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Sample records for artificial light-harvesting self-assemble

  1. Self-Assembly Strategies for Integrating Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasielewski, Michael R. (NWU)

    2017-02-15

    In natural photosynthesis, organisms optimize solar energy conversion through organized assemblies of photofunctional chromophores and catalysts within proteins that provide specifically tailored environments for chemical reactions. As with their natural counterparts, artificial photosynthetic systems for practical solar fuels production must collect light energy, separate charge, and transport charge to catalytic sites where multielectron redox processes will occur. While encouraging progress has been made on each aspect of this complex problem, researchers have not yet developed self-ordering and self-assembling components and the tailored environments necessary to realize a fully-functional artificial system. Previously researchers have used complex, covalent molecular systems comprised of chromophores, electron donors, and electron acceptors to mimic both the light-harvesting and the charge separation functions of photosynthetic proteins. These systems allow for study of the dependencies of electron transfer rate constants on donor?acceptor distance and orientation, electronic interaction, and the free energy of the reaction. The most useful and informative systems are those in which structural constraints control both the distance and the orientation between the electron donors and acceptors. Self-assembly provides a facile means for organizing large numbers of molecules into supramolecular structures that can bridge length scales from nanometers to macroscopic dimensions. The resulting structures must provide pathways for migration of light excitation energy among antenna chromophores, and from antennas to reaction centers. They also must incorporate charge conduits, that is, molecular 'wires' that can efficiently move electrons and holes between reaction centers and catalytic sites. The central scientific challenge is to develop small, functional building blocks with a minimum number of covalent linkages, which also have the appropriate molecular

  2. Self-assembled nanoscale DNA-porphyrin complex for artificial light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woller, Jakob G; Hannestad, Jonas K; Albinsson, Bo

    2013-02-20

    Mimicking green plants' and bacteria's extraordinary ability to absorb a vast number of photons and harness their energy is a longstanding goal in artificial photosynthesis. Resonance energy transfer among donor dyes has been shown to play a crucial role on the overall transfer of energy in the natural systems. Here, we present artificial, self-assembled, light-harvesting complexes consisting of DNA scaffolds, intercalated YO-PRO-1 (YO) donor dyes and a porphyrin acceptor anchored to a lipid bilayer, conceptually mimicking the natural light-harvesting systems. A model system consisting of 39-mer duplex DNA in a linear wire configuration with the porphyrin attached in the middle of the wire is primarily investigated. Utilizing intercalated donor fluorophores to sensitize the excitation of the porphyrin acceptor, we obtain an effective absorption coefficient 12 times larger than for direct excitation of the porphyrin. On the basis of steady-state and time-resolved emission measurements and Markov chain simulations, we show that YO-to-YO resonance energy transfer substantially contributes to the overall flow of energy to the porphyrin. This increase is explained through energy migration along the wire allowing the excited state energy to transfer to positions closer to the porphyrin. The versatility of DNA as a structural material is demonstrated through the construction of a more complex, hexagonal, light-harvesting scaffold yielding further increase in the effective absorption coefficient. Our results show that, by using DNA as a scaffold, we are able to arrange chromophores on a nanometer scale and in this way facilitate the assembly of efficient light-harvesting systems.

  3. Self-assembly and energy transfer in artificial light-harvesting complexes of bacteriochlorophyll c with astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, J; Polívka, T; Arellano, J B; Hříbek, P; Vácha, F; Hála, J; Pšenčík, J

    2012-03-01

    Chlorosomes, the light-harvesting antennae of green photosynthetic bacteria, are based on large aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll molecules. Aggregates with similar properties to those in chlorosomes can also be prepared in vitro. Several agents were shown to induce aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous environments, including certain lipids, carotenes, and quinones. A key distinguishing feature of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, both in vitro and in chlorosomes, is a large (>60 nm) red shift of their Q(y) absorption band compared with that of the monomers. In this study, we investigate the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c with the xanthophyll astaxanthin, which leads to the formation of a new type of complexes. Our results indicate that, due to its specific structure, astaxanthin molecules competes with bacteriochlorophylls for the bonds involved in the aggregation, thus preventing the formation of any significant red shift compared with pure bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous buffer. A strong interaction between both the types of pigments in the developed assemblies, is manifested by a rather efficient (~40%) excitation energy transfer from astaxanthin to bacteriochlorophyll c, as revealed by fluorescence excitation spectroscopy. Results of transient absorption spectroscopy show that the energy transfer is very fast (<500 fs) and proceeds through the S(2) state of astaxanthin.

  4. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of a Biomimetic Light-Harvesting Antenna Based on DNA G-Quadruplexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oltra, Nuria Sancho; Browne, Wesley R.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    A new modular approach to an artificial light-harvesting antenna system is presented. The approach involves the hierarchical self-assembly of porphyrin acceptor molecules to G-quadruplexes tethered to coumarin donor moieties.

  5. Self-assembled photosynthesis-inspired light harvesting material and solar cells containing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Chinnasamy, Muthiah; Fan, Dazhong

    2009-12-15

    A solar cell is described that comprises: (a) a semiconductor charge separation material; (b) at least one electrode connected to the charge separation material; and (c) a light-harvesting film on the charge separation material, the light-harvesting film comprising non-covalently coupled, self-assembled units of porphyrinic macrocycles. The porphyrinic macrocycles preferably comprise: (i) an intramolecularly coordinated metal; (ii) a first coordinating substituent; and (iii) a second coordinating substituent opposite the first coordinating substituent. The porphyrinic macrocycles can be assembled by repeating intermolecular coordination complexes of the metal, the first coordinating substituent and the second coordinating substituent.

  6. Multichromophoric organic molecules encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles for artificial light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Jana, Bikash; Patra, Amitava

    2015-03-16

    We designed a self-assembled multichromophoric organic molecular arrangement inside polymer nanoparticles for light-harvesting antenna materials. The self-assembled molecular arrangement of quaterthiophene molecules was found to be an efficient light-absorbing antenna material, followed by energy transfer to Nile red (NR) dye molecules, which was confined in polymer nanoparticles. The efficiency of the antenna effect was found to be 3.2 and the effective molar extinction coefficient of acceptor dye molecules was found to be enhanced, which indicates an efficient light-harvesting system. Based on this energy-transfer process, tunable photo emission and white light emission has been generated with 14 % quantum yield. Such self-assembled oligothiophene-NR systems encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles may open up new possibilities for fabrication of artificial light harvesting system.

  7. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Ocakoǧlu, Kasim

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C 18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ∼120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  8. Powering the future of molecular artificial photosynthesis with light-harvesting metallosupramolecular dye assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischmann, Peter D; Mahata, Kingsuk; Würthner, Frank

    2013-02-21

    Chemical ingenuity will play a significant role in solving the greatest challenge currently facing society: providing clean and carbon neutral energy for all of humanity. Molecular artificial photosynthesis is an emerging technology based on principles learned from Nature where individual components perform the essential light-harvesting, charge-separation, and water splitting functions to store solar energy in the form of chemical bonds. This tutorial review focuses specifically on the application of metallosupramolecular self-assembly strategies to interface solar fuel catalysts with photosensitizers and construct light-harvesting antennae capable of achieving panchromatic absorption and directional energy concentration.

  9. Highly Efficient Photon Upconversion in Self-Assembled Light-Harvesting Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Taku; Yanai, Nobuhiro; Monguzzi, Angelo; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    To meet the world’s demands on the development of sunlight-powered renewable energy production, triplet-triplet annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC) has raised great expectations. However, an ideal highly efficient, low-power, and in-air TTA-UC has not been achieved. Here, we report a novel self-assembly approach to achieve this, which enabled highly efficient TTA-UC even in the presence of oxygen. A newly developed lipophilic 9,10-diphenylanthracene-based emitter molecule functionalized with multiple hydrogen-bonding moieties spontaneously coassembled with a triplet sensitizer in organic media, showing efficient triplet sensitization and subsequent triplet energy migration among the preorganized chromophores. This supramolecular light-harvesting system shows a high UC quantum yield of 30% optimized at low excitation power in deaerated conditions. Significantly, the UC emission largely remains even in an air-saturated solution, and this approach is facilely applicable to organogel and solid-film systems.

  10. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S.; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The

  11. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  12. Influence of phospholipid composition on self-assembly and energy-transfer efficiency in networks of light-harvesting 2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nakano, Yuki; Watanabe, Natsuko; Hildner, Richard; Bösch, Nils; Köhler, Jürgen; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-09-12

    In the photosynthetic membrane of purple bacteria networks of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes capture the sunlight and transfer the excitation energy. In order to investigate the mutual relationship between the supramolecular organization of the pigment-protein complexes and their biological function, the LH2 complexes were reconstituted into three types of phospholipid membranes, consisting of L-α-phosphatidylglycerol (PG), L-α-phosphatidylcholine (PC), and L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the type of phospholipids had a crucial influence on the clustering tendency of the LH2 complexes increased from PG over PC to PE/PG/CL, where the LH2 complexes formed large, densely packed clusters. Time-resolved spectroscopy uncovered a strong quenching of the LH2 fluorescence that is ascribed to singlet-singlet and singlet-triplet annihilation by an efficient energy transfer between the LH2 complexes in the artificial membrane systems. Quantitative analysis reveals that the intercomplex energy transfer efficiency varies strongly as a function of the morphology of the nanostructure, namely in the order PE/PG/CL > PC > PG, which is in line with the clustering tendency of LH2 observed by AFM. These results suggest a strong influence of the phospholipids on the self-assembly of LH2 complexes into networks and concomitantly on the intercomplex energy transfer efficiency.

  13. Self-assembly of Artificial Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Christopher; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Actin Filaments are long, double-helical biopolymers that make up the cytoskeleton along with microtubules and intermediate filaments. In order to further understand the self-assembly process of these biopolymers, a model to recreate actin filament geometry was developed. A monomer in the shape of a bent rod with vertical and lateral binding sites was designed to assemble into single or double helices. With Molecular Dynamics simulations, a variety of phases were observed to form by varying the strength of the binding sites. Ignoring lateral binding sites, we have found a narrow range of binding strengths that lead to long single helices via various growth pathways. When lateral binding strength is introduced, double helices begin to form. These double helices self-assemble into substantially more stable structures than their single helix counterparts. We have found double helices to form long filaments at about half the vertical binding strength of single helices. Surprisingly, we have found that triple helices occasionally form, indicating the importance of structural regulation in the self-assembly of biopolymers.

  14. Discrete cyclic porphyrin arrays as artificial light-harvesting antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratani, Naoki; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2009-12-21

    The importance of photosynthesis has driven researchers to seek ways to mimic its fundamental features in simplified systems. The absorption of a photon by light-harvesting (antenna) complexes made up of a large number of protein-embedded pigments initiates photosynthesis. Subsequently the many pigments within the antenna system shuttle that photon via an efficient excitation energy transfer (EET) until it encounters a reaction center. Since the 1995 discovery of the circularly arranged chromophoric assemblies in the crystal structure of light-harvesting antenna complex LH2 of purple bacteria Rps. Acidophila, many designs of light-harvesting antenna systems have focused on cyclic porphyrin wheels that allow for efficient EET. In this Account, we review recent research in our laboratories in the synthesis of covalently and noncovalently linked discrete cyclic porphyrin arrays as models of the photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna complexes. On the basis of the silver(I)-promoted oxidative coupling strategy, we have prepared a series of extremely long yet discrete meso-meso-linked porphyrin arrays and covalently linked large porphyrin rings. We examined the photophysical properties of these molecules using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy decay, and transient absorption measurements. Both the pump-power dependence on the femtosecond transient absorption and the transient absorption anisotropy decay profiles are directly related to the EET processes within the porphyrin rings. Within these structures, the exciton-exciton annihilation time and the polarization anisotropy rise time are well-described in terms of the Forster-type incoherent energy hopping model. In noncoordinating solvents such as CHCl(3), meso-pyridine-appended zinc(II) porphyrins and their meso-meso-linked dimers spontaneously assemble to form tetrameric porphyrin squares and porphyrin boxes, respectively. In the latter case, we have demonstrated

  15. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the

  16. Out of the cleanroom, self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Gao, Yang; Wyss, Hans; Anderson, Patrick; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-01

    Micro-sized hair-like structures, such as cilia, are abundant in nature and have various functionalities. Many efforts have been made to mimic the fluid pumping function of cilia, but most of the fabrication processes for these "artificial cilia" are tedious and expensive, hindering their practical application. In this paper a cost-effective in situ fabrication technique for artificial cilia is demonstrated. The cilia are constructed by self-assembly of micron sized magnetic beads and encapsulated with soft polymer coatings. Actuation of the cilia induces an effective fluid flow, and the cilia lengths and distribution can be adjusted by varying the magnetic bead concentration and fabrication parameters.

  17. Vibronic origin of long-lived coherence in an artificial molecular light harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, James; Paleček, David; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Lincoln, Craig N; Prior, Javier; von Berlepsch, Hans; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Zigmantas, Donatas; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-07-09

    Natural and artificial light-harvesting processes have recently gained new interest. Signatures of long-lasting coherence in spectroscopic signals of biological systems have been repeatedly observed, albeit their origin is a matter of ongoing debate, as it is unclear how the loss of coherence due to interaction with the noisy environments in such systems is averted. Here we report experimental and theoretical verification of coherent exciton-vibrational (vibronic) coupling as the origin of long-lasting coherence in an artificial light harvester, a molecular J-aggregate. In this macroscopically aligned tubular system, polarization-controlled 2D spectroscopy delivers an uncongested and specific optical response as an ideal foundation for an in-depth theoretical description. We derive analytical expressions that show under which general conditions vibronic coupling leads to prolonged excited-state coherence.

  18. Verification of the vibronic origin of long-lived coherence in an artificial molecular light harvester

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, James; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Lincoln, Craig N; Prior, Javier; von Berlepsch, Hans; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Zigmantas, Donatas; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Is quantum coherence responsible for the surprisingly high efficiency of natural light harvesters? If so, how do such systems avoid the loss of coherence due to interaction with their warm, wet and noisy environments? The answer to these important questions rests in the beneficial interplay between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Here we report experimental and theoretical verification of coherent exciton-vibrational (vibronic) coupling as the origin of long-lasting coherence in an artificial light harvester, a molecular J-aggregate. In this macroscopically aligned tubular system, polarization controlled 2D spectroscopy delivers an uncongested and specific optical response. This clarity of signal provided the opportunity to unambiguously assign the origin of the observed long-lived coherences to vibronic coupling and rule out other explanations based upon correlated fluctuations. The discussed vibronic coupling is functionally relevant, as it describes interaction between vibrations and electro...

  19. Extension of Light-Harvesting Ability of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) through Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Covalently Attached Artificial Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yusuke; Noji, Tomoyasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Mizutani, Naoto; Komori, Daisuke; Nango, Mamoru; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Dewa, Takehisa

    2015-10-14

    Introducing appropriate artificial components into natural biological systems could enrich the original functionality. To expand the available wavelength range of photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050), artificial fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 647: A647) was covalently attached to N- and C-terminal Lys residues in LH2 α-polypeptides with a molar ratio of A647/LH2 ≃ 9/1. Fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopies revealed that intracomplex energy transfer from A647 to intrinsic chromophores of LH2 (B850) occurs in a multiexponential manner, with time constants varying from 440 fs to 23 ps through direct and B800-mediated indirect pathways. Kinetic analyses suggested that B800 chromophores mediate faster energy transfer, and the mechanism was interpretable in terms of Förster theory. This study demonstrates that a simple attachment of external chromophores with a flexible linkage can enhance the light harvesting activity of LH2 without affecting inherent functions of energy transfer, and can achieve energy transfer in the subpicosecond range. Addition of external chromophores, thus, represents a useful methodology for construction of advanced hybrid light-harvesting systems that afford solar energy in the broad spectrum.

  20. Artificial transmembrane ion channels from self-assembling peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, M. Reza; Granja, Juan R.; Buehler, Lukas K.

    1994-05-01

    NATURALLY occurring membrane channels and pores are formed from a large family of diverse proteins, peptides and organic secon-dary metabolites whose vital biological functions include control of ion flow, signal transduction, molecular transport and produc-tion of cellular toxins. But despite the availability of a large amount of biochemical information about these molecules1, the design and synthesis of artificial systems that can mimic the bio-logical function of natural compounds remains a formidable task2-12. Here we present a simple strategy for the design of artifi-cial membrane ion channels based on a self-assembled cylindrical β-sheet peptide architecture13. Our systems-essentially stacks of peptide rings-display good channel-mediated ion-transport activ-ity with rates exceeding 107 ions s-1, rivalling the performance of many naturally occurring counterparts. Such molecular assemblies should find use in the design of novel cytotoxic agents, membrane transport vehicles and drug-delivery systems.

  1. Exploiting Collective Effects to Direct Light Absorption in Natural and Artificial Light-Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christopher

    Photosynthesis---the conversion of sunlight to chemical energy---is fundamental for supporting life on our planet. Despite its importance, the physical principles that underpin the primary steps of photosynthesis, from photon absorption to electronic charge separation, remain to be understood in full. Electronic coherence within tightly-packed light-harvesting (LH) units or within individual reaction centers (RCs) has been recognized as an important ingredient for a complete understanding of the excitation energy transfer (EET) dynamics. However, the electronic coherence across units---RC and LH or LH and LH---has been consistently neglected as it does not play a significant role during these relatively slow transfer processes. Here, we turn our attention to the absorption process, which, as we will show, has a much shorter built-in timescale. We demonstrate that the---often overlooked---spatially extended but short-lived excitonic delocalization plays a relevant role in general photosynthetic systems. Most strikingly, we find that absorption intensity is, quite generally, redistributed from LH units to the RC, increasing the number of excitations which can effect charge separation without further transfer steps. A biomemetic nano-system is proposed which is predicted to funnel excitation to the RC-analogue, and hence is the first step towards exploiting these new design principles for efficient artificial light-harvesting.

  2. Functionalized dye encapsulated polymer nanoparticles attached with a BSA scaffold as efficient antenna materials for artificial light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Bikash; Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Patra, Amitava

    2016-09-21

    A potential strategy for a new generation light harvesting system is multi-chromophoric donor-acceptor pairs where light energy is absorbed by an antenna complex and subsequently transfers its energy to the acceptor via energy transfer. Here, we design a system of a functionalized polymer nanoparticle-protein scaffold for efficient light harvesting and white light generation where a dye doped polymer nanoparticle acts as a donor and a dye encapsulated BSA protein acts as an acceptor. Analysis reveals that 91.3% energy transfer occurs from the dye doped polymer nanoparticle to the dye encapsulated BSA protein. The antenna effect of this light harvesting system is found to be 31 at a donor to acceptor ratio of 0.82 : 1 which is unprecedented. The enhanced effective molar extinction coefficient of the acceptor dye is potential for the light harvesting system. Bright white light emission with a quantum yield of 14% under single wavelength excitation is obtained by changing the ratio of donor to acceptor. Analysis reveals that the efficient energy transfer in this polymer-protein assembly may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  3. Classification of novel thiazole compounds for sensitizing Ru-polypyridine complexes for artificial light harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Johann [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Menzel, Roberto; Weiss, Dieter [Institute for Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Humboldtstr. 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Dietzek, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.dietzek@uni-jena.d [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Beckert, Rainer [Institute for Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Humboldtstr. 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Popp, Juergen [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    A systematic study of the Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency between thiazole dyes and a ruthenium-polypyridine complex is presented. While ruthenium-polypyridines are conventionally used in artificial light harvesting systems as primary electron donors, their application suffers from rather low extinction coefficients in the visible spectral range and an absorption gap between the {pi}{pi}{sup *} transitions of the ligands and the MLCT transitions. In this paper it is shown how thiazoles might help to circumvent theses issues. The absorption and emission spectra of the thiazole can be synthetically adjusted to fall into the absorption gap of the Ru dye and to efficiently overlap with the {sup 1}MLCT absorption of the complex, respectively. Thereby, the thiazoles might serve as antenna structures to funnel energy to the Ru-polypyridine unit, which finally can act as a photoactivated primary electron donor. Systematic investigations of the Foerster radii of representative thiazole Ru-polypyridine dye pairs corroborate this potential quantitatively. - Research highlights: {yields} First systematic study of Foerster radii in thiazole (donor)-Ru-polypyridine (acceptor) pairs. {yields} Large Foerster radii are observed (up to 40 A) comparable to systems optimized for FRET microscopy. {yields} Ru-polypyridine complexes dressed by thiazole-antennas as primary electron donors in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  4. Artificial nanograting woven by self-assembled nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Qi; Shao, Ye; Huang, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2005-10-01

    We report on a new simple route to realize a high resolution nanograting. By adopting an InAlGaAs matrix and strain-compensated technique, we have proved that a uniform self-assembled InAs nanowire array can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). A nanograting woven by self-assembled semiconductor nanowires shows a conspicuous diffraction feature. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental values of diffraction peak positions indicates that a uniform nanowire array is a promising nanograting. This simple one-step MBE growth method will open exciting opportunities for the field of clever optics design.

  5. J-aggregates of amphiphilic cyanine dyes: Self-organization of artificial light harvesting complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kirstein

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous chemical linkage of cyanine dye chromophores with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substituents leads to a new type of amphiphilic molecules with the ability of spontaneous self-organization into highly ordered aggregates of various structures and morphologies. These aggregates carry the outstanding optical properties of J-aggregates, namely, efficient exciton coupling and fast exciton energy migration, which are essential for the build up of artificial light harvesting systems. The morphology of the aggregates depends sensitively on the molecular structure of the chemical substituents of the dye chromophore. Accordingly, lamellar ribbon-like structures, vesicles , tubes, and bundles of tubes are found depending on the dyes and the structure can further be altered by addition of surfactants, alcohols, or other additives. Altogether the tubular structure is the most noticeable structural motif of these types of J-aggregates. The optical spectra are characterized in general by a complex exciton spectrum which is composed of several electronic transitions. The spectrum is red-shifted as a total with respect to the monomer absorption and exhibits resonance fluorescence from the lowest energy transition. For the tubular structures, the optical spectra can be related to a structural model. Although the molecules itself are strictly achiral, a pronounced circular dichroism (CD is observed for the tubular aggregates and explained by unequal distribution of left- and right-handed helicity of the tubes. Photo-induced electron transfer (PET reactions from the dye aggregates to electron acceptor molecules lead to superquenching which proves the delocalization of the excitation. This property is used to synthesize metal nanoparticles on the aggregate surface by photo-induced reduction of metal ions.

  6. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Perlík, Václav; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The initial energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs between the light-harvesting pigments and on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that F\\"orster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which leads to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited state as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid el...

  7. DNA-mediated self-assembly of artificial vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multicompartment systems made of single unilamellar vesicles offer the potential to outperform single compartment systems widely used in analytic, synthetic, and medical applications, their use has remained marginal to date. On the one hand, this can be attributed to the binary character of the majority of the current tethering protocols that impedes the implementation of real multicomponent or multifunctional systems. On the other hand, the few tethering protocols theoretically providing multicompartment systems composed of several distinct vesicle populations suffer from the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as from the loss of specificity of the linking mechanism over time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In previous studies, we presented implementations of multicompartment systems and resolved the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as the loss of specificity by using linkers consisting of biotinylated DNA single strands that were anchored to phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers via streptavidin as a connector. The systematic analysis presented herein provides evidences for the incorporation of phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers to the vesicle membrane during vesicle formation, providing specific anchoring sites for the streptavidin loading of the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, DNA-mediated vesicle-vesicle self-assembly was found to be sequence-dependent and to depend on the presence of monovalent salts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides a solid basis for the implementation of multi-vesicle assemblies that may affect at least three distinct domains. (i Analysis. Starting with a minimal system, the complexity of a bottom-up system is increased gradually facilitating the understanding of the components and their interaction. (ii Synthesis. Consecutive reactions may be implemented in networks of vesicles that outperform current single compartment

  8. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials.

  9. Two-dimensional artificial light-harvesting antennae with predesigned high-order structure and robust photosensitising activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Ding, Xuesong; Chen, Long; Wu, Yang; Liu, Lili; Addicoat, Matthew; Irle, Stephan; Dong, Yuping; Jiang, Donglin

    2016-09-01

    Highly ordered discrete assemblies of chlorophylls that are found in natural light-harvesting antennae are key to photosynthesis, which converts light energy to chemical energy and is the principal producer of organic matter on Earth. Porphyrins and phthalocyanines, which are analogues of chlorophylls, exhibit a strong absorbance of visible and near-infrared light, respectively. A highly ordered porphyrin-co-phthalocyanine antennae would harvest photons over the entire solar spectrum for chemical transformation. However, such a robust antennae has not yet been synthesised. Herein, we report a strategy that merges covalent bonds and noncovalent forces to produce highly ordered two-dimensional porphyrin-co-phthalocyanine antennae. This methodology enables control over the stoichiometry and order of the porphyrin and phthalocyanine units; more importantly, this approach is compatible with various metalloporphyrin and metallophthalocyanine derivatives and thus may lead to the generation of a broad structural diversity of two-dimensional artificial antennae. These ordered porphyrin-co-phthalocyanine two-dimensional antennae exhibit unique optical properties and catalytic functions that are not available with single-component or non-structured materials. These 2D artificial antennae exhibit exceptional light-harvesting capacity over the entire solar spectrum as a result of a synergistic light-absorption effect. In addition, they exhibit outstanding photosensitising activities in using both visible and near-infrared photons for producing singlet oxygen.

  10. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    which can capture donor-acceptor pairs and facilitate singlet-singlet energy transfer. Such systems may form a basis for the design and construction of protein-based multi-chromophore self-assemblies for solar light harvesting, conversion and storage.

  11. Comparative study of energy-transfer processes in several porphyrin-based artificial light-harvesting molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, R. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: robert.hauschild@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de; Riedel, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zeller, J. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Balaban, T.S. [Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Nanotechnology (Germany); Prokhorenko, V.I. [Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Kalt, H. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Berova, N. [Columbia University, Department of Chemistry, New York (United States); Huang, X. [Columbia University, Department of Chemistry, New York (United States); Pescitelli, R. [Columbia University, Department of Chemistry, New York (United States); University of Pisa, Department of Chemistry, Pisa (Italy); Nakanishi, K. [Columbia University, Department of Chemistry, New York (United States)

    2005-04-15

    Time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was carried out on porphyrin-based artificial light harvesting molecules (ALHM). The ALHMs are dyads consisting of zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) as an antenna complex and a free-base tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) as an energy trap. Both chromophores are covalently bound by a steroidal bridge in different configurations. We have observed energy transfer in the ALHMs with transfer times on the order of approximately 1 ns. We have also compared the energy transfer dynamics of these ALHMs differing in the link between the energy donor and the energy trap. Only when connected by a chemical bond does energy transfer from Zn-TPP to TPP occur. A spread in the energy transfer times was found which is attributed to the different configurations of the ALHMs under study.

  12. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 121 16 (Czech Republic); Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J. [Institute of Molecular Cell and System Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.hauer@tuwien.ac.at [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Savolainen, Janne [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system’s Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  13. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  14. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-07

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  15. Triplet excitons in natural photosynthetic and artificial light harvesting systems: Measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Daniel Allen

    artificial (B)Chl and porphyrin dimers by experimental and computational methods. This data set obtained allowed for the development of an empirical model for prediction of the triplet state site energy from a given singlet site energy and for development and calibration of a T-T coupling model. Use of these models shows that triplet state lowering by pigment-protein interaction provides photoprotection to the FMO complex, while triplet state lowering by triplet exciton formation is insufficient to provide protection to the chlorosome antenna. Additionally, the T-T coupling model shows that in dimers and other aggregates, the coupling is highly sensitive to relative monomer orientation and position, contrary to what was previously assumed. The simple exponential models used to estimate T-T couplings miss this orientation sensitivity, thus in systems with significant contact between adjacent monomers a more accurate approach is required.

  16. Self-Assembled Local Artificial Substrates of GaAs on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigeri C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a self-assembling procedure for the fabrication of GaAs islands by Droplet Epitaxy on silicon substrate. Controlling substrate temperature and amount of supplied gallium is possible to tune the base size of the islands from 70 up to 250 nm and the density from 107 to 109 cm−2. The islands show a standard deviation of base size distribution below 10% and their shape evolves changing the aspect ratio from 0.3 to 0.5 as size increases. Due to their characteristics, these islands are suitable to be used as local artificial substrates for the integration of III–V quantum nanostructures directly on silicon substrate.

  17. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Jen [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng, E-mail: cjchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw, E-mail: ypchao@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-07

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  18. Nanorings and rods interconnected by self-assembly mimicking an artificial network of neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escárcega-Bobadilla, Martha V.; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A.; Pyrlin, Sergey V.; Wegrzyn, Marcin; Ramos, Marta M. D.; Giménez, Enrique; Stewart, Andrew; Maier, Gerhard; Kleij, Arjan W.

    2013-11-01

    Molecular electronics based on structures ordered as neural networks emerges as the next evolutionary milestone in the construction of nanodevices with unprecedented applications. However, the straightforward formation of geometrically defined and interconnected nanostructures is crucial for the production of electronic circuitry nanoequivalents. Here we report on the molecularly fine-tuned self-assembly of tetrakis-Schiff base compounds into nanosized rings interconnected by unusually large nanorods providing a set of connections that mimic a biological network of neurons. The networks are produced through self-assembly resulting from the molecular conformation and noncovalent intermolecular interactions. These features can be easily generated on flat surfaces and in a polymeric matrix by casting from solution under ambient conditions. The structures can be used to guide the position of electron-transporting agents such as carbon nanotubes on a surface or in a polymer matrix to create electrically conducting networks that can find direct use in constructing nanoelectronic circuits.

  19. In vitro re-hardening of artificial enamel caries lesions using enamel matrix proteins or self-assembling peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schmidlin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To assess the re-hardening potential of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD and self-assembling peptides in vitro, hypothesizing that these materials may increase the mineralization of artificial carious lesions and improve hardness profiles. Material and Methods Forty-eight enamel samples were prepared from extracted bovine lower central incisors. After embedding and polishing, nail varnish was applied, leaving a defined test area. One third of this area was covered with a flowable composite (non-demineralized control. The remaining area was demineralized in an acidic buffer solution for 18 d to simulate a carious lesion. Half the demineralized area was then covered with composite (demineralized control, while the last third was left open for three test and one control treatments: (A Application of enamel-matrix proteins (EMD - lyophilized protein fractions dissolved in acetic acid, Straumann, (B self-assembling peptides (SAP, Curodont, or (C amine fluoride solution (Am-F, GABA for 5 min each. Untreated samples (D served as control. After treatment, samples were immersed in artificial saliva for four weeks (remineralization phase and microhardness (Knoop depth profiles (25-300 µm were obtained at sections. Two-way ANOVA was calculated to determine differences between the areas (re-hardening or softening. Results Decalcification resulted in significant softening of the subsurface enamel in all groups (A-D. A significant re-hardening up to 125 µm was observed in the EMD and SAP groups. Conclusions This study showed that EMD and SAP were able to improve the hardness profiles when applied to deep demineralized artificial lesions. However, further research is needed to verify and improve this observed effect.

