WorldWideScience

Sample records for artificial nucleation sites

  1. Convective boiling in a parallel microchannel heat sink with a diverging cross-section design and artificial nucleation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chun Ting; Pan, Chin

    2009-01-01

    To develop a highly stable boiling heat transfer microchannel heat sink, the three types of diverging microchannels, namely Type-1, Type-2 and Type-3, were designed to explore experimentally the effect of different distribution of artificial nucleation sites on enhancing boiling heat transfer in 10 parallel diverging microchannels with a mean hydraulic diameter of 120 μm. The Type-1 system is with no cavities, Type-2 is with cavities distributed uniformly along the downstream half of the channel, while Type-3 is with cavities distributed uniformly along the whole channel. The artificial nucleation sites are laser-etched pits on the channel bottom wall with a mouth diameter of about 20-22 μm based on the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The results of the present study reveal the presence of the artificial nucleation sites for flow boiling in parallel diverging microchannel significantly reduces the wall superheat and enhances the boiling heat transfer performance. Additionally, the Type-3 design demonstrates the best boiling heat transfer performance. (author)

  2. Controlling the quantum dot nucleation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Nunzio; Sgarlata, Anna; Rosei, Federico; Szkutnik, P.D.; Nufris, S.; Scarselli, M.; Balzarotti, A.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are actually easily produced by self-assembling during heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductors. In order to exploit the unique electronic properties of semiconductor QDs in novel quantum effect devices, the lateral dimensions of these structures have to be reduced to the order of tens of nanometers, which is the range of the De Broglie wavelength of electrons inside these materials. Moreover, millions of QDs must be arranged in dense ordered arrays to achieve the necessary active volume for optoelectronic applications. Nowadays it is possible to control size and shape of the nanocrystals, but it is still difficult to decide their nucleation site. Many approaches have been undertaken to overcome this problem, like using regular dislocation networks, lithographically and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) patterned substrates, naturally patterned surfaces. We present results obtained by some of these methods, visualized by Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) or AFM microscopy. STM measurements at high temperature during the epitaxial growth are of great help in these studies. Images and movies of the growth of Ge on Si help to identify the real nucleation sites of the islands and to follow their evolution. The influence of the 'step bunching' on the self-organization of Ge islands on Si(111) surfaces will be analysed, as an example of growth on self-nanostructured surfaces

  3. Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the

  4. Copper Oxidation through Nucleation Sites of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Birong; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Shivayogimath, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nucleation defect-triggered oxidation of Cu covered by CVD graphene during postannealing in air. The results reveal that different growth conditions may induce imperfect nucleation of graphene, and cause creation of defects near the nucleation point such as pin holes and amorph...

  5. Assessment of Nucleation Site Density Models for CFD Simulations of Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, N. H.; Chu, I. C.; Euh, D. J.; Song, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    The framework of a CFD simulation of subcooled flow boiling basically includes a block of wall boiling models communicating with governing equations of a two-phase flow via parameters like temperature, rate of phasic change, etc. In the block of wall boiling models, a heat flux partitioning model, which describes how the heat is taken away from a heated surface, is combined with models quantifying boiling parameters, i.e. nucleation site density, and bubble departure diameter and frequency. It is realized that the nucleation site density is an important parameter for predicting the subcooled flow boiling. The number of nucleation sites per unit area decides the influence region of each heat transfer mechanism. The variation of the nucleation site density will mutually change the dynamics of vapor bubbles formed at these sites. In addition, the nucleation site density is needed as one initial and boundary condition to solve the interfacial area transport equation. A lot of effort has been devoted to mathematically formulate the nucleation site density. As a consequence, numerous correlations of the nucleation site density are available in the literature. These correlations are commonly quite different in their mathematical form as well as application range. Some correlations of the nucleation site density have been applied successfully to CFD simulations of several specific subcooled boiling flows, but in combination with different correlations of the bubble departure diameter and frequency. In addition, the values of the nucleation site density, and bubble departure diameter and frequency obtained from simulations for a same problem are relatively different, depending on which models are used, even when global characteristics, e.g., void fraction and mean bubble diameter, agree well with experimental values. It is realized that having a good CFD simulations of the subcooled flow boiling requires a detailed validations of all the models used. Owing to the importance

  6. Nucleation of recrystallization at selected sites in deformed fcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling

    have higher average hardness values and higher nucleation probabilities. In general, indentations with higher hardness values have higher nucleation potentials. The orientations of the nuclei from different indentations in a given grain are observed not to be randomly distributed, but clustered...... indentations is also investigated non-destructively by the DAXM technique. By first characterizing the deformation microstructure within a selected gauge volume near a hardness indentation, then annealing the sample and measuring the same volume again, nucleation is directly correlated to the deformation...

  7. Nucleation site in CVD graphene growth investigated by radiation-mode optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Takanobu; Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the graphene nucleation site in real space using radiation-mode optical microscopy (Rad-OM), which we have developed for the real-time observation of the graphene growth in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions. We found the bright spot in the Rad-OM image worked as a nucleation site through continuous observation of a Cu substrate from pretreatment to graphene growth. The bright spot, considered as a C impurity, was effectively removed by Ar bombardment, which significantly reduced the nucleation density. The present result directly elucidates the role of C impurities and provides a means to grow single-crystalline and large-area graphene via CVD.

  8. Molecular sizes of lichen ice nucleation sites determined by gamma radiation inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, T.L.; Ruscetti, T.

    1992-01-01

    It has previously been shown that some species of lichen fungi contain proteinaceous ice nuclei which are active at temperatures as warm as −2 °C. This experiment was undertaken to determine the molecular sizes of ice nuclei in the lichen fungus Rhizoplaca chrysoleuca and to compare them to bacterial ice nuclei from Pseudomonas syringae. Gamma radiation inactivation analysis was used to determine molecular weights. Radiation inactivation analysis is based on target theory, which states that the likelihood of a molecule being inactivated by gamma rays increases as its size increases. Three different sources of ice nuclei from the lichen R. chrysoleuca were tested: field-collected lichens, extract of lichen fungus, and a pure culture of the fungus R. chrysoleuca. P. syringae strain Cit7 was used as a source of bacterial ice nuclei. Samples were lyophilized, irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0 to 10.4 Mrads, and then tested for ice nucleation activity using a droplet-freezing assay. Data for all four types of samples were in rough agreement; sizes of nucleation sites increased logarithmically with increasing temperatures of ice nucleation activity. Molecular weights of nucleation sites active between −3 and −4 °C from the bacteria and from the field-collected lichens were approximately 1.0 × 10 6 Da. Nuclei from the lichen fungus and in the lichen extract appeared to be slightly smaller but followed the same log-normal pattern with temperature of ice nucleation activity. The data for both the bacterial and lichen ice nuclei are in agreement with ice nucleation theory which states that the size of ice nucleation sites increases logarithmically as the temperature of nucleation increases linearly. This suggests that although some differences exist between bacterial and lichen ice nucleation sites, their molecular sizes are quite similar

  9. Observation and Analysis of Particle Nucleation at a Forest Site in Southeastern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viney Aneja

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the characteristics of new particle formation at a forest site in southeastern US. Particle size distributions above a Loblolly pine plantation were measured between November 2005 and September 2007 and analyzed by event type and frequency, as well as in relation to meteorological and atmospheric chemical conditions. Nucleation events occurred on 69% of classifiable observation days. Nucleation frequency was highest in spring. The highest daily nucleation (class A and B events frequency (81% was observed in April. The average total particle number concentration on nucleation days was 8,684 cm−3 (10 < Dp < 250 nm and 3,991 cm−3 (10 < Dp < 25 nm with a mode diameter of 28 nm with corresponding values on non-nucleation days of 2,143 cm−3, 655 cm−3, and 44.5 nm, respectively. The annual average growth rate during nucleation events was 2.7 ± 0.3 nm·h−1. Higher growth rates were observed during summer months with highest rates observed in May (5.0 ± 3.6 nm·h−1. Winter months were associated with lower growth rates, the lowest occurring in February (1.2 ± 2.2 nm·h−1. Consistent with other studies, nucleation events were more likely to occur on days with higher radiative flux and lower relative humidity compared to non-nucleation days. The daily minimum in the condensation sink, which typically occurred 2 to 3 h after sunrise, was a good indicator of the timing of nucleation onset. The intensity of the event, indicated by the total particle number concentration, was well correlated with photo-synthetically active radiation, used here as a surrogate for total global radiation, and relative humidity. Even though the role of biogenic VOC in the initial nuclei formation is not understood from this study, the relationships with chemical precursors and secondary aerosol products associated with nucleation, coupled with diurnal boundary layer dynamics and seasonal meteorological patterns, suggest that H2SO4 and biogenic

  10. Basic Study for Active Nucleation Site Density Evaluation in Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, In Cheol; Song, Chul Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have been performed on a active nucleation site density (ANSD) due to its governing influence on a heat transfer. However, most of the studies were focused on pool boiling conditions. Kocamustafaogullari and Ishii developed an ANSD correlation from a parametric study of the existing pool boiling data. Also, they extended the correlation to a convective flow boiling condition by adopting the nucleation suppression factor of Chen's heat transfer correlation. However, the appropriateness of applying the Chen's suppression factor to an ANSD correlation was not fully validated because there was not enough experimental data on ANSD in the forced convective flow boiling. Basu et al. performed forced convective boiling experiments and proposed a correlation of ANSD which is the only correlation based on experimental data for a forced convective boiling. They concluded that the ANSD is only dependent on the static contact angle and the wall superheat, and is independent of the flow rate and the subcooling, which contradict the general acceptance of the nucleation suppression in the forced convective boiling. It seems that no reliable ANSD correlation or model is available for a forced convective boiling. In the present study, the effect of the flow velocity on the suppression of the nucleation site was examined, and the effectiveness of a Brewster reflection technique for the identification of the nucleation site was also examined

  11. Immersion freezing of supermicron mineral dust particles: freezing results, testing different schemes for describing ice nucleation, and ice nucleation active site densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, M J; Mason, R H; Steunenberg, K; Wagstaff, M; Chou, C; Bertram, A K

    2015-05-14

    Ice nucleation on mineral dust particles is known to be an important process in the atmosphere. To accurately implement ice nucleation on mineral dust particles in atmospheric simulations, a suitable theory or scheme is desirable to describe laboratory freezing data in atmospheric models. In the following, we investigated ice nucleation by supermicron mineral dust particles [kaolinite and Arizona Test Dust (ATD)] in the immersion mode. The median freezing temperature for ATD was measured to be approximately -30 °C compared with approximately -36 °C for kaolinite. The freezing results were then used to test four different schemes previously used to describe ice nucleation in atmospheric models. In terms of ability to fit the data (quantified by calculating the reduced chi-squared values), the following order was found for ATD (from best to worst): active site, pdf-α, deterministic, single-α. For kaolinite, the following order was found (from best to worst): active site, deterministic, pdf-α, single-α. The variation in the predicted median freezing temperature per decade change in the cooling rate for each of the schemes was also compared with experimental results from other studies. The deterministic model predicts the median freezing temperature to be independent of cooling rate, while experimental results show a weak dependence on cooling rate. The single-α, pdf-α, and active site schemes all agree with the experimental results within roughly a factor of 2. On the basis of our results and previous results where different schemes were tested, the active site scheme is recommended for describing the freezing of ATD and kaolinite particles. We also used our ice nucleation results to determine the ice nucleation active site (INAS) density for the supermicron dust particles tested. Using the data, we show that the INAS densities of supermicron kaolinite and ATD particles studied here are smaller than the INAS densities of submicron kaolinite and ATD particles

  12. Investigation of nucleation events vertical extent: a long term study at two different altitude sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boulon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an analysis of the occurrence of nucleation events during more than three years of measurements at two different rural altitude sites, the puy de Dôme research station (1465 m a.s.l. and the Opme station (660 m a.s.l., central France. The collected database is a unique combination of scanning mobility particle sizer (10–400 nm, air ion spectrometers (from 0.8 to 42 nm for NTP-conditions, and, neutral clusters and air ion spectrometers (from 0.8 to 42 nm for NTP-conditions measurements at these two different altitudes nearly located research stations, from February 2007 to June 2010. The seasonality of the frequency of nucleation events was studied at the puy de Dôme station and maximum of events frequency was found during early spring and early autumn. During the measurement period, neither the particle formation rates (J2= 1.382 ± 0.195 s−1 nor the growth rates (GR1.3−20 nm = 6.20 ± 0.12 nm h−1 differ from one site to the other on average. Hovewer, we found that, on 437 sampling days in common to the two sites, the nucleation frequency was higher at the puy de Dôme station (35.9 %, 157 days than at the low elevation station of Opme (20.8 %, 91 days. LIDAR measurements and the evolution of the potential equivalent temperature revealed that the nucleation could be triggered either (i within the whole low tropospheric column at the same time from the planetary boundary layer to the top of the interface layer (29.2 %, 47 events, (ii above the planetary boundary layer upper limit (43.5 %, 70 events, and (iii at low altitude and then transported, conserving dynamic and properties, at high altitude (24.8 %, 40 events. This is the first time that the vertical extent of nucleation can be studied over a long observational period, allowing for a rigorous

  13. Size of bacterial ice-nucleation sites measured in situ by radiation inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, A.G.; Lindow, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Four bacterial species are known to catalyze ice formation at temperatures just below 0 0 C. To better understand the relationship between the molecular structure of bacterial ice-nucleation site(s) and the quantitative and qualitative features of the ice-nucleation-active phenotype, the authors determined by γ-radiation analysis the in situ size of ice-nucleation sites in strains of Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola and in Escherichia coli HB101 carrying the plasmid pICE1.1. Lyophilized cells of each bacterial strain were irradiated with a flux of γ radiation from 0 to 10.2 Mrad. Differential concentrations of active ice nuclei decreased as a first-order function of radiation dose in all strains as temperature was decreased from -2 0 C to -14 0 C in 1 0 C intervals. Sizes of ice nuclei were calculated from the + -radiation flux at which 37% of initial ice nuclei active within each 1 0 C temperature interval remained. The minimum mass of a functional ice nucleus was about 150 kDa for all strains. The size of ice nuclei increased logarithmically with increasing temperature from -12 0 CC to -2 0 C, where the estimated nucleant mass was 19,000 kDa. The ice nucleant in these three bacterial species may represent an oligomeric structure, composed at least in part of an ice gene product that can self-associate to assume many possible sizes

  14. Preference of female mosquitoes for natural and artificial resting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Eubanks, Micky D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2008-06-01

    At a wetland study site in Tuskegee National Forest, AL, resting female mosquitoes were collected from natural and artificial resting sites to identify species-specific resting sites and to evaluate various artificial resting sites for their utility in collecting resting mosquitoes. Natural resting sites included small tree cavities, large tree cavities, and understory vegetation. Artificial resting sites included resting boxes, fiber pots, and plastic trash cans. We collected 12,888 female mosquitoes, representing 23 species in 8 genera, during the 6-month study. Each mosquito species demonstrated a preference for a particular type of resting site. Resting Aedes vexans females were collected almost exclusively from understory vegetation, while the great majority of Anopheles quadrimaculatus females were aspirated from large tree cavities. Culex erraticus and Cx. peccator females preferred trash cans over other available resting sites. Females of Cx. territans, although collected most commonly in large tree cavities, were also collected frequently from understory vegetation and trash cans. A multiple regression of resting-site parameters (excluding vegetation), including volume, surface area, and opening size, indicated that 50% and 20% of the variability associated with An. quadrimaculatus and Cx. territans collections, respectively, could be explained by opening size. Inner surface area and volume accounted for 33% and 12% of variation in Cx. erraticus and Cx. peccator collections, respectively. Thus, female mosquitoes generally preferred larger resting sites over smaller resting sites. Similarly shaped artificial resting sites (fiber pots and trash cans) yielded comparable numbers of females per unit of volume (for those species that preferred artificial resting sites), indicating that shape of the resting site is an important factor in resting-site preference. In addition, trash cans proved to be a valuable novel tool for collecting resting female mosquitoes.

  15. A study of the rates of heat transfer and bubble site density for nucleate boiling on an inclined heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, S.E.; Symons, J.G.

    1974-08-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of distilled water from an electrically heated surface at atmospheric pressure is studied for varying heating surface inclinations. The constants of the accepted boiling equation phi = K Tsup(B) and the Rohsenow Correlation Coefficient are found to be dependent on surface orientation. Convection cooling is observed to play a major role in pool boiling phenomena and causes large changes in the heat transfer rates for a given excess of temperature of the heated surface. Active nucleation site density is studied and found to be independent of surface inclination. Empirical relations are presented to provide an understanding of the effects of inclination on other boiling parameters. (author)

  16. A helping hand: artificial nest site provisioning increases breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common white terns Gygis alba lay a single egg balanced on rocks or branches and consequently are at risk of low nesting success. A novel technique of hollowing out coconut husks and providing artificial nest sites was developed on Cousine Island, Seychelles. Our study aimed to critically assess whether common white ...

  17. Determination of the strain generated in InAs/InP quantum wires: prediction of nucleation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, S I; Ben, T; Sales, D L; Pizarro, J; Galindo, P L; Varela, M; Pennycook, S J; Fuster, D; Gonzalez, Y; Gonzalez, L

    2006-01-01

    The compositional distribution in a self-assembled InAs(P) quantum wire grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an InP(001) substrate has been determined by electron energy loss spectrum imaging. We have determined the strain and stress fields generated in and around this wire capped with a 5 nm InP layer by finite element calculations using as input the compositional map experimentally obtained. Preferential sites for nucleation of wires grown on the surface of this InP capping layer are predicted, based on chemical potential minimization, from the determined strain and stress fields on this surface. The determined preferential sites for wire nucleation agree with their experimentally measured locations. The method used in this paper, which combines electron energy loss spectroscopy, high-resolution Z contrast imaging, and elastic theory finite element calculations, is believed to be a valuable technique of wide applicability for predicting the preferential nucleation sites of epitaxial self-assembled nano-objects

  18. Determination of the strain generated in InAs/InP quantum wires: prediction of nucleation sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Ben, T [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D L [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Pizarro, J [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus RIo San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Varela, M [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pennycook, S J [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Fuster, D [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Y [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, L [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-11-28

    The compositional distribution in a self-assembled InAs(P) quantum wire grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an InP(001) substrate has been determined by electron energy loss spectrum imaging. We have determined the strain and stress fields generated in and around this wire capped with a 5 nm InP layer by finite element calculations using as input the compositional map experimentally obtained. Preferential sites for nucleation of wires grown on the surface of this InP capping layer are predicted, based on chemical potential minimization, from the determined strain and stress fields on this surface. The determined preferential sites for wire nucleation agree with their experimentally measured locations. The method used in this paper, which combines electron energy loss spectroscopy, high-resolution Z contrast imaging, and elastic theory finite element calculations, is believed to be a valuable technique of wide applicability for predicting the preferential nucleation sites of epitaxial self-assembled nano-objects.

  19. Simulations reveal the power and peril of artificial breeding sites for monitoring and managing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Christopher J W; Pauli, Benjamin P; Heath, Julie A

    2017-06-01

    Despite common use, the efficacy of artificial breeding sites (e.g., nest boxes, bat houses, artificial burrows) as tools for monitoring and managing animals depends on the demography of target populations and availability of natural sites. Yet, the conditions enabling artificial breeding sites to be useful or informative have yet to be articulated. We use a stochastic simulation model to determine situations where artificial breeding sites are either useful or disadvantageous for monitoring and managing animals. Artificial breeding sites are a convenient tool for monitoring animals and therefore occupancy of artificial breeding sites is often used as an index of population levels. However, systematic changes in availability of sites that are not monitored might induce trends in occupancy of monitored sites, a situation rarely considered by monitoring programs. We therefore examine how systematic changes in unmonitored sites could bias inference from trends in the occupancy of monitored sites. Our model also allows us to examine effects on population levels if artificial breeding sites either increase or decrease population vital rates (survival and fecundity). We demonstrate that trends in occupancy of monitored sites are misleading if the number of unmonitored sites changes over time. Further, breeding site fidelity can cause an initial lag in occupancy of newly installed sites that could be misinterpreted as an increasing population, even when the population has been continuously declining. Importantly, provisioning of artificial breeding sites only benefits populations if breeding sites are limiting or if artificial sites increase vital rates. There are many situations where installation of artificial breeding sites, and their use in monitoring, can have unintended consequences. Managers should therefore not assume that provision of artificial breeding sites will necessarily benefit populations. Further, trends in occupancy of artificial breeding sites should

  20. Forming artificial soils from waste materials for mine site rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellishetty, Mohan; Wong, Vanessa; Taylor, Michael; Li, Johnson

    2014-05-01

    Surface mining activities often produce large volumes of solid wastes which invariably requires the removal of significant quantities of waste rock (overburden). As mines expand, larger volumes of waste rock need to be moved which also require extensive areas for their safe disposal and containment. The erosion of these dumps may result in landform instability, which in turn may result in exposure of contaminants such as trace metals, elevated sediment delivery in adjacent waterways, and the subsequent degradation of downstream water quality. The management of solid waste materials from industrial operations is also a key component for a sustainable economy. For example, in addition to overburden, coal mines produce large amounts of waste in the form of fly ash while sewage treatment plants require disposal of large amounts of compost. Similarly, paper mills produce large volumes of alkaline rejected wood chip waste which is usually disposed of in landfill. These materials, therefore, presents a challenge in their use, and re-use in the rehabilitation of mine sites and provides a number of opportunities for innovative waste disposal. The combination of solid wastes sourced from mines, which are frequently nutrient poor and acidic, with nutrient-rich composted material produced from sewage treatment and alkaline wood chip waste has the potential to lead to a soil suitable for mine rehabilitation and successful seed germination and plant growth. This paper presents findings from two pilot projects which investigated the potential of artificial soils to support plant growth for mine site rehabilitation. We found that pH increased in all the artificial soil mixtures and were able to support plant establishment. Plant growth was greatest in those soils with the greatest proportion of compost due to the higher nutrient content. These pot trials suggest that the use of different waste streams to form an artificial soil can potentially be used in mine site rehabilitation

  1. Wildlife Contact Rates at Artificial Feeding Sites in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Tyler A.; Long, David B.; Shriner, Susan A.

    2013-06-01

    Given the popularity of feeding white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas and the increasing amount of corn that is distributed, more information is needed on the impacts of this activity on non-target wildlife. Our objectives were to report visitation, intra- and interspecific contact, and contact rates of wildlife at artificial feeding sites in Texas. Our study was conducted at three sites in Kleberg and Nueces counties, Texas. We trapped animals from February to April and August to September, 2009 and marked animals with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. At each site and season, we placed one feeder system containing a PIT tag reader within 600 m of trap locations. Readers detected PIT tags from a distance of 25 cm. We determined a contact event to occur when two different PIT tags were detected by feeder systems within 5 s. We recorded 62,719 passes by raccoons ( Procyon lotor), 103,512 passes by collared peccaries ( Pecari tajacu), 2,923 passes by feral swine ( Sus scrofa), 1,336 passes by fox squirrels ( Sciurus niger), and no passes by opossums ( Didelphis virginiana) at feeder systems. For site-season combinations in which contact events occurred, we found intraspecific contact rates (contacts per day) for raccoons, collared peccaries, and feral swine to be 0.81-124.77, 0.69-38.08, and 0.0-0.66, respectively. Throughout our study we distributed ~2,625 kg of whole kernel corn, which resulted in 6,351 contact events between marked wildlife (2.4 contacts per kg of corn). If 136 million kg of corn is distributed in Texas annually, we would expect >5.2 billion unnatural contact events between wildlife would result from this activity each year in Texas. Consequently, we do not believe that it is wise for natural resource managers to maintain artificial feeding sites for white-tailed deer or other wildlife due to pathogen transmission risks.

  2. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, A., E-mail: aqil.ceet@pu.edu.pk; Brydson, R., E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk; Edmonds, D.V., E-mail: d.v.edmonds@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  3. Incorporating C60 as Nucleation Sites Optimizing PbI2 Films To Achieve Perovskite Solar Cells Showing Excellent Efficiency and Stability via Vapor-Assisted Deposition Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Bin; Ding, Xi-Hong; Pan, Xu; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ding, Yong; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2018-01-24

    To achieve high-quality perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the morphology and carrier transportation of perovskite films need to be optimized. Herein, C 60 is employed as nucleation sites in PbI 2 precursor solution to optimize the morphology of perovskite films via vapor-assisted deposition process. Accompanying the homogeneous nucleation of PbI 2 , the incorporation of C 60 as heterogeneous nucleation sites can lower the nucleation free energy of PbI 2 , which facilitates the diffusion and reaction between PbI 2 and organic source. Meanwhile, C 60 could enhance carrier transportation and reduce charge recombination in the perovskite layer due to its high electron mobility and conductivity. In addition, the grain sizes of perovskite get larger with C 60 optimizing, which can reduce the grain boundaries and voids in perovskite and prevent the corrosion because of moisture. As a result, we obtain PSCs with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 18.33% and excellent stability. The PCEs of unsealed devices drop less than 10% in a dehumidification cabinet after 100 days and remain at 75% of the initial PCE during exposure to ambient air (humidity > 60% RH, temperature > 30 °C) for 30 days.

  4. Real estate site selection: an application of artificial intelligence for military retail facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Shangle, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The purpose of this MBA project is to investigate and provide a comprehensive overview of the current real estate site selection industry while showing applications of how artificial intelligence can improve the selection process. The goal is to identify and document both the specific industry practices primarily utilized and the principal uses of artificial intelligent algorithms for site selection and sales forecasting. The results of this project can be applied...

  5. Detection of slip from multiple sites in an artificial finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muridan, N; Chappell, P H; Cranny, A; White, N M [Electronic Systems and Devices Group, School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cotton, D P J, E-mail: nm07r@ecs.soton.ac.u [Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    A Piezoelectric thick-film sensor is a good candidate for the extraction of information from object slip in hand prosthesis. Five slip sensors were fabricated on different linkages of an artificial hand. The signals from each sensor were compared to the output from the sensor mounted on the fingertip. An analysis of the output signals from all the sensors indicates that the linkage sensors also produce similar output signals to the fingertip sensor. In the next phase of the research, velocity and acceleration of the slipped object will be considered in the analysis.

  6. Influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of artificial graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Koide, Shirosaku; Kawada, Shimei; Shotsu, Akira

    1989-01-01

    To examine the acute influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of EPTFE vascular grafts, experimental study was performed using canine dogs. After replacement of superior vena cava and bilateral femoral arteries with EPTFE grafts, a total of 20 to 100 Gy doses were given at the anastomotic sites of superior vena cava and right femoral artery. There were no degradation of grafts themselves or rupture in the anastomoses at cumulative anastomotic sites of superior vena cava, stenoses and/or overgrowth of granulation tissues were observed, although at those of right femoral artery, no remarkable differences were observed between dogs which received irradiation and those which did not receive. (author)

  7. Impact of artificially seismic loading on the response of building structure in various site classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy I. Yansiku

    2017-10-01

    Spectral matching process using Etabs yields better average spectral curves than using Seismomatch. This, however, relies upon the scaling method and number of iterations. Structural analysis results show that the artificial records of Lacc North, Friuli, Petrolia and Trinidad create extreme story displacement and story acceleration for site class B, C, D and E in that order. Artificial load of Friuli, Lucerne and Sylmarf yield the largest base reactions whereas maximum story shear is caused by the artificial ground motion of Chichi, Laccnorth, Petrolia and Trinidad for the ordered site classes. The average displacement at the top story of matched accelerogram or site B is 50% below the displacement by the original El Centro record while for site C the displacement reduces 10% and remains stabled in site D but increases 7% in site E. The base reaction falls about 20%–30% in site B, C and D and rises 14% in site E. Pier moment due to matched records decreases up to 6% as compared to the influence of reference record in all sites while story acceleration experienced 17% increase in site B. The artificial time history records adversely affect on the story shear response up to 51% higher than El Centro record. The result of F.TEST shows 77% difference between both techniques. The selection of correct, appropriate and sufficient ground motion records may produce ideal artificial accelerations and it is, therefore, profound to select such records since the possible difference may affect the final design of the building structure using linear time history analysis.

  8. Artificial Intelligence Support for Landing Site Selection on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongier, G.; Pankratius, V.

    2017-12-01

    Mars is a key target for planetary exploration; a better understanding of its evolution and habitability requires roving in situ. Landing site selection is becoming more challenging for scientists as new instruments generate higher data volumes. The involved engineering and scientific constraints make site selection and the anticipation of possible onsite actions into a complex optimization problem: there may be multiple acceptable solutions depending on various goals and assumptions. Solutions must also account for missing data, errors, and potential biases. To address these problems, we propose an AI-informed decision support system that allows scientists, mission designers, engineers, and committees to explore alternative site selection choices based on data. In particular, we demonstrate first results of an exploratory case study using fuzzy logic and a simulation of a rover's mobility map based on the fast marching algorithm. Our system computes favorability maps of the entire planet to facilitate landing site selection and allows a definition of different configurations for rovers, science target priorities, landing ellipses, and other constraints. For a rover similar to NASA's Mars 2020 rover, we present results in form of a site favorability map as well as four derived exploration scenarios that depend on different prioritized scientific targets, all visualizing inherent tradeoffs. Our method uses the NASA PDS Geosciences Node and the NASA/ICA Integrated Database of Planetary Features. Under common assumptions, the data products reveal Eastern Margaritifer Terra and Meridiani Planum to be the most favorable sites due to a high concentration of scientific targets and a flat, easily navigable surface. Our method also allows mission designers to investigate which constraints have the highest impact on the mission exploration potential and to change parameter ranges. Increasing the elevation limit for landing, for example, provides access to many additional

  9. An ArcGIS decision support tool for artificial reefs site selection (ArcGIS ARSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Stavros; Zodiatis, George

    2017-04-01

    Although the use and benefits of artificial reefs, both socio-economic and environmental, have been recognized with research and national development programmes worldwide their development is rarely subjected to a rigorous site selection process and the majority of the projects use the traditional (non-GIS) approach, based on trial and error mode. Recent studies have shown that the use of Geographic Information Systems, unlike to traditional methods, for the identification of suitable areas for artificial reefs siting seems to offer a number of distinct advantages minimizing possible errors, time and cost. A decision support tool (DSS) has been developed based on the existing knowledge, the multi-criteria decision analysis techniques and the GIS approach used in previous studies in order to help the stakeholders to identify the optimal locations for artificial reefs deployment on the basis of the physical, biological, oceanographic and socio-economic features of the sites. The tool provides to the users the ability to produce a final report with the results and suitability maps. The ArcGIS ARSS support tool runs within the existing ArcMap 10.2.x environment and for the development the VB .NET high level programming language has been used along with ArcObjects 10.2.x. Two local-scale case studies were conducted in order to test the application of the tool focusing on artificial reef siting. The results obtained from the case studies have shown that the tool can be successfully integrated within the site selection process in order to select objectively the optimal site for artificial reefs deployment.

  10. Economic feasibility of artificial islands for cluster-siting of offshore energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baram, Michael S.; Spencer, James; Munson, J. Steve

    1977-04-01

    The study presents a general first-order cost feasibility analysis of the artificial island concept and its usefulness for the offshore siting of multiple energy facilities. The results of the study include a recommended method of cost-feasibility assessment; the collection and organization of the most useful information presently available; and a series of conclusions on feasibility for generic comparison purposes. These conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) artificial islands to the outer bound of the continental shelf are technologically feasible; (2) offshore nuclear power plants appear to be competitive with onshore plants from a cost standpoint; (3) offshore deepwater ports appear to be more economical than proposed onshore deepwater ports, existing facilities or facilities presently under construction; (4) offshore oil refineries, except under special circumstantces, will probably be more costly than onshore counterparts; (5) the cluster-siting of facilities on an artificial island has definite cost-effectiveness potential; (6) a joint public-private financial venture with a strong federal agency lead role appears essential for the multi-facility island concept to be realized; and (7) artificial island siting of energy complexes appears to be a concept worth pursuing in terms of further site and facility-specific research, and possibly in terms of a demonstration project.

  11. Economic feasibility of artificial islands for cluster-siting of offshore energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baram, M.S.; Spencer, J.; Munson, J.S.

    1977-04-01

    The study presents a general first-order cost feasibility analysis of the artificial island concept and its usefulness for the offshore siting of multiple energy facilities. The results of the study include a recommended method of cost-feasibility assessment; the collection and organization of the most useful information presently available; and a series of conclusions on feasibility for generic comparison purposes. These conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) artificial islands to the outer bound of the continental shelf are technologically feasible; (2) offshore nuclear power plants appear to be competitive with onshore plants from a cost standpoint; (3) offshore deepwater ports appear to be more economical than proposed onshore deepwater ports, existing facilities or facilities presently under construction; (4) offshore oil refineries, except under special circumstantces, will probably be more costly than onshore counterparts; (5) the cluster-siting of facilities on an artificial island has definite cost-effectiveness potential; (6) a joint public-private financial venture with a strong federal agency lead role appears essential for the multi-facility island concept to be realized; and (7) artificial island siting of energy complexes appears to be a concept worth pursuing in terms of further site and facility-specific research, and possibly in terms of a demonstration project

  12. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Majbrit; Stensballe, Allan; Rasmussen, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...

  13. Study of the legal problems raised by the siting of nuclear power stations in artificial islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.; Guieze, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The creation and operation of a nuclear power station on an artificial island in French waters are governed by domestic law and are subject to two types of procedure: the first concerns erection of the artificial island and the second the control of the public authorities over creation and operation of the nuclear power station. At administrative level, the setting up of an artificial island requires that it be attached to a commune as well as permission for occupancy from the maritime authorities. Furthermore, setting up of a nuclear power station on an artificial island is subject to the licensing procedure for large nuclear installations and to delivery of the licenses required for release of gaseous and liquid radioactive effluents. Given the proximity of the high seas and eventually, the borders of other States, siting of a nuclear power station on an artificial island imposes obligations at international level. These requirements, which concern prevention of transfrontier pollution, stem from the London (1972) and Paris (1974) Conventions on marine pollution. The third party liability regime for a nuclear incident caused by an installation sited in territorial seas is that of the 1960 Paris Convention on third party liability in the nuclear field and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention. Another problem likely to be raised is that of the right of innocent passage of ships near such installations [fr

  14. Management decision of optimal recharge water in groundwater artificial recharge conditions- A case study in an artificial recharge test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H. Y.; Shi, X. F.; Zhu, W.; Wang, C. Q.; Ma, H. W.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-11-01

    The city conducted groundwater artificial recharge test which was taken a typical site as an example, and the purpose is to prevent and control land subsidence, increase the amount of groundwater resources. To protect groundwater environmental quality and safety, the city chose tap water as recharge water, however, the high cost makes it not conducive to the optimal allocation of water resources and not suitable to popularize widely. To solve this, the city selects two major surface water of River A and B as the proposed recharge water, to explore its feasibility. According to a comprehensive analysis of the cost of recharge, the distance of the water transport, the quality of recharge water and others. Entropy weight Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Method is used to prefer tap water and water of River A and B. Evaluation results show that water of River B is the optimal recharge water, if used; recharge cost will be from 0.4724/m3 to 0.3696/m3. Using Entropy weight Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Method to confirm water of River B as optimal water is scientific and reasonable. The optimal water management decisions can provide technical support for the city to carry out overall groundwater artificial recharge engineering in deep aquifer.

  15. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...... kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA...

  16. Biomimetic conformation-specific assembly of proteins at artificial binding sites nano-patterned on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rica, Roberto; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Biomolecules such as enzymes and antibodies possess binding sites where the molecular architecture and the physicochemical properties are optimum for their interaction with a particular target, in some cases even differentiating between stereoisomers. Here, we mimic this exquisite specificity via the creation of a suitable chemical environment by fabricating artificial binding sites for the protein calmodulin (CaM). By downscaling well-known surface chemical modification methodologies to the nanometer scale via silicon nanopatterning, the Ca2+-CaM conformer was found to selectively bind the biomimetic binding sites. The methodology could be adapted to mimic other protein-receptor interactions for sensing and catalysis. PMID:19757782

  17. The nature of the water nucleation sites on TiO2(110) surfacesrelvealed by ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketteler, Guido; Yamamoto, Susumu; Bluhm, Hendrik; Andersson,Klas; Starr, David E.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson,Anders; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at ambient conditions of pressure (up to 1.5 Torr) and temperature (265Knucleation sites for subsequent water adsorption. The adsorption enthalpy of water binding to these sites is {approx}70 kJ/mol, much stronger than that in the bulk liquid (45 kJ/mol). A model is proposed that relates the structure of the oxide surface to its hydrophilic character.

  18. Simulation of artificial earthquake records compatible with site specific response spectra using time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Fadavi Amiri

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Time history analysis of infrastructures like dams, bridges and nuclear power plants is one of the fundamental parts of their design process. But there are not sufficient and suitable site specific earthquake records to do such time history analysis; therefore, generation of artificial accelerograms is required for conducting research works in this area.  Using time series analysis, wavelet transforms, artificial neural networks and genetic algorithm, a new method is introduced to produce artificial accelerograms compatible with response spectra for the specified site condition. In the proposed method, first, some recorded accelerograms are selected based on the soil condition at the recording station. The soils in these stations are divided into two groups of soil and rock according to their measured shear wave velocity. These accelerograms are then analyzed using wavelet transform. Next, artificial neural networks ability to produce reverse signal from response spectra is used to produce wavelet coefficients. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm is employed to optimize the network weight and bias matrices by searching in a wide range of values and prevent neural network convergence on local optima. At the end site specific accelerograms are produced. In this paper a number of recorded accelerograms in Iran are employed to test the neural network performances and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. It is shown that using synthetic time series analysis, genetic algorithm, neural network and wavelet transform will increase the capabilities of the algorithm and improve its speed and accuracy in generating accelerograms compatible with site specific response spectra for different site conditions.

  19. Site-selective scission of human genome using PNA-based artificial restriction DNA cutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenichiro; Komiyama, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Site-selective scission of genomes is quite important for future biotechnology. However, naturally occurring restriction enzymes cut these huge DNAs at too many sites and cannot be used for this purpose. Recently, we have developed a completely chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) by combining a pair of pseudo-complementary PNA (pcPNA) strands (sequence recognition moiety) and Ce(IV)/EDTA complex (molecular scissors). The scission site of ARCUT and its scission specificity can be freely modulated in terms of the sequences and lengths of the pcPNA strands so that even huge genomes can be selectively cut at only one predetermined site. In this chapter, the method of site-selective scission of human genomic DNA using ARCUT is described in detail.

  20. Review: The nucleation of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.W.; Johnson, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four types of phase transformation that involve the conversion of crystalline phases into more disordered forms are reviewed: melting, disordering of superlattices, amorphization by diffusion between crystalline phases, and irradation amorphization. In the review emphasis is placed on evidence for the heterogeneous nucleation of the product phases; in this connection, the role of surfaces, antiphase domain boundaries, dislocations, vacancies, and grain boundaries is specifically discussed. All of these features have been either observed, or hypothesized, to play a role as heterogeneous nucleation sites in one or more of the four transformations. An attempt is made to draw parallels between nucleation mechanisms in the various processes

  1. Aerosol charging state at an urban site: new analytical approach and implications for ion-induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gagné

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The charging state of aerosol populations was determined using an Ion-DMPS in Helsinki, Finland between December 2008 and February 2010. We extrapolated the charging state and calculated the ion-induced nucleation fraction to be around 1.3 % ± 0.4 % at 2 nm and 1.3 % ± 0.5 % at 1.5 nm, on average. We present a new method to retrieve the average charging state for a new particle formation event, at a given size and polarity. We improve the uncertainty assessment and fitting technique used previously with an Ion-DMPS. We also use a new theoretical framework that allows for different concentrations of small ions for different polarities (polarity asymmetry. We extrapolate the ion-induced fraction using polarity symmetry and asymmetry. Finally, a method to calculate the growth rates from the behaviour of the charging state as a function of the particle diameter using polarity symmetry and asymmetry is presented and used on a selection of new particle formation events.

  2. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aerin Yoon

    Full Text Available For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv, we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7 and two VH (H13 and H16 mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  3. Artificial Cavities and Nest Site Selection by Puerto Rican Parrots: a Multiscale Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. White, Jr.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined nest site selection by Puerto Rican Parrots, a secondary cavity nester, at several spatial scales using the nest entrance as the central focal point relative to 20 habitat and spatial variables. The Puerto Rican Parrot is unique in that, since 2001, all known nesting in the wild has occurred in artificial cavities, which also provided us with an opportunity to evaluate nest site selection without confounding effects of the actual nest cavity characteristics. Because of the data limitations imposed by the small population size of this critically endangered endemic species, we employed a distribution-free statistical simulation approach to assess site selection relative to characteristics of used and unused nesting sites. Nest sites selected by Puerto Rican Parrots were characterized by greater horizontal and vertical visibility from the nest entrance, greater density of mature sierra palms, and a more westerly and leeward orientation of nest entrances than unused sites. Our results suggest that nest site selection in this species is an adaptive response to predation pressure, to which the parrots respond by selecting nest sites offering advantages in predator detection and avoidance at all stages of the nesting cycle. We conclude that identifying and replicating the “nest gestalt” of successful nesting sites may facilitate conservation efforts for this and other endangered avian species.

  4. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between −5 °C to −38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about −6 °C to about −10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice

  5. Artificial Reefs in Motion: Legacy of changes and degradation at the Redbird Reef Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembanis, A. C.; DuVal, C.; Peter, B.

