WorldWideScience

Sample records for artificial radiation belts

  1. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  2. Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-27

    document for any purpose other than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government...release; distribution is unlimited. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information...Radiation Belt Modeling,” co-lead by J. Albert (AFRL), W. Li (UCLA), S. Morley ( LANL ), and W. Tu (UWV). Figure 6. Precipitating Energy Flux, Simulated

  3. Ionospheric heating for radiation-belt control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, W.J.; Villalon, E.

    1990-10-01

    Pitch-angle scattering interactions of electromagnetic waves in the ELF/VLF bands with trapped electrons, as formulated by Kennel and Petschek 1, describe the dynamics of the freshly filled radiation belts flux tubes. The natural existence of a slot region with electron fluxes below the Kennel-Petschek limit requires non-local wave sources. We describe a set of planned, active experiments in which VLF radiation will be injected from ground and space based transmitters in conjunction with the CRRES satellite in the radiation belts. These experiments will measure the intensity of waves driving pitch-angle diffusion and the electron energies in gyroresonance with the waves. An ability to reduce the flux of energetic particles trapped in the radiation belts by artificial means could improve the reliability of microelectronic components on earth-observing satellites in middle-altitude orbits.

  4. Coronal radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, H S; Frewen, S F N; DeRosa, M L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona has a large-scale dipole character, which maps into the bipolar field in the solar wind. Using standard representations of the coronal field, we show that high-energy ions can be trapped stably in these large-scale closed fields. The drift shells that describe the conservation of the third adiabatic invariant may have complicated geometries. Particles trapped in these zones would resemble the Van Allen Belts and could have detectable consequences. We discuss potential sources of trapped particles.

  5. Ring current and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  6. 1962 Satellite High Altitude Radiation Belt Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    TR-14-18 1962 Satellite High Altitude Radiation Belt Database Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. March...the Status of the High Altitude Nuclear Explosion (HANE) Trapped Radiation Belt Database”, AFRL-VS-PS-TR- 2006-1079, Air Force Research Laboratory...Roth, B., “Blue Ribbon Panel and Support Work Assessing the Status of the High Altitude Nuclear Explosion (HANE) Trapped Radiation Belt Database

  7. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  8. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  9. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  10. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  11. Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Fox, N.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in May 2012, NASA's dual spacecraft Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission carries the field and particle instrumentation needed to determine the processes that produce enhancements in radiation belt ion and electron fluxes, the dominant mechanisms that cause the loss of relativistic electrons, and the manner by which the ring current and other geomagnetic phenomena affect radiation belt behavior. The two spacecraft will operate in low-inclination elliptical lapping orbits around the Earth, within and immediately exterior to the Van Allen radiation belts. During course of their two year primary mission, they will cover the full range of local times, measuring both AC and DC electric and magnetic fields to 10kHz, as well as ions from 50 eV to 1 GeV and electrons with energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 MeV.

  12. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  13. Ionospheric heating for radiation belt control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-10-01

    Pitch-angle scattering interactions of electromagnetic waves in the ELF/VLF bands with trapped electrons describe the dynamics of the freshly filled radiation belts flux tubes. The natural existence of a 'slot' region with electron fluxes below the Kennel-Petschek limit requires non-local wave sources. A set of planned, active experiments is described in which VLF radiation is injected from ground and space band transmitters in conjunction with the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite in the radiation belts. These experiments can measure the intensity if waves driving pitch-angle diffusion and the electron energies in gyroresonance with the waves.

  14. Radiation belt dynamics during solar minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G. (Geophysics Lab., Air Force Systems Command, Hanscom AFB, MA (US)); Holeman, E. (Physics Dept., Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (US))

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45{degrees} and 55{degrees}. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  15. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  16. Ionic composition of the earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1983-01-01

    Several different ion species have been positively identified in the earth's radiation belts. Besides protons, there are substantial fluxes of helium, carbon and oxygen ions, and there are measurable quantities of even heavier ions. European, American and Soviet space experimenters have reported ion composition measurements over wide ranges of energies: at tens of keV (ring-current energies) and below, and at hundreds of keV and above. There is still a gap in the energy coverage from several tens to several hundreds of keV where little observational data are available. In this review emphasis is placed on the radiation belt ionic structure above 100 keV. Both quiet time conditions and geomagnetic storm periods are considered, and comparison of the available space observations is made with theoretical analysis of geomagnetically trapped ion spatial, energy and charge state distributions.

  17. The atmospheric implications of radiation belt remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available High altitude nuclear explosions (HANEs and geomagnetic storms can produce large scale injections of relativistic particles into the inner radiation belts. It is recognised that these large increases in >1 MeV trapped electron fluxes can shorten the operational lifetime of low Earth orbiting satellites, threatening a large, valuable population. Therefore, studies are being undertaken to bring about practical human control of the radiation belts, termed "Radiation Belt Remediation" (RBR. Here we consider the upper atmospheric consequences of an RBR system operating over either 1 or 10 days. The RBR-forced neutral chemistry changes, leading to NOx enhancements and Ox depletions, are significant during the timescale of the precipitation but are generally not long-lasting. The magnitudes, time-scales, and altitudes of these changes are no more significant than those observed during large solar proton events. In contrast, RBR-operation will lead to unusually intense HF blackouts for about the first half of the operation time, producing large scale disruptions to radio communication and navigation systems. While the neutral atmosphere changes are not particularly important, HF disruptions could be an important area for policy makers to consider, particularly for the remediation of natural injections.

  18. Solar Neutrons and the Earth's Radiation Belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R E; Flamm, E J

    1964-04-17

    The intensity and spectrum of solar neutrons in the vicinity of the earth are calculated on the assumption that the low-energy protons recently detected in balloon and satellite flights are products of solar neutron decay. The solar-neutron flux thus obtained exceeds the global average cosmic-ray neutron leakage above 10 Mev, indicating that it may be an important source of both the inner and outer radiation belts. Neutron measurements in the atmosphere are reviewed and several features of the data are found to be consistent with the estimated solar neutron spectrum.

  19. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission: Advancing Our Understanding of the Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Kessel, Ramona; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry

    2012-01-01

    We describe NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, whose primary science objective is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, the dynamics of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth's radiation belts resulting from variable solar activity. The overarching scientific questions addressed include: 1. the physical processes that produce radiation belt enhancement events, 2. the dominant mechanisms for relativistic electron loss, and 3. how the ring current and other geomagnetic processes affect radiation belt behavior. The RBSP mission comprises two spacecraft which will be launched during Fall 2012 into low inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigee altitudes and apogee radial distances of 600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. During the two-year primary mission, the spacecraft orbits precess once around the Earth and lap each other twice in each local time quadrant. The spacecraft are each equipped with identical comprehensive instrumentation packages to measure, electrons, ions and wave electric and magnetic fields. We provide an overview of the RBSP mission, onboard instrumentation and science prospects and invite scientific collaboration.

  20. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  1. NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, comprising two identically-instrumented spacecraft, is scheduled for launch in May 2012. In addition to identifying and quantifying the processes responsible for energizing, transporting, and removing energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation, the mission will determine the characteristics of the ring current and its effect upon the magnetosphere as a whole. The distances separating the two RBSP spacecraft will vary as they move along their 1000 km altitude x 5.8 RE geocentric orbits in order to enable the spacecraft to separate spatial from temporal effects, measure gradients that help identify particle sources, and determine the spatial extent of a wide array of phenomena. This talk explores the scientific objectives of the mission and the manner by which the mission has been tailored to achieve them.

  2. Trapped radiation belts of saturn: first look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W; Ip, W H; McIlwain, C E

    1980-01-25

    Pioneer 11 has made the first exploration of the magnetosphere and trapped radiation belts of Saturn. Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between Earth's and Jupiter's, with trapped particle intensities comparable to Earth's. The outer region of Saturn's magnetosphere contains lower energy radiation and is variable with time; the inner region contains higher energy particles. The pitch angle distributions show a remarkable variety of field-aligned and locally mirroring configurations. The moons and especially the rings of Saturn are effective absorbers of trapped particles; underneath the rings, the trapped radiation is completely absorbed. We confirm the discovery of a new ring, called the F ring, a new division, the Pioneer division, and a moon, called 1979 S 2. The latter has probably been seen from Earth. There may be evidence for more bodies like 1979 S 2, but at this stage the interpretation of the data is ambiguous. Using particle diffusion rates, we estimate that the cross-sectional area of the F ring is > 7 x 10(13) square centimeters and that the opacity is > 10(-5). Cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay should be looked into as a source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn.

  3. Trapped radiation belts of Saturn - First look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W. H.; Mcilwain, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the magnetosphere of Saturn obtained with the trapped radiation detector package on board the Pioneer 11 spacecraft is reported. Radiation belt profiles determined by the trapped radiation detectors on Pioneer 10 and 11 indicate that Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between those of the earth and Jupiter, with particle intensities similar to those of the earth. The outer region of the Saturn magnetosphere is found to contain particles of lower energy than the outer region, being strongly influenced by the time-varying solar wind. The moons and rings of Saturn are observed to be effective absorbers of trapped particles, confirming the discoveries of the F ring, the Pioneer ring division and the moon 1979 S 2. Particle diffusion rates are used to estimate a cross-sectional area of greater than 7 x 10 to the 13th sq cm and an opacity greater than 0.00001 for the F ring. It is suggested that cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay be studied as a possible source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn.

  4. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  5. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  6. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  7. Jupiter's radiation belt ions - A comparison of theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Danny; Thorne, Richard M.; Mei, YI

    1989-01-01

    Radial profiles are constructed for the Jovian radiation belt flux-tube content Y-asterisk from the reported phase-space density of energetic particles obtained from Voyager 1 data over the range L = 6 to L = 9. These experimental profiles are compared with theoretical solutions for Y-asterisk from an interchange-diffusion model of the coupled radiation belt and Iogenic ion populations. Subject to certain limitations of the Voyager 1 data, the model solutions are found to be consistent with the data for a variety of input parameters. Model solutions are also found corresponding to radiation belt ions that are expected to be mainly responsible for the auroral energy input. Comparison of the present theoretical profiles with the data implies that the energetic radiation belt ions should have a peak loss rate within a factor of three of that for strong diffusion scattering.

  8. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  9. Radiation-belt dynamics during solar minimum. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Holeman, E.

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45 deg. and 55 deg. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  10. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation belts causes irreversible damages on on-board instruments materials. That's why for two decades, ONERA proposes studies about radiation belts of magnetized planets. First, in the 90's, the development of a physical model, named Salammbô, carried out a model of the radiation belts of the Earth. Then, for few years, analysis of the magnetosphere of Jupiter and in-situ data (Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo) allow to build a physical model of the radiation belts of Jupiter. Enrolling on the Cassini age and thanks to all information collected, this study permits to adapt Salammbô jovian radiation belts model to the case of Saturn environment. Indeed, some physical processes present in the kronian magnetosphere are similar to those present in the magnetosphere of Jupiter (radial diffusion; interaction of energetic electrons with rings, moons, atmosphere; synchrotron emission). However, some physical processes have to be added to the kronian model (compared to the jovian model) because of the particularity of the magnetosphere of Saturn: interaction of energetic electrons with neutral particles from Enceladus, and wave-particle interaction. This last physical process has been studied in details with the analysis of CASSINI/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) data. The major importance of the wave particles interaction is now well known in the case of the radiation belts of the Earth but it is important to investigate on its role in the case of Saturn. So, importance of each physical process has been studied and analysis of Cassini MIMI-LEMMS and CAPS data allows to build a model boundary condition (at L = 6). Finally, results of this study lead to a kronian electrons radiation belts model including radial diffusion, interactions of energetic electrons with rings, moons and neutrals particles and wave-particle interaction (interactions of electrons with atmosphere particles and synchrotron emission are too weak to be taken into account in this model). Then, to

  11. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  12. The radiation belt of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    For a given solar magnetic field, the near-Sun (phase-space) density of cosmic ray electrons and positrons of energy above about 10GeV can be calculated from first principles, without any assumptions about the cosmic ray diffusion. This is because the sunlight Compton drag must be more important than diffusion. If the solar magnetic field has an appreciable dipole component, the electron/positron density should have a belt-like dent, perhaps extending to several solar radii. The belt structure appears because the quasi-bound orbits are depopulated by the sunlight Compton drag.

  13. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mauk, B. H.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Fox, N. J.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to the variable inputs of energy from the Sun. The investigations selected for this 2-spacecraft mission scheduled for launch in early 2012 address this task by making extensive observations of the plasma waves, thermal, ring current, and relativistic particle populations, and DC electric and magnetic fields within the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. We first describe the current mission concept within the scope of NASA's strategic plan and the Vision for Exploration, and then consider how its observations will be used to define and quantify the processes that accelerate, transport, and remove particles in the Earth's radiation belts.

  14. Relativistic surfatron process for Landau resonant electrons in radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Osmane, A

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of the nonlinear wave-particle interactions for relativistic particles have shown that Landau resonant orbits could be efficiently accelerated along the mean background magnetic field for propagation angles $\\theta$ in close proximity to a critical propagation $\\theta_\\textrm{c}$ associated with a Hopf--Hopf bifurcation condition. In this report, we extend previous studies to reach greater modeling capacities for the study of electrons in radiation belts by including longitudinal wave effects and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. We find that even though both effects can limit the surfatron acceleration of electrons in radiation belts, gains in energy of the order of 100 keV, taking place on the order of ten milliseconds, are sufficiently strong for the mechanism to be relevant to radiation belt dynamics.

  15. Power-Line Harmonic Radiation: Can It Significantly Affect the Earth's Radiation Belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, R M; Tsurutani, B T

    1979-05-25

    It has been suggested that harmonic radiation from the earth's 50- and 60-hertz power transmission lines might significantly influence the distribution of electrons in the radiation belts. On the basis of observations presented here, it seems advisable to accept such a hypothesis with caution. New evidence suggests that power-line radiation does not play any major role in the nonadiabatic dynamics of radiation belt electrons.

  16. Power-line harmonic radiation - Can it significantly affect the earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, R. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    It has been suggested that harmonic radiation from the earth's 50- and 60-hertz power transmission lines might significantly influence the distribution of electrons in the radiation belts. On the basis of observations presented here, it seems advisable to accept such a hypothesis with caution. New evidence suggests that power-line radiation does not play any major role in the nonadiabatic dynamics of radiation belt electrons.

  17. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for

  18. The Role of Plasma in Radiation Belt Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, J. M.; Bonnell, J. W.; Kurth, W. S.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Blake, J. B.; Denton, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation belts are zones of relativistic electrons encircling the Earth. Their radial structure is controlled by the competition between source and loss processes. Most commonly, a two-belt structure prevails, though a more complicated three-belt structure - an inner belt plus two outer electron belts - have repeatedly been observed. The plasma conditions that enable and enhance loss-facilitating wave activity in the inner magnetosphere are still under discussion. Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves (EMIC) when the total plasma density is large (i.e., in the plasmasphere and plume). However, there is evidence that this interaction may be not as strong as thought, and that instead the field-aligned motion of lower energy ring current ions (up to a few 10's keV) may play a key role. Similarly, the exact influence of large heavy ion (O+) concentrations remains unsettled. We use 2.5+ years of Van Allen Probes observations to study the region of plasmasphere-outer belt overlap (and its vicinity). By now, the Van Allen Probes provide a complete and very dense coverage of the complete magnetosphere inside geosynchronous orbit We focus our interest on understanding the plasma conditions that can favor EMIC wave growth. We investigate the temperature anisotropy A (modified by plasma β) of the warm/hot plasma, and contrast it with the location specifics of the plasmasphere (i.e., very high total density) and the occurrence of high O+ concentrations in the overlap regions with the radiation belt(s). We present both average conditions for all parameters during a variety of geomagnetic conditions, and highlight specific loss and overlap events in an effort to establish favorable plasma conditions for relativistic electron loss during those times.

  19. Implementation of Localized Ensemble Assimilation for a Three-Dimensional Radiation Belt Model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, H. C.; Chen, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.; Shprits, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is very dynamic and energetic electrons therein undergo constant changes due to acceleration, loss, and trans- port processes. In this work we improve the accuracy of simulated electron phase space density (PSD) of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, a three-dimensional radiation belt model, by implementing the localized ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) assimilation method. Assimilation methods based on Kalman filtering have been successfully applied to one-dimensional radial diffusion radiation belt models, where it has been shown to greatly improve the model estimation of electron phase space density (PSD). This work expands upon previous research by implementing the LETKF method to assimilate observed electron density into VERB, a three-dimensional radiation belt model. In particular, the LETKF will perform the assimilation locally, where the size of the local region is defined by the diffusion of electrons in the model. This will enable the optimal assimilation of data throughout the model consistently with the flow of electrons. Two sets of assimilation experiments are presented. The first is an identical-twin experiment, where artificial data is generated from the same model, with the purpose of verifying the assimilation method. In the second set of experiments, real PSD observational data from missions such as CRRES and/or the Van Allen Probes are assimilated into VERB. The results show that data assimilation significantly improves the accuracy of the VERB model by efficiently including the available observations at the appropriate pitch angles, energy levels, and L-shell regions throughout the model.

  20. Radiation Belt Storm Probes—Observatory and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Karen; Artis, David; Bushman, Stewart; Butler, Michael; Conde, Rich; Cooper, Stan; Fretz, Kristen; Herrmann, Carl; Hill, Adrian; Kelley, Jeff; Maurer, Richard; Nichols, Richard; Ottman, Geffrey; Reid, Mark; Rogers, Gabe; Srinivasan, Dipak; Troll, John; Williams, Bruce

    2013-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) is an Earth-orbiting mission that launched August 30, 2012, and is the latest science mission in NASA's Living with a Star Program. The RBSP mission will investigate, characterize and understand the physical dynamics of the radiation belts, as well as the influence of the Sun on the Earth's environment, by measuring particles, electric and magnetic fields and waves that comprise geospace. The mission is composed of two identically instrumented spinning observatories in an elliptical orbit around earth with 600 km perigee, 30,000 km apogee and 10∘ inclination to provide full sampling of the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin RBSP observatories (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) will follow slightly different orbits and will lap each other four times per year, offering simultaneous measurements over a range of observatory separation distances. A description of the observatory environment is provided along with protection for sensitive electronics to support operations in the harsh radiation belt environment. Spacecraft and subsystem key characteristics and instrument accommodations are included that allow the RBSP science objectives to be met.

  1. Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Payload Safety Introduction Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Chuck; Lampert, Dianna; Herrburger, Eric; Smith, Clay; Hill, Stuart; VonMehlem, Judi

    2008-01-01

    Mission of the Geospace Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) is: Gain s cientific understanding (to the point of predictability) of how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to changes in solar activity and the solar wind.

  2. Dynamics of the low altitude secondary proton radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A A; Kohno, T; Spjeldvik, W N; Martin, I M; Pugacheva, G I; Turtelli, A

    1998-01-01

    At the interface between the upper atmosphere and the radiation belt region, there exists a secondary radiation belt consisting mainly of energetic ions that have become neutralized in the ring current and the main radiation belt and then re-ionized by collisions in the inner exosphere. The time history of the proton fluxes in the 0.64-35 MeV energy range was traced in the equatorial region beneath the main radiation belts during the three year period from 21 February 1984 to 26 March 1987 using data obtained with the HEP experiment on board the Japanese OHZORA satellite. During most of this period a fairly small proton flux of -1.2 cm-2 S-1 sr-1 was detected on geomagnetic field lines in the range 1.05 < L < 1.15. We report a few surprisingly deep and rapid flux decreases (flux reduction by typically two orders of magnitude). These flux decreases were also long in duration (lasting up to three months). We also registered abrupt flux increases where the magnitude of the proton flux enhancements could reach three orders of magnitude with an enhancement duration of 1-3 days. Possible reasons for these unexpected phenomena are discussed.

  3. Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglis, I. A.; Bourdarie, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Santolik, O.; Horne, R.; Mann, I.; Turner, D.

    2012-04-01

    We present the concept, objectives and expected impact of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, which is being implemented by a consortium of seven institutions (five European, one Canadian and one US) with support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. The MAARBLE project employs multi-spacecraft monitoring of the geospace environment, complemented by ground-based monitoring, in order to analyze and assess the physical mechanisms leading to radiation belt particle energization and loss. Particular attention is paid to the role of ULF/VLF waves. A database containing properties of the waves is being created and will be made available to the scientific community. Based on the wave database, a statistical model of the wave activity dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity, solar wind forcing, and magnetospheric region will be developed. Multi-spacecraft particle measurements will be incorporated into data assimilation tools, leading to new understanding of the causal relationships between ULF/VLF waves and radiation belt dynamics. Data assimilation techniques have been proven as a valuable tool in the field of radiation belts, able to guide 'the best' estimate of the state of a complex system. (The members of the MAARBLE team are: I. A. Daglis, S. Bourdarie, Y. Khotyaintsev, O. Santolik, R. Horne, I. Mann, D. Turner, A. Anastasiadis, V. Angelopoulos, G. Balasis, E. Chatzichristou, C. Cully, M. Georgiou, S. Glauert, B. Grison, I. Kolmasova, D. Lazaro, E. Macusova, V. Maget, C. Papadimitriou, G. Ropokis, I. Sandberg, M. Usanova.)

  4. A New Perspective on Trapped Radiation Belts in Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    The charged particle fluxes trapped in the magnetic dipole fields of certain planets in our Solar System are interesting signatures of planetary properties in space physics. They also represent a source of potentially hazardous radiation to spacecraft during planetary and interplanetary exploration. The Earth s trapped radiation belts have been studied for years and the physical mechanisms by which primary radiation from the Sun and Galaxy is captured is well understood. The higher-energy particles collide with molecules in the planetary atmosphere and initiate large cascades of secondary radiation which itself becomes trapped by the magnetic dipole field of the planet. Some of it is even backscattered as albedo neutrons.

  5. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-08

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  6. On the propagation of uncertainties in radiation belt simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Enrico; Shprits, Yuri; Chandorkar, Mandar; Drozdov, Alexander; Wing, Simon

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of the uncertainties associated with radiation belt simulations, performed in the standard quasi-linear diffusion framework. In particular, we estimate how uncertainties of some input parameters propagate through the nonlinear simulation, producing a distribution of outputs that can be quite broad. Here we restrict our focus on two-dimensional simulations (in energy and pitch angle space) of parallel-propagating chorus waves only, and we study as stochastic input parameters the geomagnetic index Kp (that characterizes the time dependency of an idealized storm), the latitudinal extent of waves, and the average electron density. We employ a collocation method, thus performing an ensemble of simulations. The results of this work point to the necessity of shifting to a probabilistic interpretation of radiation belt simulation results and suggest that an accurate specification of a time-dependent density model is crucial for modeling the radiation environment.

  7. Dynamics of the earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere (geophysical monograph series)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere draws together current knowledge of the radiation belts prior to the launch of Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RPSP) and other imminent space missions, making this volume timely and unique. The volume will serve as a useful benchmark at this exciting and pivotal period in radiation belt research in advance of the new discoveries that the RPSP mission will surely bring. Highlights include the following: a review of the current state of the art of radiation belt science; a complete and up-to-date account of the wave-particle interactions that control the dynamical acceleration and loss processes of particles in the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere; a discussion emphasizing the importance of the cross-energy coupling of the particle populations of the radiation belts, ring current, and plasmasphere in controlling the dynamics of the inner magnetosphe...

  8. Energetic radiation belt electron precipitation showing ULF modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere. This study considers the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of several minutes. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of these ˜MeV energetic particles. ACE satellite measurements of the MHD solar wind parameters are used as the upstream boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields, used to drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. The simulation results are compared with balloon observations obtained during the January 21, 2005 CME-shock event. Rapid loss of 20~keV to 1.5~MeV electrons was detected by balloon-borne measurements of Bremsstrahlung X-rays during the MINIS balloon campaign following the shock arrival at Earth. The global response of the radiation belts to this particular CME-shock driven storm was investigated focusing on precipitation mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations influence the radiation belt population. A primary cause for the precipitation modulation seen in both the simulation and the MINIS campaign is suggested based on the lowering of mirror points due to compressional magnetic field oscillations.

  9. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Driven by Large-Amplitude Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of radiation belt electrons driven by oblique large-amplitude whistler waves is studied. We show analytically and numerically that this is a stochastic process; the intensity of which depends on the wave power modified by Bessel functions. The type of this dependence is determined by the character of the nonlinear interaction due to coupling between action and phase. The results show that physically significant quantities have a relatively weak dependence on the wave power.

  10. Nonlinear Whistler Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Wave particle interactions between electrons and whistler waves are a dominant mechanism for controlling the dynamics of energetic electrons in the radiation belts. They are responsible for loss, via pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the loss cone, and energization to millions of electron volts. It has previously been theorized that large amplitude waves on the whistler branch may scatter their wave-vector nonlinearly via nonlinear Landau damping leading to important consequences for the global distribution of whistler wave energy density and hence the energetic electrons. It can dramatically reduce the lifetime of energetic electrons in the radiation belts by increasing the pitch angle scattering rate. The fundamental building block of this theory has now been confirmed through laboratory experiments. Here we report on in situ observations of wave electro-magnetic fields from the EMFISIS instrument on board NASA's Van Allen Probes that show the signatures of nonlinear scattering of whistler waves in the inner radiation belts. In the outer radiation belts, whistler mode chorus is believed to be responsible for the energization of electrons from 10s of Kev to MeV energies. Chorus is characterized by bursty large amplitude whistler mode waves with frequencies that change as a function of time on timescales corresponding to their growth. Theories explaining the chirping have been developed for decades based on electron trapping dynamics in a coherent wave. New high time resolution wave data from the Van Allen probes and advanced spectral techniques are revealing that the wave dynamics is highly structured, with sub-elements consisting of multiple chirping waves with discrete frequency hops between sub-elements. Laboratory experiments with energetic electron beams are currently reproducing the complex frequency vs time dynamics of whistler waves and in addition revealing signatures of wave-wave and beat-wave nonlinear wave-particle interactions. These new data

  11. The Earth’s Radiation Belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-20

    release of chemical substances, injection of Y -, metallic powders , and electromagnetic wave energy production. The effects of some ,)f these modification...gvrofrequency H2=J J1 (5. 24’) m 0c Y " one can express the instantaneous vector gyroradius as S c (5. 25) 0 qB d p c p d d = ldt = -q dt.- q13 24I .4 * -.--. 9...Fundamentals of Radiology, -. . Perganion Press, New York. 107. l)esrosier, N. W., and Rosenstock, H. Al. (1960) Radiation Technology in Eood

  12. Inner radiation belt source of helium and heavy hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Casolino, M.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.

    Nuclear interactions between inner zone protons and atoms in the upper atmosphere provide the main source of energetic H and He isotopes nuclei in the radiation belt. This paper reports on the specified calculations of these isotope intensities using various inner zone proton intensity models (AP-8 and SAMPEX/PET PSB97), the atmosphere drift-averaged composition and density model MSIS-90, and cross-sections of the interaction processes from the GNASH nuclear model code. To calculate drift-averaged densities and energy losses of secondaries, the particles were tracked in the geomagnetic field (modelled through IGRF-95) by integrating numerically the equation of the motion. The calculations take into account the kinematics of nuclear interactions along the whole trajectory of trapped proton. The comparison with new data obtained from the experiments on board RESURS-04 and MITA satellites and with data from SAMPEX and CRRES satellites taken during different phases of solar activity shows that the upper atmosphere is a sufficient source for inner zone helium and heavy hydrogen isotopes. The calculation results are energy spectra and angular distributions of light nuclear isotopes in the inner radiation belt that may be used to develop helium inner radiation belt model and to evaluate their contribution to SEU (single event upset) rates.

  13. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  14. Investigating radiation belt losses though numerical modelling of precipitating fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP may be the most significant inner radiation belt loss process for some electron energy ranges. One area of uncertainty lies in identifying a typical estimate of the precipitating fluxes from the examples given in the literature to date. Here we aim to solve this difficulty through modelling satellite and ground-based observations of onset and decay of the precipitation and its effects in the ionosphere by examining WEP-produced Trimpi perturbations in subionospheric VLF transmissions. In this study we find that typical Trimpi are well described by the effects of WEP spectra derived from the AE-5 inner radiation belt model for typical precipitating energy fluxes. This confirms the validity of the radiation belt lifetimes determined in previous studies using these flux parameters. We find that the large variation in observed Trimpi perturbation size occurring over time scales of minutes to hours is primarily due to differing precipitation flux levels rather than changing WEP spectra. Finally, we show that high-time resolution measurements during the onset of Trimpi perturbations should provide a useful signature for discriminating WEP Trimpi from non-WEP Trimpi, due to the pulsed nature of the WEP arrival.

  15. The radiation belt origin of Uranus' nightside radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the location of the source field lines of the smooth nightside component of Uranus kilometric radiation, the most likely free energy source is the outer radiation belts. As the terminator sweeps over the magnetic north polar region, precipitation of electrons generated by solar heating of the upper atmosphere and submergence of the electron mirror points deeper in the atmosphere will create a backscattered electron distribution with an enhanced population at large pitch angles. The clocklike radio emission turns out to be a direct consequence of the terminator's control of the emission process.

  16. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2file system to switch between models, in order to obtain at each location in space and energy point the most reliable value. Of course, the way the model is developed is well suited to add new local developments or to include international partnership. This model will be called the GRAB model, as Global Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  17. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, Kyle R; Clauderpierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A; Milling, David; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; H. J. Singer; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss,...

  18. Explaining occurrences of auroral kilometric radiation in Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Su, Zhenpeng; He, Zhaoguo; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Gao, Zhonglei

    2016-12-01

    Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is a strong terrestrial radio emission and dominates at higher latitudes because of reflection in vicinities of the source cavity and plasmapause. Recently, Van Allen Probes have observed occurrences of AKR emission in the equatorial region of Earth's radiation belts but its origin still remains an open question. Equatorial AKR can produce efficient acceleration of radiation belt electrons and is a risk to space weather. Here we report high-resolution observations during two small storm periods 4-6 April and 18-20 May 2013 and show, using a 3-D ray tracing simulation, that AKR can propagate downward all the way into the equatorial plane in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions. The simulated results can successfully explain the observed AKR's spatial distribution and frequency range, and the current results have a wide application to all other magnetized astrophysical objects in the universe.

  19. GCR as a source for Inner radiation belt of Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the insertion orbit of Cassini in 2004 the Ion and Neutron Camera measured significant fluxes of the energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from the area between the D-ring and the Saturn's atmosphere, what brought up the idea of the possible existence of the innermost radiation belt in this narrow gap (1). There are two main sources of energetic charged particles for such inner radiation belt: the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region, and the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest. Using the particles tracer, which was developed in our group, and GEANT4 software, we study in details those two processes. With a particle tracer we evaluate the GCR access to the Saturn atmosphere and rings. Simulation of the GCR trajectories allows to calculate the energy spectra of the arriving energetic particles, which is much more accurate, compare to the analytically predicted spectra using the Stoermer theory, since simulation includes effects of the ring shadow and non-dipolar processes in the magnetosphere. Using the GEANT4 software the penetration of the GCR through the matter of rings was simulated, and the production of secondaries particles was estimated. Finally, the motion of secondaries was simulated using the particles tracer, and evaluation of the energy spectrum of neutrons the decay of which leads to the production of final CRAND elements in the inner Saturnian radiation belts was done. We show that for inner radiation belt most energetic ions comes from GCR interaction with rings, it's penetration and from interaction of secondaries with Saturn's atmosphere. This simulation allows us to predict the fluxes of energetic ions and electrons, which particle detector MIMI/LEMMS onboard the Cassini can measure during the so-called "proximal

  20. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth’s radiation belt dynamics and solar wind― magnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study. Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  1. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG QiuGang; HAO YongQiang; WANG YongFu

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth's radiation belt dynamics and solar windmagnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study.Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  2. Wave-particle interactions in the outer radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Agapitov, O V; Artemyev, A V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Van Allen Probes have provided the first extensive evidence of non-linear (as opposed to quasi-linear) wave-particle interactions in space with the associated rapid (fraction of a bounce period) electron acceleration to hundreds of keV by Landau resonance in the parallel electric fields of time domain structures (TDS) and very oblique chorus waves. The experimental evidence, simulations, and theories of these processes are discussed. {\\bf Key words:} the radiation belts, wave-particle interaction, plasma waves and instabilities

  3. Rapid energization of radiation belt electrons by nonlinear wave trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Katoh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that nonlinear wave trapping plays a significant role in both the generation of whistler-mode chorus emissions and the acceleration of radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. We have performed particle simulations that successfully reproduce the generation of chorus emissions with rising tones. During this generation process we find that a fraction of resonant electrons are energized very efficiently by special forms of nonlinear wave trapping called relativistic turning acceleration (RTA and ultra-relativistic acceleration (URA. Particle energization by nonlinear wave trapping is a universal acceleration mechanism that can be effective in space and cosmic plasmas that contain a magnetic mirror geometry.

  4. Short-Term Forecasting of Radiation Belt and Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a mathematical model of the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas resulting from interactions between the solar wind and the Earth s magnetic field, for the purpose of predicting fluxes of energetic electrons (10 keV to 5 MeV) and protons (10 keV to 1 MeV), which are hazardous to humans and spacecraft. Given solar-wind and interplanetary-magnetic-field data as inputs, the program solves the convection-diffusion equations of plasma distribution functions in the range of 2 to 10 Earth radii. Phenomena represented in the model include particle drifts resulting from the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field; electric fields associated with the rotation of the Earth, convection, and temporal variation of the magnetic field; and losses along particle-drift paths. The model can readily accommodate new magnetic- and electric-field submodels and new information regarding physical processes that drive the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas. Despite the complexity of the model, the program can be run in real time on ordinary computers. At present, the program can calculate present electron and proton fluxes; after further development, it should be able to predict the fluxes 24 hours in advance

  5. Ultra-relativistic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S J; Janssen, M; Thorne, R; Levin, S; Klein, M; Gulkis, S; Bastian, T; Sault, R; Elachi, C; Hofstadter, M; Bunker, A; Dulk, G; Gudim, E; Hamilton, G; Johnson, W T K; Leblanc, Y; Liepack, O; McLeod, R; Roller, J; Roth, L; West, R

    2002-02-28

    Ground-based observations have shown that Jupiter is a two-component source of microwave radio emission: thermal atmospheric emission and synchrotron emission from energetic electrons spiralling in Jupiter's magnetic field. Later in situ measurements confirmed the existence of Jupiter's high-energy electron-radiation belts, with evidence for electrons at energies up to 20[?]MeV. Although most radiation belt models predict electrons at higher energies, adiabatic diffusion theory can account only for energies up to around 20[?]MeV. Unambiguous evidence for more energetic electrons is lacking. Here we report observations of 13.8[?]GHz synchrotron emission that confirm the presence of electrons with energies up to 50[?]MeV; the data were collected during the Cassini fly-by of Jupiter. These energetic electrons may be repeatedly accelerated through an interaction with plasma waves, which can transfer energy into the electrons. Preliminary comparison of our data with model results suggests that electrons with energies of less than 20[?]MeV are more numerous than previously believed.

  6. Internal Charging Design Environments for the Earths Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts are a widely recognized threat to spacecraft because they penetrate lightly shielded vehicle hulls and deep into insulating materials where they accumulate to sufficient levels to produce electrostatic discharges. Strategies for evaluating the magnitude of the relativistic electron flux environment and its potential for producing ESD events are varied. Simple "rule of thumb" estimates such as the widely used 10(exp 10) e-/sq cm fluence within 10 hour threshold for the onset of pulsing in dielectric materials provide a quick estimate of when to expect charging issues. More sophisticated strategies based on models of the trapped electron flux within the Earth s magnetic field provide time dependent estimates of electron flux along spacecraft orbits and orbit integrate electron flux. Finally, measurements of electron flux can be used to demonstrate mean and extreme relativistic electron environments. This presentation will evaluate strategies used to specify energetic electron flux and fluence environments along spacecraft trajectories in the Earth s radiation belts.

  7. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Shprits; A. Y. Drozdov; M. Spasojevic; A. C. Kellerman; M. E. Usanova; M. J. Engebretson; O. V. Agapitov; K. G. Orlova; I. S. Zhelavskaya; T. Raita; H. E. Spence; D. N. Baker; H. Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) di...

  8. Exploring the Jupiter's and Saturn's radiation belts with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Julien N.; Zarka, Philippe; Pater Imke, de; Hess, Sebastien; Tasse, Cyril; Courtin, Regis; Hofstadter, Mark; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Nettelmann, Nadine; lorenzato, Lise

    2014-05-01

    Since its detection in the mid-fifties, the decimeter synchrotron radiation (DIM), originating from the radiation belts of Jupiter, has been extensively observed over a wide spectrum (from >300 MHz to 22 GHz) by various radio instruments (VLA, ATCA, WSRT, Cassini...). They provided accurate flux measurements as well as resolved maps of the emission that revealed spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities. The strong magnetic field (~4.2 G at the equator) is responsible for the radio emission generated by relativistic electrons. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility configuration (fast rotating 'dipole' magnetic field, beamed radio emission) and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) (e.g. de Pater & Klein, 1989; de Pater & Dunn, 2003; Bagenal (ed.) et al., 2004; Santos-Costa, 2009, 2011). A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons populating the inner magnetosphere over a wide frequency range. The low frequencies are associated with electron of lower energies situated in weaker magnetic field regions. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) (van Haarlem et al., 2012), the last generation of versatile and digital ground-based radio interferometer operates in the [30-250] MHz bandwidth. It brings very high time (~μsec), frequency (~kHz) and angular (~asec) resolutions and huge sensitivities (~mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to image, for the first time, the radiation belts between 127-172 MHz (Girard et al. 2012, 2013). In Feb 2013, an 11-hour joint LOFAR/WSRT observing campaign seized the dyname state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current study of the radiation belts

  9. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q-G; Zhou, X-Z; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y-X; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Blake, J B; Wygant, J R

    2015-12-22

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  10. Electron acceleration in the heart of the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Henderson, M G; Morley, S K; Friedel, R H W; Funsten, H O; Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Thorne, R M; Turner, D L; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Larsen, B A; Niehof, J T

    2013-08-30

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA's Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belts and are inconsistent with a predominantly radial acceleration process.

  11. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt by HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shanshan; Zhu, Zhengping; Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Luo, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Several extremely low-frequency (ELF)/very low-frequency (VLF) wave generation experiments have been performed successfully at High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility and the artificial ELF/VLF signals can leak into the outer radiation belt and contribute to resonant interactions with energetic electrons. Based on the artificial wave properties revealed by many of in situ observations, we implement test particle simulations to evaluate the effects of energetic electron resonant scattering driven by the HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that for both single-frequency/monotonic wave and multi-frequency/broadband waves, the behavior of each electron is stochastic while the averaged diffusion effect exhibits temporal linearity in the wave-particle interaction process. The computed local diffusion coefficients show that, the local pitch-angle scattering due to HARRP-induced single-frequency ELF/VLF whistlers with an amplitude of ∼10 pT can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ∼10-2 rad2 s-1, suggesting the feasibility of HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves for removal of outer radiation belt energetic electrons. In contrast, the energy diffusion of energetic electrons is relatively weak, which confirms that pitch-angle scattering by artificial ELF/VLF waves can dominantly lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, diffusion rates of the discrete, broadband waves, with the same amplitude of each discrete frequency as the monotonic waves, can be much larger, which suggests that it is feasible to trigger a reasonable broadband wave instead of the monotonic wave to achieve better performance of controlled precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, our test particle scattering simulation show good agreement with the predictions of the quasi-linear theory, confirming that both methods are applied to evaluate the effects of resonant interactions between radiation belt electrons and artificially generated

  12. Inner Radiation Belt Generation of Light Nuclei Isotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Leonv, A. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear interactions between inner zone protons and atoms in the upper atmosphere provide the essential source of H and He isotop es nuclei in radiation belt. This paper reports the calculations of these isotop es intensities from the inner zone proton intensity model AP-8, the atmosphere drift-averaged composition and densities model MSIS-90, and cross sections for the various interaction processes. To calculate drift-averaged densities and energy losses of secondaries the particles are traced in geomagnetic field according IGRF-95 model by numerical solution of motion equation. The calculations account for nuclear interactions kinematic along the whole trapped protons trajectories. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data from SAMPEX, CRRES, RESURS-04 and MITA satellites taken during different solar activity phases. The comparison with observational data shows that the atmosphere is sufficient source for inner zone 4 He, 3 He,2 H and 3 H for L-shell less than 1.3.

  13. Nonlinear evolution of oblique whistler waves in radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. P.; Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, Swati

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic power spectrum and formation of coherent structures have been investigated in the present work applicable to Van Allen radiation belt. The nonlinear interaction of high frequency oblique whistler wave and low frequency magnetosonic wave has been investigated. Simulation was performed of the coupled equation of these two waves. The nonlinear interaction of these waves leads to the formation of the localized structures. These resulting localized structures are of complex nature. The associated magnetic power spectrum has also been studied. Dispersive nonlinear processes account for the high frequency part of the spectrum. The resulting magnetic power spectrum shows a scaling of k^{ - 4.5}. The energy transfer process from injection scales to smaller scales is explained by the results.

  14. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Girard, J N; Tasse, C; Hess, S; de Pater, I; Santos-Costa, D; Nenon, Q; Sicard, A; Bourdarie, S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Breton, R P; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corbel, S; Corstanje, A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markov, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Moldon, J; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observing Jupiter's synchrotron emission from the Earth remains today the sole method to scrutinize the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic electrons magnetically trapped around the planet (because in-situ particle data are limited in the inner magnetosphere). Aims. We perform the first resolved and low-frequency imaging of the synchrotron emission with LOFAR at 127 MHz. The radiation comes from low energy electrons (~1-30 MeV) which map a broad region of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. Methods (see article for complete abstract) Results. The first resolved images of Jupiter's radiation belts at 127-172 MHz are obtained along with total integrated flux densities. They are compared with previous observations at higher frequencies and show a larger extent of the synchrotron emission source (>=4 $R_J$). The asymmetry and the dynamic of east-west emission peaks are measured and the presence of a hot spot at lambda_III=230 {\\deg} $\\pm$ 25 {\\deg}. Spectral flux density measurements ar...