  20. Design and self-assembly of simple coat proteins for artificial viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Kraft, Daniela J.; Janssen, Anne F. J.; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M. E.; Favretto, Marco E.; Brock, Roland; de Wolf, Frits A.; Werten, Marc W. T.; van der Schoot, Paul; Stuart, Martien Cohen; de Vries, Renko

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are among the simplest biological systems and are highly effective vehicles for the delivery of genetic material into susceptible host cells(1). Artificial viruses can be used as model systems for providing insights into natural viruses and can be considered a testing ground for developing a

  1. Towards a comprehensive insight into efficient hydrogen production by self-assembled Ru(bpy)3(2+)-polymer-Pt artificial photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huan; Liu, Dan; Long, Jinlin; Zhang, Zizhong; Zhuang, Huaqiang; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Xuxu

    2015-04-28

    The role of polymers in artificial photosystems has been studied in detail. The photosystems were composed of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) chloride as a photosensitizer (PS), colloidal Pt stabilized by polymer as a hydrogen-evolving catalyst and sodium ascorbate as an electron donor, without the addition of a traditional molecular electron mediator. Comprehensive insights into the production of hydrogen on irradiation with visible light were achieved. Several polymers, including neutral polyvinyl pyrrolidone, anionic poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) and poly(acrylic acid) not only stabilized the nanoparticles, but were also effective in the production of hydrogen. Under the optimum conditions, an outstanding apparent quantum efficiency of 12.8% for the evolution of hydrogen was achieved. The formation of self-assembled and spatially separated donor-acceptor complexes via the non-covalent intermolecular interaction between PS and the polymer-Pt was pivotal in the efficient conversion of solar energy to hydrogen fuel. Important details of the photo-induced electron and energy transfer processes in the self-assembled artificial photosystems were determined by nanosecond transient absorption spectrometry and time-resolved fluorescence spectrometry. The initial step in the photo-catalytic production of hydrogen was a reductive quenching of the triplet excited state of the PS by sodium ascorbate, leading to a reduced form of PS, which could then be quickly quenched by the polymer. The rate-determining step was the electron transfer from PS to the catalyst via the polymer bridge.

  2. Photodynamics of Light Harvesting Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Ward Piet Frans de

    2005-01-01

    Light harvesting (LH) lies at the basis of photosynthesis, the process in which energy from the sun is stored by a photochemical reaction. The photophysics of light absorption and energy transfer is the key to a detailed understanding of the first steps in this process. This thesis describes the inv

  3. A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine-phenylalanine motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Georgilis, Evangelos; Panda, Manas K.; Anson, Christopher E.; Powell, Annie K.; Doyle, Stephen; Moss, David; Jochum, Tobias; Horton, Peter N.; Coles, Simon J.; Linares, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Conradt, Jonas; Kalt, Heinz; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2016-09-01

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence.

  4. A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine–phenylalanine motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Georgilis, Evangelos; Panda, Manas K.; Anson, Christopher E.; Powell, Annie K.; Doyle, Stephen; Moss, David; Jochum, Tobias; Horton, Peter N.; Coles, Simon J.; Linares, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Conradt, Jonas; Kalt, Heinz; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence. PMID:27582363

  5. Self-assembled monolayers of Aβ peptides on Au electrodes: an artificial platform for probing the reactivity of redox active metals and cofactors relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Debajyoti; Sengupta, Kushal; Mukherjee, Soumya; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-07-25

    The water-soluble hydrophilic part of human Aβ peptide has been extended to include a C-terminal cysteine residue. Utilizing the thiol functionality of this cysteine residue, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of these peptides are formed on Au electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging confirms formation of small Aβ aggregates on the surface of the electrode. These aggregates bind redox active metals like Cu and cofactors like heme, both of which are proposed to generate toxic partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) and play a vital role in Alzheimer's disease. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these Cu and heme bound Aβ SAM are similar to those reported for the soluble Cu and heme bound Aβ peptide. Experiments performed on these Aβ-SAM electrodes clearly demonstrate that (1) heme bound Aβ is kinetically more competent in reducing O(2) than Cu bound Aβ, (2) under physiological conditions the reduced Cu site produces twice as much PROS (measured in situ) than the reduced heme site, and (3) chelators like clioquinol remove Cu from these aggregates, while drugs like methylene blue inhibit O(2) reactivity of the heme cofactor. This artificial construct provides a very easy platform for investigating potential drugs affecting aggregation of human Aβ peptides and PROS generation by its complexes with redox active metals and cofactors.

  6. A novel artificial nerve graft for repairing long-distance sciatic nerve defects: a self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianghai; Pan, Mengjie; Wen, Jinkun; Tang, Yinjuan; Hamilton, Audra D.; Li, Yuanyuan; Qian, Changhui; Liu, Zhongying; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel artificial nerve graft termed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS)-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduit (SPC) and used it to bridge a 10-mm-long sciatic nerve defect in the rat. Retrograde tracing, behavioral testing and histomorphometric analyses showed that compared with the empty PLGA conduit implantation group, the SPC implantation group had a larger number of growing and extending axons, a markedly increased diameter of...

  7. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bradley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS, and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting" software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology.

  8. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  9. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  10. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lipeng; Shenai, Prathamesh; Zheng, Fulu; Somoza, Alejandro; Zhao, Yang

    2015-08-20

    Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  11. Self assembling proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  12. Natural Light Harvesting Systems: Unraveling the quantum puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Thilagam, A

    2013-01-01

    In natural light harvesting systems, the sequential quantum events of photon absorption by specialized biological antenna complexes, charge separation, exciton formation and energy transfer to localized reaction centers culminates in the conversion of solar to chemical energy. A notable feature in these processes is the exceptionally high efficiencies (> 95 %) at which excitation is transferred from the illuminated protein complex site to the reaction centers. Such high exciton propagation rates within a system of interwoven biomolecular network structures, is yet to be replicated in artificial light harvesting complexes. A clue to unraveling the quantum puzzles of nature may lie in the observation of long lived coherences lasting several picoseconds in the electronic spectra of photosynthetic complexes, even in noisy environmental baths. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have been devoted to unlocking the links between quantum processes and information protocols, in the hope of finding answers...

  13. Efficient exciton transport in layers of self-assembled porphyrin derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijser, A.; Suijkerbuijk, B.M.J.M.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; Savenije, T.J.; Siebbeles, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria, the chlorosome, is generally considered as a highly efficient natural light-harvesting system. The efficient exciton transport through chlorosomes toward the reaction centers originates from self-assembly of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules. Th

  14. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  15. Self-assembly of fluorescent carbon dots in a N,N-dimethylmethanamide solution via Schiff base reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shengliang; Ding, Yanli; Chang, Qing; Trinchi, Adrian; Lin, Kui; Yang, Jinlong; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis.The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and more characterization of carbon dot assemblies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07119k

  16. Self-assembled gelators for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh; Prasanthkumar, Seelam; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2012-02-20

    Nature excels at engineering materials by using the principles of chemical synthesis and molecular self-assembly with the help of noncovalent forces. Learning from these phenomena, scientists have been able to create a variety of self-assembled artificial materials of different size, shapes, and properties for wide ranging applications. An area of great interest in this regard is solvent-assisted gel formation with functional organic molecules, thus leading to one-dimensional fibers. Such fibers have improved electronic properties and are potential soft materials for organic electronic devices, particularly in bulk heterojunction solar cells. Described herein is how molecular self-assembly, which was originally proposed as a simple laboratory curiosity, has helped the evolution of a variety of soft functional materials useful for advanced electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors and organic solar cells. Highlights on some of the recent developments are discussed.

  17. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Frank, Harry A. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  18. Quantum coherence, decoherence and entanglement in light harvesting complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, Martin; Caruso, Filippo; Chin, Alex; Datta, Animesh; Huelga, Susana

    2009-03-01

    Transport phenomena in networks allow for information and energy to be exchanged between individual constituents of communication systems, networks or light-harvesting complexes. Environmental noise is generally expected to hinder transport. Here we show that transport of excitations across dissipative quantum networks can be enhanced by dephasing noise. We identify two key processes that underly this phenomenon and provide instructive examples of quantum networks for each. We argue that Nature may be routinely exploiting this effect by showing that exciton transport in light harvesting complexes and other networks benefits from noise and is remarkably robust against static disorder. These results point towards the possibility for designing optimized structures for transport, for example in artificial nano-structures, assisted by noise. Furthermore, we demonstrate that quantum entanglement may be present for short times in light-harvesting complexes. We describe how the presence of such entanglement may be verified without the need for full state tomography and with minimal model assumptions. This work is based on M.B. Plenio & S.F. Huelga, New J. Phys. 10, 113019 (2008) and F. Caruso, A. Chin, A. Datta, S.F. Huelga & M.B. Plenio, in preparation

  19. Programming Light-Harvesting Efficiency Using DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable performance and quantum efficiency of biological light-harvesting complexes has prompted a multidisciplinary interest in engineering biologically inspired antenna systems as a possible route to novel solar cell technologies. Key to the effectiveness of biological “nanomachines” in light capture and energy transport is their highly ordered nanoscale architecture of photoactive molecules. Recently, DNA origami has emerged as a powerful tool for organizing multiple chromophores with base-pair accuracy and full geometric freedom. Here, we present a programmable antenna array on a DNA origami platform that enables the implementation of rationally designed antenna structures. We systematically analyze the light-harvesting efficiency with respect to number of donors and interdye distances of a ring-like antenna using ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and detailed Förster modeling. This comprehensive study demonstrates exquisite and reliable structural control over multichromophoric geometries and points to DNA origami as highly versatile platform for testing design concepts in artificial light-harvesting networks. PMID:26906456

  20. A novel artificial nerve graft for repairing long-distance sciatic nerve defects: a self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianghai; Pan, Mengjie; Wen, Jinkun; Tang, Yinjuan; Hamilton, Audra D.; Li, Yuanyuan; Qian, Changhui; Liu, Zhongying; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel artificial nerve graft termed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS)-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduit (SPC) and used it to bridge a 10-mm-long sciatic nerve defect in the rat. Retrograde tracing, behavioral testing and histomorphometric analyses showed that compared with the empty PLGA conduit implantation group, the SPC implantation group had a larger number of growing and extending axons, a markedly increased diameter of regenerated axons and a greater thickness of the myelin sheath in the conduit. Furthermore, there was an increase in the size of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber diameter in the target muscle. These findings suggest that the novel artificial SPC nerve graft can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination in the transected peripheral nerve and can be used for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25657734

  1. Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

    2012-11-02

    We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

  2. Natural strategies for photosynthetic light harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croce, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are crucial for life on Earth as they provide food and oxygen and are at the basis of most energy resources. They have a large variety of light-harvesting strategies that allow them to live nearly everywhere where sunlight can penetrate. They have adapted their pigmentation

  3. [INVITED] Self-assembled optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alexandre; Aradian, Ashod; Ponsinet, Virginie; Barois, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled metamaterials constitute a promising platform to achieving bulk and homogenous optical materials that exhibit unusual effective medium properties. For many years now, the research community has contemplated lithographically fabricated metasurfaces, with extraordinary optical features. However, achieving large volumes at low cost is still a challenge by top-down fabrication. Bottom-up fabrication, that relies both on nanochemistry and self-assembly, is capable of building such materials while greatly reducing the energy footprint in the formulation of the metamaterial. Self-assembled metamaterials have shown that they are capable of reaching unprecedented values of bulkiness and homogeneity figures of merit. This feat is achieved by synthesizing plasmonic nanoresonators (meta-atoms in the sense of artificial polarizable units) and assembling them into a fully three-dimensional matrix through a variety of methods. Furthermore it has been shown that a wide range of material parameters can be tailored by controlling the geometry and composition of the meta-atoms as well as the volume fraction of the nano-objects in the metamaterial. Here we conduct a non-comprehensive review of some of the recent trends in self-assembled optical metamaterials and illustrate these trends with our recent work.

  4. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random.

  5. Solid-state NMR applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Anjali; de Groot, Huub J M

    2012-03-01

    This short review describes how solid-state NMR has provided a mechanistic and electronic picture of pigment-protein and pigment-pigment interactions in photosynthetic antenna complexes. NMR results on purple bacterial antenna complexes show how the packing of the protein and the pigments inside the light-harvesting oligomers induces mutual conformational stress. The protein scaffold produces deformation and electrostatic polarization of the BChl macrocycles and leads to a partial electronic charge transfer between the BChls and their coordinating histidines, which can tune the light-harvesting function. In chlorosome antennae assemblies, the NMR template structure reveals how the chromophores can direct their self-assembly into higher macrostructures which, in turn, tune the light-harvesting properties of the individual molecules by controlling their disorder, structural deformation, and electronic polarization without the need for a protein scaffold. These results pave the way for addressing the next challenge, which is to resolve the functional conformational dynamics of the lhc antennae of oxygenic species that allows them to switch between light-emitting and light-energy dissipating states.

  6. Noise-assisted energy transfer in quantum networks and light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Alex W; Caruso, Filippo; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2009-01-01

    We provide physically intuitive mechanisms for the effect of noise on excitation energy transfer (EET) in networks. Using these mechanisms of dephasing-assisted transport (DAT) in a hybrid basis of both excitons and sites, we shed new light on how noise enables energy transfer with efficiencies well above 90% across light harvesting molecules, like the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex. We demonstrate explicitly how noise alters the pathways of energy transfer across the complex, suppressing ineffective pathways and facilitating direct ones to the reaction centre. This understanding opens up a new paradigm of `noise-engineering' by which EET can be optimized in artificial light-harvesting structures.

  7. Self-assembly of peptide-porphyrin complexes leads to pH-dependent excitonic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Caputo, Gregory A

    2009-10-29

    Using absorbance, fluorescence, resonance light scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, we studied the self-assembly of the anionic meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine (TPPS(4)(2-/4-)) and a cationic 22-residue polypeptide. We found that three TPPS(4)(2-/4-) molecules bind to the peptide, which contains nine lysine residues in the primary sequence. In acidic solutions, when the peptide is in the random-coil conformation, TPPS(4)(2-) bound to the peptide forms excitonically coupled J-aggregates. In pH 7.6 solutions, when the peptide secondary structure is partially alpha-helical, the porphyrin-to-peptide binding constants are approximately the same as in acidic solutions (approximately 3 x 10(6) M(-1)), but excitonic interactions between the porphyrins are insignificant. The binding of TPPS(4)(2-/4-) to lysine-containing peptides is cooperative and can be described by the Hill model. Our results show that porphyrin binding can be used to change the secondary structure of peptide-based biomaterials. In addition, binding to peptides could be used to optimize porphyrin intermolecular electronic interactions (exciton coupling), which is relevant for the design of light-harvesting antennas for artificial photosynthesis.

  8. Light harvesting by dye linked conducting polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Troensegaard

    2006-01-01

    The fact that the fossil fuel is finite and that the detrimental long-term effects of letting CO2 into our atmosphere exist, have created an enormous interest in developing new, cheap, renewable and less polluting energy resources. One of the most obviousabundant sources of energy in the solar......,15-dibromoporphinato]zinc(II) (P-domain). It is shown that the N domains in NPN work as effective light harvesting antennas for the P domain and effectively transfer electrically generated excitons in the N domain to the P domain.Unfortunately the P domain does not separate the charge carriers but instead works...

  9. Rod-like nano-light harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Zheng, Zhicheng; Köhler, Anna; Müller, Axel H E

    2014-01-01

    Imitating the natural "energy cascade" architecture, we present a single-molecular rod-like nano-light harvester (NLH) based on a cylindrical polymer brush. Block copolymer side chains carrying (9,9-diethylfluoren-2-yl)methyl methacrylate units as light absorbing antennae (energy donors) are tethered to a linear polymer backbone containing 9-anthracenemethyl methacrylate units as emitting groups (energy acceptors). These NLHs exhibit very efficient energy absorption and transfer. Moreover, we manipulate the energy transfer by tuning the donor-acceptor distance.

  10. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prathyush Samineni; Debabrata Goswami

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate coded self-assembly in nanostructures using the code seeded at the component level through computer simulations. Defects or cavities occur in all natural assembly processes including crystallization and our simulations capture this essential aspect under surface minimization constraints for self-assembly. Our bottom-up approach to nanostructures would provide a new dimension towards nanofabrication and better understanding of defects and crystallization process.

  11. Light harvesting for quantum solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvart, Tomas

    2000-05-01

    Despite wide structural and functional differences, the laws that govern quantum solar energy conversion to chemical energy or electricity share many similarities. In the photosynthetic membrane, in common with semiconductor solar cells, the conversion process proceeds from the creation of electron-hole pairs by a photon of light, followed by charge separation to produce the required high-energy product. In many cases, however, mechanisms are needed to enhance the optical absorption cross-section and extend the spectral range of operation. A common way of achieving this is by light harvesting: light absorption by a specialised unit which transfers the energy to the conversion apparatus. This paper considers two examples of light harvesting - semiconductor solar cells and the photosynthetic apparatus - to illustrate the basic operation and principles that apply. The existence of a light harvesting unit in photosynthesis has been known since the early 1930's but details of the process - relating, in particular, to the relationship between the structure and spectral properties - are still being unravelled. The excitation energy carriers are excitons but the precise nature of the transport - via the solid state Frenkel-Peierls variety or by Förster's resonant energy transfer - is still subject to debate. In semiconductor solar cells, the energy of the absorbed photon is collected by minority carriers but the broad principles remain the same. In both cases it is shown that the rate of energy conversion is described by a law which parallels the Shockley's solar cell equation, and the light harvesting energy collection is subject to reciprocity relations which resemble Onsager's reciprocity relations between coefficients which couple appropriate forces and flows in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Differences in the basic atomic make-up in the two systems lead to different energy transport equations. In both cases, however, similar mathematical techniques based on Green

  12. The use of layer by layer self-assembled coatings of hyaluronic acid and cationized gelatin to improve the biocompatibility of poly(ethylene terephthalate) artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shurong; Jiang, Jia; Tao, Hongyue; Xu, Jialing; Sun, Jianguo; Zhong, Wei; Chen, Shiyi

    2012-11-01

    In this study layer by layer (LBL) self-assembled coatings of hyaluronic acid (HA) and cationized gelatin (CG) were used to modify polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament grafts. Changes in the surface properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and contact angle and biomechanical measurements. The cell compatibility of this HA-CG coating was investigated in vitro on PET films seeded with human foreskin dermal fibroblasts over 7days. The results of our in vitro studies demonstrated that the HA-CG coating significantly enhanced cell adhesion, facilitated cell growth, and suppressed the expression of inflammation-related genes relative to a pure PET graft. Furthermore, rabbit and porcine anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction models were used to evaluate the effect of this LBL coating in vivo. The animal experiment results proved that this LBL coating significantly inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and promoted new ligament tissue regeneration among the graft fibers. In addition, the formation of type I collagen in the HA-CG coating group was much higher than in the control group. Based on these results we conclude that PET grafts coated with HA-CG have considerable potential as substitutes for ligament reconstruction.

  13. Self-assembly of cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Z.; Kurkov, S.V.; Nielsen, T.T.;

    2012-01-01

    The design of functional cyclodextrin (CD) nanoparticles is a developing area in the field of nanomedicine. CDs can not only help in the formation of drug carriers but also increase the local concentration of drugs at the site of action. CD monomers form aggregates by self-assembly, a tendency...... that increases upon formation of inclusion complexes with lipophilic drugs. However, the stability of such aggregates is not sufficient for parenteral administration. In this review CD polymers and CD containing nanoparticles are categorized, with focus on self-assembled CD nanoparticles. It is described how...... the nanoparticles can be stabilized and tuned to have specific properties....

  14. Light-Harvesting Nanoparticle Core-Shell Clusters with Controllable Optical Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dazhi; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Xu, Zhihua; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Cotlet, Mircea; Gang, Oleg

    2015-06-23

    We used DNA self-assembly methods to fabricate a series of core-shell gold nanoparticle-DNA-colloidal quantum dot (AuNP-DNA-Qdot) nanoclusters with satellite-like architecture to modulate optical (photoluminescence) response. By varying the intercomponent distance through the DNA linker length designs, we demonstrate precise tuning of the plasmon-exciton interaction and the optical behavior of the nanoclusters from regimes characterized by photoluminescence quenching to photoluminescence enhancement. The combination of detailed X-ray scattering probing with photoluminescence intensity and lifetime studies revealed the relation between the cluster structure and its optical output. Compared to conventional light-harvesting systems like conjugated polymers and multichromophoric dendrimers, the proposed nanoclusters bring enhanced flexibility in controlling the optical behavior toward a desired application, and they can be regarded as controllable optical switches via the optically pumped color.

  15. Binary ionic porphyrin nanosheets: electronic and light-harvesting properties regulated by crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongming; M. Beavers, Christine; Busani, Tito; Martin, Kathleen E.; Jacobsen, John L.; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; van Swol, Frank; Medforth, Craig J.; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-02-01

    Crystalline solids self-assembled from anionic and cationic porphyrins provide a new class of multifunctional optoelectronic micro- and nanomaterials. A 1 : 1 combination of zinc(ii) tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (ZnTPPS) and tin(iv) tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridiniumyl)porphyrin (SnTNMePyP) gives porphyrin nanosheets with high aspect ratios and varying thickness. The room temperature preparation of the nanosheets has provided the first X-ray crystal structure of a cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solid. The unit cell contains one and one-half molecules of aquo-ZnTPPS4- (an electron donor) and three half molecules of dihydroxy-SnTNMePyP4+ (an electron acceptor). Charge balance in the solid is reached without any non-porphyrinic ions, as previously determined for other CBI nanomaterials by non-crystallographic means. The crystal structure reveals a complicated molecular arrangement with slipped π-π stacking only occurring in isolated dimers of one of the symmetrically unique zinc porphyrins. Consistent with the crystal structure, UV-visible J-aggregate bands indicative of exciton delocalization and extended π-π stacking are not observed. XRD measurements show that the structure of the Zn/Sn nanosheets is distinct from that of Zn/Sn four-leaf clover-like CBI solids reported previously. In contrast with the Zn/Sn clovers that do exhibit J-aggregate bands and are photoconductive, the nanosheets are not photoconductive. Even so, the nanosheets act as light-harvesting structures in an artificial photosynthesis system capable of reducing water to hydrogen but not as efficiently as the Zn/Sn clovers.Crystalline solids self-assembled from anionic and cationic porphyrins provide a new class of multifunctional optoelectronic micro- and nanomaterials. A 1 : 1 combination of zinc(ii) tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (ZnTPPS) and tin(iv) tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridiniumyl)porphyrin (SnTNMePyP) gives porphyrin nanosheets with high aspect ratios and varying thickness. The room

  16. Mechanisms of light harvesting by photosystem II in plants

    CERN Document Server

    Amarnath, Kapil; Schneider, Anna R; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Light harvesting by photosystem II (PSII) in plants is highly efficient and acclimates to rapid changes in the intensity of sunlight. However, the mechanisms of PSII light harvesting have remained experimentally inaccessible. Using a structure-based model of excitation energy flow in 200 nanometer (nm) x 200 nm patches of the grana membrane, where PSII is located, we accurately simulated chlorophyll fluorescence decay data with no free parameters. Excitation movement through the light harvesting antenna is diffusive, but becomes subdiffusive in the presence of charge separation at reaction centers. The influence of membrane morphology on light harvesting efficiency is determined by the excitation diffusion length of 50 nm in the antenna. Our model provides the basis for understanding how nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms affect PSII light harvesting in grana membranes.

  17. Development of Scaffolds for Light Harvesting and Photocatalysis from the Coat Protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeo, Michel Toussaint

    The utility of a previously developed TMV-based light harvesting system has been dramatically expanded through the introduction of reactive handles for the site-specific modification of the interior and exterior surfaces. Further experiments to reengineer the coat protein have produced structures with unique, unexpected, and useful assembly properties that complement the newly available surface modifications. Energy transfer from chromophores in the RNA channel of self-assembled TMV structures to the exterior was made possible by conjugation of acceptor dyes and porphyrins to the N-terminus. By repositioning the N-terminus to the pore through circular permutation, this process was repeated to create structures that mimic the light harvesting 1 complex of photosynthetic bacteria. To study and improve upon natural photosynthesis, closely packed chromophore arrays and gold nanoparticles were tethered to the pore of stabilized TMV disks through introduction of a uniquely reactive lysine. Finally, a dimeric TMV coat protein was produced to control the distribution and arrangement of synthetic groups with synergistic activity.

  18. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mili C Naranthatta; V Ramkumar; Dillip Kumar Chand

    2014-09-01

    A rare variety of self-assembledmolecular triangle [Pd3(bpy)3(imidazolate)3](NO3)3, 1 is prepared by the combination of Pd(bpy)(NO3)2 with imidazole, at 1:1 ratio, in acetonitrile-water. Deprotonation of imidazole happened during the course of the complexation reaction where upon the metallomacrocycle is formed. The bowl-shaped trinuclear architecture of 1 is crafted with three peripheral bpy units capable of - stacking interactions. While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear manner utilizing intermolecular - interactions where upon two out of three bpy units of each molecule participated in the chain formation.

  19. Phycobilisomes: light-harvesting pigment complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, E.

    1975-12-01

    Phycobilisomes, as a light-harvesting sytem, appear to be organized for maximum energy transfer, with chlorophyll of the lamellae the final acceptor. Phycobilisomes were first observed by electron microscopy, and the suggestion was made that they are sites of phycobiliproteins. The shape of the phycobilisomes may be determined by the predominant phycobiliproteins present, and their size is quite constant with a diameter of about 40 nm which is about the width of two ribosomes. The algae commit a large part of their resources to phycobilin production. Phycobiliproteins can account for as much as 24% of the dry weight of blue-green algal cells and 40% of the total soluble protein. Most, if not all, of this is contained in phycobilisomes. Energy absorbed by phycobiliproteins can be transferred to chlorophyll with a high degree of efficiency, approaching 80 to 90%. Energy transfer in phycobilisomes is expected to progress from phycoerythrin to phycocyanin to allophycocyanin and eventually to chlorophyll. Evidence obtained from dissociation studies and electron microscopy, has made it possible to suggest a phycobilisome model. For efficient energy transfer, the most logical arrangement of the phycobiliproteins would be to have them in the order of the transfer events. In this arrangement, allophycocyanin would be nearest to the photosynthetic membranes, followed by phycocyanin toward the outside. Phycoerythrin would form the outermost layer. Two of the most crucial problems yet to be investigated involve the nature of the attachment site of the phycobilisome to the membrane and the physical relationship of phycobilisomes to the photosynthetic reaction centers. (CAJ)

  20. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  1. The structure and function of bacterial light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Christopher J; Roszak, Aleksander W; Southall, June; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The harvesting of solar radiation by purple photosynthetic bacteria is achieved by circular, integral membrane pigment-protein complexes. There are two main types of light-harvesting complex, termed LH2 and LH1, that function to absorb light energy and to transfer that energy rapidly and efficiently to the photochemical reaction centres where it is trapped. This mini-review describes our present understanding of the structure and function of the purple bacterial light-harvesting complexes.

  2. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  3. Stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Ana M; Ramsay, William J; Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: As Pasteur noted more than 150 years ago, asymmetry exists in matter at all organization levels. Biopolymers such as proteins or DNA adopt one-handed conformations, as a result of the chirality of their constituent building blocks. Even at the level of elementary particles, asymmetry exists due to parity violation in the weak nuclear force. While the origin of homochirality in living systems remains obscure, as does the possibility of its connection with broken symmetries at larger or smaller length scales, its centrality to biomolecular structure is clear: the single-handed forms of bio(macro)molecules interlock in ways that depend upon their handednesses. Dynamic artificial systems, such as helical polymers and other supramolecular structures, have provided a means to study the mechanisms of transmission and amplification of stereochemical information, which are key processes to understand in the context of the origins and functions of biological homochirality. Control over stereochemical information transfer in self-assembled systems will also be crucial for the development of new applications in chiral recognition and separation, asymmetric catalysis, and molecular devices. In this Account, we explore different aspects of stereochemistry encountered during the use of subcomponent self-assembly, whereby complex structures are prepared through the simultaneous formation of dynamic coordinative (N → metal) and covalent (N═C) bonds. This technique provides a useful method to study stereochemical information transfer processes within metal-organic assemblies, which may contain different combinations of fixed (carbon) and labile (metal) stereocenters. We start by discussing how simple subcomponents with fixed stereogenic centers can be incorporated in the organic ligands of mononuclear coordination complexes and communicate stereochemical information to the metal center, resulting in diastereomeric enrichment. Enantiopure subcomponents were then

  4. Light harvesting by dye linked conducting polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troensegaard Nielsen, K.

    2006-06-15

    The fact that the fossil fuel is finite and that the detrimental long-term effects of letting CO2 into our atmosphere exist, have created an enormous interest in developing new, cheap, renewable and less polluting energy resources. One of the most obvious abundant sources of energy in the solar system is the sun. Unfortunately the well developed silicon solar cells are very costly to produce. In an attempt to produce cheap and flexible solar cells, plastic solar cells have received a lot of attention in the last decades. There are still a lot of parameters to optimize if the plastic solar cell shall be able to compete with the silicon solar cells. One of the parameters is to ensure a high degree of charge carrier separation. Charge carrier separation can only happen at heterojunctions, which cover for example the interfaces between the polymers and the electrodes or the interface between an n-conductor and a p-conductor. The facts that the charge carrier separation only happens at the heterojunctions limits the thickness of the active layer in solar cells and thereby the effectiveness of the solar cells. In this project the charge carrier separation is attempted optimized by making plastic solar cells with a molecular heterojunction. The molecular heterojunction has been obtained by synthesizing a three domain super molecular assembly termed NPN. NPN consists of two poly[1-(2,5-dioctyltolanyl)ethynylene] chains (N-domains) coupled to the [10,20-bis(3,5-bistert-butylphenyl]-5,15-dibromoporphinato]zinc(II) (P-domain). It is shown that the N domains in NPN work as effective light harvesting antennas for the P domain and effectively transfer electrically generated excitons in the N domain to the P domain. Unfortunately the P domain does not separate the charge carriers but instead works as a charge carrier trap. This results in a performance of solar cells made of NPN that is much lower than the performance of solar cells made of pure poly[1-(2,5-dioctyltolanyl

  5. Efficiency enhancement in GaAs solar cells using self-assembled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Hung; Wu, Pei-Hsuan; Chen, Sheng-Hui; Chan, Chia-Hua; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chii-Chang; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2009-04-13

    In this study we develop an efficient light harvesting scheme that can enhance the efficiency of GaAs solar cells using self-assembled microspheres. Based on the scattering of the microspheres and the theory of photonic crystals, the path length can be increased. In addition, the self-assembly of microspheres is one of the simplest and the fastest methods with which to build a 2D periodic structure. The experimental results are confirmed by the use of a simulation in which a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to analyze the absorption and electric field of the 2D periodic structure. Both the results of the numerical simulations and the experimental results show an increase in the conversion power efficiency of GaAs solar cell of about 25% when 1 microm microspheres were assembled on the surface of GaAs solar cells.

