    The incorporation of organometallic catalyst precursors in proteins results in so-called artificial metalloenzymes. The protein structure will control activity, selectivity and stability of the organometallic site in aqueous medium and allow non-natural reactions in biological settings. Grubbs-Hoveyda type ruthenium catalysts with an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) as ancillary ligand, known to be active in olefin metathesis, have recently been incorporated in various proteins. An overview of these artificial metalloproteins and their potential application in olefin metathesis is given.

  18. Application Of Artificial Intelligence To Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.; Steinle, Frank W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses potential use of artificial-intelligence systems to manage wind-tunnel test facilities at Ames Research Center. One of goals of program to obtain experimental data of better quality and otherwise generally increase productivity of facilities. Another goal to increase efficiency and expertise of current personnel and to retain expertise of former personnel. Third goal to increase effectiveness of management through more efficient use of accumulated data. System used to improve schedules of operation and maintenance of tunnels and other equipment, assignment of personnel, distribution of electrical power, and analysis of costs and productivity. Several commercial artificial-intelligence computer programs discussed as possible candidates for use.

  19. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system

  20. Machine learning an artificial intelligence approach

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R; Bradshaw, Gary; Carbonell, Jaime Guillermo; Mitchell, Tom Michael; Michalski, Ryszard Spencer

    1983-01-01

    Machine Learning: An Artificial Intelligence Approach contains tutorial overviews and research papers representative of trends in the area of machine learning as viewed from an artificial intelligence perspective. The book is organized into six parts. Part I provides an overview of machine learning and explains why machines should learn. Part II covers important issues affecting the design of learning programs-particularly programs that learn from examples. It also describes inductive learning systems. Part III deals with learning by analogy, by experimentation, and from experience. Parts IV a

  1. Dissociation of Vertical Semiconductor Diatomic Artificial Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, M.; Emperador, A.; Barranco, M.; Garcias, F.; Muraki, K.; Tarucha, S.; Austing, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dissociation of few-electron circular vertical semiconductor double quantum dot artificial molecules at 0T as a function of interdot distance. A slight mismatch introduced in the fabrication of the artificial molecules from nominally identical constituent quantum wells induces localization by offsetting the energy levels in the quantum dots by up to 2meV, and this plays a crucial role in the appearance of the addition energy spectra as a function of coupling strength particularly in the weak coupling limit

  2. Artificial sweeteners and human bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Miller, A B; Morrison, B; Gordon, P; Weldon, L; Chambers, L W; Fodor, G; Winsor, G M

    1977-09-17

    A positive association between the use of artificial sweetners, particularly saccharin, and risk of bladder cancer in males has been observed in a case-control study of 480 men and 152 women in three Provinces in Canada. The risk ratio for ever versus never used is 1-6 for males (P=0-009, one-tailed test), and a significant dose-response relationship was obtained for both duration and frequency of use. The population attributable risk for males is estimated at 7%, though for diabetics, who have a similar risk ratio for artificial sweetner use as non-diabetics, the attributable risk is 33%.

  3. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  4. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Lu

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1 and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans species (Solution 2 was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  5. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  6. Opto-mechanical design of a dispersive artificial eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Mark F; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2017-05-20

    We present an opto-mechanical artificial eye that can be used for examining multi-wavelength ophthalmic instruments. Standard off-the-shelf lenses and a refractive-index-matching fluid were used in the creation of the artificial eye. In addition to dispersive properties, the artificial eye can be used to simulate refractive error. To analyze the artificial eye, a multi-wavelength Hartmann-Shack aberrometer was used to measure the longitudinal chromatic aberration and the possibility of inducing refractive error. Off-axis chromatic aberrations were also analyzed by imaging through the artificial eye at two discrete wavelengths. Possible extensions to the dispersive artificial eye are also discussed.

  7. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianwu; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-01-01

    The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  8. Chemical barriers for controlling groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical barriers are being explored as a low-cost means of controlling groundwater contamination. The barrier can intercept a contaminant plume and prevent migration by transferring contaminants from the groundwater to immobile solids. A chemical barrier can be emplaced in a landfill liner or in an aquifer cutoff wall or can be injected into a contaminant plume. Chemical barriers can be classified as either precipitation barriers or sorption barriers depending upon the dominant mode of contaminant extraction. In a precipitation barrier, contaminants are bound in the structures of newly formed phases; whereas, in a sorption barrier, contaminants attach to the surfaces of preexisting solids by adsorption or some other surface mechanism. Sorption of contaminants is pH dependent. A precipitation barrier can control the pH of the system, but alkaline groundwater may dominate the pH in a sorption barrier. A comparison is made of the characteristics of precipitation and sorption barriers. Experimental data on the extraction of uranium and molybdenum from simulated groundwater are used to demonstrate these concepts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  9. Lethal pneumatosis coli in a 12-month-old child caused by acute intestinal gas gangrene after prolonged artificial nutrition: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Stefan; Wössner, Rupert; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Völker, Hans-Ullrich

    2008-07-24

    Pneumatosis coli is a rare disease with heterogeneous symptoms which can be detected in the course of various acute and chronic intestinal diseases in children, such as necrotizing enterocolitis, intestinal obstruction and intestinal bacteriological infections. We report the case of a 12-month-old boy who died of pneumatosis coli caused by an acute intestinal gas gangrene after prolonged artificial alimentation. While intestinal gas gangrene is a highly uncommon cause of pneumatosis coli, it is important to consider it as a differential diagnosis, especially in patients receiving a prolonged artificial food supply. These patients may develop intestinal gas gangrene due to a dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

  10. Negative Refractive Index in Artificial Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorenko, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss optical constants in artificial metamaterials showing negative magnetic permeability and electric permittivity. Using effective field theory, we calculate effective permeability of nanofabricated media composed of pairs of identical gold nano-pillars with magnetic response in the visible spectrum.