  15. Diffusion of radiation belt protons by whistler waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E.; Burke, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Whistler waves propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit can interact with energetic protons (appr. 80 - 500 keV) that are transported into the radiation belts. The waves may be launched from either the ground or generated in the magnetosphere as a result of the resonant interactions with trapped electrons. The wave frequencies are significant fractions of the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and they propagate obliquely to the geomagnetic field. A finite spectrum of waves compensates for the inhomogeneity of the geomagnetic field allowing the protons to stay in gyroresonance with the waves over long distances along magnetic field lines. The Fokker-Planck equation is integrated along the flux tube considering the contributions of multiple-resonance crossings. The quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in energy, cross energy/pitch angle, and pitch angle are obtalned for second order resonant interactions. They are shown to be proportional to the electric fields amplitudes. Numerical calculations for the second order interactions show that diffusion dominates near the edge of the loss cone. For small pitch angles the largest diffusion coefficient is in energy, although the cross energy/pitch angle term is also important. This may explain the induced proton precipitation observed in active space experiments.

  16. Diffusion of radiation belt protons by whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1994-11-01

    Whistler waves propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit can interact with energetic protons (approximately 80 - 500 keV) that are transported into the radiation belts. The waves may be launched from either the ground or generated in the magnetosphere as a result of the resonant interactions with trapped electrons. The wave frequencies are significant fractions of the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and they propagate obliquely to the geomagnetic field. A finite spectrum of waves compensates for the inhomogeneity of the geomagnetic field allowing the protons to stay in gyroresonance with the waves over long distances along magnetic field lines. The Fokker-Planck equation is intergrated along the flux tube considering the contributions of multiple-resonance crossings. The quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in energy, cross energy/ pitch angle, and pitch angle are obtained for second-order resonant interactions. They are sown to be proportional to the electric fields amplitudes. Numerical calculations for the second-order interactions show that diffusion dominates near the edge of the loss cone. For small pitch angles the largest diffusion coefficient is in energy, although the cross energy/ pitch angle term is also important. This may explain the induced proton precipitation observed in active space experiments.

  17. Diffusion of radiation belt protons by whistler waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Burke, W.J. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Whistler waves propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit can interact with energetic protons ({approximately}80-500 keV) that are transported into the radiation belts. The waves may be launched from either the ground or generated in the magnetosphere as a result of the resonant interactions with trapped electrons. The wave frequencies are significant fractions of the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and they propagate oliquely to the geomagnetic field. A finite spectrum of waves compensates for the inhomogeneity of the geomagnetic field allowing the protons to stay in gyroresonance with the waves over long distances along magnetic field lines. The Fokker-Planck equation is integrated along the flux tube considering the contributions of multiple-resonance crossings. The quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in energy, cross energy/pitch angle, and pitch angle are obtained for second-order resonant interactions. They are shown to be proportional to the electric fields amplitudes. Numerical calculations for the second-order interactions show that diffusion dominates near the edge of the loss cone. For small pitch angles the largest diffusion coefficient is in energy, although the cross energy/pitch angle term is also important. This may explain the induced proton precipitation observed in active space experiments. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Energization of outer radiation belt electrons during storm recovery phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Asif; Waters, C. L.; Sciffer, M. D.; Menk, F. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use test particle simulations incorporating an MHD model of ULF wave propagation in the magnetosphere with realistic ionosphere boundary conditions to study electron energization in the dayside outer Van Allen radiation belt, referenced to in situ particle and wave observations. On 7 January 2011 the THEMIS spacecraft detected 3 and 4-5 mHz waves simultaneous with flux enhancement of >10 keV electrons during the early recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm. We find that internal energization of equatorially mirroring electrons via nonresonant ULF wave-particle interactions can explain these observations. The wave poloidal components cause radial drift of electrons, increasing (decreasing) their kinetic energy as they move inward (outward). Electrons with initial kinetic energies of a few keV can be energized to double these values within an hour by interaction with the 3 mHz waves. The energization rate is somewhat less for the 4-5 mHz waves. An increase in the ionospheric conductance decreases the power of the fast mode wave, reducing radial drift velocities and hence decreasing the rate of energization. The fast mode poloidal field varies with radial distance and longitude, and this also affects energization. Electrons which drift outward encounter a region where the toroidal field due to the field line resonance becomes dominant and produces strong azimuthal drift. These electrons become trapped in an L-shell range just outward of the resonance region and are not energized.

  19. Radiation Belt Modeling for Spacecraft Design: Model Comparisons for Common Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Barth, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the current status of radiation belt modeling, providing model details and comparisons with AP-8 and AE-8 for commonly used orbits. Improved modeling of the particle environment enables smarter space system design.

  20. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  1. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  2. Rapid flattening of butterfly pitch angle distributions of radiation belt electrons by whistler-mode chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-08-01

    Van Allen radiation belt electrons exhibit complex dynamics during geomagnetically active periods. Investigation of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) can provide important information on the dominant physical mechanisms controlling radiation belt behaviors. Here we report a storm time radiation belt event where energetic electron PADs changed from butterfly distributions to normal or flattop distributions within several hours. Van Allen Probes observations showed that the flattening of butterfly PADs was closely related to the occurrence of whistler-mode chorus waves. Two-dimensional quasi-linear STEERB simulations demonstrate that the observed chorus can resonantly accelerate the near-equatorially trapped electrons and rapidly flatten the corresponding electron butterfly PADs. These results provide a new insight on how chorus waves affect the dynamic evolution of radiation belt electrons.

  3. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    OpenAIRE

    C. Forsyth; Rae, I.; Murphy, K.; Freeman, M.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H; Boyd, A. (Adele); Coxon, J; Jackman, C.; Kalmoni, N.; Watt, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV “seed” population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave‐particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belt...

  4. Jupiter's Decametric Radio Emission and the Radiation Belts of Its Galilean Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J A

    1968-03-01

    Many of the observed properties of Jupiter's decametric radiation may be explained by postulation that the inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter have magnetic properties that strongly distort Jupiter's magnetic field in the region of each satellite. Charged particles from Jupiter's radiation belts are trapped by these distorted fields and emit synchrotron radiation.

  5. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  6. Prompt enhancement of the Earth's outer radiation belt due to substorm electron injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.-C.; Reeves, G. D.; Su, Z. P.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present multipoint simultaneous observations of the near-Earth magnetotail and outer radiation belt during the substorm electron injection event on 16 August 2013. Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms A in the near-Earth magnetotail observed flux-enhanced electrons of 300 keV during the magnetic field dipolarization. Geosynchronous orbit satellites also observed the intensive electron injections. Located in the outer radiation belt, RBSP-A observed enhancements of MeV electrons accompanied by substorm dipolarization. The phase space density (PSD) of MeV electrons at L* 5.4 increased by 1 order of magnitude in 1 h, resulting in a local PSD peak of MeV electrons, which was caused by the direct effect of substorm injections. Enhanced MeV electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt were also detected within 2 h, which may be associated with intensive substorm electron injections and subsequent local acceleration by chorus waves. Multipoint observations have shown that substorm electron injections not only can be the external source of MeV electrons at the outer edge of the outer radiation belt (L* 5.4) but also can provide the intensive seed populations in the outer radiation belt. These initial higher-energy electrons from injection can reach relativistic energy much faster. The observations also provide evidence that enhanced substorm electron injections can explain rapid enhancements of MeV electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  7. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A W; Halford, A; Millan, R; McCarthy, M; Fennell, J; Sample, J; Woodger, L; Hospodarsky, G; Wygant, J R; Cattell, C A; Goldstein, J; Malaspina, D; Kletzing, C A

    2015-07-09

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its 'quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times.

  8. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A.; Milling, D. K.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Singer, H. J.; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.; Honary, F.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave-particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. Using a data-driven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence of storm-time extremely fast outward ULF wave transport. High-frequency wave-particle scattering loss into the atmosphere is not needed in this case. When rapid ULF wave transport coupled to a dynamic boundary is accurately specified, the sensitive dynamics controlling the enigmatic ultra-relativistic third radiation belt are naturally explained.

  9. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  10. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-09-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  11. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y; Drozdov, Alexander Y; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C; Usanova, Maria E; Engebretson, Mark J; Agapitov, Oleksiy V; Zhelavskaya, Irina S; Raita, Tero J; Spence, Harlan E; Baker, Daniel N; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A

    2016-09-28

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  12. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes. PMID:27678050

  13. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Freeman, M. P.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Coxon, J. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV "seed" population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1-3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM-H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels.

  14. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C; Rae, I J; Murphy, K R; Freeman, M P; Huang, C-L; Spence, H E; Boyd, A J; Coxon, J C; Jackman, C M; Kalmoni, N M E; Watt, C E J

    2016-07-01

    Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV "seed" population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1-3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM-H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels.

  15. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  16. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  17. The effect of the earth's radiation belts on an optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, C

    1966-11-01

    A photoelectric optical imaging system has survived one year in the earth's radiation belts with no measurable (radiation belts twice every 64 hr, and experiences a noise level equivalent to 400 photons/sec when in their most intense regions. While this noise is far less than that of other photoelectric systems operating in the belts because of the small effective area of the photocathode, the noise per unit cathode area is 1.3 x 10(5) photons/sec-cm(2), and is similar to the best of the other systems. The number and energy distribution of incident particles is calculated and then combined with shielding estimates to give the total energy absorbed in the optical elements. Radiation damage reports in the literature are shown to be consistent with the lack of a sensitivity change in this orbiting optical system. The effects of particle radiation on optical systems in general is briefly summarized, with emphasis on recent work of others.

  18. Simulation of ULF wave-modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B.; Paral, J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; Usanova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the millihertz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Losses balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible. Three-dimensional simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code, during a coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock event on 17 March 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation. The arrival of a strong CME-shock, such as the one simulated, disrupts the electric and magnetic fields in the magnetosphere and causes significant changes in both components of momentum, pitch angle, and L shell of radiation belt electrons, which may cause them to precipitate into the loss cone.

  19. CubeSat-Associated Radiation Belt Research: Recent and Upcoming Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Lauren; Li, Xinlin; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    Interest in CubeSats has grown dramatically in the past decade within the space physics community. While CubeSats are generally accepted now to be useful tools for education and technology development/demonstration, their ability to provide scientific value is often still questioned. Radiation belt physics, however, is one area in which the scientific utility of these small platforms has been demonstrated and continues to offer great promise. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, designed, built, tested, and operated by students at University of Colorado with mentoring from LASP professionals, was one of the first of now a long line of CubeSats designed to study radiation belt dynamics. Launched in September 2012, just a few weeks after NASA's Van Allen Probes, CSSWE provided valuable measurements of energetic electrons and protons from low-Earth orbit for two years, well beyond its nominal 3-month mission lifetime. The status of and results from CSSWE will be presented, with an emphasis on how these measurements have been combined with those from balloons and larger satellite missions to better understand radiation belt electron acceleration and loss processes. Some highlights from other radiation belt-related CubeSats will also be presented, along with upcoming missions. Radiation belt studies are a prime example of how small inexpensive CubeSats can be used to provide valuable scientific measurements and complement larger missions.

  20. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  1. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  2. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Baker, Daniel N.; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ultra-low frequency waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion.

  3. Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than 1 day at L belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can exceed 3 orders of magnitude in the slot region and continues into the inner radiation belt, which is evidence that these events are an important - and potentially dominant - source of inner belt electrons. Electron fluxes from September 2012 through February 2016 reveal that SPELLS occur frequently ( 2.5/month at 200 keV), but the number of observed events decreases exponentially with increasing electron energy for ≥100 keV. After SPELLS events, the slot region reforms due to slow energy-dependent decay over several day time scales, consistent with losses due to interactions with plasmaspheric hiss. Combined, these results indicate that the peaked phase space density distributions in the inner electron radiation belt result from an "on/off," geomagnetic-activity-dependent source from higher radial distances.

  4. Estimation of Solar Radiation using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Suprayogi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar radiation is the most important fator affeccting evapotranspiration, the mechanism of transporting the vapor from the water surface has also a great effect. The main objectives of this study were to investigate the potential of using Artificial Neural Network (ANN to predict solar radiation related to temperature. The three-layer backpropagation were developed, trained, and tested to forecast solar radiation for Ciriung sub Cachment. Result revealed that the ANN were able to well learn the events they were trained to recognize. Moreover, they were capable of effecctively generalize their training by predicting solar radiation for sets unseen cases.

  5. Losses of Energetic Electrons in Earth's Outer Radiation Belt During Unusual Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Huang, Chia-Lin; Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    The most extreme changes in solar wind parameters important for the coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere (dynamic pressure, dawn-to-dusk electric field, Alfven Mach number, plasma beta, …) occur during the passage at Earth of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). While the response of Earth's radiation belts to CMEs and CME-driven shocks has been investigated in great details, few studies have focused on what makes some CMEs and their shocks especially effective in driving losses of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt. Here, we present specific examples of losses during the passage at Earth of a coronal mass ejection. In particular, we discuss the conditions which may result in the magnetopause to retreat earthward up to geosynchronous orbit, resulting in significant losses of energetic electrons due to magnetopause shadowing. We also present the result of a low-density magnetic ejecta which impacted Earth in January 2013. Combining interplanetary, magnetosheath, outer magnetosphere and radiation belt measurements by more than ten satellites, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and Cluster, we show how a period of extremely low Mach number and dynamic pressure during the passage of the magnetic cloud resulted in dramatic losses in the outer radiation belt and a large-scale reorganization of the entire day-side magnetosphere.

  6. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  7. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Hoxie, V C; Thorne, R M; Foster, J C; Li, X; Fennell, J F; Wygant, J R; Kanekal, S G; Erickson, P J; Kurth, W; Li, W; Ma, Q; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Malaspina, D M; Gerrard, A; Lanzerotti, L J

    2014-11-27

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  8. Nonlinear effects associated with quasi-electrostatic whistler waves relevant to that in radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, R.; Sharma, R. P.; Kumar, S.

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the dynamics of high-amplitude quasi-electrostatic whistler waves propagating near resonance cone angle and their interaction with low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in Earth's radiation belts. The wave dynamics clearly indicates the whistlers having quasi-electrostatic character when propagating close to resonance cone angle. A high-amplitude whistler wave packet is obtained using the present analysis which has also been observed by S/WAVES (STEREO/WAVES) instrument onboard STEREO (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory). A numerical simulation technique has been employed to study the localization of quasi-electrostatic whistler waves in radiation belts. The ponderomotive force of pump quasi-electrostatic whistlers (high frequency) is used to excite low-frequency waves (KAWs). The turbulent spectrum obtained using the analysis suggests the presence of quasi-electrostatic whistlers and density fluctuations associated with KAW in radiation belts plasma. The wave localization and steeper spectra could be responsible for particle energization or heating in radiation belts.

  9. Science Objectives and Rationale for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B.H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibek, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission addresses how populationsof high energy charged particles are created, vary, and evolve in space environments,and specifically within Earths magnetically trapped radiation belts. RBSP, with a nominallaunch date of August 2012, comprises two spacecraft making in situ measurements for atleast 2 years in nearly the same highly elliptical, low inclination orbits (1.1 5.8 RE, 10).The orbits are slightly different so that 1 spacecraft laps the other spacecraft about every2.5 months, allowing separation of spatial from temporal effects over spatial scales rangingfrom 0.1 to 5 RE. The uniquely comprehensive suite of instruments, identical on the twospacecraft, measures all of the particle (electrons, ions, ion composition), fields (E and B),and wave distributions (dE and dB) that are needed to resolve the most critical science questions.Here we summarize the high level science objectives for the RBSP mission, providehistorical background on studies of Earth and planetary radiation belts, present examples ofthe most compelling scientific mysteries of the radiation belts, present the mission design ofthe RBSP mission that targets these mysteries and objectives, present the observation andmeasurement requirements for the mission, and introduce the instrumentation that will deliverthese measurements. This paper references and is followed by a number of companionpapers that describe the details of the RBSP mission, spacecraft, and instruments.

  10. Improving the Salammbo code modelling and using it to better predict radiation belts dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, Vincent; Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Grimald, Sandrine Rochel; Boscher, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the FP7-SPACESTORM project, one objective is to improve the reliability of the model-based predictions performed of the radiation belt dynamics (first developed during the FP7-SPACECAST project). In this purpose we have analyzed and improved the way the simulations using the ONERA Salammbô code are performed, especially in : - Better controlling the driving parameters of the simulation; - Improving the initialization of the simulation in order to be more accurate at most energies for L values between 4 to 6; - Improving the physics of the model. For first point a statistical analysis of the accuracy of the Kp index has been conducted. For point two we have based our method on a long duration simulation in order to extract typical radiation belt states depending on the solar wind stress and geomagnetic activity. For last point we have first improved separately the modelling of different processes acting in the radiation belts and then, we have analyzed the global improvements obtained when simulating them together. We'll discuss here on all these points and on the balance that has to be taken into account between modeled processes to globally improve the radiation belt modelling.

  11. Reanalysis and forecasting killer electrons in Earth's radiation belts using the VERB code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Adam; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are torii-shaped regions of trapped energetic particles, that in recent years, have become a principle focus for satellite operators and engineers. During geomagnetic storms, electrons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies, where they may penetrate spacecraft shielding and damage electrical systems, causing permanent damage or loss of spacecraft. Data-assimilation provides an optimal way to combine observations of the radiation belts with a physics-based model in order to more accurately specify the global state of the Earth's radiation belts. We present recent advances to the data-assimilative version of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, including more sophisticated error analysis, and incorporation of realistic field-models to more accurately specify fluxes at a given MLT or along a spacecraft trajectory. The effect of recent stream-interaction-region (SIR) driven enhancements are investigated using the improved model. We also present a real-time forecast model based on the data-assimilative VERB code, and discuss the forecast performance over the past 12 months.

  12. Successful large-scale use of CMOS devices on spacecraft traveling through intense radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental models of the radiation belts and computational techniques which have been developed for predicting the radiation hazards for spacecraft. These data and techniques are then applied to the Atmosphere Explorer 51 spacecraft to explain its successful survival for more than 18 months in a severe environment. In particular, the results of the analysis are used to explain the performance of some 2400 CMOS devices, and consequently, they demonstrate the reliability of this device technology in spacecraft systems.

  13. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  14. A radiation belt disturbance study from the space weather point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochel, S.; Boscher, D.; Benacquista, R.; Roussel, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation belts are a key region located close to the Earth, where the satellites travel. They are located in the centre of the magnetosphere and constitute a region sensitive to the variations of magnetosphere activity. The magnetosphere is in equilibrium in the solar wind. If the solar wind parameters change, then, the magnetospheric balance is upset. Using several processes, particles and energy from the solar wind can enter it, disturbing the magnetosphere and the radiation belts. In this paper, the am index has been used to define a new parameter named Cm, which is indicative of the energy level in the magnetosphere. The impact of CIRs (Corotating Interaction region) and of CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejection) on the magnetosphere has been studied from the Cm point of view, as well as the reaction of the radiation belts to a solar wind disturbance. The results show that the Cm parameter provides a new perspective in space weather studies as it clearly shows that the energy level can be higher for a CIR than for a CME. It also demonstrates that the events with several solar wind structures are much more effective to increase the energy level in the magnetosphere than single ones. Finally, Cm correlates better with the radiation belts fluxes, showing again that Cm is a good indicator of the inner magnetosphere activity. Nevertheless, the energy level in the radiation belts is maximised and the energy level in this population cannot go above a given value which depends on the altitude. The particles coming from the plasmasheet also push the particles from the highest altitudes to the lower ones, allowing the slot filling for Cm> .

  15. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission and Related Missions of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, David G.; Mauk, Barry H.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Fox, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Living With a Star (LWS) Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission in the context of the broader Geospace program. Missions to Geospace offer an opportunity to observe in situ the fundamental processes that operate throughout the solar system and in particular those that generate hazardous space weather effects in the vicinity of Earth. The recently selected investigations on NASA's LWS program's RBSP will provide the measurements needed to characterize and quantify the processes that supply and remove energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Instruments on the RBSP spacecraft will observe charged particles that comprise the Earth's radiation belts over the full energy range from 1 eV to more than 10 MeV (including composition), the plasma waves which energize them, the electric fields which transport them, and the magnetic fields which guide their motion. The two-point measurements by the RBSP spacecraft will enable researchers to discriminate between spatial and temporal effects, and therefore between the various proposed mechanisms for particle acceleration and loss. The measurements taken by the RBSP spacecraft will be used in data modeling projects in order to improve the understanding of these fundamental processes and allow better predictions to be made. NASA's LWS program has also recently selected three teams to study concepts for Missions of Opportunity that will augment the RBSP program, by (1) providing an instrument for a Canadian spacecraft in the Earth's radiation belts, (2) quantifying the flux of particles precipitating into the Earth's atmosphere from the Earth's radiation belts, and (3) remotely sensing both spatial and temporal variations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere.

  16. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  17. Recent space shuttle observations of the South Atlantic anomaly and the radiation belt models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradi, A.; Badhwar, G. D.; Braby, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Active ingredients consisting of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) and a Proton and Heavy Ion Detector (PHIDE) have been carried on a number of Space Shuttle flights. These instruments have allowed us to map out parts of the South Atlantic Particle Anomaly (SAA) and to compare some of it's features with predictions of the AP-8 energetic proton flux models. We have observed that consistent with the generally observed westward drift of the surface features of the terrestial magnetic field of the SAA has moved west by about 6.9 degrees longitude between the epoch year 1970 of the AP-8 solar maximum model and the Space Shuttle observations made twenty years later. However, calculations indicate that except for relatively brief periods following very large magnetic storms the SAA seems to occupy the same position in L-space as in 1970. After the great storm of 24 March 1991 reconfiguration of the inner radiation belt and/or proton injection into the inner belt, a second energetic proton belt was observed to form at approximately equal to 2. As confirmed by a subsequent flight observations, this belt was shown to persist at least for six months. Our measurements also indicate an upward shift in the L location of the primary belt from L = 1.4 to L = 1.5. In addition we confirm through direct real time observations the existence and the approximate magnitude of the East-West effect. If the need exists for improved and updated radiation belt models in the Space Station era, these observations point out the specific features that should be considered and incorporated when this task is undertaken.

  18. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and ring surfaces, are additional

  19. Istoriya issledovanij kosmicheskogo prostranstva. Chast' II. Estestvennaya i iskusstvennaya radiatsiya v magnitosfere Zemli %t History of space researches. Part 2. Natural and artificial radiation in the Earth magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnyj, V. V.

    The discussion about the structure and source of the intense radiation zone detected onboard the first satellites begun in 1958 and was finished in 1961. It was found that this zone is not a unitary reservoir of auroral electrons. Its remote part called the "outer radiation belt" indeed if filled with electrons, but their energies far exceed the auroral energy range. The near-Earth area of the radiation zone consisting of protons with energies Ep ~ 100 MeV was called the "inner radiation belt". Intense energy fluxes of electrons were also detected in this zone. Particles of the radiation belts are trapped in the geomagnetic field. They rotate around and bounce along the field lines and also drift around of the Earth. The drift existence was proved by the formation of narrow artificial radiation belts over the whole globe after high-altitude by the "ARGUS" nuclear explosions on September 1958. They were used as markers for creation of two-dimensional geomagnetic coordinate system (L,B) applied to define the distributions of trapped particles. Until 1960, the electron fluxes of the outer radiation belt were assumed to be a possible source of auroras. However, the subsequent experiments have lowered the level of these fluxes by orders of magnitude, and these data argued against this assumption. The geomagnetic field depressions detected in 1959 were referred to an effect of the ring current, which began to be registered in 1961-1964 as fluxes of trapped protons with energies Ep ~ 100 keV. Their energy density was not less than 10% of the magnetic-energy local density B2/8π, and constant diamagnetic field depression by its was not less than 15%. The "STARFISH" high-altitude thermonuclear explosion on July 9, 1962 unexpectedly has resulted in the formation of an artificial radiation belt filled with electrons. It has polluted the Earth's central magnetosphere for many years. Nevertheless, the experiment made it possible to obtain the distribution of electrons of a

  20. Measurement of Radiation Belt Partcles by MDS-1 Onboard SEDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Goka, T.

    The Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA) is on board the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite-1 (MDS-1) to measure the radiation environment, which was launched into geo-stationary transfer orbit (GTO) on February 4, 2002 with an apogee of about 35,700km, a perigee of about 500 km and an inclination of about 28.5 degrees. SEDA consists of the four instruments. Standard Dose Monitor monitors the electron and proton flux. Dosimeter measures the integrated radiation dose at fifty-six points of the satellite. Heavy Ion Telescope monitors the flux of heavy ions from He to Fe. Magnetometer measures the magnetic field in the magnetosphere. In this paper are described first results and comparison with the ISO standard model for the space environment

  1. Diffusion Simulation of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Induced by Superluminous L-O Mode Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; HE Zhao-Guo; ZHANG Sai; SU Zhen-Peng; CHEN Liang-Xu

    2011-01-01

    Temporal evolution of outer radiation belt electron dynamics resulting from superluminous L-O mode waves is simulated at L=6.5. Diffusion rates are evaluated and then used as inputs to solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle diffusion equation, particularly with and without cross diffusion terms. Simulated results demonstrate that phase space density(PSD) of energetic electrons due to L-O mode waves can enhance significantly within 24 h, covering a broader pitch-angle range in the absence of cross terms than that in the presence of cross terms. PSD evolution is also determined by the peak wave frequency, particularly at high kinetic energies. This result indicates that superluminous waves can be a potential candidate responsible for outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  2. Wave-induced precipitation as a loss process for radiation belt particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.; Katsufrakis, J. P.; Imhof, W. L.

    Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by VLF waves injected from ground based transmitters was achieved during the Stimulated Emission of Energetic Particles (SEEP) experiments (Imhof et al., 1983), the first direct satellite based observation of modulated precipitation of electrons in the bounce loss cone. This paper considers the temporal and spectral shape as well as the absolute flux level of the observed precipitation pulses. In order to model these results, both the pitch angle dependence of the particle distribution near the edge of the loss cone and atmospheric backscatter which leads to multiple interactions of the particles with the wave are considered. Based on a comparison of theory with observations, the leverage of the precipitation process is estimated. Crude estimates of the percentage depletion of the radiation belt population due to the observed transmitter induced precipitation are also made.

  3. Effects of Magnetic Flux Circulation on Radiation Belt and Ring Current Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Fok, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) determines the location of the dayside merging line and the magnetic flux circulation patterns. Magnetic flux circulation determines the amount of energy which enters the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We use the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code to simulate both idealized and real solar wind cases. We use several satellites to validate the LFM simulation results for the real solar wind case studies. With these cases, we examine the magnetic flux circulation under differing IMF orientations. We also use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) and Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model to examine the inner magnetospheric response to the orientation of the IMF. We will present the different magnetic flux circulation patterns and the resulting effects on the radiation belt and ring current population.

  4. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  5. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  6. Observation of Relativistic Electron Microbursts in Conjunction with Intense Radiation Belt Whistler-Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, K.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Roth, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-satellite observations of large amplitude radiation belt whistler-mode waves and relativistic electron precipitation. On separate occasions during the Wind petal orbits and STEREO phasing orbits, Wind and STEREO recorded intense whistler-mode waves in the outer nightside equatorial radiation belt with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 300 mV/m. During these intervals of intense wave activity, SAMPEX recorded relativistic electron microbursts in near magnetic conjunction with Wind and STEREO. This evidence of microburst precipitation occurring at the same time and at nearly the same magnetic local time and L-shell with a bursty temporal structure similar to that of the observed large amplitude wave packets suggests a causal connection between the two phenomena. Simulation studies corroborate this idea, showing that nonlinear wave.particle interactions may result in rapid energization and scattering on timescales comparable to those of the impulsive relativistic electron precipitation.

  7. Dynamic evolution of outer radiation belt electrons driven by superluminous R-X mode waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present initial results on the temporal evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons driven by the superluminous R-X mode waves. We calculate diffusion rates in pitch angle and momentum assuming the standard Gaussian distributions in both wave frequency and wave normal angle at the location L=6.5. We solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation using those diffusion rates as inputs. Numerical results show that R-X mode can produce significant acceleration of relativistic electrons around geostationary orbit,supporting previous findings that superluminous waves potentially contribute to dramatic variation in the outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  8. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J.; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  9. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  10. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Spjeldvik

    Full Text Available New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE/HIT instrument on the ISTP/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation belts. The latter attribute makes possible direct observations of nearly the full equatorial helium ion pitch angle distributions in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt region. Additionally, the spacecraft often re-encounters the same geomagnetic flux tube at a substantially off-equatorial location within a few tens of minutes prior to or after the equatorial crossing. This makes both the equatorial pitch angle distribution and an expanded view of the local off-equatorial pitch angle distribution observable. The orbit of POLAR also permitted observations to be made in conjugate magnetic local time sectors over the course of the same day, and this afforded direct comparison of observations on diametrically opposite locations in the Earth's radiation belt region at closely spaced times. Results from four helium ion data channels covering ion kinetic energies from 520 to 8200 KeV show that the distributions display trapped particle characteristics with angular flux peaks for equatorially mirroring particles as one might reasonably expect. However, the helium ion pitch angle distributions generally flattened out for equatorial pitch angles below about 45°. Significant and systematic helium ion anisotropy difference at conjugate magnetic local time were also observed, and we report quiet time azimuthal variations of the anisotropy index.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasmasphere

  11. Charged particle diffusion and acceleration in Saturn's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to determine, from the observed intensity profiles for protons and electrons in the region of L smaller than 4, whether population of Saturn's innermost trapped radiation zones from an external source is possible. It is found that if diffusion proceeds in an episodic rather than a steady-state manner (long periods of quiescence interrupted by brief periods of rapid diffusion), the basic features of the observed phase space density profiles are qualitatively reproduced for both the trapped protons and electrons.

  12. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  13. Degradation of Akebono solar cell panels and variation of proton radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H.; Miyake, W.; Matsuoka, A.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze long-term variation of electric current generated by Akebono solar cell panels (SCPI) and investigate how solar cell panels have been affected by space radiation. SCPI decreased slowly to about 7A in 2009 from 13A in 1989. The long-term decrease is probably due to various space radiations (Total Dose Effect). Therefore, we compare the decrease of solar cell output with solar proton flux measured by GOES satellites on GEO and with flux of trapped radiation from NASA's models (AP8 and AE8). We find a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output and trapped proton flux (above 10MeV) from the radiation model. However, we also find a few intervals of poor correlation, for an example, after a large geomagnetic storm occurred in March 1991, which suggests that stable proton radiation belt can be changed drastically for some special occasions.

  14. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  15. Bounce resonance scattering of radiation belt electrons by H+ band EMIC waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Summers, Danny; Bortnik, Jacob; Tao, Xin; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Lou, Yuequn; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Shi, Run; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of bounce-resonant pitch angle scattering of radiation belt electrons due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. It is found that EMIC waves can resonate with near-equatorially mirroring electrons over a wide range of L shells and energies. H+ band EMIC waves efficiently scatter radiation belt electrons of energy >100 keV from near 90° pitch angles to lower pitch angles where the cyclotron resonance mechanism can take over to further diffuse electrons into the loss cone. Bounce-resonant electron pitch angle scattering rates show a strong dependence on L shell, wave normal angle distribution, and wave spectral properties. We find distinct quantitative differences between EMIC wave-induced bounce-resonant and cyclotron-resonant diffusion coefficients. Cyclotron-resonant electron scattering by EMIC waves has been well studied and found to be a potentially crucial electron scattering mechanism. The new investigation here demonstrates that bounce-resonant electron scattering may also be very important. We conclude that bounce resonance scattering by EMIC waves should be incorporated into future modeling efforts of radiation belt electron dynamics.

  16. On the Connection Between Microbursts and Nonlinear Electronic Structures in Planetary Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmane, Adnane; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Blum, Lauren; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach, we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters, consistent with large amplitude oblique whistlers, can commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (greater than 1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles Theta (sub k)B greater than 50 degrees and phase-speeds v(sub phi) greater than or equal to c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of double layers and electron solitary holes consistent in scales (of the order of Debye lengths) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (E greater than or equal to 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, which is much faster than previously inferred.

  17. GPU Multi-Scale Particle Tracking and Multi-Fluid Simulations of the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, T.; Carscadden, J.; O'Donnell, D.; Winglee, R.; Harnett, E.; Cash, M.

    2007-12-01

    The properties of the radiation belts can vary dramatically under the influence of magnetic storms and storm-time substorms. The task of understanding and predicting radiation belt properties is made difficult because their properties determined by global processes as well as small-scale wave-particle interactions. A full solution to the problem will require major innovations in technique and computer hardware. The proposed work will demonstrates liked particle tracking codes with new multi-scale/multi-fluid global simulations that provide the first means to include small-scale processes within the global magnetospheric context. A large hurdle to the problem is having sufficient computer hardware that is able to handle the dissipate temporal and spatial scale sizes. A major innovation of the work is that the codes are designed to run of graphics processing units (GPUs). GPUs are intrinsically highly parallelized systems that provide more than an order of magnitude computing speed over a CPU based systems, for little more cost than a high end-workstation. Recent advancements in GPU technologies allow for full IEEE float specifications with performance up to several hundred GFLOPs per GPU and new software architectures have recently become available to ease the transition from graphics based to scientific applications. This allows for a cheap alternative to standard supercomputing methods and should increase the time to discovery. A demonstration of the code pushing more than 500,000 particles faster than real time is presented, and used to provide new insight into radiation belt dynamics.

  18. Unravelling the Complexities of the Earth's Radiation Belts: Findings from the Van Allen Probes mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola; Kessel, Ramona; Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shri

    2014-05-01

    Within the first year of Van Allen Probe operations, team members made a series of highly publicized decisive discoveries concerning the structure and evolution of the Earth's radiation belts, the processes that energize particles there, and the locations where they operate. Nevertheless, much more extensive and less publicized findings from the Van Allen Probes suggest that Earth's radiation belts regions remain a highly complex and puzzling place. Although the relation between magnetic storm and radiation belt enhancements and loss has been emphasized, dynamics during non-storm periods has occasionally been shown to be dramatic. While emphasis has been placed on new findings regarding local non-adiabatic energization mechanisms, adiabatic mechanisms have also been shown to be important. Furthermore, the interplay between, and relative importance of, these and other energization processes remain uncertain. The role of seed populations has been highlighted, with some studies pointing to localized mechanisms and others pointing to the role of substorms in transporting and injecting such populations. Here we review some of the less publicized findings and future objectives of the Van Allen Probes mission to get a broader and in-depth view of present understanding of Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  19. High-resolution maps of the 1.5 GHz emission from Jupiter's disk and radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Berge, G. L.; Bignell, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    VLA maps of four different faces of Jupiter made with a resolution of about 0.3 Jovian radius show new features of the radiation belt emission. A synchrotron model which reproduces these features serves to define the major characteristics of the relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. The observations provide the best determination to date of the atmospheric emission at 1.5 GHz and yield a disk brightness temperature of 425 + or - 100 K.

  20. Modeling of electron time variations in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. W.; Teague, M. J.; Schofield, N. J.; Vette, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the temporal variation in the trapped electron population of the inner and outer radiation zones is presented. Techniques presently used for modeling these zones are discussed and their deficiencies identified. An intermediate region is indicated between the zones in which the present modeling techniques are inadequate due to the magnitude and frequency of magnetic storms. Future trends are examined, and it is suggested that modeling of individual magnetic storms may be required in certain L bands. An analysis of seven magnetic storms is presented, establishing the independence of the depletion time of the storm flux and the storm magnitude. Provisional correlation between the storm magnitude and the Dst index is demonstrated.

  1. Prompt precipitation and energization of relativistic radiation belt electrons induced by ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool to study the dynamics of these ~MeV energetic particles. We use satellite measurements of the solar wind as the boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields which then drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. Wave-particle interaction can cause both energization and pitch-angle scattering loss. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves resolved by the MHD code have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux1 and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere2. The time scales seen in several studies linking ULF waves with radiation belt flux increases are usually several hours to a few days1,3, but few studies consider the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of tens of minutes. We investigate such rapid loss, using measured solar wind input to MHD-test particle simulations for a CME-shock event that occurred on January 21, 2005. We focus on mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations, especially ones driven by pressure variations in the solar wind, influence the radiation belts. ULF modulation was seen in precipitation detected by the MINIS balloon campaign measurements of atmospheric Bremsstrahlung from MeV electron precipitation4. We propose a coherent energization and precipitation mechanism due to trapped electron drift resonance with azimuthally propagating poloidal mode ULF waves during the CME-shock compression of the magnetosphere4; depending on the drift phase, some electrons are energized by the azimuthal electric field pulse and some are de-energized in the perpendicular direction causing them to pitch

  2. Comparison of Ring Current and Radiation Belt Responses during Transient Solar Wind Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, T. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Lemon, C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of radiation belt dynamics provides insight into the physical mechanisms of trapping, energization, and loss of energetic particles in the magnetosphere. It is well known that the storm-time ring current response to solar wind drivers changes the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere, which modifies radiation belt particle trajectories as well as the magnetopause and geomagnetic cutoff locations. What is not well known is the detailed space-time structure of solar wind transient features that drive the dynamics of the ring-current and radiation belt response. We compare observed responses of the ring current and radiation belts during two geomagnetic storms of similar intensity on 15 November 2012 and 29 June 2013. Using the self-consistent ring current model RCM-Equilibrium (RCM-E), which ensures a force-balanced ring-current response at each time step, we generate a simulated ring current in response to the changing conditions as the storm evolves on a timescale of hours. Observations of the plasma sheet particles, fields, and solar wind parameters are used to specify the dynamic boundary conditions as the storm evolves. This allows more realistic magnetospheric field and plasma dynamics during solar wind transients than can be obtained from existing empirical models. Using a spatial mapping algorithm developed by Mulligan et al., (2012) we create two-dimensional contour maps of the solar wind bulk plasma parameters using ACE, Wind, Geotail, and THEMIS data to quantitatively follow upstream spatial variations in the radial and azimuthal dimensions driving the storm. We perform a comparison of how the structure and impact angle of the solar wind transients affect the intensity and duration of energization of the ring current and radiation belt at various energies. We also investigate how the varying geomagnetic conditions determined by the solar wind affect dominant loss mechanisms such as magnetopause shadowing. Comparison of energetic particle

  3. Characterizing magnetopause shadowing effects in the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D.; Maget, V. F.; Sicard-Piet, A.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic electrons dynamics is still challenging to predict during the main phase of a storm. In particular, three dimensions radiation belt models, for which temporal resolution is limited, fail in predicting their behavior, especially when dropouts occur. In this paper we present a new model of magnetopause shadowing losses to be incorporated into the ONERA Salammbô code in order to improve the model accuracy. We show in this paper that above a few hundred keVs, magnetopause shadowing is the first contribution to losses in the outer electron belt during dropout events. Global variations of Earth-magnetopause distance and relativistic electron flux have been analyzed to establish the correlation between the magnetopause shadowing and dropouts on the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. To that purpose, a Superposed Epoch Analysis has been done using NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite 15 measurements. First, a list of 67 Stream Interfaces has been used to validate the method, and then the Superposed Epoch Analysis has been run over more than one solar cycle. Our results show that the model of magnetopause location we have developed fits well with a Superposed Epoch Analysis performed and that we are able to define a criteria based on it that detect intense dropouts. Finally, we have included this model in the Salammbô code, and we present here the improvements obtained as well as the validation made.

  4. Radio maps of Jupiter's radiation belts and planetary disk at lambda 6 cm

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of Jupiter's radio emission were made in April 1978 at a frequency of 4885 MHz (6 cm) using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. Pictures in the Stokes parameters I, Q and U have been obtained every 15 deg in longitude, each smeared over 20 deg of the planet's rotation. The half power beam width was approximately 1/6 of the disk diameter in right ascension and approximately 1/2 in declination. The planetary disk shows little or no limb darkening at this wavelength and has a temperature of 220 + or - 8 K. The radiation belts clearly show a kind of plateau or flattening in intensity in the outer part of the belt. A comparison with 21 and 50 cm maps indicate no difference in the width and form of the emission regions with wavelength.

  5. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  6. Radial dependence of ionization losses of protons of the Earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Coulomb losses and charge exchange of protons are considered in detail. On the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere, the radial dependences of the rates of ionization losses of protons, with μ from 0.3 to 10 keV nT-1, of the Earth's radiation belts near the equatorial plane are calculated for quiet periods. For calculation of Coulomb losses of protons we used data of ISEE-1 satellite (protons with energy from 24 to 2081 keV) on L from 3 to 9, data of Explorer-45 satellite (protons with energy from 78.6 to 872 keV) on L from 3 to 5 and data of CRRES satellite (protons with energy from 1 to 100 MeV) on L ≤ 3 (L is the McIlwain parameter). It is shown that with decreasing L the rate of ionization losses of protons of the radiation belts is reduced; for protons with μ > 1.2 keV nT-1 in a narrow region (ΔL ˜ 0.5) in the district of plasmapause in this dependence may form a local minimum of the rate. We found that the dependence from μ of the boundary on L between Coulomb losses and charge exchange of the trapped protons with hydrogen atoms is well approximated by the function Lb = 4.71μ0.32, where [μ] = keV nT-1. Coulomb losses dominate at L Lb(μ) dominates charge exchange of protons. We found the effect of subtracting the Coulomb losses from the charge exchange of protons of the radiation belts at low μ and L, which can simulate a local source of particles.

  7. Simulation of Radiation Belt Precipitation During the March 17, 2013 Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.