  6. Research progress of self-assembly methods to prepare porphyrin nanomaterials in solution%溶液自组装法制备卟啉纳米材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 李巍; 刘东志; 王丽昌; 周雪琴

    2013-01-01

    Using self-assembly methods to prepare nanoscale porphyrin functional materials with excellent physicochemical properties has become a research focus , as it offers great potential application prospects for molecular devices and artificial photosynthesis. This review provides details for multiple-porphyrin as well as single-porphyrin self-assembly methods. In particular,mixing solvent techniques and surfactant-assisted method used in single-porphyrin self-assembly processes are discussed. Application of self-assembled porphyrin nanostructures in light-harvesting antenna and photocatalysis is summarized. Thus far,rich forms of porphyrin-based nanoarchitectures have been assembled. However,there is still a great need in understanding the self-assembly mechanisms and in further developing techniques for the practical applications of porphyrin nanostructures by self-assembly methods.%在溶液中,利用自组装方法制备以卟啉化合物为基础的纳米材料具有优良的光物理和光化学性质,在分子器件和人工模拟光合作用等方面具有巨大的应用前景,是目前的研究热点。本文详细介绍了单卟啉组装方法和多卟啉共组装方法,单卟啉组装包括双溶剂法和表面活性剂辅助法两类方法。简要介绍了卟啉自组装纳米材料在集光天线和光催化方面的应用。目前,自组装方法制备的卟啉化合物纳米材料已经出现了丰富的形态,但仍存在不足,即自组装作用机理有待深入研究,且如何将卟啉纳米材料的制备工艺放大并应用于实际,还有待进一步发展。

  7. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  8. Quantum entanglement phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Whaley, K Birgitta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2010-01-01

    We review recent theoretical calculations of quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. These works establish, for the first time, a manifestation of this characteristically quantum mechanical phenomenon in biologically functional structures. We begin by summarizing calculations on model biomolecular systems that aim to reveal non-trivial characteristics of quantum entanglement in non-equilibrium biological environments. We then discuss and compare several calculations performed recently of excitonic dynamics in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson light harvesting complex and of the entanglement present in this widely studied pigment-protein structure. We point out the commonalities between the derived results and also identify and explain the differences. We also discuss recent work that examines entanglement in the structurally more intricate light harvesting complex II (LHCII). During this overview, we take the opportunity to clarify several subtle issues relating to entanglement in such biomo...

  9. Coherent open-loop optimal control of light-harvesting dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Filippo; Calarco, Tommaso; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2011-01-01

    We apply theoretically open-loop quantum optimal control techniques to provide methods for the verification of various quantum coherent transport mechanisms in natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes under realistic experimental constraints. We demonstrate that optimally shaped laser pulses allow to faithfully prepare the photosystem in specified initial states (such as localized excitation or coherent superposition, i.e. propagating and non-propagating states) and to probe efficiently the dynamics. These results provide a path towards the discrimination of the different transport pathways and to the characterization of environmental properties, enhancing our understanding of the role that coherent processes may play in biological complexes.

  10. Mapping Out the Structure of a Spinach Light-Harvester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The major light-harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅱ(LHC-Ⅱ) serves as the principal solar energy collector in the photosynthesis of green plants and presumably also functions in photoprotection under high-light conditions. Many of its structures were revealed by a work of a 3.2A electron crystallographic model of LHC-Ⅱ in 1994. Since then researchers have eagerly awaited a higher-resolution structure to extend knowledge of the light harvesting and energy transfer processes involved in photosynthesis to the level of full atomic data.

  11. Research on Self-Assembling Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-30

    0K. in a second phase of this contract we turned our efforts to the fabrication and studies of self assembled quantum dots . We first demonstrated a...method for producing InAs-GasAs self assembled quantum dots (SAD) using MBE. (AN)

  12. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  13. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  14. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements.

  15. Photophysical characterization of low-molecular weight organogels for energy transfer and light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsbeha, T.; Bussotti, L.; Cicchi, S.; Foggi, P.; Ghini, G.; Lascialfari, L.; Marcelli, A.

    2011-05-01

    The choice of a donor and an acceptor with suitable optical and self-assembly properties is essential in the design of organogel-based light harvesting systems. Organogels can provide supramolecular structures capable of enhancing energy transfer processes. In this work, we present the characterization of N-(naphthalene-1-carboxyamide)-(3 S,4 S)-pyrrolidin-(3,4)-bisdodecyl-carbamoyldiester ( 1) and N-(4-nitrobenzofurazan-7-amino)-(3 S,4 S)-pyrrolidin-(3,4)-bisdodecyl-carbamoyldiester ( 2) which are used as donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. The donor molecule is hardly capable to form a gelon its own but it can be assembled at reasonable concentrations with the acceptor gelator to form a two-component donor-acceptor organogels in cyclohexane. Stable organogels are formed from cyclohexane for gelator concentrations as low as ≈10 -3 M. UV-vis and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopies were used to provide a characterization of their molecular interactions. The optical changes observed during the cooling of two-component solutions of these systems are indicative of typical sol-gel transitions. The occurrence of excitation energy transfer processes in the gels is confirmed by comparison of their excitation and absorption spectra.

  16. Recent development of peptide self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubo Zhao; Fang Pan; Jian R. Lu

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks to build peptides and proteins. Recent development in peptide synthesis has however enabled us to mimic this natural process by preparing various long and short peptides possessing different conformations and biological functions. The self-assembly of short designed peptides into molecular nanostructures is becoming a growing interest in nanobiotechnology. Self-assembled peptides exhibit several attractive features for applications in tissue regeneration, drug delivery, biological surface engineering as well as in food science, cosmetic industry and antibiotics. The aim of this review is to introduce the readers to a number of representative studies on peptide self-assembly.

  17. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furst, Eric M [University of Delaware

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the

  18. Limits of quantum speedup in photosynthetic light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Stephan; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    In the initial stages of photosynthesis, energy collected from light is transferred across a network of chlorophyll molecules to a reaction center. Recent experimental evidence showing long lived quantum coherences in this energy transport in several photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes has suggested that coherence may play an important role in the function of these systems. In particular, it has been hypothesized that excitation transport in such systems may feature speedups analogous to those found in quantum algorithms. The most direct analogy to such transport is found in quantum walks, which form the basis of a powerful class of quantum algorithms including quantum search. Unlike idealized quantum walks, however, real light harvesting complexes are characterized by disorder, energy funnels and decoherence. Whether any quantum speedup can be found in this situation is unclear. Here we characterize quantum speedup for excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex of green sulfur...

  19. Mechanical Self-Assembly Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical Self-Assembly: Science and Applications introduces a novel category of self-assembly driven by mechanical forces. This book discusses self-assembly in various types of small material structures including thin films, surfaces, and micro- and nano-wires, as well as the practice's potential application in micro and nanoelectronics, MEMS/NEMS, and biomedical engineering. The mechanical self-assembly process is inherently quick, simple, and cost-effective, as well as accessible to a large number of materials, such as curved surfaces for forming three-dimensional small structures. Mechanical self-assembly is complementary to, and sometimes offer advantages over, the traditional micro- and nano-fabrication. This book also: Presents a highly original aspect of the science of self-assembly Describes the novel methods of mechanical assembly used to fabricate a variety of new three-dimensional material structures in simple and cost-effective ways Provides simple insights to a number of biological systems and ...

  20. A light-harvesting array of synthetic porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Jorge; Harriman, Anthony; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    1987-05-01

    An array of five porphyrin molecules has been synthesized and used as a simple model of the light-harvesting complex found in natural photosynthesis. Efficient Förster energy transfer occurs from antenna zinc porphyrins to a central free-base porphyrin molecule. This central porphyrin retains long-lived singlet and triplet excited states that can be quenched by diffusional processes, Both electron and energy transfer quenching reactions can be observed.

  1. Light-harvesting materials: Soft support for energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolley, Ryan M.; Helm, Monte L.

    2014-11-10

    To convert solar energy into viable fuel sources, coupling light-harvesting materials to catalysts is a critical challenge. Now, coupling between an organic supramolecular hydrogel and a non precious metal catalyst has been demonstrated to be effective for photocatalytic H2 production. Ryan M. Stolley and Monte L. Helm are at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA, USA 99352. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. e-mail: Monte.Helm@pnnl.gov

  2. Noise-assisted energy transfer in quantum networks and light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, A W; Caruso, F; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069, Ulm (Germany); Datta, A, E-mail: alex.chin@uni-ulm.d [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    We provide physically intuitive mechanisms for the effect of noise on excitation energy transfer (EET) in networks. Using these mechanisms of dephasing-assisted transport (DAT) in a hybrid basis of both excitons and sites, we develop a detailed picture of how noise enables energy transfer with efficiencies well above 90% across the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex, a type of light-harvesting molecule. We demonstrate explicitly how noise alters the pathways of energy transfer across the complex, suppressing ineffective pathways and facilitating direct ones to the reaction centre. We explain that the fundamental mechanisms underpinning DAT are expected to be robust with respect to the considered noise model but show that the specific details of the exciton-phonon coupling, which remain largely unknown in these type of complexes, and in particular the impact of non-Markovian effects, result in variations of dynamical features that should be amenable to experimental verification with current or planned technology. A detailed understanding of DAT in natural compounds could open up a new paradigm of 'noise-engineering' by which EET can be optimized in artificial light-harvesting structures.

  3. Separating annihilation and excitation energy transfer dynamics in light harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengris, Mikas; Larsen, Delmar S; Valkunas, Leonas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Herrero, Christian; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas; Moore, Ana; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2013-09-26

    The dependence of excitation energy transfer kinetics on the electronic state of the acceptor (ground vs excited) has been resolved with a novel multipulse prePump-Pump-Probe spectroscopy. The primary energy transfer and annihilation dynamics in two model light-harvesting systems were explored: an artificially synthesized carotenoid-zinc-phthalocyanine dyad and a naturally occurring light-harvesting peridinin-chlorophyll protein complex from Amphidinium carterae. Both systems use carotenoid as the primary excitation energy donor with porphyrin chromophores as the acceptor molecules. The prePump-Pump-Probe transient signals were analyzed with Monte Carlo modeling to explicitly address the underlying step-by-step kinetics involved in both excitation migration and annihilation processes. Both energy transfer and annihilation dynamics were demonstrated to occur with approximately the same rate in both systems, regardless of the excitation status of the acceptor pigments. The possible reasons for these observations are discussed in the framework of the Förster energy transfer model.

  4. Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic-inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Mark D; Cogdell, Richard J; Cronin, Leroy

    2013-08-13

    Artificial photosynthesis aims at capturing solar energy and using it to produce storable fuels. However, while there is reason to be optimistic that such approaches can deliver higher energy conversion efficiencies than natural photosynthetic systems, many serious challenges remain to be addressed. Perhaps chief among these is the issue of device stability. Almost all approaches to artificial photosynthesis employ easily oxidized organic molecules as light harvesters or in catalytic centres, frequently in solution with highly oxidizing species. The 'elephant in the room' in this regard is that oxidation of these organic moieties is likely to occur at least as rapidly as oxidation of water, meaning that current device performance is severely curtailed. Herein, we discuss one possible solution to this problem: using self-assembling organic-polyoxometalate hybrid structures to produce compartments inside which the individual component reactions of photosynthesis can occur without such a high incidence of deleterious side reactions.

  5. Programming biomolecular self-assembly pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peng; Choi, Harry M T; Calvert, Colby R; Pierce, Niles A

    2008-01-17

    In nature, self-assembling and disassembling complexes of proteins and nucleic acids bound to a variety of ligands perform intricate and diverse dynamic functions. In contrast, attempts to rationally encode structure and function into synthetic amino acid and nucleic acid sequences have largely focused on engineering molecules that self-assemble into prescribed target structures, rather than on engineering transient system dynamics. To design systems that perform dynamic functions without human intervention, it is necessary to encode within the biopolymer sequences the reaction pathways by which self-assembly occurs. Nucleic acids show promise as a design medium for engineering dynamic functions, including catalytic hybridization, triggered self-assembly and molecular computation. Here, we program diverse molecular self-assembly and disassembly pathways using a 'reaction graph' abstraction to specify complementarity relationships between modular domains in a versatile DNA hairpin motif. Molecular programs are executed for a variety of dynamic functions: catalytic formation of branched junctions, autocatalytic duplex formation by a cross-catalytic circuit, nucleated dendritic growth of a binary molecular 'tree', and autonomous locomotion of a bipedal walker.

  6. Patterned self-assembled film guided electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Feng; LI; Bin; XU; Tao; CHEN; Miao; HAO; Jingcheng; LI

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the fabrication of polypyrrole (PPy) microstructures through patterned self-assembled film guided electrodeposition. Thus the patterned self-assembled monolayer is prepared by microcontact printing (μCP) and used as the template in the electrodeposition of PPy. It has been found that the self-assembled monolayer plays completely different roles on different substrates in directing the deposition of the PPy. Namely, the electrodeposition mainly occurs on the exposed area of the gold substrates patterned with dodecanethiol (DDT) and octadecanelthiol (ODT) and on the indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate patterned with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), while PPy nucleates on the OTS covered area and no deposition is found on the exposed area of a semiconductor substrate (silicon). This is attributed to the cooperative effect between the substrate conductivity and the compatibility of the PPy oligomer with the covered or exposed area of the substrate surface.

  7. S-layer protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-01-25

    Crystalline S(urface)-layers are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and archaea). S-layers are highly porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ~10 nm. One of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in solution, and at interfaces. Basic research on S-layer proteins laid foundation to make use of the unique self-assembly properties of native and, in particular, genetically functionalized S-layer protein lattices, in a broad range of applications in the life and non-life sciences. This contribution briefly summarizes the knowledge about structure, genetics, chemistry, morphogenesis, and function of S-layer proteins and pays particular attention to the self-assembly in solution, and at differently functionalized solid supports.

  8. The structural basis of light-harvesting in purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Richard J; Isaacs, Neil W; Freer, Andrew A; Howard, Tina D; Gardiner, Alastair T; Prince, Steve M; Papiz, Miroslavr Z

    2003-11-27

    A typical purple bacterial photosynthetic unit consists of two types of light-harvesting complex (LH1 and LH2) together with a reaction centre. This short review presents a description of the structure of the LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, which has recently been improved to a resolution of 2.0 A [Papiz et al., J. Mol. Biol. 326 (2003) 1523-1538]. We show how this structure has helped to reveal the details of the various excitation energy transfer events in which it is involved.

  9. Molecular factors controlling photosynthetic light harvesting by carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polívka, Tomás; Frank, Harry A

    2010-08-17

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photoinduced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in the proximity of chlorophylls. A few three-dimensional structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids

  10. 3D self-assembly of aluminium nanoparticles for plasmon-enhanced solar desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Wang, Jingyang; Xu, Weichao; Yuan, Ye; Cai, Wenshan; Zhu, Shining; Zhu, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonics has generated tremendous excitement because of its unique capability to focus light into subwavelength volumes, beneficial for various applications such as light harvesting, photodetection, sensing, catalysis and so on. Here we demonstrate a plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device, fabricated by the self-assembly of aluminium nanoparticles into a three-dimensional porous membrane. The formed porous plasmonic absorber can float naturally on water surface, efficiently absorb a broad solar spectrum (>96%) and focus the absorbed energy at the surface of the water to enable efficient (˜90%) and effective desalination (a decrease of four orders of magnitude). The durability of the devices has also been examined, indicating a stable performance over 25 cycles under various illumination conditions. The combination of the significant desalination effect, the abundance and low cost of the materials, and the scalable production processes suggest that this type of plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device could provide a portable desalination solution.

  11. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, Galien; Darras, Alexis; Hubert, Maxime; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows.

  12. Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-27

    Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing is a concept that allows the strength of thick-wall rigid pipe, and the flexibility of thin-wall tubing, to be realized in a single design. The primary use is for a drillstring tubular, but it has potential for other applications requiring transmission of mechanical loads (forces and torques) through an initially coiled tubular. The concept uses a spring-loaded spherical `ball-and-socket` type joint to interconnect two or more short, rigid segments of pipe. Use of an optional snap ring allows the joint to be permanently made, in a `self-assembling` manner.

  13. Self-assembly of small peptidomimetic cyclophanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Jorge; Burguete, M Isabel; Escuder, Beatriu; Galindo, Francisco; Gavara, Raquel; Miravet, Juan F; Luis, Santiago V; Peris, Gabriel

    2004-08-20

    The self-assembly of a series of small peptidomimetic cyclophanes in organic solvents was studied. X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modelling were used to understand the structural features of these self-assembling compounds both at the molecular and supramolecular level. The factors that could influence the formation of gels rather than crystals were studied and a model for the arrangement of molecules in the gel was proposed. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy revealed that in some cases these compounds undergo a transcription of chirality when going from organogelator to helicoidal gel fibres.

  14. Green grasses as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Sharafali, A.; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophylls, the major pigments presented in plants are responsible for the process of photosynthesis. The working principle of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is analogous to natural photosynthesis in light-harvesting and charge separation. In a similar way, natural dyes extracted from three types of grasses viz. Hierochloe Odorata (HO), Torulinium Odoratum (TO) and Dactyloctenium Aegyptium (DA) were used as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to characterize the dyes. The electron transport mechanism and internal resistance of the DSSCs were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The performance of the cells fabricated with the grass extract shows comparable efficiencies with the reported natural dyes. Among the three types of grasses, the DSSC fabricated with the dye extracted from Hierochloe Odorata (HO) exhibited the maximum efficiency. LC-MS investigations indicated that the dominant pigment present in HO dye was pheophytin a (Pheo a).

  15. Ultrafast Energy Relaxation in Single Light-Harvesting Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100 fs range. At the same time much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work we employ a pump-probe type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behaviour agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repe...

  16. Triplet Energy Transport in Platinum-Acetylide Light Harvesting Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Hsu, Hsien-Yi; Arca, Mert; Schanze, Kirk S

    2015-06-18

    Light harvesting and triplet energy transport is investigated in chromophore-functionalized polystyrene polymers featuring light harvesting and energy acceptor chromophores (traps) at varying loading. The series of precision polymers was constructed via reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization and functionalized with platinum acetylide triplet chromophores by using an azide-alkyne "click" reaction. The polymers have narrow polydispersity and degree of polymerization ∼60. The chromophores have the general structure, trans-[-R-C6H4-C≡C-Pt(PBu3)2-C≡C-Ar], where R is the attachment point to the polystyrene backbone and Ar is either -C6H4-C≡C-Ph or -pyrenyl (PE2-Pt and Py-Pt, respectively, with triplet energies of 2.35 and 1.88 eV). The polychromophores contain mainly the high-energy PE2-Pt units (light absorber and energy donor), with randomly distributed Py-Pt units (3-20% loading, energy acceptor). Photophysical methods are used to study the dynamics and efficiency of energy transport from the PE2-Pt to Py-Pt units in the polychromophores. The energy transfer efficiency is >90% for copolymers that contain 5% of the Py-Pt acceptor units. Time-resolved phosphorescence measurements combined with Monte Carlo exciton dynamics simulations suggest that the mechanism of exciton transport is exchange energy transfer hopping between PE2-Pt units.

  17. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J Michael; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-03-15

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump-probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  18. DNA addition using linear self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian; QIAN LuLu; LIU Qiang; ZHANG ZhiZhou; HE Lin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a DNA algorithm which adds two nonnegative binary integers using self-assembly in constant steps. The approach has the benefit of greater experimental simplicity when compared with previous DNA addition algorithms. For the addition of two binary n-bit integers, O(n) is different from DNA strands and only O(1) biochemical experimental procedures are required.

  19. Stabilization of Self-Assembled Alumina Mesophases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Lidia Lopez; Perdriau, Sebastien; ten Brink, Gert; Kooi, Bart J.; Heeres, Hero Jan; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    An efficient route to stabilize alumina mesophases derived from evaporation-induced self-assembly is reported after investigating various aspects in-depth: influence of the solvent (EtOH, s-BuOH, and t-BuOH) on the textural and structural properties of the mesophases based on aluminum tri-sec-butoxi

  20. Fluorescent Self-Assembled Polyphenylene Dendrimer Nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Daojun; Feyter, Steven De; Cotlet, Mircea; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Weil, Tanja; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2003-01-01

    A second-generation polyphenylene dendrimer 1 self-assembles into nanofibers on various substrates such as HOPG, silicon, glass, and mica from different solvents. The investigation with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NCAFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the morphology of the

  1. Self-assembly micro optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping (Cerina); Le, Kevin; Malalur-Nagaraja-Rao, Smitha; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Optical communication and sensor industry face critical challenges in manufacturing for system integration. Due to the assembly complexity and integration platform variety, micro optical components require costly alignment and assembly procedures, in which many required manual efforts. Consequently, self-assembly device architectures have become a great interest and could provide major advantages over the conventional optical devices. In this paper, we discussed a self-assembly integration platform for micro optical components. To demonstrate the adaptability and flexibility of the proposed optical device architectures, we chose a commercially available MEMS fabrication foundry service - MUMPs (Multi-User MEMS Process). In this work, polysilicon layers of MUMPS are used as the 3-D structural material for construction of micro component framework and actuators. However, because the polysilicon has high absorption in the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges, it is not suitable for optical interaction. To demonstrate the required optical performance, hybrid integration of materials was proposed and implemented. Organic compound materials were applied on the silicon-based framework to form the required optical interfaces. Organic compounds provide good optical transparency, flexibility to form filters or lens and inexpensive manufacturing procedures. In this paper, we have demonstrated a micro optical filter integrated with self-assembly structures. We will discuss the self-assembly mechanism, optical filter designs, fabrication issues and results.

  2. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during se...

  3. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber

  4. Coupling self-assembled quantum dots to nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badolato, Antonio

    Self-assembled quantum dot (QD) grown by molecular beam epitaxy implements the ultimate quantum confined structure in the solid-state. Because electrons are confined in all three dimensions, QDs have shown delta-function-like energy dependence of the density of states. The identification of QDs as artificial atoms has been proven by the observation of fundamental exciton emission with perfect photon antibunching and with a linewidth limited by spontaneous emission. As artificial atoms that can be monolithically integrated with other functional devices in the setting of semiconductor technology, QDs have been the source of inspiration of several novel quantum devices. Nonetheless, QD self-assemble on random nucleation sites, whereas many proposals require precise positioning of a single QD. In this thesis, two new elements of design and control for coupling single QDs to single nanostructure will be presented: (i) a technique to control ab-initio the site nucleation of a single QD and (ii) a deterministic approach to the coupling of single QDs to single nanocavity modes. Chapter 1 is dedicated to a theoretical overview of the QD system, first, as a solid-state heterostructure that confines electrons and, second, as an artificial atom interacting with confined photons. Chapter 2 presents a technique to grow highly ordered QD arrays by engineering subsurface periodic strain templates. This technique achieved almost perfect registering of single QDs into a two-dimensional lattice. In Chapter 3 a deterministic approach to the realization of solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems is demonstrated. Based on a precise spatial and spectral matching between a single QD and a PC microcavity, this approach yielded cavity QED effects (such as Purcell effect) in all fabricated nanostructures.

  5. Robustness and Optimality of Light Harvesting in Cyanobacterial Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Sener, M K; Ritz, T; Park, S; Fromme, P; Schulten, K; Sener, Melih K.; Lu, Deyu; Ritz, Thorsten; Park, Sanghyun; Fromme, Petra; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    As most biological species, photosynthetic lifeforms have evolved to function optimally, despite thermal disorder and with fault tolerance. It remains a challenge to understand how this is achieved. To address this challenge the function of the protein-pigment complex photosystem I (PSI) of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is investigated theoretically. The recently obtained high resolution structure of this complex exhibits an aggregate of 96 chlorophylls that are electronically coupled to function as a light-harvesting antenna complex. This paper constructs an effective Hamiltonian for the chlorophyll aggregate to describe excitation transfer dynamics and spectral properties of PSI. For this purpose, a new kinetic expansion method, the sojourn expansion, is introduced. Our study shows that at room temperature fluctuations of site energies have little effect on the calculated excitation lifetime and quantum yield, which compare favorably with experimental results. The efficiency of the system is fo...

  6. Dendrimer light-harvesting: intramolecular electrodynamics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L; Bradshaw, David S; Jenkins, Robert D; Rodríguez, Justo

    2009-12-01

    In the development of highly efficient materials for harvesting solar energy, there is an increasing focus on purpose-built dendrimers and allied multi-chromophore systems. A proliferation of antenna chromophores is not the only factor determining the sought light-harvesting efficiency; the internal geometry and photophysics of these molecules are also crucially important. In particular, the mechanisms by means of which radiant energy is ultimately trapped depends on an intricate interplay of electronic, structural, energetic and symmetry properties. To better understand these processes a sound theoretical representation of the intramolecular electrodynamics is required. A suitable formalism, based on quantum electrodynamics, readily delivers physical insights into the necessary excitation channelling processes, and it affords a rigorous basis for modelling the intramolecular flow of energy.

  7. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioz Etgar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered.

  8. Optimal light harvesting structures at optical and infrared frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Villate-Guío, F; García-Vidal, F J; Martín-Moreno, L; de León-Pérez, F

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional light harvesting structures with a realistic geometry nano-patterned on an opaque metallic film are optimized to render high transmission efficiencies at optical and infrared frequencies. Simple design rules are developed for the particular case of a slit-groove array with a given number of grooves that are symmetrically distributed with respect to a central slit. These rules take advantage of the hybridization of Fabry-Perot modes in the slit and surface modes of the corrugated metal surface. Same design rules apply for optical and infrared frequencies. The parameter space of the groove array is also examined with a conjugate gradient optimization algorithm that used as a seed the geometries optimized following physical intuition. Both uniform and nonuniform groove arrays are considered. The largest transmission enhancement, with respect to a uniform array, is obtained for a chirped groove profile. Such enhancement is a function of the wavelength. It decreases from 39% in the optical part of ...

  9. Dimerization-assisted energy transport in light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Xu, D Z; Song, Z; Sun, C P

    2010-06-21

    We study the role of the dimer structure of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in excitation transfer from the LH2 [without a reaction center (RC)] to the LH1 (surrounding the RC) or from the LH2 to another LH2. The excited and unexcited states of a bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) are modeled by a quasispin. In the framework of quantum open system theory, we represent the excitation transfer as the total leakage of the LH2 system and then calculate the transfer efficiency and average transfer time. For different initial states with various quantum superposition properties, we study how the dimerization of the B850 BChl ring can enhance the transfer efficiency and shorten the average transfer time.

  10. Dimerization-assisted energy transport in light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, S; Song, Z; Sun, C P

    2010-01-01

    We study the role of the dimer structure of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in excitation transfer from the LH2 (without a reaction center (RC)) to the LH1 (surrounding the RC), or from the LH2 to another LH2. The excited and un-excited states of a bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) are modeled by quasi-spin. In the framework of quantum open system theory, we represent the excitation transfer as the total leakage of the LH2 system, and then calculate the transfer efficiency and average transfer time at a low enough temperature. For different initial states with various quantum superposition properties, we study how the dimerization of the B850 BChl ring can enhance the transfer efficiency and shorten the average transfer time.

  11. Designing dye-nanochannel antenna hybrid materials for light harvesting, transport and trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzaferri, Gion; Méallet-Renault, Rachel; Brühwiler, Dominik; Pansu, Robert; Dolamic, Igor; Dienel, Thomas; Adler, Pauline; Li, Huanrong; Kunzmann, Andreas

    2011-02-25

    We discuss artificial photonic antenna systems that are built by incorporating chromophores into one-dimensional nanochannel materials and by organizing the latter in specific ways. Zeolite L (ZL) is an excellent host for the supramolecular organization of different kinds of molecules and complexes. The range of possibilities for filling its one-dimensional channels with suitable guests has been shown to be much larger than one might expect. Geometrical constraints imposed by the host structure lead to supramolecular organization of the guests in the channels. The arrangement of dyes inside the ZL channels is what we call the first stage of organization. It allows light harvesting within the volume of a dye-loaded ZL crystal and also the radiationless transport of energy to either the channel ends or center. One-dimensional FRET transport can be realized in these guest-host materials. The second stage of organization is realized by coupling either an external acceptor or donor stopcock fluorophore at the ends of the ZL channels, which can then trap or inject electronic excitation energy. The third stage of organization is obtained by interfacing the material to an external device via a stopcock intermediate. A possibility to achieve higher levels of organization is by controlled assembly of the host into ordered structures and preparation of monodirectional materials. The usually strong light scattering of ZL can be suppressed by refractive-index matching and avoidance of microphase separation in hybrid polymer/dye-ZL materials. The concepts are illustrated and discussed in detail on a bidirectional dye antenna system. Experimental results of two materials with a donor-to-acceptor ratio of 33:1 and 52:1, respectively, and a three-dye system illustrate the validity and challenges of this approach for synthesizing dye-nanochannel hybrid materials for light harvesting, transport, and trapping.

  12. Towards negative index self-assembled metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Fruhnert, Martin; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of meta-atoms that can be fabricated by a bottom-up technique. Usually such meta-atoms consist of a dielectric core surrounded by a large number of solid metallic nanoparticles. In contrast to those meta-atoms considered thus far, we study here for the first time hollow metallic nanoparticles (shells). In doing so we solve one of the most pertinent problems of current self-assembled metamaterials, namely implementing meta-atoms with sufficiently large resonance strength and small absorption. Both conditions have to be met for deep sub-wavelength meta-atoms to obtain effectively homogeneous metamaterials which may be meaningfully described by negative material parameters. Eventually we show that by using these findings self-assembled negative index materials come in reach.

  13. Ternary self-assemblies in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Leila R.; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Jones, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of higher order structures in water is realised by using the association of 1,3-biscarboxylates to binuclear meta-xylyl bridged DO3A complexes. Two dinicotinate binding sites are placed at a right-angle in a rhenium complex, which is shown to form a 1 : 2 complex with α,α'-bis(E......The self-assembly of higher order structures in water is realised by using the association of 1,3-biscarboxylates to binuclear meta-xylyl bridged DO3A complexes. Two dinicotinate binding sites are placed at a right-angle in a rhenium complex, which is shown to form a 1 : 2 complex with α...

  14. Self-assembled nanoparticles made of fucan

    OpenAIRE

    Dantas-Santos, N.; Almeida-Lima, J.; Vidal, A. A. J.; Pereira, Paula Alexandra Cunha; Pedrosa, Sílvia Santos; Gama, F. M.; Rocha,H.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Amphiphilic polymers can self-assemble in water due to hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions, forming nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical characteristics and thermodynamic stability. A non toxic sulfated Fucan, extracted from Spatoglossum schroederi was chemically modified by the grafting of Hexadecylamine (C16) to the polymer hydrophilic backbone. The resulting modified material (Fucan-C16) formed nanosized particles which were characterized by 1H NMR to asse...

  15. Magnetic Films on Self-assembled Nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Ulbrich; I.Guhr; T.Schrefl; O.Hellwig; S.van; Dijken; M.Albrecht

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Nanoparticle media using arrays of monodisperse nanoparticles with high magneticanisotropy are assumed to be the ideal future magnetic recording media. However,key requirements like control of the magnetic anisotropy orientation along with magnetic domain isolation have not been achieved so far. Here, we report on a combination of a two-dimensional topographic pattern formed of self-assembled nanoparticles with sizes as small as 20 nm and magnetic multilayer film deposition[1]. The so formed n...

  16. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  17. Engineered Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A critical need in nanotechnology is the development of new tools and methods to organize, connect, and integrate solid-state nanocomponents. Self-assembly - where components spontaneously organize themselves - can be carried out on a massively parallel scale to construct large-scale architectures using solid-state nanocrystal building blocks. I will present our recent work on the synthesis and self-assembly of nanocrystals for plasmonics, where light is propagated, manipulated, and confined by solid-state components that are smaller than the wavelength of light itself. We show the organization of polymer-grafted metal nanocrystals into hierarchical nanojunction arrays that possess intense ``hot spots'' due to electromagnetic field localization. We also show that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can serve as a new class of plasmonic building blocks, where shape and carrier density can be actively tuned to engineer plasmon resonances. These examples demonstrate that nanocrystals possess unique electromagnetic properties that rival top-down structures, and the potential of self-assembly for fabricating designer plasmonic materials.