    2016-12-01

    Artificial reefs are used for a variety of purposes at sites throughout the U.S. and around the globe, yet little, if any, long-term monitoring has been conducted with the goal of understanding inter-annual changes to the emplaced structures. Throughout the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region, several programs utilized retired subway cars as disposal structures to form artificial reefs. One such site, known as site 11, or "Redbird Reef", is located off the coast of Delaware and was at one time home to 997 former NYC subway cars. Opportunistic sonar surveys at the site have been conducted between 2008 and 2016 providing one of the most extensive and repeated mapping studies for this type of reef. Previous studies conducted by our group at the site have focused on understanding wave orbital ripple dynamics and scour patterns. In this present study, we analyze the changes apparent at the site itself, focused on the storm-response dynamics of the subway cars. Results have shown that Superstorm Sandy in 2012 produced dramatic changes to the reef structures resulting in the total or partial destruction of eight subway cars within a small (.45 x .2km) portion of the reef site. Winter Storm Jonas in 2016 resulted in the destruction of fewer cars, but rotated a previously static 47m long Navy barge nearly 60 degrees. Once destroyed or collapsed by waves the subway cars go from providing positive structural relief and thus beneficial habitat above the surrounding seabed to being reduced to scattered low relief marine debris. A once popular consideration for reef material, the event and inter-annual decay of subway cars as observed at the Redbird reef provides both a stark indication of the power of storm dynamics on the inner-shelf and a cautionary tale with regards to the selection of seabed reef material.

  6. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  7. PREDICTION OF SITE RESPONSE SPECTRUM UNDER EARTHQUAKE VIBRATION USING AN OPTIMIZED DEVELOPED ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Esmaeilabadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Site response spectrum is one of the key factors to determine the maximum acceleration and displacement, as well as structure behavior analysis during earthquake vibrations. The main objective of this paper is to develop an optimized model based on artificial neural network (ANN using five different training algorithms to predict nonlinear site response spectrum subjected to Silakhor earthquake vibrations is. The model output was tested for a specified area in west of Iran. The performance and quality of optimized model under all training algorithms have been examined by various statistical, analytical and graph analyses criteria as well as a comparison with numerical methods. The observed adaptabilities in results indicate a feasible and satisfactory engineering alternative method for predicting the analysis of nonlinear site response.

  8. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...

  9. Effects of clustered nucleation on recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to study effects of an experimentally determined 3D distribution of nucleation sites on the recrystallization kinetics and on the evolution of the recrystallized microstructure as compared to simulations with random nucleation. It is found that although...... the experimentally observed clustering is not very strong, it changes the kinetics and the recrystallized microstructural morphology plus leads to a recrystallized grain size distribution, which is significantly broadened compared to that of random nucleation simulations. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd...

  10. Designing artificial 2D crystals with site and size controlled quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuejun; Kang, Jiahao; Cao, Wei; Chu, Jae Hwan; Gong, Yongji; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2017-08-30

    Ordered arrays of quantum dots in two-dimensional (2D) materials would make promising optical materials, but their assembly could prove challenging. Here we demonstrate a scalable, site and size controlled fabrication of quantum dots in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ), and quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density by focused electron beam irradiation induced local 2H to 1T phase change in MoS 2 . By designing the quantum dots in a 2D superlattice, we show that new energy bands form where the new band gap can be controlled by the size and pitch of the quantum dots in the superlattice. The band gap can be tuned from 1.81 eV to 1.42 eV without loss of its photoluminescence performance, which provides new directions for fabricating lasers with designed wavelengths. Our work constitutes a photoresist-free, top-down method to create large-area quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density that allow the quantum dots to interfere with each other and create artificial crystals. This technique opens up new pathways for fabricating light emitting devices with 2D materials at desired wavelengths. This demonstration can also enable the assembly of large scale quantum information systems and open up new avenues for the design of artificial 2D materials.

  11. Siting of nuclear power plants on artificial islands: the Belgian situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The building of nuclear stations on the national territory involves reticences of an ecological nature which have induced technicians to consider other siting facilities. The creation of artificial islands, in particular nuclear stations, is therefore suggested. In the present state of the law of the sea, such construction gives rise to some intricate legal problems and leads to consideration of every notion, from the territorial sea to the exclusive economic zone. Especially regarding Belgium, the problem is to know where the legal competence for these facilities will lie. After analysis, it has been estimated that regional bodies have no specific powers in this regard and that no norm with a restricted territorial scope may be applied. (Auth) [fr

  12. Site of intrauterine artificial insemination in the bitch does not affect sperm distribution within the uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, F B; Malm, C; Henry, M; Gheller, V A; Serakides, R; Neves, M M; Macedo, S P; Figueiredo, M S; Andrade, M E J; Chaves, M S; Silva, M X; Rezende, C M F; Melo, E G

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of frozen-thawed spermatozoa within the uterine lumen and oviducts following intrauterine laparoscopic deposition at two sites. Twelve bitches of unknown reproductive history were randomly distributed into two groups. Semen (3 ml containing 300 × 10(6) frozen-thawed spermatozoa) was infused at the uterine body (UB group) or at the cranial tip of the left uterine horn. A 22-G catheter was used to access the uterine lumen. Sperm cell distribution was evaluated after ovariohysterectomy performed 3 h after artificial insemination (AI). There was no difference between groups in mean time to perform AI. Spermatozoa were detected in all uterine segments, including the tip of both horns, but none was detected in the oviduct. The 22-G catheter facilitated deposition of semen in the uterine lumen, particularly at the UB site. Sperm cell distribution occurred evenly along both horns, independent of the site of semen deposition. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Multimodal Imaging Reveals Improvement of Blood Supply to an Artificial Cell Transplant Site Induced by Bioluminescent Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálisová, Andrea; Fábryová, Eva; Jirák, Daniel; Sticová, Eva; Lodererová, Alena; Herynek, Vít; Kříž, Jan; Hájek, Milan

    2017-02-01

    An artificial site for cell or pancreatic islet transplantation can be created using a polymeric scaffold, even though it suffers subcutaneously from improper vascularisation. A sufficient blood supply is crucial for graft survival and function and can be enhanced by transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of syngeneic MSCs on neoangiogenesis and cell engraftment in an artificial site by multimodal imaging. MSCs expressing a gene for luciferase were injected into the artificial subcutaneous site 7 days after scaffold implantation. MRI experiments (anatomical and dynamic contrast-enhanced images) were performed on a 4.7-T scanner using gradient echo sequences. Bioluminescent images were acquired on an IVIS Lumina optical imager. Longitudinal examination was performed for 2 months, and one animal was monitored for 16 months. We confirmed the long-term presence (lasting more than 16 months) of viable donor cells inside the scaffolds using bioluminescence imaging with an optical signal peak appearing on day 3 after MSC implantation. When compared to controls, the tissue perfusion and vessel permeability in the scaffolds were significantly improved at the site with MSCs with a maximal peak on day 9 after MSC transplantation. Our data suggest that the maximal signal obtained by bioluminescence and magnetic resonance imaging from an artificially created site between 3 and 9 days after MSC transplantation can predict the optimal time range for subsequent cellular or tissue transplantation, including pancreatic islets.

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication with artificial transcription factors targeting the highly conserved primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberhardy, Scott R.; Goncalves, Joao; Coelho, Sofia; Segal, David J.; Berkhout, Ben; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primer-binding site (PBS) is a highly conserved region in the HIV genome and represents an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV therapies. In this study, we designed four artificial zinc finger transcription factors to bind at or

  15. Fidelity of northern pine snakes (Pituophis m. melanoleucus) to natural and artificial hibernation sites in the New Jersey Pine Barrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappalorti, Robert T; Burger, Joanna; Burkett, David W; Schneider, David W; McCort, Matthew P; Golden, David M

    2014-01-01

    Environmental managers require information on whether human-made hibernacula are used by rare snakes before constructing large numbers of them as mitigation measures. Fidelity of northern pine snakes (Pituophis m. melanoleucus) was examined in a 6-year study in the New Jersey Pine Barrens to determine whether they used natural and artificial hibernacula equally. Pine snakes used both artificial (human-made) and natural (snake-adapted) hibernacula. Most natural hibernacula were in abandoned burrows of large mammals. Occupancy rates were similar between natural and artificial hibernacula. Only 6 of 27 radio-tracked snakes did not shift hibernacula between years, whereas 78% shifted sites at least once, and fidelity from one year to the next was 42%. For snakes that switched hibernacula (n = 21), one switched among artificial hibernacula, 14 (65%) switched among natural hibernacula, and 6 (29%) switched from artificial to natural hibernacula. Data indicate that most pine snakes switch among hibernacula, mainly selecting natural hibernacula, suggesting that artificial dens are used, but protecting natural hibernacula should be a higher conservation priority.

  16. Principles of nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.; Wood, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The nucleation of small stable species is described in the problem of void growth by discrete rate equations. When gas is being produced the problem reduces to one of calculating the incubation dose for the gas bubble to void transition. A general expression for the steady state nucleation rate is derived for the case when voids are formed by vacancy fluctuations which enable an effective nucleation barrier to be crossed. (author)

  17. Ideal site for ventricular anchoring of artificial chordae in mitral regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alberto; Hurni, Samuel; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Wahl, Andreas; Aymard, Thierry; Vogel, Rolf; Carrel, Thierry

    2012-04-01

    Surgical treatment of mitral leaflet prolapse using artificial neochordae shows excellent outcomes. Upcoming devices attempt the same treatment in a minimally invasive way but target the left ventricular apex as an anchoring point, rather than the tip of the corresponding papillary muscle. In this study, cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare these 2 different anchoring positions and their dynamic relationship with the mitral leaflets. Eleven healthy volunteers (mean age, 31 years; 6 female; mean ejection fraction, 62%) were examined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla, cine steady free precession technique with retrospective gating), whereby dedicated software enabled assessment of the physiologic distances among 3 anchoring sites (anterior papillary muscle, posterior papillary muscle, and apex) and the plane of the mitral annulus at the level of leaflet coaptation. These distances were measured in systole and diastole, and the performance of virtual neochordae was analyzed for the 3 potential anchoring sites. Length difference between systole and diastole for the 3 measured distances were 0.19 ± 0.11 cm (5.9% ± 3.4%) for the anterior papillary muscle, 0.19 ± 0.09 cm (6.7% ± 3.6%) for the posterior papillary muscle, and 1.52 ± 0.18 cm (17.8% ± 2.8%) for the left ventricular apex (P = .001). Virtual neochordae between the leaflet and the left ventricular apex were first adjusted in systole to achieve leaflet coaptation. Leaflet tear in diastole can only be avoided if the width of the attached leaflet is larger than the systole-diastole length difference. On the other hand, if virtual neochordae are adjusted in diastole to avoid leaflet tear, residual leaflet prolapse during systole can result. Because the systole-diastole length difference for papillary muscle anchored chordae is smaller than for apical chordae by a factor 10, there is a strongly reduced risk of prolapse or tearing and the leaflet width is unimportant

  18. Preferential nucleation and growth of InAs/GaAs(0 0 1) quantum dots on defected sites by droplet epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.B.; Lei, W.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Tan, H.H.; Zou, J.; Ringer, S.P.; Jagadish, C.

    2013-01-01

    A double-layer InAs/GaAs(0 0 1) quantum dot structure grown by droplet epitaxy was found to have V-shaped defects, with the two arms of each defect originating from a buried quantum dot and extended to the top surface. Quantum dots on the sample surface nucleated and grew preferentially on top of the arms of the V-shaped defects. The mechanism behind the observed phenomenon was discussed

  19. Interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at an artificial reef site on the inner continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineault, Nicole A.; Trembanis, Arthur C.; Miller, Douglas C.; Capone, Vince

    2013-04-01

    The influence of reef structures on seafloor surface sediments has implications for marine spatial planning and coastal development, including use of the coastal zone for offshore wind energy. We present results of interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at the Redbird artificial reef site, located on the continental shelf offshore of Delaware Bay. The Redbird reef is composed of NYC subway cars, barges, tugboats, and other sunken objects. Since objects were added sporadically between 1996 and 2009, the survey area acts as a natural laboratory to study the evolution of the surrounding seafloor at a structural reef habitat through time. Annual side-scan surveys from 2008 through 2011, and one bathymetric survey in 2010 provide information about surface geology and morphology. Local wave and current data for this time period were analyzed to determine the main morphological agents. Automated backscatter segmentation show that three bottom types dominate and that these large-scale (>10 m) surface sediment patterns persist from year to year. Grab samples reveal that the bottom types are silty sand with clay and sandy gravel. Clear sediment and biological patterns emerged revealing the influence of the objects on the seafloor. Comet-shaped moats of sandy gravel surround single objects and grow to form large-scale coalesced patches around groups of objects. Alignment of sediment patches suggests the periodic hydrodynamic influence of seasonal storms. The abundance and diversity of organisms increases with decreasing clay/silt content. Evidence of scour includes the removal of fine sediments, the formation of moats 1-30 m in diameter and 0.5-1 m deep around the reef objects, and the >1 m settling of objects into the seafloor. Data suggest subway cars reached equilibrium with the environment in 6-7 years, but that larger objects or clusters of objects take a longer time to equilibrate and have farther-reaching effects. Knowledge of local wave and current climate

  20. Potential function of added minerals as nucleation sites and effect of humic substances on mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippon, Urs; Pantke, Claudia; Porsch, Katharina; Larese-Casanova, Phil; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-06-19

    The mobility of toxic metals and the transformation of organic pollutants in the environment are influenced and in many cases even controlled by iron minerals. Therefore knowing the factors influencing iron mineral formation and transformation by Fe(II)-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria is crucial for understanding the fate of contaminants and for the development of remediation technologies. In this study we followed mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing strain Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 in the presence of the crystalline Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides goethite, magnetite and hematite added as potential nucleation sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis of minerals precipitated by BoFeN1 in (57)Fe(II)-spiked microbial growth medium showed that goethite was formed in the absence of mineral additions as well as in the presence of goethite or hematite. The presence of magnetite minerals during Fe(II) oxidation induced the formation of magnetite in addition to goethite, while the addition of humic substances along with magnetite also led to goethite but no magnetite. This study showed that mineral formation not only depends on the aqueous geochemical conditions but can also be affected by the presence of mineral nucleation sites that initiate precipitation of the same underlying mineral phases.

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: bridging stochastic and singular freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized model that bridges these stochastic and singular descriptions of heterogeneous ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. We suggest that ice nucleation is fundamentally a stochastic process but that for realistic atmospheric particle populations this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties. Full evaluation of the model will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  2. Artificial coastal lagoons at solar salt-working sites: A network of habitats for specialised, protected and alien biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Roger J. H.; Broderick, Lee G.; Ross, Kathryn; Moody, Chris; Cruz, Tamira; Clarke, Leo; Stillman, Richard A.

    2018-04-01

    There are concerns that novel structures might displace protected species, facilitate the spread of non-indigenous species, or modify native habitats. It is also predicted that ocean warming and the associated effects of climate change will significantly increase biodiversity loss within coastal regions. Resilience is to a large extent influenced by the magnitude of dispersal and level of connectivity within and between populations. Therefore it is important to investigate the distribution and ecological significance of novel and artificial habitats, the presence of protected and alien species and potential vectors of propagule dispersal. The legacy of solar salt-making in tropical and warm temperate regions is regionally extensive areas of artificial hypersaline ponds, canals and ditches. Yet the broad-scale contribution of salt-working to a network of benthic biodiversity has not been fully established. Artisanal, abandoned and historic salt-working sites were investigated along the Atlantic coast of Europe between southern England (50°N) and Andalucía, Spain (36°N). Natural lagoons are scarce along this macrotidal coast and are vulnerable to environmental change; however it is suspected that avian propagule dispersal is important in maintaining population connectivity. During bird migration periods, benthic cores were collected for infauna from 70 waterbodies across 21 salt-working sites in 5 coastal regions. Bird ringing data were used to investigate potential avian connectivity between locations. Lagoonal specialist species, some of international conservation importance, were recorded across all regions in the storage reservoirs and evaporation ponds of continental salinas, yet few non-indigenous species were observed. Potential avian propagule transport and connectivity within and between extant salt-working sites is high and these artificial habitats are likely to contribute significantly to a network of coastal lagoon biodiversity in Europe.

  3. Atmospheric nucleation: highlights of the EUCAARI project and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the project EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions, atmospheric nucleation was studied by (i developing and testing new air ion and cluster spectrometers, (ii conducting homogeneous nucleation experiments for sulphate and organic systems in the laboratory, (iii investigating atmospheric nucleation mechanism under field conditions, and (iv applying new theoretical and modelling tools for data interpretation and development of parameterisations. The current paper provides a synthesis of the obtained results and identifies the remaining major knowledge gaps related to atmospheric nucleation. The most important technical achievement of the project was the development of new instruments for measuring sub-3 nm particle populations, along with the extensive application of these instruments in both the laboratory and the field. All the results obtained during EUCAARI indicate that sulphuric acid plays a central role in atmospheric nucleation. However, also vapours other than sulphuric acid are needed to explain the nucleation and the subsequent growth processes, at least in continental boundary layers. Candidate vapours in this respect are some organic compounds, ammonia, and especially amines. Both our field and laboratory data demonstrate that the nucleation rate scales to the first or second power of the nucleating vapour concentration(s. This agrees with the few earlier field observations, but is in stark contrast with classical thermodynamic nucleation theories. The average formation rates of 2-nm particles were found to vary by almost two orders of magnitude between the different EUCAARI sites, whereas the formation rates of charged 2-nm particles varied very little between the sites. Overall, our observations are indicative of frequent, yet moderate, ion-induced nucleation usually outweighed by much stronger neutral nucleation events in the continental lower troposphere. The most concrete

  4. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  5. Artificial islands for cluster-siting of offshore energy facilities: an assessment of the legal and regulatory framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backstrom, T.D.; Baram, M.

    1976-06-01

    One of the ways in which offshore coastal regions can be used in energy development is examined, namely through the construction of offshore islands for the siting of energy-related facilities. The purpose of the study is to review and assess the significant sectors of this accumulation of legal and regulatory authority, in order that those proposing and supervising such offshore development can formulate suggestions for coordination and rational allocation of responsibility. The potential demands on offshore resources are considerably greater than many would expect. In addition to offshore drilling and other mineral exploitation, there is increasing interest in safety of navigation, harvest and aquaculture of living marine resources, recreation, and preservation of uniquely valuable marine landscapes and ecosystems. Within this dynamic context, the offshore implications of the energy needs of the United States must be fully evaluated. New energy installations might be appropriately sited offshore on artificial islands. This legal and regulatory assessment contains little case law, new Congressional enactments, or proposed regulations and is, in general, a first-order analysis of the legal context for a new concept--the multiple-facility artificial island--which has not yet been tested, but which merits serious study as an alternative for uses of the offshore regions to meet energy requirements. An extensive bibliography containing 254 citations is included.

  6. Pioneer marine biofilms on artificial surfaces including antifouling coatings immersed in two contrasting French Mediterranean coast sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Jean-François; Djeridi, Ikram; Jamet, Dominique; Coupé, Stéphane; Bressy, Christine; Molmeret, Maëlle; Le Berre, Brigitte; Rimet, Frédéric; Bouchez, Agnès; Blache, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Marine biofilm communities that developed on artificial substrata were investigated using molecular and microscopic approaches. Polystyrene, Teflon® and four antifouling (AF) paints were immersed for 2 weeks at two contrasting sites near Toulon on the French Mediterranean coast (Toulon military harbour and the natural protected area of Porquerolles Island). Biofilms comprising bacteria and diatoms were detected on all the coatings. The population structure as well as the densities of the microorganisms differed in terms of both sites and coatings. Lower fouling densities were observed at Porquerolles Island compared to Toulon harbour. All bacterial communities (analysed by PCR-DGGE) showed related structure, controlled both by the sites and the type of substrata. Pioneer microalgal communities were dominated by the same two diatom species, viz. Licmophora gracilis and Cylindrotheca closterium, at both sites, irrespective of the substrata involved. However, the density of diatoms followed the same trend at both sites with a significant effect of all the AF coatings compared to Teflon and polystyrene.

  7. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA...... in vitro and 13 PKA phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometry. NetPhosK was 100% sensitive and 41% specific in predicting PKA sites in the four proteins. These results demonstrate the potential of using integrated computational and experimental methods for detailed investigations...

  8. Critical radius for nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiades, V.; Solomon, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The free energy of formation and the critical radius for homogeneous nucleation of a spherical nucleus in supercooled liquid, at given temperature and ambient pressure, are determined, taking fully into account surface area, curvature, and pressure effects. The specific heats and densities of the two phases are allowed to be different and all thermophysical properties are temperature dependent. In the simple case in which classical nucleation theory is valid, the results predict a critical radius of about 40% larger than the classical value, and an activation energy barrier of almost three times larger than the classical value. 8 refs.

  9. Return to nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumway, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a collection of TMIN (temperature of return to nucleate boiling) correlations, evaluates them under several conditions, and compares them with a wide range of data. Purpose is to obtain the best one for use in a water reactor safety computer simulator known as TRAC-B. Return to nucleate boiling can occur in a reactor accident at either high or low pressure and flow rates. Most of the correlations yield unrealistic results under some conditions. A new correlation is proposed which overcomes many of the deficiencies

  10. Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V. G.; Zuo, X.

    2006-01-01

    Diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy has been applied to resolve site-specific Mn local structure in manganese ferrite films grown under nonequilibrium conditions. The DAFS spectra were measured at a number of Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K edge. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around crystallographically inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell with nominal octahedral and tetrahedral coordination. The strong preference for Mn to be tetrahedrally coordinated in this compound is not only manifested in the relative site occupancies but also in a strong reduction in coordination number for Mn ions at nominal octahedral sites

  11. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a

  12. Foraging Habitat Quality Constrains Effectiveness of Artificial Nest-Site Provisioning in Reversing Population Declines in a Colonial Cavity Nester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catry, Inês; Franco, Aldina M. A.; Rocha, Pedro; Alcazar, Rita; Reis, Susana; Cordeiro, Ana; Ventim, Rita; Teodósio, Joaquim; Moreira, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Among birds, breeding numbers are mainly limited by two resources of major importance: food supply and nest-site availability. Here, we investigated how differences in land-use and nest-site availability affected the foraging behaviour, breeding success and population trends of the colonial cavity-dependent lesser kestrel Falco naumanni inhabiting two protected areas. Both areas were provided with artificial nests to increase nest-site availability. The first area is a pseudo-steppe characterized by traditional extensive cereal cultivation, whereas the second area is a previous agricultural zone now abandoned or replaced by forested areas. In both areas, lesser kestrels selected extensive agricultural habitats, such as fallows and cereal fields, and avoided scrubland and forests. In the second area, tracked birds from one colony travelled significantly farther distances (6.2 km ±1.7 vs. 1.8 km ±0.4 and 1.9 km ±0.6) and had significant larger foraging-ranges (144 km2 vs. 18.8 and 14.8 km2) when compared to the birds of two colonies in the extensive agricultural area. Longer foraging trips were reflected in lower chick feeding rates, lower fledging success and reduced chick fitness. Availability and occupation of artificial nests was high in both areas but population followed opposite trends, with a positive increment recorded exclusively in the first area with a large proportion of agricultural areas. Progressive habitat loss around the studied colony in the second area (suitable habitat decreased from 32% in 1990 to only 7% in 2002) is likely the main driver of the recorded population decline and suggests that the effectiveness of bird species conservation based on nest-site provisioning is highly constrained by habitat quality in the surrounding areas. Therefore, the conservation of cavity-dependent species may be enhanced firstly by finding the best areas of remaining habitat and secondly by increasing the carrying capacity of high-quality habitat areas

  13. Foraging habitat quality constrains effectiveness of artificial nest-site provisioning in reversing population declines in a colonial cavity nester.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Catry

    Full Text Available Among birds, breeding numbers are mainly limited by two resources of major importance: food supply and nest-site availability. Here, we investigated how differences in land-use and nest-site availability affected the foraging behaviour, breeding success and population trends of the colonial cavity-dependent lesser kestrel Falco naumanni inhabiting two protected areas. Both areas were provided with artificial nests to increase nest-site availability. The first area is a pseudo-steppe characterized by traditional extensive cereal cultivation, whereas the second area is a previous agricultural zone now abandoned or replaced by forested areas. In both areas, lesser kestrels selected extensive agricultural habitats, such as fallows and cereal fields, and avoided scrubland and forests. In the second area, tracked birds from one colony travelled significantly farther distances (6.2 km ± 1.7 vs. 1.8 km ± 0.4 and 1.9 km ± 0.6 and had significant larger foraging-ranges (144 km(2 vs. 18.8 and 14.8 km(2 when compared to the birds of two colonies in the extensive agricultural area. Longer foraging trips were reflected in lower chick feeding rates, lower fledging success and reduced chick fitness. Availability and occupation of artificial nests was high in both areas but population followed opposite trends, with a positive increment recorded exclusively in the first area with a large proportion of agricultural areas. Progressive habitat loss around the studied colony in the second area (suitable habitat decreased from 32% in 1990 to only 7% in 2002 is likely the main driver of the recorded population decline and suggests that the effectiveness of bird species conservation based on nest-site provisioning is highly constrained by habitat quality in the surrounding areas. Therefore, the conservation of cavity-dependent species may be enhanced firstly by finding the best areas of remaining habitat and secondly by increasing the carrying capacity of high

  14. Classification of the LCVF AVIRIS test site with a Kohonen artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenyi, Erzsebet; Singer, Robert B.; Farrand, William H.

    1993-01-01

    We present a classification of an AVIRIS spectral image of the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field (LCVF). Geologic mapping from such data is made possible by distinctive mineral signatures: absorption features and the shape of the spectral continuum. The subtle spectral shape differences between some of the geological units in this scene along with the high dimensionality of the spectral presents a challenging pattern recognition task. We found an artificial neural network powerful in separating 13 geological units based on the full spectral resolution. The LCVF, in northern Nye County, Nevada, was the primary focus of the NASA-sponsored Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment in the summer of 1989. It consists of over 100 square miles of Quaternary basaltic pyroclastic and flow deposits. These deposits lie atop ignimbrites and silicic lava flows of Tertiary age and in turn are overlain by Quaternary alluvial and playa deposits. This AVIRIS image was collected on September 29, 1989 at 11:44 at 11:44 PDT. The 256-by-256 pixel subsection in this study contains oxidized basaltic cinder deposits, the southern half of the Lunar Lake playa, and outcrops of the Rhyollite of Big Sand Spring Valley. Vegetation in LCVF is sparse, but locally abundant within washes and near springs.

  15. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Xuehua; Lhuissier , Henri; Sun , Chao; Lohse , Detlef

    2014-01-01

    International audience; When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles (" superstability "). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pi...

  16. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  17. The Influence of Artificially Introduced N-Glycosylation Sites on the In Vitro Activity of Xenopus laevis Erythropoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Kazumichi; Meguro, Mizue; Sato, Kei; Tanizaki, Yuta; Nogawa-Kosaka, Nami; Kato, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the primary regulator of erythropoiesis, is a heavily glycosylated protein found in humans and several other mammals. Intriguingly, we have previously found that EPO in Xenopus laevis (xlEPO) has no N-glycosylation sites, and cross-reacts with the human EPO (huEPO) receptor despite low homology with huEPO. In this study, we introduced N-glycosylation sites into wild-type xlEPO at the positions homologous to those in huEPO, and tested whether the glycosylated mutein retained its biological activity. Seven xlEPO muteins, containing 1–3 additional N-linked carbohydrates at positions 24, 38, and/or 83, were expressed in COS-1 cells. The muteins exhibited lower secretion efficiency, higher hydrophilicity, and stronger acidic properties than the wild type. All muteins stimulated the proliferation of both cell lines, xlEPO receptor-expressing xlEPOR-FDC/P2 cells and huEPO receptor-expressing UT-7/EPO cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the muteins retained their in vitro biological activities. The maximum effect on xlEPOR-FDC/P2 proliferation was decreased by the addition of N-linked carbohydrates, but that on UT-7/EPO proliferation was not changed, indicating that the muteins act as partial agonists to the xlEPO receptor, and near-full agonists to the huEPO receptor. Hence, the EPO-EPOR binding site in X. laevis locates the distal region of artificially introduced three N-glycosylation sites, demonstrating that the vital conformation to exert biological activity is conserved between humans and X. laevis, despite the low similarity in primary structures of EPO and EPOR. PMID:25898205

  18. The influence of artificially introduced N-glycosylation sites on the in vitro activity of Xenopus laevis erythropoietin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Nagasawa

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO, the primary regulator of erythropoiesis, is a heavily glycosylated protein found in humans and several other mammals. Intriguingly, we have previously found that EPO in Xenopus laevis (xlEPO has no N-glycosylation sites, and cross-reacts with the human EPO (huEPO receptor despite low homology with huEPO. In this study, we introduced N-glycosylation sites into wild-type xlEPO at the positions homologous to those in huEPO, and tested whether the glycosylated mutein retained its biological activity. Seven xlEPO muteins, containing 1-3 additional N-linked carbohydrates at positions 24, 38, and/or 83, were expressed in COS-1 cells. The muteins exhibited lower secretion efficiency, higher hydrophilicity, and stronger acidic properties than the wild type. All muteins stimulated the proliferation of both cell lines, xlEPO receptor-expressing xlEPOR-FDC/P2 cells and huEPO receptor-expressing UT-7/EPO cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the muteins retained their in vitro biological activities. The maximum effect on xlEPOR-FDC/P2 proliferation was decreased by the addition of N-linked carbohydrates, but that on UT-7/EPO proliferation was not changed, indicating that the muteins act as partial agonists to the xlEPO receptor, and near-full agonists to the huEPO receptor. Hence, the EPO-EPOR binding site in X. laevis locates the distal region of artificially introduced three N-glycosylation sites, demonstrating that the vital conformation to exert biological activity is conserved between humans and X. laevis, despite the low similarity in primary structures of EPO and EPOR.

  19. Seismic Design Value Evaluation Based on Checking Records and Site Geological Conditions Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tienfuan Kerh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an improved computational neural network model that uses three seismic parameters (i.e., local magnitude, epicentral distance, and epicenter depth and two geological conditions (i.e., shear wave velocity and standard penetration test value as the inputs for predicting peak ground acceleration—the key element for evaluating earthquake response. Initial comparison results show that a neural network model with three neurons in the hidden layer can achieve relatively better performance based on the evaluation index of correlation coefficient or mean square error. This study further develops a new weight-based neural network model for estimating peak ground acceleration at unchecked sites. Four locations identified to have higher estimated peak ground accelerations than that of the seismic design value in the 24 subdivision zones are investigated in Taiwan. Finally, this study develops a new equation for the relationship of horizontal peak ground acceleration and focal distance by the curve fitting method. This equation represents seismic characteristics in Taiwan region more reliably and reasonably. The results of this study provide an insight into this type of nonlinear problem, and the proposed method may be applicable to other areas of interest around the world.

  20. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability.

  1. Temperature Dependence in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R. L.; Winkler, P. M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on stable (sub-2 nm) nuclei aids the formation of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by circumventing or reducing vapor pressure barriers that would otherwise limit condensation and new particle growth. Aerosol and cloud formation depend largely on the interaction between a condensing liquid and the nucleating site. A new paper published this year reports the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature and other geometric properties of a spherical cap nucleus at nanometer scale using measurements from the Vienna Size Analyzing Nucleus Counter (SANC) (Winkler et al., 2016). For water nucleating heterogeneously on silver oxide nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to around 90 degrees for the macroscopically measured equilibrium angle for water on bulk silver. The small microscopic contact angles can be attributed via the generalized Young equation to a negative line tension that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  2. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  3. Nucleate boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz Jabardo, J.M. [Universidade da Coruna (Spain). Escola Politecnica Superior], e-mail: mjabardo@cdf.udc.es

    2009-07-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer has been intensely studied during the last 70 years. However boiling remains a science to be understood and equated. In other words, using the definition given by Boulding, it is an 'insecure science'. It would be pretentious of the part of the author to explore all the nuances that the title of the paper suggests in a single conference paper. Instead the paper will focus on one interesting aspect such as the effect of the surface microstructure on nucleate boiling heat transfer. A summary of a chronological literature survey is done followed by an analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of boiling on tubes of different materials and surface roughness. The effect of the surface roughness is performed through data from the boiling of refrigerants R-134a and R-123, medium and low pressure refrigerants, respectively. In order to investigate the extent to which the surface roughness affects boiling heat transfer, very rough surfaces (4.6 {mu}m and 10.5 {mu}m ) have been tested. Though most of the data confirm previous literature trends, the very rough surfaces present a peculiar behaviour with respect to that of the smoother surfaces (Ra<3.0 {mu}m). (author)

  4. Duplex Heterogeneous Nucleation Behavior of Precipitates in C-Mn Steel Containing Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guilin; Tao, Sufen

    2018-04-01

    The two successive heterogeneous nucleation behaviors of FeSn2-MnS-Al2O3 complex precipitates in ultrahigh Sn-bearing steel were investigated. First, Al2O3 was the nucleation site of the MnS at the end of solidification. Then, FeSn2 nucleated heterogeneously on the MnS particles that nucleated on the Al2O3 particles. The formation sequence of the precipitated phase caused the duplex heterogeneous nucleation to occur consecutively at most twice.

  5. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  6. Theory and Simulation of Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832049

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation is the process where a stable nucleus spontaneously emerges in a metastable environment. Examples of nucleation abound, for instance the formation of droplets in undercooled gasses and of crystals in undercooled liquids. The process is thermally activated and is key to understanding

  7. A dynamical theory of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2013-05-01

    A dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics is described. It is developed in detail for the case of diffusion-limited nucleation appropriate to colloids and macro-molecules in solution. By incorporating fluctuations, realistic fluid-transport and realistic free energy models the theory is able to give a unified treatment of both the pre-critical development of fluctuations leading to a critical cluster as well as of post-critical growth. Standard results from classical nucleation theory are shown to follow in the weak noise limit while the generality of the theory allows for many extensions including the description of very high supersaturations (small clusters), multiple order parameters and strong-noise effects to name a few. The theory is applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of a model globular protein in a confined volume and it is found that nucleation depends critically on the existence of long-wavelength, small-amplitude density fluctuations.

  8. An adaptive artificial neural network model for sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems: Application for isolated sites in Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellit, A.; Benghanem, M.; Hadj Arab, A.; Guessoum, G.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we investigate, by using an adaptive Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in order to find a suitable model for sizing Stand-Alone Photovoltaic (SAPV) systems, based on a minimum of input data. This model combines Radial Basis Function (RBF) network and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter in order to accelerate the convergence of the network. For the sizing of a photovoltaic (PV) system, we need to determine the optimal sizing coefficients (K PV , K B . These coefficients allow us to determine the number of solar panels and storage batteries necessary to satisfy a given consumption, especially in isolated sites where the global solar radiation data is not always available and which are considered the most important parameters for sizing a PV system. Obtained results by classical models (analytical, numerical, analytical- numerical, B-spline function) and new models like feed-forward (MLP), radial basis function (RBF), MLP-IIR and RBF-IIR have been compared with experimental sizing coefficients in order to illustrate the accuracy of the results of the new developed model. This model has been trained by using 200 known optimal sizing coefficients corresponding to 200 locations in Algeria. In this way, the adaptive model was trained to accept and even handle a number of unusual cases, the unknown validation sizing coefficients set produced very set accurate estimation and a correlation coefficient of 98% was obtained between the calculated and that estimated by the RBF-IIR model. This result indicates that the proposed method can be successfully used for the estimation of optimal sizing coefficients of SAPV systems for any locations in Algeria, but the methodology can be generalized using different locations over the world. (author)

  9. Artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret-Galix, D.

    1992-01-01

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  10. Effects of Monotypic and Binary Mixtures of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Microbial Growth in Sandy Soil Collected from Artificial Recharge Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Ha, Kyoochul; Kong, In Chul

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of monotypic and binary metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs, ZnO, NiO, Co3O4 and TiO2) on microbial growth were evaluated in sandy soil collected from artificial recharge sites. Microbial growth was assessed based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and viable cell counts (VCC). Microbial growth based on ATP content and VCC showed considerable differences depending on NP type and concentration, whereas DHA did not significantly change. In ge...

  11. Dynamic damage nucleation and evolution in multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensin, S. J.; Escobedo, J. P.; Gray, G. T.; Patterson, B. M.; Trujillo, C. P.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2014-05-01

    For ductile metals, dynamic fracture occurs through void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Previous experimental works in high purity metals have shown that microstructural features such as grain boundaries, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can act as initial void nucleation sites. However, for materials of engineering significance, those with, second phase particles it is less clear what the role of a soft second phase will be on damage nucleation and evolution. To approach this problem in a systematic manner, two materials have been investigated: high purity copper and copper with 1% lead. These materials have been shock loaded at ˜1.5 GPa and soft recovered. In-situ free surface velocity information and post mortem metallography reveals the presence of a high number of small voids in CuPb in comparison to a lower number of large voids in Cu. This suggests that damage evolution is nucleation dominated in the CuPb and growth dominated in the pure Cu.

  12. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  13. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Giberti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation.

  14. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds.

  15. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized, conceptual model to explore the transition between stochastic and singular ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. Even with ice nucleation treated fundamentally as a stochastic process this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties, as might be typical for realistic atmospheric particle populations. Full evaluation of the model findings will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  16. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  17. Differences in ice nucleation behavior of arable and desert soil dust in deposition nucleation regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Romy; Vogel, Franziska; Möhler, Ottmar; Höhler, Kristina; Schiebel, Thea

    2017-04-01

    dust will be compared to existing AIDA experiments at higher temperatures published by Steinke et al. (2016). Finally, the ice nucleation activity of both desert dust and agricultural soil dust will be compared for the upper tropospheric temperature regime. Andreae et al. (2009), Sources and Nature of Atmospheric Aerosols, in Aerosol Pollution Impact on Precipitation - A Scientific Review, Ch.3, Springer Netherlands, 45-89 Cziczo et al. (2013), Clarifying the Dominant Sources and Mechanisms of Cirrus Cloud Formation, Science, 340, 1320-1324 O'Sullivan et al. (2014), Ice nucleation by fertile soil dusts: relative importance of mineral and biogenic components, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1853-1867 Steinke et al. (2016), Ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dust aerosols from Mongolia, Argentina and Germany, J. Geophys. Res., 121 Tobo et al. (2014), Organic matter matters for ice nuclei of agricultural soil origin, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 8521-8531 Ullrich et al. (2017), A new ice nucleation active site parametrization for desert dust and soot, J. Atmos. Sci., in press

  18. Role of nucleation in nanodiamond film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, C.H.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiamond films were deposited using different microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition schemes following several nucleation pretreatment methods. The nucleation efficiency and the films structure were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. C 2 dimer growth (CH 4 and H 2 in 90% Ar) cannot nucleate diamond and works only on existing diamond surfaces. The methyl radical process (up to 20% CH 4 in H 2 ) allows some nucleation probability on appropriate substrates. Prolonged bias enhanced nucleation initiates both diamond nucleation and growth. C 2 dimer growth results in pure nanodiamond free of amorphous carbon, while prolonged bias enhanced nucleation forms an amorphous carbon/nanodiamond composite

  19. Connection of sulfuric acid to atmospheric nucleation in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, T; Manninen, H E; Sihto, S L; Yli-Juuti, T; Mauldin, R L; Petäjä, T; Riipinen, I; Kerminen, V M; Kulmala, M

    2009-07-01

    Gas to particle conversion in the boundary layer occurs worldwide. Sulfuric acid is considered to be one of the key components in these new particle formation events. In this study we explore the connection between measured sulfuric acid and observed formation rate of both charged 2 nm as well as neutral clusters in a boreal forest environment A very short time delay of the order of ten minutes between these two parameters was detected. On average the event days were clearly associated with higher sulfuric acid concentrations and lower condensation sink (CS) values than the nonevent days. Although there was not a clear sharp boundary between the nucleation and no-nucleation days in sulfuric acid-CS plane, at our measurement site a typical threshold concentration of 3.10(5) molecules cm(-3) of sulfuric acid was needed to initiate the new particle formation. Two proposed nucleation mechanisms were tested. Our results are somewhat more in favor of activation type nucleation than of kinetic type nucleation, even though our data set is too limited to omit either of these two mechanisms. In line with earlier studies, the atmospheric nucleation seems to start from sizes very close to 2 nm.

  20. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  1. Visualization of nucleate pool boiling of freon 113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afify, M.A.; Fruman, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to give a fine description of the behaviour of vapour bubbles in nucleate pool boiling at sites of known sizes using high speed photography. The shapes and growth history of isolated bubbles were determined for a variety of experimental conditions. Coalescence effects between two adjacent or consecutive bubbles were also visualized and the occurrence of vapour patches and continuous vapour columns was demonstrated. Quantitative analysis of the films allows to determine the history and nucleation characteristics of bubbles as a function of various parameters such as heat flux, liquid subcooling and size and nature of nucleation sites. These results are in good agreement with those found in the literature

  2. Ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dust aerosols from Mongolia, Argentina, and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, I.; Funk, R.; Busse, J.; Iturri, A.; Kirchen, S.; Leue, M.; Möhler, O.; Schwartz, T.; Schnaiter, M.; Sierau, B.; Toprak, E.; Ullrich, R.; Ulrich, A.; Hoose, C.; Leisner, T.

    2016-11-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain considerable mass fractions of organic material. Also, soil dust particles may act as carriers for potentially ice-active biological particles. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. The results are expressed as ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) densities and presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode. For immersion freezing occurring at 254 K, samples from Argentina, China, and Germany show ice nucleation efficiencies which are by a factor of 10 higher than desert dusts. On average, the difference in ice nucleation efficiencies between agricultural and desert dusts becomes significantly smaller at temperatures below 247 K. In the deposition mode the soil dusts showed higher ice nucleation activity than Arizona Test Dust over a temperature range between 232 and 248 K and humidities RHice up to 125%. INAS densities varied between 109 and 1011 m-2 for these thermodynamic conditions. For one soil dust sample (Argentinian Soil), the effect of treatments with heat was investigated. Heat treatments (383 K) did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency observed at 249 K. This finding presumably excludes proteinaceous ice-nucleating entities as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency.