    2014-12-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the mHZ frequency range. Several balloon missions measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the BARREL campaign, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies (Clilverd et al., 2007; Millan et al., 2011). However, ULF waves in the magnetosphere, commonly associated with oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the dayside and with Kelvin-Helmhotz instabilities in the flanks, are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons. It has been conjectured that ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere may modulate EMIC wave growth rates. EMIC waves, in turn, have long been associated with energetic electron precipitation, since they can cause pitch angle scattering of these particles, thus lowering their mirror points (Miyoshi et al., 2008; Carson et al., 2013). This would explain the ULF modulation of MeV electrons seen by the balloon instruments. However, test particle simulations show that another hypothesis is possible (Brito et al., 2012). 3D simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the LFM code, during a CME-shock event on March 17, 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of VLF-type waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation.

  8. Radial dependence of ionization losses of protons of the Earth's radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovtyukh, A.S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Phyiscs

    2016-04-01

    Coulomb losses and charge exchange of protons are considered in detail. On the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere, the radial dependences of the rates of ionization losses of protons, with μ from 0.3 to 10 keV nT{sup -1}, of the Earth's radiation belts near the equatorial plane are calculated for quiet periods. For calculation of Coulomb losses of protons we used data of ISEE-1 satellite (protons with energy from 24 to 2081 keV) on L from 3 to 9, data of Explorer-45 satellite (protons with energy from 78.6 to 872 keV) on L from 3 to 5 and data of CRRES satellite (protons with energy from 1 to 100 MeV) on L ≤ 3 (L is the McIlwain parameter). It is shown that with decreasing L the rate of ionization losses of protons of the radiation belts is reduced; for protons with μ > 1.2 keV nT{sup -1} in a narrow region (ΔL ∝ 0.5) in the district of plasmapause in this dependence may form a local minimum of the rate. We found that the dependence from μ of the boundary on L between Coulomb losses and charge exchange of the trapped protons with hydrogen atoms is well approximated by the function L{sub b} = 4.71μ{sup 0.32}, where [μ] = keV nT{sup -1}. Coulomb losses dominate at L < L{sub b}(μ), and at L > L{sub b}(μ) dominates charge exchange of protons. We found the effect of subtracting the Coulomb losses from the charge exchange of protons of the radiation belts at low μ and L, which can simulate a local source of particles.

  9. Comparative study on earthquake and ground based transmitter induced radiation belt electron precipitation at middle latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Sidiropoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We examined (peak-to-background flux ratio p/b > 20 energetic electron bursts in the presence of VLF activity, as observed from the DEMETER satellite at low altitudes (~700 km. Our statistical analysis of measurements during two 6-month periods suggests that: (a the powerful transmitter NWC causes the strongest effects on the inner radiation belts in comparison with other ground-based VLF transmitters, (b the NWC transmitter was responsible for only ~1.5 % of total electron bursts examined during the 6-month period (1 July 2008 to 31 December 2008, (c VLF transmitter-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of a narrow band emission centered at the radiating frequency emission, whereas the earthquake-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of broadband emissions from a few kHz to >20 KHz, (d daytime events are less preferable than nighttime events, but this asymmetry was found to be less evident when the powerful transmitter NWC was turned off and (d seismic activity most probably dominated the electromagnetic interactions producing the electron precipitation at middle latitudes. The results of this study support the proposal that the detection of radiation belt electron precipitation, besides other kinds of studies, is a useful tool for earthquake prediction research.

  10. High-energy electrons in the inner radiation belt of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilova, R. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Titenkov, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of electron fluxes with energies greater than 40 MeV obtained by Kosmos 490, Salut 6, and Interkosmos 17 satellites at heights of 270-500 km in the Brazilian anomaly region are discussed. The observed electron flux is explained in terms of the decomposition of pi meson, produced by the interaction between high-energy protons (0.35-1 GeV) of the inner radiation belt and atoms of the residual atmosphere. A formula describing the electron flux is presented.

  11. Forecasting the High Energy Electron Radiation Belts Using Physics Based Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions waves play an important role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts. Here we present results from the SPACECAST project to forecast the high energy electron radiation belts using physics based models in the UK and France. The forecasting models include wave-particle interactions, radial diffusion, and losses by Coulomb collisions, and highlight the importance of various types of wave-particle interactions. The system is driven by a time series of the Kp index derived from solar wind data and ground based magnetometers and provides a forecast of the radiation belts up to 3 hours ahead, updated every hour. We show that during the storm of 8-9 March, 2012 the forecasts were able to reproduce the electron flux at geostationary orbit measured by GOES 13 to within a factor of two initially, and to within a factor of 10 later on during the event. By including wave-particle interactions between L* = 6.5 and 8 the forecast of the electron flux at geostationary orbit was significantly improved for the month of March 2012. We show examples of particle injection into the slot region, and relativistic flux drop-outs and suggest that flux drop outs are more likely to be associated with magnetopause motion than losses due to wave-particle interactions. To improve the forecasts we have developed a new database of whistler mode chorus waves from 5 different satellite missions. We present data on the power spectra of the waves as a function of magnetic local time, latitude and radial distance, and present pitch angle and energy diffusion coefficients for use in global models. We show that waves at different latitudes result in structure in the diffusion rates and we illustrate the effects on the trapped electron flux. We present forecasting skill scores which show quantitatively that including wave-particle interactions improves our ability to forecast the high energy electron radiation belt. Finally we suggest several areas where

  12. Things we do not yet understand about solar driving of the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Mona

    2016-06-01

    This commentary explores how close we are to predicting the behavior of the radiations belts -- the primary science objective of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Starting with what we know or think we know about competing sources, enhancement, transport, and loss, I walk through recent papers that have improved our understanding and then focus on flux dropouts as one particular yardstick of success. I mention a new paradigm for electrons and the importance of reliably matching models and observations for different solar inputs. Although the case for prediction remains a work in progress, there are encouraging signs of progress.

  13. Alternatives to accuracy and bias metrics based on percentage errors for radiation belt modeling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report reviews existing literature describing forecast accuracy metrics, concentrating on those based on relative errors and percentage errors. We then review how the most common of these metrics, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), has been applied in recent radiation belt modeling literature. Finally, we describe metrics based on the ratios of predicted to observed values (the accuracy ratio) that address the drawbacks inherent in using MAPE. Specifically, we define and recommend the median log accuracy ratio as a measure of bias and the median symmetric accuracy as a measure of accuracy.

  14. Effects of magnetic drift shell splitting on electron diffusion in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liheng; Chan, A. A.; O'Brien, T. P.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G. S.; Albert, J. M.; Elkington, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the presence of pitch angle scattering breaks all three adiabatic invariants of radiation belt electron motion and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. The Radbelt Electron Model (REM) solves such a Fokker-Planck equation and is used to investigate the phase space density sources. Our simulation results and theoretical arguments suggest that drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces outer zone phase space density enhancements, and this reduction has a limit corresponding to two-dimensional local diffusion on a curved surface in the phase space.

  15. Energetic ionized helium in the quiet time radiation belts - Theory and comparison with observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of helium ion distributions in the inner magnetosphere are compared to observations made by ATS-6 and Explorer-45. Coupled transport equations for equatorially mirroring singly and doubly ionized helium ions in the steady state limit with an outer boundary of L = 7 are solved. Radial profiles and energy spectra are computed at all lower L values. Theoretical quiet time predictions are compared to satellite observations of energetic helium ions in the lower MeV range. It is found that the theory adequately represents the principal characteristics of the radiation belt helium ion population.

  16. On the problem of electron loss in the outer radiation belt during a magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutin, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    An abrupt change in the latitudinal profile of energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt during magnetic storms is explained in many publications by a loss of electrons at L = 4-7 resulting from their departure to the atmosphere or to the magnetopause. In the present work, the loss of electrons is explained primarily by adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories. For this purpose, the effect of dawnto- dusk asymmetry measured by low-orbit SERVIS-1 and KORONAS-F satellites is involved.

  17. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt I: Radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Elkington, Scot R.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Subbotin, Dmitriy A.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on the modeling of radial transport in the Earth's outer radiation belt. A historical overview of the first observations of the radiation belts is presented, followed by a brief description of radial diffusion. We describe how resonant interactions with poloidal and toroidal components of the ULF waves can change the electron's energy and provide radial displacements. We also present radial diffusion and guiding center simulations that show the importance of radial transport in redistributing relativistic electron fluxes and also in accelerating and decelerating radiation belt electrons. We conclude by presenting guiding center simulations of the coupled particle tracing and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes and by discussing the origin of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit. Local acceleration and losses and 3D simulations of the dynamics of the radiation belt fluxes are discussed in the companion paper [Shprits, Y.Y., Subbotin, D.A., Meredith, N.P., Elkington, S.R., 2008. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt II: Local acceleration and loss. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue. doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.06.014].

  18. Prediction of relativistic electron flux in the Earth's outer radiation belt at geostationary orbit by adaptive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Dolenko, S. A.; Efitorov, A. O.; Shirokii, V. R.; Sentemova, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates the possibilities of the prediction of the time series of the flux of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt by parameters of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field measured at the libration point and by the values of the geomagnetic indices. Different adaptive methods are used (namely, artificial neural networks, group method of data handling, and projection to latent structures). The comparison of quality indicators of predictions with a horizon of 1-12 h between each other and with the trivial model prediction has shown that the best result is obtained for the average value of the responses of three neural networks that have been trained with different sets of initial weights. The prediction result of the group method of data handling is close to the result of neural networks, and the projection to latent structures is much worse. It is shown that an increase in the prediction horizon from 1 to 12 h reduces its quality but not dramatically, which makes it possible to use these methods for medium-term prediction.

  19. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  20. Dynamics of magnetically trapped particles foundations of the physics of radiation belts and space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    This book is a new edition of Roederer’s classic Dynamics of Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, updated and considerably expanded. The main objective is to describe the dynamic properties of magnetically trapped particles in planetary radiation belts and plasmas and explain the physical processes involved from the theoretical point of view. The approach is to examine in detail the orbital and adiabatic motion of individual particles in typical configurations of magnetic and electric fields in the magnetosphere and, from there, derive basic features of the particles’ collective “macroscopic” behavior in general planetary environments. Emphasis is not on the “what” but on the “why” of particle phenomena in near-earth space, providing a solid and clear understanding of the principal basic physical mechanisms and dynamic processes involved. The book will also serve as an introduction to general space plasma physics, with abundant basic examples to illustrate and explain the physical origin of diff...

  1. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  2. Accaleration of Electrons of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt and Auroral Oval Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Elizaveta; Ovchinnikov, Ilya; Riazantseva, Maria; Znatkova, Svetlana; Pulinets, Maria; Vorobjev, Viachislav; Yagodkina, Oksana; Stepanova, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the results of experimental observations demonstrating the role of auroral processes in the formation of the outer electron radiation belt and magnetic field distortion during magnetic storms. We show that the auroral oval does not mapped to the plasma sheet proper (region with magnetic field lines stretched in the tailward direction). It is mapped to the surrounding the Earth plasma ring in which transverse currents are closed inside the magnetosphere. Such currents constitute the high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current. Mapping of the auroral oval to the region of high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current explains the ring like shape of the auroral oval with finite thickness near noon and auroral oval dynamics during magnetic storms. The auroral oval shift to low latitudes during storms. The development of the ring current produce great distortion of the Earth's magnetic field and corresponding adiabatic variations of relativistic electron fluxes. Development of the asymmetric ring current produce the dawn-dusk asymmetry of such fluxes. We analyze main features of the observed processes including formation of sharp plasma pressure profiles during storms. The nature of observed pressure peak is analyzed. It is shown that the observed sharp pressure peak is directly connected with the creation of the seed population of relativistic electrons. The possibility to predict the position of new radiation belt during recovery phase of the magnetic storm using data of low orbiting and ground based observations is demonstrated.

  3. Stormtime Dynamics of the Relativistic Electron Flux in Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    A state-vector representation is a powerful technique for describing complex plasma systems. Its framework can be adapted for classification methods which can be used to analyze the system's history and for prediction methods which can serve to forecast its future activity. A state-vector description is developed for the electron flux dynamics in Earth's radiation belts, based on an 11-year (1993-2003) dataset of high-cadence flux measurements from a low-Earth (SAMPEX) orbit over a wide L range and at a fixed energy (2-6 MeV). A clustering algorithm is used to divide the state space into regions, or clusters of vectors, and it becomes evident that flux intensifications during storms correspond to characteristic transitions in state space following geoeffective interplanetary disturbances (such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections and high-speed streams). Examples are discussed to show that the classification is valid for medium-term (several-days) and long-term (solar-cycle-phase) timescales. The state-vector representation is then used as the basis of a predictive model of the flux distribution given upstream solar wind measurements. It is found that model accuracy of storm prediction is maximized if the model is tuned at a highly nonlinear regime. The relation to earlier state representations and models of the radiation belt flux is discussed.

  4. Structure and evolution of electron "zebra stripes" in the inner radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Foster, J. C.; Rankin, R.

    2016-05-01

    "Zebra stripes" are newly found energetic electron energy-spatial (L shell) distributed structure with an energy between tens to a few hundreds keV in the inner radiation belt. Using high-quality measurements of electron fluxes from Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the twin Van Allen Probes, we carry out case and statistical studies from April 2013 to April 2014 to study the structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes below L = 3. It is revealed that the zebra stripes can be transformed into evenly spaced patterns in the electron drift frequency coordinate: the detrended logarithmic fluxes in each L shell region can be well described by sinusoidal functions of drift frequency. The "wave number" of this sinusoidal function, which corresponds to the reciprocal of the gap between two adjacent peaks in the drift frequency coordinate, increases in proportion to real time. Further, these structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes can be reproduced by an analytic model of the evolution of the particle distribution under a single monochromatic or static azimuthal electric field. It is shown that the essential ingredient for the formation of multiple zebra stripes is the periodic drift of particles. The amplitude of the zebra stripes shows a good positive correlation with Kp index, which indicates that the generation mechanism of zebra stripes should be related to geomagnetic activities.

  5. Inner Radiation Belt Source of Helium and Heavy Hydrogen Nuclei Isotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Leonov, A. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.

    Nuclear interactions between inner zone protons and atoms in the upper atmosphere provide the essential source of H and He isotopes nuclei in radiation belt. This paper reports specified calculations of these isotopes intensities from the various inner zone proton intensity models AP-8, CRRESPRO and SAMPEX/PET PSB97, the atmosphere drift-averaged composition and densities model MSIS-90, and cross sections for the interaction processes from the GNASH nuclear model code. To calculate drift-averaged densities and energy losses of secondaries the particles are traced in geomagnetic field according IGRF-95 model by numerical solution of motion equation. The calculations account for nuclear interactions kinematic along the whole trapped protons trajectories. The comparison with observational data from SAMPEX, CRRES, RESURS-04 and MITA satellites taken during different solar activity phases shows that the atmosphere is sufficient source for inner zone 4He, 3He, 2H and 3H for L-shell less than 1.3. The calculation model allows having the energy spectrum and angle distribution of light nuclear isotopes in inner radiation belt that can be used to evaluate SEU rates.

  6. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  7. Understanding Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics: Van Allen Probes observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiaojia

    2016-10-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during geomagnetic storms using a 3D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the electron evolution observed by Van Allen Probes and simulation, we found that whistler-mode chorus waves play a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV through efficient energy diffusion. By only including radial diffusion driven by ultra-low-frequency waves, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and scattering by whistler-mode waves reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics, and the importance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction may still remain as an open question. We would like to acknowledge AFOSR Award FA9550-15-1-0158, NASA Grants NNX15AI96G, NNX15AF61G, and the NSF Grant AGS 1564510 for supporting this research.

  8. Nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the outer radiation belts: Van Allen Probes results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton; Drake, James; Vasko, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. Observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B provided long-lasting signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. The feedback from trapped particles provides steepening of parallel electric field and development of TDS seeded from initial whistler structure (well explained in terms of Particle-In-Cell model). The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system and are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts.

  9. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave‐particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wave‐particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm‐time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm‐time wave power. PMID:27867798

  10. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kyle R; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Sibeck, David G; Watt, Clare E J

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  11. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  12. Artificial Optical Radiation photobiological hazards in arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourzoulidis, G A; Achtipis, A; Topalis, F V; Kazasidis, M E; Pantelis, D; Markoulis, A; Kappas, C; Bourousis, C A

    2016-08-01

    Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is associated with crucial social, economic, cultural and technical issues. A highly specialized OHS sector deals with the photobiological hazards from artificial optical radiation (AOR), which is divided into visible light, UV and IR emitted during various activities and which is legally covered by European Directive 2006/25/EC. Among the enormous amount of sources emitting AOR, the most important non-coherent ones to consider for health effects to the whole optical range, are arcs created during metal welding. This survey presents the effort to assess the complicated exposure limits of the Directive in the controlled environment of a welding laboratory. Sensors covering the UV and blue light range were set to measure typical welding procedures reproduced in the laboratory. Initial results, apart from apparently justifying the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) due to even subsecond overexposures measured, also set the basis to evaluate PPE's properties and support an integrated risk assessment of the complex welding environment. These results can also improve workers' and employer's information and training about radiation hazards, which is a crucial OHS demand.

  13. Parametric validations of analytical lifetime estimates for radiation belt electron diffusion by whistler waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lifetimes of electrons trapped in Earth's radiation belts can be calculated from quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion by whistler-mode waves, provided that their frequency spectrum is broad enough and/or their average amplitude is not too large. Extensive comparisons between improved analytical lifetime estimates and full numerical calculations have been performed in a broad parameter range representative of a large part of the magnetosphere from L ~ 2 to 6. The effects of observed very oblique whistler waves are taken into account in both numerical and analytical calculations. Analytical lifetimes (and pitch-angle diffusion coefficients are found to be in good agreement with full numerical calculations based on CRRES and Cluster hiss and lightning-generated wave measurements inside the plasmasphere and Cluster lower-band chorus waves measurements in the outer belt for electron energies ranging from 100 keV to 5 MeV. Comparisons with lifetimes recently obtained from electron flux measurements on SAMPEX, SCATHA, SAC-C and DEMETER also show reasonable agreement.

  14. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  15. Accurately specifying storm-time ULF wave radial diffusion in the radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakoudis, Stavros; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Daglis, Ioannis A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can contribute to the transport, acceleration and loss of electrons in the radiation belts through inward and outward diffusion. However, the most appropriate parameters to use to specify the ULF wave diffusion rates are unknown. Empirical representations of diffusion coefficients often use Kp; however, specifications using ULF wave power offer an improved physics-based approach. We use 11 years of ground-based magnetometer array measurements to statistically parameterise the ULF wave power with Kp, solar wind speed, solar wind dynamic pressure and Dst. We find Kp is the best single parameter to specify the statistical ULF wave power driving radial diffusion. Significantly, remarkable high energy tails exist in the ULF wave power distributions when expressed as a function of Dst. Two parameter ULF wave power specifications using Dst as well as Kp provide a better statistical representation of storm-time radial diffusion than any single variable alone.

  16. Propagation and linear mode conversion of magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2016-10-01

    Magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are important for electron acceleration and loss from the radiation belts. It is generally understood that these waves are generated by unstable ion distributions that form during geomagnetically disturbed times. Here we show that magnetosonic waves could be a source of EMIC waves as a result of propagation and a process of linear mode conversion. The converse is also possible. We present ray tracing to show how magnetosonic (EMIC) waves launched with large (small) wave normal angles can reach a location where the wave normal angle is zero and the wave frequency equals the so-called crossover frequency whereupon energy can be converted from one mode to another without attenuation. While EMIC waves could be a source of magnetosonic waves below the crossover frequency, magnetosonic waves could be a source of hydrogen band waves but not helium band waves.

  17. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  18. A radiation belt monitor for the High Energy Transient Experiment Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, D. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prigozhin, G. Y.; Doty, J.; Ricker, G.

    1993-01-01

    A Radiation Belt Monitor (RBM) sensitive to protons and electrons with energy approximately greater than 0.5 MeV has been designed for the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE) satellite in order to: first, control the on-off configuration of the experiments (i.e. those susceptible to proton damage); and second, to indicate the presence of proton and/or electron events that could masquerade as legitimate high energy photon events. One of the two RBM channels has an enhanced sensitivity to electrons. Each channel of the RBM, based on a PIN silicon diode, requires a typical power of 6 milliwatts. Tests have been performed with protons with energies from approximately 0.1 to 2.5 MeV (generated by a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator via the d(d,p)t reaction), and with electrons with energies up to 1 MeV (from a 1.0 microcurie Bi-207 source).

  19. Long-Term Variations of the Electron Slot Region and Global Radiation Belt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Shao, Xi; Tan, Lun C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observations of changes of the nominal position of the quiet-time radiation belt slot over the solar cycles. It has been found that the slot region, believed to be a result of enhanced precipitation losses of energetic electrons due to their interactions with VLF waves in the magnetosphere, tends to shift to higher L (approximately 3) during a solar maximum compared to its canonical L value of approximately 2.5, which is more typical of a solar minimum. The solar-cycle migration of the slot can be understood in terms of the solar-cycle changes in ionospheric densities, which may cause the optimal wave-particle interaction region during higher solar activity periods to move to higher altitudes and higher latitudes, thus higher L. Our analysis also suggests that the primary wave-particle interaction processes that result in the slot formation are located off of the magnetic equator.

  20. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  1. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  2. Quantifying the effect of magnetopause shadowing on electron radiation belt dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Koller, J.; Morley, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Energetic radiation belt electron fluxes can undergo sudden dropouts in response to different solar wind drivers. Many physical processes contribute to the electron flux dropout, but their respective roles in the net electron depletion remain a fundamental puzzle. Some previous studies have qualitatively examined the importance of magnetopause shadowing in the sudden dropouts either from observations or from simulations. While it is difficult to directly measure the electron flux loss into the solar wind, radial diffusion codes with a fixed boundary location (commonly utilized in the literature) are not able to explicitly account for magnetopause shadowing. The exact percentage of its contribution has therefore not yet been resolved. To overcome these limitations and to determine the exact contribution in percentage, we carry out radial diffusion simulations with the magnetopause shadowing effect explicitly accounted for during a superposed solar wind stream interface passage, and quantify the relative contribution of the magnetopause shadowing coupled with outward radial diffusion by comparing with GPS-observed total flux dropout. Results indicate that during high-speed solar wind stream events, which are typically preceded by enhanced dynamic pressure and hence a compressed magnetosphere, magnetopause shadowing coupled with the outward radial diffusion can explain about 60-99% of the main-phase radiation belt electron depletion near the geosynchronous orbit. While the outer region (L* > 5) can nearly be explained by the above coupled mechanism, additional loss mechanisms are needed to fully explain the energetic electron loss for the inner region (L* ≤ 5). While this conclusion confirms earlier studies, our quantification study demonstrates its relative importance with respect to other mechanisms at different locations.

  3. Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Zhang, X.-J.; Li, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-06-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.

  4. Chorus-Driven Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics at Different L-Shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sai; XIAO Fu-Liang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Energetic outer radiation belt electron phase space density(PSD)evolution due to interaction with whistler-mode chorus at different L-shells is investigated by solving the diffusion equation including cross diffusion terms.It is found that the difference of diffusion rates for different L-shells occurs primarily at pitch angles 0°-50° and around 90°.In particular,diffusion rates for L = 6.5 are found to be 5-10 times larger than that for L = 3.5 at these pitch angles.In the presence of cross terms,PSD for~MeV electrons after 24 h decreases by about 25,12,10 and 8 times at L = 3.5,4.5,5.5 and 6.5 near the loss cone,and increases by about 55,45,30 and 20 times at larger pitch angles,respectively.After 24 h,the ratios between~MeV electron PSDs from simulations without and with cross diffusion at L = 3.5,4.5,5.5 and 6.5 are about 350,600,800 and 800 near the loss cone,and become 5,5.5,6.5 and 8 at pitch angle 90°,respectively.These results demonstrate that neglect of cross diffusion generally results in the overestimate of PSD,and the cross diffusion plays a more significant role in the resonant interaction between chorus waves and outer radiation belt electrons at larger L.

  5. Megavolt parallel potentials arising from double-layer streams in the Earth's outer radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, F S; Bale, S D; Bonnell, J W; Chaston, C C; Roth, I; Wygant, J

    2013-12-06

    Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230,000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1,000,000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, the instantaneous parallel potential along a single magnetic field line was the order of tens of kilovolts. Electrons on the field line might experience many such potential steps in their lifetimes to accelerate them to energies where they serve as the seed population for relativistic acceleration by coherent, large amplitude whistler mode waves. Because the double-layer speed of 3100  km/s is the order of the electron acoustic speed (and not the ion acoustic speed) of a 25 eV plasma, the double layers may result from a new electron acoustic mode. Acceleration mechanisms involving double layers may also be important in planetary radiation belts such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, in the solar corona during flares, and in astrophysical objects.

  6. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  7. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  8. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  9. On the possibility to use semiconductive hybrid pixel detectors for study of radiation belt of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Guskov, A; Smolyanskiy, P; Zhemchugov, A

    2015-01-01

    The scientific apparatus "Gamma-400" designed for study of hadron and electromagnetic components of cosmic rays will be launched to an elliptic orbit with the apogee of about 300 000 km and the perigee of about 500 km. Such a configuration of the orbit allows it to cross periodically the radiation belt and the outer part of magnetosphere. We discuss the possibility to use hybrid pixel detecters based on the Timepix chip and semiconductive sensors on board the "Gamma-400" apparatus. Due to high granularity of the sensor (pixel size is 55 $mu$m) and possibility to measure independently an energy deposition in each pixel, such compact and lightweight detector could be a unique instrument for study of spatial, energy and time structure of electron and proton components of the radiation belt.

  10. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    CERN Document Server

    Rumble, D; Pattle, K; Kirk, H; Wilson, T; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Mowat, C; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Sadavoy, S; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2016-01-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450{\\mu}m and 850{\\mu}m observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, {\\beta} = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8" resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36K with a mean temperature of 20{\\pm}3K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm{^{-3}}. Thirteen of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 {\\mu}m images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850{\\mu}m band of up ...

  11. Modeling the Earth's radiation belts. A review of quantitative data based electron and proton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vette, J. I.; Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of quantitative models of the trapped radiation belts is traced to show how the knowledge of the various features has developed, or been clarified, by performing the required analysis and synthesis. The Starfish electron injection introduced problems in the time behavior of the inner zone, but this residue decayed away, and a good model of this depletion now exists. The outer zone electrons were handled statistically by a log normal distribution such that above 5 Earth radii there are no long term changes over the solar cycle. The transition region between the two zones presents the most difficulty, therefore the behavior of individual substorms as well as long term changes must be studied. The latest corrections to the electron environment based on new data are outlined. The proton models have evolved to the point where the solar cycle effect at low altitudes is included. Trends for new models are discussed; the feasibility of predicting substorm injections and solar wind high-speed streams make the modeling of individual events a topical activity.

  12. Multi-MeV electron loss in the heart of the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam; Aseev, Nikita; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Michaelis, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding acceleration mechanisms in the Earth's radiation belts. In particular, a number of studies demonstrated the importance of the local acceleration by analyzing the radial profiles of phase space density (PSD) and observing building up peaks in PSD. In this study, we focus on understanding of the local loss using very similar tools. The profiles of PSD for various values of the first adiabatic invariants during the previously studied 17 January 2013 storm are presented and discussed. The profiles of PSD show clear deepening minimums consistent with the scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Long-term evolution shows that local minimums in PSD can persist for relatively long times. During considered interval of time the deepening minimums were observed around L* = 4 during 17 January 2013 storm and around L* = 3.5 during 1 March 2013 storm. This study shows a new method that can help identify the location, magnitude, and time of the local loss and will help quantify local loss in the future. This study also provides additional clear and definitive evidence that local loss plays a major role for the dynamics of the multi-MeV electrons.

  13. Observations of energetic helium ions in the earth's radiation belts during a sequence of geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of energetic (MeV) helium ions made with Explorer 45 during a sequence of magnetic storms during June through December of 1972 are presented. It is noted that the first of these storms started on June 17 and had a Dst index excursion to -190 gamma and that the MeV helium ions were perturbed primarily beyond 3 earth radii in the equatorial radiation belts with a typical flux increase of an order of magnitude at L equal to 4. The second storm period was in August and was associated with very major solar flare activity. While the Dst extremum was at best 35 gamma less than the June storm, this period can be characterized as irregular (or multi-storm) with strong compression of the magnetosphere and very large (order of magnitude) MeV helium ion flux enhancements down to L approximately equal to 2. After this injection, the trapped helium ion fluxes showed positive spherical slope with the peak beyond 3.15 MeV at L equal to 2.5; at the lowest observable L shells, little flux decay was seen during the remainder of the year.

  14. Evaluation of Radiation Belt Space Weather Forecasts for Internal Charging Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of static electron radiation belt models, space weather prediction tools, and energetic electron datasets are used by spacecraft designers and operations support personnel as internal charging code inputs to evaluate electrostatic discharge risks in space systems due to exposure to relativistic electron environments. Evaluating the environment inputs is often accomplished by comparing whether the data set or forecast tool reliability predicts measured electron flux (or fluence over a given period) for some chosen period. While this technique is useful as a model metric, it does not provide the information necessary to evaluate whether short term deviances of the predicted flux is important in the charging evaluations. In this paper, we use a 1-D internal charging model to compute electric fields generated in insulating materials as a function of time when exposed to relativistic electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere. The resulting fields are assumed to represent the "true" electric fields and are compared with electric field values computed from relativistic electron environments derived from a variety of space environment and forecast tools. Deviances in predicted fields compared to the "true" fields which depend on insulator charging time constants will be evaluated as a potential metric for determining the importance of predicted and measured relativistic electron flux deviations over a range of time scales.

  15. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  16. Effect of Chorus Latitudinal Distribution on Evolution of Outer Radiation Belt Electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fuliang; LI Junqiu; TANG Lijun; HE Yihua; LI Jiangfan

    2009-01-01

    Primary result on the impact of the latitudinal distribution of whistler-mode chorus upon temporal evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of outer radiation belt energetic electrons was presented.We evaluate diffusion rates in pitch angle and momentum due to a band of chorus frequency distributed at a standard Gaussian spectrum,and solve a 2-D bounce-averaged momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation at L=4.5.It is shown that chorus is effective in accelerating electrons and can increase PSD for energy of ~1 MeV by a factor of 10 or more in about one day,which is consistent with observation.Moreover,the latitudinal distribution of chorus has a great impact on the acceleration of electrons.As the latitudinal distribution increases,the efficient acceleration region extends from higher pitch angles to lower pitch angles,and even covers the entire pitch angle region when chorus power reaches the maximum latitude λm=45°.

  17. Dynamic Evolution of Outer Radiation Belt Electrons due to Whistler-Mode Chorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan; XIONG Ming

    2009-01-01

    Following our preceding work,we perform a further study on dynamic evolution of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt L = 4.5 due to a band of whistler-mode chorus frequency distributed over a standard Gaussian spectrum.We solve the 2D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation by allowing incorporation of cross diffusion rates.Numerical results show that whistler-mode chorus can be effective in acceleration of electrons at large pitch angles,and enhance the phase space density for energies of about 1MeV by a factor of 102 or above in about one day,consistent with observation of significant enhancement in flux of energetic electrons during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm.Moreover,neglecting cross diffusion often leads to overestimates of the phase space density evolution at large pitch angle by a factor of 5-10 after one day,with larger errors at smaller pitch angle,suggesting that cross diffusion also plays an important role in wave-particle interaction.

  18. Relativistic radiation belt electron responses to GEM magnetic storms: Comparison of CRRES observations with 3-D VERB simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ni, Binbin

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration, loss, and transport in the Earth's radiation belt during magnetic storms is a challenging task. The U.S. National Science Foundation's Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) has identified five magnetic storms for in-depth study that occurred during the second half of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission in the year 1991. In this study, we show the responses of relativistic radiation belt electrons to the magnetic storms by comparing the time-dependent 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) simulations with the CRRES MEA 1 MeV electron observations in order to investigate the relative roles of the competing effects of previously proposed scattering mechanisms at different storm phases, as well as to examine the extent to which the simulations can reproduce observations. The major scattering processes in our model are radial transport due to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic fluctuations, pitch angle and energy diffusion including mixed diffusion by whistler mode chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss inside the plasmasphere. The 3-D VERB simulations show that during the storm main phase and early recovery phase the estimated plasmapause is located deep in the inner region, indicating that pitch angle scattering by chorus waves can be a dominant loss process in the outer belt. We have also confirmed the important role played by mixed energy-pitch angle diffusion by chorus waves, which tends to reduce the fluxes enhanced by local acceleration, resulting in comparable levels of computed and measured fluxes. However, we cannot reproduce the more pronounced flux dropout near the boundary of our simulations during the main phase, which indicates that non-adiabatic losses may extend toL-shells lower than our simulation boundary. We also provide a detailed description of simulations for each of the GEM storm events.

  19. Quasi-linear wave-particle interactions in the Earth's radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. (Center for Electromagnetics Research, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (USA)); Burke, W.J.; Rothwell, P.L. (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (USA)); Silevitch, M.B. (Center for Electromagnetic Research, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (USA))

    1989-11-01

    This paper studies the theory of gyroresonant interactions of energetic trapped electrons and protons in the Earth's radiation zones with ducted electromagnetic cyclotron waves. Substorm injected electrons in the mid-latitude regions interact with coherent VLF signals, such as whistler mode waves. Energetic protons may interact with narrow-band hydromagnetic (Alfven) waves. A set of equations is derived based on the Fokker-Planck theory of pitch angle diffusion. They describe the evolution in time of the number of particles in the flux tube and the energy density of waves, for the interaction of Alfven waves with protons and of whistler waves with electrons. The coupling coefficients are obtained based on a quasi-linear analysis after averaging over the particle bounce motion. It is found that the equilibrium solutions for particle fluxes and wave amplitudes are stable under small local perturbations. The reflection of the waves in the ionosphere is discussed. To efficiently dump the energetic particles from the radiation belts, the reflection coefficient must be very close to unity so waves amplitudes can grow to high values. Then, the precipitating particle fluxes may act as a positive feedback to raise the height integrated conductivity of the ionosphere which in turn, enhances the reflection of the waves. In addition, by heating the foot of the flux tube with high intensity, RF energy the mirroring properties of the ionosphere are also enhanced. The stability analysis around the equilibrium solutions for precipitating particle fluxes and wave intensity show that an actively excited ionosphere can cause the development of explosive instabilities. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  20. Remediation of radiation belt electrons caused by ground based man-made VLF wave%地基人工 VLF电波对辐射带电子的调制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 徐岩冰; 于晓霞; 赵小芸; 吴峰; 王焕玉; 马宇蒨; 李新乔; 卢红; 孟祥承; 张吉龙; 王辉; 石峰

    2011-01-01

    辐射带电子的加速与沉降机理是空间物理研究的重要课题.法国DEMETER电磁卫星观测到了美国NPM发射站VLF信号及与之相关的高能电子沉降事例.本研究工作将根据基于回旋共振相互作用的准线性扩散理论,通过对局域投掷角扩散系数的计算,来说明受VLF影响的高能电子的投掷角分布与电子的能量及所处位置的关系.理论计算较好地解释了DEMETER卫星在NPM实验期间所观测到的电子沉降事例.在此基础上进一步讨论了通过人工方式对辐射带高能电子施加影响的效率问题.%The physics mechanisms of radiation belt electrons loss and acceleration are important issues in space physics research. Recently, France Microsatellite DEMETER has discovered the correlation between man- made VLF signals and radiation belt electrons precipitation in the NPM ( the U. S. VLF transmitter located at Lualualei ) experiment. Our research focuses on the explanation of the relation among affected pitch angle distribution, kinetic energy and position of electrons. This is achieved by calculating the local diffusion coeffcient based on the theory of qusi-linear diffusion with resonant interaction. Our result has a good explanation of radiation belt electron precipitation discovered by DEMETER during NPM experiment. Furthermore, we have discussed the effciency of radiation belt remediation in an artificial way.

  1. Effects of ULF wave power on relativistic radiation belt electrons: 8-9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves are known to play a substantial role in radial transport, acceleration, and loss of relativistic particles trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Using in situ observations by multiple spacecraft operating in the vicinity of outer radiation belts, we analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of ULF waves throughout the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 October 2012 and compare with the dynamics of relativistic electron fluxes on board the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The analysis shows that the relativistic electron fluxes reduce from their prestorm levels during the first phase of the storm and rapidly increase during the second phase of the storm. We demonstrate that the behavior of ULF wave power changes throughout the storm, from ULF oscillations being a mixture of compressional and shear magnetic components during the first phase of the storm to ULF oscillations being dominated by transverse (shear) components during the second phase. We analyze the parameters of ULF-driven radial diffusion throughout the storm and compare the observed diffusion coefficients with their statistical averages. We demonstrate that the observed diffusion coefficients are strong enough to impact the redistribution of relativistic electron fluxes from and to the outer boundary of radiation belts and the diffusion might influence the effects of any local electron acceleration by transporting fluxes inward or outward according to phase space density gradients.

  2. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Kanekal, S G; Foster, J C; Erickson, P J; Fennell, J F; Blake, J B; Zhao, H; Li, X; Elkington, S R; Henderson, M G; Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Kletzing, C A; Wygant, J R

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching -223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching -204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong "butterfly" distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported "impenetrable barrier" at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  3. Oblique Whistler-Mode Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Energy Distribution, Origins, and Role in Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, Anton; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mourenas, Didier; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Shastun, Vitalii; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we review recent spacecraft observations of oblique whistler-mode waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere as well as the various consequences of the presence of such waves for electron scattering and acceleration. In particular, we survey the statistics of occurrences and intensity of oblique chorus waves in the region of the outer radiation belt, comprised between the plasmapause and geostationary orbit, and discuss how their actual distribution may be explained by a combination of linear and non-linear generation, propagation, and damping processes. We further examine how such oblique wave populations can be included into both quasi-linear diffusion models and fully nonlinear models of wave-particle interaction. On this basis, we demonstrate that varying amounts of oblique waves can significantly change the rates of particle scattering, acceleration, and precipitation into the atmosphere during quiet times as well as in the course of a storm. Finally, we discuss possible generation mechanisms for such oblique waves in the radiation belts. We demonstrate that oblique whistler-mode chorus waves can be considered as an important ingredient of the radiation belt system and can play a key role in many aspects of wave-particle resonant interactions.

  4. Prediction of Global Solar Radiation in India Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gupta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global warming and decreasing fossil fuel reserves has necessitated the use of renewable energy resources like solar energy in India. To maximize return on a solar farm, it had to be set up at a place with high solar radiation. The solar radiation values are available only for a small number of places and must be interpolated for the rest. This paper utilizes Artificial Neural Network in interpolation, by obtaining a function with input as combinations of 7 geographical and meteorological parameters affecting radiation, and output as global solar radiation. Data considered was of past 9 years for 13 Indian cities. Low error values and high coefficient of determination values thus obtained, verified that the results were accurate in terms of the original solar radiation data known. Thus, artificial neural network can be used to interpolate the solar radiation for the places of interest depending on the availability of the data.

  5. Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Zhang, X.-J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetrate into depends on energy with closer penetration toward the Earth at lower energies than higher energies. We incorporate radial diffusion, local acceleration, and loss processes due to whistler mode wave observations to perform a 3-D diffusion simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that chorus waves cause electron flux increase by more than 1 order of magnitude during the first 18 h, and the subsequent radial extents of the energetic electrons during the storm recovery phase are determined by the coupled radial diffusion and the pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves and plasmaspheric hiss. The radial diffusion caused by ULF waves and local plasma wave scattering are energy dependent, which lead to the observed electron flux variations with energy dependences. This study suggests that plasma wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere are crucial for the energy-dependent intrusions of several hundred keV to several MeV electrons.

  6. The cusp: a window for particle exchange between the radiation belt and the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Z. Zhou

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on a single particle dynamics in the cusp region. The topology of the cusp region in terms of magnetic field iso-B contours has been studied using the Tsyganenko 96 model (T96 as an example, to show the importance of an off-equatorial minimum on particle trapping. We carry out test particle simulations to demonstrate the bounce and drift motion. The "cusp trapping limit" concept is introduced to reflect the particle motion in the high latitude magnetospheric region. The spatial distribution of the "cusp trapping limit" shows that only those particles with near 90° pitch-angles can be trapped and drift around the cusp. Those with smaller pitch angles may be partly trapped in the iso-B contours, however, they will eventually escape along one of the magnetic field lines. There exist both open field lines and closed ones within the same drift orbit, indicating two possible destinations of these particles: those particles being lost along open field lines will be connected to the surface of the magnetopause and the solar wind, while those along closed ones will enter the equatorial radiation belt. Thus, it is believed that the cusp region can provide a window for particle exchange between these two regions. Some of the factors, such as dipole tilt angle, magnetospheric convection, IMF and the Birkeland current system, may influence the cusp's trapping capability and therefore affect the particle exchanging mechanism. Their roles are examined by both the analysis of cusp magnetic topology and test particle simulations.

  7. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  8. Electron holes in the outer radiation belt: Characteristics and their role in electron energization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Drake, J. F.; Kuzichev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Van Allen Probes have detected electron holes (EHs) around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. Presumably generated near equator, EHs propagate to higher latitudes potentially resulting in energization of electrons trapped within EHs. This process has been recently shown to provide electrons with energies up to several tens of keV and requires EH propagation up to rather high latitudes. We have analyzed more than 100 EHs observed around a particular injection to determine their kinetic structure and potential energy sources supporting the energization of trapped electrons. EHs propagate with velocities from 1000 to 20,000 km/s (a few times larger than the thermal velocity of the coldest background electron population). The parallel scale of observed EHs is from 0.3 to 3 km that is of the order of hundred Debye lengths. The perpendicular to parallel scale ratio is larger than one in a qualitative agreement with the theoretical scaling relation. The amplitudes of EH electrostatic potentials are generally below 100 V. We determine the properties of the electron population trapped within EHs by making use of the Bernstein-Green-Kruskal analysis and via analysis of EH magnetic field signatures. The density of the trapped electron population is on average 20% of the background electron density. The perpendicular temperature of the trapped population is on average 300 eV and is larger for faster EHs. We show that energy losses of untrapped electrons scattered by EHs in the inhomogeneous background magnetic field may balance the energization of trapped electrons.