  18. Self-assembly of knots and links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Enzo; Polles, Guido; Marenduzzo, Davide; Micheletti, Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Guiding the self-assembly of identical building blocks towards complex three-dimensional structures with a set of desired properties is a major goal in material science, chemistry and physics. A particularly challenging problem, especially explored in synthetic chemistry, is that of self-assembling closed structures with a target topology starting by simple geometrical templates. Here we overview and revisit recent advancements, based on stochastic simulations, where the geometry of rigid helical templates with functionalised sticky ends has been designed for self-assembling efficiently and reproducibly into a wide range of three-dimensional closed structures. Notably, these include non trivial topologies of links and knots, including the 819 knot that we had predicted to be highly encodable and that has only recently been obtained experimentally. By appropriately tuning the parameters that define the template shape, we show that, for fixed concentration of templates, the assembly process can be directed towards the formation of specific knotted and linked structures such as the trefoils, pentafoil knots, Hopf and Solomon links. More exotic and unexpected knots and links are also found. Our results should be relevant to the design of new protocols that can both increase and broaden the population of synthetise molecular knots and catenanes.

  19. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  20. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-07-16

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  1. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, a photonic hyper-crystal, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  2. Differential self-assembly behaviors of cyclic and linear peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-ju; Jeong, Woo-jin; Kang, Seong-Kyun; Lee, Myongsoo; Kim, Eunhye; Ryu, Du Yeol; Lim, Yong-beom

    2012-07-01

    Here we ask the fundamental questions about the effect of peptide topology on self-assembly. The study revealed that the self-assembling behaviors of cyclic and linear peptides are significantly different in several respects, in addition to sharing several similarities. Their clear differences included the morphological dissimilarities of the self-assembled nanostructures and their thermal stability. The similarities include their analogous critical aggregation concentration values and cytotoxicity profiles, which are in fact closely related. We believe that understanding topology-dependent self-assembly behavior of peptides is important for developing tailor-made self-assembled peptide nanostructures.

  3. Enhanced Conversion Efficiencies in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Achieved through Self-Assembled Platinum(II) Metallacages

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zuoli; Hou, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yonglei; Liu, Xiaobin; Yin, Xingtian; Que, Meidan; Shao, Jinyou; Que, Wenxiu; Stang, Peter J.

    2016-07-01

    Two-component self-assembly supramolecular coordination complexes with particular photo-physical property, wherein unique donors are combined with a single metal acceptor, can be utilized for many applications including in photo-devices. In this communication, we described the synthesis and characterization of two-component self-assembly supramolecular coordination complexes (SCCs) bearing triazine and porphyrin faces with promising light-harvesting properties. These complexes were obtained from the self-assembly of a 90° Pt(II) acceptor with 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPyT) or 5,10,15,20-Tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine (TPyP). The greatly improved conversion efficiencies of the dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells were 6.79 and 6.08 respectively, while these SCCs were introduced into the TiO2 nanoparticle film photoanodes. In addition, the open circuit voltage (Voc) of dye-sensitized solar cells was also increased to 0.769 and 0.768 V, which could be ascribed to the inhibited interfacial charge recombination due to the addition of SCCs.

  4. Potential control of DNA self-assembly on gold electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The self-assembly monolayer (SAM) was prepared with 2-aminoethanethiol (AET) on the gold electrode.A new approach based on potential was first used to control DNA self-assembly covalently onto the SAM with the activation of 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS). The influence of potential on DNA self-assembly was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), AC impedance, Auger electron spectrometry (AES) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The result proves that controlled potential can affect the course of DNA self-assembly. More negative potential can restrain the DNA self-assembly, while more positive potential can accelerate the DNA self-assembly, which is of great significance for the control of DNA self-assembly and will find wide application in the field of DNA-based devices.

  5. Energizing the light harvesting antenna: Insight from CP29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Papadatos, Sotiris; Daskalakis, Vangelis

    2016-10-01

    How do plants cope with excess light energy? Crop health and stress tolerance are governed by molecular photoprotective mechanisms. Protective exciton quenching in plants is activated by membrane energization, via unclear conformational changes in proteins called antennas. Here we show that pH and salt gradients stimulate the response of such an antenna under low and high energization by all-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Novel insight establishes that helix-5 (H5) conformation in CP29 from spinach is regulated by chemiosmotic factors. This is selectively correlated with the chl-614 macrocycle deformation and interactions with nearby pigments, that could suggest a role in plant photoprotection. Adding to the significance of our findings, H5 domain is conserved among five antennas (LHCB1-5). These results suggest that light harvesting complexes of Photosystem II, one of the most abundant proteins on earth, can sense chemiosmotic gradients via their H5 domains in an upgraded role from a solar detector to also a chemiosmotic sensor.

  6. Excitation migration in fluctuating light-harvesting antenna systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Amerongen, Herbert; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-01

    Complex multi-exponential fluorescence decay kinetics observed in various photosynthetic systems like photosystem II (PSII) have often been explained by the reversible quenching mechanism of the charge separation taking place in the reaction center (RC) of PSII. However, this description does not account for the intrinsic dynamic disorder of the light-harvesting proteins as well as their fluctuating dislocations within the antenna, which also facilitate the repair of RCs, state transitions, and the process of non-photochemical quenching. Since dynamic fluctuations result in varying connectivity between pigment-protein complexes, they can also lead to non-exponential excitation decay kinetics. Based on this presumption, we have recently proposed a simple conceptual model describing excitation diffusion in a continuous medium and accounting for possible variations of the excitation transfer pathways. In the current work, this model is further developed and then applied to describe fluorescence kinetics originating from very diverse antenna systems, ranging from PSII of various sizes to LHCII aggregates and even the entire thylakoid membrane. In all cases, complex multi-exponential fluorescence kinetics are perfectly reproduced on the entire relevant time scale without assuming any radical pair equilibration at the side of the excitation quencher, but using just a few parameters reflecting the mean excitation energy transfer rate as well as the overall average organization of the photosynthetic antenna.

  7. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  8. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  9. Molecular self-assembly at solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José María; de Parga, Amadeo L Vázquez; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2011-11-23

    Self-assembly, the process by which objects initially distributed at random arrange into well-defined patterns exclusively due to their local mutual interactions without external intervention, is generally accepted to be the most promising method for large-scale fabrication of functional nanostructures. In particular, the ordering of molecular building-blocks deposited at solid surfaces is relevant for the performance of many organic electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or photovoltaic solar cells. However, the fundamental knowledge on the nature and strength of the intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions that govern the ordering of molecular adsorbates is, in many cases, rather scarce. In most cases, the structure and morphology of the organic-metal interface is not known and it is just assumed to be the same as in the bulk, thereby implicitly neglecting the role of the surface on the assembly. However, this approximation is usually not correct, and the evidence gathered over the last decades points towards an active role of the surface in the assembly, leading to self-assembled structures that only in a few occasions can be understood by considering just intermolecular interactions in solid or gas phases. In this work we review several examples from our recent research demonstrating the apparently endless variety of ways in which the surface might affect the assembly of organic adsorbates.

  10. The determinism and boundedness of self-assembling structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoro, S

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly processes are widespread in nature, and lie at the heart of many biological and physical phenomena. The characteristics of self-assembly building blocks determine the structures that they form. Among the most important of these properties are whether the self-assembly is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. The former tells us whether the same set of building blocks always generates the same structure, and the latter whether it grows indefinitely. These properties are highly relevant in the context of protein structures, as the difference between deterministic protein self-assembly and nondeterministic protein aggregation is central to a number of diseases. Here we introduce a graph-based approach that can determine, with a few restrictions, whether a set of self-assembly building blocks is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. We apply this methodology to a previously studied lattice self-assembly model and discuss generalisatio...

  11. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  12. The statistical mechanics of dynamic pathways to self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Jack, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    This review describes some important physical characteristics of the pathways (i.e., dynamical processes) by which molecular, nanoscale, and micrometer-scale self-assembly occurs. We highlight the existence of features of self-assembly pathways that are common to a wide range of physical systems, even though those systems may differ with respect to their microscopic details. We summarize some existing theoretical descriptions of self-assembly pathways and highlight areas-notably, the description of self-assembly pathways that occur far from equilibrium-that are likely to become increasingly important.

  13. Quantum transport through complex networks - from light-harvesting proteins to semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2012-06-18

    Electron transport through small systems in semiconductor devices plays an essential role for many applications in micro-electronics. One focus of current research lies on establishing conceptually new devices based on ballistic transport in high mobility AlGaAs/AlGa samples. In the ballistic regime, the transport characteristics are determined by coherent interference effects. In order to guide experimentalists to an improved device design, the characterization and understanding of intrinsic device properties is crucial. We develop a time-dependent approach that allows us to simulate experimentally fabricated, complex devicegeometries with an extension of up to a few micrometers. Particularly, we explore the physical origin of unexpected effects that have been detected in recent experiments on transport through Aharonov-Bohm waveguide-interferometers. Such interferometers can be configured as detectors for transfer properties of embedded quantum systems. We demonstrate that a four-terminal waveguide-ring is a suitable setup for measuring the transmission phase of a harmonic quantum dot. Quantum effects are not restricted exclusively to artificial devices but have been found in biological systems as well. Pioneering experiments reveal quantum effects in light-harvesting complexes, the building blocks of photosynthesis. We discuss the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, which is a network of coupled bacteriochlorophylls. It acts as an energy wire in the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. Recent experimental findings suggest that energy transfer takes place in the form of coherent wave-like motion, rather than through classical hopping from one bacteriochlorophyll to the next. However, the question of why and how coherent transfer emerges in light-harvesting complexes is still open. The challenge is to merge seemingly contradictory features that are observed in experiments on two-dimensional spectroscopy into a consistent theory. Here, we provide such a

  14. Light Harvesting and White-Light Generation in a Composite of Carbon Dots and Dye-Encapsulated BSA-Protein-Capped Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Monoj Kumar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Bain, Dipankar; Patra, Amitava

    2016-08-08

    Several strategies have been adopted to design an artificial light-harvesting system in which light energy is captured by peripheral chromophores and it is subsequently transferred to the core via energy transfer. A composite of carbon dots and dye-encapsulated BSA-protein-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) has been developed for efficient light harvesting and white light generation. Carbon dots (C-dots) act as donor and AuNCs capped with BSA protein act as acceptor. Analysis reveals that energy transfer increases from 63 % to 83 % in presence of coumarin dye (C153), which enhances the cascade energy transfer from carbon dots to AuNCs. Bright white light emission with a quantum yield of 19 % under the 375 nm excitation wavelength is achieved by changing the ratio of components. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in carbon-dot-metal-cluster nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  15. Cascade exciton-pumping engines with manipulated speed and efficiency in light-harvesting porous π-network films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Huang, Ning; Xu, Fei; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-03-09

    Light-harvesting antennae are the machinery for exciton pumping in natural photosynthesis, whereas cascade energy transfer through chlorophyll is key to long-distance, efficient energy transduction. Numerous artificial antennae have been developed. However, they are limited in their cascade energy-transfer abilities because of a lack of control over complex chromophore aggregation processes, which has impeded their advancement. Here we report a viable approach for addressing this issue by using a light-harvesting porous polymer film in which a three-dimensional π-network serves as the antenna and micropores segregate multiple dyes to prevent aggregation. Cascade energy-transfer engines are integrated into the films; the rate and efficiency of the energy-funneling engines are precisely manipulated by tailoring the dye components and contents. The nanofilms allow accurate and versatile luminescence engineering, resulting in the production of thirty emission hues, including blue, green, red and white. This advance may open new pathways for realising photosynthesis and photoenergy conversion.

  16. Fabrication of bioinspired nanostructured materials via colloidal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Han

    ultimate strains than nacre and pure GO paper (also synthesized by filtration). Specifically, it exhibits ˜30 times higher fracture energy than filtrated graphene paper and nacre, ˜100 times tougher than filtrated GO paper. Besides reinforced nanocomposites, we further explored the self-assembly of spherical colloids and the templating nanofabrication of moth-eye-inspired broadband antireflection coatings. Binary crystalline structures can be easily accomplished by spin-coating double-layer nonclose-packed colloidal crystals as templates, followed by colloidal templating. The polymer matrix between self-assembled colloidal crystal has been used as a sacrificial template to define the resulting periodic binary nanostructures, including intercalated arrays of silica spheres and polymer posts, gold nanohole arrays with binary sizes, and dimple-nipple antireflection coatings. The binary-structured antireflection coatings exhibit better antireflective properties than unitary coatings. Natural optical structures and nanocomposites teach us a great deal on how to create high performance artificial materials. The bottom-up technologies developed in this thesis are scalable and compatible with standard industrial processes, promising for manufacturing high-performance materials for the benefits of human beings.

  17. Three-Dimensionally Isotropic Negative Refractive Index Materials from Block Copolymer Self-Assembled Chiral Gyroid Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun

    2011-10-17

    Metamaterials are engineered artificial materials that offer new functionalities such as super-resolution imaging and cloaking. Calculations of the photonic properties of three-dimensionally isotropic metamaterials with cubic double gyroid and alternating gyroid morphologies from block copolymer self-assembly are presented.

  18. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Joonsuk; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have multiple functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimic a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains about 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the...

  19. Light harvesting complexes of Chromera velia, photosynthetic relative of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Tichý, Josef

    2013-06-01

    The structure and composition of the light harvesting complexes from the unicellular alga Chromera velia were studied by means of optical spectroscopy, biochemical and electron microscopy methods. Two different types of antennae systems were identified. One exhibited a molecular weight (18-19 kDa) similar to FCP (fucoxanthin chlorophyll protein) complexes from diatoms, however, single particle analysis and circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated similarity of this structure to the recently characterized XLH antenna of xanthophytes. In light of these data we denote this antenna complex CLH, for "Chromera Light Harvesting" complex. The other system was identified as the photosystem I with bound Light Harvesting Complexes (PSI-LHCr) related to the red algae LHCI antennae. The result of this study is the finding that C. velia, when grown in natural light conditions, possesses light harvesting antennae typically found in two different, evolutionary distant, groups of photosynthetic organisms. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: A quantum heat engine picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, N; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2015-10-21

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations may contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle and quantifies its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's relevance in parameter regimes connected to natural light-harvesting structures.

  1. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: A quantum heat engine picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killoran, N.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-10-21

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations may contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system’s power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle and quantifies its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle’s relevance in parameter regimes connected to natural light-harvesting structures.

  2. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  3. Heterogeneous self-assembled media for biopolymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous media, such as micro-structured aqueous environments, could offer an alternative approach to the synthesis of biopolymers with novel functions. Structured media are here defined as specialized, self-assembled structures that are formed, e.g, by amphiphiles, such as liposomes, emulsion...... polymerization, the initial elongation rates clearly depended on the complementarity of the monomers with the templating nucleobases3. However, metal-ion catalyzed reactions deliver RNA analogs with heterogeneous linkages. Moreover, the usefulness of this medium in the form of quasi-compartmentalization extends...... beyond metal-ion catalysis reactions, as we have recently demonstrated the catalytic power of a dipeptide, SerHis, for the regioselective formation of phosphodiester bonds. These results in conjonction with the synthesis of nucleobases at -78˚C, the demonstration of ribozyme activity (RNA ligase ribozyme...

  4. Smart self-assembled hybrid hydrogel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeček, Jindřich; Yang, Jiyuan

    2012-07-23

    Hybrid biomaterials are systems created from components of at least two distinct classes of molecules, for example, synthetic macromolecules and proteins or peptide domains. The synergistic combination of two types of structures may produce new materials that possess unprecedented levels of structural organization and novel properties. This Review focuses on biorecognition-driven self-assembly of hybrid macromolecules into functional hydrogel biomaterials. First, basic rules that govern the secondary structure of peptides are discussed, and then approaches to the specific design of hybrid systems with tailor-made properties are evaluated, followed by a discussion on the similarity of design principles of biomaterials and macromolecular therapeutics. Finally, the future of the field is briefly outlined.

  5. Self Assembly and Elasticity of Nuclear Pasta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Matthew; Horowitz, Chuck; Berry, Don; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2015-10-01

    While the outer crust of a neutron star is likely a solid ion lattice, the core consists of uniform nuclear matter at or above saturation density. In between, nuclei adopt exotic non-spherical geometries called ``nuclear pasta'' in order to minimize the nuclear attraction and Coulomb repulsion between protons. These structures have been well studied with both classical and quantum molecular dynamics, and their geometry can be predicted from the density, temperature, and proton fraction. Recent classical molecular dynamics simulations find evidence for a phase transition at T ~ 0 . 5 MeV, where simulations with low proton fractions undergo a solid-liquid phase transition, while simulations with high proton fractions under a glass-rubber phase transition. This is expected to have nontrivial consequences for the elastic properties of the pasta. Additionally, recent observations indicate that the structure of nuclear pasta may be related to structures observed in biophysics, specifically self assembling lipid membranes.

  6. Self-Assembled Magnetic Surface Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhko, A.; Belkin, M.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2009-03-01

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation.

  7. Shape Restoration by Active Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arbuckle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape restoration is defined as the problem of constructing a desired, or goal, solid shape Sg by growing an initial solid Si, which is a subset of the goal but is otherwise unknown. This definition attempts to capture abstractly a situation that often arises in the physical world when a solid object loses its desired shape due to wear and tear, corrosion or other phenomena. For example, if the top of the femur becomes distorted, the hip joint no longer functions properly and may have to be replaced surgically. Growing it in place back to its original shape would be an attractive alternative to replacement. This paper presents a solution to the shape restoration problem by using autonomous assembly agents (robots that self-assemble to fill the volume between Sg and Si. If the robots have very small dimension (micro or nano, the desired shape is approximated with high accuracy. The assembly agents initially execute a random walk. When two robots meet, they may exchange a small number of messages. The robot behavior is controlled by a finite state machine with a small number of states. Communication contact models chemical communication, which is likely to be the medium of choice for robots at the nanoscale, while small state and small messages are limitations that also are expected of nanorobots. Simulations presented here show that swarms of such robots organize themselves to achieve shape restoration by using distributed algorithms. This is one more example of an interesting geometric problem that can be solved by the Active Self-Assembly paradigm introduced in previous papers by the authors.

  8. Tetrastyryl-BODIPY-based dendritic light harvester and estimation of energy transfer efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostereli, Ziya; Ozdemir, Tugba; Buyukcakir, Onur; Akkaya, Engin U

    2012-07-20

    Versatile BODIPY dyes can be transformed into bright near-IR-emitting fluorophores by quadruple styryl substitutions. When clickable functionalities on the styryl moieties are inserted, an efficient synthesis of a light harvester is possible. In addition, clear spectral evidence is presented showing that, in dendritic light harvesters, calculations commonly based on quantum yield or emission lifetime changes of the donor are bound to yield large overestimations of energy transfer efficiency.

  9. Self-assembled ultra small ZnO nanocrystals for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Astam K.; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a facile chemical approach to produce self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous zinc oxide nanocrystals using sodium salicylate (SS) as a template under hydrothermal conditions. These ZnO nanomaterials have been successfully fabricated as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) in the presence of N719 dye and iodine–triiodide electrolyte. The structural features, crystallinity, purity, mesophase and morphology of the nanostructure ZnO are investigated by several characterization tools. N{sub 2} sorption analysis revealed high surface areas (203 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and narrow pore size distributions (5.1–5.4 nm) for different samples. The mesoporous structure and strong photoluminescence facilitates the high dye loading at the mesoscopic void spaces and light harvesting in DSSC. By utilizing this ultra-small ZnO photoelectrode with film thickness of about 7 μm in the DSSC with an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.74 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 3.83 mA cm{sup −2} and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Ultra-small ZnO nanocrystals have been synthesized with sodium salicylate as a template and using it as a photoanode in a dye-sensitized solar cell 1.12% power conversion efficiency has been observed. - Highlights: • Synthesis of self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous ZnO nanocrystals by using sodium salicylate as a template. • Mesoporous ZnO materials have high BET surface areas and void space. • ZnO nanoparticles serve as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). • Using ZnO nanocrystals as photoelectrode power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved.

  10. Supramolecular chemistry: Unexplored territory for self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Florian

    2016-12-01

    Cage-like structures can self-assemble from suitable metal ions and organic linkers, but the size of the assemblies was limited. The surprise discovery of a new series of cages opens up fresh horizons for self-assembly. See Letter p.563

  11. Competition between self-assembly and surface adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Douglas, Jack F.; Freed, Karl F.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate a minimal equilibrium polymerization model for the competition between self-assembly on a boundary and in solution that arises when an assembling system is in the presence of an adsorbing interface. Adsorption generally occurs upon cooling, but assembly (equilibrium polymerization) may arise either upon cooling or heating. Both cases are shown to exhibit a coupling between adsorption and self-assembly. When both assembly and adsorption proceed upon cooling, a change in the ratio of the enthalpy of adsorption to the enthalpy of assembly in solution can switch the system between a predominance of self-assembly in solution to assembly on the substrate. If assembly is promoted by heating and adsorption by cooling, as in many self-assembling proteins in aqueous solution, then a self-assembly analog of a closed loop phase boundary is found. In particular, the order parameter for assembly on the surface exhibits a peak as a function of temperature. As demonstrated by illustrative examples, the coupling between surface adsorption and self-assembly provides a powerful means of switching self-assembly processes on and off. Understanding and controlling this switching phenomenon will be useful in designing and directing self-assembly processes on surfaces for applications to nanomanufacturing and in developing treatments for diseases arising from pathological adsorption-induced assembly.

  12. Self-assembly of hydrolysed α-lactalbumin into nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland-Bikker, Johanna Frederike

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins, peptides and DNA is a powerful approach for fabricating novel supramolecular architectures. Via this "bottom-up" approach many new nanomaterials have been and will be produced. Building blocks that self-assemble into fibrous materials are of special interest, because linea

  13. Synthetic self-assembled models with biomimetic functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, Roberto; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Self-assembly can be considered a powerful tool in the hand of chemists for the understanding, modeling and mimicking of biological systems. The possibility of reproducing biological functions in synthetic systems obtained by self-assembly is envisioned as a modest but very important step towards th

  14. Role of peripheral phenanthroline groups in the self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mili C Naranthatta; V Ramkumar; Dillip Kumar Chand

    2015-02-01

    Self-assembled molecular triangles [Pd3(phen)3(imidazolate)3](NO3)3, 1a and [Pd3(phen)3 (imidazolate)3](PF6)3, 1b are prepared by the combination of imidazole with Pd(phen)(NO3)2 and Pd(phen) (PF6)2, respectively. Imidazole was deprotonated during the complexation reactions and the imidazolate so formed acted as a bis-monodentate bridging ligand to form the bowl-shaped trinuclear architectures of 1a/b. Relative orientation of the imidazolate moieties can be best described as syn,anti,anti as observed in the crystal structure of 1b. However, in solution state, slow conformational changes are assumed on the basis of 1HNMR spectral data. The molecular triangles are crafted with three peripheral phen units capable of − stacking interactions. Well-fashioned intermolecular − interactions are observed in the solid-state, wherein further self-assembly of already self-assembled triangle is observed.

  15. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  16. Self-assembling chimeric polypeptide-doxorubicin conjugate nanoparticles that abolish tumours after a single injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Mackay, J.; Chen, Mingnan; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Liu, Wenge; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2009-12-01

    New strategies to self-assemble biocompatible materials into nanoscale, drug-loaded packages with improved therapeutic efficacy are needed for nanomedicine. To address this need, we developed artificial recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into sub-100-nm-sized, near-monodisperse nanoparticles on conjugation of diverse hydrophobic molecules, including chemotherapeutics. These CPs consist of a biodegradable polypeptide that is attached to a short Cys-rich segment. Covalent modification of the Cys residues with a structurally diverse set of hydrophobic small molecules, including chemotherapeutics, leads to spontaneous formation of nanoparticles over a range of CP compositions and molecular weights. When used to deliver chemotherapeutics to a murine cancer model, CP nanoparticles have a fourfold higher maximum tolerated dose than free drug, and induce nearly complete tumour regression after a single dose. This simple strategy can promote co-assembly of drugs, imaging agents and targeting moieties into multifunctional nanomedicines.

  17. Solid state nanofibers based on self-assemblies : from cleaving from self-assemblies to multilevel hierarchical constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H. A.; Houbenov, Nikolay; Ruokolainen, Janne; Paakko, Marjo; Laine, Janne; Leskela, Markku; Berglund, Lars A.; Lindstrom, Tom; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Iatrou, Hermis; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Faul, Charl F. J.; Pääkkö, Marjo; Leskelä, Markku; Lindström, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Self-assemblies and their hierarchies are useful to construct soft materials with structures at different length scales and to tune the materials properties for various functions. Here we address routes for solid nanofibers based on different forms of self-assemblies. On the other hand, we discuss r

  18. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such

  19. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion.

  20. {beta}-Carotene to bacteriochlorophyll c energy transfer in self-assembled aggregates mimicking chlorosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alster, J. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha (Czech Republic); Polivka, T. [Institute of Physical Biology, University of South Bohemia, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic); Biology Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Arellano, J.B. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Salamanca (IRNASA-CSIC), Apdo. 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Chabera, P. [Institute of Physical Biology, University of South Bohemia, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic); Vacha, F. [Institute of Physical Biology, University of South Bohemia, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic); Biology Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Psencik, J., E-mail: psencik@karlov.mff.cuni.cz [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha (Czech Republic); Institute of Physical Biology, University of South Bohemia, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-19

    Carotenoids are together with bacteriochlorophylls important constituents of chlorosomes, the light-harvesting antennae of green photosynthetic bacteria. Majority of bacteriochlorophyll molecules form self-assembling aggregates inside the chlorosomes. Aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with optical properties similar to those of chlorosomes can also be prepared in non-polar organic solvents or in aqueous environments when a suitable non-polar molecule is added. In this work, the ability of {beta}-carotene to induce aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous buffer was studied. Excitation relaxation and energy transfer in the carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll assemblies were measured using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A fast, {approx}100-fs energy transfer from the S{sub 2} state of {beta}-carotene to bacteriochlorophyll c was revealed, while no evidence for significant energy transfer from the S{sub 1} state was found. Picosecond formation of the carotenoid triplet state (T{sub 1}) was observed, which was likely generated by singlet homo-fission from the S{sub 1} state of {beta}-carotene.

  1. Plasmon-enhanced light harvesting of chlorophylls on near-percolating silver films via one-photon anti-Stokes upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Lan; Nan, Fan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Li; Peng, Xiao-Niu; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Yu, Ying; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qu-Quan; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    There exists a wealth of means of efficient utilization of solar energy in nature, with photosynthesis of chlorophylls as a prime example. Separately, artificially structured plasmonic materials are versatile in light harvesting and energy conversion. Using a simple and scalable design of near-percolating silver nanostructures, we demonstrate that the light-harvesting efficiency of chlorophylls can be drastically enhanced by tuning the plasmon frequency of the constituent silver nanoparticles to coincide with the maximal photon flux of sunlight. In particular, we show that the photon upconversion efficiency can be readily enhanced by over 20 folds, with the room-temperature fluorescence quantum yield increased by a factor of 2.63. The underlying mechanism for the upconversion enhancement is attributed to a one-electron-per-photon anti-Stokes process, involving absorption of a characteristic phonon mode of the chlorophylls. These findings suggest that chlorophylls can serve as molecular building blocks for high-efficiency light harvesting and solar energy conversion.

  2. Self-assembly programming of DNA polyominoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui San; Syafiq-Rahim, Mohd; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2016-10-20

    Fabrication of functional DNA nanostructures operating at a cellular level has been accomplished through molecular programming techniques such as DNA origami and single-stranded tiles (SST). During implementation, restrictive and constraint dependent designs are enforced to ensure conformity is attainable. We propose a concept of DNA polyominoes that promotes flexibility in molecular programming. The fabrication of complex structures is achieved through self-assembly of distinct heterogeneous shapes (i.e., self-organised optimisation among competing DNA basic shapes) with total flexibility during the design and assembly phases. In this study, the plausibility of the approach is validated using the formation of multiple 3×4 DNA network fabricated from five basic DNA shapes with distinct configurations (monomino, tromino and tetrominoes). Computational tools to aid the design of compatible DNA shapes and the structure assembly assessment are presented. The formations of the desired structures were validated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imagery. Five 3×4 DNA networks were successfully constructed using combinatorics of these five distinct DNA heterogeneous shapes. Our findings revealed that the construction of DNA supra-structures could be achieved using a more natural-like orchestration as compared to the rigid and restrictive conventional approaches adopted previously.

  3. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  4. Self-assembling holographic biosensors and biocomputers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Yooli Kim; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Trent, Amanda M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-01

    We present concepts for self-assembly of diffractive optics with potential uses in biosensors and biocomputers. The simplest such optics, diffraction gratings, can potentially be made from chemically-stabilized microtubules migrating on nanopatterned tracks of the motor protein kinesin. We discuss the fabrication challenges involved in patterning sub-micron-scale structures with proteins that must be maintained in aqueous buffers to preserve their activity. A novel strategy is presented that employs dry contact printing onto glass-supported amino-silane monolayers of heterobifunctional crosslinkers, followed by solid-state reactions of these cross-linkers, to graft patterns of reactive groups onto the surface. Successive solution-phase addition of cysteine-mutant proteins and amine-reactive polyethylene glycol allows assembly of features onto the printed patterns. We present data from initial experiments showing successful micro- and nanopatterning of lines of single-cysteine mutants of kinesin interleaved with lines of polyethylene, indicating that this strategy can be employed to arrays of features with resolutions suitable for gratings.

  5. Stochastic self-assembly of incommensurate clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    DÓ Rsogna, Maria; Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2013-03-01

    We examine the classic problem of homogeneous nucleation and self-assembly by deriving and analyzing a fully discrete stochastic master equation. We enumerate the highest probability steady-states, and derive exact analytical formulae for quenched and equilibrium mean cluster size distributions. Upon comparison with results obtained from the associated the mass-action Becker-Döring (BD) equations, we find striking differences between the two corresponding equilibrium mean cluster concentrations. These differences depend primarily on the divisibility of the total available mass by the maximum allowed cluster size, and the remainder. When such mass ``incommensurability'' arises, a single remainder particle can ``emulsify'' the system by significantly broadening the equilibrium mean cluster size distribution. This discreteness-induced broadening effect is periodic in the total mass of the system but arises even when the system size is asymptotically large, provided the ratio of the total mass to the maximum cluster size is finite. Our findings define a new scaling regime in which results from classic mass-action theories are qualitatively inaccurate, even in the limit of large total system size. This work supported by NSF DMS-1021818 and DMS-1021850

  6. Optical orientation in self assembled quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, G C

    2002-01-01

    We examined Zeeman splitting in a series of ln sub x Ga sub ( sub 1 sub - sub x sub ) As/GaAs self assembled quantum dots (SAQD's) with different pump polarisations. All these measurements were made in very low external magnetic fields where direct determination of the Zeeman splitting energy is impossible due to its small value in comparison to the photoluminescence linewidths. The use of a technique developed by M. J. Snelling allowed us to obtain the Zeeman splitting and hence the excitonic g-factors indirectly. We observed a linear low field splitting, becoming increasingly non-linear at higher fields. We attribute this non-linearity to field induced level mixing. It is believed these are the first low field measurements in these structures. A number of apparent nuclear effects in the Zeeman splitting measurements led us onto the examination of nuclear effects in these structures. The transverse and oblique Hanie effects then allowed us to obtain the sign of the electronic g-factors in two of our samples,...