  3. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: Parallel and series nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is su...

  4. Heat-flux enhancement by vapour-bubble nucleation in Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Xie, Yanbo; Chen, S.; Fernandez Rivas, David; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Günter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of turbulent convective heat transport due to vapour-bubble nucleation at the bottom plate of a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard sample (aspect ratio 1.00, diameter 8.8 cm) filled with liquid. Microcavities acted as nucleation sites, allowing for well-controlled bubble

  5. Nucleation and evaporation of domains due to electric field at room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study of nucleation and evaporation of 90° and 180° domains by external direct current (dc) electric field at room temperature in barium titanate single crystals has been carried out using reflecting microscope. It was observed that both the 90° and 180° domains were nucleated at some sites, while evaporated at some ...

  6. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  7. Earth's inner core nucleation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Van Orman, James A.; Hauck, Steven A.; Willard, Matthew A.

    2018-04-01

    The conventional view of Earth's inner core is that it began to crystallize at Earth's center when the temperature dropped below the melting point of the iron alloy and has grown steadily since that time as the core continued to cool. However, this model neglects the energy barrier to the formation of the first stable crystal nucleus, which is commonly represented in terms of the critical supercooling required to overcome the barrier. Using constraints from experiments, simulations, and theory, we show that spontaneous crystallization in a homogeneous liquid iron alloy at Earth's core pressures requires a critical supercooling of order 1000 K, which is too large to be a plausible mechanism for the origin of Earth's inner core. We consider mechanisms that can lower the nucleation barrier substantially. Each has caveats, yet the inner core exists: this is the nucleation paradox. Heterogeneous nucleation on a solid metallic substrate tends to have a low energy barrier and offers the most straightforward solution to the paradox, but solid metal would probably have to be delivered from the mantle and such events are unlikely to have been common. A delay in nucleation, whether due to a substantial nucleation energy barrier, or late introduction of a low energy substrate, would lead to an initial phase of rapid inner core growth from a supercooled state. Such rapid growth may lead to distinctive crystallization texturing that might be observable seismically. It would also generate a spike in chemical and thermal buoyancy that could affect the geomagnetic field significantly. Solid metal introduced to Earth's center before it reached saturation could also provide a nucleation substrate, if large enough to escape complete dissolution. Inner core growth, in this case, could begin earlier and start more slowly than standard thermal models predict.

  8. Nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Navarro, Jesús; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have constructed a density functional (DF) for parahydrogen between 14 and 32 K. ► The experimental equation of state and the surface tension are well reproduced. ► We have investigated nucleation and cavitations processes in the metastable phase. ► We have obtained the electron bubble explosion within the capillary model. - Abstract: We have used a density functional approach to investigate thermal homogeneous nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen. The effect of electrons as seeds of heterogeneous cavitation in liquid parahydrogen is also discussed within the capillary model.

  9. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L.; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  10. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-02

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  11. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  12. Regulation of microtubule nucleation mediated by gamma-tubulin complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sulimenko, Vadym; Hájková, Zuzana; Klebanovych, Anastasiya; Dráber, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 3 (2017), s. 1187-1199 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13015 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mitotic spindle formation * ring complex * fission yeast * organizing centers * protein complex * golgi-complex * cell -cycle * pole body * augmin * centrosome * Centrosomes * Microtubule nucleation * Microtubule-organizing centers * Non-centrosomal nucleation sites * Spindle pole bodies * gamma-Tubulin complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  13. Nucleation of Recrystallization studied by EBSP and 3DXRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Stine

    2009-01-01

    When a deformed crystalline material is annealed, recrystallization will typically take place. In this process new perfect crystals nucleate and grow, consuming the deformation structure. Traditionally, nucleation theories state that the crystal orientations of these new grains were already present...... in order to ease determination of the nucleation sites and the analysis of orientation relationships between nuclei and parent grains. A series of experiments was carried out using Electron Backscattered diffraction Patterns (EBSP). These were considered to provide a valuable background to support...... in the bulk of a sample after annealing. An orientation imaging map was reconstructed from the bulk of the sample before and after annealing. Such reconstructions have only been done before with completely recrystallized samples, so this was a unique opportunity to compare orientations observed locally...

  14. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  15. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation. While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation "onset" conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulfate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the "onset" of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS density is discussed as a simple and empirical normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that INAS densities of some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains, fungal

  16. Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ation thermodynamical parameters like interfacial energy between the solid Nd123 and its flux BaO–CuO, metastable zone-width, Gibbs free energy, critical energy barrier for nucleation and critical nucleation radius have been calculated from the knowledge of solubility data and by applying the classical nucleation theory.

  17. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Christopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests performed on simulated fault gouges prepared from ocean-floor carbonates and clays, cored during IODP drilling offshore Costa Rica. Clay-rich gouges show internal friction coefficients (that is, the slope of linearized shear stress versus normal stress data) of μint = 0.44 - 0.56, irrespective of temperature and pore-fluid pressure (Pf). By contrast, μint for the carbonate gouge strongly depends on temperature and pore-fluid pressure, with μint decreasing dramatically from 0.84 at room temperature and Pf = 20 MPa to 0.27 at T = 140 °C and Pf = 120 MPa. This effect provides a fundamental mechanism of shear localization and earthquake generation in subduction zones, and makes carbonates likely nucleation sites for plate-boundary earthquakes. Our results imply that rupture nucleation is prompted by a combination of temperature-controlled frictional instability and temperature- and pore-pressure-dependent weakening of calcareous fault gouges.

  18. Use of Artificial Burrows by Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) at the HAMMER Facility on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Amanda K.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Duberstein, Corey A.

    2005-09-30

    In 2003 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) constructed an Emergency Vehicle Operations Course (EVOC) at the Hazardous Material Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) in the southern portion of the Hanford Site. Preliminary surveys during 2001 identified an active burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) burrow and three burrowing owls within the proposed development area. Burrowing owls were classified as a federal species of concern, a Washington State ?candidate? species, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife priority species, and a Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan Level III resource. Therefore, the mitigation action plan for the project included the installation of twenty artificial burrows around EVOC in the spring of 2003. The mitigation plan established a success criterion of five percent annual use of the burrows by owls. In July 2005, a field survey of the EVOC burrow complex was conducted to determine use and demography at each site. Burrow locations were mapped and signs of activity (feces, owl tracks, castings, feathers) were recorded. Out of the twenty burrows, twelve were found to be active. Of the eight inactive burrows three appeared to have been active earlier in the 2005 breeding season. A total of nineteen owls were counted but demography could not be determined. It appears that the EVOC mitigation exceeded burrow use goals during 2005. Continued site monitoring and maintenance, according to mitigation plan guidelines should be conducted as prescribed.

  19. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  20. G protein regulator 1 (GPR-1) localizes to cortical sites of artificial mechanical indentation in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Henrik

    2012-10-01

    Cytokinesis and spindle positioning require the cortical force regulator G Protein Regulator 1/2 (GPR-1/2). GPR-1/2 is thought to localize to sites of cortical force generation. Does GPR-1/2 also act as a sensor for mechanical stimulation? I mechanically stimulated the cortex by indenting it with a glass needle and observed the cortical localization of a YFP::GPR-1 transgene. I found that cortical YFP::GPR-1 accumulated at the site of mechanical indentation. This phenomenon occurred on most of the cortical areas except the site of prospective cytokinesis furrow formation. This result suggests that GPR-1/2 can sense mechanical properties of the cortex, which may be important for GPR-1/2 function regulating spindle positioning and cytokinesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-01-01

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-α resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  2. Sex differences in the responses to oviposition site cues by a fish revealed by tests with an artificial host

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Phillips, A.; Reichard, Martin; Smith, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 126, April (2017), s. 187-194 ISSN 0003-3472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : maternal effect * mussel * oviposition site cue * reproduction * Rhodeus * sexual conflict Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Behavioral sciences biology Impact factor: 2.869, year: 2016

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  4. Thermodynamic and Dynamic Aspects of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2018-01-01

    It is known that ice nucleating particles (INP) immersed within supercooled droplets promote the formation of ice. Common theoretical models used to represent this process assume that the immersed particle lowers the work of ice nucleation without significantly affecting the dynamics of water in the vicinity of the particle. This is contrary to evidence showing that immersed surfaces significantly affect the viscosity and diffusivity of vicinal water. To study how this may affect ice formation this work introduces a model linking the ice nucleation rate to the modification of the dynamics and thermodynamics of vicinal water by immersed particles. It is shown that INP that significantly reduce the work of ice nucleation also pose strong limitations to the growth of the nascent ice germs. This leads to the onset of a new ice nucleation regime, called spinodal ice nucleation, where the dynamics of ice germ growth instead of the ice germ size determines the nucleation rate. Nucleation in this regime is characterized by an enhanced sensitivity to particle area and cooling rate. Comparison of the predicted ice nucleation rate against experimental measurements for a diverse set of species relevant to cloud formation suggests that spinodal ice nucleation may be common in nature.

  5. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  6. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: parallel and series nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-28

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized, and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is suggested. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  7. Fracture Statistics: Universality vs. Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Ashivni

    2012-02-01

    We reexamine several common assumptions about fracture strength, utilizing large-scale simulations of a fuse network model and applying both renormalization-group and nucleation theory methods. Statistical distributions of fracture strengths are believed to be universal and material independent. The universal Weibull and Gumbel distributions emerge as a consequence of the ``weakest-link hypothesis'' and have been studied in the classical theory of extreme value statistics. These distributions are also the fixed points of a renormalization group (RG) flow. However, the engineering community often ignores the Gumbel distribution and uses the Weibull form almost exclusively to fit experimental data. Further, such fits are often extrapolated beyond the available data to estimate the probability of rare events in a variety of applications ranging from structural reliability to insurance pricing. Our recent studies of the random fuse network model raises doubts about most of these practices. We find that the emergent distribution of fracture strengths is the Gumbel distribution. However, the extremely slow convergence to the universal Gumbel form renders it unusable at least in this case. On the other hand, we show that a non-universal distribution derived by using a Griffiths type nucleation theory (due to Duxbury et al.) converges rapidly even for moderate system sizes. We find that while extrapolating the RG based universal Gumbel distribution is perilous and gives wildly incorrect predictions, the nucleation based non-universal results can be extrapolated with confidence. It is entertaining that fracture provides wonderful examples of the statistical mechanics tools developed to study both continuous as well as abrupt phase transitions.

  8. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  9. Crystal nucleation of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ran; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2011-01-21

    Using computer simulations, we investigate the homogeneous crystal nucleation in suspensions of colloidal hard dumbbells. The free energy barriers are determined by Monte Carlo simulations using the umbrella sampling technique. We calculate the nucleation rates for the plastic crystal and the aperiodic crystal phase using the kinetic prefactor as determined from event driven molecular dynamics simulations. We find good agreement with the nucleation rates determined from spontaneous nucleation events observed in event driven molecular dynamics simulations within error bars of one order of magnitude. We study the effect of aspect ratio of the dumbbells on the nucleation of plastic and aperiodic crystal phases, and we also determine the structure of the critical nuclei. Moreover, we find that the nucleation of the aligned close-packed crystal structure is strongly suppressed by a high free energy barrier at low supersaturations and slow dynamics at high supersaturations.

  10. Study on nucleation kinetics of lysozyme crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jing J.; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-07-01

    The nucleation kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystallization was investigated using a hot stage cooling crystallizer and a microscope to monitor the solution crystallization process in real time. Images of crystals were continuously recorded under varied precipitant and protein concentrations. The nucleation rate was found to be higher at higher precipitant concentration, and increase monotonically with protein concentration if the precipitant concentration was held constant. Attempt was made to interpret the experimental data using classical nucleation theory. It was found that the model predictions are lower than the experimental values at low supersaturations but agree well with experimental data at high supersaturations. The trends in the experimental data suggest that two nucleation mechanisms might co-exist: heterogeneous nucleation seems to be the dominant at low supersaturation while at higher supersaturation homogeneous nucleation seems to play the major role.

  11. Microstructurally-sensitive fatigue crack nucleation in Ni-based single and oligo crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Jiang, Jun; Dunne, Fionn P. E.

    2017-09-01

    An integrated experimental, characterisation and computational crystal plasticity study of cyclic plastic beam loading has been carried out for nickel single crystal (CMSX4) and oligocrystal (MAR002) alloys in order to assess quantitatively the mechanistic drivers for fatigue crack nucleation. The experimentally validated modelling provides knowledge of key microstructural quantities (accumulated slip, stress and GND density) at experimentally observed fatigue crack nucleation sites and it is shown that while each of these quantities is potentially important in crack nucleation, none of them in its own right is sufficient to be predictive. However, the local (elastic) stored energy density, measured over a length scale determined by the density of SSDs and GNDs, has been shown to predict crack nucleation sites in the single and oligocrystals tests. In addition, once primary nucleated cracks develop and are represented in the crystal model using XFEM, the stored energy correctly identifies where secondary fatigue cracks are observed to nucleate in experiments. This (Griffith-Stroh type) quantity also correctly differentiates and explains intergranular and transgranular fatigue crack nucleation.

  12. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  13. Cross-Linking Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Tetragonal chicken egg white crystals consist of 4(sub 3) helices running in alternating directions, the helix rows having a two fold symmetry with each other. The unit cell consists of one complete tetrameric turn from each of two adjacent helices (an octamer). PBC analysis indicates that the helix intermolecular bonds are the strongest in the crystal, therefore likely formed first. AFM analysis of the (110) surface shows only complete helices, no half steps or bisected helices being found, while AFM line scans to measure the growth step increments show that they are multiples of the 4(sub 3) helix tetramer dimensions. This supports our thesis that the growth units are in fact multiples of the four molecule 4(sub 3) helix unit, the "average" growth unit size for the (110) face being an octamer (two turns about the helix) and the (101) growth unit averaging about the size of a hexamer. In an effort to better understand the species involved in the crystal nucleation and growth process, we have initiated an experimental program to study the species formed in solution compared to what is found in the crystal through covalent cross-linking studies. These experiments use the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent aminoethyl-4-azidonitroanaline (AEANA). An aliphatic amine at one end is covalently attached to the protein by a carbodiimide-mediated reaction, and a photo reactive group at the other can be used to initiate crosslinking. Modifications to the parent structure can be used to alter the distance between the two reactive groups and thus the cross-linking agents "reach". In practice, the cross-linking agent is first coupled to the asp101 side chain through the amine group. Asp101 lies within the active site cleft, and previous work with fluorescent probes had shown that derivatives at this site still crystallize in the tetragonal space group. This was also found to be the case with the AEANA derivative, which gave red tetragonal crystals. The protein now has a

  14. Structuring effects in binary nucleation : Molecular dynamics simulatons and coarse-grained nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, S.; Kraska, T.; Kalikmanov, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    Binary clusters formed by vapor-liquid nucleation are frequently nonhomogeneous objects in which components are not well mixed. The structure of a cluster plays an important role in nucleation and cluster growth. We demonstrate structuring effects by studying high-pressure nucleation and cluster

  15. Microbial ice nucleators scavenged from the atmosphere during simulated rain events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Regina; Powers, Craig; Failor, Kevin; Monteil, Caroline L.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Schmale, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Rain and snow collected at ground level have been found to contain biological ice nucleators. These ice nucleators have been proposed to have originated in clouds, where they may have participated in the formation of precipitation via ice phase nucleation. We conducted a series of field experiments to test the hypothesis that at least some of the microbial ice nucleators (prokaryotes and eukaryotes) present in rain may not originate in clouds but instead be scavenged from the lower atmosphere by rainfall. Thirty-three simulated rain events were conducted over four months off the side of the Smart Road Bridge in Blacksburg, VA, USA. In each event, sterile water was dispensed over the side of the bridge and recovered in sterile containers in an open fallow agricultural field below (a distance of ∼55 m). Microbes scavenged from the simulated rain events were cultured and their ice nucleation activity was examined. Putative microbial ice nucleators were cultured from 94% (31/33) of the simulated rain events, and represented 1.5% (121/8331) of the total colonies assayed. Putative ice nucleators were subjected to additional droplet freezing assays, and those confirmed through these repeated assays represented 0.4% (34/8331) of the total. Mean CFUs scavenged by simulated rain ranged from 2 to 267 CFUs/mL. Scavenged ice nucleators belong to a number of taxa including the bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Xanthomonas, and the fungal genera Fusarium, Humicola, and Mortierella. An ice-nucleating strain of the fungal genus Penicillium was also recovered from a volumetric air sampler at the study site. This work expands our knowledge of the scavenging properties of rainfall, and suggests that at least some ice nucleators in natural precipitation events may have been scrubbed from the atmosphere during rainfall, and thus are not likely to be involved in precipitation.

  16. Site of PGF2αinjection does not alter effectiveness of the Select Synch + controlled internal drug release and timed artificial insemination protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, C L; Bell, L M; Greene, W; Whisnant, C S; Poole, D H

    2017-01-01

    Beef Quality Assurance programs have contributed to significant improvements in the wholesomeness of beef available for consumption. Injection site blemishes in the round have declined since the promotion of administering intramuscular injections in the neck. Unfortunately, many producers continue to administer estrus synchronization (ES) drugs in the rump. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of injection site of PGF 2α , in ES protocols, on steroid hormone concentrations and pregnancy rates. A Select Synch + 7-day controlled internal drug release ES protocol was conducted with the site of PGF 2α injection alternated between neck and rump in beef cattle (n = 312) at the Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute and North Carolina State University. Blood samples (n = 75) were collected at controlled internal drug release insertion and at the time of artificial insemination (AI) to determine if progesterone (P4) and estrogen (E2) concentrations varied due to PGF 2α injection site. All cattle were confirmed pregnant by ultrasonography at approximately 30 and 90 days after insemination in North Carolina and approximately 70 days after insemination in Ohio. Data were analyzed as randomized complete block designs in PROC GLIMMIX with animal as the experimental unit. Differences were declared significant at P  0.05) overall conception rates in response to AI (58.4% and 55.6%, respectively). Altering PGF 2α injection site did not impact P4, E2 concentrations, or the P4:E2 ratio at AI (P > 0.05). However, cattle inseminated after displaying estrus had greater (P < 0.05) pregnancy rates than timed AI (67.8 vs. 47.5%, respectively). First service conception rates and pregnancy rates were consistent with previous reports. Overall, altering the location of the PGF 2α injection during ES did not change circulating hormone concentrations at AI or pregnancy rates; therefore, cattle producers should follow Beef Quality

  17. New trends in the nucleation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M. P.; Hopke, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    During the last half of century the most of efforts have been directed towards small molecule system modeling using intermolecular potentials. Summarizing the nucleation theory, it can be concluded that the nowadays theory is far from complete. The vapor-gas nucleation theory can produce values that deviate from the experimental results by several orders of magnitude currently. Experiments on the vapor-gas nucleation rate measurements using different devices show significant inconsistencies in the measured rates as well. Theoretical results generally are quite reasonable for sufficiently low vapor nucleation rates where the capillary approximation is applicable. In the present research the advantages and current problems of the vapor-gas nucleation experiments are discussed briefly and a view of the future studies is presented. Using the brake points of the first derivative for the nucleation rate surface as markers of the critical embryos phase change is fresh idea to show the gas-pressure effect for the nucleating vapor-gas systems. To test the accuracy of experimental techniques, it is important to have a standard system that can be measured over a range of nucleation conditions. Several results illustrate that high-pressure techniques are needed to study multi-channel nucleation. In practical applications, parametric theories can be used for the systems of interest. However, experimental measurements are still the best source of information on nucleation rates. Experiments are labor intensive and costly, and thus, it is useful to extend the value of limited experimental measurements to a broader range of nucleation conditions. Only limited experimental data one needs for use in normalizing the slopes of the linearized nucleation rate surfaces. The nucleation rate surface is described in terms of steady-state nucleation rates. It is supposed that several new measuring systems, such as High Pressure Flow Diffusion Chamber for pressure limit up to 150 bar will be

  18. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem.

  19. Heterogeneous nucleation in hypermonotectic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simple casting experiments were set up to solve the question, if heterogeneous nucleation of the liquid-liquid decomposition in monotectic systems is possible. Al-Pb alloys with different inoculants were solidified, and the resulting microstructure was analysed by SEM and X-ray microtomography. Pronounced changes in the distribution of the lead precipitations indicate that it is possible to trigger the nucleation.

  20. Tuning Ice Nucleation with Supercharged Polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Huige; Ma, Chao; Li, Kaiyong; Liu, Kai; Loznik, Mark; Teeuwen, Rosalie; van Hest, Jan C. M.; Zhou, Xin; Herrmann, Andreas; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Supercharged unfolded polypeptides (SUPs) are exploited for controlling ice nucleation via tuning the nature of charge and charge density of SUPs. The results show that positively charged SUPs facilitate ice nucleation, while negatively charged ones suppress it. Moreover, the charge density of the

  1. Crystal nucleation of colloidal hard dumbbells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2011-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we investigate the homogeneous crystal nucleation in suspensions of colloidal hard dumbbells. The free energy barriers are determined by Monte Carlo simulations using the umbrella sampling technique. We calculate the nucleation rates for the plastic crystal and the

  2. Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters are very essential for the successful growth of good quality single crystals from high temperature solution. A theoretical estimation of the nucleation thermodynamical parameters like interfacial energy between the solid Nd123 and its flux BaO–CuO, metastable ...

  3. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Laird, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ramamurty, U. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering; Suresh, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for Materials Science

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  4. Using a hybrid of traditional 3D FE model, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), and Genetic Algorithms (GA), to help locating DNAPL sources in a contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, S.; Boger, Z.

    2008-12-01

    After many years of unsuccessful pump and treat in a contaminated site in Washington, it has become clear that the actual locations of Carbon Tetrachloride (CTC) sources, particularly their interception points at the water table, were unknown. In fact, the actual sources at the surface were partly known, particularly where the history of dumping and leaking from several facilities was known. However, due to a 200-feet thick and complex vadose zone, conducive to lateral migration, this knowledge was practically misleading at the high- resolution required by the pump-treat-inject operation. A quick, data-driven Artificial Neural network (ANN) was used to imitate FEFLOW (a 3D finite-element code), in two ways: (a) by direct inverse; and (b) by indirect inverse modeling (which includes forward simulations). Since the ANN is many folds faster than FEFLOW, it could generate millions of scenarios, and then use genetic algorithms (GA) to efficiently search for the combination of sources that minimizes the errors between simulated and measured concentrations in all wells, over time. While results from the direct inverse were not consistent with simulated concentration profiles in the 31 wells, results from the more robust indirect inverse were much closer to the real concentration trends in all wells, as verified by a FEFLOW simulation using the sources determined by indirect inverse.

  5. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  6. Damage instability and Earthquake nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, I. R.; Gomez, Q.; Campillo, M.; Jia, X.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake nucleation (initiation) is usually associated to the loss of the stability of the geological structure under a slip-weakening friction acting on the fault. The key parameters involved in the stability of the fault are the stress drop, the critical slip distance but also the elastic stiffness of the surrounding materials (rocks). We want to explore here how the nucleation phenomena are correlated to the material softening during damage accumulation by dynamic and/or quasi-static processes. Since damage models are describing micro-cracks growth, which is generally an unstable phenomenon, it is natural to expect some loss of stability on the associated micro-mechanics based models. If the model accurately captures the material behavior, then this can be due to the unstable nature of the brittle material itself. We obtained stability criteria at the microscopic scale, which are related to a large class of damage models. We show that for a given continuous strain history the quasi-static or dynamic problems are instable or ill-posed (multiplicity of material responses) and whatever the selection rule is adopted, shocks (time discontinuities) will occur. We show that the quasi-static equilibria chosen by the "perfect delay convention" is always stable. These stability criteria are used to analyze how NIC (Non Interacting Crack) effective elasticity associated to "self similar growth" model work in some special configurations (one family of micro-cracks in mode I, II and III and in plane strain or plain stress). In each case we determine a critical crack density parameter and critical micro-crack radius (length) which distinguish between stable and unstable behaviors. This critical crack density depends only on the chosen configuration and on the Poisson ratio.

  7. Complex time series analysis of PM10 and PM2.5 for a coastal site using artificial neural network modelling and k-means clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangasinghe, M. A.; Singhal, N.; Dirks, K. N.; Salmond, J. A.; Samarasinghe, S.

    2014-09-01

    This paper uses artificial neural networks (ANN), combined with k-means clustering, to understand the complex time series of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at a coastal location of New Zealand based on data from a single site. Out of available meteorological parameters from the network (wind speed, wind direction, solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity), key factors governing the pattern of the time series concentrations were identified through input sensitivity analysis performed on the trained neural network model. The transport pathways of particulate matter under these key meteorological parameters were further analysed through bivariate concentration polar plots and k-means clustering techniques. The analysis shows that the external sources such as marine aerosols and local sources such as traffic and biomass burning contribute equally to the particulate matter concentrations at the study site. These results are in agreement with the results of receptor modelling by the Auckland Council based on Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Our findings also show that contrasting concentration-wind speed relationships exist between marine aerosols and local traffic sources resulting in very noisy and seemingly large random PM10 concentrations. The inclusion of cluster rankings as an input parameter to the ANN model showed a statistically significant (p < 0.005) improvement in the performance of the ANN time series model and also showed better performance in picking up high concentrations. For the presented case study, the correlation coefficient between observed and predicted concentrations improved from 0.77 to 0.79 for PM2.5 and from 0.63 to 0.69 for PM10 and reduced the root mean squared error (RMSE) from 5.00 to 4.74 for PM2.5 and from 6.77 to 6.34 for PM10. The techniques presented here enable the user to obtain an understanding of potential sources and their transport characteristics prior to the implementation of costly chemical analysis techniques or

  8. Using rheometry to determine nucleation density in a colored system containing a nucleating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhe; Steenbakkers, Rudi J.A.; Peters, Gerrit W.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Materials Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Giboz, Julien [Universite de Savoie, LMOPS, CNRS UMR5041, Le Bourget-du-Lac (France)

    2011-12-15

    A new suspension-based rheological method was applied to experimentally study the crystallization of a nucleating agent (NA) filled isotactic polypropylene. This method allows for determination of point nucleation densities where other methods fail. For example, optical microscopy can fail because nucleation densities become too high to be counted (materials with effective NA) or crystallites are not easily visible (colored materials), while differential scanning calorimetry does not allow the effect of flow to be studied. Both quiescent and mild-shear-induced crystallization were investigated. The results show that the addition of a nucleating agent increases the nucleation density by six decades for quiescent crystallization. The effect of shear on crystallization in the presence of a nucleating agent was assessed, and it is demonstrated that, at least for this system, the effect of shear is much smaller than the effect of the nucleating agent. (orig.)

  9. Nucleation and growth kinetics of palladium nanoparticles on thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1073 K and deposition time of 1000 s. The nucleation kinetics is interpreted according to the theory of random nucleation. The general scheme is consisting of three stages namely, nucleation, growth and coalescence. The saturation density of ...

  10. Interface tracking computations of bubble dynamics in nucleate flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giustini, G.

    2015-01-01

    The boiling process is of utter importance for the design and operation of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Despite continuous effort over the past decades, a fully mechanistic model of boiling in the presence of a solid surface has not yet been achieved. Uncertainties exist at fundamental level, since the microscopic phenomena governing nucleate boiling are still not understood, and as regards 'component scale' modelling, which relies heavily on empirical representations of wall boiling. Accurate models of these phenomena at sub-milli-metric scale are capable of elucidating the various processes and to produce quantitative data needed for up-scaling. Within this context, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) represents a powerful tool for CFD analysis of boiling flows. In this contribution, DNS coupled with an Interface Tracking method (Y. Sato, B. Niceno, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 249, 15 September 2013, Pages 127-161) are used to analyse the hydrodynamics and heat transfer associated with heat diffusion controlled bubble growth at a solid substrate during nucleate flow boiling. The growth of successive bubbles from a single nucleation site is simulated with a computational model that includes heat conduction in the solid substrate and evaporation from the liquid film (micro-layer) present beneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is investigated and the additional (with respect to single phase convection) heat transfer mechanisms due to the ebullition cycle are quantified. The simulations show that latent heat exchange due to evaporation in the micro-layer and sensible heat exchange during the waiting time after bubble departure are the main heat transfer mechanisms. It is found that the presence of an imposed flow normal to the bubble rising path determines a complex velocity and temperature distribution near the nucleation site. This conditions can result in bubble sliding, and influence bubble shape, departure diameter and departure frequency

  11. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  12. Polo-like kinase 1 regulates Nlp, a centrosome protein involved in microtubule nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casenghi, Martina; Meraldi, Patrick; Weinhart, Ulrike; Duncan, Peter I; Körner, Roman; Nigg, Erich A

    2003-07-01

    In animal cells, most microtubules are nucleated at centrosomes. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a structural reorganization, termed maturation, which leads to increased microtubule nucleation activity. Centrosome maturation is regulated by several kinases, including Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). Here, we identify a centrosomal Plk1 substrate, termed Nlp (ninein-like protein), whose properties suggest an important role in microtubule organization. Nlp interacts with two components of the gamma-tubulin ring complex and stimulates microtubule nucleation. Plk1 phosphorylates Nlp and disrupts both its centrosome association and its gamma-tubulin interaction. Overexpression of an Nlp mutant lacking Plk1 phosphorylation sites severely disturbs mitotic spindle formation. We propose that Nlp plays an important role in microtubule organization during interphase, and that the activation of Plk1 at the onset of mitosis triggers the displacement of Nlp from the centrosome, allowing the establishment of a mitotic scaffold with enhanced microtubule nucleation activity.

  13. Damage nucleation in Si during ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Fathy, D.; Narayan, J.

    1984-01-01

    Damage nucleation in single crystals of silicon during ion irradiation is investigated. Experimental results and mechanisms for damage nucleation during both room and liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation with different mass ions are discussed. It is shown that the accumulation of damage during room temperature irradiation depends on the rate of implantation. These dose rate effects are found to decrease in magnitude as the mass of the ions is increased. The significance of dose rate effects and their mass dependence on nucleation mechanisms is discussed

  14. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J 0 and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J 0 and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces

  15. Artificial neural network approach to predict surgical site infection after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Chang, Shu-Shya; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Tai, Hsueh-Ling; Peng, Shu-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2018-03-02

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective surgical site infection (SSI) prediction model in patients receiving free-flap reconstruction after surgery for head and neck cancer using artificial neural network (ANN), and to compare its predictive power with that of conventional logistic regression (LR). There were 1,836 patients with 1,854 free-flap reconstructions and 438 postoperative SSIs in the dataset for analysis. They were randomly assigned tin ratio of 7:3 into a training set and a test set. Based on comprehensive characteristics of patients and diseases in the absence or presence of operative data, prediction of SSI was performed at two time points (pre-operatively and post-operatively) with a feed-forward ANN and the LR models. In addition to the calculated accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, the predictive performance of ANN and LR were assessed based on area under the curve (AUC) measures of receiver operator characteristic curves and Brier score. ANN had a significantly higher AUC (0.892) of post-operative prediction and AUC (0.808) of pre-operative prediction than LR (both P <0.0001). In addition, there was significant higher AUC of post-operative prediction than pre-operative prediction by ANN (p<0.0001). With the highest AUC and the lowest Brier score (0.090), the post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall predictive performance. The post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall performance in predicting SSI after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

  16. Effects of Monotypic and Binary Mixtures of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Microbial Growth in Sandy Soil Collected from Artificial Recharge Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Ha, Kyoochul; Kong, In Chul

    2015-11-24

    The potential effects of monotypic and binary metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs, ZnO, NiO, Co₃O₄ and TiO₂) on microbial growth were evaluated in sandy soil collected from artificial recharge sites. Microbial growth was assessed based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and viable cell counts (VCC). Microbial growth based on ATP content and VCC showed considerable differences depending on NP type and concentration, whereas DHA did not significantly change. In general, ZnO NPs showed the strongest effect on microbial growth in all measurements, showing an EC50 value of 10.9 mg/L for ATP content. The ranking (EC50) of NPs based on their effect on microbial growth assessed by ATP content and VCC was ZnO > Co₃O₄ > NiO > TiO₂. Upon exposure to binary NP mixtures, synergistic and additive modes of action were observed for ATP content and VCC, respectively. The ranges of observed (P(O)) and expected (P(E)) activity were 83%-92% and 78%-82% of the control (p-value 0.0010) based on ATP content and 78%-95% and 72%-94% of the control (p-value 0.8813) based on VCC under the tested conditions, respectively. The results indicate that the effects of NP mixtures on microbial growth in the sandy soil matrix were as great, or greater, than those of single NPs. Therefore, understanding the effects of single NPs and NP mixtures is essential for proper ecological risk assessment. Additionally, these findings demonstrate that the evaluation of NP effects may be profoundly influenced by the method of microbial growth measurement.

  17. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  18. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Spanache Florin

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus a...

  19. Nucleation versus instability race in strained films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kailang; Berbezier, Isabelle; David, Thomas; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Abbarchi, Marco; Voorhees, Peter; Aqua, Jean-Noël

    2017-10-01

    Under the generic term "Stranski-Krastanov" are grouped two different growth mechanisms of SiGe quantum dots. They result from the self-organized Asaro-Tiller-Grinfel'd (ATG) instability at low strain, while at high strain, from a stochastic nucleation. While these regimes are well known, we elucidate here the origin of the transition between these two pathways thanks to a joint theoretical and experimental work. Nucleation is described within the master equation framework. By comparing the time scales for ATG instability development and three-dimensional (3D) nucleation onset, we demonstrate that the transition between these two regimes is simply explained by the crossover between their divergent evolutions. Nucleation exhibits a strong exponential deviation at low strain while ATG behaves only algebraically. The associated time scale varies with exp(1 /x4) for nucleation, while it only behaves as 1 /x8 for the ATG instability. Consequently, at high (low) strain, nucleation (instability) occurs faster and inhibits the alternate evolution. It is then this different kinetic evolution which explains the transition from one regime to the other. Such a kinetic view of the transition between these two 3D growth regimes was not provided before. The crossover between nucleation and ATG instability is found to occur both experimentally and theoretically at a Ge composition around 50% in the experimental conditions used here. Varying the experimental conditions and/or the system parameters does not allow us to suppress the transition. This means that the SiGe quantum dots always grow via ATG instability at low strain and nucleation at high strain. This result is important for the self-organization of quantum dots.

  20. Homogeneous nucleation with magic numbers: aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshick, Steven L; Agarwal, Pulkit; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-10-07

    Homogeneous nucleation of clusters that exhibit magic numbers is studied numerically, using as an example aluminum at 2000 K, based on recent calculations of free energies [Li et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 16227 (2007)] and condensation rate constants [Li and Truhlar, J. Phys. Chem. C 112, 11109 (2008)] that provide a database for Al(i) up to i=60. The nucleation behavior for saturation ratios greater than about 4.5 is found to be dominated by a peak in the free energy change associated with the reaction iAl-->Al(i) at i=55, making it the critical size over a wide range of saturation ratios. Calculated steady-state nucleation rates are many orders of magnitude lower than predicted by classical nucleation theory (CNT). The onset of nucleation is predicted to occur at a saturation ratio of about 13.3, compared to about 5.1 in CNT, while for saturation ratios greater than about 25 the abundance of magic-numbered clusters becomes high enough to invalidate the assumption that cluster growth occurs solely by monomer addition. Transient nucleation is also predicted to be substantially different than predicted by CNT, with a much longer time required to reach steady state: about 10(-4) s at a saturation ratio of 20, compared to about 10(-7) s from CNT. Magic numbers are seen to play an important role in transient nucleation, as the nucleation currents for clusters of adjacent sizes become equal to each other in temporally successive groups, where the largest cluster in each group is the magic-numbered one.

  1. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  2. Molecular nucleation mechanisms and control strategies for crystal polymorph selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driessche, Alexander E. S.; van Gerven, Nani; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Joosten, Rick R. M.; Friedrich, Heiner; Gil-Carton, David; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Sleutel, Mike

    2018-04-01

    The formation of condensed (compacted) protein phases is associated with a wide range of human disorders, such as eye cataracts, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sickle cell anaemia and Alzheimer’s disease. However, condensed protein phases have their uses: as crystals, they are harnessed by structural biologists to elucidate protein structures, or are used as delivery vehicles for pharmaceutical applications. The physiochemical properties of crystals can vary substantially between different forms or structures (‘polymorphs’) of the same macromolecule, and dictate their usability in a scientific or industrial context. To gain control over an emerging polymorph, one needs a molecular-level understanding of the pathways that lead to the various macroscopic states and of the mechanisms that govern pathway selection. However, it is still not clear how the embryonic seeds of a macromolecular phase are formed, or how these nuclei affect polymorph selection. Here we use time-resolved cryo-transmission electron microscopy to image the nucleation of crystals of the protein glucose isomerase, and to uncover at molecular resolution the nucleation pathways that lead to two crystalline states and one gelled state. We show that polymorph selection takes place at the earliest stages of structure formation and is based on specific building blocks for each space group. Moreover, we demonstrate control over the system by selectively forming desired polymorphs through site-directed mutagenesis, specifically tuning intermolecular bonding or gel seeding. Our results differ from the present picture of protein nucleation, in that we do not identify a metastable dense liquid as the precursor to the crystalline state. Rather, we observe nucleation events that are driven by oriented attachments between subcritical clusters that already exhibit a degree of crystallinity. These insights suggest ways of controlling macromolecular phase transitions, aiding the development of protein

  3. Investigation of Nucleation Events in an Industry Zone in Nanjing China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, H.; Yang, D.; Ma, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation processes contribute substantial secondary aerosols in the atmosphere, which often lead to severe air pollution episodes in China, especially in heavily populated urban area. In this work, we conducted field observations of nucleation events in an industry zone of Nanjing, a megacity of China. The nucleation rates of 1.0 nm diameter aerosol (J1) were determined from direct measurements of particle size distribution of 1.4 - 3.0 nm by a particle size magnifier (PSM) with a value ranging from 70 to 300 cm-3 s-1. Meanwhile, gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) was measured with an atmospheric pressure ionization high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (API-HR-ToF-CIMS). H2SO4 and sub-3 nm aerosols showed excellent correlations during the nucleation events. Multivariate analysis indicated that two or three molecules of H2SO4 might be present in the critical nuclei. Several nocturnal nucleation events with concurring H2SO4 peaks were also observed while the site was within the industrial plumes. High level of alkenes and relative high concentration of O3 ( 30 ppbv) indicated that alkene ozonolysis might be responsible for the nighttime production of H2SO4. The impacts of the nocturnal nucleation processes on the local air quality need to be further investigated.

  4. Flip-Flop HSV-BAC: bacterial artificial chromosome based system for rapid generation of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors using two independent site-specific recombinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todo Tomoki

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV vectors that specifically replicate in and kill tumor cells sparing normal cells are a promising cancer therapy. Traditionally, recombinant HSV vectors have been generated through homologous recombination between the HSV genome and a recombination plasmid, which usually requires laborious screening or selection and can take several months. Recent advances in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology have enabled cloning of the whole HSV genome as a BAC plasmid and subsequent manipulation in E. coli. Thus, we sought a method to generate recombinant oncolytic HSV vectors more easily and quickly using BAC technology. Results We have developed an HSV-BAC system, termed the Flip-Flop HSV-BAC system, for the rapid generation of oncolytic HSV vectors. This system has the following features: (i two site-specific recombinases, Cre and FLPe, are used sequentially to integrate desired sequences and to excise the BAC sequences, respectively; and (ii the size of the HSV-BAC-insert genome exceeds the packaging limit of HSV so only correctly recombined virus grows efficiently. We applied this to the construction of an HSV-BAC plasmid that can be used for the generation of transcriptionally-targeted HSV vectors. BAC sequences were recombined into the UL39 gene of HSV ICP4-deletion mutant d120 to generate M24-BAC virus, from which HSV-BAC plasmid pM24-BAC was isolated. An ICP4 expression cassette driven by an exogenous promoter was re-introduced to pM24-BAC by Cre-mediated recombination and nearly pure preparations of recombinant virus were obtained typically in two weeks. Insertion of the ICP4 coding sequence alone did not restore viral replication and was only minimally better than an ICP4-null construct, whereas insertion of a CMVIE promoter-ICP4 transgene (bM24-CMV efficiently drove viral replication. The levels of bM24-CMV replication in tumor cells varied considerably compared to hrR3 (UL39

  5. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  6. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  7. Artificial Metalloenzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard

    Artificial metalloenzymes have emerged as a promising approach to merge the attractive properties of homogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis. The activity and selectivity, including enantioselectivity, of natural metalloenzymes are due to the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the

  8. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  9. Ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals in the immersion mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pinti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion and bulk freezing experiments were performed to investigate immersion ice nucleation on clay minerals in pure water, using various kaolinites, montmorillonites, illites as well as natural dust from the Hoggar Mountains in the Saharan region. Differential scanning calorimeter measurements were performed on three different kaolinites (KGa-1b, KGa-2 and K-SA, two illites (Illite NX and Illite SE and four natural and acid-treated montmorillonites (SWy-2, STx-1b, KSF and K-10. The emulsion experiments provide information on the average freezing behaviour characterized by the average nucleation sites. These experiments revealed one to sometimes two distinct heterogeneous freezing peaks, which suggest the presence of a low number of qualitatively distinct average nucleation site classes. We refer to the peak at the lowest temperature as "standard peak" and to the one occurring in only some clay mineral types at higher temperatures as "special peak". Conversely, freezing in bulk samples is not initiated by the average nucleation sites, but by a very low number of "best sites". The kaolinites and montmorillonites showed quite narrow standard peaks with onset temperatures 238 K<Tonstd<242 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=257 K, but only some featuring a special peak (i.e. KSF, K-10, K-SA and SWy-2 with freezing onsets in the range 240–248 K. The illites showed broad standard peaks with freezing onsets at 244 K Tonstd<246 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=262 K. The large difference between freezing temperatures of standard and best sites shows that characterizing ice nucleation efficiencies of dust particles on the basis of freezing onset temperatures from bulk experiments, as has been done in some atmospheric studies, is not appropriate. Our investigations

  10. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie......-containing sweeteners. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the effect of artificial sweeteners on body weight, appetite, and risk markers for diabetes and CVD in humans....