  9. Lightning driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: regional and global estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine energetic electron precipitation fluxes driven by lightning, in order to determine the global distribution of energy deposited into the middle atmosphere. Previous studies using lightning-driven precipitation burst rates have estimated losses from the inner radiation belts. In order to confirm the reliability of those rates and the validity of the conclusions drawn from those studies, we have analyzed New Zealand data to test our global understanding of troposphere to magnetosphere coupling. We examine about 10000h of AbsPAL recordings made from 17 April 2003 through to 26 June 2004, and analyze subionospheric very-low frequency (VLF perturbations observed on transmissions from VLF transmitters in Hawaii (NPM and western Australia (NWC. These observations are compared with those previously reported from the Antarctic Peninsula. The perturbation rates observed in the New Zealand data are consistent with those predicted from the global distribution of the lightning sources, once the different experimental configurations are taken into account. Using lightning current distributions rather than VLF perturbation observations we revise previous estimates of typical precipitation bursts at L~2.3 to a mean precipitation energy flux of ~1×10-3 ergs cm-2s-1. The precipitation of energetic electrons by these bursts in the range L=1.9-3.5 will lead to a mean rate of energy deposited into the atmosphere of 3×10-4 ergs cm-2min-1, spatially varying from a low of zero above some ocean regions to highs of ~3-6×10-3 ergs cm-2min-1 above North America and its conjugate region.

  10. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  11. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  12. A Model for Hourly Solar Radiation Data Generation from Daily Solar Radiation Data Using a Generalized Regression Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Khatib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for predicting hourly solar radiation data using daily solar radiation averages. The proposed model is a generalized regression artificial neural network. This model has three inputs, namely, mean daily solar radiation, hour angle, and sunset hour angle. The output layer has one node which is mean hourly solar radiation. The training and development of the proposed model are done using MATLAB and 43800 records of hourly global solar radiation. The results show that the proposed model has better prediction accuracy compared to some empirical and statistical models. Two error statistics are used in this research to evaluate the proposed model, namely, mean absolute percentage error and root mean square error. These values for the proposed model are 11.8% and −3.1%, respectively. Finally, the proposed model shows better ability in overcoming the sophistic nature of the solar radiation data.

  13. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Reeves

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new method for calculating the magnetic drift invariant, L*, that is used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and for other space weather applications. L* (pronounced L-star is directly proportional to the integral of the magnetic flux contained within the surface defined by a charged particle moving in the Earth's geomagnetic field. Under adiabatic changes to the geomagnetic field L* is a conserved quantity, while under quasi-adiabatic fluctuations diffusion (with respect to a particle's L* is the primary term in equations of particle dynamics. In particular the equations of motion for the very energetic particles that populate the Earth's radiation belts are most commonly expressed by diffusion in three dimensions: L*, energy (or momentum, and pitch angle (the dot product of velocity and the magnetic field vector. Expressing dynamics in these coordinates reduces the dimensionality of the problem by referencing the particle distribution functions to values at the magnetic equatorial point of a magnetic "drift shell" (or L-shell irrespective of local time (or longitude. While the use of L* aids in simplifying the equations of motion, practical applications such as space weather forecasting using realistic geomagnetic fields require sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive numerical integration. Typically a single L* calculation can require on the order of 105 calls to a magnetic field model and each point in the simulation domain and each calculated pitch angle has a different value of L*. We describe here the development and validation of a neural network surrogate model for calculating L* in sophisticated geomagnetic field models with a high degree of fidelity at computational speeds that are millions of times faster than direct numerical field line mapping and integration. This new surrogate model has applications to real-time radiation belt forecasting, analysis of data sets

  14. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Breuillard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc. along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  15. Forecasting the Earth’s radiation belts and modelling solar energetic particle events: Recent results from SPACECAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poedts Stefaan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High-energy charged particles in the van Allen radiation belts and in solar energetic particle events can damage satellites on orbit leading to malfunctions and loss of satellite service. Here we describe some recent results from the SPACECAST project on modelling and forecasting the radiation belts, and modelling solar energetic particle events. We describe the SPACECAST forecasting system that uses physical models that include wave-particle interactions to forecast the electron radiation belts up to 3 h ahead. We show that the forecasts were able to reproduce the >2 MeV electron flux at GOES 13 during the moderate storm of 7–8 October 2012, and the period following a fast solar wind stream on 25–26 October 2012 to within a factor of 5 or so. At lower energies of 10 – a few 100 keV we show that the electron flux at geostationary orbit depends sensitively on the high-energy tail of the source distribution near 10 RE on the nightside of the Earth, and that the source is best represented by a kappa distribution. We present a new model of whistler mode chorus determined from multiple satellite measurements which shows that the effects of wave-particle interactions beyond geostationary orbit are likely to be very significant. We also present radial diffusion coefficients calculated from satellite data at geostationary orbit which vary with Kp by over four orders of magnitude. We describe a new automated method to determine the position at the shock that is magnetically connected to the Earth for modelling solar energetic particle events and which takes into account entropy, and predict the form of the mean free path in the foreshock, and particle injection efficiency at the shock from analytical theory which can be tested in simulations.

  16. Beam-excited whistler waves at oblique propagation with relation to STEREO radiation belt observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sauer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic electron beams are considered to explain the excitation of whistler waves which have been observed by the STEREO satellite in the Earth's radiation belt. Aside from their large amplitudes (~240 mV/m, another main signature is the strongly inclined propagation direction relative to the ambient magnetic field. Electron temperature anisotropy with Te⊥>Te||, which preferentially generates parallel propagating whistler waves, can be excluded as a free energy source. The instability arises due to the interaction of the Doppler-shifted cyclotron mode ω=−Ωe+kVbcosθ with the whistler mode in the wave number range of kce≤1 (θ is the propagation angle with respect to the background magnetic field direction, ωe is the electron plasma frequency and Ωe the electron cyclotron frequency. Fluid and kinetic dispersion analysis have been used to calculate the growth rate of the beam-excited whistlers including the most important parameter dependencies. One is the beam velocity (Vb which, for instability, has to be larger than about 2VAe, where VAe is the electron Alfvén speed. With increasing VAe the propagation angle (θ of the fastest growing whistler waves shifts from θ~20° for Vb=2VAe to θ~80° for Vb=5VAe. The growth rate is reduced by finite electron temperatures and disappears if the electron plasma beta (βe exceeds βe~0.2. In addition, Gendrin modes (kce≈1 are analyzed to determine the conditions under which stationary nonlinear waves (whistler oscillitons can exist. The corresponding spatial wave profiles are calculated using the full nonlinear fluid approach. The results are compared with the STEREO satellite observations.

  17. Radiation of lamp and optimized experiment using artificial light in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jin-ping; David Barber; LI Tao; LI Shu-jiang; LI Xiang

    2008-01-01

    A winter optical experiment by an artificial lamp was conducted in the Amundsen Bay of Arctic Ocean from November of 2007 to January of 2008. The radiation field emitted from an artificial lamp was measured and is introduced in this paper, and the optimized experiment project is discussed. It is demonstrated that the minimum size allowed of the lamp is determined by both the field of view (FOV) of optical instrument and the measuring distance from the lamp. Some problems that might influence on the experiment result often occur for a simple fluorescent lamp,such as instability, spatial nonuniformity, light divergence, effect of lamp temperature, etc. By the analysis of the light radiation, three kind of measures are proposed to control the quality of the experiment, i.e. keeping consistency of lamp size with FOV of instrument, calibrating in situ downwind, and conducting measurement in effective range. Among them, the downwind calibration is the key step to overcome most problems arose by the lamp. The experiment indicated that the reliable results can be obtained only when the optical measurement is coordinated with the radiation field of artificial lamp. The measured radiation property of the lamp was used to advise the field experiment to minimize measuring error. As the experiment by artificial lamp was the first attempt in the Arctic Ocean, the experience given by this paper is a valuable reference to the correlative studies.

  18. Nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique monochromatic EMIC waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Su, Zhenpeng; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shui

    2017-02-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been considered to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt high-energy electrons. For parallel-propagating EMIC waves, the nonlinear character of cyclotron resonance has been revealed in recent studies. Here we present the first study on the nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique EMIC waves on the basis of test particle simulations. Higher wave obliquity produces stronger nonlinearity of harmonic resonances but weaker nonlinearity of fundamental resonance. Compared to the quasi-linear prediction, these nonlinear resonances yield a more rapid loss of electrons over a wider pitch angle range. In the quasi-linear regime, the ultrarelativistic electrons are lost in the equatorial pitch angle range αeq87.5° at ψ = 20° and 40°. At the resonant pitch angles αeq<75°, the difference between quasi-linear and nonlinear loss timescales tends to decrease with the wave normal angle increasing. At ψ = 0° and 20°, the nonlinear electron loss timescale is 10% shorter than the quasi-linear prediction; at ψ = 40°, the difference in loss timescales is reduced to <5%.

  19. Large Amplitude Whistler Waves and Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Radiation Belts: A Review of STEREO and Wind Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Cynthia; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P.; Kersten, K.; Wygant, J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Looper, Mark D.; Blake, J. Bernard; Roth, I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical problems for understanding the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts is determining the physical processes that energize and scatter relativistic electrons. We review measurements from the Wind/Waves and STEREO S/Waves waveform capture instruments of large amplitude whistler-mode waves. These observations have provided strong evidence that large amplitude (100s mV/m) whistler-mode waves are common during magnetically active periods. The large amplitude whistlers have characteristics that are different from typical chorus. They are usually nondispersive and obliquely propagating, with a large longitudinal electric field and significant parallel electric field. We will also review comparisons of STEREO and Wind wave observations with SAMPEX observations of electron microbursts. Simulations show that the waves can result in energization by many MeV and/or scattering by large angles during a single wave packet encounter due to coherent, nonlinear processes including trapping. The experimental observations combined with simulations suggest that quasilinear theoretical models of electron energization and scattering via small-amplitude waves, with timescales of hours to days, may be inadequate for understanding radiation belt dynamics.

  20. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  1. Simulation of Resonant Interaction between Energetic Electrons and Whistler-Mode Chorus in the Outer Radiation Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan

    2008-01-01

    @@ We construct a realistic model to evaluate the chorus wave--particle interaction in the outer radiation belt L = 4.5.This model incorporates a plasmatrough number density model, a field-aligned density model and a realistic wave power and frequency model.We solve the 2D bounce-averaged momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation and show that the Whistler-mode chorus can be effective in the acceleration of electrons, and enhance the phase space density for energies of ~1 Me V by a factor from 10 to 103 in about two days, consistent with the observation.We also demonstrate that ignorance of the electron number density variation along field line and magnetic local time in the previous work yields an overestimate of energetic electron phase space density by a factor 5~10 at large pitch-angle after two days, suggesting that a realistic plasma density model is very important to evaluate the evolution of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  2. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  3. Whistlers Observed Outside the Plasmasphere: Correlation to Plasmaspheric/Plasmapause Features and Implications for the Scattering of Radiation-Belt Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Mark L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospherically reflected, lightning-generated whistler waves are an important potential contributor to pitch-angle scattering loss processes of the electron radiation belts. While lightning-generated whistlers are a common feature at, and just inside, the plasmapause, they are infrequently observed outside the plasmasphere. As such, their potential contribution to outer radiation belt loss processes is more tenuous. Recently, Platino et al. [2005] has reported on whistlers observed outside the plasmasphere by Cluster. Here, we present correlative global observations of the plasmasphere, for the reported periods of Cluster-observed whistlers outside the plasmasphere, using IMAGE-EUV data. The intent of this study is to seek the underlying mechanisms that result in whistlers outside the plasmasphere and consequently the anticipated morphology and significance these waves may have on radiation belt dynamics.

  4. Long-term solar UV radiation reconstructed by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Feister

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Neural Networks (ANN are efficient tools to derive solar UV radiation from measured meteorological parameters such as global radiation, aerosol optical depths and atmospheric column ozone. The ANN model has been tested with different combinations of data from the two sites Potsdam and Lindenberg, and used to reconstruct solar UV radiation at eight European sites by more than 100 years into the past. Annual totals of UV radiation derived from reconstructed daily UV values reflect interannual variations and long-term patterns that are compatible with variabilities and changes of measured input data, in particular global dimming by about 1980–1990, subsequent global brightening, volcanic eruption effects such as that of Mt. Pinatubo, and the long-term ozone decline since the 1970s. Patterns of annual erythemal UV radiation are very similar at sites located at latitudes close to each other, but different patterns occur between UV radiation at sites in different latitude regions.

  5. Long-term solar UV radiation reconstructed by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feister, U.; Junk, J.; Woldt, M.

    2008-01-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are efficient tools to derive solar UV radiation from measured meteorological parameters such as global radiation, aerosol optical depths and atmospheric column ozone. The ANN model has been tested with different combinations of data from the two sites Potsdam and Lindenberg, and used to reconstruct solar UV radiation at eight European sites by more than 100 years into the past. Annual totals of UV radiation derived from reconstructed daily UV values reflect interannual variations and long-term patterns that are compatible with variabilities and changes of measured input data, in particular global dimming by about 1980-1990, subsequent global brightening, volcanic eruption effects such as that of Mt. Pinatubo, and the long-term ozone decline since the 1970s. Patterns of annual erythemal UV radiation are very similar at sites located at latitudes close to each other, but different patterns occur between UV radiation at sites in different latitude regions.

  6. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  7. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  8. A Nano-satellite Mission to Study Charged Particle Precipitation from the Van Allen Radiation Belts caused due to Seismo-Electromagnetic Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Sivadas, Nithin; Kannapan, Deepti; Yalamarthy, Ananth Saran; Dhiman, Ankit; Bhagoji, Arjun; Shankar, Athreya; Prasad, Nitin; Ramachandran, Harishankar; Koilpillai, R David

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, several attempts have been made to study the effects of seismo-electromagnetic emissions - an earthquake precursor, on the ionosphere and the radiation belts. The IIT Madras nano-satellite (IITMSAT) mission is designed to make sensitive measurements of charged particle fluxes in a Low Earth Orbit to study the nature of charged particle precipitation from the Van Allen radiation belts caused due to such emissions. With the Space-based Proton Electron Energy Detector on-board a single nano-satellite, the mission will attempt to gather statistically significant data to verify possible correlations with seismo-electromagnetic emissions before major earthquakes.

  9. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  10. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  11. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koller

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new method for calculating the magnetic drift invariant, L*, that is used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and for other space weather applications. L* (pronounced L-star is directly proportional to the integral of the magnetic flux contained within the surface defined by a charged particle moving in the Earth's geomagnetic field. Under adiabatic changes to the geomagnetic field L* is a conserved quantity, while under quasi-adiabatic fluctuations diffusion (with respect to a particle's L* is the primary term in equations of particle dynamics. In particular the equations of motion for the very energetic particles that populate the Earth's radiation belts are most commonly expressed by diffusion in three dimensions: L*, energy (or momentum, and pitch angle (the dot product of velocity and the magnetic field vector. Expressing dynamics in these coordinates reduces the dimensionality of the problem by referencing the particle distribution functions to values at the magnetic equatorial point of a magnetic "drift shell" (or L-shell irrespective of local time (or longitude. While the use of L* aids in simplifying the equations of motion, practical applications such as space weather forecasting using realistic geomagnetic fields require sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive numerical integration. Typically a single L* calculation can require on the order of 105 calls to a magnetic field model and each point in the simulation domain and each calculated pitch angle has a different value of L*. We describe here the development and validation of a neural network surrogate model for calculating L* in sophisticated geomagnetic field models with a high degree of fidelity at computational speeds that are millions of times faster than direct numerical field line mapping and integration. This new surrogate model has

  12. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rumble, D; Gutermuth, R A; Kirk, H; Buckle, J; Beaulieu, S F; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Allen, L E; Cieza, L A; Dunham, M M; Harvey, P M; Stapelfeldt, K R; Bastien, P; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Sadavoy, S; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wilson, C D; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2014-01-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star-formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of beta = 1.8. Within 40 of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03\\pm0.02, consistent with an ultra-compact HII region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73\\pm5 per cent and 82\\pm4 per cent of peak flux at 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m respectively. The residual thermal disk of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young Stellar Objects are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850\\mu m clumps identified by the fellwalker algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey d...

  13. Nonlinear local parallel acceleration of electrons through Landau trapping by oblique whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Artemyev, Anton; Mourenas, Didier; Mozer, Forrest; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B are analyzed to identify long-lasting (more than 6 h) signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. Such Landau resonant interactions result in the trapping of ˜1-10 keV electrons and their acceleration up to 100-300 keV. This kind of process becomes important for oblique whistler mode waves having a significant electric field component along the background magnetic field. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. We demonstrate that the electron energy corresponding to the observed plateau remains in very good agreement with the energy required for Landau resonant interaction with the simultaneously measured oblique chorus waves over 6 h and a wide range of L shells (from 4 to 6) in the outer belt. The efficient parallel acceleration modifies electron pitch angle distributions at energies ˜50-200 keV, allowing us to distinguish the energized population. The observed energy range and the density of accelerated electrons are in reasonable agreement with test particle numerical simulations.

  14. Modeling of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Scattering due to Spatial and Spectral Properties of ULF Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornquist, Mattias

    The research presented in this thesis covers wave-particle interactions for relativistic (0.5-10 MeV) electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (r = 3-7 RE, or L-shells: L = 3-7) interacting with magnetospheric Pc-5 (ULF) waves. This dissertation focuses on ideal models for short and long term electron energy and radial position scattering caused by interactions with ULF waves. We use test particle simulations to investigate these wave-particle interactions with ideal wave and magnetic dipole fields. We demonstrate that the wave-particle phase can cause various patterns in phase space trajectories, i.e. local acceleration, and that for a global electron population, for all initial conditions accounted for, has a negligible net energy scattering. Working with GSM polar coordinates, the relevant wave field components are EL, Ephi and Bz, where we find that the maximum energy scattering is 3-10 times more effective for Ephi compared to EL in a magnetic dipole field with a realistic dayside compression amplitude. We also evaluate electron interactions with two coexisting waves for a set of small frequency separations and phases, where it is confirmed that multi-resonant transport is possible for overlapping resonances in phase space when the Chirikov criterion is met (stochasticity parameter K = 1). The electron energy scattering enhances with decreasing frequency separation, i.e. increasing K, and is also dependent on the phases of the waves. The global acceleration is non-zero, can be onset in about 1 hour and last for > 4 hours. The adiabatic wave-particle interaction discussed up to this point can be regarded as short-term scattering ( tau ˜ hours ). When the physical problem extends to longer time scales (tau ˜ days ) the process ceases to be adiabatic due to the introduction of stochastic element in the system and becomes a diffusive process. We show that any mode in a broadband spectrum can contribute to the total diffusion rate for a particular drift

  15. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  16. [Polymeric materials for biomedical purposes obtained by radiation methods. V. hybrid artificial pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burczak, K; Rosiak, J

    1994-01-01

    The authors present a review of works done on the elaboration of a hybrid-type artificial pancreas. The article discusses construction designs, applied polymeric materials as well as biocompatibility problems of polymeric membranes that encapsulate the Langerhans islets. On example of hydrogel membranes prepared by radiation crosslinking of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) the dependence of the diffusion coefficients of glucose, insulin and immunoglobulin G on the crosslinking degree of hydrogels has been shown.

  17. Solar Radiation Measurement Using Raspberry Pi and Its Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Selvanathan Shanmuga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of solar energy as the best alternative to traditional energy sources has led to an extensive study on the measurement and prediction of solar radiation. Devices such as pyranometer, pyrrheliometer, global UV radiometer are used for the measurement of solar radiation. The solar radiation measuring instruments available at Innovation Center, MIT Manipal were integrated with a Raspberry Pi to allow remote access to the data through the university Local Area Network. The connections of the data loggers and the Raspberry Pi were enclosed in a plastic box to prevent damage from the rainfall and humidity in Manipal. The solar radiation data was used to validate an Artificial Neural Network model which was developed using various meterological data from 2011-2015.

  18. The importance of energetic particle injections and cross-energy and -species interactions to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (invited talk)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Drew; Gkioulidou, Matina; Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Gabrielse, Christine; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-05-01

    Earth's radiation belts provide a natural laboratory to study a variety of physical mechanisms important for understanding the nature of energetic particles throughout the Universe. The outer electron belt is a particularly variable population, with drastic changes in relativistic electron intensities occurring on a variety of timescales ranging from seconds to decades. Outer belt variability ultimately results from the complex interplay between different source, loss, and transport processes, and all of these processes are related to the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere. Currently, an unprecedented number of spacecraft are providing in situ observations of the inner magnetospheric environment, including missions such as NASA's THEMIS and Van Allen Probes and ESA's Cluster and operational monitors such as NOAA's GOES and POES constellations. From a sampling of case studies using multi-point observations, we present examples showcasing the significant importance of two processes to outer belt dynamics: energetic particle injections and wave-particle interactions. Energetic particle injections are transient events that tie the inner magnetosphere to the near-Earth magnetotail; they involve the rapid inward transport of plasmasheet particles into the trapping zone in the inner magnetosphere. We briefly review key concepts and present new evidence from Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS of how these injections provide: 1. the seed population of electrons that are subsequently accelerated locally to relativistic energies in the outer belt and 2. the source populations of ions and electrons that produce a variety of ULF and VLF waves, which are also important for driving outer belt dynamics via wave-particle interactions. Cases of electron acceleration by chorus waves, losses by plasmaspheric hiss and EMIC waves, and radial transport driven by ULF waves will also be presented. Finally, we discuss the implications of this developing picture of the system, namely how

  19. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight.

  20. Variations in Jupiter's Radiation Belts and Synchrotron Radiation as a Result of the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Changes to Jupiter's synchrotron radiation following the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9 are reported. Also, the consequences are reported for three possible mechanisms that might have caused those changes.

  1. Supervised artificial neural network-based method for conversion of solar radiation data (case study: Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidi, Maamar; Hanini, Salah; Rezrazi, Ahmed; Yaiche, Mohamed Redha; El Hadj, Abdallah Abdallah; Chellali, Farouk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) model is used as an alternative approach to predict solar radiation on tilted surfaces (SRT) using a number of variables involved in physical process. These variables are namely the latitude of the site, mean temperature and relative humidity, Linke turbidity factor and Angstrom coefficient, extraterrestrial solar radiation, solar radiation data measured on horizontal surfaces (SRH), and solar zenith angle. Experimental solar radiation data from 13 stations spread all over Algeria around the year (2004) were used for training/validation and testing the artificial neural networks (ANNs), and one station was used to make the interpolation of the designed ANN. The ANN model was trained, validated, and tested using 60, 20, and 20 % of all data, respectively. The configuration 8-35-1 (8 inputs, 35 hidden, and 1 output neurons) presented an excellent agreement between the prediction and the experimental data during the test stage with determination coefficient of 0.99 and root meat squared error of 5.75 Wh/m2, considering a three-layer feedforward backpropagation neural network with Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm, a hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer function at the hidden and the output layer, respectively. This novel model could be used by researchers or scientists to design high-efficiency solar devices that are usually tilted at an optimum angle to increase the solar incident on the surface.

  2. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  3. Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J. R.; Hudson, M. K.; Blake, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    We model the rapid (about 1 min) formation of a new electron radiation belt at L about or = 2.5 that resulted from the Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) of March 24, 1991 as observed by the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite. Guided by the observed electric and magnetic fields, we represent the time-dependent magnetospheric electric field during the SSC by an asymmetric bipolar pulse that is associated with the compression and relaxation of the Earth's magnetic field. We follow the electrons using a relativistic guiding center code. The test-particle simulations show that electrons with energies of a few MeV at L greater than 6 were energized up to 40 MeV and transported to L about or = 2.5 during a fraction of their drift period. The energization process conserves the first adiabatic invariant and is enhanced due to resonance of the electron drift motion with the time-varying electric field. Our simulation results, with an initial W(exp -8) energy flux spectra, reproduce the observed electron drift echoes and show that the interplanetary shock impacted the magnetosphere between 1500 and 1800 MLT.

  4. Typological classification and the existing condition of artificially established sycamore maple and Norway maple stands in the protective forest belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Rajko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study results on the typological classification of the artificially established sycamore maple and Norway maple stands included in the shelterbelt along the „Belgrade-Zagreb“ highway are presented. The environmental conditions of the sycamore and Norway maple plantation have been typologically defined in specific typological entitities at the ecological level (ecological units. In this context, the specific site conditions were characterised and defined as: a Forest of common oak (Tilio-Quercetum crassiusculae typicum on leached chernozem, b Forest of common oak (Tilio-Quercetum crassiusculae typicum on moderately deep to deep calcareous chernozem, c Forest of common oak (Tilio-Quercetum crassiusculae typicum on shallow to moderately deep calcareous chernozem. The inter-relationship between sycamore maple and Norway maple regarding the ecological and coenological optimum differs within the above ecological units. The diversity reflects the sycamore and Norway maple bioecology and the site typology of the particular ecological units.

  5. Entropy-based artificial viscosity stabilization for non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delchini, Marc O., E-mail: delchinm@email.tamu.edu; Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu; Morel, Jim, E-mail: jim.morel@tamu.edu

    2015-09-01

    The entropy viscosity method is extended to the non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations. The method employs a viscous regularization to stabilize the numerical solution. The artificial viscosity coefficient is modulated by the entropy production and peaks at shock locations. The added dissipative terms are consistent with the entropy minimum principle. A new functional form of the entropy residual, suitable for the Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations, is derived. We demonstrate that the viscous regularization preserves the equilibrium diffusion limit. The equations are discretized with a standard Continuous Galerkin Finite Element Method and a fully implicit temporal integrator within the MOOSE multiphysics framework. The method of manufactured solutions is employed to demonstrate second-order accuracy in both the equilibrium diffusion and streaming limits. Several typical 1-D radiation-hydrodynamic test cases with shocks (from Mach 1.05 to Mach 50) are presented to establish the ability of the technique to capture and resolve shocks.

  6. Formation of the inner electron radiation belt by enhanced large-scale electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Jiun; Selesnick, Richard S.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional bounce-averaged test particle code was developed to examine trapped electron trajectories during geomagnetic storms with the assumption of conservation of the first and second adiabatic invariants. The March 2013 storm was selected as an example because the geomagnetic activity Kp index sharply increased from 2 + to 7- at 6:00 UT on 17 March. Electron measurements with energies between 37 and 460 keV from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard Van Allen Probes (VAP) are used as initial conditions prior to the storm onset and served to validate test particle simulations during the storm. Simulation results help to interpret the observed electron injection as nondiffusive radial transport over a short distance in the inner belt and slot region based on various electric field models, although the quantitative comparisons are not precise. We show that electron drift trajectories are sensitive to the selection of electric field models. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that the actual field strength of penetration electric fields during this storm is stronger than any existing electric field model, particularly for L ≤ 2.

  7. On spatial distribution of proton radiation belt from solar cell degradation of Akebono satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, W.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar cells on any satellite degrade gradually due to severe space radiation environment. We found a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output current of Akebono satellite orbiting in the inner magnetosphere and trapped proton flux from AP8 model between 1989 and 1992. After 1993, presumably as a result of long-term degradation, variation of solar cell output seems more susceptible to other causes such as high temperature effect, and simple monthly averaged data show no significant relation between them. One of possible causes for the temperature variation of the solar cells is terrestrial heat radiation with changing orientation of solar cell panels towards the earth and another is solar radiation varied with eccentric earth's orbit around the sun. In order to remove the possible temperature effect, we sort the data expected to be least affected by the terrestrial heat radiation from the orbit conditions, and also analyze difference of the output current for a month from that for the same month in the previous year. The analysis method leads us to successfully track a continuous correlation between the decease rate of solar cell output and energetic trapped proton flux up to 1996. We also discuss the best-fitted spatial distribution of energetic protons from comparison with model calculations.

  8. Controlled Studies of Whistler Wave Interactions with Energetic Particles in Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    unprecedented. During experiments conducted with the S-81 satellite, Imhof et al [1983] observed the controlled precipitation of energetic electrons...precipitating electrons with E > 45 keV were detected in conjunction with VLF radiation bursts from the Siple station in Antarctica [ Imhof et al...accelerated by HF excited instabilities, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 44, 1089, 1982. Imhof , W. L., J. B. Reagan, H. D. Voss, E. E. Gaines, D. W. Datlowe, J

  9. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masao S; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-05-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the 'integrate-and-fire' algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (i) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (ii) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to (239)Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation-environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking.

  10. Lighting-induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) Events versus Geomagnetic Activity: A Probe Tool to Re-Evaluate the Electron Radiation Belt Loss Mechanisms (P16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J. H.; Raulin, J.-P.; Correia, E.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first results of an incipient attempt to re-model the Van Allen electron radiation belts equilibrium mechanisms. During the 23rd cycle solar minimum period (1995-1997) the Lightning- induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) events (electron precipitation from the geo-space to the upper Earth atmosphere) occurrence at the Antarctica Peninsula region was collected and studied. With statistical techniques we have reproduced the pattern of the events incidence during that period. The year 1998 was also analyzed and two well-defined geomagnetic storms (01-07 May and 26-31 Aug) were studied in association with the Trimpi events data. We have confirmed the narrow relationship between events occurrence rate and geomagnetic activity. The next step, in order to carry on the model, will be the modeling of the solar maximum LEP occurrence and to compute these results in the present radiation belts population models.

  11. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.-R., E-mail: crchoi@kaist.ac.kr; Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, M.-H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.-J. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 674, Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 (United States); Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.-Y. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  12. Rapid precipitation of radiation belt electrons induced by EMIC rising tone emissions localized in longitude inside and outside the plasmapause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yuko; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    By performing test particle simulations of relativistic electrons scattered by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions, we find a nonlinear scattering process named SLPA (Scattering at Low Pitch Angle) totally different from the nonlinear wave trapping. The nonlinear wave trapping, occurring for high pitch angles away from the loss cone, scatters some of resonant electrons to lower pitch angles, and a fraction of the electrons is further transported into the loss cone by SLPA after being released from the wave trapping. SLPA as well as the nonlinear wave trapping can work in any cases with proton band or helium band and inside or outside the plasmapause. We clarify that the combined scattering process causes significant depletion of the outer radiation belt. In the time evolution of an electron distribution observed locally in longitude, we find echoes of the electron depletion by the localized EMIC emissions. Monitoring fluxes of electrons being lost into the atmosphere in the wave generation region, we also find that efficient relativistic electron precipitation in several seconds. The characteristics of the precipitating electron flux as a function of kinetic energy vary significantly depending on the wave frequency range and the plasma density.

  13. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  14. Comparison of Van Allen Probes radiation belt proton data with test particle simulation for the 17 March 2015 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M. A.; Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Selesnick, R. S.

    2016-11-01

    The loss of protons in the outer part of the inner radiation belt (L = 2 to 3) during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm was investigated using test particle simulations that follow full Lorentz trajectories with both magnetic and electric fields calculated from an empirical model. The simulation results presented here are compared with proton pitch angle measurements from the Van Allen Probe satellites Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instrument before and after the coronal mass ejection-shock-driven storm of 17-18 March 2015, with minimum Dst =- 223 nT, the strongest storm of Solar Cycle 24, for four different energy ranges with 30, 38, 50, and 66 MeV mean energies. Two simulations have been run, one with an inductive electric field and one without. All four energy channels show good agreement with the Van Allen Probes REPT measurements for low L (L 2.4. A previous study using the Highly Elliptical Orbiter 3 spacecraft also showed improved agreement when including the inductive electric field but was unable to compare effects on the pitch angle distributions.

  15. Discovery of ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 9 stability trapped in the earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of MeV heavy ions obtained by Explorer 45 in an equatorial earth orbit during a 7 month period in 1972 are presented, including data from four major magnetic storms. The spacecraft contained a heavy ion detector telescope and heavy ion discriminator electronics. Heavy ions were distinguished from protons and electrons, and He ions and ions heavier than F were recorded on separate data channels. The L equals 2.25 to L equals 4 zones were probed, and it was found that the relative enhancement in heavy ion fluxes in the radiation belts over the prestorm ion flux intensities tends to increase with increasing ion mass and/or increasing ion energy in the MeV range. The radial profiles of ions with nucleon number greater than nine peak at L equals 2.9, and MeV ions in this class decay on time scales from 23 days at L equals 3.25 to 55 days at L equals 2.25. Indirect evidence indicated a solar source for the very heavy ions in the magnetosphere.

  16. Generation of Nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the Outer Radiation Belt through Electrons Trapping by Oblique Whistler Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Drake, James; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. The parameters favorable for the generation of TDS were studied experimentally as well as making use of 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the system with inhomogeneous magnetic field. It is shown that an outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons amplifies oblique whistlers which collapse into regions of intense parallel electric field with properties consistent with recent observations of TDS from the Van Allen Probe satellites. Oblique whistlers seed the parallel electric fields that are driven by the beams. The resulting parallel electric fields trap and heat the precipitating electrons. These electrons drive spikes of intense parallel electric field with characteristics similar to the TDSs seen in the VAP data. The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system. These effects are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.

  17. Hydrogen and helium isotope inner radiation belts in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Pugacheva

    Full Text Available Radial transport theory for inner radiation zone MeV ions has been extended by combining radial diffusive transport and losses due to Coulomb friction with local generation of D, T and 3He ions from nuclear reactions taking place on the inner edge of the inner radiation zone. Based on interactions between high energy trapped protons and upper atmospheric constituents we have included a nuclear reaction yield D, T and 3He flux source that was numerically derived from a nuclear reaction model code originally developed at the Institute of Nuclear Researches in Moscow, Russia. Magnetospheric transport computations have been made covering the L-shell range L=1.0–1.6. The resulting MeV energy D, T and 3He ion flux distributions show a strong influence of the local nuclear source mechanism on the inner zone energetic D, T and 3He ion content.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (Thermosphere-composition and chemistry · Magnetospheric physics (Energetic particles · trapped.

  18. Simultaneous quiet time observations of energetic radiation belt protons and helium ions - The equatorial alpha/p ratio near 1 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, T. A.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of energetic helium ions and protons in the earth's radiation belts has been conducted with Explorer 45 in the immediate vicinity of the equatorial plane. Protons were measured from less than 1 keV to 1.6 MeV and also above 3.3 MeV in a channel responsive up to 22 MeV; helium ions were monitored in three passbands: 910 keV to 3.15 MeV, 590 to 910 keV, and 2.0 to 3.99 MeV. Alpha/proton flux ratios were found to vary significantly with energy and location in the radiation belts. At equal energy per nucleon a range of variability for alpha/p from 0.0001 to well above 0.001 was found, and at equal energy per ion the corresponding variability was from 0.001 to above 10. The latter findings emphasize the relative importance of the very energetic helium ions in the overall radiation belt ion populations.

  19. Comparison of artificial intelligence methods and empirical equations to estimate daily solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Saeid; Behmanesh, Javad; Khalili, Keivan

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, three artificial intelligence methods including Gene Expression Programming (GEP), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) as well as, 48 empirical equations (10, 12 and 26 equations were temperature-based, sunshine-based and meteorological parameters-based, respectively) were used to estimate daily solar radiation in Kerman, Iran in the period of 1992-2009. To develop the GEP, ANN and ANFIS models, depending on the used empirical equations, various combinations of minimum air temperature, maximum air temperature, mean air temperature, extraterrestrial radiation, actual sunshine duration, maximum possible sunshine duration, sunshine duration ratio, relative humidity and precipitation were considered as inputs in the mentioned intelligent methods. To compare the accuracy of empirical equations and intelligent models, root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), mean absolute relative error (MARE) and determination coefficient (R2) indices were used. The results showed that in general, sunshine-based and meteorological parameters-based scenarios in ANN and ANFIS models presented high accuracy than mentioned empirical equations. Moreover, the most accurate method in the studied region was ANN11 scenario with five inputs. The values of RMSE, MAE, MARE and R2 indices for the mentioned model were 1.850 MJ m-2 day-1, 1.184 MJ m-2 day-1, 9.58% and 0.935, respectively.

  20. The role of EUV/X-ray solar activity and electron precipitations from radiation belts in the climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Voronin, Nikolai; Baranova, Lubov

    The authors associate the recently observed climate warming and carbon dioxide concentration growth in lower atmospheric layers with variations of the solar-geomagnetic activity contribution to global cloud formation and with significant decrease of carbon dioxide accumulation in forests in the process of photosynthesis. The contribution of the greenhouse effect of carbon-bearing gases to global warming turns out to be insignificant. We consider the impact of microwave emissions of the ionosphere disturbed by solar flares and magnetic storms on the troposphere and suggest the radio-optical trigger mechanism of the solar influence on weather and climate of the Earth, which consists of the following three stages: - the ionosphere absorbs the ionizing solar radiation and corpuscles from the radiation belts and transforms these into microwaves through the excitation of Rydberg states by electron impact (ionospheric photoelectron, secondary and Auger electrons); - the rates of formation and destruction of water cluster ions in the troposphere are regulated by the microwave radiation; - the clusters contribute to formation of clouds, which affects the energy flux of solar radiation through the troposphere and the flux of outgoing heat from the underlying surface. All stages of the proposed mechanism were strictly confirmed: amplification of ionospheric microwave radiation during solar flares and magnetic storms was detected; the regulation of humidity at altitude above 2 km by solar microwave emission during solar flares was registered; an influence of solar flares and magnetic storms on the cloudiness is distinctly registered at least in some geographic areas; a direct influence of solar-geomagnetic activity on the global total cloud cover in latest maximum of secular variability (in 1985 - in electromagnetic solar activity, and in 2003 - in geomagnetic activity) was discovered. Basing on analysis of satellite data on global cloud cover and radiation balance the

  1. Prediction of monthly mean daily global solar radiation using Artificial Neural Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sivamadhavi; R Samuel Selvaraj

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a multilayer feed forward (MLFF) neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed, trained, and tested to predict monthly mean daily global radiation in Tamil Nadu, India. Various geographical, solar and meteorological parameters of three different locations with diverse climatic conditions were used as input parameters. Out of 565 available data, 530 were used for training and the rest were used for testing the artificial neural network (ANN). A 3-layer and a 4-layer MLFF networks were developed and the performance of the developed models was evaluated based on mean bias error, mean absolute percentage error, root mean squared error and Student’s -test. The 3-layer MLFF network developed in this study did not give uniform results for the three chosen locations. Hence, a 4-layer MLFF network was developed and the average value of the mean absolute percentage error was found to be 5.47%. Values of global radiation obtained using the model were in excellent agreement with measured values. Results of this study show that the designed ANN model can be used to estimate monthly mean daily global radiation of any place in Tamil Nadu where measured global radiation data are not available.

  2. Characteristics of Pitch Angle Distributions of 100s Kev Electrons in the Slot Region and Inner Radiation Belt­­­­­­­­

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-art pitch-angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of 100s keV electron PADs below L =4 is performed, in which the PADs is categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°) and 90°-minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of 460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90°-minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (Lbelt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2mechanism can hardly explain the formation of 90°-minimum PADs at the center of inner belt. These new and compelling observations, made possible by the high-quality measurements of MagEIS, present a challenge for the wave modelers, and future work is still needed to fully understand them.

  3. Fast radiative transfer of dust reprocessing in semi-analytic models with artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Laura; Granato, Gian Luigi

    2012-01-01

    A serious concern for semi-analytical galaxy formation models, aiming to simulate multi-wavelength surveys and to thoroughly explore the model parameter space, is the extremely time consuming numerical solution of the radiative transfer of stellar radiation through dusty media. To overcome this problem, we have implemented an artificial neural network algorithm in the radiative transfer code GRASIL, in order to significantly speed up the computation of the infrared SED. The ANN we have implemented is of general use, in that its input neurons are defined as those quantities effectively determining the shape of the IR SED. Therefore, the training of the ANN can be performed with any model and then applied to other models. We made a blind test to check the algorithm, by applying a net trained with a standard chemical evolution model (i.e. CHE_EVO) to a mock catalogue extracted from the SAM MORGANA, and compared galaxy counts and evolution of the luminosity functions in several near-IR to sub-mm bands, and also t...

  4. Effects of {gamma}-radiation on the fungus Alternaria alternata in artificially inoculated cereal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braghini, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas II, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1374, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: raquelbraghini@yahoo.com.br; Pozzi, C.R. [Instituto de Zootecnia, Rua Heitor Penteado 56, CEP 13460-000, Nova Odessa, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Aquino, S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 355 , CEP 01246-902, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, L.O.; Correa, B. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas II, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1374, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different {gamma}-radiation doses on the growth of Alternaria alternata in artificially inoculated cereal samples. Seeds and grains were divided into four groups: Control Group (not irradiated), and Groups 1, 2 and 3, inoculated with an A. alternata spore suspension (1x10{sup 6} spores/mL) and exposed to 2, 5 and 10 kGy, respectively. Serial dilutions of the samples were prepared and seeded on DRBC (dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar) and DCMA (dichloran chloramphenicol malt extract agar) media, after which the number of colony-forming units per gram was determined in each group. In addition, fungal morphology after irradiation was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that ionizing radiation at a dose of 5 kGy was effective in reducing the growth of A. alternata. However, a dose of 10 kGy was necessary to inhibit fungal growth completely. SEM made it possible to visualize structural alterations induced by the different {gamma}-radiation doses used.