  7. What promotes derected self assembly (DSA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    A low-energy electron beam (EB) can create self-interstitial atoms (SIA) in a solid and can cause directed self-assembly (DSA), e.g. {3 1 1}SIA platelets in c-Si. The crystalline structure of this planar defect is known from experiment to be made up of SIAs that form well aligned atomic rows on each (3 1 1) plane. To simulate the experiment we distributed Frenkel pairs (FP) randomly in bulk c-Si. Then making use of a molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, we have reproduced the experimental result, where SIAs are trapped at metastable sites in bulk. With increasing pre-doped FP concentration, the number of SIAs that participate in DSA tends to be increased but soon slightly supressed. On the other hand, when the FP concentration is less than 3%, a cooperative motion of target atoms was characterized from the long-range-order (LRO) parameter. Here we investigated the correlation between DSA and that cooperative motion, by adding a case of intrinsic c-Si. We confirmed that the cooperative motion slightly promote DSA by assisting migration of SIAs toward metastable sites as long as the FP concentration is less than 3%, however, it is essentially independent of DSA.

  8. Self-assembled nanostructures via electrospraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, S. N.

    2006-07-01

    A concentrated nanoparticulate-based ethylene glycol suspension was prepared and electrosprayed at optimum and stable cone-jet mode conditions. Using laser spectroscopy, the droplets were measured and found to range within ∼0.23-3.8 μm. In parallel to spectroscopy-assisted sizing, a volume equivalence route for estimating droplet sizes was carried out by measuring contact angles and diameters of the deposits. The electrosprayed nanosuspension relics were examined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These deposits were further characterized using energy-dispersive X-rays and selected area electron diffraction. Simultaneously deposits were formed by a controlled route through needle deposition without the presence of an electric field. The structures formed in this non-electric field driven route are compared with those formed with electric fields. Thus, elucidating electrosprays as a competing nanofabrication route for forming self-assemblies with a wide range of nanomaterials in the nanoscale for top-down based bottom-up assembly of structures.

  9. Self-assembly models for lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2006-03-01

    Solutions of mixed long and short (detergent-like) phospholipids referred to as ``bicelle'' mixtures in the literature, are known to form a variety of different morphologies based on their total lipid composition and temperature in a complex phase diagram. Some of these morphologies have been found to orient in a magnetic field, and consequently bicelle mixtures are widely used to study the structure of soluble as well as membrane embedded proteins using NMR. In this work, we report on the low temperature phase of the DMPC and DHPC bicelle mixture, where there is agreement on the discoid structures but where molecular packing models are still being contested. The most widely accepted packing arrangement, first proposed by Vold and Prosser had the lipids completely segregated in the disk: DHPC in the rim and DMPC in the disk. Using data from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments, we show how radius of the planar domain of the disks is governed by the effective molar ratio qeff of lipids in aggregate and not the molar ratio q (q = [DMPC]/[DHPC] ) as has been understood previously. We propose a new quantitative (packing) model and show that in this self assembly scheme, qeff is the real determinant of disk sizes. Based on qeff , a master equation can then scale the radii of disks from mixtures with varying q and total lipid concentration.

  10. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems.

  11. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-11-24

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole-dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained.

  12. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  13. Self-assembly of latex particles for colloidal crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhirong Li; Jingxia wang; Yanlin Song

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of latex particles is of great importance for fabricating various functional colloidal crystals.In this paper,we review recent research on the self-assembly of latex particles for colloidal crystals,covering the assembly forces and various assembly approaches of latex particles,including self-assembly by gravity sedimentation,vertical deposition,physical confinement,electric field,and magnetic field.Furthermore,some simple methods for assembling latex particles such as spin coating,spray coating,and printing are also summarized.

  14. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  15. Dynamic self-assembly of 'living' polymeric chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Binghui; Shi, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We report a dynamic self-assembly system of 'living' polymeric chains sustained by chemistry using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The linear polymeric chains consist of self-assembled nanoparticles connected by metastable linker molecules. As such, the polymeric chains, once assembled, undergo spontaneous dissociation driven by thermodynamics. However, with a continuous supply of linker molecules and the stored chemical energy therein, the polymeric chains can survive and maintain a steady state averaged chain length. These dynamically self-assembled polymeric chains are analogous to biological systems that both are thermodynamically metastable, yet dynamically stable upon continuous influx of matter and energy.

  16. The Lost Work in Dissipative Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, G. J. M.; Boekhoven, J.; Hendriksen, W. E.; van Esch, J. H.; Eelkema, R.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Rubí, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.

    2013-07-01

    A general thermodynamic analysis is given of dissipative self-assembly (DSA). Subsequently, the analysis is used to quantify the lost work in a recently published chemical realization of DSA (Boekhoven et al., Angew Chem Int Ed 49:4825, 2010) where a formation reaction produces the monomers that subsequently self-assemble and are finally annihilated by means of a destruction reaction. For this example, the work lost in self-assembly itself is found to be negligibly small compared to the work lost in the reactions driving the non-spontaneous formation reaction and the kinetically hindered destruction reaction.

  17. Inspection of directed self-assembly defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chikashi; Durant, Stephane; Lange, Steve; Harukawa, Ryota; Miyagi, Takemasa; Nagaswami, Venkat; Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina; Gronheid, Roel; Nealey, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is considered as a potential patterning solution for future generation devices. One of the most critical challenges for translating DSA into high volume manufacturing is to achieve low defect density in the DSA patterning process. The defect inspection capability is fundamental to defect reduction in any process, particularly the DSA process, as it provides engineers with information on the numbers and types of defects. While the challenges of other candidates of new generation lithography are well known (for example, smaller size, noise level due to LER etc.), the DSA process causes certain defects that are unique. These defects are nearly planar and in a material which produces very little defect scattering signal. These defects, termed as "dislocation" and "disclination" have unique shapes and have very little material contrast. While large clusters of these unique defects are easy to detect, single dislocation and disclination defects offer considerable challenge during inspection. In this investigation, etching the DSA pattern into a silicon (Si) substrate structure to enhance defect signal and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is studied. We used a Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) method for solving Maxwell's equations to simulate the DSA unique defects and calculate inspection parameters. Controllable inspection parameters include various illumination and collection apertures, wavelength band, polarization, noise filtering, focus, pixel size, and signal processing. From the RCWA simulation, we compared SNR between "Post-SiN etch" and "Post-SiN+Si-substrate etch" steps. The study is also extended to investigate wafer-level data at post etch inspection. Both the simulations and inspection tool results showed dramatic signal and SNR improvements when the pattern was etched into the SiN+Si substrate allowing capture of DSA unique defect types.

  18. Mixed-organic-cation perovskite photovoltaics for enhanced solar-light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, Norman; Gao, Peng; Gregori, Giuliano; Yang, Tae-Youl; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Maier, Joachim; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite APbX3 pigments, such as methylammonium lead iodide, have recently emerged as excellent light harvesters in solid-state mesoscopic solar cells. An important target for the further improvement of the performance of perovskite-based photovoltaics is to extend their optical-absorption onset further into the red to enhance solar-light harvesting. Herein, we show that this goal can be reached by using a mixture of formamidinium (HN=CHNH3 (+), FA) and methylammonium (CH3 NH3 (+), MA) cations in the A position of the APbI3 perovskite structure. This combination leads to an enhanced short-circuit current and thus superior devices to those based on only CH3 NH3 (+). This concept has not been applied previously in perovskite-based solar cells. It shows great potential as a versatile tool to tune the structural, electrical, and optoelectronic properties of the light-harvesting materials.

  19. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: a quantum heat engine picture

    CERN Document Server

    Killoran, Nathan; Plenio, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle, and quantify its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's applicability for realistic biological structures.

  20. Regulating the Energy Flow in a Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ido; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Harris, Dvir; Yochelis, Shira; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Adir, Noam; Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-16

    Photosynthetic organisms harvest light energy, utilizing the absorption and energy-transfer properties of protein-bound chromophores. Controlling the harvesting efficiency is critical for the optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we show that the cyanobacterial light-harvesting antenna complex may be able to regulate the flow of energy to switch reversibly from efficient energy conversion to photoprotective quenching via a structural change. We isolated cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, and measured their optical properties in solution and in an aggregated-desiccated state. The results indicate that energy band structures are changed, generating a switch between the two modes of operation, exciton transfer and quenching, achieved without dedicated carotenoid quenchers. This flexibility can contribute greatly to the large dynamic range of cyanobacterial light-harvesting systems.

  1. Cooperative Self-Assembly Transfer from Hierarchical Supramolecular Polymers to Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, João Paulo; Tardajos, Gloria; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Rödle, Alexander; Fernández, Gustavo; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés

    2015-11-24

    The transfer of information encoded by molecular subcomponents is a key phenomenon that regulates the biological inheritance in living organisms, yet there is a lack of understanding of related transfer mechanisms at the supramolecular level in artificial multicomponent systems. Our contribution to tackle this challenge has focused on the design of a thiolated π-conjugated linking unit, whose hierarchical, cooperative self-assembly in nonpolar media can be efficiently transferred from the molecular to the nanoscopic level, thereby enabling the reversible self-assembly of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) clusters. The transfer of supramolecular information by the linking π-system can only take place when a specific cooperative nucleation-elongation mechanism is operative, whereas low-ordered noncooperative assemblies formed below a critical concentration do not suffice to extend the order to the AuNP level. To the best of our knowledge, our approach has allowed for the first time a deep analysis of the hierarchy levels and thermodynamics involved in the self-assembly of AuNPs.

  2. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Cinar, Goksu; Aref Khalily, Mohammad; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  3. Self-Assembled Nanostructured Health Monitoring Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed NASA SBIR program is to design, fabricate and evaluate the performance of self-assembled nanostructured sensors for the health...

  4. Self-Assembling Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. and the MIT Space Systems Laboratory propose Self-assembling, Wireless, Autonomous, Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM) as an innovative approach to...

  5. Predicting self-assembled patterns on spheres with multicomponent coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Erik; Lindgren, Oskar; Jacobi, Martin Nilsson

    2014-05-01

    Patchy colloids are promising candidates for building blocks in directed self-assembly, but large scale synthesis of colloids with controlled surface patterns remains challenging. One potential fabrication method is to self-assemble the surface patterns themselves, allowing complex morphologies to organize spontaneously. For this approach to be competitive, prediction and control of the pattern formation process are necessary. However, structure formation in many-body systems is fundamentally hard to understand, and new theoretical methods are needed. Here we present a theory for self-assembling pattern formation in multi-component systems on the surfaces of colloidal particles, formulated as an analytic technique that predicts morphologies directly from the interactions in an effective model. As a demonstration we formulate an isotropic model of alkanethiols on gold, a suggested system for directed self-assembly, and predict its morphologies and transitions as a function of the interaction parameters.

  6. Directed flexibility: self-assembly of a supramolecular tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, James M; Xie, Tingzheng; Guo, Zaihong; Guo, Kai; Saunders, Mary Jane; Moorefield, Charles N; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Newkome, George R

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembly of a tribenzo-27-crown-9 ether functionalized with six terpyridines generated (85%) an expanded tetrahedral structure comprised of four independent triangular surfaces interlinked by crown ether vertices.

  7. Measuring quantum effects in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes with multipartite entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Cathal

    This thesis is a compilation of studies on delocalization measures, entanglement, and the role of quantum coherence in electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting complexes. The first two chapters after the introduction provide foundational knowledge of quantum information and light-harvesting, respectively. Chapter 2 introduces concepts from quantum information such as purity, bipartite entanglement and criteria for its measurement. The peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2, isolated from the anoxygenic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, is employed as model system of interest. This light-harvesting complex, along with a description of the process of light-harvesting, the presence of quantum coherence, and the different models used to simulate EET, are described in chapter 3. In combination these two chapters lay the foundation for chapter 4, a critical assessment of the current measures of delocalization employed in EET studies, their relationship, and overall effectiveness. The conclusion is that entanglement based measures are most effective at measuring quantum effects, and that they can be related to more conventional delocalization measures such as the inverse participation ratio (IPR) by taking into account the entropy of the system under study. All the measures within this chapter are known as bipartite measures, and only measure the strength of correlation between two sites. The fifth chapter presents the core of this thesis. Following a brief introduction to the concept of multipartite entanglement, the development of multipartite delocalization measures that give high-resolution information on quantum coherence in light-harvesting complexes is detailed. In contrast to other measures, these analytical measures can detect many body correlations in large systems undergoing decoherence. We determine that, much like the bipartite entanglement based measures of chapter 4, these measures are also a function of system entropy, and have a

  8. A hybrid photocatalytic system comprising ZnS as light harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic as hydrogen evolution catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fuyu; Wang, Xiuli; Huang, Lei; Ma, Guijun; Yang, Jinhui; Li, Can

    2012-05-01

    Photo opportunity: A highly efficient and stable hybrid artificial photosynthetic H(2) evolution system is assembled by using a semiconductor (ZnS) as light-harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic ([(μ-SPh-4-NH(2) )(2) Fe(2) (CO)(6)]) as catalyst for H(2) evolution. Photocatalytic H(2) production is achieved with more than 2607 turnovers (based on [Fe(2)S(2)]) and an initial turnover frequency of 100 h(-1) through the efficient transfer of photogenerated electrons from ZnS to the [Fe(2)S(2)] complex.

  9. Electronic polymers and DNA self-assembled in nanowire transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahiar; Elfwing, Anders; Gabrielsson, Roger; Inganäs, Olle

    2013-02-11

    Aqueous self-assembly of DNA and molecular electronic materials can lead to the creation of innumerable copies of identical devices, and inherently programmed complex nanocircuits. Here self-assembly of a water soluble and highly conducting polymer PEDOT-S with DNA in aqueous conditions is shown. Orientation and assembly of the conducting DNA/PEDOT-S complex into electrochemical DNA nanowire transistors is demonstrated.

  10. Construction of Supramolecular Architectures via Self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeharu; Haino

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In this paper we report supramolecular polymeric nano networks formed by the molecular-recognition-directed self-assembly between a calix[5]arene and C60[1]. Covalently-linked double-calix[5]arenes take up C60 into their cavities[2]. This complementary interaction creates a strong non-covalent bonding; thus,the iterative self-assembly between dumbbell fullerene 1 and ditopic host 2 can produce the supramolecular polymer networks (See Fig.1).

  11. Mesoscopic Self-Assembly: A Shift to Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eMastrangeli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the construction of thermodynamically stable structures, the self-assembly of mesoscopic systems has proven capable of formidable achievements in the bottom-up engineering of micro- and nanosystems. Yet, inspired by an analogous evolution in supramolecular chemistry, synthetic mesoscopic self-assembly may have a lot more ahead, within reach of a shift toward fully three-dimensional architectures, collective interactions of building blocks and kinetic control. All over these challenging fronts, complexity holds the key.

  12. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-30

    demonstrated that various substituted gallic acid derivatives can be used to constmict exo-receptors with a tapered shape. "Tihis paper will review...understood self-assembled biological system [3ab.5]. Therefore, we believe it provides an ideal model to be used for the understanding of the principles...governing the self-assembly of synthetic supraimolecular architectures. Synthetic Strategy Used In The Design Of TMV-Like Supramolecular Architectures fl

  13. Self-assembly drugs: from micelles to nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Besada-Porto, Jose Miguel; Ruso, Juan M

    2014-03-01

    Self-assembly has fascinated many scientists over the past few decades. Rapid advances and widespread interest in the study of this subject has led to the synthesis of an ever-increasing number of elegant and intricate functional structures with sizes that approach nano- and mesoscopic dimensions. Today, it has grown into a mature field of modern science whose interfaces with many disciplines have provided invaluable opportunities for crossing boundaries for scientists seeking to design novel molecular materials exhibiting unusual properties, and for researchers investigating the structure and function of biomolecules. Consequently, self-assembly transcends the traditional divisional boundaries of science and represents a highly interdisciplinary field including nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Basically, self-assembly focuses on a wide range of discrete molecules or molecular assemblies and uses physical transformations to achieve its goals. In this Review, we present a comprehensive overview of the advances in the field of drug self-assembly and discuss in detail the synthesis, self-assembly behavior, and physical properties as well as applications. We refer the reader to past reviews dealing with colloidal molecules and colloidal self-assembly. In the first part, we will discuss, compare, and link the various bioinformatic procedures: Molecular Dynamics and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship. The second section deals with the self-assembly behavior in more detail, in which we focus on several experimental techniques, selected according to the depth of knowledge obtained. The last part will review the advances in drug-protein assembly. Nature provides many examples of proteins that form their substrate binding sites by bringing together the component pieces in a process of self-assembly. We will focus in the understanding of physical properties and applications developing thereof.

  14. Biohydrogen production with the light-harvesting function of grana from spirulina and colloidal platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amao, Yutaka; Nakamura, Naoki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Oita University Dannoharu 700, Oita 870-1192 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    Biohydrogen production with the light-harvesting function of grana from spirulina by use of three-component system consisting of NADH, methylviologen (MV{sup 2+}) and colloidal platinum was investigated. The decay rate of chlorophyll included in grana was suppressed by addition of NADH and little degradation was observed in 120min irradiation. The biohydrogen production system was developed using the light-harvesting function of grana and platinum colloid in the presence of NADH and MV{sup 2+} and the amount of hydrogen produced was estimated to be 0.14{mu}mol after 4h irradiation. (author)

  15. DNA-directed spatial assembly of photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Sarah L; Withers, Jamie M; Singh, Ishwar; Cooper, Jonathan M; Clark, Alasdair W; Burley, Glenn A; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-28

    This manuscript describes the surface immobilization of a light-harvesting complex to prescribed locations directed by the sequence-selective recognition of duplex DNA. An engineered light-harvesting complex (RC-LH1) derived from Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris containing the zinc finger (ZF) domain zif268 was prepared. The zif268 domain directed the binding of zfRC-LH1 to target double-stranded DNA sequences both in solution and when immobilized on lithographically defined micro-patterns. Excitation energy transfer from the carotenoids to the bacteriochlorophyll pigments within zfRC-LH1 confirmed that the functional and structural integrity of the complex is retained after surface immobilization.

  16. Enhanced Light Harvesting in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Using External Lightguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hui Chien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An external lightguide (EL for enhancing the light-harvesting efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was designed and developed. The EL attached to the exterior of a DSSC photoelectrode directed light on a dye-covered nanoporous TiO2 film (D-NTF of the photoelectrode. Experimental tests confirmed that the EL increased the light-harvesting efficiency of a DSSC with an active area of 0.25 cm2 by 30.69%. Photocurrent density and the power conversion efficiency were also increased by 38.12% and 25.09%, respectively.

  17. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  18. Self-assembly of DNA-polymer complexes using template polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Budker, V G; Hanson, L J; Slattum, P M; Wolff, J A; Hagstrom, J E

    1998-09-15

    The self-assembly of supramolecular complexes of nucleic acids and polymers is of relevance to several biological processes including viral and chromatin formation as well as gene therapy vector design. We now show that template polymerization facilitates condensation of DNA into particles that are <150 nm in diameter. Inclusion of a poly(ethylene glycol)-containing monomer prevents aggregation of these particles. The DNA within the particles remains biologically active and can express foreign genes in cells. The formation or breakage of covalent bonds has until now not been employed to compact DNA into artificial particles.

  19. Bright Fluorescence and Host-Guest Sensing with a Nanoscale M₄L₆ Tetrahedron Accessed by Self-Assembly of Zinc-Imine Chelate Vertices and Perylene Bisimide Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Würthner, Frank

    2015-06-15

    A highly luminescent Zn4L6 tetrahedron is reported with 3.8 nm perylene bisimide edges and hexadentate Zn(II)-imine chelate vertices. Replacing Fe(II) and monoamines commonly utilized in subcomponent self-assembly with Zn(II) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine provides access to a metallosupramolecular host with the rare combination of structural integrity at concentrations <10(-7) mol L(-1) and an exceptionally high fluorescence quantum yield of Φ(em) =0.67. Encapsulation of multiple perylene or coronene guest molecules is accompanied by strong luminescence quenching. We anticipate this self-assembly strategy may be generalized to improve access to brightly fluorescent coordination cages tailored for host-guest light-harvesting, photocatalysis, and sensing.

  20. Spectroscopy of Single Light-Harvesting Complexes from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria at 1.2 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, A.M. van; Ketelaars, M.; Köhler, J.; Aartsma, T.J.; Schmidt, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this Letter we present the first observation of the fluorescence-excitation spectra of individual light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple photosynthetic bacteria at 1.2 K. The spectra reveal the electronic transitions to the individual excitonic states of the assembly of absorbing bacterioch

  1. Strong antenna-enhanced fluorescence of a single light-harvesting complex shows photon antibunching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-06-23

    The nature of the highly efficient energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is a subject of intense research. Unfortunately, the low fluorescence efficiency and limited photostability hampers the study of individual light-harvesting complexes at ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an over 500-fold fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) at the single-molecule level by coupling to a gold nanoantenna. The resonant antenna produces an excitation enhancement of circa 100 times and a fluorescence lifetime shortening to ~20 ps. The radiative rate enhancement results in a 5.5-fold-improved fluorescence quantum efficiency. Exploiting the unique brightness, we have recorded the first photon antibunching of a single light-harvesting complex under ambient conditions, showing that the 27 bacteriochlorophylls coordinated by LH2 act as a non-classical single-photon emitter. The presented bright antenna-enhanced LH2 emission is a highly promising system to study energy transfer and the role of quantum coherence at the level of single complexes.

  2. Energy transfer from conjugated polymer to bacterial light-harvesting complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buczynska, D.; Bujak, L.; Loi, M. A.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Cogdell, R.; Mackowski, S.; Bujak, Ł.

    2012-01-01

    Energy transfer from a conjugated polymer blend (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl):poly (2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene) to a light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria has been demonstrated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. For our hybrid nanostructure, we

  3. Organization of the Bacterial Light-Harvesting Apparatus Rationalized by Exciton Transport Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Harel, Elad

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light harvesting I-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM)1. Here, we report that the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane can be largely rationalized by a simple physical model that relies primarily on exciton transfer optimization. The process through which the light-harvesting complexes transfer excitation energy has been recognized to incorporate both coherent and incoherent processes mediated by the surrounding protein environment. Using the Haken-Strobl model, we show that the organization of the complexes in the membrane can be almost entirely explained by simple electrostatic considerations and that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robust...

  4. Plasmon enhanced light harvesting: multiscale modeling of the FMO protein coupled with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Caprasecca, Stefano; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Guarnetti-Prandi, Ingrid; Guido, Ciro A; Jurinovich, Sandro; Viani, Lucas; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2015-05-28

    Plasmonic systems, such as metal nanoparticles, are becoming increasingly important in spectroscopies and devices because of their ability to enhance, even by several orders of magnitude, the photophysical properties of neighboring systems. In particular, it has been shown both theoretically and experimentally that combining nanoplasmonic devices with natural light-harvesting proteins substantially increases the fluorescence and absorption properties of the system. This kind of biohybrid device can have important applications in the characterization and design of efficient light-harvesting systems. In the present work, the FMO light-harvesting protein was combined with gold nanoparticles of different sizes, and its photophysical properties were characterized using a multiscale quantum-mechanical classical-polarizable and continuum model (QM/MMPol/PCM). By optimal tuning of the plasmon resonance of the metal nanoparticles, fluorescence enhancements of up to 2 orders of magnitude were observed. Orientation effects were found to be crucial: amplifications by factors of up to 300 were observed for the absorption process, while the radiative decay of the emitting state increased at most by a factor of 10, mostly as a result of poor alignment of the emitting state with the considered metal aggregates. Despite being a limiting factor for high-fluorescence-enhancement devices, the strong orientation dependence may represent an important feature of the natural light-harvesting system that could allow selective enhancement of a specific excited state of the complex.

  5. Stark spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex II in different oligomerisation states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palacios, M.A.; Frese, R.N.; Gradinaru, C.C.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Premvardhan, L.L.; Horton, P.; Ruban, A.V.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The electric field-induced absorption changes (Stark effect) of light-harvesting complex 11 (LHCII) in different oligomerisation states-monomeric, trimeric and aggregated-have been probed at 77 K. All the chlorophyll (Chl) a molecules exhibit electro-optic properties in the Q(y) absorption region ch

  6. New Light-Harvesting Materials Using Accurate and Efficient Bandgap Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Hüser, Falco; Pandey, Mohnish;

    2014-01-01

    of materials for different applications where the bandgaps are used as descriptors for the efficiency of a photoelectrochemical device. Here, new light harvesting materials are proposed to be used in a one-photon photoelectrochemical device for water splitting by combining the estimation of the bandgaps...

  7. Ab inito study on triplet excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2011-04-28

    We have studied the triplet energy transfer (TET) for photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, the bacterial light-harvesting complex II (LH2) of Rhodospirillum molischianum and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, and the peridinin-chlorophyll a protein (PCP) from Amphidinium carterae. The electronic coupling factor was calculated with the recently developed fragment spin difference scheme (You and Hsu, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 074105), which is a general computational scheme that yields the overall coupling under the Hamiltonian employed. The TET rates were estimated based on the couplings obtained. For all light-harvesting complexes studied, there exist nanosecond triplet energy transfer from the chlorophylls to the carotenoids. This result supports a direct triplet quenching mechanism for the photoprotection function of carotenoids. The TET rates are similar for a broad range of carotenoid triplet state energy, which implies a general and robust TET quenching role for carotenoids in photosynthesis. This result is also consistent with the weak dependence of TET kinetics on the type or the number of π conjugation lengths in the carotenoids and their analogues reported in the literature. We have also explored the possibility of forming triplet excitons in these complexes. In B850 of LH2 or the peridinin cluster in PCP, it is unlikely to have triplet exciton since the energy differences of any two neighboring molecules are likely to be much larger than their TET couplings. Our results provide theoretical limits to the possible photophysics in the light-harvesting complexes.

  8. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-02-05

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have several functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be among the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria, the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level, we introduce an atomistic model that mimics a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains approximately 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate, and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the transfer between collective excited states of pigments can result in robust energy funneling to the initial excitation conditions and temperature changes. Moreover, the same mechanism describes the coexistence of multiple time scales of excitation dynamics frequently observed in ultrafast optical experiments. While our findings support the hypothesis of supertransfer, the model reveals energy transport through multiple channels on different length scales.

  9. Improving light harvesting in polymer photodetector devices through nanoindented metal mask films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, A. G.; Zanetti, F.; Mikowski, A.; Hummelen, J. C.; Lepienski, C. M.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Roman, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    To enhance light harvesting in organic photovoltaic devices, we propose the incorporation of a metal (aluminum) mask film in the system's usual layout. We fabricate devices in a sandwich geometry, where the mask (nanoindented with a periodic array of holes of sizes d and spacing s) is added between

  10. Bio serves nano: biological light-harvesting complex as energy donor for semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werwie, Mara; Xu, Xiangxing; Haase, Mathias; Basché, Thomas; Paulsen, Harald

    2012-04-03

    Light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants is attached to type-II core-shell CdTe/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) exhibiting an absorption band at 710 nm and carrying a dihydrolipoic acid coating for water solubility. LHCII stays functional upon binding to the QD surface and enhances the light utilization of the QDs significantly, similar to its light-harvesting function in photosynthesis. Electronic excitation energy transfer of about 50% efficiency is shown by donor (LHCII) fluorescence quenching as well as sensitized acceptor (QD) emission and corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The energy transfer efficiency is commensurable with the expected efficiency calculated according to Förster theory on the basis of the estimated donor-acceptor separation. Light harvesting is particularly efficient in the red spectral domain where QD absorption is relatively low. Excitation over the entire visible spectrum is further improved by complementing the biological pigments in LHCII with a dye attached to the apoprotein; the dye has been chosen to absorb in the "green gap" of the LHCII absorption spectrum and transfers its excitation energy ultimately to QD. This is the first report of a biological light-harvesting complex serving an inorganic semiconductor nanocrystal. Due to the charge separation between the core and the shell in type-II QDs the presented LHCII-QD hybrid complexes are potentially interesting for sensitized charge-transfer and photovoltaic applications.

  11. Strong antenna-enhanced fluorescence of a single light-harvesting complex shows photon anti-bunching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, E.; Renger, J.; Curto, A.G.; Cogdell, R.; Hulst, van N.F.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the highly efficient energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is a subject of intense research. Unfortunately, the low fluorescence efficiency and limited photostability hampers the study of individual light-harvesting complexes at ambient conditions. Here we demons

  12. Functional architectures based on self-assembly of bio-inspired dipeptides: Structure modulation and its photoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengjun; Liu, Kai; Li, Junbai; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-01

    Getting inspiration from nature and further developing functional architectures provides an effective way to design innovative materials and systems. Among bio-inspired materials, dipeptides and its self-assembled architectures with functionalities have recently been the subject of intensive studies. However, there is still a great challenge to explore its applications likely due to the lack of effective adaptation of their self-assembled structures as well as a lack of understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms. In this context, taking diphenylalanine (FF, a core recognition motif for molecular self-assembly of the Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptides) as a model of bio-inspired dipeptides, recent strategies on modulation of dipeptide-based architectures were introduced with regard to both covalent (architectures modulation by coupling functional groups) and non-covalent ways (controlled architectures by different assembly pathways). Then, applications are highlighted in some newly emerging fields of innovative photoelectronic devices and materials, such as artificial photosynthetic systems for renewable solar energy storage and renewable optical waveguiding materials for optoelectronic devices. At last, the challenges and future perspectives of these bio-inspired dipeptides are also addressed.

  13. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  14. Controlled crystallization of hydroxyapatite under hexadecylamine self-assembled monolayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄苏萍; 周科朝; 刘咏; 黄伯云

    2003-01-01

    The role of self-assembled monolayer in inducing the crystal growth was investigated by X-ray diffractions (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that crystallization in the absence of monolayer results in a mixture of poorly crystallized calcium phosphates, including hydroxyapatite (HAP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP), while the presence of self-assembled monolayer gives rise to oriented and well crystallized HAP crystals. Moreover, the HAP crystal grows very quickly under the self-assembled monolayer, whereas very little calcium phosphate crystals grow without the monolayer. It is rationalized that the hexadecylamine monolayer with high polarity and charged density leads to increase supersaturation and lower the interfacial energy, which attributes to the HAP crystals nucleation. On the other hand, the positive headgroups construct the ordered "recognized site" with distinct size and topology, which results in the oriented HAP crystals deposit.

  15. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  16. Self-assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Theodorakis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal particles grafted with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA chains can self-assemble into a number of different crystalline structures, where hybridization of the ssDNA chains creates links between colloids stabilizing their structure. Depending on the geometry and the size of the particles, the grafting density of the ssDNA chains, and the length and choice of DNA sequences, a number of different crystalline structures can be fabricated. However, understanding how these factors contribute synergistically to the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized nano- or micro-sized particles remains an intensive field of research. Moreover, the fabrication of long-range structures due to kinetic bottlenecks in the self-assembly are additional challenges. Here, we discuss the most recent advances from theory and experiment with particular focus put on recent simulation studies.

  17. Hydrodynamic Self-Assembly of Topographical Patterns on Soft Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Satish [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-01-06

    The objective of this project is to use theoretical tools to explore fundamentally new ways of creating and controlling surface topography on soft materials (e.g., polymeric liquids, gels, colloidal suspensions) that make use of principles from hydrodynamics and self-assembly. Surface topography is known to have a significant impact on the optical, adhesive, and wetting properties of materials, so improved fundamental understanding of how to create and control it will help enable the tailoring of these properties to desired specifications. Self-assembly is the spontaneous organization of an ordered structure, and hydrodynamics often plays an important role in the self-assembly of soft materials. This research supported through this project has led to the discovery of a number of novel phenomena that are described in published journal articles. In this way, the research significantly adds to the fundamental understanding of the topics investigated.