  11. Modelling the stochastic behaviour of primary nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Giovanni Maria; Mazzotti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the stochastic nature of primary nucleation and how it manifests itself in a crystallisation process at different scales and under different operating conditions. Such characteristics of nucleation are evident in many experiments where detection times of crystals are not identical, despite identical experimental conditions, but instead are distributed around an average value. While abundant experimental evidence has been reported in the literature, a clear theoretical understanding and an appropriate modelling of this feature is still missing. In this contribution, we present two models describing a batch cooling crystallisation, where the interplay between stochastic nucleation and deterministic crystal growth is described differently in each. The nucleation and growth rates of the two models are estimated by a comprehensive set of measurements of paracetamol crystallisation from aqueous solution in a 1 mL vessel [Kadam et al., Chemical Engineering Science, 2012, 72, 10-19]. Both models are applied to the cooling crystallisation process above under different operating conditions, i.e. different volumes, initial concentrations, cooling rates. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches are illustrated and discussed, with particular reference to their use across scales of nucleation rate measured in very small crystallisers.

  12. Can Hail and Rain Nucleate Cloud Droplets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S.; Prabhakaran, P.; Krekhov, A.; Pumir, A.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from a laboratory scale moist convection experiment composed of a mixture of pressurized sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 - liquid and vapor phase) and helium (He - gas phase) to mimic the wet (saturated water vapor) and dry components (nitrogen, oxygen etc.) of the earth's atmosphere. We operate the experiments close to critical conditions to allow for homogeneous nucleation of sulphur hexafluoride droplets. The liquid SF6 pool is heated from below and the warm SF6 vapor from the liquid-vapor interface rise and condense underneath the cold top plate. We observe the nucleation of microdroplets in the wake of cold drops falling through the SF6-He atmosphere. Using classical nucleation theory, we show that the nucleation is caused by isobaric cooling of SF6 vapor in the wake of the cold drop. Furthermore, we argue that in an atmospheric cloud, falling hail and large cold raindrops may induce heterogeneous nucleation of microdroplets in their wake. We also observe that under appropriate conditions these microdroplets form a stable horizontal layer, thus separating regions of super and sub-critical saturation.

  13. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, S.

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  14. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    OpenAIRE

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adap...

  15. A variational approach to nucleation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggi, Pablo M; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-12-22

    We study by computer simulation the nucleation of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor into the liquid phase. The large free energy barriers to transition make the time scale of this process impossible to study by ordinary molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore we use a recently developed enhanced sampling method [Valsson and Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett.113, 090601 (2014)] based on the variational determination of a bias potential. We differ from previous applications of this method in that the bias is constructed on the basis of the physical model provided by the classical theory of nucleation. We examine the technical problems associated with this approach. Our results are very satisfactory and will pave the way for calculating the nucleation rates in many systems.

  16. ON THE PRECISION OF THE NUCLEATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier González-Villa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleator is a design unbiased method of local stereology for estimating the volume of a bounded object. The only information required lies in the intersection of the object with an isotropic random ray emanating from a fixed point (called the pivotal point associated with the object. For instance, the volume of a neuron can be estimated from a random ray emanating from its nucleolus. The nucleator is extensively used in biosciences because it is efficient and easy to apply. The estimator variance can be reduced by increasing the number of rays. In an earlier paper a systematic sampling design was proposed, and theoretical variance predictors were derived, for the corresponding volume estimator. Being the only variance predictors hitherto available for the nucleator, our basic goal was to check their statistical performance by means of Monte Carlo resampling on computer reconstructions of real objects. As a plus, the empirical distribution of the volume estimator revealed statistical properties of practical relevance.

  17. Mechanism of the nanoscale localization of Ge quantum dot nucleation on focused ion beam templated Si(001) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portavoce, A; Kammler, M; Hull, R; Reuter, M C; Ross, F M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the fundamental mechanism by which self-assembled Ge islands can be nucleated at specific sites on Si(001) using ultra-low-dose focused ion beam (FIB) pre-patterning. Island nucleation is controlled by a nanotopography that forms after the implantation of Ga ions during subsequent thermal annealing of the substrate. This nanotopography evolves during the annealing stage, changing from a nanoscale annular depression associated with each focused ion beam spot to a nanoscale pit, and eventually disappearing (planarizing). The correspondence of Ge quantum dot nucleation sites to the focused ion beam features requires a growth surface upon which the nanotopography is preserved. A further key observation is that the Ge wetting layer thickness is reduced in patterned regions, allowing the formation of islands on the templated regions without nucleation elsewhere. These results provide routes to the greatly enhanced design and control of quantum dot distributions and dimensions

  18. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  19. On the discrimination between nucleation and propagation in nanomagnetic logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemys, Grazvydas; Csaba, Gyorgy; Becherer, Markus

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we present the extensive nucleation and propagation characterization of fabricated nanomagnets by applying ns-range magnetic field pulses. For that, an artificial nucleation center (ANC) is created by focused ion beam irradiation (FIB) of a 50 x 50 nm area at the side of a Co/Pt island as typically used in Nanomagnetic Logic with perpendicular anisotropy (pNML). Laser-Kerr Microscope is applied for statistical evaluation of the switching probability of the whole magnet, while the wide-field-Kerr microscopy is employed to discriminate between the nucleation process (which takes place at the irradiated ANC area) and the domain wall propagation process along the magnet. We show that the nanomagnet can be treated as a single Stoner-Wolfhart particle above 100 ns field-pulse width, as the whole magnetization is switched during the field-pulse. By contrary, for field-pulse width below 100 ns, the domain wall (DW) motion is the limiting process hindering full magnetization reversal on that time-scale. However, the nucleation still follows the Arrhenius law. The results allow precise understanding of the reversal process and highlight the need for faster DW speed in pNML materials.

  20. A unified kinetic approach to binary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road]|[E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Lazaridis, M. [Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Instittutvein 18, P. O. Box 100, N-2007 Kjeller (Norway); Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Georgopoulos, P.G. [E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Two different methods to calculate the steady-state nucleation rate in heteromolecular systems proposed by Stauffer (1976) and Langer (1969) are analyzed. Their mathematical equivalence is explicitly demonstrated, thereby obtaining a generic expression for the rate of binary nucleation. Its numerical evaluation does not entail rotation of the coordinate system at the saddle point, but it only requires data in the natural coordinate system of number fluctuations, namely molecular impingement rates, the droplet free energy and its second order derivatives at the saddle point, and the total density of condensible vapors. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Dumbbells and onions in ternary nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellas, Ricky B; Chen, Bin; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2007-06-14

    Molecular simulations for a ternary nucleation system (water/n-nonane/1-butanol) demonstrate a more complex nucleation mechanism than previously thought, where critical nuclei with different compositions are present even for a given vapour-phase composition; the spatial distribution in these critical nuclei is heterogeneous and dumbbell and onion motifs are found; in the former, water and nonane nano-droplets are connected through a butanol handle, while in the latter a water core is surrounded by a nonane corona with an interfacial butanol shell.

  2. Crystal nucleation in simple and complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, David W

    2003-03-15

    The application of density-functional methods from statistical mechanics to the nucleation of crystals from the melt is described. Simple fluids such as metals, with sizes comparable with the range of their attractive forces, are compared with complex fluids such as colloidal suspensions and proteins dissolved in solution. A different mechanism for crystal nucleation is proposed in the latter case, in which density (concentration) changes before periodic crystalline order appears. This leads to a theoretical foundation for empirical observations on the 'crystallization window' in protein crystallization. Comparisons are made with the results of computer simulation via molecular dynamics.

  3. The Ice Nucleation Activity of Surface Modified Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Thomas; Witek, Lorenz; Felgitsch, Laura; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    The ice nucleation efficiency of many important atmospheric particles remains poorly understood. Since soot is ubiquitous in the Earth's troposphere, they might have the potential to significantly impact the Earth's climate (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 2000; Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998). Here we present the ice nucleation activity (INA) in immersion freezing mode of different types of soot. Therefor a CAST (combustion aerosol standard) generator was used to produce different kinds of soot samples. The CAST generator combusts a propane-air-mixture and deposits thereby produced soot on a polyvinyl fluoride filter. By varying the propane to air ratio, the amount of organic portion of the soot can be varied from black carbon (BC) with no organic content to brown carbon (BrC) with high organic content. To investigate the impact of functional sites of ice nuclei (IN), the soot samples were exposed to NO2 gas for a certain amount of time (30 to 360 minutes) to chemically modify the surface. Immersion freezing experiments were carried out in a unique reaction gadget. In this device a water-in-oil suspension (with the soot suspended in the aqueous phase) was cooled till the freezing point and was observed through a microscope (Pummer et al., 2012; Zolles et al., 2015) It was found that neither modified nor unmodified BC shows INA. On the contrary, unmodified BrC shows an INA at -32˚ C, which can be increased up to -20˚ C. The INA of BrC depends on the duration of NO2- exposure. To clarify the characteristics of the surface modifications, surface sensitive analysis like infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were carried out. Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. and Pitts, J. N. J.: Chemistry of the Upper and Lower Atmosphere, Elsevier, New York, 2000. Pummer, B. G., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S., and Grothe, H.: Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen, Atmos Chem Phys, 12, 2541-2550, 2012. Seinfeld, J

  4. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  5. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana; Hájek, J.; Worland, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2013), s. 137-148 ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601630808; GA AV ČR KJB600050708 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Ice nucleation * snow algae * lichen photobionts Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2013

  6. Transformation kinetics for surface and bulk nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Elena, E-mail: elena.villa@unimi.it [University of Milan, Department of Mathematics, via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rios, Paulo R., E-mail: prrios@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia Industrial Metalurgica de Volta Redonda, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, 27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)] [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on the causal cone and stochastic geometry concepts is used to derive new exact expressions for transformation kinetics theory. General expressions for the mean volume density and the volume fraction are derived for both surface and bulk nucleation in a general Borel subset of R{sup 3}. In practice, probably any specimen shape of engineering interest is going to be a Borel set. An expression is also derived for the important case of polyhedral shape, in which surface nucleation may take place on the faces, edges and vertices of the polyhedron as well as within the bulk. Moreover, explicit expressions are given for surface and bulk nucleation for three specific shapes of engineering relevance: two parallel planes, an infinitely long cylinder and a sphere. Superposition is explained in detail and it permits the treatment of situations in which surface and bulk nucleation take place simultaneously. The new exact expressions presented here result in a significant increase in the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  7. Binary nucleation of water and sodium chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Tomáš; Maršík, František; Palmer, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 4 (2006), 0445091-0445096 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : binary nucleation * sodium chloride * water Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  8. Effect of Air Injection on Nucleation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capellades Mendez, Gerard; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    was reduced from 69 to 13 min, and the mean induction time decreased from 128 to 36 min. The effect on aqueous solutions of l-arginine was less apparent, with a detection delay reduction from 15 to 3 min, and no significant changes on the rate of primary nucleation. These results demonstrate the potential...

  9. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in Ni droplets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Demo, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 475, Oct (2017), s. 247-250 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD15004 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nucleation * crystallization * phase transition * nickel Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  10. NUCLEATION STUDIES OF GOLD ON CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SOBRI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Interest has grown in developing non-toxic electrolytes for gold electrodeposition to replace the conventional cyanide-based bath for long term sustainability of gold electroplating. A solution containing thiosulphate and sulphite has been developed specially for microelectronics applications. However, at the end of the electrodeposition process, the spent electrolyte can contain a significant amount of gold in solution. This study has been initiated to investigate the feasibility of gold recovery from a spent thiosulphate-sulphite electrolyte. We have used flat-plate glassy carbon and graphite electrodes to study the mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth of gold deposition from the spent electrolyte. It was found that at the early stages of reduction process, the deposition of gold on glassy carbon exhibits an instantaneous nucleation of non-overlapping particles. At longer times, the particles begin to overlap and the deposition follows a classic progressive nucleation phenomenon. On the other hand, deposition of gold on graphite does not follow the classical nucleation phenomena.

  11. Surface nucleation in complex rheological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfurth, J.; Ulrich, J.

    2017-07-01

    Forced nucleation induced by suitable foreign seeds is an important tool to control the production of defined crystalline products. The quality of a surface provided by seed materials represents an important variable in the production of crystallizing layers that means for the nucleation process. Parameters like shape and surface structure, size and size distribution of the seed particles as well as the ability to hold up the moisture (the solvent), can have an influence on the nucleation process of different viscous supersaturated solutions. Here the properties of different starch powders as seeds obtained from corn, potato, rice, tapioca and wheat were tested. It could be found, that the best nucleation behavior of a sugar solution could be reached with the use of corn starch as seed material. Here the surface of the crystallized sugar layer is smooth, crystallization time is short (<3 h) and the shape of the product is easily reproducible. Beneficial properties of seed materials are therefore an edged, uneven surface, small particle sizes as well as low moisture content at ambient conditions within the seed materials.

  12. Crystal nucleation kinetics in confined systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2013), 2269-2274 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0891 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nucleation * phase transtion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.858, year: 2013

  13. Dynamic observations of vesiculation reveal the role of silicate crystals in bubble nucleation and growth in andesitic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M. D.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Brun, F.; Fife, J. L.; Casselman, J.; Baker, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth control the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, and the kinetics of these processes are generally determined from examinations of natural samples and quenched experimental run products. These samples, however, only provide a view of the final state, from which the initial conditions of a time-evolving magmatic system are then inferred. The interpretations that follow are inexact due to the inability of determining the exact conditions of nucleation and the potential detachment of bubbles from their nucleation sites, an uncertainty that can obscure their nucleation location - either homogeneously within the melt or heterogeneously at the interface between crystals and melts. We present results of a series of dynamic, real-time 4D X-ray tomographic microscopy experiments where we observed the development of bubbles in crystal bearing silicate magmas. Experimentally synthesized andesitic glasses with 0.25-0.5 wt% H2O and seed silicate crystals were heated at 1 atm to induce bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. In contrast to previous studies on natural and experimentally produced samples, we found that bubbles readily nucleated on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, that their contact angle changes during growth and that they can grow to sizes many times that of the silicate on whose surface they originated. The rapid heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles at low degrees of supersaturation in the presence of silicate crystals demonstrates that silicates can affect when vesiculation ensues, influencing subsequent permeability development and effusive vs. explosive transition in volcanic eruptions.

  14. Dynamic observations of vesiculation reveal the role of silicate crystals in bubble nucleation and growth in andesitic magmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M. D.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Brun, F.; Fife, J. L.; Casselman, J.; Baker, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth control the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, and the kinetics of these processes are generally determined from examinations of natural samples and quenched experimental run products. These samples, however, only provide a view of the final state, from which the initial conditions of a time-evolving magmatic system are then inferred. The interpretations that follow are inexact due to the inability of determining the exact conditions of nucleation and the potential detachment of bubbles from their nucleation sites, an uncertainty that can obscure their nucleation location – either homogeneously within the melt or heterogeneously at the interface between crystals and melts. We present results of a series of dynamic, real-time 4D X-ray tomographic microscopy experiments where we observed the development of bubbles in crystal bearing silicate magmas. Experimentally synthesized andesitic glasses with 0.25–0.5 wt% H2O and seed silicate crystals were heated at 1 atm to induce bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. In contrast to previous studies on natural and experimentally produced samples, we found that bubbles readily nucleated on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, that their contact angle changes during growth and that they can grow to sizes many times that of the silicate on whose surface they originated. The rapid heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles at low degrees of supersaturation in the presence of silicate crystals demonstrates that silicates can affect when vesiculation ensues, influencing subsequent permeability development and effusive vs. explosive transition in volcanic eruptions.

  15. Using survival analysis of artificial and Real Brewer's sparrow (Spizella breweri breweri) nests to model site level and nest site factors associated with nest success in the South Okanagan region of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pam Krannitz Kym Welstead

    2005-01-01

    Predation is the predominant cause of nest failure for the Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri breweri), a provincially red-listed shrub-steppe species that has experienced significant declines throughout most of its range. We monitored Brewer’s Sparrow nests and conducted an artificial nest experiment, in the South Okanagan Valley,...

  16. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  17. Effect of CaCO3(S) nucleation modes on algae removal from alkaline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Yong; Kinney, Kerry A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-02-29

    The role of calcite heterogeneous nucleation was studied in a particle coagulation treatment process for removing microalgae from water. Batch experiments were conducted with Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. in the presence and absence of carbonate and in the presence and absence of Mg to delineate the role of CaCO 3(S) nucleation on microalgae removal. The results indicate that effective algae coagulation (e.g., up to 81 % algae removal efficiency) can be achieved via heterogeneous nucleation with CaCO 3(S) ; however, supersaturation ratios between 120 and 200 are required to achieve at least 50% algae removal, depending on ion concentrations. Algae removal was attributed to adsorption of Ca 2+ onto the cell surface which provides nucleation sites for CaCO 3(S) precipitation. Bridging of calcite particles between the algal cells led to rapid aggregation and formation of larger flocs. However, at higher supersaturation conditions, algae removal was diminished due to the dominance of homogeneous nucleation of CaCO 3(S) . Removal of algae in the presence of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ required higher supersaturation values; however, the shift from heteronucleation to homonucleation with increasing supersaturation was still evident. The results suggest that water chemistry, pH, ionic strength, alkalinity and Ca 2+ concentration can be optimized for algae removal via coagulation-sedimentation.

  18. Bubble Lift-off Diameter and Nucleation Frequency in Vertical Subcooled Boiling Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, In Cheol; Lee, S. T.; Cho, Y. I.; Song, C. H.

    2010-11-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the bubble nucleation to lift-off phenomena for subcooled boiling flow in a vertical annulus channel. A high speed digital video camera was used to capture the dynamics of bubbles. The bubble lift-off diameter and the bubble nucleation frequency were evaluated in terms of heat flux, mass flux, and degree of subcooling. The fundamental features of the lift-off diameter and the nucleation frequency (i.e., the variations across nucleation sites and the dependence on the flow and heat flux conditions) were addressed based on the present observation. A database for the bubble lift-off diameter was built by gathering and summarizing the data of Prodanovic et al., Situ et al., and the present experiments. We evaluated the predictive capabilities of Unal's model, Situ et al.'s model, and Prodanovic et al.'s correlation against the database. We obtained the best prediction results through modifying the wall superheat correlation in Unal's model. In addition, we suggested a new correlation for a combined parameter of the bubble nucleation frequency and the bubble lift-off diameter

  19. Nucleation, Melting Behaviour and Mechanical Properties of Poly(L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anew category of nucleating agent for poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was developed. An organic nucleating agent; N,N'-bis(benzoyl) suberic acid dihydrazide (NA) was synthesized from benzoyl hydrazine and suberoyl chloride which was deprived from suberic acid via acylation. The nucleation, melting behaviour and ...

  20. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released dur- ing the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by .... This noise level does not affect the characteristics or performance of the sensor–amplifier.

  1. Mechanism of cube grain nucleation during recrystallization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The subject of cube texture nucleation i.e. cube grain nucleation, from the deformed state of aluminium and copper is of scientific curiosity with concurrent technological implications. There are essentially two models currently in dispute over the mechanism of cube grain nucleation i.e. the differential stored energy model ...

  2. Nucleation of colloidal crystals on configurable seed structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, M; Vermolen, E.C.M.; Leunissen, M.E.; Vossen, D.L.J.; van Oostrum, P.D.J.; Dijkstra, M.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation is an important stage in the growth of crystals. During this stage, the structure and orientation of a crystal are determined. However, short time- and length-scales make nucleation poorly understood. Micrometer-sized colloidal particles form an ideal model system to study nucleation due

  3. Vapor nucleation paths in lyophobic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Antonio; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2018-04-19

    In recent years, technologies revolving around the use of lyophobic nanopores gained considerable attention in both fundamental and applied research. Owing to the enormous internal surface area, heterogeneous lyophobic systems (HLS), constituted by a nanoporous lyophobic material and a non-wetting liquid, are promising candidates for the efficient storage or dissipation of mechanical energy. These diverse applications both rely on the forced intrusion and extrusion of the non-wetting liquid inside the pores; the behavior of HLS for storage or dissipation depends on the hysteresis between these two processes, which, in turn, are determined by the microscopic details of the system. It is easy to understand that molecular simulations provide an unmatched tool for understanding phenomena at these scales. In this contribution we use advanced atomistic simulation techniques in order to study the nucleation of vapor bubbles inside lyophobic mesopores. The use of the string method in collective variables allows us to overcome the computational challenges associated with the activated nature of the phenomenon, rendering a detailed picture of nucleation in confinement. In particular, this rare event method efficiently searches for the most probable nucleation path(s) in otherwise intractable, high-dimensional free-energy landscapes. Results reveal the existence of several independent nucleation paths associated with different free-energy barriers. In particular, there is a family of asymmetric transition paths, in which a bubble forms at one of the walls; the other family involves the formation of axisymmetric bubbles with an annulus shape. The computed free-energy profiles reveal that the asymmetric path is significantly more probable than the symmetric one, while the exact position where the asymmetric bubble forms is less relevant for the free energetics of the process. A comparison of the atomistic results with continuum models is also presented, showing how, for simple

  4. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  5. Artificial intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract : Issue of this work is to acquaint the reader with the history of artificial inteligence, esspecialy branch of chess computing. Main attention is given to progress from fifties to the present. The work also deals with fighting chess programs against each other, and against human opponents. The greatest attention is focused on 1997 and duel Garry Kasparov against chess program Deep Blue. The work is divided into chapters according to chronological order.

  6. Artificial Wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Kirillov, A. A.; Savelova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that recently reported result by the OPERA Collaboration (arXive:1109.4897) of an early arrival time of muon neutrinos with respect to the speed of light in vacuum does not violate standard physical laws. We show that vacuum polarization effects in intensive external fields may form a wormhole-like object. The simplest theory of such an effect is presented and basic principles of formation of an artificial wormhole are also considered.

  7. Dislocation nucleation facilitated by atomic segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lianfeng; Yang, Chaoming; Lei, Yinkai; Zakharov, Dmitri; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Su, Dong; Yin, Qiyue; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Zhenyu; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Qi, Liang; Wang, Guofeng; Zhou, Guangwen

    2018-01-01

    Surface segregation--the enrichment of one element at the surface, relative to the bulk--is ubiquitous to multi-component materials. Using the example of a Cu-Au solid solution, we demonstrate that compositional variations induced by surface segregation are accompanied by misfit strain and the formation of dislocations in the subsurface region via a surface diffusion and trapping process. The resulting chemically ordered surface regions acts as an effective barrier that inhibits subsequent dislocation annihilation at free surfaces. Using dynamic, atomic-scale resolution electron microscopy observations and theory modelling, we show that the dislocations are highly active, and we delineate the specific atomic-scale mechanisms associated with their nucleation, glide, climb, and annihilation at elevated temperatures. These observations provide mechanistic detail of how dislocations nucleate and migrate at heterointerfaces in dissimilar-material systems.

  8. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  9. Acoustic vibration effects in classical nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Su, C.-H.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic vibration is often used to improve the yield of crystals and nanoparticles growing from solutions and melts. As there is still a debate on how acoustic vibration actually works, we have examined the possibility that acoustic pressure can affect the rate of nucleation. Our method is based on an expansion of the free energy of the nucleus in powers of the acoustic pressure. With the assumption that the period of the sound wave is short as compared to the time scale for nucleation, we replace the powers of the acoustic pressure by their time averages, retaining the average of the square of the acoustic pressure as the leading term. By assuming a nucleus having spherical shape, we use the Young-Laplace equation to relate the pressure inside the nucleus to the ambient pressure. Without making further approximations not already standard in classical nucleation theory, we find that the proximate effect of acoustic pressure is to reduce both the size of the critical nucleus as well as the work required to form it from monomers. As the work serves as the activation energy, the ultimate effect of acoustic pressure is to increase the rate of nucleation. If we assume that the atomic structure of the nucleus is the same as that of an ordinary solid, however, we find the compressibility is too small for acoustic vibration effects to be noticeable. If on the other hand, we assume that the structure is similar to that of a loosely bound colloidal particle, then the effects of acoustic vibration become potentially observable.

  10. The emergence of modern nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A series of important papers by David Turnbull and his collaborators in the late 1940's and early 1950's laid the experimental and theoretical foundation of modern nucleation theory. The elegance, versatility, and generality of the phenomenological approach, coupled with brilliant and insightful experimental confirmation, sparked widespread application which continues today. Much of David Turnbull's subsequent work in other subjects grew directly or indirectly from this work

  11. Nucleation of (4)R brane universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Rojas, EfraIn

    2004-01-01

    The creation of brane universes induced by a totally antisymmetric tensor living in a fixed background spacetime is presented, where a term involving the intrinsic curvature of the brane is considered. A canonical quantum mechanical approach employing the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is used. The probability nucleation for the brane is calculated by means of the corresponding instanton and the WKB approximation. Some cosmological implications from the model are presented

  12. Nucleation of {sup (4)}R brane universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de FIsica, Escuela Superior de FIsica y Matematicas del IPN, Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rojas, EfraIn [Facultad de FIsica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, Sebastian Camacho 5, Xalapa, Veracruz, 91000 (Mexico)

    2004-09-07

    The creation of brane universes induced by a totally antisymmetric tensor living in a fixed background spacetime is presented, where a term involving the intrinsic curvature of the brane is considered. A canonical quantum mechanical approach employing the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is used. The probability nucleation for the brane is calculated by means of the corresponding instanton and the WKB approximation. Some cosmological implications from the model are presented.

  13. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  14. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M., E-mail: marco.schweizer@math.ethz.ch [Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sagis, L. M. C., E-mail: leonard.sagis@wur.nl [Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Food Physics Group, Wageningen University, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708 WG Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-21

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 − 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  15. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  16. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  17. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  18. Single-fluorophore monitoring of DNA hybridization for investigating the effect of secondary structure on the nucleation step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Joon-Jung; Kim, Min-Ji; Son, Jung-Tae; Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2009-07-17

    Nucleic acid hybridization is one of the essential biological processes involved in storage and transmission of genetic information. Here we quantitatively determined the effect of secondary structure on the hybridization activation energy using structurally defined oligonucleotides. It turned out that activation energy is linearly proportional to the length of a single-stranded region flanking a nucleation site, generating a 0.18 kcal/mol energy barrier per nucleotide. Based on this result, we propose that the presence of single-stranded segments available for non-productive base pairing with a nucleation counterpart extends the searching process for nucleation sites to find a perfect match. This result may provide insights into rational selection of a target mRNA site for siRNA and antisense gene silencing.

  19. Leipzig Ice Nucleation chamber Comparison (LINC): intercomparison of four online ice nucleation counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert-Kohn, Monika; Wex, Heike; Welti, André; Hartmann, Susan; Grawe, Sarah; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Atkinson, James D.; Stratmann, Frank; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-09-01

    Ice crystal formation in atmospheric clouds has a strong effect on precipitation, cloud lifetime, cloud radiative properties, and thus the global energy budget. Primary ice formation above 235 K is initiated by nucleation on seed aerosol particles called ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Instruments that measure the ice-nucleating potential of aerosol particles in the atmosphere need to be able to accurately quantify ambient INP concentrations. In the last decade several instruments have been developed to investigate the ice-nucleating properties of aerosol particles and to measure ambient INP concentrations. Therefore, there is a need for intercomparisons to ensure instrument differences are not interpreted as scientific findings.In this study, we intercompare the results from parallel measurements using four online ice nucleation chambers. Seven different aerosol types are tested including untreated and acid-treated mineral dusts (microcline, which is a K-feldspar, and kaolinite), as well as birch pollen washing waters. Experiments exploring heterogeneous ice nucleation above and below water saturation are performed to cover the whole range of atmospherically relevant thermodynamic conditions that can be investigated with the intercompared chambers. The Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) and the Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber coupled to the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PIMCA-PINC) performed measurements in the immersion freezing mode. Additionally, two continuous-flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs) PINC and the Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN) are used to perform measurements below and just above water saturation, nominally presenting deposition nucleation and condensation freezing.The results of LACIS and PIMCA-PINC agree well over the whole range of measured frozen fractions (FFs) and temperature. In general PINC and SPIN compare well and the observed differences are explained by the ice crystal growth and different residence times in

  20. The acceleration of solid particles subjected to cavitation nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkent, B.M.; Arora, M.; Ohl, C.-D.

    2008-01-01

    The cavity -particle dynamics at cavitation inception on the surface of spherical particles suspended in water and exposed to a strong tensile stress wave is experimentally studied with high-speed photography. Particles, which serve as nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles, are set into a fast...... translatory motion during the explosive growth of the cavity. They reach velocities of ~40 ms-1 and even higher. When the volume growth of the cavity slows down, the particle detaches from the cavity through a process of neck-breaking, and the particle is shot away. The experimental observations are simulated...... with (i) a spherical cavity model and (ii) with an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM). The input for both models is a pressure pulse, which is obtained from the observed radial cavity dynamics during an individual experiment. The model then allows us to calculate the resulting particle trajectory...

  1. Inorganic Nanoparticle Nucleation on Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteleski, Adrian John

    The introduction of inorganic nanoparticles into organic materials enhances both the mechanical and chemical properties of the material. Metallic nanoparticles, like silver and gold, have been introduced into polymers for use as antimicrobial coatings or dielectric materials, respectively. The challenge in creating these materials currently is the difficulty to homogeneously disperse the particles throughout the polymer matrix. The uneven dispersion of nanoparticles can lead to less than optimal quality and undesired properties. By creating a polymer nanocomposite material with well-controlled size inorganic materials that are evenly dispersed throughout the polymer matrix; we can improve the materials performance and properties. The objective for this research is to use polymer networks for the in situ mineralization of silver and other metallic materials to create intricate inorganic structures. The work performed here studied the ability to nucleate silver nanoparticles using poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) as the templating agent. Ionic silver was chemically reduced by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of PAA. The effect of varying reactant concentrations of silver, NaBH 4, and PAA on particle size was studied. Reaction conditions in terms of varying temperature and pH levels of the reaction solution were monitored to observe the effect of silver nanoparticle size, shape, and concentration. By monitoring the UV spectra over time the reaction mechanism of the silver reduction process was determined to be an autocatalytic process: a period of slow, continuous nucleation followed by rapid, autocatalytic growth. The reaction kinetics for this autocatalytic process is also reported. PAA was crosslinked both chemically and physically to 3 biopolymers; ELP, an elastin like peptide, cotton fabrics, and calcium alginate hydrogels. Various compositions of PAA were physically crosslinked with calcium alginate gels to design an antimicrobial hydrogel for use in wound

  2. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  3. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  4. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  5. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, W; Van Robays, J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones.

  6. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today’s common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  7. Ice nucleation on mineral dust particles: Onset conditions, nucleation rates and contact angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Michael L.; Cremel, Sebastien; Gehrke, Clemens; Girard, Eric; Bertram, Allan K.

    2008-11-01

    An optical microscope coupled to a flow cell was used to investigate the onset conditions for ice nucleation on five atmospherically relevant minerals at temperatures ranging from 233 to 246 K. Here we define the onset conditions as the humidity and temperature at which the first ice nucleation event was observed. Kaolinite and muscovite were found to be efficient ice nuclei in the deposition mode, requiring relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi) below 112% in order to initiate ice crystal formation. Quartz and calcite, by contrast, were poor ice nuclei, requiring relative humidities close to water saturation before ice crystals would form. Montmorillonite particles were efficient ice nuclei at temperatures below 241 K but were poor ice nuclei at higher temperatures. In several cases, there was a lack of quantitative agreement between our data and previously published work. This can be explained by several factors including the mineral source, the particle sizes, the surface area available for nucleation, and observation time. Heterogeneous nucleation rates (Jhet) were calculated from the measurements of the onset conditions (temperature and RHi) required from ice nucleation. The Jhet values were then used to calculate contact angles (θ) between the mineral substrates and an ice embryo using classical nucleation theory. The contact angles measured for kaolinite and muscovite ranged from 6° to 12°, whereas for quartz and calcite, the contact angles ranged from 25° to 27°. The reported Jhet and θ values may allow for a more direct comparison between laboratory studies and can be used when modeling ice cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  8. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  9. The effect of sliding velocity on the mechanical response of an artificial joint in Topopah Spring Member tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, W.A.

    1994-04-01

    A smooth artificial joint in Topopah Spring Member tuff was sheared at constant normal stress at velocities from 0 to 100 {mu}m/s to determine the velocity-dependence of shear strength. Two different initial conditions were used: (1) unprimed -- the joint had been shear stress-free since last application of normal stress, and before renewed shear loading; and (2) primed -- the joint had undergone a slip history after application of normal stress, but before the current shear loading. Observed steady-state rate effects were found to be about 3 times lager than for some other silicate rocks. These different initial conditions affected the character of the stress-slip curve immediately after the onset of slip. Priming the joint causes a peak in the stress-slip response followed by a transient decay to the steady-state stress, i.e., slip weakening. Slide-hold-slide tests exhibit time-dependent strengthening. When the joint was subjected to constant shear stress, no slip was observed; that is, joint creep did not occur. One set of rate data was collected from a surface submerged in tap water, the friction was higher for this surface, but the rate sensitivity was the same as that for surfaces tested in the air-dry condition.

  10. Modeling aftershock rates using simulations of spontaneous earthquake nucleation on rate and state faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Y.; Lapusta, N.

    2005-12-01

    Large earthquakes are followed by increased seismic activity, usually referred to as aftershock sequences, that decays to the background rate over time. The decay of aftershocks is well-described empirically by Omori's law. Dieterich (1994) proposed that Omori's law could result from perturbing, by static stress steps, a population of nucleation sites governed by laboratory-derived rate and state friction. He used one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider system to represent elastic interactions and made a simplified assumption about frictional behavior during nucleation. The model was further explored in a number of studies (i.e., Gomberg et al., 2000) and used to interpret observations (i.e., Toda et al., 1998). In this study, we explore the consequences of Dieterich's approach using models of faults embedded in elastic continuum, where the nucleation process can be more complicated than assumed in Dieterich's model. Our approach is different from previous studies of aftershock rates with rate and state friction in that here, nucleation processes are simulated as a part of spontaneously occurring earthquake sequences in continuum fault models. We use two 2D models of a vertical strike-slip fault, the depth-variable model (Rice, 1993; Lapusta at el., 2000) and the crustal-plane model (Myers et al., 1996). We find that nucleation processes in continuum models and the resulting aftershock rates are well-described by the model of Dieterich (1994) when Dieterich's assumption that the state variable of the rate and state friction law is significantly behind its steady-state value holds during the entire nucleation process. On the contrary, aftershock rates in models where the state variable assumption is violated for a significant portion of the nucleation process exhibit behavior different from Dieterich's model. The state variable assumption is significantly violated, and hence the aftershock rates are affected, when stress heterogeneities are present within the nucleation

  11. Internet advertising of artificial tanning in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Markovic, Milica

    2006-08-01

    Artificial tanning, defined as deliberate exposure to ultraviolet rays produced by artificial tanning devices, is a new and emerging public health issue in Australia and globally. Epidemiological research suggests that artificial tanning may contribute to the incidence of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as other health problems. Given that Australia has a high incidence of skin cancer, we have undertaken a study to explore how artificial tanning has been promoted to its users. The aim was to analyze the completeness and accuracy of information about artificial tanning. A content analysis of web sites of tanning salons and distributors of tanning equipment in Australia was conducted. A total of 22 web sites were analyzed. None of the solarium operators or distributors of equipment provided full information about the risks of artificial tanning. Fifty-nine percent of web advertisements had no information and 41% provided only partial information regarding the risks of artificial tanning. Pictures with the image of bronze-tanned bodies, predominantly women, were used by all web advertisers. In light of the success of sun-safety campaigns in Australia, the findings of future epidemiological research on the prevalence of artificial tanning and sociological and anthropological research on why people utilize artificial tanning should be a basis for developing effective targeted health promotion on the elimination of artificial tanning in the country.

  12. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  13. Binary Homogeneous Nucleation in Selected Aqueous

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Němec, Tomáš; Hrubý, Jan; Demo, Pavel; Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Petr, V.; Kolovratník, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 12 (2008), s. 1671-1708 ISSN 0095-9782 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2524; GA AV ČR KJB400760701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA AV ČR IBS2076003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nucleation * steam * theory Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2008 http://www.springerlink.com/content/104381/

  14. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...

  15. A Photoemission Electron Microscope Investigation of Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films and Diamond Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun

    1993-01-01

    CVD diamond nucleation is investigated using the hot filament technique. The stability of CVD diamond at elevated temperatures in vacuum, O_2, and atomic hydrogen environments are studied using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) combined with in-vacuo x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Dissolution, oxidation, and atomic hydrogen etching processes of CVD diamond are observed in real-time. Low field cold electron emission from CVD diamond films has been observed for the first time by PEEM. Nucleation density Mo substrates could be increased from 10^4 to rm 10 ^8/cm^2 by polishing. Heating the substrate to 870^circC in vacuum prior to deposition, or above 1000^ circC at the beginning of deposition, reduced nucleation by more than 100-fold. Reduction in nucleation sites is attributed to annealing. Nucleation on Mo _2C substrates was found to be very poor rm (10^4/cm^2), which shows carbide alone does not promote nucleation. Carbide formation may remove nucleation sites. CVD diamond was found to dissolve into the Mo substrate in vacuum at about 1200^circ C. XPS showed formation of Mo_2 C when the diamond dissolved. Diamond oxidation to gas phase products occurred directly at about 600 ^circC, with no observable participation by the substrate. No detectable etching by atomic hydrogen at a pressure of 1times10^{-4 } torr was observed. Boron doped and "pure" CVD diamond films were found to emit electrons at room temperature under the action of the accelerating electric field of the PEEM (about 30 kV/cm) without photon excitation. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was investigated with PEEM and by studying the emission current-vs-voltage characteristics of the CVD diamond films. Morphology and crystalline orientation were found to play only a minor role. Impurities in the CVD diamond structure lowers the potential barrier substantially; tunneling of electrons into the vacuum is facile. The effective work function of the emitting CVD diamond films is

  16. Snow-borne nanosized particles: Abundance, distribution, composition, and significance in ice nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Alvarado, Rodrigo Benjamin; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2015-11-01

    Physicochemical processes of nucleation constitute a major uncertainty in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. To improve the knowledge of the ice nucleation process, we characterized physical, chemical, and biological properties of fresh snow using a suite of state-of-the-art techniques based on mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, chromatography, and optical particle sizing. Samples were collected at two North American Arctic sites, as part of international campaigns (2006 and 2009), and in the city of Montreal, Canada, over the last decade. Particle size distribution analyses, in the range of 3 nm to 10 µm, showed that nanosized particles are the most numerous (38-71%) in fresh snow, with a significant portion (11 to 19%) less than 100 nm in size. Particles with diameters less than 200 nm consistently exhibited relatively high ice-nucleating properties (on average ranged from -19.6 ± 2.4 to -8.1 ± 2.6°C). Chemical analysis of the nanosized fraction suggests that they contain bioorganic materials, such as amino acids, as well as inorganic compounds with similar characteristics to mineral dust. The implication of nanoparticle ubiquity and abundance in diverse snow ecosystems are discussed in the context of their importance in understanding atmospheric nucleation processes.

  17. Artificial rheotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes.

  18. Nucleation and growth of voids by radiation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.M.; Brown, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The original model of Brown, Kelly and Mayer [1] for the nucleation of interstitial loops has been extended to take into account the following: (i) mobility of the vacancies, (ii) generation and migration of gas atoms during irradiation, (iii) nucleation and growth of voids, and (iv) vacancy emission from voids and clusters at high temperatures. Using chemicalrate equations, additional expressions are formulated for the nucleation and growth of vacancy loops and voids. (orig.)

  19. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    -effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  20. Earthquake Nucleation on Faults With Heterogeneous Frictional Properties, Normal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sohom; Viesca, Robert C.

    2017-10-01

    We examine the development of an instability of fault slip rate. We consider a slip rate and state dependence of fault frictional strength, in which frictional properties and normal stress are functions of position. We pose the problem for a slip rate distribution that diverges quasi-statically within finite time in a self-similar fashion. Scenarios of property variations are considered and the corresponding self-similar solutions found. We focus on variations of coefficients, a and b, respectively, controlling the magnitude of a direct effect on strength due to instantaneous changes in slip rate and of strength evolution due to changes in a state variable. These results readily extend to variations in fault-normal stress, σ, or the characteristic slip distance for state evolution, Dc. We find that heterogeneous properties lead to a finite number of self-similar solutions, located about critical points of the distributions: maxima, minima, and between them. We examine the stability of these solutions and find that only a subset is asymptotically stable, occurring at just one of the critical point types. Such stability implies that during instability development, slip rate and state evolution can be attracted to develop in the manner of the self-similar solution, which is also confirmed by solutions to initial value problems for slip rate and state. A quasi-static slip rate divergence is ultimately limited by inertia, leading to the nucleation of an outward expanding dynamic rupture: asymptotic stability of self-similar solutions then implies preferential sites for earthquake nucleation, which are determined by distribution of frictional properties.

  1. Quantitative studies of the nucleation of recrystallization in metals utilizing microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel Wright

    This thesis covers three main results obtained during the project: A reliable method of performing serial sectioning on metal samples utilizing a Logitech polishing machine has been developed. Serial sectioning has been performed on metal samples in 1 µmsteps utilizing mechanical polishing, and i...... microstructures to be compared at a given nucleation site in the bulk of a metal sample. From an experiment threenuclei were identified, their respective crystal orientations were determined, and growth curves were obtained for two of them....