  5. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK AND WAVELET DECOMPOSITION IN THE FORECAST OF GLOBAL HORIZONTAL SOLAR RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Albino Teixeira Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method (denoted by WD-ANN that combines the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and the Wavelet Decomposition (WD to generate short-term global horizontal solar radiation forecasting, which is an essential information for evaluating the electrical power generated from the conversion of solar energy into electrical energy. The WD-ANN method consists of two basic steps: firstly, it is performed the decomposition of level p of the time series of interest, generating p + 1 wavelet orthonormal components; secondly, the p + 1 wavelet orthonormal components (generated in the step 1 are inserted simultaneously into an ANN in order to generate short-term forecasting. The results showed that the proposed method (WD-ANN improved substantially the performance over the (traditional ANN method.

  6. Neural Network on Photodegradation of Octylphenol using Natural and Artificial UV Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper comes up with an experimental design meant to point out the factors interferingin octylphenol’s degradation in surface waters under solar radiation, underlining each factor’sinfluence on the process observable (concentration of p-octylphenol. Multiple linear regressionanalysis and artificial neural network (Multi-Layer Perceptron type were applied in order to obtaina mathematical model capable to explain the action of UV-light upon synthetic solutions of OP inultra-pure water (MilliQ type. Neural network proves to be the most efficient method in predictingthe evolution of OP concentration during photodegradation process. Thus, determination in neuralnetwork’s case has almost double value versus the regression analysis.

  7. [Therapeutic approach to post-radiation xerostomia. A reservoir prosthesis and an artificial salivary gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smatt, V; Briere, M; Cornebise-Drouhet, F; Maugey, N; Robin, M

    1989-01-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia is an incapacitating sequela of salivary gland irradiation in patients receiving tumoricidal X-ray therapeutical doses for cancer of the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. All stimulant type therapeutics available are powerless to bring back wetness into the mouth of patients with asialia. Replacement therapy constitutes the only alternative for symptomatic treatment. Artificial salivary gland sprays have a proven unsustained, short-lasting efficacy. The administration of an oral mucine-containing salivary emollient solution drip, presented either in the form of an oral or external container, constitutes an original symptomatic treatment regimen, the efficacy of which has been established. The authors here review the concept and methodology of their palliative treatment protocol against chronic asialia.

  8. Modeling radiation belt radial diffusion in ULF wave fields: 1. Quantifying ULF wave power at geosynchronous orbit in observations and in global MHD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Lin; Spence, Harlan E.; Singer, Howard J.; Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    To provide critical ULF wave field information for radial diffusion studies in the radiation belts, we quantify ULF wave power (f = 0.5-8.3 mHz) in GOES observations and magnetic field predictions from a global magnetospheric model. A statistical study of 9 years of GOES data reveals the wave local time distribution and power at geosynchronous orbit in field-aligned coordinates as functions of wave frequency, solar wind conditions (Vx, ΔPd and IMF Bz) and geomagnetic activity levels (Kp, Dst and AE). ULF wave power grows monotonically with increasing solar wind Vx, dynamic pressure variations ΔPd and geomagnetic indices in a highly correlated way. During intervals of northward and southward IMF Bz, wave activity concentrates on the dayside and nightside sectors, respectively, due to different wave generation mechanisms in primarily open and closed magnetospheric configurations. Since global magnetospheric models have recently been used to trace particles in radiation belt studies, it is important to quantify the wave predictions of these models at frequencies relevant to electron dynamics (mHz range). Using 27 days of real interplanetary conditions as model inputs, we examine the ULF wave predictions modeled by the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamic code. The LFM code does well at reproducing, in a statistical sense, the ULF waves observed by GOES. This suggests that the LFM code is capable of modeling variability in the magnetosphere on ULF time scales during typical conditions. The code provides a long-missing wave field model needed to quantify the interaction of radiation belt electrons with realistic, global ULF waves throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  9. On the relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind parameters/geomagnetic indices: Dependence on the first adiabatic invariant and L*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Huang, C.-L.; Forsyth, C.

    2017-02-01

    The relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind/magnetospheric processes is of particular interest due to both scientific and practical needs. Though many studies have focused on this topic, electron data from Van Allen Probes with wide L shell coverage and fine energy resolution, for the first time, enabled this statistical study on the relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind parameters/geomagnetic indices as a function of first adiabatic invariant μ and L*. Good correlations between electron phase space density (PSD) and solar wind speed, southward IMF Bz, SYM-H, and AL indices are found over wide μ and L* ranges, with higher correlation coefficients and shorter time lags for low-μ electrons than high-μ electrons; the anticorrelation between electron PSD and solar wind proton density is limited to high-μ electrons at high L*. The solar wind dynamic pressure has dominantly positive correlation with low-μ electrons and negative correlation with high-μ electrons at different L*. In addition, electron PSD enhancements also correlate well with various solar wind/geomagnetic parameters, and for most parameters this correlation is even better than that of electron PSD while the time lag is also much shorter. Among all parameters investigated, AL index is shown to correlate the best with electron PSD enhancements, with correlation coefficients up to 0.8 for low-μ electrons (time lag 0 day) and 0.7 for high-μ electrons (time lag 1-2 days), suggesting the importance of seed and source populations provided by substorms in radiation belt electron PSD enhancements.

  10. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, Josep [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Space weather modeling, forecasts, and predictions, especially for the radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere, require detailed information about the Earth's magnetic field. Results depend on the magnetic field model and the L* (pron. L-star) values which are used to describe particle drift shells. Space wather models require integrating particle motions along trajectories that encircle the Earth. Numerical integration typically takes on the order of 10{sup 5} calls to a magnetic field model which makes the L* calculations very slow, in particular when using a dynamic and more accurate magnetic field model. Researchers currently tend to pick simplistic models over more accurate ones but also risking large inaccuracies and even wrong conclusions. For example, magnetic field models affect the calculation of electron phase space density by applying adiabatic invariants including the drift shell value L*. We present here a new method using a surrogate model based on a neural network technique to replace the time consuming L* calculations made with modern magnetic field models. The advantage of surrogate models (or meta-models) is that they can compute the same output in a fraction of the time while adding only a marginal error. Our drift shell model LANL* (Los Alamos National Lab L-star) is based on L* calculation using the TSK03 model. The surrogate model has currently been tested and validated only for geosynchronous regions but the method is generally applicable to any satellite orbit. Computations with the new model are several million times faster compared to the standard integration method while adding less than 1% error. Currently, real-time applications for forecasting and even nowcasting inner magnetospheric space weather is limited partly due to the long computing time of accurate L* values. Without them, real-time applications are limited in accuracy. Reanalysis application of past conditions in the inner magnetosphere are used to understand

  11. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 2. Time evolution of the distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Villalon, E.

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of the bounce-averaged ring current/radiation belt proton distribution is simulated during resonant interactions with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. The plasmaspheric hiss is assumed to be generated by ring current electrons and to be damped by the energetic protons. Thus energy is transferred between energetic electrons and protons using the plasmaspheric hiss as a mediary. The problem is not solved self-consistently. During the simulation period, interactions with ring current electrons (not represented in the model) are assumed to maintain the wave amplitudes in the presence of damping by the energetic protons, allowing the wave spectrum to be held fixed. Diffusion coefficients in pitch angle, cross pitch angle/energy, and energy were previously calculated by Kozyra et al. (1994) and are adopted for the present study. The simulation treats the energy range, E>=80 keV, within which the wave diffusion operates on a shorter timescale than other proton loss processes (i.e., Coulomb drag and charge exchange). These other loss processes are not included in the simulation. An interesting result of the simulation is that energy diffusion maximizes at moderate pitch angles near the edge of the atmospheric loss cone. Over the simulation period, diffusion in energy creates an order of magnitude enhancement in the bounce-averaged proton distribution function at moderate pitch angles. The loss cone is nearly empty because scattering of particles at small pitch angles is weak. The bounce-averaged flux distribution, mapped to ionospheric heights, results in elevated locally mirroring proton fluxes. OGO 5 observed order of magnitude enhancements in locally mirroring energetic protons at altitudes between 350 and 1300 km and invariant latitudes between 50° and 60° (Lundblad and Soraas, 1978). The proton distributions were highly anisotropic in pitch angle with nearly empty loss cones. The similarity between the observed distributions and those resulting from this

  12. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV radiation in an in vitro model: part II; UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluvia de Abril Alexandra Soriano-Melgar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultraviolet type B (UV-B radiation effects on medicinal plants have been recently investigated in the context of climate change, but the modifications generated by UV-B radiation might be used to increase the content of antioxidants, including phenolic compounds. Objective: To generate information on the effect of exposure to artificial UV-B radiation at different high-doses in the antioxidant content of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Methods: Damiana plantlets (tissue cultures in Murashige-Skoog medium were irradiated with artificial UV-B at 3 different doses (1 0.5 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 (high for 2 h daily, (2 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (severe for 2 h daily, or (3 1 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 for 4 h daily during 3 weeks. The concentration of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, vitamins (C and E and total phenolic compounds, the enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1 and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1, as well as total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified to assess the effect of high artificial UV-B radiation in the antioxidant content of in vitro damiana plants. Results: Severe and high doses of artificial UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content by increasing the content of vitamin C and decreased the phenolic compound content, as well as modified the oxidative damage of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Conclusion: UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content in damiana plants in an in vitro model, depending on the intensity and duration of the exposure.

  13. The Martian and extraterrestrial UV radiation environment. Part II: further considerations on materials and design criteria for artificial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C S

    2001-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is an important natural physical influence on organism function and ecosystem interactions. The UV radiation fluxes in extraterrestrial environments are substantially different from those experienced on Earth. On Mars, the moon and in Earth orbit they are more biologically detrimental than on Earth. Based on previously presented fluxes and biologically weighted irradiances, this paper considers in more detail measures to mitigate UV radiation damage and methods to modify extraterrestrial UV radiation environments in artificial ecosystems that use natural sunlight. The transmission characteristics of a Martian material that will mimic the terrestrial UV radiation environment are presented. Transmissivity characteristics of other Martian and lunar materials are described. Manufacturing processes for the production of plastics and glass on the lunar and Martian surface are presented with special emphasis on photobiological requirements. Novel UV absorbing configurations are suggested.

  14. Dynamics of electron fluxes in the slot between radiation belts in November-December 2014 according to data of the Vernov satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Svertilov, S. I.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Sibiryakova, D. V.; Balan, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    The variations in the spatial structure and time in electron fluxes with E = 235-300 keV in the slot region (2 radiation belts in the period of November 1, 2014 through December 8, 2014 during weak and moderate geomagnetic disturbances ( Kp -60 nT) are analyzed based on the data of the RELEC complex on board the Vernov satellite (the height and inclination of the orbit are from 640 to 830 km and 98.4°, respectively). Irregular increases in the fluxes of such electrons and formation of a local maximum at L 2.2-3.0 were observed. It has been shown that the intensity of this maximum is inversely proportional to the L value and grows with an increase in the geomagnetic activity level. New features discovered for the first time in the dynamics of radiation belt electrons manifest in the variations in the local structure and dynamics of fluxes of subrelativistic electrons in the slot region.

  15. Radiometric mapping of Goiania urban area: natural and artificial radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Nivaldo C.; Dias, Danila C.S.; Guerrero, Eder T. Z.; Alberti, Heber L.C., E-mail: ncsilva@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: danilacdias@gmail.com, E-mail: edertzg@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heber@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Santos, Eliane E.; Pimenta, Lucinei R.; Costa, Heliana F., E-mail: esantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lucinei@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heliana@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the city of Goiania it is common to observe in some social groups, such as medical society, academy and communication (media), the association between cancer incidence and the 1987's Goiania radiological accident. Moreover, data of Population-Base Cancer Register published in 2010 by INCA (Instituto Nacional do Cancer), reveals that Goiania figures among the three cities where the major increases in cancer incidence were observed. Therefore, this project aims to provide a dose rate database over Goiania's road network aiming to: 1) assess the level radiation dose to which the population is exposed and 1) provide technical support for social communication of Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy. The monitoring was accomplished by using a mobile system (EBERLINE FHT 1376) which includes a 5-liter plastic scintillator detector coupled with a GPS (Global Positioning System) and a portable computer. This system allowed the recording of both the geographical coordinates and the dose rate of each single point. Using a NBR (Natural Background Rejection) the system is able to discriminate between natural and artificial radiation. After the field campaign, the raw data were then treated in a Geographical Information System (GIS) using the ArcGis software in order to produce dose maps. Therefore, this paper will present the results of the current stage of this research encompassing the monitoring of streets located on seven regions Goiania - divided in for administrative purposes. It is important to point out that more than 175175 individual data were collected with results ranging from 13 to 490 nSv/h. (author)

  16. Real time determination of dose radiation through artificial intelligence and virtual reality; Determinacao de dose de radiacao, em tempo real, atraves de inteligencia artificial e realidade virtual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Victor Goncalves Gloria

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, a virtual environment of Argonauta research reactor, sited in the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (Brazil), has been developed. Such environment, called here Argonauta Virtual (AV), is a 3D model of the reactor hall, in which virtual people (avatar) can navigate. In AV, simulations of nuclear sources and doses are possible. In a recent work, a real time monitoring system (RTMS) was developed to provide (by means of Ethernet TCP/I P) the information of area detectors situated in the reactor hall. Extending the scope of AV, this work is intended to provide a continuous determination of gamma radiation dose in the reactor hall, based in several monitored parameters. To accomplish that a module based in artificial neural network (ANN) was developed. The ANN module is able to predict gamma radiation doses using as inputs: the avatar position (from virtual environment), the reactor power (from RTMS) and information of fixed area detectors (from RTMS). The ANN training data has been obtained by measurements of gamma radiation doses in a mesh of points, with previously defined positions, for different power levels. Through the use of ANN it is possible to estimate, in real time, the dose received by a person at any position in Argonauta reactor hall. Such approach allows tasks simulations and training of people inside the AV system, without exposing them to radiation effects. (author)

  17. Changes in the width of the tropical belt due to simple radiative forcing changes in the GeoMIP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Seidel, Dian J.; Birner, Thomas; Davis, Sean M.; Tilmes, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Model simulations of future climates predict a poleward expansion of subtropical arid climates at the edges of Earth's tropical belt, which would have significant environmental and societal impacts. This expansion may be related to the poleward shift of the Hadley cell edges, where subsidence stabilizes the atmosphere and suppresses precipitation. Understanding the primary drivers of tropical expansion is hampered by the myriad forcing agents in most model projections of future climate. While many previous studies have examined the response of idealized models to simplified climate forcings and the response of comprehensive climate models to more complex climate forcings, few have examined how comprehensive climate models respond to simplified climate forcings. To shed light on robust processes associated with tropical expansion, here we examine how the tropical belt width, as measured by the Hadley cell edges, responds to simplified forcings in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). The tropical belt expands in response to a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and contracts in response to a reduction in the solar constant, with a range of a factor of 3 in the response among nine models. Models with more surface warming and an overall stronger temperature response to quadrupled carbon dioxide exhibit greater tropical expansion, a robust result in spite of inter-model differences in the mean Hadley cell width, parameterizations, and numerical schemes. Under a scenario where the solar constant is reduced to offset an instantaneous quadrupling of carbon dioxide, the Hadley cells remain at their preindustrial width, despite the residual stratospheric cooling associated with elevated carbon dioxide levels. Quadrupled carbon dioxide produces greater tropical belt expansion in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere. This expansion is strongest in austral summer and autumn. Ozone depletion has been argued to cause

  18. A Comparison of Van Allen Belt Radiation Environment Modeling Programs: AE8/AP8 Legacy, AE9/AP9, and SPENVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In the space surrounding Earth there exists an active radiation environment consisting mostly of electrons and protons that have been trapped by Earths magnetic field. This radiation, also known as the Van Allen Belts, has the potential to damage man-made satellites in orbit; thus, proper precautions must be taken to shield NASA assets from this phenomenon. Data on the Van Allen Belts has been collected continuously by a multitude of space-based instruments since the beginning of space exploration. Subsequently, using theory to fill in the gaps in the collected data, computer models have been developed that take in the orbital information of a hypothetical mission and output the expected particle fluence and flux for that orbit. However, as new versions of the modeling system are released, users are left wondering how the new version differs from the old. Therefore, we performed a comparison of three different editions of the modeling system: AE8/AP8 (legacy), which is included in the model 9 graphical user interface as an option for ones calculations, AE9/AP9, and the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS), which is an online-based form of AE8/AP8 developed by NASA and the European Space Agency that changed the code to allow the program to extrapolate data to predict fluence and flux at higher energies. Although this evaluation is still ongoing, it is predicted that the model 8 (legacy) and SPENVIS version will have identical outputs with the exception of the extended energy levels from SPENVIS, while model 9 will provide different fluences than model 8 based on additional magnetic field descriptions and on-orbit data.

  19. Study - Radiation Shielding Effectiveness of the Prototyped High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) 'Artificial' Magnetosphere for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature superconductor (HTS) is being used to develop the magnets for the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket (VASIMR ) propulsion system and may provide lightweight magnetic radiation shielding to protect spacecraft crews from radiation caused by GCR and SPEs on missions to Mars. A study is being planned to assess the radiation shielding effectiveness of the artificial magnetosphere produced by the HTS magnet. VASIMR is an advanced technology propulsion engine which is being touted as enabling one way transit to Mars in 90 days or less. This is extremely important to NASA. This technology would enable a significant reduction in the number of days in transit to and from Mars and significantly reduce the astronauts exposure to a major threat - high energy particles from solar storms and GCR during long term deep space missions. This paper summarizes the plans for the study and the subsequent testing of the VASIMR technology onboard the ISS slated for 2013.

  20. A comparison of the radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - The high energy electron distribution in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. II - East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a function of Jovian longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison has been made between detailed model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation and the radio data at wavelengths of 6, 21, and 50 cm. The calculations were performed for a Jovian longitude of 200 deg and were based on the multipole field configurations as derived from the Pioneer data. The electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere was derived as a function of energy, pitch angle, and spatial coordinates. In addition, the hot region or east-west asymmetry in the radiation belts is investigated. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes of 240-360 deg and the existence of a dusk-to-dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere.

  1. Economic Disparities in Radiation Belt of Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway%兰渝铁路辐射带经济空间差异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗君; 白永平; 张学斌

    2011-01-01

    It is important to make an analysis on the spatial pattern of the railway economy, which plays a crucial role in making development planning and guiding the industrial distribution. The main counties, within the 120 km areas along the Lanzhou-Chongqing railway, are taken as samples, based on 9 economic indexes, whose spatial differences are analyzed by using SPSS. This article uses the spatial analysis provided by GeoDa to reveal the spatial characteristics of economic differences along the radiation belts. The result shows that there are great disparities within different economic levels, a big gap exists between the numbers of developed areas and undeveloped areas, and the range value of the general score is high. A Geo-spatial agglomeration exists within the study area, which is the developed regions adjacent to the developed regions, and vice versa. Chongqing is the only one "hot-spot" region of the entire railway economic belt, which has a strong capacity to promote the economic development, and with the distance far from Chongqing, and the economic radiation capacity tens a systematic decline. Lanzhou, another endpoint city, has a weak radiation capacity. There are no node cities to guide the economic development within the study area, except for the endpoint metropolitan areas, so the regional spatial structure displays a model of economic nucleus-cluster. Based on the status of the spatial differentiation of the railway, we find main factors to impact the economic disparities and then several countermeasures and suggestions are put forward, including that node cities should be found in the radiation belt in order to build a point-axis spatial structure, and infrastructure improvement and regional cooperation are necessary to promote the economic development.%认识铁路辐射带经济发展的空间格局对制定相关发展规划、铁路带沿线产业合理布局具有重要意义.以兰渝铁路沿线120 km范围内的主要行政单元为研究对

  2. On the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient and spectra of inner radiation belt particles - Analytic solutions and comparison with numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, H.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical method by which the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient may be deduced from spectral observations of the particle population at the inner edge of the earth's radiation belts is presented. This region has previously been analyzed with numerical techniques; in this report an analytical treatment that illustrates characteristic limiting cases in the L shell range where the time scale of Coulomb losses is substantially shorter than that of radial diffusion (L approximately 1-2) is given. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the particle spectra there are shaped by the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient regardless of the spectral shapes of the particle populations diffusing inward from the outer radiation zone, so that from observed spectra the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be determined. To insure realistic simulations, inner zone data obtained from experiments on the DIAL, AZUR, and ESRO 2 spacecraft have been used as boundary conditions. Excellent agreement between analytic and numerical results is reported.

  3. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV radiation in an in vitro model: part I; UV-C radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluvia de Abril Alexandra Soriano-Melgar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultraviolet type C (UV-C radiation has higher energy than the UV-B radiation and has been less studied because it is completely absorbed by the ozone layer. However, artificial UV-C radiation can generate diverse modifications in the plants. Given that exposure to UV-C for short periods of time increases the antioxidant content, improving the appearance and shelf-life of products, its potential application in postharvest treatments to modify the antioxidant content of medicinal plants, such as damiana (Turnera diffusa, is novel and relevant. Objective: To determine the effects of UV-C radiation on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses, as well as oxidative damage levels, in damiana (Turnera diffusa plants in vitro. Results: UV-C radiation decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1 and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1 activities, the concentration of chlorophylls (a and b, carotenes, vitamin C, and total antioxidant capacity. UV-C radiation increased the phenolic compound levels in damiana. Loss of antioxidant defenses was higher in damiana plants exposed to higher UV-C doses and/or for longer periods. This study suggests that UV-C radiation induces oxidative stress, evidenced as increased protein carbonyls and phenolic compound content, in damiana (T. diffusa. Conclusion: Low dose, short exposure to UV-C stimulates phenolic compound content in damiana. Thus, controlled UV-C treatments could be used as postharvest treatment to increase phenolic compound content in damiana plants.

  4. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation (R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination (r (2)), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  5. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation ( R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination ( r 2), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  6. RESEARCH PROGRESS OF SOIL FORMING PROCESS OF AEOLIAN SANDY SOIL UNDER THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL SHELTER-BELT%人工防护林作用下风沙土成土过程的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李从娟; 雷加强; 高培; 徐新文; 王永东; 范敬龙

    2012-01-01

    人工防护林是防风固沙、有效防治沙漠化的重要措施之一.在沙漠地区建立人工防护林,可以有效防止土壤侵蚀,促进土壤有机质及黏粒积累,促使地表结皮形成,不仅对流沙起到了固定作用,而且促进了风沙土的成土过程.本文结合植物-土壤相互作用理论,分别从植物地上部分对养分的阻滞、聚集和减少土壤表面蒸发,以及地下部分的固沙和物质的分解与营养补给等方面综述了生物防护林在风沙土成土过程中的作用.同时,从以往的研究发现,在风沙土成土过程中,土壤机械组成变细,比重和容重减小;土壤剖面结构分异显著,分层增加;土壤含水量和养分显著聚集;土壤微生物数量和种类增加,活性增强,酶活性也大幅度提高.总之,随着沙漠生物防护林的建造,林下风沙土性质发生了明显的改良作用,逐渐发展成固定风沙土.说明人工防护林和风沙土的成土过程是协同发展的,这不仅有利于沙漠防护林的可持续管护,也有利于沙漠化的防治和退化生态系统的恢复与重建.%Artificial shelterbelt is an important and effective measure for checking winds and fixing drifting sands and hence for controlling desertification. To build up windbreak forest belts in desert areas can effectively control soil erosion and promote accumulation of organic matter and clay in the soil and formation of crust at soil surface, thus fixing drifting sands and accelerating formation of aeolian sandy soil. Based on the theory of plant-soil interaction theory, an overview is presented of the effects of artificial shelterbelt on formation of aeolian sandy soil, from the aspects of the function of the aboveground parts of plants intercepting and accumulating nutrients and reducing surface soil evaporation, and the function of the underground parts of plants fixing drifting sands, decomposing organic matter and supplying nutrients. It was found from the

  7. Belt conveyer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwieczek, A.; Dembinski, C.

    1982-04-30

    The patented belt conveyor is distinguished by the fact that the rate of motion of the belt changes smoothly depending on the load: the greater the load the higher the rate. This makes it possible to prolong the service life of the belt, i.e., during idling of the conveyor it is exposed to deformation on the drive and tension drums a fewer number of times. The essence of the invention is based on the use for driving the drum of a friction transmission. One of the elements of this transmission is the drive drum of the conveyor, and the other is the drive wheel which is pressed to the inner (or outer) surface of the drum. Change in rotation velocity of the drum is reached by changing the diameter of the drive wheel. The rim of the latter has an elastic tire to which compressed air is fed. The diameter of the drive wheel depends on the quantity of air in the tire. It is set automatically by a regulating system depending on the conveyor load. Variants are patented for the belt conveyor which is distinguished by the design of the friction transmission. It contains 1, 2 or more drive wheels. It can have a cylindrical or conical inner surface of the drive drum, etc.

  8. The effects of the big storm events in the first half of 2015 on the radiation belts observed by EPT/PROBA-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pierrard

    2016-01-01

    the penetration of high energy fluxes at L L = 2.8 for electrons of 500–600 keV separates the outer belt from the belt extending at other longitudes than the South Atlantic Anomaly. Two other major events appeared in January and June 2015, again with injections of electrons in the inner belt, contrary to what was observed in 2013 and 2014. These observations open many perspectives to better understand the source and loss mechanisms, and particularly concerning the formation of three belts.

  9. Deduction of the rates of radial diffusion of protons from the structure of the Earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, Alexander S.

    2016-11-01

    From the data on the fluxes and energy spectra of protons with an equatorial pitch angle of α0 ≈ 90° during quiet and slightly disturbed (Kp ≤ 2) periods, I directly calculated the value DLL, which is a measure of the rate of radial transport (diffusion) of trapped particles. This is done by successively solving the systems (chains) of integrodifferential equations which describe the balance of radial transport/acceleration and ionization losses of low-energy protons of the stationary belt. This was done for the first time. For these calculations, I used data of International Sun-Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) for protons with an energy of 24 to 2081 keV at L = 2-10 and data of Explorer-45 for protons with an energy of 78.6 to 872 keV at L = 2-5. Ionization losses of protons (Coulomb losses and charge exchange) were calculated on the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere. It is shown that for protons with μ from ˜ 0.7 to ˜ 7 keV nT-1 at L ≈ 4.5-10, the functions of DLL can be approximated by the following equivalent expressions: DLL ≈ 4.9 × 10-14μ-4.1L8.2 or DLL ≈ 1.3 × 105(EL)-4.1 or DLL ≈ 1.2 × 10-9fd-4.1, where fd is the drift frequency of the protons (in mHz), DLL is measured in s-1, E is measured in kiloelectronvolt and μ is measured in kiloelectronvolt per nanotesla. These results are consistent with the radial diffusion of particles under the action of the electric field fluctuations (pulsations) in the range of Pc6 and contradict the mechanism of the radial diffusion of particles under the action of sudden impulses (SIs) of the magnetic field and also under the action of substorm impulses of the electric field. During magnetic storms DLL increases, and the expressions for DLL obtained here can change completely.

  10. Non-Linear Model for the Disturbance of Electronics in by High Energy Electron Plasmas in the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William

    2009-11-01

    A model is presented that models the disturbance of electrical components by high energy electrons trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts; the model components consists of module computing the electron fluence rate given the altitude, the time of the year, and the sunspot number, a module that transports the electrons through the materials of the electrical component, and a module that computes the charge and electrical fields of the insulating materials as a function of time. A non-linear relationship (the Adameic-Calderwood equation) for the variation of the electrical conductivity with the electrical field strength is used as the field intensities can be quite high due to the small size of the electrical components and the high fluence rate of the electrons. The results show that the electric fields can often be as high as 10 MV/m in materials commonly used in cables such as Teflon and that the field can stay at high levels as long as an hour after the irradiation ends.

  11. A comparison of radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radition 2. East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a functon of Jovian longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke

    1981-05-01

    On the basis of comparison of radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiaton the 'hot region' or east-west asymmetry in the planet's radiation belts is proposed to be due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes λJ~240°-360° and the existence of a dusk dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere, generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere. The model calculations were based upon the magnetic field configurations derived from the Pioneer data by Acuna and Ness [1976] (the O4 model) and Davis, Jones and Smith (quoted in Smith and Gulkis [1979]) (the P11 (3,2)A model), with an electron distribution derived in the first paper of this series [de Pater, this issue]. We would infer from the calculations that the O4 model gives a slightly better fit to the data; the relatively large number density at λJ~240°-360°, however, might indicate the presence of even higher order moments in the field.

  12. On the Importance of Searching for Oscillations of the Jovian Inner Radiation Belt with a Quasi-Period of 40 Minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Lou, Y Q; Lou, Yu-Qing; Zheng, Chen

    2003-01-01

    Experiments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft discovered quasi-periodic bursts of relativistic electrons and of radio emissions with ~40-minute period(QP-40) from the south pole of Jupiter in February 1992. Such polar QP-40 burst activities were found to correlate well with arrivals of high-speed solar winds at Jupiter. We advance the physical scenario that the inner radiation belt(IRB) within ~2-3 Jupiter's radius, where ralativistic electrons are known to be trapped via synchrotron emissions, can execute global QP-40 magnetoinertial oscillations excited by arrivals of high-speed solar winds. Modulated by such QP-40 IRB oscillations, relativistic electrons trapped in the IRB may escape from the magnetic circumpolar regions during a certain phase of each 40-min period to form circumpolar QP-40 electron bursts. Highly beamed synchrotron emissions from such QP-40 burst electrons with small pitch angles relative to Jovian magnetic field at ~30-40 Jupiter radius give rise to QP-40 radio bursts with typical frequencie...

  13. Energetic heavy ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 in the equatorial radiation belts of the earth - Magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Direct in situ observations of trapped energetic heavy ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 at energies in the lower MeV range made with Explorer 45 during the period June-December 1972 are presented. It is noted that all measurements were carried out in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equatorial plane and that the data show the varying effects of four major magnetic storm periods. Orders of magnitude increases in the trapped heavy ion population are seen deep within the radiation belts following the August 1972 solar flare and magnetic storm events. Fluxes of the Z greater than or equal to 4 ions are found to decay faster than those of helium ions of comparable energies; typical decay times for these ions are found to be 24-40 days at L less than or equal to 4 and shorter at higher L shells. The observations are compared with the expected post-injection long-term behavior of atomic oxygen ions deduced from charge exhange, radial diffusive transport, and Coulomb collisions. Good agreement is found between theory and observations.

  14. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, Muhittin; Yakut, Emre

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010). Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin). The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm). Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 ( 98%) was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE) of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE) 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  15. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahan Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010. Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin. The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm. Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 (~98% was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  16. The role of the convection electric field in filling the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Zhao, H.; Kellerman, A.; Sarris, T. E.; Jaynes, A.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes have reported frequent flux enhancements of 100s keV electrons in the slot region, with lower energy electrons exhibiting more dynamic behavior at lower L shells. Also, in situ electric field measurements from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), and the Van Allen Probes have provided evidence for large-scale electric fields at low L shells during active times. We study an event on 19 February 2014 where hundreds of keV electron fluxes were enhanced by orders of magnitude in the slot region and electric fields of 1-2 mV/m were observed below L = 3. Using a 2-D guiding center particle tracer and a simple large-scale convection electric field model, we demonstrate that the measured electric fields can account for energization of electrons up to at least 500 keV in the slot region through inward radial transport.

  17. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for simulating infrared sounder radiances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveen Krishnan; K Srinivasa Ramanujam; C Balaji

    2012-08-01

    The first step in developing any algorithm to retrieve the atmospheric temperature and humidity parameters at various pressure levels is the simulation of the top of the atmosphere radiances that can be measured by the satellite. This study reports the results of radiative transfer simulations for the multichannel infrared sounder of the proposed Indian satellite INSAT-3D due to be launched shortly. Here, the widely used community software k Compressed Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Algorithm (kCARTA) is employed for performing the radiative transfer simulations. Though well established and benchmarked, kCARTA is a line-by-line solver and hence takes enormous computational time and effort for simulating the multispectral radiances for a given atmospheric scene. This necessitates the development of a much faster and at the same time, equally accurate RT model that can drive a real-time retrieval algorithm. In the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of INSAT-3D. Realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles have been used for training the network. Spectral response functions of GOES-13, a satellite similar in construction, purpose and design and already in use are used. The fast RT model is able to simulate the radiances for 1200 profiles in 18 ms for a 15-channel GOES profile, with a correlation coefficient of over 99%. Finally, the robustness of the model is tested using additional synthetic profiles generated using empirical orthogonal functions (EOF).

  18. Artificial semi-rigid tissue sensitized with natural pigments: Effect of photon radiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Jaradat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new approach for evaluating the optical penetration depth and testing its validity with Monte Carlo simulations and Kubelka-Munk theory is used for artificial semi-rigid tissue sensitized with natural pigments. Photodynamic therapy is a promising cancer treatment in which a photosensitizing drug concentrates in malignant cells and is activated by visible light at certain wavelength. Materials and Methods: Cheap artificial semi-rigid tissue incorporated with scattering and absorbing materials along with some other composites comparable to normal human tissue has been performed. The optical parameters as measured with different conditions and calculated with various techniques are investigated. Results: The probability of interaction of light with tissue is very high when exposed to light in presence of Cichorium pumilum and RBCs followed by photohemolysis or/and photodegradation. The optical penetration depth calculated by linear absorption coefficient ranges from 0.63 to 2.85 mm is found to be comparable to those calculated using Kubelka-Munk theory or Monte Carlo simulation (range from 0.78 to 2.42 mm. The ratio of absorption to the scattering is independent of thickness and decreases with increasing irradiation time. Moreover, the optical parameters as well as their ratios are in very good agreement in the two approaches of calculation. The values of absorption and scattering coefficients are independent of thickness. Furthermore, the average photon ranges in the samples containing no scattering and absorbing materials are about three times greater than those samples containing scattering materials. Conclusion: Our results suggest that light propagation with optical properties presented in this work could be applicable in diagnostic and therapeutic of the human biological tissue for photodynamic therapy.

  19. Effects of environmental and artificial UV-B radiation on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Evelise Maria [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Morfologicas, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21949-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genetica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Ammar, Dib [Universidade do Oeste de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia, Campus Universitario, 89600-000 Joacaba, SC (Brazil); Bem, Andreza Fabro de; Latini, Alexandra [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Bioquimica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Mueller, Yara Maria Rauh [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genetica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Allodi, Silvana, E-mail: sallodi@histo.ufrj.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Morfologicas, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21949-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    The recent decrease of the stratospheric ozone has resulted in an increase of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the Earth's surface. In freshwater ecosystems with transparent water, UV-B rays easily penetrate and potentially cause harmful effects to organisms. In this study, embryos of the prawn Macrobrachium olfersi were used to evaluate the impact of UV-B rays in freshwater environments. We observed three groups of embryos: the first was to assess whether UV-B radiation produced morphological defects and/or biochemical impairments in the laboratory. The second was to check whether embryos with the same impairments as those observed in the laboratory were found in their environment, under natural solar radiation. The third group was the non-irradiated control. The embryos irradiated with 310 mW cm{sup -2} UV-B for 30 min showed morphological alterations similar to those observed in embryos from the environmental control group. The most important effects of the UV-B radiation observed in M. olfersi embryos were morphological (1.2% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 2.8% of the total number of irradiated embryos), pigmentation changes in the eyes (78.0% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 98.9% of the total number of irradiated embryos), and disruption of the chromatophores (46.9% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 95.5% of the total number of irradiated embryos). We also observed an increase in egg volume, which was accompanied by a significant increase in water content in UV-B irradiated groups when compared with aquaria control embryos. In addition, a significant decrease in the mitotic index in eggs exposed to UV-B radiation was detected (0.17 for the embryos from the aquaria control, 0.10 for the embryos of the environmental control, and 0.04 for the irradiated groups). The low levels of NPSH and high levels of TBARS indicated that UV-B rays directly compromised the antioxidant function of

  20. Aplicação de radiação UV artificial e solar no tratamento fotocatalítico de efluentes de curtume Application of artificial and solar UV radiation in the photocatalytic treatment of a tannery effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomão de Andrade Pascoal

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tannery effluents are very dangerous for the environment since they contain large amounts of dangerous and biorecalcitrant contaminants (organic matter and Cr(VI. This paper reports the efficiency of heterogeneous photocatalysis, based on the application of solar and artificial radiation, furnished by UV lamps, using TiO2 fixed on a flat plate, in the treatment of synthetic effluents. The results of COD and Cr(VI demonstrate that the use of solar radiation is the most efficient way to perform the photocatalytic treatment of these effluents since a minimum removal of 62 and 61% was observed for Cr(VI and organic matter, respectively.

  1. Infrared radiation method for measuring ice segregation temperature of artificially frozen soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Guoqing; Zhang Qi; Xu Zhiwei; Zhou Yang

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the evolution of the freezing fringe and final lenses of frost susceptible soils and advance the understanding of frost heave and mechanism of frost heave control,we used an open one-dimensional frost heave test system of infrared radiation technology,instead of a traditional thermistor method.Temperatures of the freezing fringe and segregated ice were measured in a non-contact mode.The results show that accurate and precise temperatures of ice segregation can be obtained by infrared thermal imaging systems.A self-developed inversion program inverted the temperature field of frozen soils.Based on our analysis of temperature variation in segregated ice and our study of the relationship between temperature and rate of ice segregation in cooling and warming processes during intermittent freezing,the mechanism of decreasing frost heave of frozen soils by controlling the growth of final lenses with an intermittent freezing mode,can be explained properly.

  2. Seat belt reminders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Seat belts are an effective way of reducing the number or road deaths and severe road injuries in crashes. Seat belt reminders warn car drivers and passengers if the seat belt is not fastened. This can be done by a visual signal or an acoustic signal or by a combination of the two. Seat belt reminde

  3. Evaluation of artificial neural network (ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS methods in prediction of global solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Sabziparvar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is an important climate parameter which can affect hydrological and meteorological processes. This parameter is a key element in development of solar energy application studies. The purpose of this study is the assessment of artificial intelligence techniques in prediction of solar radiation (Rs using artificial neural network (ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. Minimum temperature, maximum temperature, average relative humidity, sunshine hours and daily solar radiation recorded in four synoptic stations (Esfahan, Urmieh, Shiraz and Kerman were used during the period 1992-2006. The results showed that ANN and ANFIS intelligent models are powerful tools in prediction of global solar radiation for the selected stations. Prediction by ANN was found to be more accurate than ANFIS. Also, the accuracy of prediction in Kerman with higher sunny hours was better than other stations (R2> 0.9. Additionally, using linear regression model, the most effective factors affecting Rs in each site was introduced. The results revealed that sunshine hour is the most important determining parameter affecting surface solar radiation. In contrast, in most sites minimum air temperature and mean relative humidity showed the least effect on surface global solar radiation.