  18. A novel autonomous self-assembly distributed swarm flying robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hongxing; Li Ning; Liu Miao; Tan Jindong

    2013-01-01

    Swarm intelligence embodied by many species such as ants and bees has inspired scholars in swarm robotic researches.This paper presents a novel autonomous self-assembly distributed swarm flying robot-DSFR,which can drive on the ground,autonomously accomplish self-assembly and then fly in the air coordinately.Mechanical and electrical designs ofa DSFR module,as well as the kinematics and dynamics analysis,are specifically investigated.Meanwhile,this paper brings forward a generalized adjacency matrix to describe configurations of DSFR structures.Also,the distributed flight control model is established for vertical taking-off and horizontal hovering,which can be applied to control of DSFR systems with arbitrary configurations.Finally,some experiments are carried out to testify and validate the DSFR design,the autonomous self-assembly strategy and the distributed flight control laws.

  19. Self-assembly of size-controlled liposomes on DNA nanotemplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Shigematsu, Hideki; Xu, Weiming; Shih, William M.; Rothman, James E.; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lipid-bilayer membranes are valuable tools for the study of membrane structure and dynamics. For applications such as the study of vesicular transport and drug delivery, there is a pressing need for artificial vesicles with controlled size. However, controlling vesicle size and shape with nanometre precision is challenging, and approaches to achieve this can be heavily affected by lipid composition. Here, we present a bio-inspired templating method to generate highly monodispersed sub-100-nm unilamellar vesicles, where liposome self-assembly was nucleated and confined inside rigid DNA nanotemplates. Using this method, we produce homogeneous liposomes with four distinct predefined sizes. We also show that the method can be used with a variety of lipid compositions and probe the mechanism of templated liposome formation by capturing key intermediates during membrane self-assembly. The DNA nanotemplating strategy represents a conceptually novel way to guide lipid bilayer formation and could be generalized to engineer complex membrane/protein structures with nanoscale precision.

  20. Self-Assembled DNA Templated Nano-wires and Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Erez

    2000-03-01

    The realization that conventional microelectronics is approaching its miniaturization limits has motivated the search for an alternative route based on self-assembled nanometer-scale electronics. We have recently proposed a new approach based on the hybridization of biological and electronic materials (Braun E., Eichen Y., Sivan U. and Ben-Yoseph G., Nature 391, 775 (1998)). The concept relies on a two-step self-assembly process. The inherent molecular recognition capabilities of DNA molecules are first utilized to construct a network that serves as a template for the subsequent assembly of electronic materials into a circuit. The utilization of DNA and its associated enzymatic machinery enables: (a) self-assembly of complex substrates, (b) specific molecular addresses for the localization of electronic materials (e.g., gold colloids) by standard molecular biology techniques, (c) interdevice wiring and (d) bridging the microscopic structures to the macroscopic world. The self-assembly of nanometer scale electronics relies on two complementary developments. First, the ability to convert DNA molecules into thin conductive wires and second, the self-assembly of complex extended DNA templates. Our progress in these two directions will be presented. Regarding the first issue, a physical process resulting in condensation of gold colloids onto DNA molecules enables the assembly of thin gold wires (around 100-200 A wide) having, in principle, unlimited extensions. The second issue is developed in the context of recombinant DNA which allows the self-assembly of precise molecular junctions and networks. Specifically, we use RecA protein, which is the main protein responsible for genetic recombination in E. Coli bacteria, to construct DNA junctions at pre-designed addresses (sequences) on the molecules. The integration of these processes allows advancing nanometer-scale electronics. A realistic fabrication scheme for a room-temperature single-electron transistor

  1. Self-Assembled Hydrogel Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gama

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel nanoparticles—also referred to as polymeric nanogels or macromolecular micelles—are emerging as promising drug carriers for therapeutic applications. These nanostructures hold versatility and properties suitable for the delivery of bioactive molecules, namely of biopharmaceuticals. This article reviews the latest developments in the use of self-assembled polymeric nanogels for drug delivery applications, including small molecular weight drugs, proteins, peptides, oligosaccharides, vaccines and nucleic acids. The materials and techniques used in the development of self-assembling nanogels are also described.

  2. Self-assembly of two-dimensional DNA crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Cheng; CHEN Yaqing; WEI Shuai; YOU Xiaozeng; XIAO Shoujun

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides into two-dimensional lattices presents a 'bottom-up' approach to the fabrication of devices on nanometer scale. We report the design and observation of two-dimensional crystalline forms of DNAs that are composed of twenty-one plane oligonucleotides and one phosphate-modified oligonucleotide. These synthetic sequences are designed to self-assemble into four double-crossover (DX) DNA tiles. The 'sticky ends' of these tiles that associate according to Watson-Crick's base pairing are programmed to build up specific periodic patterns upto tens of microns. The patterned crystals are visualized by the transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Self-assembly of flagellin on Au(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Orive, Alejandro; Pissinis, Diego E; Diaz, Carolina; Miñán, Alejandro; Benítez, Guillermo A; Rubert, Aldo; Daza Millone, Antonieta; Rumbo, Martin; Hernández Creus, Alberto; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Schilardi, Patricia L

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of flagellin monomers from Pseudomonas fluorescens on Au(111) has been studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. Results show that flagellin monomers spontaneously self-assemble forming a monolayer thick protein film bounded to the Au surface by the more hydrophobic subunit and exposed to the environment the hydrophilic subunit. The films are conductive and allow allocation of electrochemically active cytochrome C. The self-assembled films could be used as biological platforms to build 3D complex molecular structures on planar metal surfaces and to functionalize metal nanoparticles.

  4. Directional Self-assembly in Archaerhodopsin-Reconstituted Phospholipid Liposomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴佳; 黄力; 刘坚; 明明; 李庆国; 丁建东

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, that Archaerhodopsin-4 (AR4) could be reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes by self-assembly. AR4 is a new membrane protein isolated from halobacteria H.sp. xz515 in a salt lake of Tibet, China. This is a bacteriorhodopsin (bR) like protein, function as a light-driven proton pump. Experimental measurements verified that similar to bR, AR not only remains its biological activity in pmteoliposome, but also keeps a preferred orientation in self-assembly.

  5. Self-assembly patterning of organic molecules on a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Minghu; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Maksymovych, Petro; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Li, Qing

    2017-04-04

    The embodiments disclosed herein include all-electron control over a chemical attachment and the subsequent self-assembly of an organic molecule into a well-ordered three-dimensional monolayer on a metal surface. The ordering or assembly of the organic molecule may be through electron excitation. Hot-electron and hot-hole excitation enables tethering of the organic molecule to a metal substrate, such as an alkyne group to a gold surface. All-electron reactions may allow a direct control over the size and shape of the self-assembly, defect structures and the reverse process of molecular disassembly from single molecular level to mesoscopic scale.

  6. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furst, Eric (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Dunn, Elissa (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Park, Jin-Gyu (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Merrill, Jason (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Dufresne, Eric (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Lele, Pushkar (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Mittal, Manish (University of Delaware, Newark, DE)

    2009-09-01

    Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

  7. Self-assembly and manipulation of particles on drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, M.; Fischer, I. S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    We have recently shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be self-assembled at the poles or the equator of the drop by applying a uniform electric field, and that this method can be used to separate on the surface of a drop particles experiencing positive dielectrophoresis from those experiencing negative dielectrophoresis. In this talk we show that the frequency of the electric field is an important parameter which can be used to modify the distribution of self-assembled monolayers.

  8. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  9. Large-Scale Self-Assembled Ag Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Guodan; NAN Cewen; YU Dapeng

    2005-01-01

    A high yield of silver nanotubes with large aspect ratio were conveniently synthesized via an organic-assist solvothermal preparation technique using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping reagent and architecture soft-template. The molecular ratio between the repeating unit of PVP and AgNO3 plays a crucial role in determining the geometric shape of the product. Such novel-type Ag nanotubes were self-assembled by Ag nanoparticles, which had largely similar crystallographic orientation, forming a texture. The fact that nanoparticles without anisotropic crystal structures can form such superstructures by self-assembly may open a window for understanding a range of nanotube formation processes.

  10. A light-harvesting siphonaxanthin-chlorophyll a/b-protein complex of marine green alga,Bryopsis corticulans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hui; SHEN Shihua; HE Junfang; LENG Jing; LI Liangbi; KUANG Tingyun

    2004-01-01

    A light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex (LHCP) was isolated directly from thylakoid membranes of marine green alga, Bryopsis corticulans, by two consecutive runs of liquid chromatography. The trimeric form of the light-harvesting complex has been obtained by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The result of SDSPAGE shows that the light-harvesting complex is composed of at least five apoproteins in which a protein with apparent molecular weight of about 31 kD was never found in the major light-harvesting complex (LHC Ⅱ) from higher plants.The isolated Bryopsis corticulans light-harvesting complex contains a specific carotenoid, siphonaxanthin, as well as chlorophyll (Chl) a, Chl b, neoxanthin and violaxanthin. Siphonaxanthin which is present in the light-harvesting siphonaxanthin-chlorophyll a/b-protein complex of Bryopsis corticulans is responsible for enhanced absorption in the blue-green region (530 nm). Efficient energy transfer from both siphonaxanthin and Chl b to Chl a in Bryopsis corticulans LHCP, which has similar absorption and fluorescence emission spectra to those of the lutein-chlorophyll a/b-protein of higher plants, proved that molecular arrangement of the light-harvesting pigments was highly ordered in the Bryopsis corticulans LHCP. The siphonaxanthin-chlorophyll a/b-proteins allow enhanced absorption of blue-green light, the predominant light available in deep ocean waters or shaded subtidal marine habitats.

  11. Improving photosynthesis of microalgae by changing the ratio of light-harvesting pigments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaohong; CHEN Lanzhou; LI Genbao; LI Dunhai; HU Chunxiang; CHEN Haofeng; LIU Yongding; SONG Lirong

    2005-01-01

    Changing the ratio of light-harvesting pigments was regarded as an efficient way to improve the photosynthesis rate in microalgae, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, a mutant of Anabeana simensis (called SP) was selected from retrieved satellite cultures. Several parameters related with photosynthesis, such as the growth, photosynthesis rate, the content of photosynthetic pigment, low temperature fluorescence spectrum (77K) and electron transport rate, were compared with those of the wild type. It was found that the change in the ratio of light-harvesting pigments in the mutant led to more efficient light energy transfer and usage in mutant than in the wild type. This may be the reason why the mutant had higher photosynthesis and growth rates.

  12. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  13. Architecture of a charge-transfer state regulating light harvesting in a plant antenna protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R

    2008-05-01

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). We found evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a delocalized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can "tune" the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophyll-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  14. Plasmon-controlled light-harvesting: design rules for biohybrid devices via multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Biancardi, Alessandro; Corni, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2013-09-11

    Photosynthesis is triggered by the absorption of light by light-harvesting (LH) pigment-protein complexes followed by excitation energy transfer to the reaction center(s). A promising strategy to achieve control on and to improve light harvesting is to complement the LH complexes with plasmonic particles. Here a recently developed QM/MM/continuum approach is used to investigate the LH process of the peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP) complex on a silver island film. The simulations not only reproduce and interpret the experiments but they also suggest general rules to design novel biohybrid devices; hot-spot configurations in which the LH complex is sandwiched between couples of metal aggregates are found to produce the largest amplifications. Indications about the best distances and orientations are also reported together with illumination and emission geometries of the PCP-NP system necessary to achieve the maximum enhancement.

  15. Purple-bacterial light harvesting benefits more from energy funnelling than from delocalisation

    CERN Document Server

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria have two properties that are thought to contribute to the efficiency of their exciton transport: an energy funnel that directs excitons towards the reaction centre as well as substantial excitonic delocalisation, which can enhance transport through supertransfer. To determine the relative importance of these two features, we compared models of the light-harvesting apparatus with thousands of counterfactual situations in which the extent of delocalisation and the energy landscape were altered. We find that the influence of delocalisation is usually minor and sometimes deleterious, especially when compared to the decisive importance of a funnel in the energy landscape. Consequently, delocalisation is most likely a side-effect of the dense chlorophyll packing that evolved to increase light absorption per reaction centre.

  16. Silica entrapment for significantly stabilized, energy-conducting light-harvesting complex (LHCII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Sebastian; Hobe, Stephan; Paulsen, Harald

    2014-12-02

    The major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in green plants consists of a membrane protein and numerous noncovalently bound pigments that make up about one-third of the molecular mass of the pigment-protein complex. Due to this high pigment density, LHCII is potentially interesting as a light-harvesting component in synthetic constructs. However, for such applications its stability needs to be significantly improved. In this work, LHCII was dramatically stabilized by enclosing it within polymerizing colloidal silica. The entrapped LHCII stayed functional at 50 °C for up to 24 h instead of a few minutes in detergent solution and clearly showed energy transfer between complexes. Entrapment yield was enhanced by a polycationic peptide attached to the N terminus. Both the extent of stabilization and the yield of entrapment strongly increased with decreasing diameters of the silica particles.

  17. Quantum coherent energy transfer over varying pathways in single light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildner, Richard; Brinks, Daan; Nieder, Jana B; Cogdell, Richard J; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-06-21

    The initial steps of photosynthesis comprise the absorption of sunlight by pigment-protein antenna complexes followed by rapid and highly efficient funneling of excitation energy to a reaction center. In these transport processes, signatures of unexpectedly long-lived coherences have emerged in two-dimensional ensemble spectra of various light-harvesting complexes. Here, we demonstrate ultrafast quantum coherent energy transfer within individual antenna complexes of a purple bacterium under physiological conditions. We find that quantum coherences between electronically coupled energy eigenstates persist at least 400 femtoseconds and that distinct energy-transfer pathways that change with time can be identified in each complex. Our data suggest that long-lived quantum coherence renders energy transfer in photosynthetic systems robust in the presence of disorder, which is a prerequisite for efficient light harvesting.

  18. Clustered Geometries Exploiting Quantum Coherence Effects for Efficient Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Qing; Jin, Bih-Yaw; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating quantum coherence effects and geometrical factors for efficient energy transfer in photosynthesis has the potential to uncover non-classical design principles for advanced organic materials. We study energy transfer in a linear light-harvesting model to reveal that dimerized geometries with strong electronic coherences within donor and acceptor pairs exhibit significantly improved efficiency, which is in marked contrast to predictions of the classical F\\"orster theory. We reveal that energy tuning due to coherent delocalization of photoexcitations is mainly responsible for the efficiency optimization. This coherence-assisted energy-tuning mechanism also explains the energetics and chlorophyll arrangements in the widely-studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We argue that a clustered network with rapid energy relaxation among donors and resonant energy transfer from donor to acceptor states provides a basic formula for constructing efficient light-harvesting systems, and the general principles revea...

  19. Environmental correlation effects on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies of energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes have revealed a subtle interplay between coherent and decoherent dynamic contributions to the overall transfer efficiency in these open quantum systems. In this work we systematically investigate the impact of temporal and spatial correlations in environmental fluctuations on excitation transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex. We demonstrate that the exact nature of the correlations can have a large impact on the efficiency of light harvesting. In particular, we find that spatial correlations can enhance coherences in the site basis while at the same time slowing transport, and that the overall efficiency of transport is maximized at a finite temporal correlation that results in optimal driving of transitions between excitonic states.

  20. Density of phonon states in the light-harvesting complex II of green plants

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, J K; Irrgang, K D; Renger, G

    2002-01-01

    In photosynthetic antenna complexes, the coupling of electronic transitions to low-frequency vibrations of the protein matrix (phonons) plays an essential role in light absorption and ultra-fast excitation energy transfer (EET). The model calculations presented here indicate that inelastic neutron scattering experiments provide invaluable information on the phonon density of states for light-harvesting complex II, which may permit a consistent interpretation of contradictory results from high-resolution optical spectroscopy. (orig.)

  1. A Hidden State in Light-Harvesting Complex II Revealed By Multipulse Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Oort, Bart van; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is pivotal both for collecting solar radiation for photosynthesis, and for protection against photodamage under high light intensities (via a process called nonphotochemical quenching, NPQ). Aggregation of LHCII is associated with fluorescence quenching, and is used as an in vitro model system of NPQ. However, there is no agreement on the nature of the quencher and on the validity of aggregation as a model system. Here, we use ultrafast multipulse spectrosc...

  2. Single-molecule exploration of photoprotective mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiang-Yu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Gwizdala, Michal; Krüger, Tjaart; Xu, Pengqi; Croce, Roberta; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    Plants harvest sunlight by converting light energy to electron flow through the primary events in photosynthesis. One important question is how the light harvesting machinery adapts to fluctuating sunlight intensity. As a result of various regulatory processes, efficient light harvesting and photoprotection are balanced. Some of the biological steps in the photoprotective processes have been extensively studied and physiological regulatory factors have been identified. For example, the effect of lumen pH in changing carotenoid composition has been explored. However, the importance of photophysical dynamics in the initial light-harvesting steps and its relation to photoprotection remain poorly understood. Conformational and excited-state dynamics of multi-chromophore pigment-protein complexes are often difficult to study and limited information can be extracted from ensemble-averaged measurements. To address the problem, we use the Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trap to investigate the fluorescence from individual copies of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the primary antenna protein in higher plants, in a solution-phase environment. Perturbative surface immobilization or encapsulation schemes are avoided, and therefore the intrinsic dynamics and heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual proteins are revealed. We perform simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity (brightness), excited-state lifetime, and emission spectrum of single trapped proteins. By analyzing the correlated changes between these observables, we identify forms of LHCII with different fluorescence intensities and excited-state lifetimes. The distinct forms may be associated with different energy dissipation mechanisms in the energy transfer chain. Changes of relative populations in response to pH and carotenoid composition are observed, which may extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of photoprotection.

  3. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  4. Photoinduced Electronic Energy Transfer: Theoretical and Experimental Issues for Light Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    harvesting systems. Summary of key results: 1. Coherence in photosynthetic light harvesting (experiment) The initial step in photosynthesis ...two dihydrobiliverdins (DBV) with a peak absorption of 580 nm, two mesobiliverdins (MBV) with absorption peaks near 610 nm and four...phycocyanobilins (PCB) two with peak absorptions of 630 nm and two with peaks at 645 nm – covalently bound to a protein matrix. The presence of three distinct types

  5. Direct evidence of quantum transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Abramavicius, Darius; Caram, Justin R.; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Mukamel, Shaul; Engel, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    The photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus moves energy from absorbed photons to the reaction center with remarkable quantum efficiency. Recently, long-lived quantum coherence has been proposed to influence efficiency and robustness of photosynthetic energy transfer in light-harvesting antennae. The quantum aspect of these dynamics has generated great interest both because of the possibility for efficient long-range energy transfer and because biology is typically considered to operate entirely in the classical regime. Yet, experiments to date show only that coherence persists long enough that it can influence dynamics, but they have not directly shown that coherence does influence energy transfer. Here, we provide experimental evidence that interaction between the bacteriochlorophyll chromophores and the protein environment surrounding them not only prolongs quantum coherence, but also spawns reversible, oscillatory energy transfer among excited states. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we observe oscillatory excited-state populations demonstrating that quantum transport of energy occurs in biological systems. The observed population oscillation suggests that these light-harvesting antennae trade energy reversibly between the protein and the chromophores. Resolving design principles evident in this biological antenna could provide inspiration for new solar energy applications. PMID:22167798

  6. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of chlorophylls in light-harvesting complexes coupled to silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Dorota; Krajnik, Bartosz; Olejnik, Maria; Twardowska, Magdalena; Czechowski, Nikodem; Hofmann, Eckhard; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate metal-enhanced fluorescence of peridinin-chlorophyll protein coupled to silver nanowires using optical microscopy combined with spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In particular we study two different sample geometries: first, in which the light-harvesting complexes are deposited onto silver nanowires, and second, where solution of both nanostructures are mixed prior deposition on a substrate. The results indicate that for the peridinin-chlorophyll complexes placed in the vicinity of the silver nanowires we observe higher intensities of fluorescence emission as compared to the reference sample, where no nanowires are present. Enhancement factors estimated for the sample where the light-harvesting complexes are mixed together with the silver nanowires prior deposition on a substrate are generally larger in comparison to the other geometry of a hybrid nanostructure. While fluorescence spectra are identical both in terms of overall shape and maximum wavelength for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes both isolated and coupled to metallic nanostructures, we conclude that interaction with plasmon excitations in the latter remains neutral to the functionality of the biological system. Fluorescence transients measured for the PCP complexes coupled to the silver nanowires indicate shortening of the fluorescence lifetime pointing towards modifications of radiative rate due to plasmonic interactions. Our results can be applied for developing ways to plasmonically control the light-harvesting capability of photosynthetic complexes.

  7. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  8. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  9. Design principles of natural light-harvesting as revealed by single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krüger, T.P.J., E-mail: tjaart.kruger@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Grondelle, R. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Biology offers a boundless source of adaptation, innovation, and inspiration. A wide range of photosynthetic organisms exist that are capable of harvesting solar light in an exceptionally efficient way, using abundant and low-cost materials. These natural light-harvesting complexes consist of proteins that strongly bind a high density of chromophores to capture solar photons and rapidly transfer the excitation energy to the photochemical reaction centre. The amount of harvested light is also delicately tuned to the level of solar radiation to maintain a constant energy throughput at the reaction centre and avoid the accumulation of the products of charge separation. In this Review, recent developments in the understanding of light-harvesting by plants will be discussed, based on results obtained from single molecule spectroscopy studies. Three design principles of the main light-harvesting antenna of plants will be highlighted: (a) fine, photoactive control over the intrinsic protein disorder to efficiently use intrinsically available thermal energy dissipation mechanisms; (b) the design of the protein microenvironment of a low-energy chromophore dimer to control the amount of shade absorption; (c) the design of the exciton manifold to ensure efficient funneling of the harvested light to the terminal emitter cluster.

  10. Direct evidence of quantum transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Voronine, Dmitri V; Abramavicius, Darius; Caram, Justin R; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Mukamel, Shaul; Engel, Gregory S

    2011-12-27

    The photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus moves energy from absorbed photons to the reaction center with remarkable quantum efficiency. Recently, long-lived quantum coherence has been proposed to influence efficiency and robustness of photosynthetic energy transfer in light-harvesting antennae. The quantum aspect of these dynamics has generated great interest both because of the possibility for efficient long-range energy transfer and because biology is typically considered to operate entirely in the classical regime. Yet, experiments to date show only that coherence persists long enough that it can influence dynamics, but they have not directly shown that coherence does influence energy transfer. Here, we provide experimental evidence that interaction between the bacteriochlorophyll chromophores and the protein environment surrounding them not only prolongs quantum coherence, but also spawns reversible, oscillatory energy transfer among excited states. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we observe oscillatory excited-state populations demonstrating that quantum transport of energy occurs in biological systems. The observed population oscillation suggests that these light-harvesting antennae trade energy reversibly between the protein and the chromophores. Resolving design principles evident in this biological antenna could provide inspiration for new solar energy applications.

  11. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  12. A Precise Packing Sequence for Self-Assembled Convex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Zhenli; Glotzer, Sharon

    2007-03-01

    We present molecular simulations of the self-assembly of cone-shaped particles with patchy, attractive interactions[1,2]. Upon cooling from random initial conditions, we find that the cones self assemble into clusters and that clusters comprised of particular numbers of cones have a unique and precisely packed structure that is robust over a range of cone angles. These precise clusters form precise packing sequence that for small sizes is identical to that observed in evaporation-driven assembly of colloidal spheres. This sequence is reproduced and extended in simulations of two simple models of spheres self-assembling from random initial conditions subject to convexity constraints, and contains six of the most common virus capsid structures obtained in vivo including large chiral clusters, and a cluster that may correspond to several non- icosahedral, spherical virus capsid structures obtained in vivo. For prolate spheroidal convexity conditions, we demonstrate the formation of several prolate virus structures from self-assembling hard spheres[3]. [1] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, PNAS, in press (http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/ 0608592) [2] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/0608613 [3] Chen T, Glotzer SC http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/q-bio.BM/0608040

  13. New Metal-organic Polymers Through Subcomponent Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    material using subcomponent self-assembly. We developed the synthesis of double helical polymeric species according to the general procedure...to use - diketones as subcomponents for polymers. She then shifted her efforts to other projects, funded by the European Research Council. Because

  14. Controlled self-assembly of hydrophobic quantum dots through silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Ando, Masanori; Murase, Norio

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the formation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanocomposites through the self-assembly of silanized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by using a controlled sol-gel process. The self-assembly behavior of the QDs was created when partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxide monomers replaced hydrophobic ligands on the QDs. We examined systematically self-assembly conditions such as solvent components and QD sizes in order to elucidate the formation mechanism of various QD nanocomposites. The QD nanocomposites were assembled in water phase or on the interface of water and oil phase in emulsions. The partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides act as intermolecules to assemble the QDs. The QD nanocomposites with well-defined solid or hollow spherical, fiber-like, sheet-like, and pearl-like morphologies were prepared by adjusting the experimental conditions. The high photoluminescence efficiency of the prepared QD nanocomposites suggests partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides reduced the surface deterioration of QDs during self-assembly. These techniques are applicable to other hydrophobic QDs for fabricating complex QD nanocomposites.

  15. Photoresponsive self-assemblies based on fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fameau, A-L; Arnould, A; Lehmann, M; von Klitzing, R

    2015-02-18

    Photoresponsive surfactant system based on fatty acids has been developed by the introduction in aqueous solution of a photoacid generator (PAG). Self-assembly transitions are triggered by UV irradiation due to a pH change induced by the presence of PAG.

  16. Self-assembled materials from thermosensitive and biohybrid block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this research, several block copolymers were synthesized and characterized with regard to possible pharmaceutical applications. All block copolymers were thermosensitive and self-assembled at 37 °C into structures like micelles and hydrogels, which can be used for innovative drug delivery purpose

  17. Self-assembly and semiconductivity of an oligothiophene supergelator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pratihar, P.; Ghosh, S.; Stepanenko, V.; Patwardhan, S.; Grozema, F.C.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Würthner, F.

    2010-01-01

    A bis(trialkoxybenzamide)-functionalized quaterthiophene derivative was synthesized and its self-assembly properties in solution were studied. In non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane, this quaterthiophene π-system formed fibril aggregates with an H-type molecular arrangement due to synergistic eff

  18. Developmental self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, John P; Calvert, Colby R; Zhang, David Yu; Pierce, Niles A; Yin, Peng

    2014-04-22

    Kinetically controlled isothermal growth is fundamental to biological development, yet it remains challenging to rationally design molecular systems that self-assemble isothermally into complex geometries via prescribed assembly and disassembly pathways. By exploiting the programmable chemistry of base pairing, sophisticated spatial and temporal control have been demonstrated in DNA self-assembly, but largely as separate pursuits. By integrating temporal with spatial control, here we demonstrate the "developmental" self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron, where a prescriptive molecular program orchestrates the kinetic pathways by which DNA molecules isothermally self-assemble into a well-defined three-dimensional wireframe geometry. In this reaction, nine DNA reactants initially coexist metastably, but upon catalysis by a DNA initiator molecule, navigate 24 individually characterizable intermediate states via prescribed assembly pathways, organized both in series and in parallel, to arrive at the tetrahedral final product. In contrast to previous work on dynamic DNA nanotechnology, this developmental program coordinates growth of ringed substructures into a three-dimensional wireframe superstructure, taking a step toward the goal of kinetically controlled isothermal growth of complex three-dimensional geometries.

  19. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    of transfer converge at ∼-18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical micelle...

  20. Fluorescent self-assembled monolayers as new sensing materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basabe Desmonts, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass surfaces have been studied as a new material for chemical sensing. The new sensing system presented in this thesis is a label-free sensing approach suitable for metal ion and inorganic anions sensing in both organic solvents and aqueous solution.

  1. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    With remarkably interesting surface activities, two-dimensional Janus materials arouse intensive interests recently in many fields. We demonstrate by molecular dynamic simulations that hydrofluorinated Janus graphene (J-GN) can self-assemble into Janus nanoscroll (J-NS) at room temperature. The van...... der Waals (vdW) interaction and the coupling of C-H/π/C-F interaction and π/π interaction are proven to offer the continuous driving force of self-assembly of J-GN. The results show that J-GN can self-assemble into various J-NSs structures, including arcs, multi-wall J-NS and arm-chair-like J......-NS by manipulating its original geometry (size and aspect ratio). Moreover, we also investigated self-assembly of hydrofluorinated J-GN and Fe nanowires (NWs), suggesting that Fe NW is a good alternative to activate J-GN to form J-NS. Differently, the strong vdW interaction between J-GN and Fe NW provides the main...

  2. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Self Assembled Peptide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Pantagos, Spyros P.;

    2011-01-01

    In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures. In partic......In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures....... In particular we use EFM to investigate the structures of diphenylalanine peptide tubes, particles, and CSGAITIG peptide particles placed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. We show that the cavity in the peptide tubes could be to the presence of water residues. Additionally we show that self......-assembled amyloid peptides form spherical solid structures containing the same self-assembled peptide in its interior. In both cases transmission electron microscopy is used to verify these structures. Further, the limitations of the EFM technique are discussed, especially when the observed structures become small...

  3. Multiphonon capture processes in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Uskov, A.; Bischoff, Svend;

    2001-01-01

    We investigate capture of carriers from states in the continuous part of the energy spectrum into the discrete states of self-assembled InAs/GaAs QDs via emission of one or two phonons. We are not aware of any other investigations of two-phonon mediated capture processes in QDs, but we show that ...

  4. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain;

    2014-01-01

    New methods to handle membrane bound proteins, e.g. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are highly desirable. Recently, apoliprotein A1 (ApoA1) based lipoprotein particles have emerged as a new platform for studying membrane proteins, and it has been shown that they can self-assemble in combinat...

  5. Nanoporous Network Channels from Self-Assembled Triblock Copolymer Supramolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Sart, Gerrit Gobius; Vukovic, Ivana; Vukovic, Zorica; Polushkin, Evgeny; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Ruokolainen, Janne; Loos, Katja; ten Brinke, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of a poly(tert-butoxystyrene)-block-polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) triblock copolymers and less than stoichiometric amounts of pentadecylphenol (PDP) are shown to self-assemble into a core-shell gyroid morphology with the core channels formed by the hydrogen-bonded

  6. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    With remarkably interesting surface activities, two-dimensional Janus materials arouse intensive interests recently in many fields. We demonstrate by molecular dynamic simulations that hydrofluorinated Janus graphene (J-GN) can self-assemble into Janus nanoscroll (J-NS) at room temperature. The van...

  7. Photocontrol over cooperative porphyrin self-assembly with phenylazopyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Takashi; Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-01-02

    The cooperative self-assembly of chiral zinc porphyrins is regulated by a photoresponsive phenylazopyridine ligand. Porphyrin stacks depolymerize into dimers upon axial ligation and the strength of the coordination is regulated by its photoinduced isomerization, which shows more than 95 % conversion ratio for both photostationary states.

  8. Tuning of metal work functions with self-assembled monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B; Hadipour, A; Foekema, R; van Woudenbergh, T; Mandoc, MM; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM; Heremans, PL; Muccini, M; Hofstraat, H

    2004-01-01

    Tuning the work functions of metals was demonstrated by chemically modifying the metal surface through the formation of chemisorbed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) derived from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorinated alkanethiols and hexadecanethiol. The ordering inherent in the SAMs creates an effective, molec

  9. Understanding the self-assembly of TCNQ on Cu(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stradi, Daniele; Borca, Bogdana; Barja, Sara;

    2016-01-01

    The structure of self-assembled monolayers of 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) adsorbed on Cu(111) has been studied using a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We show that the polymorphism of the self-assem...