  2. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  3. A nucleation theory of cell surface capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Wester, M.J.; Perelson, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new theory of cell surface capping based on the principles of nucleation. When antibody interacts with cell surface molecules, the molecules initially form small aggregates called patches that later coalesce into a large aggregate called a cap. While a cap can form by patches being pulled together by action of the cell''s cytoskeleton, in the case of some molecules, disruption of the cytoskeleton does not prevent cap formation. Diffusion of large aggregates on a cell surface is slow, and thus we propose that a cap can form solely through the diffusion of small aggregates containing just one or a few cell surface molecules. Here we consider the extreme case in which single molecules are mobile, but aggregates of all larger sizes are immobile. We show that a set of patches in equilibrium with a open-quotes seaclose quotes of free cell surface molecules can undergo a nucleation-type phase transition in which the largest patch will bind free cell surface molecules, deplete the concentration of such molecules in the open-quotes seaclose quotes and thus cause the other patches to shrink in size. We therefore show that a cap can form without patches having to move, collide with each other, and aggregate

  4. Epitaxial nucleation and growth of molecular films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Daniel Edwin

    2000-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased emphasis on the design and use of molecular-based materials, commonly in thin film form, as components in electronic devices, sensors, displays, and logic elements. The growing interest in films based on molecular components, rather than their more traditional inorganic counterparts, stems largely from the premise that collective optical and electronic properties can be systematically manipulated through molecular design. Many of these properties depend strongly upon film structure and orientation with respect to the substrate upon which they are deposited. This relationship mandates careful attention to the interface between the primary molecular overlayer and the substrate. Further advances in molecular films and multilayer composites based on molecular films require improved understanding of the role of epitaxy in molecular organization as well as the nucleation events that precede film formation. Determination of critical nucleus dimensions and elucidation of the factors that govern critical size are particularly important for fabricating nanoscale molecular features and controlling domain defects in contiguous molecular films. This thesis describes an examination of the role of epitaxy in the growth of molecular films, including a hierarchical classification and grammar of molecular epitaxy, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation of the intercalation of molecular components into multilayer organic-inorganic composites, and an AFM investigation of the nucleation of molecular films.

  5. Evaluation of onset of nucleate boiling models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, LiDong [Heat Transfer Research, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)], e-mail: lh@htri.net

    2009-07-01

    This article discusses available models and correlations for predicting the required heat flux or wall superheat for the Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB) on plain surfaces. It reviews ONB data in the open literature and discusses the continuing efforts of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. in this area. Our ONB database contains ten individual sources for ten test fluids and a wide range of operating conditions for different geometries, e.g., tube side and shell side flow boiling and falling film evaporation. The article also evaluates literature models and correlations based on the data: no single model in the open literature predicts all data well. The prediction uncertainty is especially higher in vacuum conditions. Surface roughness is another critical criterion in determining which model should be used. However, most models do not directly account for surface roughness, and most investigators do not provide surface roughness information in their published findings. Additional experimental research is needed to improve confidence in predicting the required wall superheats for nucleation boiling for engineering design purposes. (author)

  6. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures to treat urine leakage and incontinence include: Anterior vaginal wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material ... urinary incontinence Images Inflatable artificial sphincter Anal sphincter anatomy Inflatable artificial sphincter - series References Adams MC, Joseph ...

  7. Artificial resuspension studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.M.; Marchall, K.B.; Thomas, K.A.; Tracy, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial resuspension studies on a range of Taranaki and other major trial site soils were performed by use of a mechanical dust-raising apparatus. A cascade impactor was used to analyse airborne dust in terms of mass and 241 Am activities for particle sizes less than 7 μm. Plutonium and americium activities were found to be enhanced in the respirable fraction. Reported enhancement factors (defined as the ratio of activity concentration of the respirable fraction to that of the total soil) ranged from 3.7 to 32.5 for Taranaki soils with an average value of 6 appearing reasonable for general application in outer (plume) areas. Values close to unity were measured at major trial sites , One Tree and Tadje. Results of some experiments where uncontamined dust was raised by activities such as walking and driving over dusty ground are also presented. 7 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs

  8. Some ice nucleation characteristics of Asian and Saharan desert dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Field

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The large (7 m×4 m cylinder, 84 m3 AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber facility at Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany was used to test the ice nucleating ability of two desert dust samples from the Sahara and Asia. Aerosol samples were lognormally distributed with a mode diameter of 0.4(±0.1 μm and geometric standard deviation of ~1.7(±0.2. At temperatures warmer than −40°C droplets were formed before ice crystals formed and there was generally no deposition nucleation observed. At temperatures colder than −40°C both dust samples exhibited dual nucleation events that were observed during the same expansion experiment. The primary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios of 1.1 to 1.3 and is likely to be a deposition nucleation mode. The secondary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios between 1.35 and 1.5. We cannot categorically determine whether this ice nucleation event is via a further deposition mode or a condensation mode, but the presence of some soluble material in the dust samples leads us to favour the latter process. The activated fractions of desert dust ranged from ~5–10% at −20°C to 20–40% at temperatures colder than −40°C. There was no obvious difference between the nucleation behaviour of the two dust samples.

  9. Nucleation of domains under the influence of temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is found that the nucleation of domains can take place in Ba5Ti2O7Cl4 under the influence of temperature unlike in many other ferroelectrics. The nucleated domain can also be removed from the structure under the randomizing effect of tem- perature. These observations have been explained on the basis of a ...

  10. Mechanism of cube grain nucleation during recrystallization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Cube texture is a sharp recrystallization texture component in fcc metals like aluminium, copper, etc. It is described by an ideal orientation i.e. (100) 〈100〉. The subject of cube texture nucleation i.e. cube grain nucleation, from the deformed state of aluminium and copper is of scientific curiosity with concurrent.

  11. Nucleation and growth of polycrystalline SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, M.; Schimmel, S.; Jokubavicius, V.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation and bulk growth of polycrystalline SiC in a 2 inch PVT setup using isostatic and pyrolytic graphite as substrates was studied. Textured nucleation occurs under near-thermal equilibrium conditions at the initial growth stage with hexagonal platelet shaped crystallites of 4H, 6H and ...

  12. Local structure of liquid carbon controls diamond nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process: diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleation rate

  13. Trapping crystal nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline nucleation of cholesterol at the air-water interface has been studied via grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The various stages of cholesterol molecular assembly from monolayer to three bilayers incorporating interleaving hydrogen-bonded water layers...... in a monoclinic cholesterol . H2O phase, has been monitored and their structures characterized to near atomic resolution. Crystallographic evidence is presented that this multilayer phase is similar to that of a reported metastable cholesterol phase of undetermined structure obtained from bile before...... transformation to the triclinic phase of cholesterol . H2O, the thermodynamically stable macroscopic form. According to grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements and crystallographic data, a transformation from the monoclinic film structure to a multilayer of the stable monohydrate phase involves...

  14. Mini-Tn7 Insertion in an Artificial attTn7 Site Enables Depletion of the Essential Master Regulator CtrA in the Phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Cuilan, Wanda; Daniel, Jeremy J; Howell, Matthew; Sulaiman, Aliyah; Brown, Pamela J B

    2016-08-15

    Mechanistic studies of many processes in Agrobacterium tumefaciens have been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for characterization of essential genes. In this study, we used a Tn7-based method for inducible control of transcription from an engineered site on the chromosome. We demonstrate that this method enables tighter control of inducible promoters than plasmid-based systems and can be used for depletion studies. The method enables the construction of depletion strains to characterize the roles of essential genes in A. tumefaciens Here, we used the strategy to deplete the alphaproteobacterial master regulator CtrA and found that depletion of this essential gene results in dramatic rounding of cells, which become nonviable. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a bacterial plant pathogen and natural genetic engineer. Thus, studies of essential processes, including cell cycle progression, DNA replication and segregation, cell growth, and division, may provide insights for limiting disease or improving biotechnology applications. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Overcoming artificial spatial correlations in simulations of superstructure domain growth with parallel Monte Carlo algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleier, W.; Besold, G.; Heinz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The authors study the applicability of parallelized/vectorized Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms to the simulation of domain growth in two-dimensional lattice gas models undergoing an ordering process after a rapid quench below an order-disorder transition temperature. As examples they consider models with 2 x 1 and c(2 x 2) equilibrium superstructures on the square and rectangular lattices, respectively. They also study the case of phase separation ('1 x 1' islands) on the square lattice. A generalized parallel checkerboard algorithm for Kawasaki dynamics is shown to give rise to artificial spatial correlations in all three models. However, only if superstructure domains evolve do these correlations modify the kinetics by influencing the nucleation process and result in a reduced growth exponent compared to the value from the conventional heat bath algorithm with random single-site updates. In order to overcome these artificial modifications, two MC algorithms with a reduced degree of parallelism ('hybrid' and 'mask' algorithms, respectively) are presented and applied. As the results indicate, these algorithms are suitable for the simulation of superstructure domain growth on parallel/vector computers. 60 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  16. Observations on the nucleation of ice VII in compressed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Chapman, David J.; Bland, Simon N.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Water can freeze upon multiple shock compression, but the window material determines the pressure of the phase transition. Several plate impact experiments were conducted with liquid targets on a single-stage gas gun, diagnosed simultaneously using photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) and high speed imaging through the water. The experiments investigated why silica windows instigate freezing above 2.5 GPa whilst sapphire windows do not until 7 GPa. We find that the nucleation of ice occurs on the surfaces of windows and can be affected by the surface coating suggesting the surface energy of fused silica, likely due to hydroxyl groups, encourages nucleation of ice VII crystallites. Aluminium coatings prevent nucleation and sapphire surfaces do not nucleate until approximately 6.5 GPa. This is believed to be the threshold pressure for the homogeneous nucleation of water.

  17. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dommaes@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vorontsova, Maria A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sleutel, Mike [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giglio, Marzio [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vekilov, Peter G. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  18. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  19. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  20. In Situ Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Nucleation Kinetics and Pathways during Intra- and Extrafibrillar Mineralization of Collagen Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Doyoon [Department; amp, Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States; Lee, Byeongdu [X-ray; Thomopoulos, Stavros [Department; Jun, Young-Shin [Department; amp, Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

    2016-08-04

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) nanocrystals nucleate and grow in intrafibrillar and/or extrafibrillar spaces of collagen fibrils during the mineralization of bones and teeth. Little is known about the early stages of CaP nucleation and distribution in fibrillar matrices, despite their significant influence on the physical and chemical structures of tissue-level constructs. Using in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we examined the nucleation and growth of CaP within collagen matrices and elucidated how a nucleation inhibitor, polyaspartic acid (pAsp), governs mineralization kinetics and pathways at multiple length scales. In situ SAXS analysis clearly revealed that nucleation sites, kinetically-controlled by the nucleation inhibitor, determined the pathways of CaP morphological transformation. Mineralization with pAsp led to intrafibrillar CaP plates with a spatial distribution gradient through the depth of the matrix. Mineralization without pAsp led initially to spherical aggregates of CaP in the entire extrafibrillar spaces. With time, the spherical aggregates transformed into plates at the outermost surface of the collagen matrix, preventing intrafibrillar mineralization inside. The results illuminate mineral nucleation kinetics and real-time nanoparticle distributions within organic matrices in solutions containing body fluid components. Because the macroscale mechanical properties of collagen matrices depend on their mineral content, phase, and arrangement at the nanoscale, this study contributes to better design and fabrication of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  1. European Marine Background Ice Nucleating Particle concentrations Measured at the Mace Head Station, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin A.; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation is an important process which controls cloud microphysical properties and can be critical in the creation of precipitation, therefore influencing the hydrological cycle and energy budget of the Earth. Ice Nucleating Particles (INP) can greatly increase the temperature and rate of ice formation, but the sources and geographical distributions of these particles is not well understood. Mace Head in Ireland is a coastal site on the north eastern edge of Europe with prevailing winds generally from the Atlantic Ocean with little continental influence. Observations of INP concentration from August 2015 using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC) at temperature of -30 C are presented. Correlations between the INP and meteorological conditions and aerosol compositions are made, as well as comparisons with commonly used INP concentration parameterisations. Observed INP concentrations are generally low, suggesting that oceanic sources in this region do not contribute significant numbers of INP to the global distribution.

  2. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  3. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  4. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  5. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  6. Non-self-averaging nucleation rate due to quenched disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sear, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    We study the nucleation of a new thermodynamic phase in the presence of quenched disorder. The quenched disorder is a generic model of both impurities and disordered porous media; both are known to have large effects on nucleation. We find that the nucleation rate is non-self-averaging. This is in a simple Ising model with clusters of quenched spins. We also show that non-self-averaging behaviour is straightforward to detect in experiments, and may be rather common. (fast track communication)

  7. Analysis of isothermal and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Alpert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature, T, and relative humidity, RH, at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nucleating particles (INPs all have the same INP surface area (ISA; however, the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimental data is rarely questioned. Descriptions of ice active sites and variability of contact angles have been successfully formulated to describe ice nucleation experimental data in previous research; however, we consider the ability of a stochastic freezing model founded on classical nucleation theory to reproduce previous results and to explain experimental uncertainties and data scatter. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses parameters including the total number of droplets, Ntot, and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T. This model is applied to address if (i a time and ISA-dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and

  8. Saturation and nucleation in hot nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deangelis, A.R.

    1990-07-01

    We investigate nuclear fragmentation in a supersaturated system using classical nucleation theory. This allows us to go outside the normally applied constraint of chemical equilibrium. The system is governed by a virial equation of state, which we use to find an expression for the density as a function of pressure and temperature. The evolution of the system is discussed in terms of the phase diagram. Corrections are included to account for the droplet surface and all charges contained in the system. Using this model we investigate and discuss the effects of temperature and saturation, and compare the results to those of other models of fragmentation. We also discuss the limiting temperatures of the system for the cases with and without chemical equilibrium. We find that large nuclei will be formed in saturated systems, even above the limiting temperature as previously defined. We also find that saturation and temperature dominate surface and Coulomb effects. The effects are quite large, thus even a qualitative inspection of the yields may give an indication of the conditions during fragmentation

  9. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  10. Heat transfer in nucleate pool boiling of aqueous SDS and triton X-100 solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasekar, Vivek M. [Tata Steel Limited, Department of Research and Development, Jamshedpur (India)

    2009-09-15

    Variation in degree of surface wettability is presented through the application of Cooper's correlative approach (h{proportional_to}M{sup -0.5}q{sub w}''0.67) for computing enhancement ({phi}) in nucleate pool boiling of aqueous solutions of SDS and Triton X-100 and its presentation with Marangoni parameter ({chi}) that represents the dynamic convection effects due to surface tension gradients. Dynamic spreading coefficient defined as {sigma} {sub dyn}N{sub a}, which relates spreading and wetting characteristics with the active nucleation site density on the heated surface and bubble evolution process, represents cavity filling and activation process and eliminates the concentration dependence of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in boiling of aqueous surfactant solutions. Using the dynamic spreading coefficient ({sigma}{sub dyn}N{sub a}=0.09q{sub w}''0.71), correlation predictions within {+-}15% for both SDS and triton X-100 solutions for low heat flux boiling condition (q{sub w}''{<=} 100 kW/m {sup 2}) characterised primarily by isolated bubble regime are presented. (orig.)

  11. Polyol Synthesis of Silver Nanowires by Heterogeneous Nucleation and Mechanistic Aspects Influencing its Length and Diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, Waynie Mark

    Various additives are employed in the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires (Ag NWs), which are typically halide salts such as NaCl. A variety of mechanistic roles have been suggested for these additives. My research showed that the early addition of NaCl in the polyol synthesis of Ag NWs from AgNO3 in ethylene glycol results in the rapid formation of AgCl nanocubes, which induce the heterogeneous nucleation of metallic Ag upon their surfaces. Ag NWs subsequently grow from these nucleation sites. The conclusions are supported by studies using ex-situ generated AgCl nanocubes. Additionally, the final mean silver nanowire diameter is found to be independent of the size of the heterogeneous nucleant, showing that the diameter is not significantly influenced by the nucleation event. Kinetics studies determine that nanowire diameter, length, and aspect ratio grow in parallel to one another and with the extent of the Ag+ reduction reaction, demonstrating that growth is reduction-rate limited. The results are interpreted to support nanowire growth by a surface-catalyzed reduction process occurring on all nanowire surfaces, and to exclude nanoparticle aggregation or Ostwald ripening as primary components of the growth mechanism.

  12. Quantifying the Effect of Stress on Sn Whisker Nucleation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chason, Eric; Vasquez, Justin; Pei, Fei; Jain, Nupur; Hitt, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Although Sn whiskers have been studied extensively, there is still a need to understand the driving forces behind whisker nucleation and growth. Many studies point to the role of stress, but confirming this requires a quantitative comparison between controlled stress and the resulting whisker evolution. Recent experimental studies applied stress to a Sn layer via thermal cycling and simultaneously monitored the evolution of the temperature, stress and number of nuclei. In this work, we analyze these nucleation kinetics in terms of classical nucleation theory to relate the observed behavior to underlying mechanisms including a stress dependent activation energy and a temperature and stress-dependent whisker growth rate. Non-linear least squares fitting of the data taken at different temperatures and strain rates to the model shows that the results can be understood in terms of stress decreasing the barrier for whisker nucleation.

  13. Nucleation from a cluster of inclusions, leading to void coalescense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2017-01-01

    A cell model analysis is used to study the nucleation and subsequent growth of voids from a non-uniform distribution of inclusions in a ductile material. Nucleation is modeled as either stress controlled or strain controlled. The special clusters considered consist of a number of uniformly spaced...... inclusions located along a plane perpendicular to the maximum principal tensile stress. A plane strain approximation is used, where the inclusions are parallel cylinders perpendicular to the plane. Clusters with different numbers of inclusions are compared with the nucleation and growth from a single...... inclusion, such that the total initial volume of the inclusions is the same for the clusters and the single inclusion. After nucleation, local void coalescence inside the clusters is accounted for, since this makes it possible to compare the rate of growth of the single larger void that results from...

  14. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  15. Mediating conducting polymer growth within hydrogels by controlling nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Patton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the efficacy of primary and secondary nucleation for electrochemical polymerisation of conductive polymers within poly(vinyl alcohol methacrylate hydrogels. The two methods of nucleation investigated were a primary heterogeneous mechanism via introduction of conductive bulk metallic glass (Mg64Zn30Ca5Na1 particles and a secondary mechanism via introduction of “pre-polymerised” conducting polymer within the hydrogel (PEDOT:PSS. Evidence of nucleation was not seen in the bulk metallic glass loaded gels, however, the PEDOT:PSS loaded gels produced charge storage capacities over 15 mC/cm2 when sufficient polymer was loaded. These studies support the hypothesis that secondary nucleation is an efficient approach to producing stand-alone conducting hydrogels.

  16. Availability analysis for heterogeneous nucleation in a uniform electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Saidi, M H

    2003-01-01

    Industrial demands for more compact heat exchangers are a motivation to find new technology features. Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is introduced as a promising phenomenon for heat transfer enhancement mechanisms. Similar to any new technology, EHD has not been understood completely yet and require more fundamental studies. In boiling phase change phenomena, nucleation is the dominant mechanism in heat transfer. Because of higher performance in heat transfer, nucleate boiling is considered as the main regime in thermal components. Hence, bubble dynamic investigation is a means to evaluate heat transfer. This study investigate bubble formation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Change in availability due to bubble embryo nucleation is discussed. Stability criteria for these systems are theoretically studied and results are discussed considering experimental data. In addition, a conceptual discussion on entropy generation in a thermodynamic system under electri...

  17. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tutum, Cem Celal; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallogra...

  18. Evolution of a magnetic bubble after quantum nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defranzo, A.; Gunther, L.

    1989-06-01

    Chudnovsky and Gunther recently presented a theory of quantum nucleation in a ferromagnet [Phys. Rev. B 37, 9455 (1989)]. As a sequel, this paper is concerned with the evolution of the magnetic bubble after its materialization.

  19. Theoretical Studies Of Nucleation Kinetics And Nanodroplet Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilemski, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this project were to (1) explore ways of bridging the gap between fundamental molecular nucleation theories and phenomenological approaches based on thermodynamic reasoning, (2) test and improve binary nucleation theory, and (3) provide the theoretical underpinning for a powerful new experimental technique, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) from nanodroplet aerosols, that can probe the compositional structure of nanodroplets. This report summarizes the accomplishments of this project in realizing these goals. Publications supported by this project fall into three general categories: (1) theoretical work on nucleation theory (2) experiments and modeling of nucleation and condensation in supersonic nozzles, and (3) experimental and theoretical work on nanodroplet structure and neutron scattering. These publications are listed and briefly summarized in this report.

  20. Development of an experimental apparatus for nucleate boiling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.J.A. de.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental apparatus is developed for the study of the parameters that affect nucleate boiling. The experimental set up is tested for nucleate boiling in an annular test section with subcooled water flow. The following parameters are analysed: pressure, fluid velocity and the fluid temperature at the test section entrance. The performance of the experimental apparatus is analysed by the results and by the problems raised by the operation of the setup. (Author) [pt

  1. Artificial Disc Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR) Patient Education Committee Jamie Baisden The disc ... Disc An artificial disc (also called a disc replacement, disc prosthesis or spine arthroplasty device) is a ...

  2. Trends in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the foundations of artificial intelligence as a science and the types of answers that may be given to the question, "What is intelligence?" The paradigms of artificial intelligence and general systems theory are compared. (Author/VT)

  3. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  4. Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured by unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrod, Jann; Weber, Daniel; Drücke, Jaqueline; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Ebert, Martin; Cvetković, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan; Marinou, Eleni; Baars, Holger; Ansmann, Albert; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Sciare, Jean; Curtius, Joachim; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2017-04-01

    During an intensive field campaign on aerosol, clouds, and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the lower troposphere from unmanned aircraft systems (UASs). Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UASs at altitudes up to 2.5 km. The number of INPs in these samples, which are active in the deposition and condensation modes at temperatures from -20 to -30 °C, were analyzed immediately after collection on site using the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment). During the 1-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers' altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with aerosol number concentrations, observations of lidar backscattering, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INPs with the particulate matter (PM), the lidar signal, and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INPs std L-1 were measured at -30 °C. The INP concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. Since desert dust is transported for long distances over wide areas of the globe predominantly at several kilometers' altitude, we conclude that INP measurements at ground level may be of limited significance for the situation at the level of cloud formation.

  5. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  6. Influence of surface morphology on the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of hematite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiranuma, N.; Hoffmann, N.; Kiselev, A.; Dreyer, A.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Koop, T.; Möhler, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of the morphological modification of aerosol particles with respect to heterogeneous ice nucleation is comprehensively investigated for laboratory-generated hematite particles as a model substrate for atmospheric dust particles. The surface-area-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of monodisperse cubic hematite particles and milled hematite particles were measured with a series of expansion cooling experiments using the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud simulation chamber. Complementary offline characterization of physico-chemical properties of both hematite subsets were also carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and an electro-kinetic particle charge detector to further constrain droplet-freezing measurements of hematite particles. Additionally, an empirical parameterization derived from our laboratory measurements was implemented in the single-column version of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) to investigate the model sensitivity in simulated ice crystal number concentration on different ice nucleation efficiencies. From an experimental perspective, our results show that the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of milled hematite particles is almost an order of magnitude higher at -35.2 °C < T < -33.5 °C than that of the cubic hematite particles, indicating a substantial effect of morphological irregularities on immersion mode freezing. Our modeling results similarly show that the increased droplet-freezing rates of milled hematite particles lead to about one order magnitude higher ice crystal number in the upper troposphere than cubic hematite particles. Finally and overall, our results suggest that the surface irregularities and associated active sites lead to greater ice activation through droplet freezing.

  7. Effect of nucleating agents on crystallization kinetics of PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of three nucleating agents concluding talc, sodium benzoate (SB and an ionomer (Ion., Na+ on crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and polarized optical microscope (POM, the parameters of crystallization kinetics were obtained through Avrami and Ozawa equations. The fold surface free energy σe of pure PET and PET/nucleating agent blends were calculated by Hoffman-Lauritzen theory. The results indicate that the three kinds of nucleating agents increase the crystallization rate constant through promoting their nucleating effect for PET crystallization, among which SB is the best one with the same content. The crystallization mode of PET might shift from three-dimensional growth to two-dimensional growth by the addition of the nucleating agents. The values of σe of PET/nucleating agent blends are much less than that of pure PET, and PET/SB (99:1 blend has the least value of σe (18.2 mJ/m2. The conclusion based on Hoffman theory is similar to the analysis by Avrami and Ozawa equations.

  8. Computer simulations of homogeneous nucleation of benzene from the melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manas; Santiso, Erik E; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-09-08

    Nucleation is the key step in crystallization by which the molecules (or atoms or ions) aggregate together, find the right relative orientations, and start to grow to form the final crystal structure. Since nucleation is an activated step involving a large gap in time scales between molecular motions and the nucleation event itself, nucleation must be studied using rare events methods. We employ a technique developed previously in our group known as aimless shooting [Peters, B.; Trout, B. L. J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 125, 054108], which is based on transition path sampling, to generate reactive trajectories between the disordered and ordered phases of benzene. Using the likelihood maximization algorithm, we analyze the aimless shooting trajectories to identify the key order parameters or collective variables to describe the reaction coordinate for the nucleation of benzene from the melt. We find that the local bond orientation and local relative orientation order parameters are the most important collective variables in describing the reaction coordinate for homogeneous nucleation from the melt, as compared to cluster size and space-averaged order parameters. This study also demonstrates the utility of recently developed order parameters for molecular crystals [Santiso, E. E.; Trout, B. L. J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 134, 064109].

  9. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  10. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  11. artificial neural network (ann)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-08-18

    Aug 18, 2004 ... forecasting models and artificial intelligence techniques and have become one of the major research fields (Kher and Joshin, 2003). (a) Artificial Neural Network and Electrical Load. Prediction. Neural network analysis is an Artificial Intelligence. (AI) approach to mathematical modeling. Neural. Networks ...

  12. Controlled ice nucleation in the field of freeze-drying: fundamentals and technology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geidobler, R; Winter, G

    2013-10-01

    In the scientific community as well as in commercial freeze-drying, controlled ice nucleation has received a lot of attention because increasing the ice nucleation temperature can significantly reduce primary drying duration. Furthermore, controlled ice nucleation enables to reduce the randomness of the ice nucleation temperature, which can be a serious scale-up issue during process development. In this review, fundamentals of ice nucleation in the field of freeze-drying are presented. Furthermore, the impact of controlled ice nucleation on product qualities is discussed, and methods to achieve controlled ice nucleation are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of artificial spawning substrates in order to understand the factors influencing the spawning site selection, depth of egg strands deposition and hatching time of perch (Perca fluviatilis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubečka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of egg strands of perch Perca fluviatilis and factors affecting this distribution, in terms of spawning sites and spawning depths used, was studied in spring 2010 in Chabařovice Lake, Czech Republic, using areas with an artificial spawning substrate (A.S.S. and control areas outside the A.S.S. Perch significantly preferred a calm shore instead of a windward shore for spawning. The depths at which perch egg strands were found increased significantly during the spawning period in both A.S.S. areas and in areas outside the A.S.S. (on average from 4.9 m at the beginning to 12.3 m at the end of the spawning period. With increasing depth of deposition the size of the egg strands decreased significantly. The mean depth of egg strands on individual dates corresponded to the position of 10-12°C water layers. From the third week onward, however, egg strands were deposited in much deeper and colder water. A strong relationship was found between the depth at which egg strands were deposited and the duration of the daylight period, indicating that, at the end of the spawning season, perch do not react to the actual temperature of the water column but that they follow their inner clock, assuming that "normally" the shallower depth layers are too warm for successful embryo development. Factors influencing the depth distribution of egg strands were identified as waves, temperature and duration of the daylight period. Factors influencing the selection of spawning sites were identified as wind inducing current, internal seiches and temperature instability of the water column. The first perch larvae were present in the open water of Chabařovice Lake before mid-May, and the latest larvae not earlier than the beginning of July, since warming of the water in deeper layers was very slow. It appears that with prolonged spawning and hatching periods and with spawning occurring at various depths and temperatures, perch have evolved a powerful

  14. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  15. Prediction of flow boiling curves based on artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Junmei; Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xi'an; Su Guanghui

    2007-01-01

    The effects of the main system parameters on flow boiling curves were analyzed by using an artificial neural network (ANN) based on the database selected from the 1960s. The input parameters of the ANN are system pressure, mass flow rate, inlet subcooling, wall superheat and steady/transition boiling, and the output parameter is heat flux. The results obtained by the ANN show that the heat flux increases with increasing inlet sub cooling for all heat transfer modes. Mass flow rate has no significant effects on nucleate boiling curves. The transition boiling and film boiling heat fluxes will increase with an increase of mass flow rate. The pressure plays a predominant role and improves heat transfer in whole boiling regions except film boiling. There are slight differences between the steady and the transient boiling curves in all boiling regions except the nucleate one. (authors)

  16. In Situ Conductance Analysis of Zinc Oxide Nucleation and Coalescence during Atomic Layer Deposition on Metal Oxides and Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2015-07-07

    Real time in situ conductance is collected continuously during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of zinc oxide films, and trends are used to study ALD nucleation on polypropylene, nylon-6, SiO2, TiO2, and Al2O3 substrates. The detailed conductance change during the ALD cycle is ascribed to changes in surface band bending upon precursor/reactant exposure. Conductive pathways form earlier on the inorganic surfaces than on the polymers, with Al2O3 substrates showing more rapid nucleation than SiO2 or TiO2, consistent with the expected density of nucleation sites (e.g., hydroxyl groups) on these different materials. The measured conductance is ohmic, and both two- and four-electrode configurations show the same data trends. Detailed analysis of conductivity at deposition temperatures between 100 and 175 °C shows faster conductivity decay at higher temperature during the water purge step, ascribed to thermally activated water desorption kinetics. Analysis of real-time conductivity during ALD of other material systems could provide further insight into key aspects of film nucleation and nuclei coalescence.

  17. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  19. Nucleation and growth in alkaline zinc electrodeposition An Experimental and Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Divyaraj

    The current work seeks to investigate the nucleation and growth of zinc electrodeposition in alkaline electrolyte, which is of commercial interest to alkaline zinc batteries for energy storage. The morphology of zinc growth places a severe limitation on the typical cycle life of such batteries. The formation of mossy zinc leads to a progressive deterioration of battery performance while zinc dendrites are responsible for sudden catastrophic battery failure. The problems are identified as the nucleation-controlled formation of mossy zinc and the transport-limited formation of dendritic zinc. Consequently, this thesis work seeks to investigate and accurately simulate the conditions under which such morphologies are formed. The nucleation and early-stage growth of Zn electrodeposits is studied on carbon-coated TEM grids. At low overpotentials, the morphology develops by aggregation at two distinct length scales: ~5 nm diameter monocrystalline nanoclusters form ~50nm diameter polycrystalline aggregates, and second, the aggregates form a branched network. Epitaxial (0002) growth above a critical overpotential leads to the formation of hexagonal single-crystals. A kinetic model is provided using the rate equations of vapor solidification to simulate the evolution of the different morphologies. On solving these equations, we show that aggregation is attributed to cluster impingement and cluster diffusion while single-crystal formation is attributed to direct attachment. The formation of dendritic zinc is investigated using in-operando transmission X-ray microscopy which is a unique technique for imaging metal electrodeposits. The nucleation density of zinc nuclei is lowered using polyaniline films to cover the active nucleation sites. The effect of overpotential is investigated and the morphology shows beautiful in-operando formation of symmetric zinc crystals. A linear perturbation model was developed to predict the growth and formation of these crystals to first

  20. Using Ice Nucleating Particles to Enable Desublimation on Chilled Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Julia; Failor, Kevin; Bisbano, Caitlin; Mulroe, Megan; Nath, Saurabh; Vinatzer, Boris; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    On a subfreezing surface, nucleating embryos usually form as supercooled condensate that later freeze into ice, as opposed to desublimation. Ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been widely used to freeze existing water; however, nobody has studied how they might affect the initial mode of nucleation. Here, we show that INPs deposited on a substrate can switch the mode of embryo nucleation to desublimation, rather than supercooled condensation. Deposition was achieved by evaporating a water droplet containing INPs on a hydrophobic silicon wafer. A Peltier stage was used to cool the wafer down inside of a controlled humidity chamber, such that the desired set point temperature correlated with the dew point and onset of nucleation. Beneath a critical surface temperature, microscopy indicated that desublimation occurred on the circular patch of deposited INPs, compared to supercooled condensation outside the circle. The hydrophobic surface was then patterned with hydrophilic stripe arrays, which facilitated the deposition of stripes of INPs via the same evaporation method. The resulting array of desublimating ice stripes created dry zones free of condensation or frost in the intermediate areas, as the hygroscopic ice stripes served as overlapping humidity sinks.

  1. The barrier to ice nucleation in monatomic water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Santi

    2018-03-01

    Crystallization from a supercooled liquid initially proceeds via the formation of a small solid embryo (nucleus), which requires surmounting an activation barrier. This phenomenon is most easily studied by numerical simulation, using specialized biased-sampling techniques to overcome the limitations imposed by the rarity of nucleation events. Here, I focus on the barrier to homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water, as represented by the monatomic-water model, which in the bulk exhibits a complex interplay between different ice structures. I consider various protocols to identify solidlike particles on a computer, which perform well enough for the Lennard-Jones model, and compare their respective impact on the shape and height of the nucleation barrier. It turns out that the effect is stronger on the nucleus size than on the barrier height. As a by-product of the analysis, I determine the structure of the nucleation cluster, finding that the relative amount of ice phases in the cluster heavily depends on the method used for classifying solidlike particles. Moreover, the phase which is most favored during the earlier stages of crystallization may happen, depending on the nucleation coordinate adopted, to be different from the stable polymorph. Therefore, the quality of a reaction coordinate cannot be assessed simply on the basis of the barrier height obtained. I explain how this outcome is possible and why it just points out the shortcoming of collective variables appropriate to simple fluids in providing a robust method of particle classification for monatomic water.

  2. Nucleation of Salt Crystals in Clay Minerals: Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Wang, Haimeng; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-07-20

    Nucleation of salt crystals in confined media occurs in many processes of high importance, such as injection of CO 2 in geological formations for its sequestration. In particular, salt precipitation in clays, a main component of sedimentary rock, is an important phenomenon. The crystals precipitate on the pores' surface, modify the pore space morphology, and reduce its flow and transport properties. Despite numerous efforts to understand the mechanisms of nucleation of salt crystals in confined media, the effect of the clay's chemistry on the growth, distribution, and properties of the crystals is not well understood. We report the results of extensive molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation and growth of NaCl crystals in a clay pore using molecular models of two types of clay minerals, Na-montmorillonite and kaolinite. Clear evidence is presented for the nucleation of the salt crystals that indicates that the molecular structure of clay minerals affects their spatial distribution, although the nucleation mechanism is the same in both types of clays.

  3. Nucleated red blood cells in infants of mothers with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littner, Yoav; Mandel, Dror; Sheffer-Mimouni, Galit; Mimouni, Francis B; Deutsch, Varda; Dollberg, Shaul

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the absolute nucleated red blood cell and lymphocyte count is elevated in term, appropriate-for-gestational-age infants born to women with asthma. We compared absolute nucleated red blood cell counts taken during the first 12 hours of life in two groups of term, vaginally delivered, appropriate-for-gestational-age infants; one group was born to mothers with active asthma during pregnancy (n = 28 infants), and the other group was born to control mothers (n = 29 infants). Asthma severity was classified according to the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. We excluded infants of women with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcohol, and tobacco or drug abuse and infants with fetal heart rate abnormalities, hemolysis, blood loss, or chromosomal anomalies. There were no differences between groups in birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, gravidity, parity, maternal analgesia during labor, 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, and infant sex. The hematocrit level, red blood cell count, absolute nucleated red blood cell count, and corrected leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the asthma group than in the control group. The platelet count was not significantly different between groups. The absolute nucleated red blood cell count correlated significantly with the asthma severity score (r (2) = 28%, P cell count with the presence of asthma and its severity (P mothers with asthma have increased circulating absolute nucleated red blood cell and lymphocyte counts compared with control infants.

  4. Nucleated red blood cells in infants of smoking mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruchimovich, M; Dollberg, S; Green, D W; Mimouni, F B

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate whether the absolute nucleated red blood cell (RBC) count is elevated in term, appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants born to smoking women. We compared absolute nucleated RBC counts taken during the first 12 hours of life in two groups of term, vaginally delivered, AGA infants, one group born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy (n = 30) and the other born to mothers who did not smoke (n = 30). We excluded infants of women with diabetes, hypertension, or alcohol or drug abuse, and infants with heart rate abnormalities, hemolysis, blood loss, or chromosomal anomalies. There were no differences between the groups in birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, gravidity, parity, maternal analgesia during labor, 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, corrected white blood cell counts, lymphocyte counts, or hematocrits. The median absolute nucleated RBC count in infants of smoking mothers was 0.5 x 10(9)/L (range 0 to 5.0) versus 0.0005 x 10(9)/L (range 0 to 0.6) in nonsmoking controls (P mothers have increased circulating absolute nucleated RBC counts compared with controls. The absolute nucleated RBC count in newborns correlates with the number of cigarettes smoked during pregnancy.

  5. Supersolubility and induction of aluminosilicate nucleation from clear solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Li, Yinghui; Zhang, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The supersolubility of silica in supersaturated aluminate solution and the sodium aluminosilicate precipitation nucleation mechanism from the clear solution were investigated by experiment. The obtained semi-empirical expression of the induction ( tind) of sodium aluminosilicate precipitation from clear solution is significant for zeolite A membranes synthesis, desilication and more important for valuating the stability of the supersaturated SiO 2 in the aluminate solution during the hydrolysis operation in the most used alkaline alumina manufacture. The semi-empirical expressions of the silica supersolubility in clear supersaturated sodium aluminate solution for both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation were originally conducted. The homogeneous nucleation predominated with the supersaturation ( S) above 6.0, conversely, heterogeneous nucleation with S below 4.0. The inferred activation energy ( Ea) of the homogeneous nucleated reaction was 14.9 kJ/mol, and that of the heterogeneous 50.5 kJ/mol. The interfacial tension ( γs) between the precipitate of sodium aluminosilicate and the surrounding aqueous solution was obtained at 15.1 mJ/m 2, negligibly decreased with increasing temperature. It was much larger than the value of 12.4 mJ/m 2 in pure water (J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 5383), but very much smaller than the estimated value of 38.64-50 mJ/m 2 in the solution for traditional zeolite synthesis.

  6. Pressure control in interfacial systems: Atomistic simulations of vapor nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchio, S.; Meloni, S.; Giacomello, A.; Valeriani, C.; Casciola, C. M.

    2018-02-01

    A large number of phenomena of scientific and technological interest involve multiple phases and occur at constant pressure of one of the two phases, e.g., the liquid phase in vapor nucleation. It is therefore of great interest to be able to reproduce such conditions in atomistic simulations. Here we study how popular barostats, originally devised for homogeneous systems, behave when applied straightforwardly to heterogeneous systems. We focus on vapor nucleation from a super-heated Lennard-Jones liquid, studied via hybrid restrained Monte Carlo simulations. The results show a departure from the trends predicted for the case of constant liquid pressure, i.e., from the conditions of classical nucleation theory. Artifacts deriving from standard (global) barostats are shown to depend on the size of the simulation box. In particular, for Lennard-Jones liquid systems of 7000 and 13 500 atoms, at conditions typically found in the literature, we have estimated an error of 10-15 kBT on the free-energy barrier, corresponding to an error of 104-106 s-1σ-3 on the nucleation rate. A mechanical (local) barostat is proposed which heals the artifacts for the considered case of vapor nucleation.

  7. Urediospores of Puccinia spp. and other rusts are warm-temperature ice nucleators and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2012-10-01

    In light of various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause that illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history, we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections from 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active having freezing onset temperatures as warm as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. We suggest that air sampling techniques have ignored the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric concentrations that occur under conditions propitious for precipitation that could increase their local abundance intermittently. Nevertheless, we propose that the relative low abundance of warm-temperature biological ice nucleators in the

  8. Numerical prediction of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient under high heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezo Milada L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approach to prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for nucleate pool boiling under high heat fluxes. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling are performed. Mathematical modelling of pool boiling requires a treatment of vapor-liquid two-phase mixture on the macro level, as well as on the micro level, such as bubble growth and departure from the heating surface. Two-phase flow is modelled by the two-fluid model, which consists of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for each phase. Interface transfer processes are calculated by the closure laws. Micro level phenomena on the heating surface are modelled with the bubble nucleation site density, the bubble resistance time on the heating wall and with the certain level of randomness in the location of bubble nucleation sites. The developed model was used to determine the heat transfer coefficient and results of numerical simulations are compared with available experimental results and several empirical correlations. A considerable scattering of the predictions of the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient by experimental correlations is observed, while the numerically predicted values are within the range of results calculated by well-known Kutateladze, Mostinski, Kruzhilin and Rohsenow correlations. The presented numerical modeling approach is original regarding both the application of the two-fluid two-phase model for the determination of heat transfer coefficient in pool boiling and the defined boundary conditions at the heated wall surface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174014

  9. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  10. Modulating Nucleation by Kosmotropes and Chaotropes: Testing the Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is a fundamental solvent sustaining life, key to the conformations and equilibria associated with solute species. Emerging studies on nucleation and crystallization phenomena reveal that the dynamics of hydration associated with mineral precursors are critical in determining material formation and growth. With certain small molecules affecting the hydration and conformational stability of co-solutes, this study systematically explores the effects of these chaotropes and kosmotropes as well as certain sugar enantiomers on the early stages of calcium carbonate formation. These small molecules appear to modulate mineral nucleation in a class-dependent manner. The observed effects are finite in comparison to the established, strong interactions between charged polymers and intermediate mineral forms. Thus, perturbations to hydration dynamics of ion clusters by co-solute species can affect nucleation phenomena in a discernable manner.