  4. Belt attachment and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  5. Upscaling instantaneous to daily evapotranspiration using modelled daily shortwave radiation for remote sensing applications: an artificial neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandera, Loise; Mallick, Kaniska; Kiely, Gerard; Roupsard, Olivier; Peichl, Matthias; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Upscaling instantaneous evapotranspiration retrieved at any specific time-of-day (ETi) to daily evapotranspiration (ETd) is a key challenge in mapping regional ET using polar orbiting sensors. Various studies have unanimously cited the shortwave incoming radiation (RS) to be the most robust reference variable explaining the ratio between ETd and ETi. This study aims to contribute in ETi upscaling for global studies using the ratio between daily and instantaneous incoming shortwave radiation (RSd / RSi) as a factor for converting ETi to ETd.This paper proposes an artificial neural network (ANN) machine-learning algorithm first to predict RSd from RSi followed by using the RSd / RSi ratio to convert ETi to ETd across different terrestrial ecosystems. Using RSi and RSd observations from multiple sub-networks of the FLUXNET database spread across different climates and biomes (to represent inputs that would typically be obtainable from remote sensors during the overpass time) in conjunction with some astronomical variables (e.g. solar zenith angle, day length, exoatmospheric shortwave radiation), we developed the ANN model for reproducing RSd and further used it to upscale ETi to ETd. The efficiency of the ANN is evaluated for different morning and afternoon times of day, under varying sky conditions, and also at different geographic locations. RS-based upscaled ETd produced a significant linear relation (R2 = 0.65 to 0.69), low bias (-0.31 to -0.56 MJ m-2 d-1; approx. 4 %), and good agreement (RMSE 1.55 to 1.86 MJ m-2 d-1; approx. 10 %) with the observed ETd, although a systematic overestimation of ETd was also noted under persistent cloudy sky conditions. Inclusion of soil moisture and rainfall information in ANN training reduced the systematic overestimation tendency in predominantly overcast days. An intercomparison with existing upscaling method at daily, 8-day, monthly, and yearly temporal resolution revealed a robust performance of the ANN-driven RS-based ETi

  6. Estimation of global solar radiation using an artificial neural network based on an interpolation technique in southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ling; Wang, Lunche; Lin, Aiwen; Zhu, Hongji; Peng, Yuling; Zhao, Zhenzhen

    2016-08-01

    Solar radiation plays important roles in energy application, vegetation growth and climate change. Empirical relations and machine-learning methods have been widely used to estimate global solar radiation (GSR) in recent years. An artificial neural network (ANN) based on spatial interpolation is developed to estimate GSR in southeast China. The improved Bristow-Campbell (IBC) model and the improved Ångström-Prescott (IA-P) model are compared with the ANN model to explore the best model in solar radiation modeling. Daily meteorological parameters, such as sunshine duration hours, mean temperature, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, air pressure, water vapor pressure, and wind speed, along with station-measured GSR and a daily surface GSR dataset over China obtained from the Data Assimilation and Modeling Center for Tibetan Multi-spheres (DAM), are used to predict GSR and to validate the models in this work. The ANN model with the network of 9-17-1 provides better accuracy than the two improved empirical models in GSR estimation. The root-mean-square error (RMSE), mean bias error (MBE), and determination coefficient (R2) are 2.65 MJ m-2, -0.94 MJ m-2, and 0.68 in the IA-P model; 2.19 MJ m-2, 1.11 MJ m-2, and 0.83 in the IBC model; 1.34 MJ m-2, -0.11 MJ m-2, and 0.91 in the ANN model, respectively. The regional monthly mean GSR in the measured dataset, DAM dataset, and ANN model is analyzed. The RMSE (RMSE %) is 1.07 MJ m-2 (8.91%) and the MBE (MBE %) is -0.62 MJ m-2 (-5.21%) between the measured and ANN-estimated GSR. The statistical errors of RMSE (RMSE %) are 0.91 MJ m-2 (7.28%) and those of MBE (MBE %) are -0.15 MJ m-2 (-1.20%) between DAM and ANN-modeled GSR. The correlation coefficients and R2 are larger than 0.95. The regional mean GSR is 12.58 MJ m-2. The lowest GSR is observed in the northwest area, and it increases from northwest to southeast. The annual mean GSR decreases by 0.02 MJ m-2 decade-1 over the entire

  7. Risk from exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation; Il rischio di esposizione alla radiazione ultravioletta naturale e artificiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzeu, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Fisica

    1998-12-31

    The association between exposure to ultraviolet (UV) and damage to the skin and eyes is today generally accepted. Exposure to UV radiation may occur in several ways. Apart from the sun, there is a wide range of artificial sources used in different fields of industry, research and medicine, the exposure to which adds to the total exposure of an individual during his life-span. The potential effects of ozone layer depletion on the increase of the solar UV radiation at earth`s surface, and therefor on human health, have recently been emphasized. Moreover, great attention has been devoted to the often uncontrolled use of UV lamps for tanning. This report shows the basis on which short and long term UV risk is assessed, and indicates some parameters necessary to its evaluation. The UV effects, both at molecular and cellular levels and on humans, are described together with their respective action spectra. The most common UV sources are then analyzed and their use in different fields is shown. Finally, some methods in dosimetry, which are useful for the correct measurement of exposure values, are described. [Italiano] E` oggi generalmente accettata l`assciazione tra l`esposizione alla radiazione UV e alcuni danni alla pelle e agli occhi (carcinomi e cataratta). Le occasioni di esposizione sono molteplici; oltre al sole, anche una grande varieta` di sorgenti artificiali impiegate per scopi diversi nell`industria, nella ricerca e in medicina danno un contributo, non sempre valutabile, all`esposizione totale di un individuo nell`arco della sua vita. Recentemente e` stato posto l`accento sulle possibili conseguenze della riduzione dello stato di ozono stratosferico sull`aumento della frazione di UV solare al suolo e quindi sulla salute umana; particolare attenzione ha inoltre suscitato l`uso, spesso incontrollato, delle lampade UV per scopi estetici. Sono illustrate le basi sulle quali viene riconosciuto il rischio a breve e a lungo termine e sono definiti i parametri

  8. Artificial Neural Network L* from different magnetospheric field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Koller, J.; Zaharia, S. G.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2011-12-01

    The third adiabatic invariant L* plays an important role in modeling and understanding the radiation belt dynamics. The popular way to numerically obtain the L* value follows the recipe described by Roederer [1970], which is, however, slow and computational expensive. This work focuses on a new technique, which can compute the L* value in microseconds without losing much accuracy: artificial neural networks. Since L* is related to the magnetic flux enclosed by a particle drift shell, global magnetic field information needed to trace the drift shell is required. A series of currently popular empirical magnetic field models are applied to create the L* data pool using 1 million data samples which are randomly selected within a solar cycle and within the global magnetosphere. The networks, trained from the above L* data pool, can thereby be used for fairly efficient L* calculation given input parameters valid within the trained temporal and spatial range. Besides the empirical magnetospheric models, a physics-based self-consistent inner magnetosphere model (RAM-SCB) developed at LANL is also utilized to calculate L* values and then to train the L* neural network. This model better predicts the magnetospheric configuration and therefore can significantly improve the L*. The above neural network L* technique will enable, for the first time, comprehensive solar-cycle long studies of radiation belt processes. However, neural networks trained from different magnetic field models can result in different L* values, which could cause mis-interpretation of radiation belt dynamics, such as where the source of the radiation belt charged particle is and which mechanism is dominant in accelerating the particles. Such a fact calls for attention to cautiously choose a magnetospheric field model for the L* calculation.

  9. Statistical analysis of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts under different geomagnetic activities%地球辐射带能量电子通量在不同地磁活动下的统计分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾旭东; 赵正予; 项薇; 周晨; 汪枫

    2011-01-01

    利用大约15个月的CRRES卫星MEA能量电子观测数据,分别在地磁活动平静(0≤Kp<3)、中等(3≤Kp≤6)及强烈(6<Kp≤9)的条件下,选取电子能量为148 keV,509 keV,1090 keV,1581 keV的辐射带能量电子通量进行统计分析,得到了不同地磁活动条件下地球辐射带高能电子通量在(L,MLT)空间的全球分布模型.结果表明,在2<L<8的磁层区域,高能电子通量分布在不同的地磁活动指数Kp条件下差别明显;在12~18 MLT 时段内高能电子的通量明显增大.%By utilizing the 15-month energetic electron flux data provided by the MEA instrument onboard CRRES, energetic radiation belt electron fluxes are analyzed statistically for electrons at energies of 148 keV, 509 keV, 1090 keV, and 1581 kev under periods of quiet (0≤Kp<3),moderate (3≤Kp≤6) and active (6<Kp≤9) geomagnetic activity condition, respectively. A global model of the Earth's radiation belt electron flux distribution is presented as a function of Lshell, magnetic local time (MLT) and geomagnetic activity condition. The results indicate a strong dependence of radiation belt electron omni-directional flux on the level of geomagnetic activity in the inner magnetosphere within 2<L<8. Considerable increases in energetic electron omni-directional fluxes are also shown to occur in 12~18 MLT sector.

  10. Energetic neutron and gamma-ray spectra under the earth radiation belts according to "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686" orbital complex and "CORONAS-I" satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Myagkova, I N; Ryumin, S P; Smirnova, O N; Sobolevsky, I M

    1998-01-01

    The spectra of neutrons >10 MeV and gamma-rays 1.5-100 MeV under the Earth Radiation Belts, restored from the data, obtained onboard orbital complex "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686", are presented. The spectra shapes are similar to those for albedo neutrons and gamma-rays, but absolute values of their fluxes (0.2 cm-2 s-1 for neutrons, 0.8 cm-2 s-1 for gamma-rays at the equator and 1.2 cm-2 s-1, 1.9 cm-2 s-1, accordingly, at L=1.9) are several times as large. It is possibly explained by the fact that most of the detected particles were produced by the cosmic ray interactions with the orbital complex matter. Neutron and gamma-ray fluxes obtained from "CORONAS-1" data are near those for albedo particles.

  11. Gamma radiation effects on phases of evolutional cycle of Plodia interpunctella (Huebner, 1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) on artificial diet; Efeitos da radiacao gama nas fases do ciclo evolutivo da Plodia interpunctella (Huebner, 1813) (Lepidoptera - Pyralidae) em dieta artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamborlin, Maria Julia

    1988-10-01

    The effects of increased gamma radiation ({sup 60} Co) doses on different phases of the evolutional cycle of Plodia interpunctella (Hubner,1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) have bean studied under laboratory conditions in the Laboratory of Radioentomology of the Nuclear Energy for Agriculture Center (CENA) in Piracicaba, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. For all treatments with gamma radiation a Cobalt-60 source type Gamma bean-650 has been used and the activity was of approximately 2.93 x 10{sup 14} Bq (7,925 Ci), with a dose rate of 2.80 KGy per hour and the insects were kept in a climatic chamber with the temperature adjusted to 27 {+-} 2{sup 0} C and a relative humidity of 70 {+-} 10%. The LD{sub 50} and LD{sub 100} of gamma radiation for eggs of in artificial diet were respectively 51 Gy and 125 Gy. The sterilizing doses in adults which were irradiated at immature phases (larvae and pupae) were 160 Gy and 250 Gy respectively. The sterilizing doses for adults females and males were respectively 250 Gy and 300 Gy. The LD{sub 100} for adult males was 4,750 Gy, 4,500 Gy for females and 4,750 Gy for insects at random. (author). 70 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. Atmospheric Diffusion Loss of Radiation Belt Trapped Electrons Injected by High Altitude Nuclear Detonation%高空核爆炸注入辐射带电子的大气扩散损失

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛胜利; 罗旭东; 王建国; 乔登江

    2011-01-01

    With Fokerer-Plank equation of pitch-angle diffusion, a numerical method for atmospheric diffusion loss of radiation belt trapped electrons is shown. Flux and energy spectrum are calculated as atmospheric scattering of fission β spectrum electrons injected in radiation belt by high altitude nuclear detonation. Diffusion due to atmospheric scattering is remarkable as L < 1. 3. Low energy electrons are removed more rapidly than those with high energy. Electron flux decays rapidly at an initial phase and then decays gradually aa an exponential function of time.%利用辐射带电子大气倾角扩散的福克-普朗克方程,通过推导与拟合处理扩散系数表征式,构造二阶精度有限差分格式,给出辐射带捕获电子大气扩散损失的数值计算方法.计算高空核爆炸裂变β谱电子注入辐射带后在不同L壳上的通量损失和能谱变化,结果表明,当L<1.3时,大气作用引起的扩散损失效应明显,低能电子比高能电子消失要快,电子通量初始阶段衰减很快,随后逐渐近似成时间指数函数形式衰减.

  13. Personnel dose assessment due to the normal operations with the artificial radiation sources according to the data from the unified system of individual dose control (USIDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Stepkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was personnel dose assessment due to the normal operations with the artificial radiation sources. The article is based on the data from the Unified System of Individual Dose Control and Voronezh Region’s radiation-hygienic passport. The data from No.1-DOZ “Information on personnel exposure doses under normal operation of technogenic ionizing radiation sources” and over a period of 2006-2010 years were analyzed. In 2006-2015, the number of organizations, which submitted form No.1-DOZ “Information on personnel exposure doses under normal operation of technogenic ionizing radiation sources”, increased from 175 to 229. In amount of the radiation facilities, Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant is the first. Novovoronezh NPP has 1512 sources, which amounts to 51,9% from all sources in Voronezh Region (2915. Health care facilities have 869 radiation sources or 29,8%. X-ray machines are the main part of these sources (844 health care facilities or 97,1% of all medical sources. Industrial sources occupy third place with 305 facilities or 10,5% of all considered sources. In 2015, according to the data from Voronezh Region’s radiation-hygienic passport, the number of “A” group personnel were 4237, the number of “B” group personnel were 2341. The average individual dose for personnel was over the range from 0.66 to 2.02 mSv. Collective dose was from 4.16 to 11.79 man-sieverts per year. The increase of number of the radiation sources has attended with the decrease of individual and collective doses. The most likely it is related to using the modern facilities. In 2015, the maximum value of the average individual dose of “A” group personnel was registered in Voronezh regional hospital (6.17 mSv y–1. There are medical facilities with unsealed and sealed sources in this hospital. In 2006-2015, the average individual doses of personnel of all radiation facilities that use radiation sources in Voronezh

  14. The Development of Radiation hardened tele-robot system - Development of artificial force reflection control for teleoperated mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Jang; Hong, Sun Gi; Kang, Young Hoon; Kim, Min Soeng [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    One of the most important issues in teleoperation is to provide the sense of telepresence so as to conduct the task more reliably. In particular, teleoperated mobile robots are needed to have some kinds of backup system when the operator is blind for remote situation owing to the failure of vision system. In the first year, the idea of artificial force reflection was researched to enhance the reliability of operation when the mobile robot travels on the plain ground. In the second year, we extend previous results to help the teleoperator even when the robot climbs stairs. Finally, we apply the developed control algorithms to real experiments. The artificial force reflection method has two modes; traveling on the plain ground and climbing stairs. When traveling on the plain ground, the force information is artificially generated by using the range data from the environment while generating the impulse force when climbing stairs. To verify the validity of our algorithm, we develop the simulator which consists of the joystick and the visual display system. Through some experiments using this system, we confirm the validity and effectiveness of our new idea of artificial force reflection in the teleoperated mobile robot. 11 refs., 30 figs. (Author)

  15. Seat belt restraint system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, A.; Matsuhiro, D.

    1972-01-01

    Shoulder-harness and lap-belt restraint system was designed to be worn by individuals of widely different sizes and to permit normal body motion except under sudden deceleration. System is divided into two basic assemblies, lap belt and torso or shoulder harness. Inertia-activated reels immediately lock when seat experiences sudden deceleration.

  16. Typical values of the electric drift E × B/B2 in the inner radiation belt and slot region as determined from Van Allen Probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejosne, Solène; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The electric drift E × B/B2 plays a fundamental role for the description of plasma flow and particle acceleration. Yet it is not well-known in the inner belt and slot region because of a lack of reliable in situ measurements. In this article, we present an analysis of the electric drifts measured below L 3 by both Van Allen Probes A and B from September 2012 to December 2014. The objective is to determine the typical components of the equatorial electric drift in both radial and azimuthal directions. The dependences of the components on radial distance, magnetic local time, and geographic longitude are examined. The results from Van Allen Probe A agree with Van Allen Probe B. They show, among other things, a typical corotation lag of the order of 5 to 10% below L 2.6, as well as a slight radial transport of the order of 20 m s-1. The magnetic local time dependence of the electric drift is consistent with that of the ionosphere wind dynamo below L 2 and with that of a solar wind-driven convection electric field above L 2. A secondary longitudinal dependence of the electric field is also found. Therefore, this work also demonstrates that the instruments on board Van Allen Probes are able to perform accurate measurements of the electric drift below L 3.

  17. Effect of Solar Cycle Activity on High Energy Proton of Inner Radiation Belt in the Low Altitude Region%太阳周期活动对低高度内辐射带高能质子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师立勤; 林瑞淋; 刘四清; 郑惠南

    2012-01-01

    The NOAA-15 high energy proton observation from 1998 to 2011 is used to analyze the effect of solar cycle activity on high energy proton flux. The statistic research indicates that there is an inverse correlative relationship between the proton flux in inner radiation belt and solar activity. This anti-correlation is related to geomagnetic coordinates L and B, and more significant with the increasing of L and decreasing of B. There is also a phase lag between the solar activity and the proton flux. This hysteresis effect is more obvious in the region with smaller L or larger B. The lagcan reach one year in some regions. This hysteresis effect means it takes a long time to reach the dynamic balance between the source and the loss for the proton of inner radiation belt in the low altitude region. The unbalance between the source and loss is the reason why the intensity of proton flux at the same solar activity is different. The comparison with the result of AP8 model indicates the energetic proton flux from AP8 is higher than the satellite's observation in the region with large B, which suggests that the AP8 model may overstate the proton flux enhancement at inner radiation belt in the low altitude region if only the long-term variation of magnetic field is considered.%利用NOAA-15卫星1998年到2011年近13年的高能质子全向通量观测资料,分析了一个太阳活动周内,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量的分布变化特性及其物理原因,比较了观测结果与AP8模型的不同.研究表明,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反相关关系与磁壳参数L值及磁场B值有关;L值越低,B值越大的空间点,其高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反向相关性越明显.高能质子通量随太阳活动水平的变化存在明显滞后现象,L值越高、B值越小的空间点,滞后现象就越明显,滞后严重时可以达到一年左右的时间;这种滞后现象反映出

  18. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd) to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV) radiation in an in vitro model; part ii; UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Melgar, Lluvia de Abril Alexandra; Alcaraz-Meléndez, Lilia; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Puente, María Esther; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Introducción: Los efectos de la radiación ultravioleta tipo B (UV-B) sobre las plantas medicinales se han investigado recientemente en el contexto del cambio climático, pero las modificaciones que genera la radiación UV-B podrían emplearse para modificar el contenido de compuestos antioxidantes, incluyendo los compuestos fenólicos. Objetivo: Generar información sobre el efecto de una alta exposición a UV-B artificial en el contenido antioxidante de damiana (Turnera diffusa, Willd) en un modelo in vitro. Método: Plántulas de damiana en cultivo de tejidos (medio Murashige-Skoog) fueron irradiadas con UV-B artificial en 3 diferentes dosis: (1) 0,5 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (alto) por 2 h diarias, (2) 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (severa) por 2 h diarias, o (3) 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 durante 4 horas diarias por 3 semanas. Se cuantificó la concentración de pigmentos fotosintéticos (clorofilas a y b, carotenoides), vitaminas (C y E) y compuestos fenólicos totales, la actividad enzimática de la superóxido dismutasa (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) y las peroxidasas totales (POX, EC 1.11.1), así como la capacidad antioxidante total y la peroxidación de lípidos para evaluar el efecto de la alta radiación UV-B artificial en el contenido antioxidante de damiana in vitro. Resultados: Dosis altas y severas de radiación UV-B artificial modificaron el contenido antioxidante incrementando el contenido de vitamina C y disminuyendo el contenido de compuestos fenólicos totales, además de modificar el daño oxidativo de plantas de damiana en un modelo in vitro. Conclusión: La radiación UV-B modifica el contenido antioxidante en damiana en un modelo in vitro, dependiendo de la intensidad y el tiempo de exposición.

  19. Photocatalytic treatment of an industrial effluent using artificial and solar UV radiation: an operational cost study on a pilot plant scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; San Martín, I

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study the operation costs of treating a real effluent from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power station located in Spain. The study compares different homogeneous photocatalytic processes on a pilot plant scale using different types of radiation (artificial UV or solar UV with a compound parabolic collector). The efficiency of the processes was evaluated by an analysis of the total organic carbon (TOC) removed. The following processes were considered in the study: (i) a photo-Fenton process at an artificial UV pilot plant (with the initial addition of H(2)O(2)), (ii) a modified photo-Fenton process with continuous addition of H(2)O(2) and O(2) to the system and (iii) a ferrioxalate-assisted solar photo-Fenton process at a compound parabolic collector (CPC) pilot plant. The efficiency of these processes in degrading pollutants has been studied previously, and the results obtained in each of those studies have been published elsewhere. The operational costs due to the consumption of electrical energy, reagents and catalysts were calculated from the optimal conditions of each process. The results showed that the solar photo-Fenton system was economically feasible, being able to achieve up to 75% mineralization with a total cost of 6 €/m(3), which can be reduced to 3.6 €/m(3) by subtracting the electrical costs because the IGCC plant is self-sufficient in terms of energy.

  20. Convergence of simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs II: Sensitivity to the implementation of radiative cooling and artificial viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, W K M; Forgan, D H; Armitage, P J

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the fragmentation boundary in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) and FARGO simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs with beta-cooling do not converge as resolution is increased. Furthermore, this recent work suggests that by carefully optimising the artificial viscosity parameters in these codes it can be shown that fragmentation may occur for much longer cooling times than earlier work suggests. If correct, this result is intriguing as it suggests that gas giant planets could form, via direct gravitational collapse, reasonably close to their parent stars. This result is, however, slightly surprising and there have been a number of recent studies suggesting that the result is likely an indication of a numerical problem with the simulations. One suggestion, in particular, is that the SPH results are influenced by the manner in which the cooling is implemented. We extend this work here and show that if the cooling is implemented in a manner that removes a known numer...

  1. A survey of sources of incoherent artificial optical radiation in a hospital environment in accordance with European Directive 2006/25/EC: evaluation of the related exposure risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavatorta, Claudia; Lualdi, Manuela; Meroni, Silvia; Polita, Giovanni; Bolchi, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of incoherent artificial optical radiation (AOR) exposure in hospital environments is a complex task due to the variety of sources available. This study has been designed to provide a proposal for the precautionary assessment of the related risk. This survey suggested that, in our Institution, at least three kinds of AOR sources required specific investigations: ambient lighting, theatre operating lighting and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) sources. For each kind of evaluated sources a specific measurement approach was developed. All irradiance measurements were made using a commercial spectroradiometer. The obtained results were compared with the appropriate exposure limit values (ELVs) defined in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and adopted by the European Directive 2006/25/EC. The risk related to the evaluated AOR exposure was finally assessed according to our risk matrix. According to our results, the emission of ambient lighting in the actual exposure conditions was always in accordance with the ELVs and the related risk was classifiable as not relevant. The risk related to the exposure to theatre operating lighting resulted not negligible, especially when two or more sources were used with focal spots overlapping on reflective objects. UVR sources emission may represent a health hazard depending, in particular, on the set up of the device containing the source. In case of laminar flow cabinets and closed transilluminators, if the UVR source is well contained within an enclosure with interlock, it presents no risk of exposure. Otherwise, the emission arising from UVR lamps, open transilluminators or sources not provided with interlock, may represent a risk classifiable as high even in the actual working conditions. The personal protective equipment used by workers were also assessed and their suitability was discussed.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of conveyor belts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU You-fu; MENG Qing-rui

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a belt conveyor are determined to a large extent by the properties of the belt. This paper describes experiments designed to establish the dynamic properties of belting material. The dynamic elastic modulus, viscous damping and theological constants of the belt were measured. Several properties were studied as a function of the tensile loading on the belt. These included longitudinal vibration, the natural vibration frequency in the transverse direction and the response to an impulse excitation. Vibration response was observed under several different excitation frequencies. Most of these properties have not been tested previously under conditions appropriate for the ISO/DP9856 standard. Two types of belt were tested, a steel reinforced belt and a fabric reinforced belt. The test equipment was built to provide data appropriate for designing belt conveyors. It was observed that the stress wave propagation speed increased with tensile load and that tensile load was the main factor influencing longitudinal vibrations.

  3. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  4. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence nanoanalyses of the metallome of a ~3.3 Ga-old microbial biofilm from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, A.; Lemelle, L.; Salome, M.; Cloetens, P.; Westall, F.; Simionovici, A.

    2012-04-01

    Combining in situ nanometer-scale techniques on the fossilized Josefsdal Chert Microbial Biofilm (JCMB) reveals a distinct vertical structural and compositional organisation: the lower part is calcified as aragonite, while the upper non-calcified kerogenous layer is characterised by up to 1% sulphur [1]. The in situ analysis of all the metals as a group represents a useful microbial fingerprint [2] and we will continue to explore it. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence maps of high spatial resolution (AIP Conference Proceedings, 1221, 131-138. 4. Bleuet P., et al., 2008. App. Phys. Lett., 92, 213111-1-3. 5. Golosio B., et al., 2003. Appl. Phys., 94, 145-157. 6. M. Haschke, 2003. PhD dissertation, T.U. Berlin. 7. Simionovici A. S., et al., 2010. Proceedings of the Meteoritical Society Conference, N.Y., USA. 8. Solé V.A., et al., 2006, Elsevier, 62, 63-68.

  5. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd) to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV) radiation in an in vitro model; part I; UV-C radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Melgar, Lluvia de Abril Alexandra; Alcaraz-Meléndez, Lilia; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Puente, María Esther; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Introducción: La radiación ultravioleta tipo C (UV-C) presenta mayor energía y es menos estudiada que la radiación UV-B, debido a que se considera que es totalmente absorbida por la capa de ozono. Sin embargo, la radiación UV-C artificial es capaz de generar diversas modificaciones en las plantas. Dado que la exposición a UV-C por intervalos de tiempo cortos incrementa la concentración de compuestos antioxidantes, mejorando la apariencia y vida de anaquel de los productos, su potencial aplicación en tratamientos poscosecha para modificar el contenido antioxidante de plantas medicinales, como la damiana (Turnera diffusa), es novedoso y relevante. Objetivo: Determinar el efecto de la radiación UV-C sobre las defensas antioxidantes enzimáticas y no enzimáticas, así como en los niveles de daño oxidativo de damiana (Turnera diffusa) in vitro. Resultados: La radiación UV-C disminuyó la actividad de las enzimas superóxido dismutasa (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) y peroxidasas totales (POX, CE 1.11.1), la concentración de clorofila (a y b), carotenos, vitamina C y la capacidad antioxidante total, e incrementó el contenido de compuestos fenólicos en damiana. La disminución de las defensas antioxidantes fue mayor en plantas de damiana expuestas a dosis más altas de UV-C o por períodos más largos. Estos resultados sugieren que la radiación UV-C induce estrés oxidativo, evidenciado por el incremento del contenido de carbonilos proteicos y el contenido de compuestos fenólicos en damiana (T. diffusa). Conclusión: Dosis bajas y menor exposición a UV-C estimulan la síntesis de compuestos fenólicos en damiana. Por ello, tratamientos controlados con UV-C podrían emplearse como tratamientos poscosecha para incrementar el contenido de compuestos fenólicos en plantas de damiana.

  6. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  7. Kuiper Belt Occultation Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Wesley C; Trujillo, Chad; Stephens, Andrew W; Kavelaars, JJ; Brown, Michael E; Bianco, Federica B; Boyle, Richard P; Brucker, Melissa J; Hetherington, Nathan; Joner, Michael; Keel, William C; Langill, Phil P; Lister, Tim; McMillan, Russet J; Young, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Here we present observations of 7 large Kuiper Belt Objects. From these observations, we extract a point source catalog with $\\sim0.01"$ precision, and astrometry of our target Kuiper Belt Objects with $0.04-0.08"$ precision within that catalog. We have developed a new technique to predict the future occurrence of stellar occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects. The technique makes use of a maximum likelihood approach which determines the best-fit adjustment to cataloged orbital elements of an object. Using simulations of a theoretical object, we discuss the merits and weaknesses of this technique compared to the commonly adopted ephemeris offset approach. We demonstrate that both methods suffer from separate weaknesses, and thus, together provide a fair assessment of the true uncertainty in a particular prediction. We present occultation predictions made by both methods for the 7 tracked objects, with dates as late as 2015. Finally, we discuss observations of three separate close passages of Quaoar to field star...

  8. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-02

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea.

  9. Modelling of Jupiter's Innermost Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand better source and loss processes for energetic trapped protons near Jupiter, a modification of de Pater and Goertz' finite difference diffusion calculations for Jovian equatorial energetic electrons is made to apply to the case of protons inside the orbit of Metis. Explicit account is taken of energy loss in the Jovian ring. Comparison of the results is made with Galileo Probe measurements.

  10. Lap belt injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, N

    2010-07-01

    The use of adult seat belts without booster seats in young children may lead to severe abdominal, lumbar or cervical spine and head and neck injuries. We describe four characteristic cases of lap belt injuries presenting to a tertiary children\\'s hospital over the past year in addition to a review of the current literature. These four cases of spinal cord injury, resulting in significant long-term morbidity in the two survivors and death in one child, arose as a result of lap belt injury. These complex injuries are caused by rapid deceleration characteristic of high impact crashes, resulting in sudden flexion of the upper body around the fixed lap belt, and consequent compression of the abdominal viscera between the lap belt and spine. This report highlights the dangers of using lap belts only without shoulder straps. Age-appropriate child restraint in cars will prevent these injuries.

  11. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning

  12. Dunlop Enerka Belting supplies and installs Europe's longest conveyor belt at British Coal-Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Dunlop Enerka Belting of Farington, U.K., has supplied a steel cord conveyor belt to the mine complex at Selby in North Yorkshire operated by RJB Mining plc. The new conveyor belt replaces the belt supplied and installed in 1981 by Dunlop Enerka Belting (then BTR Belting Ltd.).

  13. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  14. Artificial blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman

    2008-07-01

    Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  15. Geography of the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  16. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  17. Artificial urushi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity.

  18. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  19. Artificial Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. They may cause you to need an amputation. Traumatic injuries, including from traffic accidents and military combat Cancer Birth defects If you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ...

  20. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  1. Evaluation of the static belt fit provided by belt-positioning booster seats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert, Sheila M; Sherwood, Christopher P; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A

    2009-05-01

    Belt-positioning booster seats are recommended for children who use vehicle seat belts as primary restraints but who are too small to obtain good belt fit. Previous research has shown that belt-positioning boosters reduce injury risk, but the belt fit produced by the wide range of boosters in the US market has not previously been assessed. The present study describes the development of a method for quantifying static belt fit with a Hybrid-III 6-year-old test dummy. The measurement method was applied in a laboratory seat mockup to 31 boosters (10 in both backless and highback modes) across a range of belt geometries obtained from in-vehicle measurements. Belt fit varied widely across boosters. Backless boosters generally produced better lap belt fit than highback boosters, largely because adding the back component moved the dummy forward with respect to the lap belt routing guides. However, highback boosters produced more consistent shoulder belt fit because of the presence of belt routing guides near the shoulder. Some boosters performed well on both lap belt and shoulder belt fit. Lap belt fit in dedicated boosters was generally better than in combination restraints that also can be used with an integrated harness. Results demonstrate that certain booster design features produce better belt fit across a wide range of belt geometries. Lap belt guides that hold the belt down, rather than up, and shoulder belt guides integrated into the booster backrest provided better belt fit.

  2. Seat Belt Use and Stress in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schichor, Aric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored adolescent seat belt use and psychosocial risk factors in urban minority population (n=541). Found seat belt use reported by 49 percent of respondents. Those reporting no or intermittent seat belt use were significantly more likely than seat belt users to feel down, have decreased home support, have problems with school and the law, and…

  3. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses... the driver's seat and seat belt assembly anchorages that conform to the location and...

  4. Nutrient content of soils under artificial grass vegetation in the urban hydro-fluctua-tion belt of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region%三峡水库城区消落带人工草本植被土壤养分含量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨予静; 李昌晓; 马朋

    2015-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to explore the dynamics of soil chemical properties under different wa-ter-logging durations following re-vegetation in the urban hydro-fluctuation belt of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region.The study also aimed to determine the potential impact of vegetation reconstruction on water quality. Soil samples were taken from Hemarthria compressa ,Cynodon dactylon and Saccharum spontaneum commu-nities,and from non-vegetated areas in a hydro-fluctuation belt located in downtown Chongqing,in June 2012, March 2013,May 2013,July 2013 and September 2013.Analysis was undertaken of soil pH,organic matter (OM),alkali hydrolysable nitrogen (AN),available phosphorus (AP),available potassium (AK),total nitro-gen (TN),total phosphorus (TP)and total potassium (TK).Results showed that vegetation type significantly influenced soil pH values and AN,AP and TP contents.No significant differences were found in the tested properties between soils without vegetation and those beneath the three types of artificial grasses.However, there were significant soil differences under different water-logging durations.pH values and OM contents fluc-tuated throughout the experiment.Soil pH ranged from 6.5 to 8.5.AN contents were relatively higher in March and September 2013,when the water level dropped,while maximum AP contents were found in June 2012.At that time,AP contents under bare areas,H .compressa,C.dactylon,and S .spontaneum were (2.62±0.30),(3.92±0.34),(1.08±0.16),and (1.24±0.06)mg/kg respectively.TP and TK contents in-creased in the later phases of the experiment.The study also showed that,besides vegetation and hydrological factors,other factors such as urban sewage discharge,human disturbance and point or non-point source pollu-tion caused by surface runoff influenced soil pH and nutrients.For the Yangtze River in Chongqing urban areas of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region,the potential risk of water eutrophication caused by artificial grasses might be lower

  5. Chaos on the conveyor belt

    CERN Document Server

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Tél, Tamás; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of a spring-block train placed on a moving conveyor belt is investigated both by simple experiments and computer simulations. The first block is connected by spring to an external static point, and due to the dragging effect of the belt the blocks undergo complex stick-slip dynamics. A qualitative agreement with the experimental results can only be achieved by taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the friction force on the belt's surface, modeled as noise. As a function of the velocity of the conveyor belt and the noise strength, the system exhibits complex, self-organized critical, sometimes chaotic dynamics and phase transition-like behavior. Noise induced chaos and intermittency is also observed. Simulations suggest that the maximum complexity of the dynamical states is achieved for a relatively small number of blocks, around five.

  6. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  7. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containin......Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie...

  8. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere, absorb sunlight. That

  9. The use of solar simulation systems for producing artificial global radiation for the purpose of determining the heat load of rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Certain climatic tests which require solar and sky radiation were carried out in the laboratory by using simulated global radiation. The advantages of such a method of measurement and the possibilities and limitations resulting from the simulation of global radiation are described. Experiments concerning the thermal load in rooms were conducted in order to test the procedure. In particular, the heat gain through a window with sunshade is discussed, a venetian blind between the panes of a double-glazed window being used in most cases.

  10. Distribution of dust from Kuiper belt objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkavyi, N N; Taidakova, T; Mather, J C; Gorkavyi, Nick N.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John C.

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) Using an efficient computational approach, we have reconstructed the structure of the dust cloud in the Solar system between 0.5 and 100 AU produced by the Kuiper belt objects. Our simulations offer a 3-D physical model of the `kuiperoidal' dust cloud based on the distribution of 280 dust particle trajectories produced by 100 known Kuiper belt objects ; the resulting 3-D grid consists of $1.9\\times 10^6$ cells containing $1.2\\times 10^{11}$ particle positions. The following processes that influence the dust particle dynamics are taken into account: 1) gravitational scattering on the eight planets (neglecting Pluto); 2) planetary resonances; 3) radiation pressure; and 4) the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) and solar wind drags. We find the dust distribution highly non-uniform: there is a minimum in the kuiperoidal dust between Mars and Jupiter, after which both the column and number densities of kuiperoidal dust sharply increase with heliocentric distance between 5 and 10 AU, and then form a plateau betwee...

  11. Artificial ribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J R

    1994-01-01

    Many inorganic and organic compounds promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A. Both the transesterification step, where a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is formed with concomitant cleavage of RNA, and the hydrolysis step, where the 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is converted to a phosphate monoester, may be mimicked with compounds that are readily synthesized in the laboratory. Electrophilic activation of the phosphate ester and charge neutralization are generally important means by which artificial RNases promote phosphate diester displacement reactions. Several artificial RNases operate by a bifunctional general acid/general base mechanism, as does RNase A. Provision of an intramolecular nucleophile appears to be an important pathway for metal complex promoted phosphate diester hydrolysis. In contrast to the successful design of compounds that promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A, there are no artificial nucleases to date that will cleave the 3' P-O bond of RNA or hydrolyze an oligonucleotide of DNA. Artificial RNases based on both metal complexes and organic compounds have been described. Metal complexes may be particularly effective catalysts for both transesterification and hydrolysis reactions of phosphate diesters. Under physiological conditions (37 degrees C and neutral pH), several metal complexes catalyze the transesterification of RNA. Future work should involve the development of metal complexes which are inert to metal ion release but which maintain open coordination sites for catalytic activity. The design of compounds containing multiple amine or imidazole groups that may demonstrate bifunctional catalysis is a promising route to new artificial RNases. Further design of these compounds and careful placement of catalytic groups may yield new RNase mimics that operate under physiological conditions. The attachment of artificial RNases to recognition agents such as oligodeoxynucleotides to create new sequence-specific endoribonucleases is an exciting field of

  12. Deterministic methods for the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations and the Van Allen belts dynamics; Methodes deterministes de resolution des equations de Vlasov-Maxwell relativistes en vue du calcul de la dynamique des ceintures de Van Allen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bourdiec, S

    2007-03-15

    Artificial satellites operate in an hostile radiation environment, the Van Allen radiation belts, which partly condition their reliability and their lifespan. In order to protect them, it is necessary to characterize the dynamics of the energetic electrons trapped in these radiation belts. This dynamics is essentially determined by the interactions between the energetic electrons and the existing electromagnetic waves. This work consisted in designing a numerical scheme to solve the equations modelling these interactions: the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. Our choice was directed towards methods of direct integration. We propose three new spectral methods for the momentum discretization: a Galerkin method and two collocation methods. All of them are based on scaled Hermite functions. The scaling factor is chosen in order to obtain the proper velocity resolution. We present in this thesis the discretization of the one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system and the numerical results obtained. Then we study the possible extensions of the methods to the complete relativistic problem. In order to reduce the computing time, parallelization and optimization of the algorithms were carried out. Finally, we present 1Dx-3Dv (mono-dimensional for x and three-dimensional for velocity) computations of Weibel and whistler instabilities with one or two electrons species. (author)

  13. Effects of vehicle seat and belt geometry on belt fit for children with and without belt positioning booster seats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert-Hamilton, Sheila M; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effects of belt-positioning boosters on lap and shoulder belt fit. Postures and belt fit were measured for forty-four boys and girls ages 5-12 in four highback boosters, one backless booster, and on a vehicle seat without a booster. Belt anchorage locations were varied over a wide range. Seat cushion angle, seat back angle, and seat cushion length were varied in the no-booster conditions. All boosters produced better mean lap belt fit than was observed in the no-booster condition, but the differences among boosters were relatively large. With one midrange belt configuration, the lap belt was not fully below the anterior-superior iliac spine (ASIS) landmark on the front of the pelvis for 89% of children in one booster, and 75% of children failed to achieve that level of belt fit in another. In contrast, the lap belt was fully below the ASIS for all but two children in the best-performing booster. Child body size had a statistically significant but relatively small effect on lap belt fit. The largest children sitting without a booster had approximately the same lap belt fit as the smallest children experienced in the worst-performing booster. Increasing lap belt angle relative to horizontal produced significantly better lap belt fit in the no-booster condition, but the boosters isolated the children from the effects of lap belt angles. Reducing seat cushion length in the no-booster condition improved lap belt fit but changing cushion angle did not. Belt upper anchorage (D-ring) location had a strong effect on shoulder belt fit in conditions without shoulder belt routing from the booster. Unexpectedly, the worst average shoulder belt fit was observed in one highback booster with a poorly positioned shoulder belt routing clip. The shoulder belt was routed more outboard, on average, with a backless booster than without a booster, but raising the child also amplified the effect of D-ring location, such that children were

  14. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  15. Single beam optical conveyor belt for chiral particles

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, David E

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel paradigm to selectively manipulate and transport small engineered chiral particles and discriminate different enantiomers using unstructured chiral light. It is theoretically shown that the response of a chiral metamaterial particle may be tailored to enable an optical conveyor belt operation with no optical traps, such that for a fixed incident light helicity and independent of the nanoparticle location, it is either steadily pushed towards the direction of the photon flow or steadily pulled against the photon flow. Our findings create new opportunities for unconventional optical manipulations of tailored nanoparticles and may have applications in sorting racemic mixtures of artificial chiral molecules and in particle delivery.

  16. Artificial blood.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    #Blood substitutes have been developed for almost a century. The various type of artificial blood was continuously available on the market. The theme of this report is to identify the best substitute in emergency situation for some patients and science students. The definition of best is given; thus, as the vital part of the report, the comparison between them is described and discussed. Modified hemoglobin, bovine-based hemoglobin and PFCs are three basic types. In terms of the perfor...

  17. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  18. Kuiper Belts Around Nearby Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, R; Brandeker, A; Olofsson, G; Pilbratt, G L; Risacher, C; Rodmann, J; Augereau, J -C; Bergman, P; Eiroa, C; Fridlund, M; Thébault, P; White, G J

    2010-01-01

    In order to detect and characterise cold extended circumstellar dust originating from collisions of planetesimal bodies in disks, belts, or rings at Kuiper-Belt distances (30--50\\,AU or beyond) sensitive submillimetre observations are essential. Measurements of the flux densities at these wavelengths will extend existing IR photometry and permit more detailed modelling of the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the disks spectral energy distribution (SED), effectively constraining dust properties and disk extensions. By observing stars spanning from a few up to several hundred Myr, the evolution of debris disks during crucial phases of planet formation can be studied. // We have performed 870\\,$\\mu$m observations of 22 exo-Kuiper-Belt candidates, as part of a Large Programme with the LABOCA bolometer at the APEX telescope. Dust masses (or upper limits) were calculated from integrated 870\\,$\\mu$m fluxes, and fits to the SED of detected sources revealed the fractional dust luminosities $f_{\\mathrm{dust}}$, dust temperatures...

  19. The Relative Deep Penetrations of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Slot Region and Inner Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, with the slot region in between separating the two belts. Though many studies have focused on the outer belt dynamics, the energetic electrons in the slot region and especially inner belt did not receive much attention until recently. A number of new features regarding electrons in the low L region have been reported lately, including the abundance of 10s-100s of keV electrons in the inner belt, the frequent deep injections of 100s of keV electrons, and 90°-minimum pitch angle distributions of 100s of keV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. In this presentation, we focus on the relative deep injections into the slot region and inner belt of energetic electrons and ions using observations from HOPE and MagEIS instruments on the Van Allen Probes. It is shown that while 10s - 100s of keV electrons penetrate commonly deep into the low L region and are persistent in the inner belt, the deep injections of ions with similar energies occur rarely, possibly due to the fast loss of ions in the low L region. The energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of electrons and ions during injections are also very different, indicating the existence of different physical mechanisms acting on them. In addition, some intriguing similarities between lower energy ions and higher energy electrons will also be discussed.