  10. Effect of alkyl substitutions on self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The self-assemblies of 4-hexadecyloxybenzoic acid and 3,4,5-trihexadecyloxybenzoic acid have been studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The well-ordered assemblies with different arrangement have been investigated. The structural change is attributed to the different number of substituted alkyl chains on periphery.

  11. Self-assembled three-dimensional non-volatile memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels; Berenschot, Erwin; Elwenspoek, Miko

    2010-01-01

    The continuous increase in capacity of non-volatile data storage systems will lead to bit densities of one bit per atom in 2020. Beyond this point, capacity can be increased by moving into the third dimension. We propose to use self-assembly of nanosized elements, either as a loosely organised assoc

  12. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-07

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  13. Anisotropic Nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we consider the influence of anisotropy on the behaviour of colloids using theory and simulations. The recent increase in the ability to synthesize anisotropic particles (cubes, caps, octapods, etc.) has led to samples of sufficient quality to perform self-assembly experiments. Our in

  14. Electrostatic Self-Assembled Multilayers from Side Chain Azo Polyelectrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庹新林; 陈峥; 邓永红; 王晓工; 刘德山

    2002-01-01

    Photoresponsive behavior and self-assembly properties of three side chain azo polyelectrolytes, poly (2-(4-phenylazophenoxy) ethanol-co-acrylic acid) (PPAPE), poly (2-(4-(4′-nitrophenylazo) phenoxy) ethanol-co-acrylic acid) (PNAPE), and poly (2-(4-(4′-ethoxyphenylazo) phenoxy) ethanol-co-acrylic acid) (PEAPE), were studied. These polyelectrolytes with different degrees of functionalization of azo chromophores were fabricated into nano-composite multilayers using two types of dipping solutions through a layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembling process. Results show that the ratio between tetrahydrofuran (THF) and H2O significantly influences the photoresponsive behavior of PNAPE in THF-H2O mixture. The THF-H2O dipping solution, used in this work for self-assembly of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes, is proved to be as applicable as aqueous dipping solution for normal self-assembly of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes. However, significant differences in the multilayer growth between the two systems were also observed, which resulted from the remarkable difference of the existing forms of the polyelectrolytes in these two dipping solutions.

  15. Adaptation of light-harvesting systems of Arthrospira platensis to light conditions, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Hamada, Fumiya; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-08-01

    Cyanobacteria change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed excitation relaxation dynamics in the cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis, grown under lights exhibiting different spectral profiles, by means of steady-state absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. It was found that F760, which is the PSI red-chlorophyll characteristic of A. platensis, contributes to slower energy-transfer phase in the PSI of A. platensis. Excitation energy transfers in phycobilisome and those from PSII to PSI were modified depending on the light quality. Existence of quencher was suggested in PSI of the blue-light grown cells. Phycobilisomes in the green-light grown cells and the far-red-light grown cells transferred excitation energy from phycobilisome to chlorophyll without loss of energy. In these cells, excitation energy was shared between two photosystems. Fast energy transfer was established in phycobilisome under the yellow-light condition where only the phycobilisome can absorb the cultivation light. Differences in light-harvesting and energy-transfer processes under different cultivation-light conditions are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  16. Cell differentiation on disk- and string-shaped hydrogels fabricated from Ca(2+) -responsive self-assembling peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2016-11-04

    We recently developed a self-assembling peptide, E1Y9, that self-assembles into nanofibers and forms a hydrogel in the presence of Ca(2+) . E1Y9 derivatives conjugated with functional peptide sequences derived from extracellular matrices (ECMs) reportedly self-assemble into peptide nanofibers that enhance cell adhesion and differentiation. In this study, E1Y9/E1Y9-IKVAV-mixed hydrogels were constructed to serve as artificial ECMs that promote cell differentiation. E1Y9 and E1Y9-IKVAV co-assembled into networked nanofibers, and hydrogels with disk and string shapes were formed in response to Ca(2+) treatment. The neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was facilitated on hydrogels of both shapes that contained the IKVAV motifs. Moreover, long neurites extended along the long axis of the string-shaped gel, suggesting that the structure of hydrogels of this shape can affect cellular orientation. Thus, E1Y9 hydrogels can potentially be used as artificial ECMs with desirable bioactivities and shapes that could be useful in tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 476-483, 2016.

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  18. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler G Moore

    Full Text Available Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic

  19. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  20. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  1. A Two-Piece Derivative of a Group I Intron RNA as a Platform for Designing Self-Assembling RNA Templates to Promote Peptide Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent RNA-peptide complexes are attractive from the viewpoint of artificial design of functional biomacromolecular systems. We have developed self-folding and self-assembling RNAs that serve as templates to assist chemical ligation between two reactive peptides with RNA-binding capabilities. The design principle of previous templates, however, can be applied only to limited classes of RNA-binding peptides. In this study, we employed a two-piece derivative of a group I intron RNA from the Tetrahymena large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA as a platform for new template RNAs. In this group I intron-based self-assembling platform, modules for the recognition of substrate peptides can be installed independently from modules holding the platform structure. The new self-assembling platform allows us to expand the repertoire of substrate peptides in template RNA design.

  2. The Self-Made Puzzle: Integrating Self-Assembly and Pattern Formation Under Non-Random Genetic Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doursat, René

    On the one hand, research in self-assembling systems, whether natural or artificial, has traditionally focused on pre-existing components endowed with fixed shapes. Biological development, by contrast, dynamically creates new cells that acquire selective adhesion properties through differentiation induced by their neighborhood. On the other hand, pattern formation phenomena are generally construed as orderly states of activity on top of a continuous 2-D or 3-D substrate. Yet, again, the spontaneous patterning of an organism into domains of gene expression arises within a multicellular medium in perpetual expansion and reshaping. Finally, both phenomena are often thought in terms of stochastic events, whether mixed components that randomly collide in self-assembly, or spots and stripes that occur unpredictably from instabilities in pattern formation. Here too, these notions need significant revision if they are to be extended and applied to embryogenesis. Cells are not randomly mixed but pre-positioned where cell division occurs. Genetic identity domains are not randomly distributed but highly regulated in number and position. In this work, I present a computational model of program-mable and reproducible artificial morphogenesis that integrates self-assembly and pattern formation under the control of a nonrandom gene regulatory network. The specialized properties of cells (division, adhesion, migration) are determined by the gene expression domains to which they belong, while at the same time these domains further expand and segment into subdomains due to the self-assembly of specialized cells. Through this model, I also promote a new discipline, embryomorphic engineering to solve the paradox of "meta-designing" decentralized, autonomous systems.

  3. Development of self-assembling nanowires containing electronically active oligothiophenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Wen

    This dissertation discusses the development of conductive one-dimensional nanowires from self-assembling oligothiophene molecules. Self-assembly has been demonstrated to be a promising alternative approach towards high performance, solution processable, and low-cost organic electronics. One of the many challenges in this field is the control of supramolecular morphologies of ordered structures containing pi-conjugated moieties. This research demonstrated several successful strategies to achieve self assembly of conductive nanowires using synergistic interactions combining pi stacking and hydrogen bonding. The first approach used was to develop a hairpin-shaped sexithiophene molecule, which features two arms of the conjugated structure. The diamidocyclohexyl headgroup of this molecule successfully directs the self-assembly from hydrogen bonding among the amides, forming high-aspect-ratio one-dimensional nanowires with well-defined diameters of 3.0 +/- 0.3 nm. The molecular orientation in the nanostructures promotes formation of sexithiophene H and J aggregates that facilitate efficient charge transport. Organic field-effect transistors were fabricated to reveal improved intrinsic hole mobility from films of the nanostructures, 3.46 x 10-6 cm2V-1s-1, which is one order of magnitude higher than films cast from unassembled molecules. Bulk heterojunction solar cells were developed from this molecule and fullerenes utilizing solution-phase fabrication methods. Intimate mix of the molecule and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester creates structured interfaces for efficient exciton splitting. The charge carrier mobilities of each material are improved by self-assembly in solution and thermal-energy assisted phase separation.The photovoltaic devices achieved the highest open-circuit voltage of 0.62 V, short-circuit current of 1.79 mA/cm2, fill factor of 35%, and power conversion efficiency of 0.48%. Another strategy to one-dimensional nanowires studied here involved the

  4. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-03-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  5. Self-Assembled Epitaxial Au-Oxide Vertically Aligned Nanocomposites for Nanoscale Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leigang; Sun, Liuyang; Gomez-Diaz, Juan Sebastian; Hogan, Nicki L; Lu, Ping; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Huang, Jijie; Su, Qing; Fan, Meng; Jacob, Clement; Li, Jin; Zhang, Xinghang; Jia, Quanxi; Sheldon, Matthew; Alù, Andrea; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    Metamaterials made of nanoscale inclusions or artificial unit cells exhibit exotic optical properties that do not exist in natural materials. Promising applications, such as super-resolution imaging, cloaking, hyperbolic propagation, and ultrafast phase velocities have been demonstrated based on mostly micrometer-scale metamaterials and few nanoscale metamaterials. To date, most metamaterials are created using costly and tedious fabrication techniques with limited paths toward reliable large-scale fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the one-step direct growth of self-assembled epitaxial metal-oxide nanocomposites as a drastically different approach to fabricating large-area nanostructured metamaterials. Using pulsed laser deposition, we fabricated nanocomposite films with vertically aligned gold (Au) nanopillars (∼20 nm in diameter) embedded in various oxide matrices with high epitaxial quality. Strong, broad absorption features in the measured absorbance spectrum are clear signatures of plasmon resonances of Au nanopillars. By tuning their densities on selected substrates, anisotropic optical properties are demonstrated via angular dependent and polarization resolved reflectivity measurements and reproduced by full-wave simulations and effective medium theory. Our model predicts exotic properties, such as zero permittivity responses and topological transitions. Our studies suggest that these self-assembled metal-oxide nanostructures provide an exciting new material platform to control and enhance optical response at nanometer scales.

  6. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-11-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  7. Smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Zhuang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Lin, Shuo; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Smart gating membranes, inspired by the gating function of ion channels across cell membranes, are artificial membranes composed of non-responsive porous membrane substrates and responsive gates in the membrane pores that are able to dramatically regulate the trans-membrane transport of substances in response to environmental stimuli. Easy fabrication, high flux, significant response and strong mechanical strength are critical for the versatility of such smart gating membranes. Here we show a novel and simple strategy for one-step fabrication of smart gating membranes with three-dimensionally interconnected networks of functional gates, by self-assembling responsive nanogels on membrane pore surfaces in situ during a vapor-induced phase separation process for membrane formation. The smart gating membranes with in situ self-assembled responsive nanogels as functional gates show large flux, significant response and excellent mechanical property simultaneously. Because of the easy fabrication method as well as the concurrent enhancement of flux, response and mechanical property, the proposed smart gating membranes will expand the scope of membrane applications, and provide ever better performances in their applications.

  8. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakab, Karoly; Marga, Francoise; Forgacs, Gabor [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Norotte, Cyrille [Department of Biology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Murphy, Keith [Organovo, Inc., 5871 Oberlin Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana, E-mail: forgacsg@missouri.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. (topical review)

  9. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Norotte, Cyrille; Marga, Francoise; Murphy, Keith; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2010-06-01

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion.

  10. Efficiency Enhancement of InGaN-Based Solar Cells via Stacking Layers of Light-Harvesting Nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Amal M. Al-Amri; Po-Han Fu; Kun-Yu Lai; Hsin-Ping Wang; Lain-Jong Li; Jr-Hau He

    2016-01-01

    An effective light-harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells is demonstrated using stacking layers of polystyrene nanospheres. Light-harvesting efficiencies on the solar cells covered with varied stacks of nanospheres are evaluated through numerical and experimental methods. The numerical simulation reveals that nanospheres with 3 stacking layers exhibit the most improved optical absorption and haze ratio as compared to those obtained by monolayer nanospheres. The ex...

  11. Self-Assembled Monolayers of CdSe Nanocrystals on Doped GaAs Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Walzer, Karsten;

    2002-01-01

    This letter reports the self-assembly and analysis of CdSe nanocrystal monolayers on both p- and a-doped GaAs substrates. The self-assembly was performed using a 1,6-hexanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to link CdSe nanocrystals to GaAs substrates. Attenuated total reflection Fourier tran...

  12. Self-assembly of double helical nanostructures inside carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cheng; Xue, Qingzhong; Shan, Meixia; Jing, Nuannuan; Ling, Cuicui; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Zhiyong; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2013-05-21

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that a DNA-like double helix of two poly(acetylene) (PA) chains can form inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The computational results indicate that SWNTs can activate and guide the self-assembly of polymer chains, allowing them to adopt a helical configuration in a SWNT through the combined action of the van der Waals potential well and the π-π stacking interaction between the polymer and the inner surface of SWNTs. Meanwhile both the SWNT size and polymer chain stiffness determine the outcome of the nanostructure. Furthermore, we also found that water clusters encourage the self-assembly of PA helical structures in the tube. This molecular model may lead to a better understanding of the formation of a double helix biological molecule inside SWNTs. Alternatively, it could form the basis of a novel nanoscale material by utilizing the 'empty' spaces of SWNTs.

  13. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  14. Self-Assembly and Hydrogelation of Peptide Amphiphiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Priyono Suwarso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Seven peptide amphiphiles were successfully synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis method. Peptide amphiphiles were characterized using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI. Atomic force microscopy (AFM study showed that peptide amphiphiles having glycine, valine, or proline as linker, self-assembled into 100-200 nm nanofibers structure. According to our research, both peptide amphiphile with positive and negative charges bear similar self-assembly properties. Peptide amphiphile also showed its capability as low molecular weight gelator (LMWG. Peptide amphiphiles bearing C-16 and C-12 as alkyl showed better hydrogelation properties than C-8 alkyl. Five out of seven peptide amphiphiles have minimum gelation concentration (MGC lower than 1% (w/v.

  15. Self-assembly and semiconductivity of an oligothiophene supergelator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampa Pratihar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A bis(trialkoxybenzamide-functionalized quaterthiophene derivative was synthesized and its self-assembly properties in solution were studied. In non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane, this quaterthiophene π-system formed fibril aggregates with an H-type molecular arrangement due to synergistic effect of hydrogen bonding and π-stacking. The self-assembled fibres were found to gelate numerous organic solvents of diverse polarity. The charge transport ability of such elongated fibres of quaterthiophene π-system was explored by the pulse radiolysis time resolved microwave conductivity (PR-TRMC technique and moderate mobility values were obtained. Furthermore, initial AFM and UV-vis spectroscopic studies of a mixture of our electron-rich quaterthiophene derivative with the electron acceptor [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM revealed a nanoscale segregated assembly of the individual building blocks in the blend.

  16. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V., E-mail: podzorov@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices for Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A. [Department of Physics and NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  17. Self-Assembled Monolayer of Mixed Gold and Nickel Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanni Jie; Huiqing Fan; Wei You

    2012-01-01

    Forming a monolayer of mixed nickel and gold nanoparticles through self-assembly via simple solu-tion processing constitutes an important step toward inexpensive nanoparticle-based carbon nanofiber growth. In this work, mixed gold and nickel nanoparticles were anchored on the silicon wafer using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as a template. SAMs of 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS-SAMs) were formed on silicon wafer, with the exposed thiol functionality providing ligand exchange sites to form the mixed mono-layer of nickel and gold nanoparticles via a two-step sequential soaking approach. The densities of the nickel and gold nanoparticles on the surface can be varied by adjusting the soaking sequence.

  18. Advances in self-assembled ultrathin polyoxomolybdates multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-bao YANG; Xiu-fang WANG; An-jian XIE; Gang HU; Yu-bua SHEN

    2009-01-01

    The research on the assembly and function of organized molecular films has gained more and more interest. Electrostatic interactions can be employed to assemble polyoxomolybdates in surface confined multi-layers. Ultrathin multilayer films of polyoxomolybdates and organic molecules by the self-assembly method have been reviewed. At the same time, self-assemblies in aqueous solution are also reported, such as wheel-shaped clusters (Mo154), hollow spherical "blackberry"-like vesicles (Mo72Fe30) and Keggin structures. Polyoxomo-lybdate multilayers are promising candidates for diverse applications including electrocatalytic, photo- and electro-chromic systems. The development in this particular field of materials science may be highlighted in the future.

  19. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  20. Biomolecular decision-making process for self assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2005-01-01

    The brain is often identified with decision-making processes in the biological world. In fact, single cells, single macromolecules (proteins) and populations of molecules also make simple decisions. These decision processes are essential to survival and to the biological self-assembly and self-repair processes that we seek to emulate. How do these tiny systems make effective decisions? How do they make decisions in concert with a cooperative network of other molecules or cells? How can we emulate the decision-making behaviors of small-scale biological systems to program and self-assemble microsystems? This LDRD supported research to answer these questions. Our work included modeling and simulation of protein populations to help us understand, mimic, and categorize molecular decision-making mechanisms that nonequilibrium systems can exhibit. This work is an early step towards mimicking such nanoscale and microscale biomolecular decision-making processes in inorganic systems.

  1. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  2. Lipid Self-Assemblies and Nanostructured Emulsions for Cosmetic Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar V. Kulkarni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cosmetic products that we encounter on daily basis contain lipid constituents in solubilized or insolubilized forms. Due to their amphiphilic nature, the lipid molecules spontaneously self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures when mixed with water. This review illustrates the formation and finely tunable properties of self-assembled lipid nanostructures and their hierarchically organized derivatives, as well as their relevance to the development of cosmetic formulations. These lipid systems can be modulated into various physical forms suitable for topical administration including fluids, gels, creams, pastes and dehydrated films. Moreover, they are capable of encapsulating hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as amphiphilic active ingredients owing to their special morphological characters. Nano-hybrid materials with more elegant properties can be designed by combining nanostructured lipid systems with other nanomaterials including a hydrogelator, silica nanoparticles, clays and carbon nanomaterials. The smart materials reviewed here may well be the future of innovative cosmetic applications.

  3. Communication: Self-assembly of semiflexible-flexible block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N. Arun; Ganesan, Venkat

    2012-03-01

    We apply the methodology of self-consistent Brownian dynamics simulations to study the self-assembly behavior in melts of semiflexible-flexible diblock copolymers as a function of the persistence length of the semiflexible block. Our results reveal a novel progression of morphologies in transitioning from the case of flexible-coil to rod-coil copolymers. At even moderate persistence lengths, the morphologies in the semiflexible-block rich region of the phase diagram transform to liquid crystalline phases. In contrast, the phases in the flexible-block rich region of the phase diagram persist up to much larger persistence lengths. Our analysis suggests that the development of orientational order in the semiflexible block to be a critical factor influencing the morphologies of self-assembly.

  4. Self-assembly of semiflexible-flexible block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Ganesan, Venkat

    2012-02-01

    We apply self-consistent Brownian dynamics simulations to study the self-assembly behavior of semiflexible-flexible block copolymers. A Maier-Saupe interaction model was applied for the orientational interactions between the semiflexible polymers, while the enthalpic interactions between semiflexible and flexible polymers were modeled through a standard Flory-Huggins approach. To develop a physical understanding of the phases and their regimes of occurrence as a function of varying persistence length of the semiflexible block, we computed the 2D phase diagram for our model. We quantify the progression of the self-assembly morphologies in transitioning from coil-coil block copolymers on the one hand to rod-coil block copolymers on the other hand. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with the existing experimental and numerical results.

  5. Self-Assembled Magnetic Surface Swimmers: Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranson, Igor; Belkin, Maxim; Snezhko, Alexey

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms of self-propulsion of living microorganisms are a fascinating phenomenon attracting enormous attention in the physics community. A new type of self-assembled micro-swimmers, magnetic snakes, is an excellent tool to model locomotion in a simple table-top experiment. The snakes self-assemble from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles suspended on the liquid-air interface and subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Formation and dynamics of these swimmers are captured in the framework of theoretical model coupling paradigm equation for the amplitude of surface waves, conservation law for the density of particles, and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. The results of continuum modeling are supported by hybrid molecular dynamics simulations of magnetic particles floating on the surface of fluid.

  6. The collagen assisted self-assembly of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salhi, Billel; Vaurette, Francois; Grandidier, Bruno; Stievenard, Didier [IEMN, UMR8520, Department ISEN, 41 Boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Melnyk, Oleg [IBL, UMR8161, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Universite de Lille Nord de France, 1 rue du Professeur Calmette, 59021 Lille (France); Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah [IRI, USR3078, c/o IEMN, Cite Scientifique, BP60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)], E-mail: didier.stievenard@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr

    2009-06-10

    The paper reports on self-assembly of silicon nanowire junctions assisted by protocollagen, a low cost soluble long fiber protein and precursor of collagen fibrils. First, the collagen was combed on an octadecyl-terminated silicon surface with gold electrodes. Then the combed surface was exposed to an aqueous suspension of silicon nanowires. In order to increase electrostatic interactions between the positively charged collagen and the nanowires, the nanowires were chemically modified with negatively charged sulfonate groups. The interaction of collagen with the sulfonated nanowires, which mimics the native collagen/heparin sulfate interaction, induced self-assembly of the nanowires localized between gold electrodes. The proof of concept for the formation of spontaneous electrode-nanowire-electrode junctions using collagen as a template was supported by current-voltage measurements.

  7. Self-reproduction of nanoparticles through synergistic self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We describe a self-reproduction mechanism of nanometer-sized particles (i.e., nanodiscs) through chemical ligation of the precursors and self-assembly of the building blocks. The ligation reaction was accelerated on lipid bilayer surfaces, and the products spontaneously assembled into nanodiscs with lipid molecules. With the increase in the number of nanodiscs, a rapid proliferation of the nanodiscs occurred through the spatial rearrangements of the molecules between the pre-existing nanodiscs and the unreacted materials, rather than template- or complex-enhanced ligation of the precursors. The subsequent process of surface-enhanced ligation of integrated precursors matured the nanoparticles into identical copies of the pre-existing assembly. Our study showed that the synergistic self-assembly mechanism probably underlie the self-replication principles for heterogeneous multimolecular systems.

  8. Iterative linearized density matrix propagation for modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, P; Coker, D F

    2010-11-14

    Rather than incoherent hopping between chromophores, experimental evidence suggests that the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently, and involves coherent superposition states in which excitation spreads over multiple chromophores separated by several nanometers. Treating such delocalized coherent superposition states in the presence of decoherence and dissipation arising from coupling to an environment is a significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that either use a perturbative approach or make the Markovian approximation. In this paper, we extend the recently developed iterative linearized density matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme [E. R. Dunkel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 114106 (2008)] to study coherent excitation energy transfer in a model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light harvesting complex from green sulfur bacteria. This approach is nonperturbative and uses a discrete path integral description employing a short time approximation to the density matrix propagator that accounts for interference between forward and backward paths of the quantum excitonic system while linearizing the phase in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the environmental degrees of freedom resulting in a classical-like treatment of these variables. The approach avoids making the Markovian approximation and we demonstrate that it successfully describes the coherent beating of the site populations on different chromophores and gives good agreement with other methods that have been developed recently for going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study coherent exciton transfer in light harvesting systems. We conclude with a discussion of decoherence in independent bilinearly coupled harmonic chromophore baths. The ILDM propagation approach in principle can be applied to more general descriptions of the environment.

  9. Tailoring self-assembled monolayers at the electrochemical interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Varatharajan; Sheela Berchmans; V Yegnaraman

    2009-09-01

    The main focus of this review is to illustrate the amenability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for functionalisation with different receptors, catalytic materials, biomolecules, enzymes, antigen-antibody, etc for various applications. The review discusses initially about the preparation and characterization of SAMs and tailoring of SAMs by incorporation of suitable recognition elements. A description of how the molecular recognition is achieved through forces like electrostatic, covalent and host-guest interactions is included in the review.

  10. Hydrophobic Interactions Modulate Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Altantzis, Thomas; Goris, Bart; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Hydrophobic interactions constitute one of the most important types of nonspecific interactions in biological systems, which emerge when water molecules rearrange as two hydrophobic species come close to each other. The prediction of hydrophobic interactions at the level of nanoparticles (Brownian objects) remains challenging because of uncontrolled diffusive motion of the particles. We describe here a general methodology for solvent-induced, reversible self-assembly of gold nanopar...

  11. Biocompatible and Biomimetic Self-Assembly of Functional Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    evaporation induced self-assembly of aqueous silica precursors with a biologically compatible surfactant, glycerol monooleate ( GMO ) via dip-coating...film is first deposited, it has a relatively low contact angle with water and remains in a semi-solid state. Upon exposure to UV/ozone, the GMO begins...Figure 8. A) Water contact angle of a GMO -templated silica film as a function of UV light and ozone exposure time, B) Localization of fluorescently

  12. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...... coherence. The inferred homogeneous line widths are significantly smaller than the line widths usually observed in the photoluminescence from single quantum dots indicating an additional inhomogeneours broadening mechanism in the latter....

  13. Monodisperse magnesium hydride nanoparticles uniformly self-assembled on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guanglin; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Sun, Dalin; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min; Yu, Xuebin

    2015-10-21

    Monodisperse MgH2 nanoparticles with homogeneous distribution and a high loading percent are developed through hydrogenation-induced self-assembly under the structure-directing role of graphene. Graphene acts not only as a structural support, but also as a space barrier to prevent the growth of MgH2 nanoparticles and as a thermally conductive pathway, leading to outstanding performance.

  14. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Ł. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Czechowski, N. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Piatkowski, D. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Litvin, R. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Mackowski, S. [Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P. [Ma Chung Univ., Malang (Indonesia). Ma Chung Research Center for Photosynthetic Pigments; Pichler, S. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom). Inst. of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology; Cogdell, R. J. [Univ. Linz (Austria). Inst. fur Halbleiter-und Festkorperphysik; Heiss, W. [Univ. Linz (Austria). Inst. fur Halbleiter-und Festkorperphysik

    2011-10-24

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  15. Periodically arranged colloidal gold nanoparticles for enhanced light harvesting in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina; Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis; Kunstmann-Olsen, Casper

    material and fabrication costs along with the possibility of making ultra-thin and flexible devices makes organic solar cells ideal candidates as efficient components on a future renewable energy market. Over the past ten years, investigations on the synthesis of new organic semiconductors...... active layer. The latter are fabricated with a lithography-free stamp technique, creating a centimeter scaled area with defined inter-particle spacing. Our study presents the light harvesting ability of template-assisted nanoparticle assemblies in organic solar cells and as the approach is easily...

  16. Efficient Light Harvester Layer Prepared by Solid/Mist Interface Reaction for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiang; Li, Hongcui; Wu, Wenyi; Li, Yanhua; Fei, Dehou; Gao, Chunxiao; Liu, Xizhe

    2015-08-12

    A solid/mist reaction method is developed to produce well-crystallized light harvester layers without pinhole defects for perovskite solar cells. The reaction based on mist precursor can be facilely operated with low process temperature. And it can effectively control the volume of CH3NH3I solution and the reaction temperature, which affect the quality of perovskite harvester layers and the performance of perovskite solar cells remarkably. Under optimized condition, the efficiencies of devices reach 16.2% with the average efficiency of 14.9%. The solid/mist reaction is also used to fabricate planar junction solar cells and a PCE of 14.9% is obtained.

  17. Recent trends in mesoscopic solar cells based on molecular and nanopigment light harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Grätzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscopic solar cells are one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies among third generation photovoltaics due to their low cost and high efficiency. The morphology of wide-band semiconductors, sensitized with molecular or nanosized light harvesters, used as electron collectors contribute substantially to the device performance. Recent developments in the use of organic–inorganic layer structured perovskites as light absorbers and as electron or hole transport materials allows reduction in the thickness of photoanodes to the submicron level and have raised the power conversion efficiency of solid state mesoscopic solar cells above the 10% level.

  18. Geometry, supertransfer, and optimality in the light harvesting of purple bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable rotational symmetry of the photosynthetic antenna complexes of purple bacteria has long been thought to enhance their light harvesting and excitation energy transport. We study the role of symmetry by modeling hypothetical antennas whose symmetry is broken by altering the orientations of the bacteriochlorophyll pigments. We find that in both LH2 and LH1 complexes, symmetry increases energy transfer rates by enabling the cooperative, coherent process of supertransfer. The enhancement is particularly pronounced in the LH1 complex, whose natural geometry outperforms the average randomized geometry by 5.5 standard deviations, one of the most significant increase due to coherent effects in any photosynthetic complex studied to date.

  19. Long-distance electronic energy transfer in light-harvesting supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, Christian B; Li, Shaoguang; Kumar, Ganesh R; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2014-12-01

    The efficient collection of solar energy relies on the design and construction of well-organized light-harvesting systems. Herein we report that supramolecular phenanthrene polymers doped with pyrene are effective collectors of light energy. The linear polymers are formed through the assembly of short amphiphilic oligomers in water. Absorption of light by phenanthrene residues is followed by electronic energy transfer along the polymer over long distances (>100 nm) to the accepting pyrene molecules. The high efficiency of the energy transfer, which is documented by large fluorescence quantum yields, suggests a quantum coherent process.

  20. Recent trends in mesoscopic solar cells based on molecular and nanopigment light harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Grätzel, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Mesoscopic solar cells are one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies among third generation photovoltaics due to their low cost and high efficiency. The morphology of wide-band semiconductors, sensitized with molecular or nanosized light harvesters, used as electron collectors contribute substantially to the device performance. Recent developments in the use of organic-inorganic layer structured perovskites as light absorbers and as electron or hole transport materials allows reduction in the thickness of photoanodes to the submicron level and have raised the power conversion efficiency of solid state mesoscopic solar cells above the 10% level.

  1. Facile Synthesis of Colloidal CuO Nanocrystals for Light-Harvesting Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Yee-Fun

    2012-01-01

    CuO is an earth-abundant, nontoxic, and low band-gap material; hence it is an attractive candidate for application in solar cells. In this paper, a synthesis of CuO nanocrystals by a facile alcohothermal route is reported. The nanocrystals are dispersible in a solvent mixture of methanol and chloroform, thus enabling the processing of CuO by solution. A bilayer solar cell comprising of CuO nanocrystals and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) achieved a power conversion efficiency of 0.04%, indicating the potential of this material for light-harvesting applications.

  2. Synthesis and self-assembly of glycal-based bolaforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozell, Joseph J; Tice, Nathan C; Sanyal, Nibedita; Thompson, David; Kim, Jong-Mok; Vidal, Sébastien

    2008-11-21

    Glycal-based bolaforms serve as synthetically flexible components of molecular self-assembly. The compounds are prepared in good yield by a Ferrier reaction between triacetylglucal or -galactal or diacetylxylal and a long chain alpha,omega-diol, followed by deacetylation under Zemplen conditions. The reactions are stereoselective and preferentially afford the alpha-diastereomer. The bolaforms undergo self-assembly in water or water/dioxane solution to give a variety of nanostructures. In solution, bolaforms with C8 or C10 chains between glucal headgroups form nanoscale vesicles. In contrast, bolaforms with C12 chains exhibit lower solubility and a dynamic self-assembly, forming several different nanoscale structures. However, the solid-state structures of C12 bolaform isomers adopt shapes very similar to those of bolaforms possessing more extensive hydrogen-bonding networks, indicating that multiple hydrogen bonds in solution are important to formation of stable, discrete nanostructures but that only a few key intermolecular interactions between bolaform headgroups are necessary to determine the structure in the solid state. The diversity and differentiation of the functional groups present in glycal-based bolaforms suggest that they could be useful probes of the various noncovalent forces controlling the structure of new nanomaterials.