  11. A two-parameter extension of classical nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.

    2015-06-01

    A two-variable stochastic model for diffusion-limited nucleation is developed using a formalism derived from fluctuating hydrodynamics. The model is a direct generalization of the standard classical nucleation theory (CNT). The nucleation rate and pathway are calculated in the weak-noise approximation and are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for the weak-solution/strong-solution transition in globular proteins. We find that CNT underestimates the time needed for the formation of a critical cluster by two orders of magnitude and that this discrepancy is due to the more complex dynamics of the two variable model and not, as often is assumed, a result of errors in the estimation of the free energy barrier.

  12. A two-parameter extension of classical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsko, James F; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    A two-variable stochastic model for diffusion-limited nucleation is developed using a formalism derived from fluctuating hydrodynamics. The model is a direct generalization of the standard classical nucleation theory (CNT). The nucleation rate and pathway are calculated in the weak-noise approximation and are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for the weak-solution/strong-solution transition in globular proteins. We find that CNT underestimates the time needed for the formation of a critical cluster by two orders of magnitude and that this discrepancy is due to the more complex dynamics of the two variable model and not, as often is assumed, a result of errors in the estimation of the free energy barrier. (paper)

  13. Homogeneous bulk, surface, and edge nucleation in crystalline nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Jessica L.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2011-03-01

    We present a study on the homogeneous nucleation of dewetted poly(ethylene oxide) droplets on a substrate that is itself crystallisable. While the chemical properties of the substrate prepared in either the amorphous or crystalline state are identical, the surface landscape varies widely. We observe a large difference in the substrate's nucleating ability depending on how it is prepared. Furthermore, the scaling dependence of the nucleation rate on the size of the droplets depends on the substrate surface properties. The birth of the crystalline state can be directed to originate predominantly within the bulk, at the substrate surface or at the droplet's edge depending on how we tune the substrate. J.L. Carvalho and K. Dalnoki-Veress, Phys. Rev. Lett in press, 2010.

  14. Bubble nucleation and growth in slow cosmological phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Ramírez, Santiago

    2018-03-01

    We study the dynamics of cosmological phase transitions in the case of small velocities of bubble walls, vw development of the phase transition. We consider different kinds of approximations and refinements for relevant aspects of the dynamics, such as the dependence of the wall velocity on hydrodynamics, the distribution of the latent heat, and the variation of the nucleation rate. Although in this case the common simplifications of a constant wall velocity and an exponential nucleation rate break down due to reheating, we show that a delta-function rate and a velocity which depends linearly on the temperature give a good description of the dynamics and allow to solve the evolution analytically. We also consider a Gaussian nucleation rate, which gives a more precise result for the bubble size distribution. We discuss the implications for the computation of cosmic remnants.

  15. Designing magnetic droplet soliton nucleation employing spin polarizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Morteza; Mohseni, Majid

    2018-04-01

    We show by means of micromagnetic simulations that spin polarizer in nano-contact (NC) spin torque oscillators as the representative of the fixed layer in an orthogonal pseudo-spin valve can be employed to design and to control magnetic droplet soliton nucleation and dynamics. We found that using a tilted spin polarizer layer decreases the droplet nucleation time which is more suitable for high speed applications. However, a tilted spin polarizer increases the nucleation current and decreases the frequency stability of the droplet. Additionally, by driving the magnetization inhomogenously at the NC region, it is found that a tilted spin polarizer reduces the precession angle of the droplet and through an interplay with the Oersted field of the DC current, it breaks the spatial symmetry of the droplet profile. Our findings explore fundamental insight into nano-scale magnetic droplet soliton dynamics with potential tunability parameters for future microwave electronics.

  16. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  17. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  18. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    OpenAIRE

    Berrar, Daniel; Sato, Naoyuki; Schuster, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervou...

  19. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  20. International Workshop on Comparing Ice Nucleation Measuring Systems 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cziczo, Daniel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-04-30

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding the Earth’s climate. The uncertainty is due to several poorly understood processes and measurements including, but not limited to: (1) the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, (2) the number of ice forming particles as a function of atmospheric properties such as temperature and relative humidity, (3) the atmospheric distribution of ice forming particles and (4) the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles. The ways in which ice forming particles can impact climate is also multi-faceted. More ice forming particles can lead to clouds with more ice crystals and different optical properties than clouds with less ice forming particles. More effective ice forming particles can lead to ice at higher temperature and/or lower saturation, resulting in clouds at lower altitude or latitude which also changes the Earth’s radiative balance. Ice nucleation also initiates most of the Earth’s precipitation, even in the mid- and low-latitudes, since cloud-top temperatures are often below freezing. The limited measurements and lack of understanding directly translates to restrictions in our ability to model atmospheric ice formation and project changes into the future. The importance of ice nucleation research is further exemplified by Figure 1 which shows the publications per decade and citations per year on the topic of ice nucleation [DeMott et al., 2011]. After a lull at the end of the last century, there has been a dramatic increase in both publications and citations related to ice nucleation; this directly corresponds to the importance of ice nucleation on the Earth’s climate and the uncertainty in this area noted by the Solomon [2007].

  1. An artificial muscle computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  2. Polyamine sharing between tubulin dimers favours microtubule nucleation and elongation via facilitated diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mechulam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest for the first time that the action of multivalent cations on microtubule dynamics can result from facilitated diffusion of GTP-tubulin to the microtubule ends. Facilitated diffusion can promote microtubule assembly, because, upon encountering a growing nucleus or the microtubule wall, random GTP-tubulin sliding on their surfaces will increase the probability of association to the target sites (nucleation sites or MT ends. This is an original explanation for understanding the apparent discrepancy between the high rate of microtubule elongation and the low rate of tubulin association at the microtubule ends in the viscous cytoplasm. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion requires an attraction force between two tubulins, which can result from the sharing of multivalent counterions. Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are present in all living cells and are potent agents to trigger tubulin self-attraction. By using an analytical model, we analyze the implication of facilitated diffusion mediated by polyamines on nucleation and elongation of microtubules. In vitro experiments using pure tubulin indicate that the promotion of microtubule assembly by polyamines is typical of facilitated diffusion. The results presented here show that polyamines can be of particular importance for the regulation of the microtubule network in vivo and provide the basis for further investigations into the effects of facilitated diffusion on cytoskeleton dynamics.

  3. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made...... of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...

  4. Aerosol nucleation in an ultra-low ion density environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Paling, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    sulfuric acid–water clusters over a range of sulfuric acid concentrations although neutral nucleation mechanisms remain evident at low ionization levels. The effect of ions is found both to enhance the nucleation rate of stable clusters and the initial growth rate. The effects of possible contaminations...... are also discussed and are believed to be small, but cannot be excluded. If our results can be extrapolated to conditions that resemble the clean air atmosphere over the Earth's oceans they suggest that ions may dominate the production of small (4nm) aerosols here....

  5. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  6. Noise-induced wave nucleations in an excitable chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, V.; Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Gerdes, I.; Engel, H.

    2005-03-01

    We study both experimentally and numerically the temporal coherence of noise-induced wave nucleations in excitable media subjected to external fluctuations with finite correlation time. The experiments are performed with the light-sensitive variant of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction forced by an exponentially correlated dichotomous fluctuating illumination. We find that there exists an optimal correlation time for which nucleations coherence reaches a maximum. The same behavior is obtained in numerical simulations with a stochastic Oregonator model, modified to describe the light-sensitive BZ reaction.

  7. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  8. Grain Nucleation Experiments and other Laboratory Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anja C.

    2011-01-01

    Stars are conspicuous components of galaxies, and the sites of the creation of most chemical elements. Due to their brightness and their production of heavy elements, stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) play an important role for understanding stellar and galactic evolution. This conference...... aims to build a bridge between AGB research and its application to the modelling of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of galaxies. Current developments and challenges on both sides will be discussed to reach an understanding of possibilities, limitations, and needs in both areas, and hence...

  9. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  10. Nucleation and growth of a multicomponent metallic glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of modified Kissinger and Matusita equations for the non-isothermal crystallization. The results show enhanced bulk nucleation in general. At high heating rates added to it is surface induced abnormal grain growth resulting in fractal dimensionality. Keywords. Activation energy; isothermal annealing; abnormal grain growth; ...

  11. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ticle formation. Cluster ions can grow to form new particles and rate of such new particle forma- tion will be proportional to ion concentration or the ionization rate in the atmosphere (Dickinson. 1975). Later, many studies have identified ion- induced nucleation (IIN) as one of the most important source of atmospheric particles ...

  12. How Ambient Pressure Influences Water Droplet Nucleation at Tropospheric Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Brus, David; Wedekind, J.; Lihavainen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, - (2010), L21802 ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nucleations theories * ambient pressure * condensation of droplets Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2010

  13. Kinetic nucleation and ions in boreal forest particle formation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain a more comprehensive picture on different mechanisms behind atmospheric particle formation, measurement results from QUEST 2-campaign are analyzed with an aid of an aerosol dynamic model. A special emphasis is laid on air ion and charged aerosol dynamics. Model simulations indicate that kinetic nucleation of ammonia and sulphuric acid together with condensation of sulphuric acid and low-volatile organic vapours onto clusters and particles explain basic features of particle formation events as well as ion characteristics. However, an observed excess of negative ions in the diameter range 1.5-3nm and overcharge of 3-5nm particles demonstrate that ions are also involved in particle formation. These observations can be explained by preferential condensation of sulphuric acid onto negatively charged clusters and particles and/or contribution of ion-induced nucleation on particle formation. According to model simulations, which assume that the nucleation rate is equal to the sulfuric acid collision rate, the relative contribution of ion-based particle formation seems to be smaller than kinetic nucleation of neutral clusters. Conducted model simulations also corroborate the recently-presented hypothesis according to which a large number of so-called thermodynamically stable clusters (TSCs having a diameter between 1-3nm exist in the atmosphere. TSCs were found to grow to observable sizes only under favorable conditions, e.g. when the pre-existing particle concentration was low.

  14. The role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Bondo, T.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol nucleation has been studied experimentally in purified, atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide. The results are compared with model calculations. It is found that an increase in ionization by a factor of 10 increases the production rate of stable...

  15. The role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Bondo, T.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol nucleation has been studied experimentally in purified, atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide. The results are compared with model calculations. It is found that an increase in ionization by a factor of 10 increases the production rate of stab...

  16. Nucleation and growth kinetics of palladium nanoparticles on thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1073 K and deposition .... The entry parameters are: the velocity of nucleation, velocity of growth, the average means life time, the ... Ts = 573 K and 673 K, we can see that the density of clusters is increasing rapidly after 10 to 70 s (see table 1) ...

  17. Void nucleation at elevated temperatures under cascade-damage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, A.A.; Woo, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    The effects on void nucleation of fluctuations respectively due to the randomness of point-defect migratory jumps, the random generation of free point defects in discrete packages, and the fluctuating rate of vacancy emission from voids are considered. It was found that effects of the cascade-induced fluctuations are significant only at sufficiently high total sink strength. At lower sink strengths and elevated temperatures, the fluctuation in the rate of vacancy emission is the dominant factor. Application of the present theory to the void nucleation in annealed pure copper neutron-irradiated at elevated temperatures with doses of 10 -4 -10 -2 NRT dpa showed reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. This application also predicts correctly the temporal development of large-scale spatial heterogeneous microstructure during the void nucleation stage. Comparison between calculated and experimental void nucleation rates in neutron-irradiated molybdenum at temperatures where vacancy emission from voids is negligible showed reasonable agreement as well. It was clearly demonstrated that the athermal shrinkage of relatively large voids experimentally observable in molybdenum at such temperatures may be easily explained in the framework of the present theory

  18. Breakdown of classical nucleation theory near isostructural phase transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacciuto, A.; Auer, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    We report simulations of crystal nucleation in binary mixtures of hard spherical colloids with a size ratio of 1:10. The stable crystal phase of this system can be either dense or expanded. We find that, in the vicinity of the solid-solid critical point where the crystallites are highly

  19. Modelling the role of compositional fluctuations in nucleation kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ženíšek, J.; Kozeschnik, E.; Svoboda, Jiří; Fischer, F. D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, JUN (2015), s. 365-376 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-24252S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Kinetics * Nucleation and growth * Precipitates * Interface energy * Fluctuations of chemical composition Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 5.058, year: 2015

  20. Annealing Twinning and the Nucleation of Recrystallization at Grain Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, A R.

    1981-01-01

    boundaries during recovery might stimulate nucleation of recrystallization in low stacking fault energy materials. The experimental observations also lead to the implication that the density of recrystallization nuclei formed in such materials may be directly related to the strength of the deformation...

  1. Nucleation at hardness indentations in cold rolled Al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.L.; Zhang, Yubin; Wu, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleation of recrystallization near hardness indentations has been investigated in slightly cold rolled high purity aluminium. Samples were cold rolled to 12% and 20% reductions in thickness and indentations were done with two different loads (500 g and 2000 g). The samples were annealed at 300 ...

  2. Containerless Undercooled Melts: Ordering, Nucleation, and Dendrite Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Binder, Sven; Galenko, Peter; Gegner, Jan; Holland-Moritz, Dirk; Klein, Stefan; Kolbe, Matthias; Volkmann, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Electromagnetic and electrostatic levitation are applied to containerless undercool and solidify metallic melts. A large undercooling range becomes accessible with the extra benefit that the freely suspended drop is accessible directly for in situ observation. The short-range order in undercooled melts is investigated by combining levitation with elastic neutron scattering and X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation. Muon Spin Rotation ( µSR) experiments show magnetic ordering in deeply undercooled Co80Pd20 alloys. The onset of magnetic ordering stimulates nucleation. Results on nucleation undercooling of zirconium are presented showing the limit of maximum undercoolability set by the onset of homogeneous nucleation. Metastable phase diagrams are determined by applying energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction of Ni-V alloys with varying concentration. Nucleation is followed by crystal growth. Rapid dendrite growth velocity is measured on levitation-processed samples as a function of undercooling ∆ T by using high-speed video camera technique. Solute trapping in dilute solid solutions and disorder trapping in intermetallic compounds are experimentally verified. Measurements of glass-forming Cu-Zr alloy show a maximum in the V(∆ T) relation that is indicative for diffusion-controlled growth. The influence of convection on dendrite growth of Al50Ni50 is shown by comparative measurements of dendrite growth velocity on Earth and in reduced gravity. Eventually, faceting of a rough interface by convection is presented as observed on Ni2B alloys.

  3. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.D.; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    Experimental studies of ultra-fine aerosol nucleation in clean atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour suggest that the production rate of critical clusters is sensitive to ionisation. To assess this sensitivity numerical simulations of the initial...

  4. Total Sulfate vs. Sulfuric Acid Monomer Concenterations in Nucleation Studies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neitola, K.; Brus, David; Makkonen, U.; Sipilä, M.; Mauldin III, R.L.; Sarnela, N.; Jokinen, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2015), s. 3429-3443 ISSN 1680-7316 Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 1118615 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : ion-induced nucleation * particle formation * experimental setup Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.114, year: 2015

  5. Nanocellular polymer foams nucleated by core-shell nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shanqiu; Zoetebier, Bram; Hulsman, Lars; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Duvigneau, Joost; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of low surface energy polymer grafted silica nanoparticles is reported for the utilization as highly efficient cell nucleation agents to obtain nanocellular, CO2 blown polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films in a batch process. For nanoparticle surface

  6. The role of specific nucleation in polypropylene photodegradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Výchopňová, J.; Čermák, R.; Obadal, M.; Raab, Miroslav; Verney, V.; Commereuc, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 10 (2007), s. 1763-1768 ISSN 0141-3910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymorphism * photooxidation * crystallization * nucleating agent Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.073, year: 2007

  7. Local Structure of Liquid Carbon Controls Diamond Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process, i.e., diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond

  8. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    jess/120/05/0843-0850. Keywords. New particle formation; ion-induced nucleation; lightning intensity and rain. Abstract. A case of new particle formation observed during dissipation stage of a thunderstorm at a tropical station, Pune, India on 3 ...

  9. Nucleation and growth of nanoscaled one-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongtao

    Nanoscaled one-dimensional materials have attracted great interest due to their novel physical and chemical properties. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the nucleation and growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and silicon nitride nanowires with their field emission applications in mind. As a result of this research, a novel methodology has been developed to deposit aligned bamboo-like carbon nanotubes on substrates using a methane and ammonia mixture in microwave plasma enhanced chemical deposition. Study of growth kinetics suggests that the carbon diffusion through bulk catalyst particles controls growth in the initial deposition process. Microstructures of carbon nanotubes are affected by the growth temperature and carbon concentration in the gas phase. High-resolution transmission electron microscope confirms the existence of the bamboo-like structure. Electron diffraction reveals that the iron-based catalyst nucleates and sustains the growth of carbon nanotubes. A nucleation and growth model has been constructed based upon experimental data and observations. In the study of silicon nitride nanoneedles, a vapor-liquid-solid model is employed to explain the nucleation and growth processes. Ammonia plasma etching is proposed to reduce the size of the catalyst and subsequently produce the novel needle-like nanostructure. High-resolution transmission electron microscope shows the structure is well crystallized and composed of alpha-silicon nitride. Other observations in the structure are also explained.

  10. Polymer-based nucleation for chemical vapour deposition of diamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Domonkos, Mária; Ižák, Tibor; Kromka, Alexander; Varga, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 29 (2016), 1-7, č. článku 43688. ISSN 0021-8995 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-22102J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : copolymers * composites * diamond * nucleation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.860, year: 2016

  11. The Role of Sulfuric Acid in Atmospheric Nucleation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sipilä, M.; Berndt, T.; Petäjä, T.; Brus, David; Vanhanen, J.; Stratmann, F.; Patokoski, J.; Mauldin, III, R.L.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 327, č. 5970 (2010), s. 1243-1246 ISSN 0036-8075 Grant - others:EUCAARI(XE) 036833-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nucleation * sulfuric acid * climate Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  12. The Effect of Volcanic Ash Composition on Ice Nucleation Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K. D.; Cloer, S.; Primm, K.; Woods, T.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the role that volcanic ash plays in ice nucleation is important for knowledge of lightning generation in both volcanic plumes and in clouds developing downwind from active volcanoes. Volcanic ash has long been suggested to influence heterogeneous ice nucleation following explosive eruptions, but determining precisely how composition and mineralogy affects ice nucleation affinity (INA) is poorly constrained. For the study presented here, volcanic ash samples with different compositions and mineral/glass contents were tested in both the deposition and immersion modes, following the methods presented in Schill et al. (2015). Bulk composition was determined with X-ray fluorescence (XRF), grain size distribution was determined with laser diffraction particle size analysis (LDPSA), and mineralogy was determined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results of the deposition-mode experiments reveal that there is no relationship between ice saturation ratios (Sice) and either mineralogy or bulk ash composition, as all samples have similar Sice ratios. In the immersion-mode experiments, frozen fractions were determined from -20 °C to -50 °C using three different amounts of ash (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt% of slurry). Results from the immersion freezing reveal that the rhyolitic samples (73 wt% SiO2) nucleate ice at higher temperatures compared to the basaltic samples (49 wt% SiO2). There is no observed correlation between frozen fractions and mineral content of ash samples, but the two most efficient ice nuclei are rhyolites that contain the greatest proportion of amorphous glass (> 90 %), and are enriched in K2O relative to transition metals (MnO and TiO2), the latter of which show a negative correlation with frozen fraction. Higher ash abundance in water droplets increases the frozen fraction at all temperatures, indicating that ash amount plays the biggest role in ice nucleation. If volcanic ash can reach sufficient abundance (

  13. Investigation of primary nucleation phenomena of acetylsalicylic acid crystals induced by ultrasonic irradiation—ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Etsuko; Ebihara, Satomi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of our study is to clarify ultrasonic primary nucleation phenomena for controlling final product size by adjusting the number of primary nuclei. In our previous study, the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the number of nuclei was investigated under the same supersaturated condition, as a result two novel phenomena were observed. First, there is a region where ultrasonic irradiation inhibits primary nucleation. Second, a specific amount of energy is needed to activate primary nucleation. From this result, it was expected that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation has a certain relationship to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. Therefore, we investigated the following: whether ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various degrees of supersaturation, whether final crystal size relates to the number of nuclei, and whether the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation relates to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. First, we found that ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various supersaturated degrees. Second, we found that final crystal size increases or decreases depending on the number of nuclei. Therefore, it was indicated that ultrasonic energy could yield the desired crystal size by inducing suitable nucleation. Third, we found that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation decreases with a decrease in the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. From this, we can propose criteria for determining the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on primary nucleation by showing diagrams correlating Δ Gcrit with Ecrit.

  14. Interaction potentials and their effect on crystal nucleation and symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular dynamics technique has been used to study the effect of the interaction potential on crystal nucleation and the symmetry of the nucleated phase. Four systems, namely rubidium, Lennard-Jones, rubidium-truncated, and Lennard-Jones-truncated, have been studied each at reduced density 0.95. Two types of calculations were performed. Firstly, starting from a liquid state, each system was quenched rapidly to a reduced temperature of approx.0.1. The nucleation process for these systems was monitored by studying the time dependence of temperature and the pair correlation function, and the resulting crystalline structure analyzed using among other properties the Voronoi polyhedra. Only in the case of rubidium was a b.c.c. structure nucleated. In the other three cases we obtained a f.c.c. ordering. Secondly, we have studied the effect of changing the interaction potential in a system which has already achieved an ordered state under the action of some other potential. After establishing a b.c.c. structure in a rubidium system, the change in the symmetry of the system was studied when the pair potential was modified to one of the other three forms. The results from both types of calculations are consistent: the rubidium potential leads to a b.c.c. structure while the other three potentials give an f.c.c. structure. Metastable disordered structures were not obtained in any of the calculations. However, the time elapse between the moment when the system is quick-quenched and the moment when nucleation occurs appears to depend upon the potential of interaction

  15. Droplet Nucleation: Physically-Based Parameterizations and Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Ghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in simulations of climate and climate change is the influence of aerosols on the optical properties of clouds. The root of this influence is the droplet nucleation process, which involves the spontaneous growth of aerosol into cloud droplets at cloud edges, during the early stages of cloud formation, and in some cases within the interior of mature clouds. Numerical models of droplet nucleation represent much of the complexity of the process, but at a computational cost that limits their application to simulations of hours or days. Physically-based parameterizations of droplet nucleation are designed to quickly estimate the number nucleated as a function of the primary controlling parameters: the aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity and cooling rate. Here we compare and contrast the key assumptions used in developing each of the most popular parameterizations and compare their performances under a variety of conditions. We find that the more complex parameterizations perform well under a wider variety of nucleation conditions, but all parameterizations perform well under the most common conditions. We then discuss the various applications of the parameterizations to cloud-resolving, regional and global models to study aerosol effects on clouds at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. We compare estimates of anthropogenic aerosol indirect effects using two different parameterizations applied to the same global climate model, and find that the estimates of indirect effects differ by only 10%. We conclude with a summary of the outstanding challenges remaining for further development and application.

  16. Distinct actin oligomers modulate differently the activity of actin nucleators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zheng; Silvan, Unai; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Aebi, Ueli; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2015-10-01

    Polymerization of actin monomers into filaments requires the initial formation of nuclei composed of a few actin subunits; however, their instability has hindered their detailed study. Therefore we used chemically crosslinked actin oligomers to analyse their effect on actin polymerization. Actin dimer (upper dimer, UD), trimer and tetramer intermolecularly crosslinked by phenylene-bismaleimide along the genetic helix (between Lys199 and Cys374) were isolated by gel filtration and found to increasingly stimulate actin polymerization as shown by the pyrene assay and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, the so-called lower actin dimer (LD) characterized by a Cys374-Cys374 crosslink stimulated actin polymerization only at low but inhibited it at high concentrations. UD and trimer stimulated the repolymerization of actin from complexes with thymosin β4 (Tβ4) or profilin, whereas the LD stimulated repolymerization only from the profilin : actin but not the actin : Tβ4 complex. In vivo, actin polymerization is stimulated by nucleation factors. Therefore the interaction and effects of purified LD, UD and trimer on the actin-nucleating activity of gelsolin, mouse diaphanous related (mDia) formin and the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex were analysed. Native gel electrophoresis demonstrated binding of LD, UD and trimer to gelsolin and its fragment G1-3, to the FH2 domains of the formins mDia1 and mDia3, and to Arp2/3 complex. UD and trimer increased the nucleating activity of gelsolin and G1-3, but not of the mDia-FH2 domain nor of the Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, LD at equimolar concentration to Arp2/3 complex stimulated its nucleating activity, but inhibited that of mDia-FH2 domains, gelsolin and G1-3, demonstrating differential regulation of their nucleating activity by dimers containing differently oriented actin subunits. © 2015 FEBS.

  17. Penguin colony attendance under artificial lights for ecotourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Airam; Holmberg, Ross; Dann, Peter; Chiaradia, André

    2018-03-30

    Wildlife watching is an emerging ecotourism activity around the world. In Australia and New Zealand, night viewing of little penguins attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors per year. As penguins start coming ashore after sunset, artificial lighting is essential to allow visitors to view them in the dark. This alteration of the nightscape warrants investigation for any potential effects of artificial lighting on penguin behavior. We experimentally tested how penguins respond to different light wavelengths (colors) and intensities to examine effects on the colony attendance behavior at two sites on Phillip Island, Australia. At one site, nocturnal artificial illumination has been used for penguin viewing for decades, whereas at the other site, the only light is from the natural night sky. Light intensity did not affect colony attendance behaviors of penguins at the artificially lit site, probably due to penguin habituation to lights. At the not previously lit site, penguins preferred lit paths over dark paths to reach their nests. Thus, artificial light might enhance penguin vision at night and consequently it might reduce predation risk and energetic costs of locomotion through obstacle and path detection. Although penguins are faithful to their path, they can be drawn to artificial lights at small spatial scale, so light pollution could attract penguins to undesirable lit areas. When artificial lighting is required, we recommend keeping lighting as dim and time-restricted as possible to mitigate any negative effects on the behavior of penguins and their natural habitat. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nucleation of polypropylene with gold nanoparticles. Part 1: Introduction of sandwich method for evaluation of very weak nucleation activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlova, Ewa; Šlouf, Miroslav; Šandová, Hana; Baldrian, Josef; Sikora, Antonín; Lednický, František; Masirek, R.; Piorkowska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 392-404 ISSN 0022-2348 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * isotactic polypropylene nucleation * transcrystallization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.602, year: 2010

  19. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  20. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A N; Kambhampati, C; Monson, J R T; Drew, P J

    2004-09-01

    Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting.

  1. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  2. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Berrar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervous systems of biological organisms and systems biology with its longing to comprehend, holistically, the multitude of complex interactions in biological systems are two such fields. They target ideals artificial intelligence has dreamt about for a long time including the computer simulation of an entire biological brain or the creation of new life forms from manipulations of cellular and genetic information in the laboratory. The scope for artificial intelligence in neuroscience and systems biology is extremely wide. This article investigates the standing of artificial intelligence in relation to neuroscience and systems biology and provides an outlook at new and exciting challenges for artificial intelligence in these fields. These challenges include, but are not necessarily limited to, the ability to learn from other projects and to be inventive, to understand the potential and exploit novel computing paradigms and environments, to specify and adhere to stringent standards and robust statistical frameworks, to be integrative, and to embrace openness principles.

  3. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below Ttr.p. reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143...

  4. Thermodynamic formulation of the barrier for heterogeneous pinned nucleation: Implication to the crossover scenarios associated with barrierless and homogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sanat K; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-06-21

    The effect of contact line pinning on nucleation is reported using continuum thermodynamics. Based on the principle of the free-energy maximization, closed-form expressions in the dimensionless form for the free-energy of the three-phase metastable system and the thermodynamic barrier are formulated with respect to the system geometry and the substrate wettability. The condition of maximality limits the dynamic contact angle within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. The dimensionless nucleation barrier or the potency factor can be divided into two components related to the system geometry and the pinning effect. Depending on the relative value of the equilibrium and the critical dynamic contact angle, the contact line pinning can either have favorable or adverse effects. Associated pinning-depinning transition can also lead to the crossovers related to barrierless and homogeneous nucleation. Contact line tension is found to have a considerable effect during these transitional scenarios. Complete wetting transition associated with barrierless nucleation can take place due to the presence of tensile (negative) line tension. On the other hand, complete drying transition related to homogeneous nucleation can occur when line tension is compressive (positive) in nature. The pinning has a favorable effect only when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-philic regime. There can be favorable, adverse, or no pinning effects when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. Although the contact line is pinned, the minimum value of the potency factor is obtained when equilibrium and dynamic contact angles are equal.

  5. Organic Aerosol Nucleation and Growth at the CERN CLOUD chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Lethipalo, Katrianne; Bianchi, Federico; Sipilä, Mikko; Nieminen, Tuomo; Wagner, Robert; Frege, Carla; Simon, Mario; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that atmospheric aerosols influence the climate by changing Earth's radiation balance (IPCC 2007 and 2013). Recent models have shown (Merikanto et al. 2009) that aerosol nucleation is one of the biggest sources of low level cloud condensation nuclei. Still, aerosol nucleation and growth are not fully understood. The driving force of nucleation and growth is sulfuric acid. However ambient nucleation and growth rates cannot be explained by solely sulfuric acid as precursor. Recent studies have shown that only traces of precursors like ammonia and dimethylamine enhance the nucleation rates dramatically (Kirkby et al. 2011, Almeida et al., 2013). Thus the role of different aerosol precursor needs to be studied not only in ambient but also in very well controlled chamber experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment enables conducting experiments very close to atmospheric conditions and with a very low contaminant background. The latest CLOUD experiments focus on the role of organics in aerosol nucleation and growth. For this purpose, numerous experiments with alpha-pinene have been conducted at the CERN CLOUD chamber. Several state-of-the-art instruments were used to cover the whole complexity of the experiment. Chamber conditions were set to 40% relative humidity and 5° C. Atmospheric concentrations of SO2, O3, HONO, H2O and alpha-pinene were injected to the chamber. Different oxidation conditions were used, yielding different levels of oxidized organics: (1) OH radicals, (2) Ozone with the OH scavenger H2 (pure ozonolysis) and (3) both. SO2 was injected to allow for sulfuric acid production. Optical UV fibers were used to enable photochemical reactions. A high field cage (30 kV) can be turned on to remove all charged particles in the chamber to enable completely neutral conditions. Comparing neutral conditions to the beam conditions using CERN's proton synchrotron, the fraction of ion-induced nucleation can be studied. Using

  6. Interplay between collective pinning and artificial defects on domain wall propagation in Co/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Montenegro, N; Alameda, J M; Velez, M [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Menendez, J L [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN). Principado de Asturias-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)-Univ. Oviedo -UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Ravelosona, D, E-mail: mvelez@uniovi.e [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR CNRS 8622, Univ. Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-08-04

    The interplay between collective pinning on intrinsic structural defects and artificial pinning at a patterned hole is studied in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy. The pinning strength of a patterned hole is measured through its efficiency to stop domain wall (DW) propagation into a consecutive unpatterned nanowire section (using antisymmetric magnetoresistance to detect the direction of DW propagation) whereas collective pinning is characterized by the field dependence of DW velocity. Close to room temperature, collective pinning becomes weaker than artificial pinning so that pinning at the hole compensates nucleation-pad geometry, blocking DW propagation across the nanowire.

  7. Interplay between collective pinning and artificial defects on domain wall propagation in Co/Pt multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Montenegro, N; Alameda, J M; Velez, M; Menendez, J L; Ravelosona, D

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between collective pinning on intrinsic structural defects and artificial pinning at a patterned hole is studied in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy. The pinning strength of a patterned hole is measured through its efficiency to stop domain wall (DW) propagation into a consecutive unpatterned nanowire section (using antisymmetric magnetoresistance to detect the direction of DW propagation) whereas collective pinning is characterized by the field dependence of DW velocity. Close to room temperature, collective pinning becomes weaker than artificial pinning so that pinning at the hole compensates nucleation-pad geometry, blocking DW propagation across the nanowire.

  8. Preferential nucleation, guiding, and blocking of self-propelled droplets by dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanachuchai, Songphol; Wongpinij, Thipusa; Kijamnajsuk, Suphakan; Himwas, Chalermchai; Panyakeow, Somsak; Photongkam, Pat

    2018-04-01

    Lattice-mismatched layers of GaAs/InGaAs are grown on GaAs(001) using molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently heated in vacuum while the surface is imaged in situ using low-energy electron microscopy, in order to study (i) the nucleation of group-III droplets formed as a result of noncongruent sublimation and (ii) the dynamics of these self-propelled droplets as they navigate the surface. It is found that the interfacial misfit dislocation network not only influences the nucleation sites of droplets, but also exerts unusual steering power over their subsequent motion. Atypical droplet flow patterns including 90° and 180° turns are found. The directions of these dislocations-guided droplets are qualitatively explained in terms of in-plane and out-of-plane stress fields associated with the buried dislocations and the driving forces due to chemical potential and stress gradients typical of Marangoni flow. The findings would benefit processes and devices that employ droplets as catalysts or active structures such as droplet epitaxy of quantum nanostructures, vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires, or the fabrication of self-integrated circuits.

  9. Experimental investigations on nucleate boiling heat transfer of aqua based reduced graphene oxide nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized from graphite powder and various characterization techniques have been used to study the in-plane crystallite size, number of layers, presence of functional groups and surface morphology. The rGO flakes are dispersed in Millipore water to obtain 0.0005, 0.001, and 0.002 wt.% of rGO-water nanofluids. It is then used in the experimental facility to study the nucleate boiling heat transfer with different heating surfaces viz. smooth and sandblasted surface (SBS). Results of this study indicate (i) an enhancement in heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for concentration upto 0.001 wt.% and deterioration beyond this in the case of smooth surface, and (ii) an increase in HTC with concentrations is observed for SBS and shows a maximum enhancement of about 60% in comparison with smooth surface at 0.002 wt.%. It is found that the presence of secondary cavities (acts as nucleation sites) formed by the rGO flakes during boiling is responsible for the observed phenomena in addition to the possible effect of rGO in the fluid flow.

  10. Parameterization of ion-induced nucleation rates based on ambient observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nieminen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric ions participate in the formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles, yet their exact role in this process has remained unclear. Here we derive a new simple parameterization for ion-induced nucleation or, more precisely, for the formation rate of charged 2-nm particles. The parameterization is semi-empirical in the sense that it is based on comprehensive results of one-year-long atmospheric cluster and particle measurements in the size range ~1–42 nm within the EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions project. Data from 12 field sites across Europe measured with different types of air ion and cluster mobility spectrometers were used in our analysis, with more in-depth analysis made using data from four stations with concomitant sulphuric acid measurements. The parameterization is given in two slightly different forms: a more accurate one that requires information on sulfuric acid and nucleating organic vapor concentrations, and a simpler one in which this information is replaced with the global radiation intensity. These new parameterizations are applicable to all large-scale atmospheric models containing size-resolved aerosol microphysics, and a scheme to calculate concentrations of sulphuric acid, condensing organic vapours and cluster ions.

  11. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  12. Investigating the Sensitivity of Nucleation Parameterization on Ice Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, L.; Sulia, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate prediction of precipitation from lake-effect snow events associated with the Great Lakes region depends on the parameterization of thermodynamic and microphysical processes, including the formation and subsequent growth of frozen hydrometeors. More specifically, the formation of ice hydrometeors has been represented through varying forms of ice nucleation parameterizations considering the different nucleation modes (e.g., deposition, condensation-freezing, homogeneous). These parameterizations have been developed from in-situ measurements and laboratory observations. A suite of nucleation parameterizations consisting of those published in Meyers et al. (1992) and DeMott et al. (2010) as well as varying ice nuclei data sources are coupled with the Adaptive Habit Model (AHM, Harrington et al. 2013), a microphysics module where ice crystal aspect ratio and density are predicted and evolve in time. Simulations are run with the AHM which is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate the effect of ice nucleation parameterization on the non-spherical growth and evolution of ice crystals and the subsequent effects on liquid-ice cloud-phase partitioning. Specific lake-effect storms that were observed during the Ontario Winter Lake-Effect Systems (OWLeS) field campaign (Kristovich et al. 2017) are examined to elucidate this potential microphysical effect. Analysis of these modeled events is aided by dual-polarization radar data from the WSR-88D in Montague, New York (KTYX). This enables a comparison of the modeled and observed polarmetric and microphysical profiles of the lake-effect clouds, which involves investigating signatures of reflectivity, specific differential phase, correlation coefficient, and differential reflectivity. Microphysical features of lake-effect bands, such as ice, snow, and liquid mixing ratios, ice crystal aspect ratio, and ice density are analyzed to understand signatures in the aforementioned modeled

  13. Do Predation Rates on Artificial Nests Accurately Reflect Predation Rates on Natural Bird Nests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David I. King; Richard M. DeGraaf; Curtice R. Griffin; Thomas J. Maier

    1999-01-01

    Artificial nests are widely used in avian field studies. However, it is unclear how well predation rates on artificial nests reflect predation rates on natural nests. Therefore, we compared survival rates of artificial nests (unused natural nests baited with House Sparrow eggs) with survival rates of active bird nests in the same habitat at the same sites. Survival...

  14. Metatheases: artificial metalloproteins for olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, D F; Gotzen, S; Okuda, J

    2016-10-21

    The incorporation of organometallic catalyst precursors in proteins results in so-called artificial metalloenzymes. The protein structure will control activity, selectivity and stability of the organometallic site in aqueous medium and allow non-natural reactions in biological settings. Grubbs-Hoveyda type ruthenium catalysts with an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) as ancillary ligand, known to be active in olefin metathesis, have recently been incorporated in various proteins. An overview of these artificial metalloproteins and their potential application in olefin metathesis is given.

  15. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis from acrylates in artificial nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowad, Christen M; Ferringer, Tammie

    2004-03-01

    Artificial nails are an increasingly popular cosmetic enhancement to the natural nail. Several forms are available, including sculptured nails, photobonded nails, and preformed nails. Reactions to artificial nails have included paronychia, onychodystrophies, and dermatitis at contact areas and at sites distant to the contactant. We present a patient who developed erythema and painful pruritic vesicles of the paronychial tissue several hours after the application of sculptured nails. A strong reaction of erythema and edema occurred at the site of methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate testing. Removal of the artificial nails resulted in resolution of the reaction.

  17. Principles of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  18. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Summary Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiol...

  19. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of ...

  20. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  1. Novel synthesis of gibbsite by laser-stimulated nucleation in supersaturated sodium aluminate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, K. A.

    2000-12-01

    Laser-induced localized density fluctuations are shown to stimulate primary nucleation of nano-sized aluminum trihydroxide seed crystals in flowing supersaturated industrial sodium aluminate solutions (Bayer liquor). The post-nucleation mass deposition rate is greatly increased over rates attainable through more traditional seeding methods. Near-ideal single-crystal gibbsite is formed under diffusion-limited growth conditions. Laser-stimulated nucleation represents an in situ method for the active local modulation of the supersaturation state, so that the stimulated nucleation occurs under macroscopic solution conditions that are unfavorable for spontaneous nucleation.

  2. Calculating free energy profiles using entropy as a reaction coordinate: Application to water nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2018-03-01

    We identify the nucleation pathway for a liquid droplet of a water-like system. In order to calculate the free energy barrier associated with the droplet formation, we use the recently developed μVT- S simulation method to unravel the nucleation process. We analyze the interdependence between droplet size, entropy and free energy of nucleation. Three key features emerge: the droplet size increases as entropy decreases during the process, the nucleation free energy increases as supersaturation decreases, and the nucleation free energy increases as T decreases. This method can be readily applied to calculate free energy barriers of activated events with entropy as the reaction coordinate.