  20. Causal analyzing on regional economic disparities based on the spatial economic model: A case study of Lan-Xin railway radiation belt%基于空间计量经济模型的区域经济差异成因分析——以兰新铁路辐射带为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建豹; 白永平; 李建虎; 侯成成

    2012-01-01

    利用空间分析法确定兰新铁路辐射带的辐射范围,以县级行政单元为基本研究单元,综合运用SPSS、GeoDA和ARCGIS分析区域经济差异后发现:在兰新铁路辐射带内,兰州市市辖区、乌鲁木齐市市辖区、嘉峪关市、哈密市、阿拉善左旗的经济发展水平明显比其它地区高,甘肃段内区域经济差异较大,新疆段内区域经济差异较小;区域经济空间集聚特征明显;利用空间计量经济模型分析区域经济差异成因可知,财政收入对经济发展具有明显的负面影响,市场规模、经济结构、工业化、虚拟变量对经济发展具有明显的促进作用,其中虚拟变量与经济发展水平的回归系数最大,说明农村城市化对经济发展的促进作用最大。区域投资水平对经济发展影响不明显。%In this paper we discussed economic development disparities and the causes by taking administrative county units in the radiation range through spatial analysis of GIS.Based on the ten relative economic indices in Lan-Xin railway radiation belt,the general score of regional economic level was calculated by SPSS,and the disparities of regional economic level in Lan-Xin railway radiation belt were analyzed by means of GIS spatial analysis provided by ARCGIS and GeoDA.Based on studying on the economic development disparities,some conclusions were drawn as follows.In Lan-Xin railway radiation belt,the regional economic level is significantly higher in the municipal of Lanzhou city,the municipal of Urumqi city,Jiayuguan city,Hami city,Alxa Left Banner than others.The economic disparities is larger in Gansu section,it is comparatively smaller in Xinjiang section.Regional economy takes on significantly spatial agglomeration.Based on the spatial econometric models,we analyzed the causes of regional economic disparities,and got some conclusions as follows.Financial receipt has obvious negative impact on economic development.Market scale

  1. French experience in seat belt use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassarre, S. & Page, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper concerns the French experience in seat belt use. As well as the seat belt regulations, the strategies employed to reinforce the wearing of seat belts by using information and encouragement campaigns and checks by the police and gendarmerie are described here along with their timetables an

  2. Appendiceal transection associated with seat belt restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Seung Je; Sul, Young Hoon; Ye, Jin Bong; Kim, Joong Suck

    2016-08-01

    The seat belt is designed for safety in a motor vehicle and should be worn to prevent severe injuries. But, the seat belt itself can be an injury factor in combination with deceleration forces applied to fixation points of mobile viscera. Here, we present a 23-year-man with traumatic transection of the appendix, highly mobile viscera, following seat belt injury.

  3. Sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities from Andean lakes to artificial ultraviolet-B radiation Sensibilidad de comunidades fitoplanctónicas invernales de lagos andinos a la radiación ultravioleta-B artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. WALTER HELBLING

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available During July of 1999 sampling was carried out in five Andean lakes to determine the sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities to ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm. The studied lakes, Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi, Gutiérrez, and Morenito, located in the Patagonia region (41° S, 71° W, 800 m of altitude, had attenuation coefficients for UV-B that ranged from 0.36 m-1 (Lake Moreno to 2.8 m-1 (Lake Morenito. The samples were inoculated with labeled carbon (NaH14CO3 and incubated in an illuminated chamber (UV-B = 0.35 W m-2, UV-A [320-400 nm] = 1.1 W m-2, and PAR [400-700 nm] = 10.8 W m-2 at 10 °C. The phytoplankton cells were exposed to UV radiation (280-400 nm + PAR (quartz tubes, and to UV-A + PAR (quartz tubes covered with Mylar-D. The total duration of the experiments was 4 h and two samples were taken from each treatment every hour. In lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez, the photosynthetic inhibition increased linearly with UV-B doses, while in Lake Morenito just a slight relationship was observed. After receiving a dose of 1.25 kJ m-2 (UV-B, phytoplankton from Lake Morenito had the highest cumulative photosynthetic inhibition (44 %, whereas in Lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez the inhibition was of 22, 11, 5, and 1 %, respectively. However, at the end of incubation period and after receiving doses of 5 kJ m-2, the most inhibited phytoplankton cells were from Lake Moreno (70 % and the most resistant (27 % was that from Lake Gutiérrez. The kinetics of inhibition was different in each lake, and transparent lakes, with higher proportion of large cells, had higher inhibition rates. The results suggest that an increase in UV-B radiation (e.g., produced by a decrease in stratospheric ozone would have a greater impact on microplankton from clear lakes, while pico- and nanoplankton from less transparent lakes will be less affectedDurante julio de 1999 se realizaron muestreos en cinco lagos

  4. Seat belt sign and its significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Inamadar, Praveenkumar Ishwarappa; Subrahmanyam, Bhattara Vishweswar

    2013-07-01

    Safety belts are the most important safety system in motor vehicles and when worn intend to prevent serious injuries. However, in unusual circumstances (high velocity motor vehicle collisions) these safety measures (seat belts) can be the source and cause of serious injuries. The seat belt syndrome was first described as early by Garrett and Braunste in but the term "seat belt sign" was discussed by Doersch and Dozier. Medical personnel's involved in emergency care of trauma patients should be aware of seat belt sign and there should a higher index of suspicion to rule out underlying organ injuries.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus; Efeitos da radiacao gama e feixe de eletrons sobre amostras de castanhas-do-Brasil inoculadas artificialmente com Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-07-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  6. Protection of Marine Structures by Artificial Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Ottesen Hansen, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    protection of the bridge and of the grounding ships aspects like erosion of the islands and hydraulic resistance to the water flow through the belt must also be considered. The paper is focused on the design aspects related to ship grounding. It presents a theoretical model, which predicts the ship motions...... material and giving minimum resistance to the water flow through the belt......., the loads and the deformations during a ship grounding event on a soft sea bed. The models applied to determine the shapes of the artificial islands, which most efficiently protect the bridge from ship impact while posing minimum risk of damage to the grounding ships, requiring the least amount of building...

  7. Method based on artificial excitation of characteristic radiation by an electron beam for remote X-ray spectral elemental analysis of surface rocks on atmosphereless celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.

    2016-11-01

    This article, like our previous one [1], is devoted to advanced space technology concepts. It evaluates the potential for developing active systems to conduct a remote elemental analysis of surface rocks on an atmosphereless celestial body. The analysis is based on the spectrometry of characteristic X-rays (CXR) artificially excited in the surface soil layer. It has been proposed to use an electron beam injected from aboard a spacecraft orbiting the celestial body (or moving in a flyby trajectory) to excite the CXR elements contained in surface rocks. The focus is on specifying technical requirements to the parameters of payloads for a global mapping of the composition of lunar rocks from aboard of a low-orbiting lunar satellite. This article uses the results obtained in [2], our first study that shows the potential to develop an active system for a remote elemental analysis of lunar surface rocks using the above method. Although there has been interest in our research on the part of leading national academic institutions and space technology developers in the Soviet Union, the studies were discontinued because of the termination of the Soviet lunar program and the completion of the American Apollo program.

  8. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhiming [Department of Neurosurgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang Ping; Wang Hongyan; Zhang Xiangming [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang Minli [Division of Life Sciences, Universities Space Research Association, Houston, Texas (United States); Cucinotta, Francis A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Ya, E-mail: ywang94@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  9. 电离层人工调制激发的下行ELF/VLF波辐射%The downward ELF/VLF waves radiation excited by ionospheric artificial modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常珊珊; 赵正予; 汪枫

    2011-01-01

    By heating the ionosphere with large ELF/VLF-modulated HF wave, a virtual antenna is produced in the ionosphere, which is an effective means to radiate ELF/VLF waves. This paper uses the modulated-heating models of Wang Feng (2009) to calculate the strength of the LF radiation source produced by HF heating, uses full-wave model to analyze attenuation and reflection of the LF wave transmitting downward, and with HAARP experiment parameter, simulates magnetic field of the LF signals on the sea, which is in PT order, according with the experimental data.%通过大功率ELF/VLF调幅高频波对电离层进行加热,形成电离层虚拟天线,可以作为发射ELF/VLF波的一种有效手段.本文使用汪枫(2009)的调制加热模型,计算高频加热电离层产生的低频辐射源强度,采用全波解算法分析辐射的低频波向下传播过程中的衰减和反射问题,并采用HAARP实验参数,模拟出在海面上接收到的低频信号强度为PT量级,与实验数据一致.模拟结果表明,加热泵波功率、低频调制波频率、以及加热纬度位置是影响ELF/VLF波辐射和传播的三个主要因素.

  10. Artificial Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru JIVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to eliminate, a routine in the economic thinking, claimed to be responsible for the negative essence of economic developments, from the point of view, of the ecological implications (employment in the planetary ecosystem. The methodological foundations start from the natural origins of the functionality of the human economic society according to the originary physiocrat liberalism, and from specific natural characteristics of the humankind. This paper begins with a comment-analysis of the difference between natural and artificial within the economy, and then explains some of the most serious diversions from the natural essence of economic liberalism. It shall be explained the original (heterodox interpretation of the Classical political economy (economics, by making calls to the Romanian economic thinking from aggravating past century. Highlighting the destructive impact of the economy - which, under the invoked doctrines, we call unnatural - allows an intuitive presentation of a logical extension of Marshall's market price, based on previous research. Besides the doctrinal arguments presented, the economic realities inventoried along the way (major deficiencies and effects, determined demonstrate the validity of the hypothesis of the unnatural character and therefore necessarily to be corrected, of the concept and of the mechanisms of the current economy.The results of this paper consist of original heterodox methodspresented, intuitive or developed that can be found conclusively within the key proposals for education and regulation.

  11. Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

    2014-02-01

    The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

  12. Future aerosol reductions and widening of the northern tropical belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert J.; Ajoku, Osinachi

    2016-06-01

    Observations show that the tropical belt has widened over the past few decades, a phenomenon associated with poleward migration of subtropical dry zones and large-scale atmospheric circulation. Although part of this signal is related to natural climate variability, studies have identified an externally forced contribution primarily associated with greenhouse gases (GHGs) and stratospheric ozone loss. Here we show that the increase in aerosols over the twentieth century has led to contraction of the northern tropical belt, thereby offsetting part of the widening associated with the increase in GHGs. Over the 21st century, however, when aerosol emissions are projected to decrease, the effects of aerosols and GHGs reinforce one another, both contributing to widening of the northern tropical belt. Models that have larger aerosol forcing, by including aerosol indirect effects on cloud albedo and lifetime, yield significantly larger Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropical widening than models with direct aerosol effects only. More targeted simulations show that future reductions in aerosols can drive NH tropical widening as large as greenhouse gases, and idealized simulations show the importance of NH midlatitude aerosol forcing. Mechanistically, the 21st century reduction in aerosols peaks near 40°N, which results in a corresponding maximum increase in surface solar radiation, NH midlatitude tropospheric warming amplification, and a poleward shift in the latitude of maximum baroclinicity, implying a corresponding shift in atmospheric circulation. If models with aerosol indirect effects better represent the real world, then future aerosol changes are likely to be an important -- if not dominant -- driver of NH tropical belt widening.

  13. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Most Kuiper Belt surveys to date either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky to efficiently detect objects beyond 50 AU. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we are conducting a deep wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if it is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or one of a new class of object. We request one night in 2013B to recover a very interesting object that we discovered at Subaru in July 2012 and complete the sky coverage needed to constrain the Sedna-like population. This one night was awarded to us in 2012B but lost because of instrument problems.

  14. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Goldreich, P; Sari, R; Goldreich, Peter; Lithwick, Yoram; Sari, Re'em

    2002-01-01

    It appears that at least several percent of large Kuiper belt objects are members of wide binaries. Physical collisions are too infrequent to account for their formation. Collisionless gravitational interactions are more promising. These provide two channels for binary formation. In each, the initial step is the formation of a transient binary when two large bodies penetrate each other's Hill spheres. Stabilization of a transient binary requires that it lose energy. Either dynamical friction due to small bodies or the scattering of a third large body can be responsible. Our estimates favor the former, albeit by a small margin. We predict that most objects of size comparable to those currently observed in the Kuiper belt are members of multiple systems. More specifically, we derive the probability that a large body is a member of a binary with semi-major axis of order a. The probability depends upon sigma, the total surface density, Sigma, the surface density of large bodies having radius R, and theta=10^-4, t...

  15. The Administrator's "Handy Dandy" Tool Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Every good leader needs a tool belt. Throughout the author's years of building early childhood programs, she has acquired a number of tools for her personal belt. These tools have helped her sharpen her skills in supporting teachers and staff, connecting with families, and educating children. This article focuses on those leadership skills that…

  16. Biomechanics of seat belt restraint system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Hock, Davis

    2004-01-01

    Seat belt system restrains and protects occupants in motor vehicle crashes and any slack in seat belt system induces additional loading on occupant. Signs of belt loading are more obvious in high-speed frontal collisions with heavy occupants. However subtle changes may occur at low speeds or with low forces from occupants during rollovers. In certain cases, the seat belt webbing is twisted and loaded by the occupant. The loading of webbing induces an observable fold/crimp on the seat belt. The purpose of the study is to biomechanically evaluate the force required to produce such marks using an anthropometric physical test dummy. Two tests were conducted to determine the amount of force required to put an observable fold/crimp in a shoulder belt. A head form designed by Voight Hodgson was used to represent the neck which interacted with the belt. The force was applied with a pneumatic pull ram (central hydraulic 89182 N) and the force was measured with a 44,000 N transducer load cell (DSM-10K). Results indicate that the force of over 1,000 N produced a fold or crimp in the belt.

  17. Seat Belts on School Buses: Some Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, David

    1982-01-01

    A representative of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration weighs advantages and discusses issues associated with installing seat belts in school buses. Federal regulations and research findings are considered. A list of guideline questions for school districts planning to install seat belts is included. (PP)

  18. Intelligent Belt Conveyor Monitoring and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Belt conveyors have been used worldwide in continuous material transport for about 250 years. Traditional inspection and monitoring of large-scale belt conveyors focus on individual critical components and response to catastrophic system failures. To prevent operational problems caused by the lack o

  19. Parameters affecting seat belt use in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannis, G; Laiou, A; Vardaki, S; Papadimitriou, E; Dragomanovits, A; Kanellaidis, G

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this research is the exploration of seat belt use in Greece and particularly the identification of the parameters affecting seat belt use in Greece. A national field survey was conducted for the analytical recording of seat belt use. A binary logistic regression model was developed, and the impact of each parameter on seat belt use in Greece was quantified. Parameters included in the model concern characteristics of car occupants (gender, age and position in the car), the type of the car and the type of the road network. The data collection revealed that in Greece, the non-use of seat belt on the urban road network was higher than on the national and rural road network and young and older men use seat belts the least. The developed model showed that travelling on a national road is negative for not wearing the seat belt. Finally, the variable with the highest impact on not wearing a seat belt is being a passenger on the back seats.

  20. Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system (130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ and -50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ). Strong ultra-violet (UV) flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse....... By combining physical models for vibrational and rotational dust emission and adding the constraints from the thermal dust spectrum from Planck and IRAS we are able to get a good description of the frequency spectrum of the AME for plausible values of the local density and radiation field....

  1. Trends in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the foundations of artificial intelligence as a science and the types of answers that may be given to the question, "What is intelligence?" The paradigms of artificial intelligence and general systems theory are compared. (Author/VT)

  2. Artificiality in Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Rennard, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    This text provides with an introduction to the modern approach of artificiality and simulation in social sciences. It presents the relationship between complexity and artificiality, before introducing the field of artificial societies which greatly benefited from the computer power fast increase, gifting social sciences with formalization and experimentation tools previously owned by "hard" sciences alone. It shows that as "a new way of doing social sciences", artificial societies should undo...

  3. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  4. Seat belt use law in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SangWanLee

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To highlight the way to successful implementation of mandantory seat belt use law in developing countries particulary where have significant increase in number or cars and subsequent increase in car occupant casualties.Methods:Literatures concerning seat belt use were reviewed and experiences of the world.Satisfactory or not,investigated.It summed up general aspects of seat belt use as well as benefits,attitude toward legislation and measures to enhance the usage.Results:Seat belt use has been proven and stood time tested as the most effective means to protect car occupants from road crash injuries.It appears to be arduous to achieve the golal of seat belt use law in developing countries. but possible via strategies appropriately leading to legislation and promotion of the belt usage.Conclusions:It is prime necessity for the government authorities to recognize the importance of seat belt use.There needs an organizational structure composed of relevant professional from both private and government sectors which is able to carry out every steps toward successful legislation and implementation:education,publicity,enforcement,evaluation and dissemination of the law's benefits.

  5. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftin, Laurel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To increase teen seat belt use among drivers at a rural high school by implementing the Drive Alive Pilot Program (DAPP, a theory-driven intervention built on highway safety best practices.Methods: The first component of the program was 20 observational teen seat belt surveys conducted by volunteer students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month period before and after the month-long intervention. The survey results were published in the newspaper. The second component was the use of incentives, such as gift cards, to promote teen seat belt use. The third component involved disincentives, such as increased police patrol and school policies. The fourth component was a programmatic intervention that focused on education and media coverage of the DAPP program.Results: Eleven pre-intervention surveys and nine post-intervention surveys were conducted before and after the intervention. The pre- and post-intervention seat belt usage showed significant differences (p<0.0001. The average pre-intervention seat belt usage rate was 51.2%, while the average post-intervention rate was 74.5%. This represents a percentage point increase of 23.3 in seat belt use after the DAPP intervention.Conclusion: Based on seat belt observational surveys, the DAPP was effective in increasing seat belt use among rural high school teenagers. Utilizing a theory-based program that builds on existing best practices can increase the observed seat belt usage among rural high school students. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(3: 280-283.

  6. Computer-aided design of conveyor belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karolewski, B.; Pytel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Possibilities are discussed for using mathematical models of belt conveyors for development of computer-aided design of conveyors for coal mining. Examples of optimization tasks and methods for their solution using computerized simulation are analyzed. The analysis is illustrated by an algorithm used to design a starter for the drive system of a belt conveyor. Electromagnetic moment and starting current are used as optimization criteria. A simplified model of a belt conveyor is used. The model consists of an equation of motion with variable braking moment and variable moment of inertia. 3 references.

  7. Collisional evolution of the early asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, Ricardo; Brunini, Adrián

    1999-04-01

    We present numerical results obtained by a simulation of the collisional process between asteroids and scattered comets from the Uranus-Neptune zone. This mechanism allows the use of single exponent incremental size distributions for the initial belt reaching a final distribution that matches the observed population very well. Since the cometary bombardment was extremely efficient removing mass from the primordial asteroid belt in a very short time, we always obtained belts with total masses less than 0.001 M ⊕ after ≈ 2×10 7 yrs. This result allows processes with an important initial mass preserving Vestas basaltic crust.

  8. 30 CFR 56.14131 - Seat belts for haulage trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seat belts for haulage trucks. 56.14131 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14131 Seat belts for haulage trucks. (a) Seat belts shall be provided and worn in haulage trucks. (b) Seat belts shall be maintained in...

  9. Programmable artificial phototactic microswimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Baohu; Wang, Jizhuang; Xiong, Ze; Zhan, Xiaojun; Dai, Wei; Li, Chien-Cheng; Feng, Shien-Ping; Tang, Jinyao

    2016-12-01

    Phototaxis is commonly observed in motile photosynthetic microorganisms. For example, green algae are capable of swimming towards a light source (positive phototaxis) to receive more energy for photosynthesis, or away from a light source (negative phototaxis) to avoid radiation damage or to hide from predators. Recently, with the aim of applying nanoscale machinery to biomedical applications, various inorganic nanomotors based on different propulsion mechanisms have been demonstrated. The only method to control the direction of motion of these self-propelled micro/nanomotors is to incorporate a ferromagnetic material into their structure and use an external magnetic field for steering. Here, we show an artificial microswimmer that can sense and orient to the illumination direction of an external light source. Our microswimmer is a Janus nanotree containing a nanostructured photocathode and photoanode at opposite ends that release cations and anions, respectively, propelling the microswimmer by self-electrophoresis. Using chemical modifications, we can control the zeta potential of the photoanode and program the microswimmer to exhibit either positive or negative phototaxis. Finally, we show that a school of microswimmers mimics the collective phototactic behaviour of green algae in solution.

  10. Raytracing of extreamely low frequency waves radiated from ionospheric artificial modulation at low latitude%低纬电离层人工调制所激发的ELF波射线追踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪枫; 赵正予; 常珊珊; 倪彬彬; 顾旭东

    2012-01-01

    通过大功率极低频(ELF)/甚低频(VLF)高频调幅波能有效地扰动低电离层电流,形成等效的ELF/VLF电离层虚拟天线,辐射ELFNLF波,所辐射出的低频信号能够传播进入到磁层,对其传播特性的研究对于理解辐射带高能电子沉降具有重要意义.本文基于磁层射线追踪理论,通过数值模拟得到在低纬地区所激发出的ELF波在磁层中的射线路径,并对其特征进行分析.数值模拟结果表明,从低纬激发的ELF波在南北半球来回弹跳,并逐渐传播到更远处,对于不同频率的ELF波,频率越高,传播距离越近,频率越低,传播距离越远,在传播过程中,ELF波会逐渐倾向于在一个固定的磁层区域附近来回反射,在此过程中波法向角也逐渐变为90°,射线方向倾向于沿着背景磁场方向传播.%Powerful high-frequency radio waves modulated at extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) can efficiently modify the lower ionospheric current which can act as an equivalent ionospheri'c antenna for the generation of ELF/VLF wave and these signals can propagate into the magnetosphere and the investigation of the propagation properties is of significance for understanding of radiation belt energetic electrons precipitation. In this paper, based on the raytracing theory, the ray paths of ELF waves in the magnetosphere are obtained using numerical modeling and the properties are analyzed. The results shows that the ELF waves generated from the low latitude reflect between the southern and northern hemisphere and propagate to the farther place gradually. For the signals with different frequencies, the higher their frequencies, the shorter their propagation distances are, the lower their frequencies, the longer their propagtion distances are. In the process, ELF waves tend to reflect near a fixed region. The normal angel increases to 90° gradually and ray direction tends to

  11. Simulation of engine auxiliary drive V-belt slip motion. Part 1. Development of belt slip model; Engine hoki V belt slip kyodo no simulation. 1. Belt slip model no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurisu, T. [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    V-belts are widely used for driving auxiliary components of an engine. Inadequet design of such belt system sometimes results in troubles such as belt squeak, side rubber separation and/or bottom rubber crack. However, there has been no design tools which can predict belt slip quantitatively. The author developed a motion simulation program of Auxiliary Drive V-Belt System considering belt slip. The program showed good prediction accuracy for belt slip motion. This paper describes the simulation model. 1 ref., 12 figs.

  12. The Compositional Structure of the Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    DeMeo, Francesca E; Walsh, Kevin J; Chapman, Clark R; Binzel, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has brought major improvements in large-scale asteroid discovery and characterization with over half a million known asteroids and over 100,000 with some measurement of physical characterization. This explosion of data has allowed us to create a new global picture of the Main Asteroid Belt. Put in context with meteorite measurements and dynamical models, a new and more complete picture of Solar System evolution has emerged. The question has changed from "What was the original compositional gradient of the Asteroid Belt?" to "What was the original compositional gradient of small bodies across the entire Solar System?" No longer is the leading theory that two belts of planetesimals are primordial, but instead those belts were formed and sculpted through evolutionary processes after Solar System formation. This article reviews the advancements on the fronts of asteroid compositional characterization, meteorite measurements, and dynamical theories in the context of the heliocentric distribution of...

  13. Seat Belt Usage on School Buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Ernest

    1985-01-01

    Studies on seat belt usage conducted under contract with governmental organizations or prepared by professional societies, state and local organizations, and transportation specialists have made significant contributions, but none has successfully resolved the issue. (MLF)

  14. Eccentricity distribution in the main asteroid belt

    CERN Document Server

    Malhotra, Renu

    2016-01-01

    The observationally complete sample of the main belt asteroids now spans more than two orders of magnitude in size and numbers more than 64,000 (excluding collisional family members). We undertook an analysis of asteroids' eccentricities and their interpretation with simple physical models. We find that Plummer's (1916) conclusion that the asteroids' eccentricities follow a Rayleigh distribution holds for the osculating eccentricities of large asteroids, but the proper eccentricities deviate from a Rayleigh distribution: there is a deficit of eccentricities smaller than $\\sim0.1$ and an excess of larger eccentricities. We further find that the proper eccentricities do not depend significantly on asteroid size but have strong dependence on heliocentric distance: the outer asteroid belt follows a Rayleigh distribution, but the inner belt is strikingly different. Eccentricities in the inner belt can be modeled as a vector sum of a primordial eccentricity vector of random orientation and magnitude drawn from a Ra...

  15. Handbook Timing Belts Principles, Calculations, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perneder, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    Timing belts offer a broad range of innovative drivetrain solutions; they allow low-backlash operation in robot systems, they are widely used in automated processes and industrial handling involving highly dynamic start-up loads, they are low-maintenance solutions for continuous operation applications, and they can guarantee exact positioning at high operating speeds. Based on his years of professional experience, the author has developed concise guidelines for the dimensioning of timing belt drives and presents proven examples from the fields of power transmission, transport and linear transfer technology. He offers definitive support for dealing with and compensating for adverse operating conditions and belt damage, as well as advice on drive optimization and guidelines for the design of drivetrain details and supporting systems. All market-standard timing belts are listed as brand neutral. Readers will discover an extensive bibliography with information on the various manufacturers and their websites. This...

  16. Eccentricity distribution in the main asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Renu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-03-01

    The observationally complete sample of the main belt asteroids now spans more than two orders of magnitude in size and numbers more than 64 000 (excluding collisional family members). We undertook an analysis of asteroids' eccentricities and their interpretation with simple physical models. We find that a century old conclusion that the asteroids' eccentricities follow a Rayleigh distribution holds for the osculating eccentricities of large asteroids, but the proper eccentricities deviate from a Rayleigh distribution; there is a deficit of eccentricities smaller than ∼0.1 and an excess of larger eccentricities. We further find that the proper eccentricities do not depend significantly on asteroid size but have strong dependence on heliocentric distance; the outer asteroid belt follows a Rayleigh distribution, but the inner belt is strikingly different. Eccentricities in the inner belt can be modelled as a vector sum of a primordial eccentricity vector of random orientation and magnitude drawn from a Rayleigh distribution of parameter ∼0.06, and an excitation of random phase and magnitude ∼0.13. These results imply that when a late dynamical excitation of the asteroids occurred, it was independent of asteroid size and was stronger in the inner belt than in the outer belt. We discuss implications for the primordial asteroid belt and suggest that the observationally complete sample size of main belt asteroids is large enough that more sophisticated model-fitting of the eccentricities is warranted and could serve to test alternative theoretical models of the dynamical excitation history of asteroids and its links to the migration history of the giant planets.

  17. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    OpenAIRE

    Burkett, Katie M.; Davidson, Steve; Cotton, Carol; Barlament, James; Loftin, Laurel; Stephens, James; Dunbar, Martin; Butterfield, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To increase teen seat belt use among drivers at a rural high school by implementing the Drive Alive Pilot Program (DAPP), a theory-driven intervention built on highway safety best practices. Methods: The first component of the program was 20 observational teen seat belt surveys conducted by volunteer students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month period before and after the month-long intervention. The survey results were published in the newspaper. The second compo...

  18. THE GOULD'S BELT DISTANCE SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Loinard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Observaciones que utilizan la interferometría de muy larga línea de base (VLBI por sus siglas en ingl´es pueden proveer la posición de radiofuentes compactas con una precisión del orden de 50 micro-segundos de arco. Esto es suficiente para medir la paralaje trigonométrica y los movimientos propios de cualquier objeto localizado hasta 500 pc del Sol con una precisión mejor que unos porcientos. Por ser magnéticamente activas, las estrellas jóvenes a menudo emiten emisión radio compacta detectable usando técnicas VLBI. Aquí, mostraremos cómo observaciones VLBI ya han restringido la distancia a las regiones de formación estelar cercanas más frecuentemente estudiadas (Tauro, Ofiuco, Orión, etc. y han empezado a revelar su estructura y su cinemática interna. Luego, describiremos un gran proyecto (llamado The Gould's Belt Distance Survey diseñado para proveer una vista detallada de la formación estelar en la vecindad Solar, usando observaciones VLBI.

  19. 电离层人工调制在水平分层电离层中所激发的ELF波辐射%Radiation of ELF waves by ionospheric artificial modulation into a stratified ionosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪枫; 赵正予; 常珊珊; 赵光欣; 青海银

    2012-01-01

    通过大功率ELF/VIF调幅高频波能有效地扰动低电离层,形成等效的ELF/VLF电离层虚拟天线,用来辐射ELF/VLF波,所辐射出的低频信号可以进入中性大气层形成地球-电离层波导.本文基于调制加热模型,采用全波有限元算法计算由人工调制电离层所形成的电偶极矩所辐射出的ELF波在水平分层电离层中的波场,计算结果将与地面观测结果进行比较.模拟结果表明,所辐射出的ELF波在电离层中形成一个窄的准直波束,海面所能接收到的ELF信号强度为pT量级,并且频率越低,海面所接收到的场强就越小,与HAARP实验数据一致.结果还表明,低纬电离层对低频信号的传播衰减较大,并且所能透射出电离层的角度小,因此高纬地区更适合地球-电离层波导的激发.%Using powerful high-frequency radio waves modulated at ELF/VLF can efficiently modify the lower ionosphere which can act as an equivalent ELF/VLF virtual antenna for the generation of ELF/VLF waves which can propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. In this paper, based on the modulation model, a full-wave finite element method is used to calculate the field of the ELF waves radiated by the dipole moment which is produced by ionospheric artificial modulation in the stratified ionosphere and the calculated values are compared to the ground observation. The numerical modeling shows that these waves form a narrow collimated beam and the magnitude of field intensity of low frequency signals received on the sea is -pT which will become smaller when the frequency is lower and this result is in accordance with the laboratory data from HAARP. The result also shows that it has stronger attenuation and small angel penetrating the ionosphere for the low signal at low latitude, so that the excitation of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide is easier at high latitude.

  20. Proton whistler interactions near the equator in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1993-08-01

    The interactions of energetic protons with whistlers propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit are investigated using a test-particle Hamiltonian formalism. Near the equator the protons interact with the waves which appear Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of their cyclotron frequency. In an inhomogeneous geomagnetic field the spacing between cyclotron harmonic resonances is very small. The Hamiltonian equations of motion are solved including multiple independent harmonics for each resonance. The wave frequency varies as a function of the distance along the field line, with only one frequency being resonant at a given point. Thus the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field is compensated by the frequency variation. The proton whistler interactions satisfy the conditions for second-order resonances for all the harmonics. The resonances may also overlap in phase space, leading to significant changes in the protons energies and pitch angles. The combined contributions of positive and negative harmonics allow protons to diffuse toward smaller pitch angles. Numerical calculations applying this formalism to parameters relevant to the plasmasphere and controlled VLF transmission experiments are presented.

  1. Proton whistler interactions near the equator in the radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Burke, W.J. [Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The interactions of energetic protons with whistlers propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit, are investigated using a test particle, Hamiltonian formalism. The authors assume that wave packets exist with finite bandwidths of frequencies, which are close to the equatorial electron gyrofrequency and propagate obliquely with respect to the geomagnetic field. Near the equator the protons interact with the waves which appear Doppler shifted to some harmonic of their cyclotron frequency. In an inhomogeneous geomagnetic field the spacing between cylotron harmonic resonances is very small. The Hamiltonian equations of motion are solved including multiple, independent harmonics for each resonance. The wave frequency varies as a function of the distance along the field line, with only one frequency being resonant at a given point. Thus the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field is compensated by the frequency variation. The proton whistler interactions satisfy the conditions for second-order resonances for all the harmonics. The resonances may also overlap in phase space, leading to significant changes in the protons energies and pitch angles. The combined contributions of positive and negative harmonics allow protons to diffuse toward smaller pitch angles. Numerical calculations applying this formalism to parameters relevant to the plasmasphere and controlled VLF transmission experiments are presented. 34 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Absence of Martian Radiation Belts and Implications Thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, J A; Frank, L A; Krimigis, S M; Hills, H K

    1965-09-10

    A system of sensitive particle detectors on Mariner IV showed the presence of electrons of energy (E(e)) less than 40 kiloelectron volts out to a radial distance of 165,000 kilometers in the morning fringe of the earth's magnetosphere but failed to detect any such electrons during the close encounter with Mars on 14-15 July 1965, at the time when the minimum areocentric radial distance was 13,200 kilometers. This result can mean that the ratio of the magnetic dipole moment of Mars to that of the earth (M(M)/M(E)) is surely less than 0.001 and probably is less than 0.0005. The corresponding upper limits on the equatorial magnetic field at the surface of Mars are 200 and 100 gammas, respectively. It appears possible that the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian atmosphere.

  3. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girard, J.N.; Tasse, C.; Asgekar, A.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Falcke, H.; Gunst, A.W.; et, al

    2016-01-01

    Context: With the limited amount of in situ particle data available for the innermost region of Jupiter’s magnetosphere, Earth-based observations of the giant planets synchrotron emission remain the sole method today of scrutinizing the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic elec

  4. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  5. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girard, J. N.; Zarka, P.; Tasse, C.; Hess, S.; de Pater, I.; Santos-Costa, D.; Nenon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Bourdarie, S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Breton, R. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Moldon, J.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. With the limited amount of in situ particle data available for the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere, Earth-based observations of the giant planets synchrotron emission remain the sole method today of scrutinizing the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic elec

  6. Whistler mode emissions in the Uranian radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Scarf, F. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Voyager 2 detected intense whistler mode emissions and fluxes of energetic electrons during the outbound pass through the region of auroral L shells. The observed energetic (E greater than 22 keV) electron distribution, a model warm (E less than 27.5 keV) electron distribution, and the cold plasma density profile deduced by Kurth et al. (1987) are used to calculate the ray path-integrated spatial amplification of whistlers which arrive at Voyager 2 from the magnetic equator. By matching the calculated amplification and the relative gains at different frequencies deduced from the observed whistler power spectrum, the pitch angle anisotropy parameters of the electron distributions are determined to within a fairly narrow range of values. The estimated bounce average pitch angle diffusion coefficient indicates that electrons are on strong diffusion over a wide range in energies. The electron precipitation energy flux is sufficient to produce the observed auroral light emissions.

  7. Seat belts, airbags and child protection devices. [previously: Seat belts and child restraint seats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the use of seat belts results in a yearly reduction of hundreds of fatalities. Seat belts reduce the risk of fatal injury by 37 to 48%, depending on the position in the car. At 50%, the effect of child protection devices is even slightly higher. When last measured (in 2010), 97%

  8. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  9. Flat belt continuously variable high speed drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumm, E.L.

    1992-02-01

    A study was undertaken at Kumm Industries funded by DOE in the NBS/DOE Energy-Related Inventions Program starting in August 1990 to design, construct and test a novel very high speed flat belt drive. The test arrangement as shown in Figure 1 consists of a multiple belt-pulley configuration that transmits power from a low speed (2000--4000 RPM) input to a small pulley turbine'' (27,000 to 55,000 RPM) and then to the low speed output variable radius pulley (2000--5000 RPM) via a special self-active tensioner. Transmitting 25 HP to and from the turbine'' corresponds to obtaining 50 HP in one direction only in a possible turbo compounded engine application. The high speed of the turbine'' belts, i.e. 100 meters/sec. at 55,000 RPM, while transferring substantial power is a new much higher operating regime for belts. The study showed that the available belts gave overall test rig efficiencies somewhat above 80% for the higher speeds (50,000 RPM) and higher powers (corresponding to above 90% in the turbocompound application) and a significantly better efficiencies at slightly lower speeds. The tests revealed a number of improved approaches in the design of such high speed drives. It appears that there is considerable possibility for further improvement and application of such equipment.

  10. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  11. The effects of Maine's change to primary seat belt law on seat belt use and public perception and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neil K; Tison, Julie; Casanova, Tara

    2010-04-01

    Maine upgraded its seat belt law to primary enforcement on September 20, 2007. Belt observations during the day and night were conducted along with awareness surveys in state licensing offices. Both daytime and nighttime observed belt use increased in the months following implementation of the law (daytime 77-84%; night 69-81%). Although daytime belt use was generally higher, nighttime belt use showed a greater increase than daytime belt use. Awareness surveys indicated that Maine motorists were clearly aware of the law change and its consequences. Survey respondents also indicated having heard both messages about enforcement and messages encouraging belt use. Primary seat belt laws may have a stronger effect on belt use at night--when risk is higher--than during the day.

  12. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 inner radiation belt (1.2 inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  13. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  14. Onion artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  15. Composite Microdiscs with a Magnetic Belt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Høyer, Henrik; Helgesen, Geir

    2015-01-01

    We describe an emulsion-based preparation of patchy composite particles (diameter of 100-500 mu m) consisting of a disclike epoxy core and a belt of porous polystyrene particles (diameter of 30 mu m) with magnetite within the pores. Compared to the magnetically uniform polystyrene particles......, the spontaneous aggregation of composite particles is suppressed when dispersed into liquid, which is attributed to the increased particle size, reduced magnetic susceptibility, and the shape of the magnetic domain distribution within the particles (spherical versus a belt). When the composite particles...

  16. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    OpenAIRE

    Loftin, Laurel; Barlament, James; Cotton, Carol; Davidson, Steve M; Burkett, Katie M.; Stephens, James

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To increase teen seat belt use among drivers at a rural high school by implementing the Drive Alive Pilot Program (DAPP), a theory-driven intervention built on highway safety best practices.Methods: The first component of the program was 20 observational teen seat belt surveys conducted by volunteer students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month period before and after the month-long intervention. The survey results were published in the newspaper. The second component was t...

  17. Development of belt conveyor driving system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jun-qing(付峻青); WANG Cong(王聪); HUO Wei(霍伟)

    2004-01-01

    A short review for the existing various driving methods for belt conveyor was given, which include the analysis and comparison about the advantages, disadvantages and suitable application range of these methods. Based on this the variable-frequency-control(VFC) method for belt conveyor drive was fully discussed with focus on its application in medium-high voltage range. The principle of Neutral Point Clamped (NPC) Three-Level Inverter using high-voltage IGBTs together with the control strategy of rotor field-oriented vector control for induction motor drive were illustrated.

  18. CALCULATION OF TENSION FORCE OF BELT CONVEYOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet Ibishi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is done the explanation on tension fashion of the belt conveyor which is employed in Kosovo Energy Corporation – KEK, for coal transportation to provide electric power plant. The aim of the paper enables to recognize tension forces not to pass with deformation of belt so that this problem will damage the workingprocess. Work principle is based on initial tension and tension during working process. The fact is known that the tension starts from the carriage on the way to tension mechanization, so forces on the rope passing through pulley there has to dominate the friction coefficient. All this process is related to economy of transportationmechanism.

  19. The case for artificial black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Philbin, Thomas G

    2008-08-28

    The event horizon is predicted to generate particles from the quantum vacuum, an effect that bridges three areas of physics--general relativity, quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. The quantum radiation of real black holes is too feeble to be detectable, but black-hole analogues may probe several aspects of quantum black holes. In this paper, we explain in simple terms some of the motivations behind the study of artificial black holes.

  20. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  1. An icy Kuiper-Belt around the young solar-type star HD 181327

    CERN Document Server

    Lebreton, J; Thi, W -F; Roberge, A; Donaldson, J; Schneider, G; Maddison, S T; Ménard, F; Riviere-Marichalar, P; Mathews, G S; Kamp, I; Pinte, C; Dent, W R F; Barrado, D; Duchêne, G; Gonzalez, J -F; Grady, C A; Meeus, G; Pantin, E; Williams, J P; Woitke, P

    2011-01-01

    HD 181327 is a young F5/F6V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at 90 AU. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. We obtained far-IR observations with the Herschel/PACS instrument, and 3.2 mm observations with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST/NICMOS images that break the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties. We use the radiative transfer code GRaTer to compute a large grid of models, and we identify the grain models that best reproduce the Spectral Energy Distribution through a Bayesian analysis. We attempt to detect the [OI] and [CII] lines with PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected in the far-IR with PACS and the disk is resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium ...

  2. 14 CFR 125.211 - Seat and safety belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seat and safety belts. 125.211 Section 125... Requirements § 125.211 Seat and safety belts. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless there are available... share one approved safety belt and two persons occupying a multiple lounge or divan seat may share...

  3. 49 CFR 392.16 - Use of seat belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of seat belts. 392.16 Section 392.16... VEHICLES Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.16 Use of seat belts. A commercial motor vehicle which has a seat belt assembly installed at the driver's seat shall not be driven unless the driver...

  4. Observed seat belt use in Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afukaar, Francis K; Damsere-Derry, James; Ackaah, Williams

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an observational survey of seat belt use to determine the use rate of drivers and front-right passengers of vehicles in Kumasi, Ghana. Unobtrusive observations of seat belt use were made at 41 locations composed of signalized intersections and roundabouts where vehicles come to a halt or slow down considerably. The overall driver seat belt use rate was 17.6% compared to 4.9% for front-right passengers. Driver belt use was 33.2% for private cars, 9.0% for taxis, 8.3% for minibus (trotro), 13.1% for large buses and 9.7% for trucks. Overall seat belt use was higher for female drivers than for male drivers (44.8% versus 16.4%, p seat belt use rate increased with age. Passengers belted more often if drivers were belted, but about three-quarters of male passengers and 70-80% of female passengers were unbelted even when drivers were belted. In conclusion, the seat belt use rate was generally low in Kumasi, Ghana, and it is a function of occupant seating position, gender, vehicle type and usage, age group, and location setting. The results provide important preliminary data about seat belt use, particularly among male drivers and commercial vehicle occupant population. The study also suggests the need to develop effective strategies and programs that address low seat belt use in Ghana.

  5. The thrust belts of Western North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, F.C.

    1993-08-01

    Most of the Basin and Range physiographic province of western North America is now believed to be part of the overthrust. The more obvious overthrust belt along the eastern edge of the Basin and Range Province is named the Sevier orogenic belt, where older rocks are observed thrust onto younger rocks. More detailed surface geological mapping, plus deep multiple-fold geophysical work and many oil and gas wildcat wells, have confirmed an east-vergent shortened and stacked sequence is present in many places in the Basin and Range. This western compressive deformed area in east central Nevada is now named the Elko orogenic belt by the U.S. Geological Survey. This older compressed Elko orogenic belt started forming approximately 250 m.y. ago when the North American plate started to move west as the Pangaea supercontinent started to fragment. The North American plate moved west under the sediments of the Miogeocline that were also moving west. Surface-formed highlands and oceanic island arcs on the west edge of the North American plate restricted the westward movement of the sediments in the Miogeocline, causing east-vergent ramp thrusts to form above the westward-moving North American plate. The flat, eastward-up-cutting thrust assemblages moved on the detachment surfaces.