  11. Building Artificial Vision Systems with Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCun, Yann [New York University

    2011-02-23

    Three questions pose the next challenge for Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and neuroscience. How do we learn perception (e.g. vision)? How do we learn representations of the perceptual world? How do we learn visual categories from just a few examples?

  12. The artificial pancreas, a challenge to research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The first attempts for automated glucose control were made in the seventies of the last century. Nowadays several prototypes for closed-loop glucose control are being tested, most of them in clinical research centers. Systems for automated glucose control, also named ‘artificial pancreas’ or

  13. Artificial Intelligence, Computational Thinking, and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI), computational thinking (CT), and mathematics education (ME) for young students (K-8). Specifically, it focuses on three key elements that are common to AI, CT and ME: agency, modeling of phenomena and abstracting concepts beyond specific instances.…

  14. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don J. Latham

    1987-01-01

    Artificial intelligence could be used in Forest Service fire management and land-use planning to a larger degree than is now done. Robots, for example, could be programmed to monitor for fire and insect activity, to keep track of wildlife, and to do elementary thinking about the environment. Catching up with the fast-changing technology is imperative.

  15. Harvesting Sperm and Artificial Insemination of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duselis, Amanda R.; Vrana, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    Rodents of the genus Peromyscus (deer mice) are the most prevalent native North American mammals. Peromyscus species are used in a wide range of research including toxicology, epidemiology, ecology, behavioral, and genetic studies. Here they provide a useful model for demonstrations of artificial insemination. Methods similar to those displayed here have previously been used in several deer mouse studies, yet no detailed protocol has been published. Here we demonstrate the basic method of artificial insemination. This method entails extracting the testes from the rodent, then isolating the sperm from the epididymis and vas deferens. The mature sperm, now in a milk mixture, are placed in the female’s reproductive tract at the time of ovulation. Fertilization is counted as day 0 for timing of embryo development. Embryos can then be retrieved at the desired time-point and manipulated. Artificial insemination can be used in a variety of rodent species where exact embryo timing is crucial or hard to obtain. This technique is vital for species or strains (including most Peromyscus) which may not mate immediately and/or where mating is hard to assess. In addition, artificial insemination provides exact timing for embryo development either in mapping developmental progress and/or transgenic work. Reduced numbers of animals can be used since fertilization is guaranteed. This method has been vital to furthering the Peromyscus system, and will hopefully benefit others as well. PMID:18978991

  16. Artificial liver support in the third millennium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Analogous to the artificial kidney there is a need for an effective and safe liver support system to bridge patients with hepatic failure to liver transplantation or own liver regeneration. An over-view is given of the biological and non-biological systems used in clinical practice in the past and

  17. The artificial kidney: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, G

    2008-08-01

    World War II can be taken as a turning point after which the introduction and development of several new diagnostic and therapeutic discoveries have revolutionized medicine and improved the expectancy of life for millions. Notable amongst those technological therapeutic achievements is that of the artificial kidney, first used successfully in the closing years of the war. As a result of the improvements that followed, the kidney was the first solid organ whose function could be replaced, at least partially, by a machine. What started then as exploratory efforts to sustain life evolved over the next few decades into life saving replacement therapy for millions worldwide. Chronic maintenance hemodialysis has certainly changed the prognosis of the otherwise fatal end stage kidney disease that had afflicted humans theretofore. Unfortunately, many of the challenges and problems that had to be overcome in making artificial kidney treatment available continue to plague end-stage kidney disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Concerted investigative efforts are currently underway to improve the replacement of kidney function with artificial kidneys that better mimic kidney function. This article reviews the beginnings, evolution, and current challenges of the artificial kidney.

  18. Artificial Intelligence and School Library Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses developments in artificial intelligence in terms of their impact on school library media centers and the role of media specialists. Possible uses of expert systems, hypertext, and CD-ROM technologies in school media centers are examined and the challenges presented by these technologies are discussed. Fourteen sources of additional…

  19. Artificial Intelligence. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kay, Comp.

    Desgined to serve as a guide to resources on artificial intelligence (AI) and expert systems, this Library of Congress bulletin is divided into 18 sections that contain lists of books, journal articles, periodicals, associations, and other sources of information. A brief statement of the scope of the guide introduces the sections, which are listed…

  20. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Videodisc Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vries, John K.; Banks, Gordon; McLinden, Sean; Moossy, John; Brown, Melanie

    1985-01-01

    Much of medical information is visual in nature. Since it is not easy to describe pictorial information in linguistic terms, it has been difficult to store and retrieve this type of information. Coupling videodisc technology with artificial intelligence programming techniques may provide a means for solving this problem.