  3. Advances in Understanding the Role of Aerosols on Ice Clouds from the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziczo, D. J.; Moehler, O.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding climate. This is due to several poorly understood processes including the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, the number of effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and their atmospheric distribution, the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles and the interplay between effective heterogeneous ice nuclei and homogeneous ice formation. Our team recently completed a three-part international workshop to improve our understanding of atmospheric ice formation. Termed the Fifth International Ice Nucleation (FIN) Workshops, our motivation was the limited number of measurements and a lack of understanding of how to compare data acquired by different groups. The first activity, termed FIN1, addressed the characterization of ice nucleating particle size, number and chemical composition. FIN2 addressed the determination of ice nucleating particle number density. Groups modeling ice nucleation joined FIN2 to provide insight on measurements critically needed to model atmospheric ice nucleation and to understand the performance of ice chambers. FIN1 and FIN2 took place at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A particular emphasis of FIN1 and FIN2 was the use of 'blind' intercomparisons using a highly characterized, but unknown to the instrument operators, aerosol sample. The third activity, FIN3, took place at the Desert Research Institute's Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL). A high elevation site not subject to local emissions, SPL allowed for a comparison of ice chambers and subsequent analysis of the ice residuals under the challenging conditions of low particle loading, temperature and pressure found in the atmosphere. The presentation focuses on the improvement in understanding how mass spectra from different

  4. Nucleation and condensational growth to CCN sizes during a sustained pristine biogenic SOA event in a forested mountain valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Pierce

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS 2010, included intensive measurements of trace gases and particles at two sites on Whistler Mountain. Between 6–11 July 2010 there was a sustained high-pressure system over the region with cloud-free conditions and the highest temperatures of the study. During this period, the organic aerosol concentrations rose from <1 μg m−3 to ∼6 μg m−3. Precursor gas and aerosol composition measurements show that these organics were almost entirely of secondary biogenic nature. Throughout 6–11 July, the anthropogenic influence was minimal with sulfate concentrations <0.2 μg m−3 and SO2 mixing ratios ≈ 0.05–0.1 ppbv. Thus, this case provides excellent conditions to probe the role of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in aerosol microphysics. Although SO2 mixing ratios were relatively low, box-model simulations show that nucleation and growth may be modeled accurately if Jnuc = 3 × 10−7[H2SO4] and the organics are treated as effectively non-volatile. Due to the low condensation sink and the fast condensation rate of organics, the nucleated particles grew rapidly (2–5 nm h−1 with a 10–25% probability of growing to CCN sizes (100 nm in the first two days as opposed to being scavenged by coagulation with larger particles. The nucleated particles were observed to grow to ∼200 nm after three days. Comparisons of size-distribution with CCN data show that particle hygroscopicity (κ was ∼0.1 for particles larger 150 nm, but for smaller particles near 100 nm the κ value decreased near midway through the period from 0.17 to less than 0.06. In this environment of little anthropogenic influence and low SO2, the rapid growth rates of the regionally nucleated particles – due to condensation of biogenic SOA – results in an unusually high efficiency of conversion of

  5. Quantum nucleation of phase slips in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, H.P.; Blatter, G.; Geschkenbein, V.B.; Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of quantum fluctuations in a Bose-Einstein condensate confined within a thin cylindrical trap and perturbed by a moving impurity. We derive an effective action which maps the problem to that of a massive particle with damping in a periodic potential. Quantum fluctuations lead to a finite nucleation rate of phase slips and we make use of known results in our determination of the transport characteristic. Real Bose-Einstein condensate are finite systems and exhibit interesting effects depending on topology: in superfluid rings we obtain a critical velocity below which the nucleation rate is quenched. In a cigar shaped condensate the low-energy action is equivalent to that of a capacitively shunted Josephson junction. The state with a well defined phase difference across the impurity then is unstable towards a decoupled state with a fixed number of particles on either side of the impurity. (orig.)

  6. Suppression of graphene nucleation on Cu(111) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannett, Will; Miller, David L.; Keller, Mark W.

    2014-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu substrates depends on a large number of factors and currently suffers from a lack of reproducibility, both within and between research groups. We used Cu(111) thin films with centimeter-sized grains to avoid variations in surface roughness, crystalline orientation, and impurity content that may affect growth on polycrystalline Cu foils. We found that exposing these films (or commercial foils) to a variety of surface treatments prior to CVD can dramatically reduce the nucleation density of graphene islands. This allowed us to select the resulting average domain size of the graphene film. In addition, this suppression of nucleation may enable seeding of graphene growth at particular locations.

  7. Time-dependent distributions in self-quenching nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneidman, Vitaly A.

    2011-09-01

    Diffusion- and interface-limited Becker-Döring (BD) -type nucleation is considered in a closed system, where supersaturation is depleted by growing nuclei. Special focus is on nonadiabatic effects, which become increasingly pronounced for barriers lower than 20-25kBT, and which lead to nucleation rates deviating from their quasi-steady-state (QSS) values. Several essential modifications of the QSS distribution are observed. For example, the front is continuous rather than sharp and has a double-exponential shape, which is in agreement with the earlier matched asymptotic solution obtained in neglect of depletion. The total number of nuclei is larger than predicted by the QSS approximation. The obtained distributions are compared with numerical solutions of the BD equations and can serve as initial conditions for further transition to the Ostwald Ripening stage.

  8. Synaptic Bistability Due to Nucleation and Evaporation of Receptor Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2012-01-10

    We introduce a bistability mechanism for long-term synaptic plasticity based on switching between two metastable states that contain significantly different numbers of synaptic receptors. One state is characterized by a two-dimensional gas of mobile interacting receptors and is stabilized against clustering by a high nucleation barrier. The other state contains a receptor gas in equilibrium with a large cluster of immobile receptors, which is stabilized by the turnover rate of receptors into and out of the synapse. Transitions between the two states can be initiated by either an increase (potentiation) or a decrease (depotentiation) of the net receptor flux into the synapse. This changes the saturation level of the receptor gas and triggers nucleation or evaporation of receptor clusters. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  9. Suppressing Ice Nucleation of Supercooled Condensate with Biphilic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Yu, Miao; Shang, Yuhe; Zhou, Peng; Song, Ruyuan; Xu, Xiaonan; Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Zuankai; Yao, Shuhuai

    2018-02-01

    Preventing or minimizing ice formation in supercooled water is of prominent importance in many infrastructures, transportation, and cooling systems. The overall phase change heat transfer on icephobic surfaces, in general, is intentionally sacrificed to suppress the nucleation of water and ice. However, in a condensation frosting process, inhibiting freezing without compromising the water condensation has been an unsolved challenge. Here we show that this conflict between anti-icing and efficient condensation cooling can be resolved by utilizing biphilic topography with patterned high-contrast wettability. By creating a varying interfacial thermal barrier underneath the supercooled condensate, the biphilic structures tune the nucleation rates of water and ice in the sequential condensation-to-freezing process. Our experimental and theoretical investigation of condensate freezing dynamics further unravels the correlation between the onset of droplet freezing and its characteristic radius, offering a new insight for controlling the multiphase transitions among vapor, water, and ice in supercooled conditions.

  10. A Pathway to Artificial Metalloenzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of catalytic systems and the application thereof has proven to be the key to overcome traditional limitations of industrial-scale synthetic processes. Converging organometallic and biocatalytic principles lead to the development of Artificial Metalloenzymes (ArMs) that comprise a synthetic metal catalyst embedded in a protein scaffold, thereby combining the reactivity of the former with the versatility of the latter. This synergistic approach introduces rationally designed building blocks for the catalytic site and the host protein to assemble enzyme-like structures that follow regio-, chemo-, enantio- and substrate-selective principles. Yet, the identification of suitable protein scaffolds has thus far been challenging. Herein we report a rationally optimized fluorescent protein host, mTFP*, that was engineered to have no intrinsic metal binding capability and, owing to its robust nature, can act as scaffold for the design of novel ArMs. We demonstrate the potential of site-specific modifications within the protein host, use protein X-Ray analysis to validate the respective scaffolds and show how artificial mutant binding sites can be introduced. Transition metal Förster Resonance Energy transfer (tmFRET) methodologies help to evaluate micromolar dissociation constants and reveal structural rearrangements upon coordination of the metal centers. In conjunction with molecular insights from X-Ray crystallographic structure determination, dynamics of the binding pocket can be inferred. The versatile subset of different binding motifs paired with transition metal catalysts create artificial metalloenzymes that provide reactivities which otherwise do not exist in nature. As a proof of concept, Diels-Alder cycloadditions highlight the potential of the present mTFP* based catalysts by stereoselectively converting azachalcone and cyclopentadiene substrates. Screens indicate an enantiomeric excess of up to 60% and provide insights into the electronic and

  11. Nucleation of relativistic first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Kapusta, J.I.

    1992-01-01

    The authors apply the general formalism of Langer to compute the nucleation rate for systems of relativistic particles with zero or small baryon number density and which undergo first-order phase transitions. In particular, the pre-exponential factor is computed and it is proportional to the viscosity. The initial growth rate of a critical size bubble or droplet is limited by the ability of dissipative processes to transport latent heat away from the surface. 30 refs., 4 figs

  12. Surface nucleation and growth in the system of interacting particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvoj, Zdeněk; Chromcová, Zdeňka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2012), 1-8 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P331; GA MŠk ME09048; GA AV ČR IAA100100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : epitaxy * nucleation * island density * graphene * long-range interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2012

  13. Fracture of Rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor (Nucleation Threshold Stress).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    November 1976. (AD #BO16015L) 9R. F. Benck and J. L. Robitaille, "Teneile Strees -Strain Curves--IIl, Rolled Homogeneous Armor at a Strain Rate of 0.42 s...unloading at void interfaces must either be treated independently or be reduced to negligible effects. The approach used was to try to render the...nucleation can be interpreted in several ways . For example, a stable nucleus could quite naturally be envisioned as a cracked inclusion. Here

  14. Atmospheric Nucleation: Highlights of the EUCAARI Project and Future Directions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.; Manninen, H.E.; Paasonen, P.; Nieminen, T.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Laakso, L.; Riipinen, I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Kutren, T.; Ortega, I.K.; Dal Maso, M.; Brus, David; Hyvärinen, A-P.; Lihavainen, H.; Leppä, J.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Mirme, A.; Mirme, S.; Hörrak, U.; Berndt, T.; Stratmann, F.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Kiendler-Scarr, A.; Mentel, T.F.; Wildt, J.; Winkler, P.M.; Wagner, P.E.; Petzold, A.; Minikin, A.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 22 (2010), s. 10829-10848 ISSN 1680-7316 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 36833 - EUCAARI; European Commission(XE) 26140 - EUSAAR Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 211483; AFCE(FI) 211484; AFCE(FI) 1118615 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : atmospheric nucleation * boundary layers * particle size Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.309, year: 2010

  15. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Akinci, Aybige; Malignini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes.

  16. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid-induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Malagnini, Luca; Akinci, Aybige

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes. PMID:28845448

  17. Investigation of PLC band nucleation in AA5754

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X., E-mail: Xiaoqun.Feng@tu-dortmund.de [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Fischer, G., E-mail: Gottfried.Fischer@rif-ev.de [RIF e.V., Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Str. 20, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zielke, R., E-mail: Reiner.Zielke@tu-dortmund.de [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Svendsen, B., E-mail: Bob.Svendsen@udo.edu [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Mechanik, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Tillmann, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Tillmann@udo.edu [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous propagation of bands in transverse and longitudinal directions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PLC band nucleation at the back front of Lueders bands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic time of critical strain decreases with strain rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous existence of two type-B bands at specimen shoulder. - Abstract: The purpose of the present work is the experimental investigation of the nucleation of PLC deformation bands in the aluminium alloy AA5754. The PLC bands are investigated using both mechanical methods and infrared (IR) thermography. The latter employs a high-speed IR camera which captures local changes of radiated power resulting from mechanical dissipation and heating due to the nucleation of PLC bands. The resulting IR images are used to determine spatio-temporal power field variations via image subtraction. Furthermore, band trajectories obtained from the IR images are used to study possible correlations between the spatio-temporal evolution of stress and radiated power in the specimens and PLC band development.

  18. Non-equilibrium Quasi-Chemical Nucleation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-chemical model, which is widely used for nucleation description, is revised on the basis of recent results in studying of non-equilibrium effects in reacting gas mixtures (Kolesnichenko and Gorbachev in Appl Math Model 34:3778-3790, 2010; Shock Waves 23:635-648, 2013; Shock Waves 27:333-374, 2017). Non-equilibrium effects in chemical reactions are caused by the chemical reactions themselves and therefore these contributions should be taken into account in the corresponding expressions for reaction rates. Corrections to quasi-equilibrium reaction rates are of two types: (a) spatially homogeneous (caused by physical-chemical processes) and (b) spatially inhomogeneous (caused by gas expansion/compression processes and proportional to the velocity divergency). Both of these processes play an important role during the nucleation and are included into the proposed model. The method developed for solving the generalized Boltzmann equation for chemically reactive gases is applied for solving the set of equations of the revised quasi-chemical model. It is shown that non-equilibrium processes lead to essential deviation of the quasi-stationary distribution and therefore the nucleation rate from its traditional form.

  19. Homogeneous ice nucleation evaluated for several water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, J. R.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.; Vega, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we evaluate by means of computer simulations the rate for ice homogeneous nucleation for several water models such as TIP4P, TIP4P/2005,TIP4P/ICE, and mW (following the same procedure as in Sanz et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)]) in a broad temperature range. We estimate the ice-liquid interfacial free-energy, and conclude that for all water models γ decreases as the temperature decreases. Extrapolating our results to the melting temperature, we obtain a value of the interfacial free-energy between 25 and 32 mN/m in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental values. Moreover, we observe that the values of γ depend on the chosen water model and this is a key factor when numerically evaluating nucleation rates, given that the kinetic prefactor is quite similar for all water models with the exception of the mW (due to the absence of hydrogens). Somewhat surprisingly the estimates of the nucleation rates found in this work for TIP4P/2005 are slightly higher than those of the mW model, even though the former has explicit hydrogens. Our results suggest that it may be possible to observe in computer simulations spontaneous crystallization of TIP4P/2005 at about 60 K below the melting point.

  20. Homogeneous nucleation in liquid nitrogen at negative pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baidakov, V. G., E-mail: baidakov@itp.uran.ru; Vinogradov, V. E.; Pavlov, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Thermal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen at positive and negative pressures has been studied in a tension wave formed by a compression pulse reflected from the liquid–vapor interface on a thin platinum wire heated by a current pulse. The limiting tensile stresses (Δp = p{sub s}–p, where p{sub s} is the saturation pressure), the corresponding bubble nucleation frequencies J (10{sup 20}–10{sup 22} s{sup –1} m{sup –3}), and temperature induced nucleation frequency growth rate G{sub T} = dlnJ/dT have been experimentally determined. At T = 90 K, the limiting tensile stress was Δp = 8.3 MPa, which was 4.9 MPa lower than the value corresponding to the boundary of thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase (spinodal). The measurement results were compared to classical (homogeneous) nucleation theory (CNT) with and without neglect of the dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles on their dimensions. In the latter case, the properties of new phase nuclei were described in terms of the Van der Waals theory of capillarity. The experimental data agree well with the CNT theory when it takes into account the “size effect.”.

  1. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winchester, Benjamin Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  2. Intermediate Nucleation State of GaN Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. X.; Xie, M. H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    Homoexpitaxial nucleation of GaN during molecular-beam epitaxy is followed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). We observe a metastable nucleation state, which manifests as “ghost” islands in STM images. These “ghost” islands can be irreversibly driven into normal islands by continuous STM imaging. It is further established that the “ghost” island formation is related to the presence of excess Ga atoms on the surface: Normal islands are only seen under the N-rich or stoichiometric flux condition, whereas “ghost” islands are observed under Ga-rich conditions. For intermediate excess-Ga coverages, both normal and “ghost” islands are present, however, they show distinctly different sizes, suggesting different nucleation states for the two. A growth model is proposed to account for the formation of metastable, “ghost” islands. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out and main features of the surface are reproduced. We acknowledge financial support from HK RGC under grant Nos. 7396/00P, 7142/99P, and 7121/00P.

  3. Effect of system compliance on crack nucleation in soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Shruti; Crosby, Alfred

    Puncture mechanics in soft materials is critical for the development of new surgical instruments, robot assisted-surgery as well as new materials used in personal protective equipment. However, analytical techniques to study this important deformation process are limited. We have previously described a simple experimental method to study the resistive forces and failure of a soft gel being indented with a small tip needle. We showed that puncture stresses can reach two orders of magnitude greater than the material modulus and that the force response is insensitive to the geometry of the indenter at large indentation depths. Currently, we are examining the influence of system compliance on crack nucleation (e.g. puncture) in soft gels. It is well known that system compliance influences the peak force in adhesion and traditional fracture experiments; however, its influence on crack nucleation is unresolved. We find that as the system becomes more compliant, lower peak forces required to puncture a gel of certain stiffness with the same indenter were measured. We are developing scaling relationships to relate the peak puncture force and system compliance. Our findings introduce new questions with regard to the possibility of intrinsic materials properties related to the critical stress and energy for crack nucleation in soft materials.

  4. Autocatalytic microtubule nucleation determines the size and mass of Xenopus laevis egg extract spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Franziska; Oriola, David; Dalton, Benjamin; Brugués, Jan

    2018-01-11

    Regulation of size and growth is a fundamental problem in biology. A prominent example is the formation of the mitotic spindle, where protein concentration gradients around chromosomes are thought to regulate spindle growth by controlling microtubule nucleation. Previous evidence suggests that microtubules nucleate throughout the spindle structure. However, the mechanisms underlying microtubule nucleation and its spatial regulation are still unclear. Here, we developed an assay based on laser ablation to directly probe microtubule nucleation events in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. Combining this method with theory and quantitative microscopy, we show that the size of a spindle is controlled by autocatalytic growth of microtubules, driven by microtubule-stimulated microtubule nucleation. The autocatalytic activity of this nucleation system is spatially regulated by the limiting amounts of active microtubule nucleators, which decrease with distance from the chromosomes. This mechanism provides an upper limit to spindle size even when resources are not limiting. © 2018, Decker et al.

  5. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L; Eisele, Fred L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Hanson, David R; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H

    2012-11-13

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid-base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta.

  6. Freezing on a Chip—A New Approach to Determine Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Micrometer-Sized Water Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Häusler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a new approach to analyze the freezing behavior of aqueous droplets containing ice nucleating particles. The freezing chip consists of an etched and sputtered (15 × 15 × 1 mm gold-plated silicon or pure gold chip, enabling the formation of droplets with defined diameters between 20 and 80 µm. Several applications like an automated process control and an automated image evaluation were implemented to improve the quality of heterogeneous freezing experiments. To show the functionality of the setup, we compared freezing temperatures of aqueous droplets containing ice nucleating particles (i.e., microcline, birch pollen washing water, juniper pollen, and Snomax® solution measured with our setup, with literature data. The ice nucleation active surface/mass site density (ns/m of microcline, juniper pollen, and birch pollen washing water are shown to be in good agreement with literature data. Minor variations can be explained by slight differences in composition and droplet generation technique. The nm values of Snomax® differ by up to one order of magnitude at higher subzero temperatures when compared with fresh samples but are in agreement when compared with reported data of aged Snomax® samples.

  7. Designing maleic anhydride-{alpha}-olifin copolymeric combs as wax crystal growth nucleators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Hemant P. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Kiranbala; Bharambe, D.P. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 001 (India); Agrawal, K.S. [Department of Petrochemical Technology, Polytechnic, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Nagar, A. [MH ASSET, ONGC, Mumbai (India)

    2010-09-15

    Modification of the wax crystal habit is of great practical interest during transportation and processing of crude oil at low temperature. Various pour point depressant (PPD) additives can facilitate this modification by different mechanisms. Comb shaped polymer additives are known to depress the pour point of crude oil by providing different nucleation sites for the precipitation of wax. This paper describes performance based design, synthesis, characterization and evaluation of comb shaped polymeric diesters. Copolymers of maleic anhydride with different unsaturated C{sub 22} esters were synthesized and copolymers then reacted with two unsaturated fatty alcohols. All products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). Rheological properties of crude (with and without additive) were studied by Advance Rheometer AR-500. In this study the additive based on oleic acid was evaluated as good PPD and rheology modifier. (author)

  8. Particle stimulated nucleation during dynamic and metadynamic recrystallisation of Ni-30%Fe-Nb-C alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, Elena V.; Mannan, Parvez; Casillas, Gilberto; Saleh, Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron back-scattering diffraction is used to elucidate the early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides in Ni-30wt.%Fe alloy subjected to high temperature plane strain compression. While particles with sizes even below 1 μm were found to induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallisation, only a small fraction of coarse particles served as nucleation sites. - Highlights: • The early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides are elucidated • A combination of transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction used • Particles below 1 μm size could induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallization

  9. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers of municipal landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, James W.; Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners are gaining acceptance as tracers of human wastewater in the environment. The 3 artificial sweeteners analyzed in this study were detected in leachate or leachate-impacted groundwater at levels comparable to those of untreated wastewater at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites tested, including several closed for >50 years. Saccharin was the dominant sweetener in old (pre-1990) landfills, while newer landfills were dominated by saccharin and acesulfame (introduced 2 decades ago; dominant in wastewater). Cyclamate was also detected, but less frequently. A case study at one site illustrates the use of artificial sweeteners to identify a landfill-impacted groundwater plume discharging to a stream. The study results suggest that artificial sweeteners can be useful tracers for current and legacy landfill contamination, with relative abundances of the sweeteners potentially providing diagnostic ability to distinguish different landfills or landfill cells, including crude age-dating, and to distinguish landfill and wastewater sources. -- Highlights: • Artificial sweeteners detected at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites. • Concentrations comparable to wastewater even at sites closed for >50 yr. • Saccharin elevated at all sites; potentially diagnostic of landfill impacts. • Potential for age-dating recent (past 2 decades) waste with acesulfame. -- Artificial sweeteners may be useful for tracing landfill leachate contamination and distinguishing it from wastewater impacts

  10. Ice nucleating particles in the Saharan Air Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Boose

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at quantifying the ice nucleation properties of desert dust in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, the warm, dry and dust-laden layer that expands from North Africa to the Americas. By measuring close to the dust's emission source, before aging processes during the transatlantic advection potentially modify the dust properties, the study fills a gap between in situ measurements of dust ice nucleating particles (INPs far away from the Sahara and laboratory studies of ground-collected soil. Two months of online INP concentration measurements are presented, which were part of the two CALIMA campaigns at the Izaña observatory in Tenerife, Spain (2373 m a.s.l., in the summers of 2013 and 2014. INP concentrations were measured in the deposition and condensation mode at temperatures between 233 and 253 K with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC. Additional aerosol information such as bulk chemical composition, concentration of fluorescent biological particles as well as the particle size distribution was used to investigate observed variations in the INP concentration. The concentration of INPs was found to range between 0.2 std L−1 in the deposition mode and up to 2500 std L−1 in the condensation mode at 240 K. It correlates well with the abundance of aluminum, iron, magnesium and manganese (R: 0.43–0.67 and less with that of calcium, sodium or carbonate. These observations are consistent with earlier results from laboratory studies which showed a higher ice nucleation efficiency of certain feldspar and clay minerals compared to other types of mineral dust. We find that an increase of ammonium sulfate, linked to anthropogenic emissions in upwind distant anthropogenic sources, mixed with the desert dust has a small positive effect on the condensation mode INP per dust mass ratio but no effect on the deposition mode INP. Furthermore, the relative abundance of biological particles was found to be significantly higher

  11. Nucleation and dissociation of nano-particles in gas phase; Nucleation et evaporation de nanoparticules en phase gazeuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiden, P

    2007-09-15

    This work deals with the study of nano-particles formation in gas phase and their dissociation pathways after an optical excitation. The clusters formation decomposes in two steps: a seed is formed (nucleation phase) and sticks atoms during its propagation in a sodium atomic vapor (growth phase). Those two steps have been observed separately for homogeneous Na{sub n} and heterogeneous Na{sub n}X particles (X = (NaOH){sub 2} or (Na{sub 2}O){sub 2}). The growth mechanism is well interpreted by a Monte Carlo simulation taking into account an accretion mechanism with hard-sphere cross section. The homogeneous nucleation mechanism has been highlighted by a direct comparison with the Classical Nucleation Theory predictions. The clusters fragmentation of ionic Na{sup +}(NaOH){sub p} et Na{sup +}(NaF){sub p} particles is studied in the second part. The way clusters fragment with size when they are excited optically is compared with theoretical previsions: this highlights the existence of an energetic barrier for special size of clusters. Finally, the fragmentation of doubly charged Na{sup +} Na{sup +} (NaOH){sub p} clusters shows a competition between the fission into two single charged fragments and the unimolecular evaporation of a neutral fragment. (author)

  12. Development of artificial soft rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kiyoshi

    1995-01-01

    When foundation base rocks are deeper than the level of installing structures or there exist weathered rocks and crushed rocks in a part of base rocks, often sound artificial base rocks are made by substituting the part with concrete. But in the construction of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., the foundation base rocks consist of mudstone, and the stiffness of concrete is large as compared with the surrounding base rocks. As the quality of the substituting material, the nearly same stiffness as that of the surrounding soft rocks and long term stability are suitable, and the excellent workability and economical efficiency are required, therefore, artificial soft rocks were developed. As the substituting material, the soil mortar that can obtain the physical property values in stable form, which are similar to those of Nishiyama mudstone, was selected. The mechanism of its hardening and the long term stability, and the manufacturing plant are reported. As for its application to the base rocks of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the verification test at the site and the application to the base rocks for No. 7 plant reactor building and other places are described. (K.I.)

  13. Electrodeposition nucleation and film formation of cadmium from a low melting molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajev

    Consider the simple electrodeposition reaction of a metal: Mz+ + ze- M (at the cathode of the base metal)Whereby metal ions, Mz+, are reduced to metal atoms, M, at the interface of the base metal and electrolyte. The occurrence of such an electrode reaction does not guarantee the nucleation of M or the formation of a compact film of metal M on the base metal. In cases where deposition does occur, metal crystals are formed at fixed sites on the base metal. These metal crystals grow into a polycrystalline film. In this work, this concept of metal deposition is studied. The studies were carried out on cadmium using nickel as a base metal and purified chloroaluminate molten salt electrolyte under purified helium. Cadmium is typically electroplated from aqueous electrolytes. Therefore, the first part of this work consisted of developing an electroplating process for the deposition of this metal from a molten salt electrolyte. This consisted of selection of an electrolyte, cadmium salt, base metal, and experimental proof of cadmium deposition in the selected system. The second part consisted of identification of the cadmium electrode reactions in the chloroaluminate molten salt electrolyte using cyclic voltammetry. When cadmium chloride was added to the chloroaluminate melt, the divalent salt dissolved to form a mixture of divalent and subvalent ions of cadmium in the electrolyte. During cathodic potential scans, these cadmium ions produced two reduction peaks. The first cathodic peak was from reduction of divalent ions to subvalent ions, and the second peak from reduction of subvalent ions to cadmium metal. During anodic potential scans, two oxidation peaks were produced due to reverse reactions of cadmium ions and metal. In addition, a third pair of cadmium peaks was noted to form between the two bulk pairs of cadmium peaks. This third pair of peaks was from chemical dissociation of subvalent ions to divalent ions and cadmium, and coupled electrochemical reactions of

  14. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines. (topical review)

  15. Artificial organ engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annesini, Maria Cristina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Artificial organs may be considered as small-scale process plants, in which heat, mass and momentum transfer operations and, possibly, chemical transformations are carried out. This book proposes a novel analysis of artificial organs based on the typical bottom-up approach used in process engineering. Starting from a description of the fundamental physico-chemical phenomena involved in the process, the whole system is rebuilt as an interconnected ensemble of elemental unit operations. Each artificial organ is presented with a short introduction provided by expert clinicians. Devices commonly used in clinical practice are reviewed and their performance is assessed and compared by using a mathematical model based approach. Whilst mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool for quantitative descriptions of clinical devices, models are kept simple to remain focused on the essential features of each process. Postgraduate students and researchers in the field of chemical and biomedical engineering will find that t...

  16. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  17. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  18. Artificial intelligence executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamsley, S.J.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1984-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a high technology field that can be used to provide problem solving diagnosis, guidance and for support resolution of problems. It is not a stand alone discipline, but can also be applied to develop data bases for retention of the expertise that is required for its own knowledge base. This provides a way to retain knowledge that otherwise may be lost. Artificial Intelligence Methodology can provide an automated construction management decision support system, thereby restoring the manager's emphasis to project management

  19. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Korb, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    As the power of Bayesian techniques has become more fully realized, the field of artificial intelligence has embraced Bayesian methodology and integrated it to the point where an introduction to Bayesian techniques is now a core course in many computer science programs. Unlike other books on the subject, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence keeps mathematical detail to a minimum and covers a broad range of topics. The authors integrate all of Bayesian net technology and learning Bayesian net technology and apply them both to knowledge engineering. They emphasize understanding and intuition but also provide the algorithms and technical background needed for applications. Software, exercises, and solutions are available on the authors' website.

  20. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  1. Nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Due to a great combination of physical and mechanical properties, beta titanium alloys have become promising candidates in the field of chemical industry, aerospace and biomedical materials. The microstructure of beta titanium alloys is the governing factor that determines their properties and performances, especially the size scale, distribution and volume fraction of precipitate phase in parent phase matrix. Therefore in order to enhance the performance of beta titanium alloys, it is critical to obtain a thorough understanding of microstructural evolution in beta titanium alloys upon various thermal and/or mechanical processes. The present work is focusing on the study of nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure and super-refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys in order to study the influence of instabilities within parent phase matrix on precipitates nucleation, including compositional instabilities and/or structural instabilities. The current study is primarily conducted in Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (wt%, Ti-5553), a commercial material for aerospace application. Refined and super-refined precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553 are obtained under specific accurate temperature controlled heat treatments. The characteristics of either microstructure are investigated in details using various characterization techniques, such as SEM, TEM, STEM, HRSTEM and 3D atom probe to describe the features of microstructure in the aspect of morphology, distribution, structure and composition. Nucleation mechanisms of refined and super-refined precipitates are proposed in order to fully explain the features of different precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553. The necessary thermodynamic conditions and detailed process of phase transformations are introduced. In order to verify the reliability of proposed nucleation mechanisms, thermodynamic calculation and phase field modeling simulation are accomplished using the database of simple binary Ti-Mo system

  2. Theories of nucleation and growth of bubbles and voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    The application of classical nucleation theory to the formation of voids from a supersaturated concentration of vacancies is reviewed. The effect of a dissolved concentration of barley soluble gas on the nucleation rate of voids is emphasized. Exposure to a damaging flux of irradiation is the most effective way of introducing a vacancy supersaturation, but interstitials are produced at an equal rate. The concentration of interstitials inhibits the nucleation of voids which can occur only in the presence of dislocations since they preferentially absorb interstitials. It is well known that a definite value of internal gas pressure is necessary to stabilize a bubble so that it shows no tendencies to either shrink or grow. The arguments are reviewed which conclude that this pressure is determined by the specific surface free energy of the solid rather than the surface tension. While the former property refers to the energy necessary to create new surface, the latter is a measure of the work done in elastically stretching a a given surface. The presence of an equilibrium gas bubble leaves the stresses in the surrounding solid unperturbed only when surface energy and surface tension are numerically equal. A bubble with internal pressure greater than the restraint offered by surface energy tends to grow to relieve the excess pressure. The mechanism of growth can involve the migration of vacancies from remote sources to the bubble surface or the plastic straining of the solid surrounding the bubble. The kinetics of both mechanisms are developed and compared. The theory of growth of grain-boundary voids by vacancy condensation under an applied stress is also considered. (author)

  3. Nucleation of microwave plasma CVD diamond on molybdenum (Mo) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inderjeet, K.; Ramesh, S.

    2000-01-01

    Molybdenum is a metal, which is gaining increasing significance in industrial applications. The main use of Mo is as all alloying element added in small amounts to steel, irons and non- ferrous alloys in order to enhance the strength, toughness and wear resistance. Mo is also vastly being employed in the automotive and aircraft industries, mainly due to its low coefficient of friction. Diamond, on be other hand, is a unique material for innumerable applications because of its usual combination of physical and chemical properties. Several potential applications can be anticipated for diamond in many sectors including electronics, optics, as protective corrosion resistant coatings, cutting tools, etc. With the enhancement in science and technology, diamond microcrystals and thin films are now being produced from the vapour phase by a variety of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques; such as microwave plasma CVD. With such technology being made available, it is envisage that diamond-coated molybdenum would further enhance the performance and to open up new avenue for Mo in various industries. Therefore, it is the aim of the present work to study the nucleation and growth of diamond particles on Mo surface by employing microwave plasma CVD (MAPCVD). In the present work, diamond deposition was carried out in several stages by varying the deposition distance. The nucleation and growth rate were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the existence of diamond was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It has been found that the nucleation and growth rate of diamond particles were influenced by the deposition height between the substrate and plasma. Under the optimum condition, well defined diamond crystallites distributed homogeneously throughout the surface, could be obtained. Some of the important parameters controlling the deposition and growth of diamond particles on Mo surface are discussed. (author)

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  5. Physical and chemical characterization of bioaerosols - Implications for nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, P. A.; Sun, J.; Eltouny, N. A.; Hudson, E. D.; Hayes, C. T.; Kos, G.

    The importance of organic compounds in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and as cloud condensation and ice-forming nuclei, has been recognized for several decades. Organic compounds comprise a significant fraction of the suspended matter mass, leading to local (e.g. toxicity, health hazards) and global (e.g. climate change) impacts. The state of knowledge of the physical chemistry of organic aerosols has increased during the last few decades. However, due to their complex chemistry and the multifaceted processes in which they are involved, the importance of organic aerosols, particularly bioaerosols, in driving physical and chemical atmospheric processes is still very uncertain and poorly understood. Factors such as solubility, surface tension, chemical impurities, volatility, morphology, contact angle, deliquescence, wettability, and the oxidation process are pivotal in the understanding of the activation processes of cloud droplets, and their chemical structures, solubilities and even the molecular configuration of the microbial outer membrane, all impact ice and cloud nucleation processes in the atmosphere. The aim of this review paper is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols with a focus on those properties important in nucleation processes. We herein discuss the potential importance (or lack thereof) of physical and chemical properties of bioaerosols and illustrate how the knowledge of these properties can be employed to study nucleation processes using a modeling exercise. We also outline a list of major uncertainties due to a lack of understanding of the processes involved or lack of available data. We will also discuss key issues of atmospheric significance deserving future physical chemistry research in the fields of bioaerosol characterization and microphysics, as well as bioaerosol modeling. These fundamental questions are to be addressed prior to any definite conclusions on the

  6. Microcrystalline silicon prepared at magnetic field modified nucleation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočka, Jan; Mates, Tomáš; Ledinský, Martin; Stuchlíková, The-Ha; Stuchlík, Jiří; Fejfar, Antonín

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 352, - (2006), s. 901-905 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SM/300/1/03; GA MŽP(CZ) SN/3/172/05; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010316; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010413; GA MŠk(CZ) LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : amorphous semiconductors * nucleation * electrical and electronic properties * chemical vapor deposition * atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy * microcrystallinity * optical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2006

  7. Understanding the ice nucleation characteristics of feldspars suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Zobrist et al. (2008) Arizona test dust, silver iodide, nonadecanol and silicon dioxide suspensions in various solutes showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust particles at a microphysical scale. To improve our understanding how solute and mineral dust particle surface interaction, we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with microcline, sanidine, plagioclase, kaolinite and quartz particles suspended in pure water and solutions containing ammonia, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium nitrate, potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid. Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (2 - 5 wt%) are prepared in water with varying solute concentrations (0 - 15 wt%). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich

  8. Sources of organic ice nucleating particles in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tom C. J.; DeMott, Paul J.; Tobo, Yutaka; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Moffett, Bruce F.; Franc, Gary D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2016-06-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) may be a significant source of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs), especially of those active > -15 °C. However, due to both a lack of investigations and the complexity of the SOM itself, the identities of these INPs remain unknown. To more comprehensively characterize organic INPs we tested locally representative soils in Wyoming and Colorado for total organic INPs, INPs in the heat-labile fraction, ice nucleating (IN) bacteria, IN fungi, IN fulvic and humic acids, IN plant tissue, and ice nucleation by monolayers of aliphatic alcohols. All soils contained ≈ 106 to ≈ 5 × 107 INPs g-1 dry soil active at -10 °C. Removal of SOM with H2O2 removed ≥ 99 % of INPs active > -18 °C (the limit of testing), while heating of soil suspensions to 105 °C showed that labile INPs increasingly predominated > -12 °C and comprised ≥ 90 % of INPs active > -9 °C. Papain protease, which inactivates IN proteins produced by the fungus Mortierella alpina, common in the region's soils, lowered INPs active at ≥ -11 °C by ≥ 75 % in two arable soils and in sagebrush shrubland soil. By contrast, lysozyme, which digests bacterial cell walls, only reduced INPs active at ≥ -7.5 or ≥ -6 °C, depending on the soil. The known IN bacteria were not detected in any soil, using PCR for the ina gene that codes for the active protein. We directly isolated and photographed two INPs from soil, using repeated cycles of freeze testing and subdivision of droplets of dilute soil suspensions; they were complex and apparently organic entities. Ice nucleation activity was not affected by digestion of Proteinase K-susceptible proteins or the removal of entities composed of fulvic and humic acids, sterols, or aliphatic alcohol monolayers. Organic INPs active colder than -10 to -12 °C were resistant to all investigations other than heat, oxidation with H2O2, and, for some, digestion with papain. They may originate from decomposing plant material, microbial

  9. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    An experiment has been set up in order to investigate the role of ionization in Earth's climate. We have chosen to start our investigation at the smallest scales, namely by studying the effect of cosmic ray produced ions on atmospheric aerosol nucleation and growth processes. This experiment...... is conducted at the Danish National Space Center, Center for Sun-Climate Research. It comprises a 7 m3 reaction chamber where atmospheric conditions can be simulated. The number of ions can be increased by exposure to radioactive sources and decreased by applying an electric field; this will enable experiments...

  10. Cohesive zone modelling of nucleation, growth and coalesce of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Anders; Stigh, U.

    2017-01-01

    The stress-deformation relation i.e. cohesive law representing the fracture process in an almost incompressible adhesive tape is measured using the double cantilever beam specimen. As in many ductile materials, the fracture process of the tape involves nucleation, growth and coalesce of cavities....... This process is studied carefully by exploiting the transparency of the used materials and the inherent stability of the specimen configuration. Utilising the path independence of the J-integral, the cohesive law is measured. The law is compared to the results of butt-joint tests. The law contains two stress...

  11. Nucleation and growth of the Naica giant gypsum crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Fermín; García-Ruiz, JuanMa

    2014-04-07

    The Cave of Giant Crystals in the Naica mine (Mexico) is one of the most amazing displays of mineral beauty ever created in nature. In addition to the colossal crystals of gypsum, which in some cases exceed eleven meters in length and one meter in thickness, the scenery fashioned by the crystalline beams that thrust through the darkness of the cave from floor to ceiling with a luster like moonlight is a unique example of harmony based on crystal symmetry. We review the crystallogenesis of this remarkable and challenging phenomenon of mineralization near equilibrium that can be used to teach the basics of nucleation and crystal growth.

  12. Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the atmosphere. Here we implement the IMN scheme into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on H2SO4-H2O binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN, the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~3, CCN burden by ~10% (at 0.2% supersaturation to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation, and cloud droplet number burden by ~18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF by 3.67 W m−2 (more negative and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W m−2 (more positive, with large spatial variations. The effect of ionization on SWCF derived from this study (3.67 W m−2 is a factor of ~3 higher that of a previous study (1.15 W m−2 based on a different ion nucleation scheme and climate model. Based on the present CAM5 simulation, the 5-yr mean impacts of solar cycle induced changes in ionization rates on CCN and cloud forcing are small (~−0.02 W m−2 but have larger inter-annual (from −0.18 to 0.17 W m−2 and spatial variations.

  13. Controlling the Solidification of Organic Photovoltaic Blends with Nucleating Agents

    KAUST Repository

    Nekuda Malik, Jennifer A.

    2014-11-20

    Blending fullerenes with a donor polymer for the fabrication of organic solar cells often leads to at least partial vitrification of one, if not both, components. For prototypical poly(3-hexylthiophene):fullerene blend, we show that the addition of a commercial nucleating agent, di(3,4-dimethyl benzylidene)sorbitol, to such binary blends accelerates the crystallization of the donor, resulting in an increase in its degree of crystallinity in as-cast structures. This allows manipulation of the extent of intermixing/ phase separation of the donor and acceptor directly from solution, offering a tool to improve device characteristics such as power conversion efficiency.

  14. Experimental investigation of the role of ions in aerosol nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    rays and Earth's climate and there is thus a need to corroborate the results in a different experiment. The present results are obtained in the same laboratory, but using a new setup The experiments were conducted in a 50 L cylindrical reaction chamber made of electropolished stainless steel. Aerosols...... were grown using photochemically produced sulphuric acid and ionization levels were controlled with a Cs-137 gamma-source. An increase in nucleation was observed when the chamber was exposed to the radioactive source. The results were analyzed using a model based on the General Dynamic Equation...

  15. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  16. Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Generality in Artificial Intelligence. John McCarthy. Classics Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 283-296. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/03/0283-0296. Author Affiliations.

  17. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  18. Artificial Intelligence and CALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, John H.

    The potential application of artificial intelligence (AI) to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is explored. Two areas of AI that hold particular interest to those who deal with language meaning--knowledge representation and expert systems, and natural-language processing--are described and examples of each are presented. AI contribution…

  19. Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Generality in Artificial Intelligence. John McCarthy. Classics Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 283-296. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/03/0283-0296. Author Affiliations.

  20. Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured at ground and by unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniel; Schrod, Jann; Drücke, Jaqueline; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Ebert, Martin; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan; Baars, Holger; Marinou, Eleni; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Curtius, Joachim; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2017-04-01

    During the intensive INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS field campaign focusing on aerosols, clouds and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we have measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INP) in the lower troposphere both with unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as well as from the ground. Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UAS and were analyzed immediately after collection on site in the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE for INP active at -20˚ C to -30˚ C in the deposition/condensation mode (INPD). Immersion freezing INP (INPI) were sampled on membrane filters and were analysed in aqueous extracts by the drop freezing method on the cold stage of FRIDGE. Ground samples were collected at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO) in Agia Marina Xyliatou (Latitude; 35˚ 2' 8" N; Longitude: 33˚ 3' 26" E; Altitude: 532 m a.s.l.). During the one-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with OPC aerosol number concentrations, backscatter and depolarization retrievals from the Polly-XT Raman Lidar, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INP with the particulate mass (PM), the Lidar retrievals and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INP std.l-1 were measured at -30˚ C. The INPD concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. The INPI concentration at ground also agreed with PM levels and exceeded the ground-based INPD concentration by more than one order of magnitude. Since desert dust is transported

  1. Measurements of ice nucleating particle concentrations at 242 K in the free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, L.; Lohmann, U.; Boose, Y.; Zipori, A.; Herrmann, E.; Bukowiecki, N.; Steinbacher, M.; Gute, E.; Kanji, Z. A.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds containing ice play an important role in the Earth's system, but some fundamental knowledge on their formation and further development is still missing. The phase change from vapor or liquid to ice in the atmosphere can occur heterogeneously in the presence of ice nucleating particles (INPs) at temperatures warmer, and supersaturations lower than required for homogeneous freezing. Only a small fraction of particles in an environment relevant for the occurrence of ice- and mixed-phase clouds are INPs, and their identification and quantification remains challenging. We measure INP concentrations with the ETH Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC) at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ) during several field campaigns in different seasons and years. The measurements are performed at 242 K and above water saturation, representing ice- and mixed-phase clouds conditions. Due to its elevation of 3580 m a.s.l. the site encounters mostly free tropospheric conditions, and is influenced by boundary layer injections up to 80% of the time in summer. JFJ regularly encounters Saharan dust events and receives air masses of marine origin, which can both occur within the free troposphere. Our measurements show that INP concentrations in the free troposphere do not follow a seasonal cycle. They are remarkably constant, with concentrations from 0.5 - 8 L-1 (interquartile range), which compares well to measurements performed under the same conditions at another location within the free troposphere, the Izaña Atmospheric Research Station in Tenerife. At JFJ, correlations with parameters of physical properties of ambient particles, meteorology and air mass characteristics do not show a single best estimator to predict INP concentrations, emphasizing the complexity of ice nucleation in the free troposphere. Increases in INP concentrations of a temporary nature were observed in the free troposphere during Saharan dust events and marine air mass influence, which

  2. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  3. Understanding and Controlling Cu-Catalyzed Graphene Nucleation: The Role of Impurities, Roughness, and Oxygen Scavenging

    OpenAIRE

    Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Brennan, B; Pollard, AJ; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which Cu catalyst pretreatments control graphene nucleation density in scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is systematically explored. The intrinsic and extrinsic carbon contamination in the Cu foil is identified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a major factor influencing graphene nucleation and growth. By selectively oxidizing the backside of the Cu foil prior to graphene growth, a drastic reduction of the graphene nucleation density by 6 orders of m...