  6. School Buses & Seat Belts: A Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    Safety belts are not installed in school buses for several reasons. School buses are constructed differently from automobiles in terms of (1) the locations of doors and instrument panels relative to passengers, (2) outer construction, (3) seat design and padding, and (4) visibility on the road. Under current regulations, bus seats are constructed…

  7. Design aspects of multiple driven belt conveyors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuttall, A.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide belt conveyors are used to transport a great variety of bulk solid materials. The desire to carry higher tonnages over longer distances and more diverse routes, while keeping exploitation costs as low as possible, has fuelled many technological advances. An interesting development in the r

  8. Belts and Chains. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on belts and chain drives is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids on theory, of operation, diagnosis, and repair of automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and…

  9. Stability of Triangular Equilibrium Points in the Photogravitational Restricted Three-Body Problem with Oblateness and Potential from a Belt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish Singh; Joel John Taura

    2014-06-01

    We have examined the effects of oblateness up to 4 of the less massive primary and gravitational potential from a circum-binary belt on the linear stability of triangular equilibrium points in the circular restricted three-body problem, when the more massive primary emits electromagnetic radiation impinging on the other bodies of the system. Using analytical and numerical methods, we have found the triangular equilibrium points and examined their linear stability. The triangular equilibrium points move towards the line joining the primaries in the presence of any of these perturbations, except in the presence of oblateness up to 4 where the points move away from the line joining the primaries. It is observed that the triangular points are stable for 0 < < c and unstable for c ≤ ≤ $\\frac{1}{2}$, where c is the critical mass ratio affected by the oblateness up to 4 of the less massive primary, electromagnetic radiation of the more massive primary and potential from the belt, all of which have destabilizing tendencies, except the coefficient 4 and the potential from the belt. A practical application of this model could be the study of motion of a dust particle near a radiating star and an oblate body surrounded by a belt.

  10. Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Ming Kuan

    2006-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) constitute a class of flexible nonlinear models designed to mimic biological neural systems. In this entry, we introduce ANN using familiar econometric terminology and provide an overview of ANN modeling approach and its implementation methods.

  11. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, P.; Gevarter, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory view of Artificial Intelligence (AI). In addition to defining AI, it discusses the foundations on which it rests, research in the field, and current and potential applications.

  12. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  13. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  14. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lafon-Hughes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG. Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair. Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt. In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO. PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications.

  15. China belting up or down? Seat belt wearing trends in Nanjing and Zhoushan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routley, Virginia; Ozanne-Smith, Joan; Li, Dan; Yu, Min; Wang, Jianyue; Zhang, Junhe; Tong, Zhendong; Wu, Ming; Wang, Peihua; Qin, Yu

    2008-11-01

    National seat belt wearing legislation became effective in China May 2004 and associated provincial and city regulations followed. Despite rapid motorisation seat belt studies in China have been scarce. Patterns and trends in urban seat belt wearing were observed for all driver, front and rear seating positions over the years 2005-2007 in two eastern cities Nanjing (Jiangsu Province) and Zhoushan (Zhejiang Province). There were 35,256 vehicles observed in Nanjing, 20,939 in Zhoushan and 95,933 occupants overall. Males dominated all seating positions, especially drivers. Seat belt wearing overall was significantly higher for drivers (49.9% Nanjing, 47.4% Zhoushan) than for front seat passengers (9.1% Nanjing, 1.0% Zhoushan) and virtually nonexistent for rear passengers (0.5% Nanjing, 0.2% Zhoushan). Generally levels declined significantly from year to year (drivers Nanjing 66.7%, 47.7%, 38.6%; Zhoushan 57.4%, 57.9%, 30.6%; front passengers Nanjing 19.2%, 6.6%, 3.2%). Zhoushan wearing did not initially decline, 2006 observations coinciding with anticipation of provincial regulations (July 2006). Observations revealed an absence of child restraints. Pretend wearing/belt tampering was observed almost exclusively in taxi drivers (14.2% of Nanjing taxi drivers, 11.3% of Zhoushan's). Awareness of and attitudes to urban seat belt laws should be investigated, appropriate countermeasures developed and enforcement reassessed.

  16. The Gould Belt, the de Vaucouleurs-Dolidze Belt, and the Orion Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Bobylev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Based on masers with measured trigonometric parallaxes, we have redetermined the spatial orientation parameters of the Local (Orion) arm. Using 23 sources (the Gould Belt objects were excluded), we have found that their spatial distribution can be approximated by a very narrow ellipsoid elongated in the direction L_1=77.1+/-2.9^o whose symmetry plane is inclined to the Galactic plane at an angle of 5.6+/-0.2^o. The longitude of the ascending node of the symmetry plane is l_\\Omega=70+/-3^o. A new estimate for the pitch angle of the Local spiral arm has been obtained by an independent method: i=12.9+/-2.9^o. Previously, a belt of young B stars, the de Vaucouleurs.Dolidze belt, was pointed out on the celestial sphere with parameters close to such an orientation. We have refined the spatial orientation parameters of this belt based on a homogeneous sample of protostars. The de Vaucouleurs.Dolidze belt can be identified with the Local arm, with the belt proper as a continuous band on the celestial sphere like the ...

  17. Principles of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  18. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  19. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  20. Comparing natural and artificial carious lesions in human crowns by means of conventional hard x-ray micro-tomography and two-dimensional x-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Lea Maria; White, Shane N.; Deyhle, Hans; Dziadowiec, Iwona; Schulz, Georg; Thalmann, Peter; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Dental caries, one of the most prevalent infectious bacterial diseases in the world, is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria. Caries is a disease continuum resulting from the earliest loss of ions from apatite crystals through gross cavitation. Enamel dissolution starts when the pH-value drops below 5.5. Neutralizing the pH-value in the oral cavity opposes the process of demineralization, and so caries lesions occur in a dynamic cyclic de-mineralizing/remineralizing environment. Unfortunately, biomimetic regeneration of cavitated enamel is not yet possible, although remineralization of small carious lesions occurs under optimal conditions. Therefore, the development of methods that can regenerate carious lesions, and subsequently recover and retain teeth, is highly desirable. For the present proceedings we analyzed one naturally occurring sub-surface and one artificially produced lesion. For the characterization of artificial and natural lesions micro computed tomography is the method of choice when looking to determine three-dimensional mineral distribution and to quantify the degree of mineralization. In this pilot study we elucidate that the de-mineralized enamel in natural and artificially induced lesions shows comparable X-ray attenuation behavior, thereby implying that the study protocol employed herein seems to be appropriate. Once we know that the lesions are comparable, a series of well-reproducible in vitro experiments on enamel regeneration could be performed. In order to quantify further lesion morphology, the anisotropy of the enamel's nanostructure can be characterized by using spatially resolved, small-angle X-ray scattering. We wanted to demonstrate that the artificially induced defect fittingly resembles the natural carious lesion.

  1. Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers - 21 States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, Winifred L; Li, Jia; Rodriguez-Acosta, Rosa L

    2016-06-17

    Roadway incidents involving motorized vehicles accounted for 24% of fatal occupational injuries in the United States during 2013 and were the leading cause of fatal injuries among workers.* In 2013, workers' compensation costs for serious, nonfatal injuries among work-related roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles were estimated at $2.96 billion.(†) Seat belt use is a proven method to reduce injuries to motor vehicle occupants (1). Use of lap/shoulder seat belts reduces the risk for fatal injuries to front seat occupants of cars by 45% and the risk to light truck occupants by 60%.(§) To characterize seat belt use among adult workers by occupational group, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and found that not always using a seat belt was significantly associated with occupational group after controlling for factors known to influence seat belt use. Occupational groups with the highest prevalences of not always using a seat belt included construction and extraction; farming, fishing, and forestry; and installation, maintenance, and repair. To increase seat belt use among persons currently employed, states can enact and enforce primary seat belt laws, employers can set and enforce safety policies requiring seat belt use by all vehicle occupants, and seat belt safety advocates can target interventions to workers in occupational groups with lower reported seat belt use.

  2. LOAD DISTRIBUTION ON DRUMS OF DOUBLE DRIVE BELT CONVEYOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛河; 苏清祖; 马胜利

    1999-01-01

    The double drum drive is widely used on the mine belt conveyor, which are divided the rigid connected double drums and separately driving double drums according to connected method of two drums. Because of the change of real work condition, the load distribution is changed on the two drive drums, which may produce a slippage between a drum and belt. Slippage may intensify the wear of the drum, and sometimes causing the fire of the belt. This restricts the development toward narrow belt, high velocity and large power of belt conveyor. In this paper, the factors affecting the load distribution of two drums of double drum belt conveyor are'systematically analyzed and some computing formulas derived, by these formulas, the actual load distribution onthe two drums of rigid connected or separately driving belt conveyor can be separately calculated. These formulas also can be as the theory base for adjusting the driving force of two drums.

  3. THE EXTRAORDINARY MULTI-TAILED MAIN-BELT COMET P/2013 P5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewitt, David [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Agarwal, Jessica [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Weaver, Harold [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Mutchler, Max [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larson, Stephen, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of main-belt comet P/2013 P5 reveal an extraordinary system of six dust tails that distinguish this object from any other. Observations two weeks apart show dramatic morphological change in the tails while providing no evidence for secular fading of the object as a whole. Each tail is associated with a unique ejection date, revealing continued, episodic mass loss from the 0.24 ± 0.04 km radius nucleus over the last five months. As an inner-belt asteroid and probable Flora family member, the object is likely to be highly metamorphosed and unlikely to contain ice. The protracted period of dust release appears inconsistent with an impact origin, but may be compatible with a body that is losing mass through a rotational instability. We suggest that P/2013 P5 has been accelerated to breakup speed by radiation torques.

  4. Simulation and analysis of airflow stability during fire in mine belt roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng-zhu; CHENG Wei-min; LI Qiu-jin; ZHANG Rui; LUO Chuan-long

    2010-01-01

    According to fluid dynamics analysis during the fire, the criteria k-ε two-equation model for solving three-dimensional turbulence was determined, the pollutants generated in the fire disaster were set by adopting Mixture multiphase flow, and the SIMPLE algorithm was used for solving on the basis of comprehensive consideration on the heat radiation and components transmission during fire. By simulating the airflow flowing state inside the tunnel during fire disaster of downward ventilation, drift ventilation, and ascensional ventilation, respectively, with regard to the actual situation of No.1, No.3, and No.5 belt roadway in Kongzhuang Coal Mine, the velocity vector distributions of pollutants under different inlet air volumes were obtained, and the damage degree and influential factors of disaster were also clear, which is helpful to control and avoid disaster during belt roadway fire.

  5. The Extraordinary Multi-Tailed Main-Belt Comet P/2013 P5

    CERN Document Server

    Jewitt, David; Weaver, Harold; Mutchler, Max; Larson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of main-belt comet P/2013 P5 reveal an extraordinary system of six dust tails that distinguish this object from any other. Observations two weeks apart show dramatic morphological change in the tails while providing no evidence for secular fading of the object as a whole. Each tail is associated with a unique ejection date, revealing continued, episodic mass loss from the 0.24+/-0.04 km radius nucleus over the last five months. As an inner-belt asteroid and probable Flora family member, the object is likely to be highly metamorphosed and unlikely to contain ice. The protracted period of dust release appears inconsistent with an impact origin, but may be compatible with a body that is losing mass through a rotational instability. We suggest that P/2013 P5 has been accelerated to breakup speed by radiation torques.

  6. Persistence of Salmonella on egg conveyor belts is dependent on the belt type but not on the rdar morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocki, S L; Annett, C B; Sibley, C D; McLaws, M; Checkley, S L; Singh, N; Surette, M G; White, A P

    2007-11-01

    Commercial caged layer flocks in Alberta, Canada, are commonly monitored for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) by environmental sampling. In one recent case, a SE strain isolated from the egg conveyor belt was a source of persistent infection for the flock. This study was undertaken to examine Salmonella colonization on egg conveyor belts and to determine whether the rdar morphotype, a conserved physiology associated with aggregation and long-term survival, contributed to persistence. Four woven belts constructed of natural or nonnatural fibers and a 1-piece belt made of vinyl were tested with rdar-positive ST and SE strains and a rdar-negative ST DeltaagfD reference strain. The type of egg belt was the most important factor influencing Salmonella colonization and persistence. The vinyl belt, with the least surface area available for colonization, had the fewest Salmonella remaining after washing and disinfection, whereas the hemp-plastic belt, with the greatest surface area, had the most Salmonella remaining. Real-time gene expression indicated that the rdar morphotype was involved in colonizing the egg belt pieces; however, it was not essential for persistence. In addition, rdar-positive and rdar-negative strains were equally similarly to disinfection on the egg belt pieces. The results indicate that Salmonella can persist on a variety of egg belts by mechanisms other than the rdar morphotype, and that using egg conveyer belts with reduced surface area for bacterial colonization can lessen contamination problems.

  7. An Artificial Gravity Spacecraft Approach which Minimizes Mass, Fuel and Orbital Assembly Reg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    radiation storm shelter is provided for periods spent in the Van Allen Belt vicinity and for protection during possible solar energetic particle events. AGSEV planning baselines use of Shuttle Orbiters for element launches to LEO, and oxygen-hydrogen propulsion utilizing Shuttle External Tanks for storage as worst-case scenarios. The need for an economical heavy-lift launch vehicle and much more efficient alternative to chemical propulsion are recognized.

  8. HP metamorphic belt of the western Alps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertoCompagnoni

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of the subduction-related processes benefited by the studies of the high-pressure (HP) meta-morphic rocks from the western Alps. The most stimu-lating information was obtained from the inner part of the western Alpine belt, where most tectonic units show an early Alpine eclogite-facies recrystallisation. This is especially true for the Austroalpine Sesia Zone and the Penninic Dora-Maira massif. From the Sesia zone,which consists of a wide spectrum of continental crust lithologies recrystallised to quartz-eclogite-facies min-eral assemblages, the first finding of a jadeite-bearingmeta-granitoid has been described, supporting evidencethat even continental crust may subduct into the mantle.From the Dora-Maira massif the first occurrence of regional metamorphic coesite has been reported, open-ing the new fertile field of the ultrahigh-pressure meta-morphism (UHPM), which is now becoming the rule in the collisional orogenic belts.

  9. Alien Asteroid Belt Compared to our Own

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Band of Light Comparison This artist's concept illustrates what the night sky might look like from a hypothetical alien planet in a star system with an asteroid belt 25 times as massive as the one in our own solar system (alien system above, ours below; see Figure 1). NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence for such a belt around the nearby star called HD 69830, when its infrared eyes spotted dust, presumably from asteroids banging together. The telescope did not find any evidence for a planet in the system, but astronomers speculate one or more may be present. The movie begins at dusk on the imaginary world, when HD 69830, like our Sun, has begun to set over the horizon. Time is sped up to show the onset of night and the appearance of a brilliant band of light. This light comes from dust in a massive asteroid belt, which scatters sunlight. In our solar system, anybody observing the skies on a moonless night far from city lights can see the sunlight that is scattered by dust in our asteroid belt. Called zodiacal light and sometimes the 'false dawn,' this light appears as a dim band stretching up from the horizon when the Sun is about to rise or set. The light is faint enough that the disk of our Milky Way galaxy remains the most prominent feature in the sky. (The Milky Way disk is shown perpendicular to the zodiacal light in both pictures.) In contrast, the zodiacal light in the HD 69830 system would be 1,000 times brighter than our own, outshining even the Milky Way.

  10. Artificial vision workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, P

    1997-01-01

    Machine vision is an important component of medical systems engineering. Inexpensive miniature solid state cameras are now available. This paper describes how these devices can be used as artificial retinas, to take snapshots and moving pictures in monochrome or color. Used in pairs, they produce a stereoscopic field of vision and enable depth perception. Macular and peripheral vision can be simulated electronically. This paper also presents the author's design of an artificial orbit for this synthetic eye. The orbit supports the eye, protects it, and provides attachment points for the ocular motion control system. Convergence and image fusion can be produced, and saccades simulated, along with the other ocular motions. The use of lenses, filters, irises and focusing mechanisms are also discussed. Typical camera-computer interfaces are described, including the use of "frame grabbers" and analog-to-digital image conversion. Software programs for eye positioning, image manipulation, feature extraction and object recognition are discussed, including the application of artificial neural networks.

  11. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  12. Artificial muscles on heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  13. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  14. Artificial organ engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annesini, Maria Cristina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Artificial organs may be considered as small-scale process plants, in which heat, mass and momentum transfer operations and, possibly, chemical transformations are carried out. This book proposes a novel analysis of artificial organs based on the typical bottom-up approach used in process engineering. Starting from a description of the fundamental physico-chemical phenomena involved in the process, the whole system is rebuilt as an interconnected ensemble of elemental unit operations. Each artificial organ is presented with a short introduction provided by expert clinicians. Devices commonly used in clinical practice are reviewed and their performance is assessed and compared by using a mathematical model based approach. Whilst mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool for quantitative descriptions of clinical devices, models are kept simple to remain focused on the essential features of each process. Postgraduate students and researchers in the field of chemical and biomedical engineering will find that t...

  15. Seat belt use during pregnancy in Iran: attitudes and practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojgan Karbakhsh; Zahra Ershadi; Ali Khaji; Fatemeh Rahimi-Sharbaf

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Seat belt use during pregnancy reduces injury to the mother and her fetus. During recent years, the use of seat belts has been mandated by law in Iran. The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes and practices of pregnant women regarding seat belt use.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we asked 335 pregnant women at a hospital-based prenatal care clinic on the use of safety belt before and during pregnancy. SPSS version 13.0 was used for data analysis.Results: The mean age of study subjects was 27.3 years±5.3 years with the median of 27 years. Compared with the seat belt use before pregnancy, no change was detected in 48.7% of the women; seat belt use had increased in 17.5 %of them and decreased in 33.8 %. Eighty-one percent of women knew the correct placing of both lap belt and shoulder belt. Only 4% of women had received education on proper restraint use during pregnancy.Conclusions: The prevalence of seat belt use during pregnancy is lower than reports which are mostly from developed nations. The fact that about one-third of women have decreased their seat belt usage during pregnancy highlights the importance of education of mothers on this topic.

  16. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Korb, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    As the power of Bayesian techniques has become more fully realized, the field of artificial intelligence has embraced Bayesian methodology and integrated it to the point where an introduction to Bayesian techniques is now a core course in many computer science programs. Unlike other books on the subject, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence keeps mathematical detail to a minimum and covers a broad range of topics. The authors integrate all of Bayesian net technology and learning Bayesian net technology and apply them both to knowledge engineering. They emphasize understanding and intuition but also provide the algorithms and technical background needed for applications. Software, exercises, and solutions are available on the authors' website.

  17. Artificial human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  18. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  19. General artificial neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeratu, Vasile; Schiopu, Paul; Degeratu, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the authors present a model of artificial neuron named the general artificial neuron. Depending on application this neuron can change self number of inputs, the type of inputs (from excitatory in inhibitory or vice versa), the synaptic weights, the threshold, the type of intensifying functions. It is achieved into optoelectronic technology. Also, into optoelectronic technology a model of general McCulloch-Pitts neuron is showed. The advantages of these neurons are very high because we have to solve different applications with the same neural network, achieved from these neurons, named general neural network.

  20. Research on measurement method of optical transmittance of the artificial fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianghua; Jian, Chaochao; Cui, Guangzhen; Lv, Xuliang; Rong, Xianhui

    2016-10-01

    The attenuation of light was a common result that the light was absorbed and scattered by the artificial fog particles when it transmitted in the artificial fog. The absorbing attenuation process of light transmission in the artificial fog was that the artificial fog converting incident light energy into other forms of internal energy (such as heat energy). The scattering attenuation process of light transmission in the artificial fog was that the artificial fog particles intercepting incident radiation energy to form infrasonic waves and to radiate peripherally so that the incident light energy was reduced on the original direction of transmission. The mechanism of light transmission attenuation in the artificial fog was analyzed. The formation method of the artificial fog was expounded and the measuring principle of the artificial fog transmittance was described. A simple and reliable measurement method of the optical transmittance of the artificial fog in the fog chamber was proposed. The optical transmittance measurement system of the artificial fog was built by using incandescent lamp, power with steady current and voltage, lens, selenium photocell, micro-galvanometer, optical bench, hygrothermograph, humidifier, etc. Under different conditions of humidity, the optical transmittance of the artificial fog was obtained on the basis of measuring the photocurrent before the fog was formed in the fog chamber. The test results show that the measurement system is stable and reliable. During the 43 minutes after the artificial fog was formed, the optical transmittance of the artificial fog was averagely less than 5 percent and the optical transmittance increased gradually with the extension of time. In addition, the optical transmittance of artificial fog didn't produce obvious change while air humidity increased from 68.7% to 85%. The measurement system can be used to measure transmittance of smoke screen, water mist and other aerosol.

  1. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  2. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-24

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  3. Micromachined Artificial Haircell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor); Chen, Nannan (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A micromachined artificial sensor comprises a support coupled to and movable with respect to a substrate. A polymer, high-aspect ratio cilia-like structure is disposed on and extends out-of-plane from the support. A strain detector is disposed with respect to the support to detect movement of the support.

  4. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  5. Artificial Left Ventricle

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjbar, Saeed; Meybodi, Mahmood Emami

    2014-01-01

    This Artificial left ventricle is based on a simple conic assumption shape for left ventricle where its motion is made by attached compressed elastic tubes to its walls which are regarded to electrical points at each nodal .This compressed tubes are playing the role of myofibers in the myocardium of the left ventricle. These elastic tubes have helical shapes and are transacting on these helical bands dynamically. At this invention we give an algorithm of this artificial left ventricle construction that of course the effect of the blood flow in LV is observed with making beneficiary used of sensors to obtain this effecting, something like to lifegates problem. The main problem is to evaluate powers that are interacted between elastic body (left ventricle) and fluid (blood). The main goal of this invention is to show that artificial heart is not just a pump, but mechanical modeling of LV wall and its interaction with blood in it (blood movement modeling) can introduce an artificial heart closed to natural heart...

  6. Artificial intelligence and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servan-Schreiber, D

    1986-04-01

    This paper provides a brief historical introduction to the new field of artificial intelligence and describes some applications to psychiatry. It focuses on two successful programs: a model of paranoid processes and an expert system for the pharmacological management of depressive disorders. Finally, it reviews evidence in favor of computerized psychotherapy and offers speculations on the future development of research in this area.

  7. Observations of artificial satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAMMANO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The following publication gives the results of photographic
    observations of artificial satellites made at Asiago during the second
    and third year of this programme. The fixed camera technique and that
    with moving film (the latter still in its experimental stage have been used.

  8. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  9. Modal analysis of coupled vibration of belt drive systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-jun; CHEN Li-qun

    2008-01-01

    The modal method is applied to analyze coupled vibration of belt drive systems. A belt drive system is a hybrid system consisting of continuous belts modeled as strings as well as discrete pulleys and a tensioner arm. The characteristic equation of the system is derived from the governing equation. Numerical results demenstrate the effects of the transport speed and the initial tension on natural frequencies.

  10. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  11. Genesis Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Skipworth, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft launched on 8 August 2001 sampled solar wind environments at L1 from 2001 to 2004. After the Science Capsule door was opened, numerous foils and samples were exposed to the various solar wind environments during periods including slow solar wind from the streamer belts, fast solar wind flows from coronal holes, and coronal mass ejections. The Survey and Examination of Eroded Returned Surfaces (SEERS) program led by NASA's Space Environments and Effects program had initiated access for the space materials community to the remaining Science Capsule hardware after the science samples had been removed for evaluation of materials exposure to the space environment. This presentation will describe the process used to generate a reference radiation Genesis Radiation Environment developed for the SEERS program for use by the materials science community in their analyses of the Genesis hardware.

  12. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2014; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung. Jahresbericht 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef (comps.) [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The annual report 2014 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following topics: (1) Actual data and their evaluation: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial environmental radioactivity, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. (2) Fundamentals and general information: legal basis and explanations, basic information on natural environmental radioactivity, basic information on artificial radioactivity in the environment, basic information on occupational radiation exposure, basic information on radiation exposures from medical applications, basic information on the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, basic information on non-ionizing radiation. (3) Tables.

  13. CHAOTIC BELT PHENOMENA IN NONLINEAR ELASTIC BEAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张年梅; 杨桂通

    2003-01-01

    The chaotic motions of axial compressed nonlinear elastic beam subjected totransverse load were studied. The damping force in the system is nonlinear. Consideringmaterial and geometric nonlinearity, nonlinear governing equation of the system wasderived. By use of nonlinear Galerkin method, differential dynamic system was set up.Melnikov method was used to analyze the characters of the system. The results showed thatchaos may occur in the system when the load parameters P0 and f satisfy some conditions.The zone of chaotic motion was belted. The route from subharmonic bifurcation to chaoswas analyzed. The critical conditions that chaos occurs were determined.

  14. Parametric resonances of convection belt system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-an YANG; Gao-feng LI

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Coriolis acceleration and the Lagrangian strain formula,a generalized equation for the transverse vibration system of convection belts is derived using Newton's second law.The method of multiple scales is directly applied to the governing equations,and an approximate solution of the primary parameter resonance of the system is obtained.The detuning parameter,cross-section area,elastic and viscoelastic parameters,and axial moving speed have a significant influences on the amplitudes of steady-state response and their existence boundaries.Some new dynamical phenomena are revealed.

  15. Orion revisited. III. The Orion Belt population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, K.; Alves, J.; Bouy, H.; Sarro, L. M.; Ascenso, J.; Burkert, A.; Forbrich, J.; Großschedl, J.; Hacar, A.; Hasenberger, B.; Lombardi, M.; Meingast, S.; Köhler, R.; Teixeira, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: This paper continues our study of the foreground population to the Orion molecular clouds. The goal is to characterize the foreground population north of NGC 1981 and to investigate the star formation history in the large Orion star-forming region. We focus on a region covering about 25 square degrees, centered on the ɛ Orionis supergiant (HD 37128, B0 Ia) and covering the Orion Belt asterism. Methods: We used a combination of optical (SDSS) and near-infrared (2MASS) data, informed by X-ray (XMM-Newton) and mid-infrared (WISE) data, to construct a suite of color-color and color-magnitude diagrams for all available sources. We then applied a new statistical multiband technique to isolate a previously unknown stellar population in this region. Results: We identify a rich and well-defined stellar population in the surveyed region that has about 2000 objects that are mostly M stars. We infer the age for this new population to be at least 5 Myr and likely 10 Myr and estimate a total of about 2500 members, assuming a normal IMF. This new population, which we call the Orion Belt population, is essentially extinction-free, disk-free, and its spatial distribution is roughly centered near ɛ Ori, although substructure is clearly present. Conclusions: The Orion Belt population is likely the low-mass counterpart to the Ori OB Ib subgroup. Although our results do not rule out Blaauw's sequential star formation scenario for Orion, we argue that the recently proposed blue streams scenario provides a better framework on which one can explain the Orion star formation region as a whole. We speculate that the Orion Belt population could represent the evolved counterpart of an Orion nebula-like cluster. The catalog (Full Table A.1) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/598/A124

  16. Period Determination of Six Main Belt Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Observations of six main-belt asteroids (MBA) produced lightcurve parameters of: 487 Venetia, P = 13.34 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.20 mag; 684 Hildburg, P = 15.89 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.22 mag; 772 Tanete, P = 8.629 ± 0.001 h, A = 0.18 mag.; 1181 Lilith, P = 15.04 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.11 mag.; 1246 Chaka, P = 25.44 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.25 mag.; and 2834 Christy Carol, P = 12.79 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.39 mag.

  17. Water activities in the Kerala Khondalite Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Thomas; Kumar, G. R. Ravindra; Peterson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The author and colleagues presented their determinations of water activities in various granulite-facies rocks of the Kerala Khondalite Belt. Using mineral equilibria, thermodynamic data, and assumed geopressure-geotemperature conditions of 5.5 kbar and 750 C, they calculated uniformly low a(H2O) values of about 0.27 over a large geographic region. They suggested that these conditions were produced by the presence of abundant CO2-rich fluids, derived either from deeper levels or from metamorphic reactions involving graphite.

  18. Linear Motor for Drive of Belt Conveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Krasl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel approach on the design of a linear motor for drive of belt conveyor (LMBC. The motor is a simple combination of asynchronous motor in plane. The electromagnetic forces is one of the most important parameters of electrical machines. This parameter is necessary for the checking of the design. This paper describes several variants: linear motor with slots in platens, slots in one half of platens and optimization of slots. The electromagnetic force can be found with the help of a Finite Elements Method – based program. For solution was used QuickField program.

  19. International Workshop on First Decadal Review Of The Edgeworth-kuiper-belt : Towards New Frontiers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrera, Luis; Towards New Frontiers

    2004-01-01

    A decade after the confirmation of the Kuiper Belt's existence, 80 of the world's experts gathered in Chile to review what has been learned since 1992. This record of the meeting is enhanced by several specially solicited papers covering additional material not presented at the conference. The volume includes papers on the dynamics of the trans-Neptunian region, the results of deep surveys for the new objects and the evidence for an outer Edge to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. Physical observations of many objects are described and attempts are made to bring these data into some coherent picture of the distant solar system. The interior physics of these distant, icy objects, and the link between the Kuiper Belt and dust disks around other stars are also considered. Of particular interest is a set of papers on how the surfaces of distant asteroids are affected by various types of radiation, an area crucial to the interpretation of data being collected by large ground based telescopes. Suitable for professi...

  20. Origins and Asteroid Main-Belt Stratigraphy for H-, L-, LL-Chondrite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard; DeMeo, Francesca; Burbine, Thomas; Polishook, David; Birlan, Mirel

    2016-10-01

    We trace the origins of ordinary chondrite meteorites to their main-belt sources using their (presumably) larger counterparts observable as near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). We find the ordinary chondrite stratigraphy in the main belt to be LL, H, L (increasing distance from the Sun). We derive this result using spectral information from more than 1000 near-Earth asteroids [1]. Our methodology is to correlate each NEA's main-belt source region [2] with its modeled mineralogy [3]. We find LL chondrites predominantly originate from the inner edge of the asteroid belt (nu6 region at 2.1 AU), H chondrites from the 3:1 resonance region (2.5 AU), and the L chondrites from the outer belt 5:2 resonance region (2.8 AU). Each of these source regions has been cited by previous researchers [e.g. 4, 5, 6], but this work uses an independent methodology that simultaneously solves for the LL, H, L stratigraphy. We seek feedback from the planetary origins and meteoritical communities on the viability or implications of this stratrigraphy.Methodology: Spectroscopic and taxonomic data are from the NASA IRTF MIT-Hawaii Near-Earth Object Spectroscopic Survey (MITHNEOS) [1]. For each near-Earth asteroid, we use the Bottke source model [2] to assign a probability that the object is derived from five different main-belt source regions. For each spectrum, we apply the Shkuratov model [3] for radiative transfer within compositional mixing to derive estimates for the ol / (ol+px) ratio (and its uncertainty). The Bottke source region model [2] and the Shkuratov mineralogic model [3] each deliver a probability distribution. For each NEA, we convolve its source region probability distribution with its meteorite class distribution to yield a likelihood for where that class originates. Acknowledgements: This work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant 0907766 and NASA Grant NNX10AG27G.References: [1] Binzel et al. (2005), LPSC XXXVI, 36.1817. [2] Bottke et al. (2002). Icarus 156, 399. [3

  1. Effects of driver characteristics on seat belt fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert, Sheila M; Hallman, Jason J

    2013-11-01

    A laboratory study of posture and belt fit was conducted with 46 men and 51 women, 61% of whom were age 60 years or older and 32% age 70 years or older. In addition, 28% of the 97 participants were obese, defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m^2. A mockup of a passenger vehicle driver's station was created and five belt anchorage configurations were produced by moving the buckle, outboard-upper (D-ring), and outboard-lower anchorages. An investigator recorded the three-dimensional locations of landmarks on the belt and the participant's body using a coordinate measurement machine. The location of the belt with respect to the underlying skeletal structures was analyzed, along with the length of belt webbing. Using linear regression models, an increase in age from 20 to 80 years resulted in the lap belt positioned 18 mm further forward relative to the pelvis, 26 mm greater lap belt webbing length, and 19 mm greater shoulder belt length. An increase in stature of 350 mm (approximately the range from 5th-percentile female to 95th-percentile male in the U.S. population) was associated with the lap belt 14 mm further forward relative to the pelvis, the shoulder belt 37 mm more outboard relative to the body centerline, and 38 mm less shoulder belt webbing length. Among the driver factors considered, body mass index had the greatest effects. An increase of BMI in 20 kg/m^2, which spans approximately the central 90% of U.S. adults, was associated with the lap belt being placed 102 mm further forward and 94 mm higher, relative to the pelvis, and increases in lap and shoulder belt webbing length of 276 and 258 mm, respectively. Gender did not have important effects on the analyzed belt fit measures after taking into account stature and body mass index. These results offer important considerations for future crash safety assessments and suggest that further research is needed to consider belt fit for older and obese occupants.

  2. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M;

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  3. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  4. Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Nahar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An artificial neural network is an information-processing paradigm that is inspired by the way biological nervous systems, such as the brain, process information.The key element of this paradigm is the novel structure of the information processing system. It is composed of a large number of highly interconnected processing elements (neurons working in unison to solve specific problems.Ann’s, like people, learn by example.

  5. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  6. Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Nahar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An artificial neural network is an information-processing paradigm that is inspired by the way biological nervous systems, such as the brain, process information. The key element of this paradigm is the novel structure of the information processing system. It is composed of a large number of highly interconnected processing elements (neurons working in unison to solve specific problems. Ann’s, like people, learn by example.

  7. Artificial sweetener; Jinko kanmiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The patents related to the artificial sweetener that it is introduced to the public in 3 years from 1996 until 1998 are 115 cases. The sugar quality which makes an oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol the subject is greatly over 28 cases of the non-sugar quality in the one by the kind as a general tendency of these patents at 73 cases in such cases as the Aspartame. The method of manufacture patent, which included new material around other peptides, the oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol isn`t inferior to 56 cases of the formation thing patent at 43 cases, and pays attention to the thing, which is many by the method of manufacture, formation. There is most improvement of the quality of sweetness with 31 cases in badness of the aftertaste which is characteristic of the artificial sweetener and so on, and much stability including the improvement in the flavor of food by the artificial sweetener, a long time and dissolution, fluid nature and productivity and improvement of the economy such as a cost are seen with effect on a purpose. (NEDO)

  8. ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION IN BOVINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M Marinho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This literature review aims to show the main scientific advances achieved in the area of Artificial Insemination (AI within animal reproduction and how these can improve reproductive efficiency and productive of the Brazilian cattle herd. With knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the control of reproductive physiology, in levels endocrine, cellular and molecular, it was possible the development of reproductive biotechnologies, standing out the IA, It has been used on a large scale, by allow the multiplication of animals superior genetically , increase the birthrate and be particularly effective in adjusting the breeding season in cattle. Artificial insemination has an important role in animal genetic improvement; it is the main and more viable middle of spread of genes worldwide when compared to other methods how technologies of embryos and the natural breeding. There are several advantages in using artificial insemination in herd both of cutting as milkman, as herd genetic improvement in lesser time and at a low cost through the use of semen of demonstrably superior sires for production, well as in the control and decrease of diseases which entail reproductive losses and consequently productive, by allowing the creator The crossing of zebuine females with bulls of European breeds and vice-versa, through the use of semen, increasing the number of progeny of a reproducer superior

  9. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  10. The Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; O'Brien, David P; Minton, David A; Bottke, William F

    2015-01-01

    The asteroid belt is the leftover of the original planetesimal population in the inner solar system. However, currently the asteroids have orbits with all possible values of eccentricities and inclinations compatible with long-term dynamical stability, whereas the initial planetesimal orbits should have been quasi-circular and almost co-planar. The total mass in the asteroid population is a small fraction of that existing primordially. Also, asteroids with different chemical/mineralogical properties are not ranked in an orderly manner with mean heliocentric distance as one could expect from the existence of a radial gradient of the temperature in the proto-planetary disk, but they are partially mixed. These properties show that the asteroid belt has been severely sculpted by one or a series of processes during its lifetime. This paper reviews the processes that have been proposed so far, discussing the properties that they explain and the problems that they are confronted with. Emphasis is paid to the interpl...

  11. Young Stellar Objects in the Gould Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Dunham, Michael M; Evans, Neal J; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Cieza, Lucas; Di Francesco, James; Gutermuth, Robert A; Harvey, Paul M; Hatchell, Jennifer; Heiderman, Amanda; Huard, Tracy; Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Jason M; Matthews, Brenda C; Miller, Jennifer F; Peterson, Dawn E; Young, Kaisa E

    2015-01-01

    We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope "cores to disks" (c2d) and "Gould Belt" (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the Gould Belt. We compile extinction corrected SEDs for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0+I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background AGB stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40-0.78 Myr for Class 0+I YSOs and 0.26-0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the ado...

  12. Modulation of forelimb and hindlimb muscle activity during quadrupedal tied-belt and split-belt locomotion in intact cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigon, A; Thibaudier, Y; Hurteau, M-F

    2015-04-02

    The modulation of the neural output to forelimb and hindlimb muscles when the left and right sides step at different speeds from one another in quadrupeds was assessed by obtaining electromyography (EMG) in seven intact adult cats during split-belt locomotion. To determine if changes in EMG during split-belt locomotion were modulated according to the speed of the belt the limb was stepping on, values were compared to those obtained during tied-belt locomotion (equal left-right speeds) at matched speeds. Cats were chronically implanted for EMG, which was obtained from six muscles: biceps brachii, triceps brachii, flexor carpi ulnaris, sartorius, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius. During tied-belt locomotion, cats stepped from 0.4 to 1.0m/s in 0.1m/s increments whereas during split-belt locomotion, cats stepped with left-right speed differences of 0.1 to 0.4m/s in 0.1m/s increments. During tied-belt locomotion, EMG burst durations and mean EMG amplitudes of all muscles respectively decreased and increased with increasing speed. During split-belt locomotion, there was a clear differential modulation of the EMG patterns between flexors and extensors and between the slow and fast sides. Changes in the EMG pattern of some muscles could be explained by the speed of the belt the limb was stepping on, while in other muscles there were clear dissociations from tied-belt values at matched speeds. Therefore, results show that EMG patterns during split-belt locomotion are modulated to meet task requirements partly via signals related to the stepping speed of the homonymous limb and from the other limbs.

  13. Safety belt usage in Finland and in other Nordic countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valtonen, J.

    1992-01-01

    Legislation has played a significant role in increasing safety belt usage in Finland and in the other Nordic countries. Publicity and enforcement have, however, been required to support the legislation. The development of safety belt regulations has been nearly similar in all these countries, both i

  14. Canadian seat belt wearing rates, promotion programs, and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grant, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of a national driver seat belt survey conducted in Canada each year, the most important results are presented. A number of programmes for increasing seat belt use has been evaluated in Canada. Finally, a description is given of some of the current and planned activities within Canada wh

  15. Ambient Response Analysis of the Great Belt Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Frandsen, J. B.; Andersen, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper an ambient response analysis of the Great Belt Bridge is presented. The Great Belt Bridge is one of the largest suspension bridges in the world, and the analysis was carried out in order to investigate the possibilities of estimating reliable damping values from the ambient response...

  16. Biomechanical considerations for abdominal loading by seat belt pretensioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhana, Stephen W; El-Jawahri, Raed E; Laituri, Tony R

    2010-11-01

    While seat belts are the most effective safety technology in vehicles today, there are continual efforts in the industry to improve their ability to reduce the risk of injury. In this paper, seat belt pretensioners and current trends towards more powerful systems were reviewed and analyzed. These more powerful systems may be, among other things, systems that develop higher belt forces, systems that remove slack from belt webbing at higher retraction speeds, or both. The analysis started with validation of the Ford Human Body Finite Element Model for use in evaluation of abdominal belt loading by pretensioners. The model was then used to show that those studies, done with lap-only belts, can be used to establish injury metrics for tests done with lap-shoulder belts. Then, previously-performed PMHS studies were used to develop AIS 2+ and AIS 3+ injury risk curves for abdominal interaction with seat belts via logistic regression and reliability analysis with interval censoring. Finally, some considerations were developed for a possible laboratory test to evaluate higher-powered pretensioners.

  17. Policy Implications from an Evaluation of Seat Belt Use Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Anand; You, Min-Bong

    1992-01-01

    Effects of Ohio's mandatory seat belt law on seat belt use, number of car accidents, and number of fatal and severe injuries were evaluated for January 1982 through March 1988. The monthly average number of accident victims was 2,002. Implications for public policy formulation and implementation are discussed. (SLD)

  18. An Evaluation of the Seat Belt Education Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, James

    A seat belt education campaign conducted in Canada to dispel myths surrounding seat belts and promote a better understanding of their functions was evaluated. Two telephone surveys, each comprised of 4,000 respondents, were conducted. The first was done immediately before the campaign and the second immediately succeeding the campaign. Also, a…

  19. Teaching Taekwondo in Physical Education: Incorporating the Color Belt System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Ju; Hannon, James C.; Banks, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Taekwondo is an excellent lifetime physical activity that provides both physical and mental benefits to its participants. The color belt system may be creatively used in physical education to encourage improvement in all learning domains. This article provides information on incorporating the color belt system into physical education, and provides…

  20. HUMAN NEURONAL INTERLIMB COORDINATION DURING SPLIT-BELT LOCOMOTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIETZ, [No Value; ZIJLSTRA, W; DUYSENS, J

    1994-01-01

    Human interlimb coordination and the adaptations in leg muscle activity were studied during walking on a treadmill with split belts. Four different belt speeds (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 m/s) were offered in all possible combinations for the left and right leg. Subjects adapted automatically to a differenc