  4. Percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation: criticality in very small systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, A.J. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Chung, K.C.

    1994-12-01

    Different criteria for criticality in very small systems are discussed in the context of percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation. It is shown that the probability threshold in percolation and interaction radius threshold in nucleation are very strongly dependent upon the adopted criterion. By using Monte Carlo method, similarities and dissimilarities between nucleation and percolation pictures are also pointed out. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. Percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation: criticality in very small systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, A.J.; Chung, K.C.

    1994-12-01

    Different criteria for criticality in very small systems are discussed in the context of percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation. It is shown that the probability threshold in percolation and interaction radius threshold in nucleation are very strongly dependent upon the adopted criterion. By using Monte Carlo method, similarities and dissimilarities between nucleation and percolation pictures are also pointed out. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Weakly-bound Dimers that Underlie the Crystal Nucleation Precursors in Lysozyme Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Mohammad; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Conrad, Jacinta; Vekilov, Peter; Mccabe, Jacob; Angel, Laurence; Hawke, David; Byington, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Protein crystallization is central to understanding of molecular structure in biology, a vital part of processes in the pharmaceutical industry, and a crucial component of numerous disease pathologies. Crystallization starts with nucleation and how nucleation proceeds determines the crystallization rate and essential properties of the resulting crystal population. Recent results with several proteins indicate that crystals nucleate within preformed mesoscopic protein-rich clusters. The origin...

  7. Ice nucleation activity in various tissues of Rhododendron flower buds: their relevance to extraorgan freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Mikiko; Toyomasu, Takayuki; Aoki, Takayuki; Price, William S

    2015-01-01

    Wintering flower buds of cold hardy Rhododendron japonicum cooled slowly to subfreezing temperatures are known to undergo extraorgan freezing, whose mechanisms remain obscure. We revisited this material to demonstrate why bud scales freeze first in spite of their lower water content, why florets remain deeply supercooled and how seasonal adaptive responses occur in regard to extraorgan freezing in flower buds. We determined ice nucleation activity (INA) of various flower bud tissues using a test tube-based assay. Irrespective of collection sites, outer and inner bud scales that function as ice sinks in extraorgan freezing had high INA levels whilst florets that remain supercooled and act as a water source lacked INA. The INA level of bud scales was not high in late August when flower bud formation was ending, but increased to reach the highest level in late October just before the first autumnal freeze. The results support the following hypothesis: the high INA in bud scales functions as the subfreezing sensor, ensuring the primary freezing in bud scales at warmer subzero temperatures, which likely allows the migration of floret water to the bud scales and accumulation of icicles within the bud scales. The low INA in the florets helps them remain unfrozen by deep supercooling. The INA in the bud scales was resistant to grinding and autoclaving at 121(∘)C for 15 min, implying the intrinsic nature of the INA rather than of microbial origin, whilst the INA in stem bark was autoclaving-labile. Anti-nucleation activity (ANA) was implicated in the leachate of autoclaved bud scales, which suppresses the INA at millimolar levels of concentration and likely differs from the colligative effects of the solutes. The tissue INA levels likely contribute to the establishment of freezing behaviors by ensuring the order of freezing in the tissues: from the primary freeze to the last tissue remaining unfrozen.

  8. Ice nucleation activity in various tissues of Rhododendron flower buds: their relevance to extraorgan freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya eIshikawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wintering flower buds of cold hardy Rhododendron japonicum cooled slowly to subfreezing temperatures are known to undergo extraorgan freezing, whose mechanisms remain obscure. We revisited this material to demonstrate why bud scales freeze first in spite of their lower water content, why florets remain deeply supercooled and how seasonal adaptive responses occur in regard to extraorgan freezing in flower buds. We determined ice nucleation activity (INA of various flower bud tissues of using a test tube-based assay. Irrespective of collection sites, outer and inner bud scales that function as ice sinks in extraorgan freezing had high INA levels whilst florets that remain supercooled and act as a water source lacked INA. The INA level of bud scales was not high in late August when flower bud formation was ending, but increased to reach the highest level in late October just before the first autumnal freeze. The results support the following hypothesis: the high INA in bud scales functions as the subfreezing sensor, ensuring the primary freezing in bud scales at warmer subzero temperatures, which likely allows the migration of floret water to the bud scales and accumulation of icicles within the bud scales. The low INA in the florets helps them remain unfrozen by deep supercooling. The INA in the bud scales was resistant to grinding and autoclaving at 121°C for 15 min, implying the intrinsic nature of the INA rather than of microbial origin, whilst the INA in stem bark was autoclaving labile. Anti-nucleation activity (ANA was implicated in the leachate of autoclaved bud scales, which suppresses the INA at millimolar levels of concentration and likely differs from the colligative effects of the solutes. The tissue INA levels likely contribute to the establishment of freezing behaviors by ensuring the order of freezing in the tissues: from the primary freeze to the last tissue remaining unfrozen.

  9. The Effects of Thermal History on Nucleation of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals, or Hot Protein and Cold Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.2 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubilities are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to addition of precipitant solution. Warming a lysozyme solution above the phase transition point, then cooling it back below this point, has been shown to affect the subsequent nucleation rate, as determined by the numbers and size of crystals formed, but not the growth rate for the tetragonal crystal form . We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. The transition effects are progressive with temperature, having a half time of about 1 hour at 37C at pH 4.8. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling it back to 4C no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. This differential behaviour may be exploited to elucidate how and where flow affects the lysozyme crystal growth process. The presentation will focus on the results of these and ongoing studies in this area.

  10. Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmanová, Leona

    2016-01-01

    Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion This diploma thesis deals with the issue of artificial abortion, especially its criminal aspects. Legal aspects are not the most important aspects of artificial abortion. Social, ethical or ideological aspects are of the same importance but this diploma thesis cannot analyse all of them. The main issue with artificial abortion is whether it is possible to force a pregnant woman to carry a child and give birth to a child when she cannot or does not want ...

  11. On the Role of Ammonia in Arctic Aerosol Nucleation and Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browse, J.; Dall'Osto, M.; Geels, C.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Boertmann, D.; Beddows, D.; Gordon, H.; Pringle, K.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the importance of ammonia in Arctic aerosol nucleation and the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at high-latitudes. The importance of atmospheric nucleation processes to summertime Arctic aerosol concentration has been frequently noted at ground-stations, during campaigns and within models (which typically predict that the majority of aerosol in the Arctic summertime boundary layer derives from nucleation). However, as nucleation mechanisms in global models have increased in complexity (improving model skill globally) our skill in the Arctic has generally decreased. This decrease in model skill is likely due to a lack of organic compounds (monterpenes etc.) in the modelled high Arctic which have been identified as a key component in atmospheric nucleation in the mid-latitudes and thus incorporated into many global nucleation parametrisations. Recently it has been suggested that ammonia (also identified as a potentially important component in atmospheric nucleation) may control nucleation processes in the Arctic. However, the source (or sources) of Arctic ammonia remain unclear. Here, we use modelling, long-term aerosol in-situ observations, high resolution sea-ice satellite observations and new emission inventories to investigate the link between ammonia sources (including bird colonies, sea-ice melt and open ocean in the marginal ice zones) and nucleation events in the mid-to-high Arctic, and thus quantify the importance of individual ammonia sources to Arctic-wide CCN and cloud droplet populations.

  12. Homogeneous nucleation: a problem in nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The master equation for cluster growth and evaporation is derived for many-body quantum mechanics and from a modified version of quantum damping theory used in laser physics. For application to nucleation theory, the quantum damping theory is generalized to include system and reservoir states that are not separate entities. Formulas for rate constants are obtained. Solutions of the master equation yield equations of state and system-averaged quantities recognized as thermodynamic variables. Formulas for Helmholtz free energies of clusters in a Debye approximation are derived. Coexistence-line equations for pressure, volume, and number of clusters are obtained from equations-of-state analysis. Coexistence-line and surface-tension data are used to obtain values of parameters for the Debye approximation. These data are employed in calculating both the nucleation current in diffusion cloud chamber experiments and the onset of condensation in expansion nozzle experiments. Theoretical and experimental results are similar for both cloud chamber and nozzle experiments, which measure water. Comparison with other theories reveals that classical theory only accidently agrees with experiment and that the Helmholtz free-energy formula used in the Lothe--Pound theory is incomplete. 27 figures, 3 tables, 149 references.

  13. Hysteresis, nucleation and growth phenomena in spin-crossover solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Molnár, Gábor; Salmon, Lionel; Nicolazzi, William; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-12-01

    The observation and the study of first-order phase transitions in cooperative spin-crossover (SCO) solids exhibiting hysteresis behaviours are of particular interest and currently constitute a burgeoning area in the field of bistable molecular materials. The understanding and the control of the transition mechanisms (nucleation and growth processes) and their dynamics within the hysteresis region appear to be a general and appealing problem from a fundamental point of view and for technological applications as well. This review reports on the recent progresses and most important findings made on the spatiotemporal dynamics of the spin transition in SCO solids, particularly through the universal nucleation and growth process. Both thermally induced and light-induced spin transitions are discussed. We open up this review to the central question of the evolution of the transition mechanisms and dynamics in SCO nano-objects, which constitute promising systems to reach ultra-fast switching, and the experimental issues inherent to such studies at the micro- and nanometric scale.

  14. Convergent evolution of germ granule nucleators: A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arpita; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2017-10-01

    Germ cells have been considered "the ultimate stem cell" because they alone, during normal development of sexually reproducing organisms, are able to give rise to all organismal cell types. Morphological descriptions of a specialized cytoplasm termed 'germ plasm' and associated electron dense ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structures called 'germ granules' within germ cells date back as early as the 1800s. Both germ plasm and germ granules are implicated in germ line specification across metazoans. However, at a molecular level, little is currently understood about the molecular mechanisms that assemble these entities in germ cells. The discovery that in some animals, the gene products of a small number of lineage-specific genes initiate the assembly (also termed nucleation) of germ granules and/or germ plasm is the first step towards facilitating a better understanding of these complex biological processes. Here, we draw on research spanning over 100years that supports the hypothesis that these nucleator genes may have evolved convergently, allowing them to perform analogous roles across animal lineages. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The nucleation of microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Monteiro Cristina de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filaments composed of dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulins, which have a variety of functions in living cells. In fungi, the spindle pole bodies usually have been considered to be microtubule-organizing centers. We used the antimicrotubule drug Benomyl in block/release experiments to depolymerize and repolymerize microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings to learn more about the microtubule nucleation process in this filamentous fungus. Twenty seconds after release from Benomyl short microtubules were formed from several bright (immunofluorescent dots distributed along the germlings, suggesting that microtubule nucleation is randomly distributed in A. nidulans germlings. Since nuclear movement is dependent on microtubules in A. nidulans we analyzed whether mutants defective in nuclear distribution along the growing hyphae (nud mutants have some obvious microtubule defect. Cytoplasmic, astral and spindle microtubules were present and appeared to be normal in all nud mutants. However, significant changes in the percentage of short versus long mitotic spindles were observed in nud mutants. This suggests that some of the nuclei of nud mutants do not reach the late stage of cell division at normal temperatures.

  16. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-11-10

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ(18)O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ -10 °C (INPs-10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space.

  17. Isolation of fetal DNA from nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, D.W.; Knoll, J.H.M. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Flint, A.F. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (USA)); Pizzimenti, M.F. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA)); Latt, S.A. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Fetal nucleated cells within maternal blood represent a potential source of fetal genes obtainable by venipuncture. The authors used monoclonal antibody against the transferrin receptor (TIR) to identify nucleated erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of pregnant women. Candidate fetal cells from 19 pregnancies were isolated by flow sorting at 12 1/2-17 weeks gestation. The DNA in these cells was amplified for a 222-base-pair (bp) sequence present on the short arm of the Y chromosome as proof that the cells were derived from the fetus. The amplified DNA was compared with standardized DNA concentrations. In the case of the female fetus, DNA prepared from samples at 32 weeks of gestation and cord blood at delivery also showed the presence of the Y chromosomal sequence, suggesting Y sequence mosaicism or translocation. In 10/12 cases where the 222-bp band was absent, the fetuses were female. Thus, they were successful in detecting the Y chromosomal sequence in 75% of the male-bearing pregnancies, demonstrating that it is possible to isolate fetal gene sequences from cells in maternal blood. Further refinement in methodology should increase sensitivity and facilitate noninvasive screening for fetal gene mutations.

  18. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  19. Atomistic simulation of helium bubble nucleation in palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu, Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Xiao Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: sfxiao@yahoo.com.cn; Yang Jianyu [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Deng Huiqiu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A palladium crystal has been constructed with 11808 atoms. 55 helium atoms occupied the octahedral position of palladium crystal are introduced and retained in a spherical region. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed in a constant temperature and constant volume ensemble (NVT) with temperature controlled by Nose-Hoover thermostat. The interactions between palladium atoms are described with modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM), the interactions between palladium atom and helium atom are in the form of Morse potential, and the interactions between helium atoms are in the form of L-J potential function. With the analysis of the radial distribution function (RDF) and microstructure, it reveals that some of helium atoms form a series of clusters with different size, and the nucleation core is random at low temperature, and which is the embryo of helium bubble. Increasing temperature can accelerate the process of bubble nucleation, and the clusters will aggregate and coalesce into a bigger one in which there are no palladium atoms, and it is considered as a helium bubble.

  20. Artificial Intelligence and Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Ioana

    1987-01-01

    Compares artificial intelligence and information retrieval paradigms for natural language understanding, reviews progress to date, and outlines the applicability of artificial intelligence to question answering systems. A list of principal artificial intelligence software for database front end systems is appended. (CLB)

  1. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction....... It reviews calibration procedures, outlines the computational algorithms, and summarizes examplary applications. Four different platforms for BD and DPD simulations are presented that differ in their focus, features, and complexity....

  2. Artificial structures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Flandern, T.

    2002-05-01

    Approximately 70,000 images of the surface of Mars at a resolution of up to 1.4 meters per pixel, taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, are now in public archives. Approximately 1% of those images show features that can be broadly described as `special shapes', `tracks, trails, and possible vegetation', `spots, stripes, and tubes', `artistic imagery', and `patterns and symbols'. Rather than optical illusions and tricks of light and shadow, most of these have the character that, if photographed on Earth, no one would doubt that they were the products of large biology and intelligence. In a few cases, relationships, context, and fulfillment of a priori predictions provide objective evidence of artificiality that is exempt from the influence of experimenter biases. Only controlled test results can be trusted because biases are strong and operate both for and against artificiality.

  3. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Investigation on heterogeneous nucleation of MgAl2O4 in Al-Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Kapranos, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the mechanisms of grain refinement of Al-Mg alloys through ultrasonic treatment and varying Mg content. MgAl2O4 particles display an equiaxed and faceted morphology with {111} planes and when exposed to {111} of α-Al, can act as heterogeneous and potent nuclei for aluminium. Intensive vibrations by ultrasonic treatment lead to significant grain refinement through effective dispersion of MgAl2O4 particles. The equiaxed and faceted morphology of MgAl2O4 along with a well-defined cube-on-cube orientation relationship (1bar 11)[110] MgAl2O4//(1bar 11)[110] α-Al, provide improved refinement. Furthermore, multiplication of solidification sites by the ultrasonic pulses enhances heterogeneous nucleation. The resulting improved grain refinement relates in all probability to the increased nucleation sites, due to grain multiplications and wetting of impurities, the lowering of surface tension due to the segregation of magnesium to the surface of liquid aluminium, the appropriate growth restriction factor and the low lattice mismatch coupled with strong dispersion of oxides.The filtration test confirms these particles as potent refiners.

  4. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  5. Intelligence in Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Shoumen Palit Austin

    2016-01-01

    The elusive quest for intelligence in artificial intelligence prompts us to consider that instituting human-level intelligence in systems may be (still) in the realm of utopia. In about a quarter century, we have witnessed the winter of AI (1990) being transformed and transported to the zenith of tabloid fodder about AI (2015). The discussion at hand is about the elements that constitute the canonical idea of intelligence. The delivery of intelligence as a pay-per-use-service, popping out of ...

  6. Intelligence, Artificial and Otherwise

    OpenAIRE

    Chace, William M.

    1984-01-01

    I rise now to speak with the assumption that all of you know very well what I am going to say. I am the humanist here, the professor of English. We humanists, when asked to speak on questions of science and technology, are notorious for offering an embarrassed and ignorant respect toward those matters, a respect, however, which can all too quickly degenerate into insolent condescension. Face to face with the reality of computer technology, say, or with "artificial intelligence," we humanists ...

  7. Impacts of Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Trappl, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book, which is intended to serve as the first stage in an iterative process of detecting, predicting, and assessing the impacts of Artificial Intelligence opens with a short "one-hour course" in AI, which is intended to provide a nontechnical informative introduction to the material which follows. Next comes an overview chapter which is based on an extensive literature search, the position papers, and discussions. The next section of the book contains position papers whose richness...

  8. Ethical Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Hibbard, Bill

    2014-01-01

    This book-length article combines several peer reviewed papers and new material to analyze the issues of ethical artificial intelligence (AI). The behavior of future AI systems can be described by mathematical equations, which are adapted to analyze possible unintended AI behaviors and ways that AI designs can avoid them. This article makes the case for utility-maximizing agents and for avoiding infinite sets in agent definitions. It shows how to avoid agent self-delusion using model-based ut...

  9. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  10. Modeling artificial leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Raucci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient artificial leaves relies on the subtle combination of the electronic structure of molecular assemblies able to absorbing sunlight, converting light energy into electrochemical potential energy and finally transducing it into chemical accessible energy. The electronical design of these charge transfer molecular machine is crucial to build up a complex supramolecular architecture for the light energy conversion. The theoretical computational approach represent...

  11. Artificial perception and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John; Johnson, John L.

    2000-06-01

    Perception has both unconscious and conscious aspects. In all cases, however, what we perceive is a model of reality. By brain construction through evolution, we divide the world into two parts--our body and the outside world. But the process is the same in both cases. We perceive a construct usually governed by sensed data but always involving memory, goals, fears, expectations, etc. As a first step toward Artificial Perception in man-made systems, we examine perception in general here.

  12. Thermostability analysis of line-tension-associated nucleation at a gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sanat Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-01-01

    The influence of line tension on the thermostability of a droplet nucleated from an oversaturated vapor at the interface of the vapor and another immiscible liquid is investigated. Along with the condition of mechanical equilibrium, the notion of extremization of the reversible work of formation is considered to obtain the critical parameters related to heterogeneous nucleation. From the energetic formulation, the critical reversible work of formation is found to be greater than that of homogeneous nucleation for high value of the positive line tension. On the other hand, for high value of the negative line tension, the critical reversible work of formation becomes negative. Therefore, these thermodynamic instabilities under certain substrate wettability situations necessitate a free-energetics-based stability of the nucleated droplet, because the system energy is not minimized under these conditions. This thermostability is analogous to the transition-based stability proposed by Widom [B. Widom, J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995)], 10.1021/j100009a041 in the case of partial wetting phenomena along with the positive line tension. The thermostability analysis limits the domain of the solution space of the present critical-value problem as the thermodynamic transformation in connection with homogeneous and workless nucleation is considered. Within the stability range of the geometry-based wetting parameters, three limiting modes of nucleation, i.e., total-dewetting-related homogeneous nucleation, and total-wetting-associated and total-submergence-associated workless nucleation scenarios, are identified. Either of the two related limiting wetting scenarios of workless nucleation, namely, total wetting and total submergence, is found to be favorable depending on the geometry-based wetting conditions. The line-tension-associated nucleation on a liquid surface can be differentiated from that on a rigid substrate, as in the former, the stability based on mechanical

  13. Artificial sweetener; Jinko kanmiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The patents related to the artificial sweetener that it is introduced to the public in 3 years from 1996 until 1998 are 115 cases. The sugar quality which makes an oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol the subject is greatly over 28 cases of the non-sugar quality in the one by the kind as a general tendency of these patents at 73 cases in such cases as the Aspartame. The method of manufacture patent, which included new material around other peptides, the oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol isn`t inferior to 56 cases of the formation thing patent at 43 cases, and pays attention to the thing, which is many by the method of manufacture, formation. There is most improvement of the quality of sweetness with 31 cases in badness of the aftertaste which is characteristic of the artificial sweetener and so on, and much stability including the improvement in the flavor of food by the artificial sweetener, a long time and dissolution, fluid nature and productivity and improvement of the economy such as a cost are seen with effect on a purpose. (NEDO)

  14. Using measurements of the aerosol charging state in determination of the particle growth rate and the proportion of ion-induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fraction of charged nucleation mode particles as a function of particle diameter depends on the particle growth rate and the proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation. In this study we have tested the applicability of recent data analysis methods to determine the growth rate and the proportion of ion-induced nucleation from the measured charged fractions. For this purpose we have conducted a series of aerosol dynamic simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The growth rate and initial fraction of charged particles were estimated from simulated data using these methods and compared with the values obtained directly from the simulations. We found that the data analysis methods used in this study should not be used when the nuclei growth rate is less than ~3 nm h−1, or when charged particles grow much more rapidly than neutral ones. Furthermore, we found that the difference in removal rates of neutral and charged particles should be taken into account when estimating the proportion of ion-induced nucleation. Neglecting the higher removal rate of charged particles compared with that of neutral ones could result in an underestimation of the proportion of ion-induced nucleation by up to a factor of 2. This underestimation is further increased if charged particles grow more rapidly than neutral ones. We also provided a simple way of assessing whether these methods are suitable for analyzing data measured under specific conditions. The assessment procedure was illustrated using a few examples of actual measurement sites with a more detailed examination of the typical conditions observed at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland.

  15. SWAN: NGC 253’s Nucleated Star Bursting Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David; Momjian, Emmanuel; Walter, Fabian; Rand, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We present the first results from SWAN: Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies. Nearby galaxies are conveniently located to probe molecular gas properties on scales of 10 to 200 pc, which are appropriate for Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). The resolution of the VLA in D and C configurations maps to a few 10’s of parsecs in these galaxies. To advance studies of galaxy evolution it is paramount to understand how processes in the molecular ISM and star formation are linked on these scales. We have observed the metastable transitions of ammonia and the 22GHz water maser line in four nearby galaxies: NGC 253, IC 342, NGC 2146, and NGC 6946. These galaxies were chosen to span an order of magnitude in star formation rate, and a range of galactic ecosystems. We use the ammonia transitions to derive kinetic temperatures, which exposes the heating and cooling balance of the ISM. We then aim to relate these conditions to energetic feedback from star formation indicated by water masers. Currently our analysis is focused on NGC 253. NGC 253 is a barred spiral galaxy with a nucleated starburst of ≈3M⊙ per year. We have observed ammonia transitions (1,1) to (5,5) and the 22GHz water maser line with a resolution of ≈63pc. We have identified nine regions across the nucleated starburst for study. The ammonia (3,3) line appears to be masing in the centermost 200pc. In combination with Large Velocity Gradient models (LVG) we find that the properties of the molecular gas is warm, ranging from 100K to 160K, with molecular hydrogen densities from 2.2e3 cm-3 to 4.8e3 cm-3. We have identified two regions of water maser emission. The first region is a north south extension, about the center of the galaxy, with a major axis of ≈7”(150pc) and a minor axis of ≈3”(90pc), and the second is a nearby region ≈6”(100pc) to the southeast of the galaxy center. By means of these measurements, we gain an understanding of the molecular ISM associated with the nucleated

  16. Nucleation rate of the quark-gluon plasma droplet at finite quark ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolution of the system [4]. Another important issue is that while calculating the nucle- ation rate of the QGP droplet, it is necessary to consider the finite size of hadrons [5]. These corrections are properly taken care of in the workout of this paper. Now, in the framework of the homogeneous nucleation theory, the nucleation ...

  17. Forward flux sampling calculation of homogeneous nucleation rates from aqueous NaCl solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2018-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations and the path sampling technique known as forward flux sampling to study homogeneous nucleation of NaCl crystals from supersaturated aqueous solutions at 298 K and 1 bar. Nucleation rates were obtained for a range of salt concentrations for the Joung-Cheatham NaCl force field combined with the Extended Simple Point Charge (SPC/E) water model. The calculated nucleation rates are significantly lower than the available experimental measurements. The estimates for the nucleation rates in this work do not rely on classical nucleation theory, but the pathways observed in the simulations suggest that the nucleation process is better described by classical nucleation theory than an alternative interpretation based on Ostwald's step rule, in contrast to some prior simulations of related models. In addition to the size of NaCl nucleus, we find that the crystallinity of a nascent cluster plays an important role in the nucleation process. Nuclei with high crystallinity were found to have higher growth probability and longer lifetimes, possibly because they are less exposed to hydration water.

  18. Relative Role of Gas Generation and Displacement Rates in Cavity Nucleation and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Foreman, A. J E.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of helium diffusion and clustering during irradiation are analysed. Using the “homogeneous” nucleation theory , the effect of damage rate on cavity density is calculated for different gas generation to damage rate ratios. The influence of gas mobility on cavity nucleation has been...

  19. Effect of oxygen on the bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, M.; Christensen, Carsten; Stritzker, B.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of traces of oxygen in the process gas on the bias-enhanced nucleation (BEN) of diamond on silicon has been studied in the present work. CO2 in concentrations ranging from 0 to 3000 ppm was added during the nucleation procedure at U-bias = -200 V in microwave plasma chemical vapour...

  20. Parametrization of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate for the numerical simulation of multiphase flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Tomáš; Eisenschmidt, K.; Rauschenberger, P.; Weigand, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 533-534 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/10/1819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : ice nucleation * ice-water surface energy * classical nucleation theory Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201210255/abstract

  1. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-14

    The vapor–liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  2. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  3. Effect of Controlled Ice Nucleation on Stability of Lactate Dehydrogenase During Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Bogner, Robin H; Pikal, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Several controlled ice nucleation techniques have been developed to increase the efficiency of the freeze-drying process as well as to improve the quality of pharmaceutical products. Owing to the reduction in ice surface area, these techniques have the potential to reduce the degradation of proteins labile during freezing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ice nucleation temperature on the in-process stability of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH in potassium phosphate buffer was nucleated at -4°C, -8°C, and -12°C using ControLyo™ or allowed to nucleate spontaneously. Both the enzymatic activity and tetramer recovery after freeze-thawing linearly correlated with product ice nucleation temperature (n = 24). Controlled nucleation also significantly improved batch homogeneity as reflected by reduced inter-vial variation in activity and tetramer recovery. With the correlation established in the laboratory, the degradation of protein in manufacturing arising from ice nucleation temperature differences can be quantitatively predicted. The results show that controlled nucleation reduced the degradation of LDH during the freezing process, but this does not necessarily translate to vastly superior stability during the entire freeze-drying process. The capability of improving batch homogeneity provides potential advantages in scaling-up from lab to manufacturing scale. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dislocation nucleation and vacancy formation during high-speed deformation of fcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, J.; Leffers, T.; Singh, B.N.

    2001-01-01

    . The dislocations are nucleated as single Shockley partials. The large stresses required before dislocations are nucleated result in a very high dislocation density, and therefore in many inelastic interactions between the dislocations. These interactions create vacancies and a very large vacancy concentration...

  5. Nucleation rate of the quark-gluon plasma droplet at finite quark ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nucleation rate of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) droplet is computed at finite quark chemical potential. In the course of computing the nucleation rate, the finite size effects of the QGP droplet are taken into account. We consider the phenomenological flow parameter of quarks and gluons, which is dependent on quark ...

  6. Investigating Freezing Point Depression and Cirrus Cloud Nucleation Mechanisms Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzewski, Kentaro Y.; Caylor, Ryan L.; Comstock, Ashley M.; Hadley, Austin T.; Imholt, Felisha M.; Kirwan, Kory D.; Oyama, Kira S.; Wise, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    A differential scanning calorimeter was used to study homogeneous nucleation of ice from micron-sized aqueous ammonium sulfate aerosol particles. It is important to understand the conditions at which these particles nucleate ice because of their connection to cirrus cloud formation. Additionally, the concept of freezing point depression, a topic…

  7. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  8. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  9. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  10. Genetic Algorithms and Nucleation in VIH-AIDS transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranon, Armando

    2003-03-01

    VIH to AIDS transition has been modeled via a genetic algorithm that uses boom-boom principle and where population evolution is simulated with a cellular automaton based on SIR model. VIH to AIDS transition is signed by nucleation of infected cells and low probability of infection are obtained for different mutation rates in agreement with clinical results. A power law is obtained with a critical exponent close to the critical exponent of cubic, spherical percolation, colossal magnetic resonance, Ising Model and liquid-gas phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Computations were carried out at UAM-A Supercomputing Lab and author acknowledges financial support from Division of CBI at UAM-A.

  11. Growth Kinetics of the Homogeneously Nucleated Water Droplets: Simulation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Galimzyanov, Bulat N

    2012-01-01

    The growth of homogeneously nucleated droplets in water vapor at the fixed temperatures T = 273, 283, 293, 303, 313, 323, 333, 343, 353, 363 and 373 K (the pressure p = 1 atm.) is investigated on the basis of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation data with the mW-model. The treatment of simulation results is performed by means of the statistical method within the mean-first-passage-time approach, where the reaction coordinate is associated with the largest droplet size. It is found that the water droplet growth is characterized by the next features: (i) the rescaled growth law is unified at all the considered temperatures and (ii) the droplet growth evolves with acceleration and follows the power law.

  12. Carbides nucleation and growth processes in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, F.A.; Otero, E.; Ballester, A.; Leiro, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleation and growth process at some carbides with high chromium content inside an austenitic matrix corresponding to a 304 type inoxidable steel are studied. The precipitate growth seems to be controlled, at least at temperatures above 973 K, by the diffusion of carbon atoms from the matrix phase to the beginning of the second phase which is normally placed in the grain boundaries. A relationship between the percentage of precipitated carbide, as a function of the carbon excess in the saturated austenitic solid solution, and the time employed for each work temperature is established. From these data, some aspects relating to the morphologie, the carbide localization and the influence of these factors in the steel sensibilization to the grain corrosion, are interpreted. (author)

  13. Evolution of particle composition in CLOUD nucleation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keskinen, H; Joutsensaari, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Duplissy, J; Schobesberger, S; Gysel, M; Riccobono, F; Bianchi, F; Yli-Juuti, T; Lehtipalo, K; Rondo, L; Breitenlechner, M; Kupc, A; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dunne, E M; Downard, A J; Ehrhart, S; Franchin, A; Kajos, M K; Kirkby, J; Kurten, A; Nieminen, T; Makhmutov, V; Mathot, S; Miettinen, P; Onnela, A; Petaja, T; Praplan, A; Santos, F D; Schallhart, S; Sipila, M; Stozhkov, Y; Tome, A; Vaattovaara, P; Wimmer, D; Prevot, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Flagan, R C; Weingartner, E; Viisanen, Y; Riipinen, I; Hansel, A; Curtius, J; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R; Baltensperger, U; Wex, H; Stratmann, F; Laaksonen, A; Slowik, J G

    2013-01-01

    Sulphuric acid, ammonia, amines, and oxidised organics play a crucial role in nanoparticle formation in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the composition of nucleated nanoparticles formed from these compounds in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber experiments at CERN (Centre europ ́ een pour la recherche nucl ́ eaire). The investigation was carried out via analysis of the particle hygroscopicity, ethanol affinity, oxidation state, and ion composition. Hygroscopicity was studied by a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser and a cloud condensation nuclei counter, ethanol affinity by an organic differential mobility analyser and particle oxidation level by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. The ion composition was studied by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The volume fraction of the organics in the particles during theirgrowth from sizes of a few nanometers to tens of nanometers was derived from measured hygros...

  14. Export of ice nucleating particles from a watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jarl Are; Conen, Franz; Alewell, Christine

    2017-08-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INP) active at a few degrees below 0°C are produced by a range of organisms and released into the environment. They may affect cloud properties and precipitation when becoming airborne. So far, our knowledge about sources of biological INP is based on grab samples of vegetation, soil or water studied in the laboratory. By combining measurements of INP concentrations in river water with river water discharge rates over the course of 16 months, we obtained a lower limit for the production rate of INP in a watershed covering most of Switzerland (4 × 105 INP-8 m-2 d-1). Coincidentally, we found that INP-8 are likely to retain their potential for catalysing ice formation in the natural environment for at least several months before they are mobilized by an intensive rainfall, washed into the river and exported from the watershed.

  15. Surface wettability and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroto, Bambang Joko; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2018-02-01

    The effect of varying surface wettabilities and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer at intermediate heat flux has been examined and investigated. The experiments were performed using pure water as the working fluid and subcooling ranging from 0, 5 and 10 K, respectively. The three types of heat transfer block were used that are bare surface/hydrophilic (polished copper), superhydrophilic/TiO2-coated on copper and hydrophobic/PTFE surface. The experimental results will be examined by the existing model. The results show that the heat transfer performance of surfaces with PTFE coating is better at low heat flux. While for an intermediate heat flux, superhydrophilic surface (TiO2) is superior compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It is observed that the heat transfer performance is decreasing when the sub cooling degree is increased.

  16. Sources of organic ice nucleating particles in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. J. Hill

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM may be a significant source of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs, especially of those active  >  −15 °C. However, due to both a lack of investigations and the complexity of the SOM itself, the identities of these INPs remain unknown. To more comprehensively characterize organic INPs we tested locally representative soils in Wyoming and Colorado for total organic INPs, INPs in the heat-labile fraction, ice nucleating (IN bacteria, IN fungi, IN fulvic and humic acids, IN plant tissue, and ice nucleation by monolayers of aliphatic alcohols. All soils contained  ≈  106 to  ≈  5 × 107 INPs g−1 dry soil active at −10 °C. Removal of SOM with H2O2 removed  ≥  99 % of INPs active  >  −18 °C (the limit of testing, while heating of soil suspensions to 105 °C showed that labile INPs increasingly predominated  >  −12 °C and comprised  ≥  90 % of INPs active  >  −9 °C. Papain protease, which inactivates IN proteins produced by the fungus Mortierella alpina, common in the region's soils, lowered INPs active at  ≥  −11 °C by  ≥  75 % in two arable soils and in sagebrush shrubland soil. By contrast, lysozyme, which digests bacterial cell walls, only reduced INPs active at  ≥  −7.5 or  ≥  −6 °C, depending on the soil. The known IN bacteria were not detected in any soil, using PCR for the ina gene that codes for the active protein. We directly isolated and photographed two INPs from soil, using repeated cycles of freeze testing and subdivision of droplets of dilute soil suspensions; they were complex and apparently organic entities. Ice nucleation activity was not affected by digestion of Proteinase K-susceptible proteins or the removal of entities composed of fulvic and humic acids, sterols, or aliphatic alcohol monolayers. Organic INPs active colder than −10 to −12 °C were

  17. Nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth of electroactive centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomar-Pardave, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Materiales, C.P. 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: mepp@correo.azc.uam.mx; Scharifker, B.R. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Departamento de Quimica, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, Apartado 75-876, C.P. 07300 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Romero-Romo, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Materiales, C.P. 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-08-30

    A theory is presented describing, for the first time, the temporal evolution of the fractional surface area, S(t), of 3D non-interacting nuclei growing at a rate limited by diffusion of electrodepositing ions onto substrates of a different nature. Likewise, an equation has been derived describing the potentiostatic current-time transients arising from the formation and growth of such nuclei with redox reactions occurring simultaneously on their surfaces. An equation is also proposed to describe the current due to redox reactions taking place on the surface of interacting growing nuclei. The latter is used to describe the experimental current transients recorded during nucleation and growth of cobalt at applied potentials where the proton reduction reaction occurs simultaneously with the electrocrystallization process.

  18. Native bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Peters, L K

    1982-11-15

    Native myosin filaments from rabbit psoas muscle are always 1.5 micrometer long. The regulated assembly of these filaments is generally considered to occur by an initial antiparallel and subsequent parallel aggregation of identical myosin subunits. In this schema myosin filament length is controlled by either a self-assembly or a Vernier process. We present evidence which refines these ideas. Namely, that the intact myosin bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly. This suggestion is based on the following experimental evidence. (1) A native bare zone assemblage about 0.3 micrometer long can be formed by dialysis of native myosin filaments to either a pH 8 or a 0.2 M-KCl solution. (2) Upon dialysis back to 0.1 M-KCl, bare zone assemblages and distal myosin molecules recombine to form 1.5 micrometer long bipolar filaments. (3) The bare zone assemblage can be separated from the distal myosin molecules by column chromatography in 0.2 M-KCl. Upon dialysis of the fractionated subsets back to 0.1 M-KCl, the bare zone assemblage retains its length of about 0.3 micrometer. However, the distal molecules reassemble to form filaments about 5 micrometers long. (4) Filaments are formed from mixes of the isolated subsets. The lengths of these filaments vary with the amount of distal myosin present. (5) When native filaments, isolated bare zone assemblages or distal myosin molecules are moved sequentially to 0.6 M-KCl and then to 0.1 M-KCl, the final filament lengths are all about 5 micrometers. The capacity of the bare zone assemblage to nucleate filament assembly may be due to the bare zone myosin molecules, the associated M band components or both.

  19. New species of ice nucleating fungi in soil and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gray D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere (1,2). Several types of PBAP have been identified as ice nuclei (IN) that can initiate the formation of ice at relatively high temperatures (3, 4). The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is due to a surface protein on the outer cell membrane that catalyses ice formation, for which the corresponding gene has been identified and detected by DNA analysis (3). Fungal spores or hyphae can also act as IN, but the biological structures responsible for their IN activity have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, properties, and effects of fungal IN in the atmosphere have neither been characterized nor quantified. Recent studies have shown that airborne fungi are highly diverse (1), and that atmospheric transport leads to efficient exchange of species among different ecosystems (5, 6). The results presented in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. 2012 (7) clearly demonstrate the presence of geographic boundaries in the global distribution of microbial taxa in air, and indicate that regional differences may be important for the effects of microorganisms on climate and public health. DNA analyses of aerosol samples collected during rain events showed higher diversity and frequency of occurrence for fungi belonging to the Sordariomycetes, than samples that were collected under dry conditions (8). Sordariomycetes is the class that comprises known ice nucleation active species (Fusarium spp.). By determination of freezing ability of fungal colonies isolated from air samples two species of ice nucleation active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators were found. By DNA-analysis they were identified as Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum. Both fungi belong to the phylum Ascomycota, produce fluorescent spores in the range of 1-4 µm in diameter, and induced freezing at -4 and

  20. Insights Regarding Ice Nucleating Particle Measurement Capabilities from Laboratory and Field Measurements During the Fifth International Ice Nucleation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, P. J.; Mohler, O.; Cziczo, D. J.; Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Petters, M.

    2017-12-01

    Improvement in the ability to quantify the role of aerosols in primary ice formation in clouds is vital to improving prediction of natural and anthropogenic impacts on cold cloud properties and reducing uncertainties in climate predictions. A host of common and new methods for quantifying the atmospheric abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs) have recently been developed. To realize the utility of such data for numerical model parameterization development and validation, it is important to understand similarities, differences, and biases in different methods. To achieve this goal, it is common to challenge instruments with a range of aerosol types in laboratory studies. Only a few comparisons have occurred in atmospheric situations. This presentation highlights comparisons made in laboratory and field phases of the Fifth International Ice Nucleation workshop (FIN) during 2015. The FIN-2 laboratory workshop was conducted at the AIDA facility of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, involving nine real-time INP instruments and several sampling methods for wet suspensions and filter collection and resuspension for INP measurements. The FIN-3 atmospheric activity was conducted at the Desert Research Institute's Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), with a reduced set of participants. Lessons and insights were gained during analyses of data from both workshops regarding the capabilities and comparability of present ice nucleation measurement systems. The FIN-2 and FIN-3 results show typical one order of magnitude agreement within basic measurement types and overall for characterizing the concentrations (over several orders of magnitude dynamic range from -5 to -35 C) of a variety of INP types and ambient INPs active in the immersion-freezing mode. Discrepancies are least for lab sampling of natural soil particle INPs and greatest for materials with steep d[INP]/dT functions, such as K-feldspar or bacterial INPs processed warmer than -8 C. Varied reasons and implications