  3. Algorithmic self-assembly of DNA Sierpinski triangles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W K Rothemund

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Algorithms and information, fundamental to technological and biological organization, are also an essential aspect of many elementary physical phenomena, such as molecular self-assembly. Here we report the molecular realization, using two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA tiles, of a cellular automaton whose update rule computes the binary function XOR and thus fabricates a fractal pattern--a Sierpinski triangle--as it grows. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on double-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single-stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. For both of two independent molecular realizations, atomic force microscopy revealed recognizable Sierpinski triangles containing 100-200 correct tiles. Error rates during assembly appear to range from 1% to 10%. Although imperfect, the growth of Sierpinski triangles demonstrates all the necessary mechanisms for the molecular implementation of arbitrary cellular automata. This shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a Turing-universal biomolecular system, capable of implementing any desired algorithm for computation or construction tasks.

  4. Directed self-assembly of a colloidal kagome lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2011-01-20

    A challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics is spontaneously to form intended superstructures from designed building blocks. In fields such as crystal engineering and the design of porous materials, this typically involves building blocks of organic molecules, sometimes operating together with metallic ions or clusters. The translation of such ideas to nanoparticles and colloidal-sized building blocks would potentially open doors to new materials and new properties, but the pathways to achieve this goal are still undetermined. Here we show how colloidal spheres can be induced to self-assemble into a complex predetermined colloidal crystal-in this case a colloidal kagome lattice-through decoration of their surfaces with a simple pattern of hydrophobic domains. The building blocks are simple micrometre-sized spheres with interactions (electrostatic repulsion in the middle, hydrophobic attraction at the poles, which we call 'triblock Janus') that are also simple, but the self-assembly of the spheres into an open kagome structure contrasts with previously known close-packed periodic arrangements of spheres. This open network is of interest for several theoretical reasons. With a view to possible enhanced functionality, the resulting lattice structure possesses two families of pores, one that is hydrophobic on the rims of the pores and another that is hydrophilic. This strategy of 'convergent' self-assembly from easily fabricated colloidal building blocks encodes the target supracolloidal architecture, not in localized attractive spots but instead in large redundantly attractive regions, and can be extended to form other supracolloidal networks.

  5. Epitaxial photostriction-magnetostriction coupled self-assembled nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng-Jui; Chen, Long-Yi; He, Qing; Liang, Chen-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ze; Chien, Yung-Shun; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Lin, Su-Jien; Arenholz, Elke; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2012-08-28

    Self-assembled vertical nanostructures take advantage of high interface-to-volume ratio and can be used to design new functionalities by the choice of a proper combination of constituents. However, most of the studies to date have emphasized the functional controllability of the nanostructures using external electric or magnetic fields. In this study, to introduce light (or photons) as an external control parameter in a self-assembled nanostructure system, we have successfully synthesized oxide nanostructures with CoFe(2)O(4) nanopillars embedded in a SrRuO(3) matrix. The combination of photostrictive SrRuO(3) and magnetostrictive CoFe(2)O(4) in the intimately assembled nanostructures leads to a light-induced, ultrafast change in magnetization of the CoFe(2)O(4) nanopillars. Our work demonstrates a novel concept on oxide nanostructure design and opens an alternative pathway for the explorations of diverse functionalities in heteroepitaxial self-assembled oxide nanostructures.

  6. Simulation Methods for Self-Assembled Polymers and Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, James T.

    2003-11-01

    New off-lattice grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation methods have been developed and used to model the equilibrium structure and phase diagrams of equilibrium polymers and rings. A scheme called Polydisperse Insertion, Removal, and Resizing (PDIRR) is used to accelerate the equilibration of the size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This method allows the insertion or removal of aggregates (e.g., chains) containing an arbitrary number of monomers in a single Monte Carlo move, or the re-sizing of an existing aggregate. For the equilibrium polymer model under semi-dilute conditions, a several-fold increase in equilibration rate compared with single-monomer moves is observed, facilitating the study of the isotropic-nematic transition of semiflexible, self-assembled chains. Combined with the pivot-coupled GCMC method for ring simulation, the PDIRR approach also allows the phenomenological simulation of a polydisperse equilibrium phase of rings, 2-dimensional fluid domains, or flat self-assembled disks in three dimensions.

  7. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  8. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  9. Highly conductive self-assembled nanoribbons of coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Lorena; Calzolari, Arrigo; Di Felice, Rosa; Zamora, Felix; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2010-02-01

    Organic molecules can self-assemble into well-ordered structures, but the conductance of these structures is limited, which is a disadvantage for applications in molecular electronics. Conductivity can be improved by using coordination polymers-in which metal centres are incorporated into a molecular backbone-and such structures have been used as molecular wires by self-assembling them into ordered films on metal surfaces. Here, we report electrically conductive nanoribbons of the coordination polymer [Pt(2)I(S(2)CCH(3))(4)](n) self-assembled on an insulating substrate by direct sublimation of polymer crystals. Conductance atomic force microscopy is used to probe the electrical characteristics of a few polymer chains ( approximately 10) within the nanoribbons. The observed currents exceed those previously sustained in organic and metal-organic molecules assembled on surfaces by several orders of magnitude and over much longer distances. These results, and the results of theoretical calculations based on density functional theory, confirm coordination polymers as candidate materials for applications in molecular electronics.

  10. SELF-ASSEMBLING AMPHIPHILIC POLYELECTROLYTES AND THEIR NANOSTRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yotaro Morishima

    2000-01-01

    The self-assembling behavior of random copolymers of sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate (AMPS)and hydrophobic comonomers possessing dodecyl groups linked by various spacer bonds was discussed with a focus on the effect of the spacer. The characterization of association behavior of such polymers in water using quasielastic light scattering,capillary electrophoresis, NMR relaxation, various fluorescence, and viscoelastic methods was described. These copolymers form a variety of self-assembled nanostructures depending on the type of the spacer. Random copolymers of AMPS and Ndodecylmethacrylamide show a strong preference for intrapolymer self-association even in concentrated aqueous solutions forming single-macromolecular self-assemblies (unimolecular micelles). In contrast, random copolymers of AMPS and dodecyl methacrylate are prone to undergo interpolymer associations yielding multipolymer micelles. In random copolymers of AMPS and a methacrylate substituted a nonionic surfactant (HO(CH2CH2O)25C12H25) (C12E25), dodecyl groups are much less restricted by the polymer backbone because they are linked via a long, flexible hydrophilic spacer. Thus, the polymerbound C12E25 surfactant moieties form micelles similar to those formed by discrete surfactants, but they are bridged by polymer chains forming a network structure.

  11. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Saiter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted.

  12. Fluorescence intermittency in self-assembled InP quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, M; Ren, H W; Nishi, K; Masumoto, Y

    2001-05-21

    Fluorescence intermittency in InP self-assembled dots is investigated by means of far field imaging and single dot spectroscopy. Based on our observation that blinking dots are found in the vicinity of scratches and the blinking frequency is drastically enhanced under a near-infrared laser irradiation, we attribute the origin of the fluorescence intermittency to a local electric field due to a carrier trapped at a deep localized center in the Ga0.5In0.5P matrix. The validity of this explanation is confirmed by a thermal activation-type behavior of the switching rate and artificial reproduction of the blinking phenomenon by an external electric field.

  13. Nanoparticle self-assembly by a highly stable recombinant spider wrapping silk protein subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Orrell, Kathleen E; Leclerc, Jérémie; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2013-10-01

    Artificial spider silk proteins may form fibers with exceptional strength and elasticity. Wrapping silk, or aciniform silk, is the toughest of the spider silks, and has a very different protein composition than other spider silks. Here, we present the characterization of an aciniform protein (AcSp1) subunit named W1, consisting of one AcSp1 199 residue repeat unit from Argiope trifasciata. The structural integrity of recombinant W1 is demonstrated in a variety of buffer conditions and time points. Furthermore, we show that W1 has a high thermal stability with reversible denaturation at ∼71°C and forms self-assembled nanoparticle in near-physiological conditions. W1 therefore represents a highly stable and structurally robust module for protein-based nanoparticle formation.

  14. Supramolecular Chemistry And Self-assembly Special Feature: Virus-assisted loading of polymer nanocontainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Alexandra; Sauer, Marc; van Gelder, Patrick; Meier, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    We present a DNA-containing polymeric nanocontainer using the self-assembled superstructure of amphiphilic block copolymers in aqueous solutions. To demonstrate that DNA translocation is possible across a completely synthetic block copolymer membrane, we have used a phage transfection strategy as a DNA-transfer model system. For this purpose the bacterial channel forming protein LamB was reconstituted in ABA-triblock copolymer vesicles. The outer membrane protein LamB is a specific transporter for maltodextrins but also serves as a receptor for phage to trigger the ejection of phage DNA. We demonstrate that the functionality of the LamB protein is fully preserved despite the artificial surrounding. This leads to a type of polymeric vehicle for DNA that could be useful for gene therapy.

  15. Towards in vivo mutation analysis: knock-out of specific chlorophylls bound to the light-harvesting complexes of Arabidopsis thaliana - the case of CP24 (Lhcb6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Francesca; Xu, Pengqi; Caffarri, Stefano; Hille, Jacques; Croce, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    In the last ten years, a large series of studies have targeted antenna complexes of plants (Lhc) with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of light harvesting and photoprotection. Combining spectroscopy, modeling and mutation analyses, the role of individual pigments in these processes has been highlighted in vitro. In plants, however, these proteins are associated with multiple complexes of the photosystems and function within this framework. In this work, we have envisaged a way to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies by knocking out in vivo pigments that have been proposed to play an important role in excitation energy transfer between the complexes or in photoprotection. We have complemented a CP24 knock-out mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with the CP24 (Lhcb6) gene carrying a His-tag and with a mutated version lacking the ligand for chlorophyll 612, a specific pigment that in vitro experiments have indicated as the lowest energy site of the complex. Both complexes efficiently integrated into the thylakoid membrane and assembled into the PSII supercomplexes, indicating that the His-tag does not impair the organization in vivo. The presence of the His-tag allowed the purification of CP24-WT and of CP24-612 mutant in their native states. It is shown that CP24-WT coordinates 10 chlorophylls and 2 carotenoid molecules and has properties identical to those of the reconstituted complex, demonstrating that the complex self-assembled in vitro assumes the same folding as in the plant. The absence of the ligand for chlorophyll 612 leads to the loss of one Chl a and of lutein, again as in vitro, indicating the feasibility of the method. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  16. Templated self-assembly of SiGe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dais, Christian

    2009-08-19

    This PhD thesis reports on the fabrication and characterization of exact aligned SiGe quantum dot structures. In general, SiGe quantum dots which nucleate via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode exhibit broad size dispersion and nucleate randomly on the surface. However, to tap the full potential of SiGe quantum dots it is necessary to control the positioning and size of the dots on a nanometer length, e.g. for electronically addressing of individual dots. This can be realized by so-called templated self-assembly, which combines top-down lithography with bottom-up selfassembly. In this process the lithographically defined pits serve as pre-defined nucleation points for the epitaxially grown quantum dots. In this thesis, extreme ultraviolet interference lithography at a wavelength of e=13.4 nm is employed for prepatterning of the Si substrates. This technique allows the precise and fast fabrication of high-resolution templates with a high degree of reproducibility. The subsequent epitaxial deposition is either performed by molecular beam epitaxy or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition. It is shown that the dot nucleation on pre-patterned substrates depends strongly on the lithography parameters, e.g. size and periodicity of the pits, as well as on the epitaxy parameters, e.g. growth temperature or material coverage. The interrelations are carefully analyzed by means of scanning force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Provided that correct template and overgrowth parameters are chosen, perfectly aligned and uniform SiGe quantum dot arrays of different period, size as well as symmetry are created. In particular, the quantum dot arrays with the so far smallest period (35 nm) and smallest size dispersion are fabricated in this thesis. Furthermore, the strain fields of the underlying quantum dots allow the fabrication of vertically aligned quantum dot stacks. Combining lateral and vertical dot alignment results in three

  17. Fabrication of Thermo-Responsive Molecular Layers from Self-Assembling Elastin-Like Oligopeptides Containing Cell-Binding Domain for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel thermo-responsive elastin-like oligopeptides containing cell-binding epitope (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser sequence; arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (RGDS-elastin-like peptides (ELP and RGDS-deg-ELP; were newly prepared as building blocks of self-assembled molecular layer for artificial extra cellular matrix. A detailed analysis of the conformation of the oligo(ELPs in water and their self-assembling behavior onto hydrophobic surfaces were performed by using circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, atomic force microscopy and water contact angle measurements. The experimental results revealed that both oligo(ELPs self-assembled onto hydrophobic surfaces and formed molecular layers based on their thermo-responsive conformational change from hydrous random coil to dehydrated β-turn structure. Effective cell adhesion and spreading behaviors were observed on these self-assembled oligo(ELP layers. In addition, attached cells were found to be recovered successfully as a cell-sheet by temperature-induced disassembly of oligo(ELP layer. This achievement provides an important insight to construct novel oligopeptide-based nano-surfaces for the design of smart artificial extra-cellular matrix.

  18. Colloidal self-assembly concepts for light management in photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Karg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal particles show interaction with electromagnetic radiation at optical frequencies. At the same time clever colloid design and functionalization concepts allow for versatile particle assembly providing monolayers of macroscopic dimensions. This has led to a significant interest in assembled colloidal structures for light harvesting in photovoltaic devices. In particular thin-film solar cells suffer from weak absorption of incoming photons. Consequently light management using assembled colloidal structures becomes vital for enhancing the efficiency of a given device. This review aims at giving an overview of recent developments in colloid synthesis, functionalization and assembly with a focus on light management structures in photovoltaics. We distinguish between optical effects related to the single particle properties as well as collective optical effects, which originate from the assembled structures. Colloidal templating approaches open yet another dimension for controlling the interaction with light. We focus in this respect on structured electrodes that have received much attention due to their dual functionality as light harvesting systems and conductive electrodes and highlight the impact of inter-particle spacing for templating.

  19. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of DNA Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Harish

    The control of matter and phenomena at the nanoscale is fast becoming one of the most important challenges of the 21st century with wide-ranging applications from energy and health care to computing and material science. Conventional top-down approaches to nanotechnology, having served us well for long, are reaching their inherent limitations. Meanwhile, bottom-up methods such as self-assembly are emerging as viable alternatives for nanoscale fabrication and manipulation. A particularly successful bottom up technique is DNA self-assembly where a set of carefully designed DNA strands form a nanoscale object as a consequence of specific, local interactions among the different components, without external direction. The final product of the self-assembly process might be a static nanostructure or a dynamic nanodevice that performs a specific function. Over the past two decades, DNA self-assembly has produced stunning nanoscale objects such as 2D and 3D lattices, polyhedra and addressable arbitrary shaped substrates, and a myriad of nanoscale devices such as molecular tweezers, computational circuits, biosensors and molecular assembly lines. In this dissertation we study multiple problems in the theory, simulations and experiments of DNA self-assembly. We extend the Turing-universal mathematical framework of self-assembly known as the Tile Assembly Model by incorporating randomization during the assembly process. This allows us to reduce the tile complexity of linear assemblies. We develop multiple techniques to build linear assemblies of expected length N using far fewer tile types than previously possible. We abstract the fundamental properties of DNA and develop a biochemical system, which we call meta-DNA, based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecule. We further develop various enzyme-free protocols to manipulate meta-DNA systems and provide strand level details along with abstract notations for these mechanisms. We simulate DNA circuits by

  20. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex.

  1. Multireference Excitation Energies for Bacteriochlorophylls A within Light Harvesting System 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, André; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-03-08

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We find that the excitation energies vary among the bacteriochlorophyll monomers and that they are regulated by the curvature of the macrocycle ring and the dihedral angle of an acetyl moiety. Increasing the curvature lifts the ground state energy, which causes a red shift of the excitation energy. Increasing the torsion of the acetyl moiety raises the excited state energy, resulting in a blue shift of the excitation energy. The obtained results mark a giant leap for multiconfigurational multireference quantum chemical methods in the photochemistry of biological systems, which can prove instrumental in exposing the underlying physics of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

  2. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  3. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  4. Light-harvesting cross-linked polymers for efficient heterogeneous photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Xie, Zhigang; deKrafft, Kathryn E; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-04-01

    Nonporous, phosphorescent cross-linked polymers (Ru-CP and Ir-CP) were synthesized via Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions between tetra(p-ethynylphenyl)methane and dibrominated Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) or Ir(ppy)(2)(bpy)(+), respectively. The resultant particulate cross-linked polymer (CP) materials have very high catalyst loadings (76.3 wt % for Ru-CP and 71.6 wt % for Ir-CP), and are nonporous with negligibly small surface areas (2.9 m(2)/g for Ru-CP and 2.7 m(2)/g for Ir-CP). Despite their nonporous nature, the insoluble CP materials serve as highly active and recyclable heterogeneous photocatalysts for a range of organic transformations such as aza-Henry reaction, aerobic amine coupling, and dehalogenation of benzyl bromoacetate. An efficient light-harvesting mechanism, which involves collection of photons by exciting the (3)MLCT states of the phosphors and migration of the excited states to the particle surface, is proposed to account for the very high catalytic activities of these nonporous CPs. Steady-state and time-resolved emission data, as well as the reduced catalytic activity of Os(bpy)(3)(2+)-doped Ru-CPs supports efficient excited state migration for the CP frameworks. This work uncovers a new strategy in designing highly efficient photocatalysts based on light-harvesting cross-linked polymers.

  5. Integral Light-Harvesting Complex Expression In Symbiodinium Within The Coral Acropora aspera Under Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierz, Sarah L.; Gordon, Benjamin R.; Leggat, William

    2016-04-01

    Coral reef success is largely dependent on the symbiosis between coral hosts and dinoflagellate symbionts belonging to the genus Symbiodinium. Elevated temperatures can result in the expulsion of Symbiodinium or loss of their photosynthetic pigments and is known as coral bleaching. It has been postulated that the expression of light-harvesting protein complexes (LHCs), which bind chlorophylls (chl) and carotenoids, are important in photobleaching. This study explored the effect a sixteen-day thermal stress (increasing daily from 25-34 °C) on integral LHC (chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC)) gene expression in Symbiodinium within the coral Acropora aspera. Thermal stress leads to a decrease in Symbiodinium photosynthetic efficiency by day eight, while symbiont density was significantly lower on day sixteen. Over this time period, the gene expression of five Symbiodinium acpPC genes was quantified. Three acpPC genes exhibited up-regulated expression when corals were exposed to temperatures above 31.5 °C (acpPCSym_1:1, day sixteen; acpPCSym_15, day twelve; and acpPCSym_18, day ten and day sixteen). In contrast, the expression of acpPCSym_5:1 and acpPCSym_10:1 was unchanged throughout the experiment. Interestingly, the three acpPC genes with increased expression cluster together in a phylogenetic analysis of light-harvesting complexes.

  6. Lutein epoxide cycle, light harvesting and photoprotection in species of the tropical tree genus Inga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Shizue; Krause, G Heinrich; Seltmann, Martin; Virgo, Aurelio; Kursar, Thomas A; Jahns, Peter; Winter, Klaus

    2008-04-01

    Dynamics and possible function of the lutein epoxide (Lx) cycle, that is, the reversible conversion of Lx to lutein (L) in the light-harvesting antennae, were investigated in leaves of tropical tree species. Photosynthetic pigments were quantified in nine Inga species and species from three other genera. In Inga, Lx levels were high in shade leaves (mostly above 20 mmol mol(-1) chlorophyll) and low in sun leaves. In Virola surinamensis, both sun and shade leaves exhibited very high Lx contents (about 60 mmol mol(-1) chlorophyll). In Inga marginata grown under high irradiance, Lx slowly accumulated within several days upon transfer to deep shade. When shade leaves of I. marginata were briefly exposed to the sunlight, both violaxanthin and Lx were quickly de-epoxidized. Subsequently, overnight recovery occurred only for violaxanthin, not for Lx. In such leaves, containing reduced levels of Lx and increased levels of L, chlorophyll fluorescence induction showed significantly slower reduction of the photosystem II electron acceptor, Q(A), and faster formation as well as a higher level of non-photochemical quenching. The results indicate that slow Lx accumulation in Inga leaves may improve light harvesting under limiting light, while quick de-epoxidation of Lx to L in response to excess light may enhance photoprotection.

  7. The terminal phycobilisome emitter, LCM: A light-harvesting pigment with a phytochrome chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kun; Ding, Wen-Long; Höppner, Astrid; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Lun; Hontani, Yusaku; Kennis, John T M; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2015-12-29

    Photosynthesis relies on energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to reaction centers. Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, attach to the membrane via the multidomain core-membrane linker, L(CM). The chromophore domain of L(CM) forms a bottleneck for funneling the harvested energy either productively to reaction centers or, in case of light overload, to quenchers like orange carotenoid protein (OCP) that prevent photodamage. The crystal structure of the solubly modified chromophore domain from Nostoc sp. PCC7120 was resolved at 2.2 Å. Although its protein fold is similar to the protein folds of phycobiliproteins, the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore adopts ZZZssa geometry, which is unknown among phycobiliproteins but characteristic for sensory photoreceptors (phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes). However, chromophore photoisomerization is inhibited in L(CM) by tight packing. The ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore and π-π stacking with a neighboring Trp account for the functionally relevant extreme spectral red shift of L(CM). Exciton coupling is excluded by the large distance between two PCBs in a homodimer and by preservation of the spectral features in monomers. The structure also indicates a distinct flexibility that could be involved in quenching. The conclusions from the crystal structure are supported by femtosecond transient absorption spectra in solution.

  8. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and photosynthesis: Fundamentals and applications to photosynthetic light-harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Ishizaki, Akihito [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-28

    Graphical abstract: 2D electronic spectroscopy, when combined with theoretical approaches, can investigate structure-function relationships in photosynthetic complexes by probing electronic energy transfer and excited state orientations. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} We review theoretical principles and experimental implementation of 2D spectroscopy. {yields} 2DES monitors energy transfer, observes coherence, determines excited state geometry, and compares to homology models. {yields} 2DES reveals structure-function relationships in the Photosystem II supercomplex. - Abstract: In natural light harvesting systems, pigment-protein complexes are able to harvest sunlight with near unity quantum efficiency. These complexes exhibit emergent properties that cannot be simply extrapolated from knowledge of their component parts. In this perspective, we focus on how two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) can provide an incisive tool to probe the electronic, energetic, and spatial landscapes that must be understood to describe photosynthetic light-harvesting. We review the theoretical and experimental principles of 2DES, and demonstrate its application to the study of the Photosystem II supercomplex of green plants. We illustrate several capabilities of 2DES, including monitoring energy transfer pathways, observing excitonic coherence, determining excitonic geometry, and informing on the atomic structure.

  9. Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in organic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Shih-Huang

    2007-12-01

    Amphiphilic molecules are well-known for their ability to self-assemble in water to form structures such as micelles and vesicles. In comparison, much less is known about amphiphilic self-assembly in nonpolar organic liquids. Such "reverse" self assembly can produce many of the counterparts to structures found in water. In this dissertation, we focus on the formation and dynamics of such reverse structures. We seek to obtain fundamental insight into the driving forces for reverse self-assembly processes. Three specific types of reverse structures are studied: (a) reverse wormlike micelles, i.e., long, flexible micellar chains; (b) reverse vesicles, i.e., hollow containers enclosed by reverse bilayers; and (c) organogel networks. While our focus is on the fundamentals, we note that reverse structures can be useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery, controlled release, hosts for enzymatic reactions, and templates for nanomaterials synthesis. In the first part of this study, we describe a new route for forming reverse wormlike micelles in nonpolar organic liquids. This route involves the addition of trace amounts of a bile salt to solutions of the phospholipid, lecithin. We show that bile salts, due to their unique "facially amphiphilic" structure, can promote the aggregation of lecithin molecules into these reverse micellar chains. The resulting samples are viscoelastic and show interesting rheological properties. Unusual trends are seen in the temperature dependence of their rheology, which indicates the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the formation of these micelles. Another remarkable feature of their rheology is the presence of strain-stiffening, where the material becomes stiffer at high deformations. Strain-stiffening has been seen before for elastic gels of biopolymers; here, we demonstrate the same properties for viscoelastic micellar solutions. The second reverse aggregate we deal with is the reverse vesicle. We present a

  10. Large organized surface domains self-assembled from nonpolar amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2012-04-17

    For years, researchers had presumed that Langmuir monolayers of small C(n)F(2n+1)C(m)H(2m+1) (FnHm) diblock molecules (such as F8H16) consisted of continuous, featureless films. Recently we have discovered that they instead form ordered arrays of unusually large (~30-60 nm), discrete self-assembled surface domains or hemimicelles both at the surface of water and on solid substrates. These surface micelles differ in several essential ways from all previously reported or predicted molecular surface aggregates. They self-assemble spontaneously, even at zero surface pressure, depending solely on a critical surface concentration. They are very large (~100 times the length of the diblock) and involve thousands of molecules (orders of magnitude more than classical micelles). At the same time, the surface micelles are highly monodisperse and self-organize in close-packed hexagonal patterns (two-dimensional crystals). Their size is essentially independent from pressure, and they do not coalesce and are unexpectedly sturdy for soft matter (persisting even beyond surface film collapse). We and other researchers have observed large surface micelles for numerous diblocks, using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) transfer, spin-coating and dip-coating techniques, or expulsion from mixed monolayers, and on diverse supports, establishing that hemimicelle formation and ordering are intrinsic properties of (perfluoroalkyl)alkanes. Notably, they involve "incomplete" surfactants with limited amphiphilic character, which further illustrates the outstanding capacity for perfluoroalkyl chains to promote self-assembly and interfacial film structuring. Using X-ray reflectivity, we determined a perfluoroalkyl-chain-up orientation. Theoretical investigations assigned self-assembly and hemimicelle stability to electrostatic dipole-dipole interactions at the interface between Fn- and Hm-sublayers. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) data collected directly on the surface of water

  11. Self-Assembled Conjugated Polymer Nanometer Scale Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenping Hu; Hiroshi Nakashima; Keiichi Torimitsu; Yunqi Liu; Daoben Zhu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Nanometer scale devices, as the next generation devices of electronics, have got a worldwide attention and rapid development recently. Simultaneously, conjugated polymers have been applied in organic electronics successfully because of their outstanding electronic-photonic properties. However, as far as we know few reports have dealt with the fabrication of nanometer scale devices by using conjugated polymers, although the combination of nanometer scale devices and polymers will not only extend conjugated polymers to Nanoelectronics, but also excavate the behaviors of polymer molecules at nano-molecular level, such as the electron transport through polymer molecules. One reason for this case is due to the lack of rigidity for most polymers.It results in the failure to bridge them between electrodes or to stand on substrates, therefore, fails to be characterized by scanning probe microscopy. Another reason is that the non-functionalized end-group of most polymers is impossible to graft on substrates through chemical bonds. Here, we introduce a self-assembled conjugated polymer can be used to fabricate nanodevices by self-assembly. The conjugated polymer is a derivative of poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)s (PPE) with thioacetyl end groups (Fig. 1). In general, it is known that for self-assembling ideal nanojunctions the materials should possess: a) conductivity, b) rigidity (for wiring and bridging between electrodes), and c) connectivity (for covalent attachment to metallic or semiconductor solid surfaces). PPE provides good conductivity owing to its special π-conjugated configuration. It is also believed that in principle PPE molecules possess rigidity because of the presence of the triple bond in their molecules,which prevents the rotation of adjacent phenyl rings with respect to each other.

  12. Bottlebrush Polymers: Synthesis, Rheology, and Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsin, Samuel J.

    Bottlebrush polymers are comb-like molecules with a high density of side chains grafted along a central backbone. Due to their unique conformational properties, bottlebrush polymers have become attractive candidates for developing new photonic bandgap materials, nanotubes and nanowires, or drug delivery vehicles, to name a few. This dissertation primarily investigates the rheological properties and self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush polymer molecules made using a variety of different polymerization routes. A considerable portion of the work is directed towards the linear rheology of model, polyolefin-based bottlebrush polymers with independently varied branch and backbone lengths. These studies demonstrate how the tight spacing between branch points effectively precludes backbone entanglement in the polymer melts, but it does not inhibit the formation of entanglements among the branched side chains. Furthermore, the relaxation profiles reveal transient scaling behavior in which the dynamics transition from Zimm-like to Rouse-like at increasing relaxation times. These results highlight the distinct conformational character of bottlebrushes at different length scales. The latter parts of this work report on the self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush diblock polymers composed of atactic polypropylene and polystyrene side chains. The diblock samples are analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy. Nearly all of the samples display strong segregation between the two blocks, owing to the large molar mass of typical bottlebrush polymers. Consequently, only one experimental sample displays an accessible order-disorder transition temperature. The strong segregation is also shown to affect the ability of large bottlebrush diblocks to readily achieve well-ordered nanostructures by self-assembly. Finally, results of the most symmetric (by volume fraction) diblock samples are compared with predictions of a newly developed self-consistent field

  13. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  14. A 3D Optical Metamaterial Made by Self-Assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Vignolini, Silvia

    2011-10-24

    Optical metamaterials have unusual optical characteristics that arise from their periodic nanostructure. Their manufacture requires the assembly of 3D architectures with structure control on the 10-nm length scale. Such a 3D optical metamaterial, based on the replication of a self-assembled block copolymer into gold, is demonstrated. The resulting gold replica has a feature size that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Its optical signature reveals an archetypal Pendry wire metamaterial with linear and circular dichroism. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rapid self-assembly of block copolymers to photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R; Grubbs, Robert H; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M; Atwater, Harry A; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot; Hong, Sung Woo; Gu, Weiyin; Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-07-05

    The invention provides a class of copolymers having useful properties, including brush block copolymers, wedge-type block copolymers and hybrid wedge and polymer block copolymers. In an embodiment, for example, block copolymers of the invention incorporate chemically different blocks comprising polymer size chain groups and/or wedge groups that significantly inhibit chain entanglement, thereby enhancing molecular self-assembly processes for generating a range of supramolecular structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using copolymers, including block copolymers.

  16. Microcolumns with self-assembled particle frits for proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Yasushi; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersen, Jens S;

    2002-01-01

    LC-MS-MS experiments in proteomics are usually performed with packed microcolumns employing frits or outlets smaller than the particle diameter to retain the packing material. We have developed packed microcolumns using self-assembled particles (SAPs) as frits that are smaller than the size...... of the outlet. A five to one ratio of outlet size to particle diameter appears to be the upper maximum. In these situations the particles assembled into an arch over the outlet like the stones in a stone bridge. When 3 microm particles were packed into a tapered column with an 8 microm outlet, two particles...

  17. Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 DNA, nanoscience, self-assembly... themes of our other accomplishments: (1) proof of concept high-density optical memory, (2) a physical key based information assurance system, (3) a...provide defect tolerance by self‐organizing into irregular  topologies . In this scenario, simple static  routing algorithms based on regular physical

  18. Self-assembled antimicrobial and biocompatible copolymer films on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffenroth, Cornelia; Winkel, Andreas; Dempwolf, Wibke; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G; Stiesch, Meike; Menzel, Henning

    2011-11-10

    Copolymers of 4-vinyl-N-hexylpyridinium bromide and dimethyl(2-methacryloyloxyethyl) phosphonate self-assemble to form ultrathin layers on titanium surfaces that show antimicrobial activity, and biocompatibility. The copolymer layers are characterized by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry and XPS. Antibacterial activity is assessed by investigation of adherence of S. mutans. Biocompatibility is rated based on human gingival fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. By balancing the opposing effects of the chemical composition on biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, copolymer coatings are fabricated that are able to inhibit the growth of S. mutans on the surface but still show attachment of gingival fibroblasts, and therefore might prevent biofilm formation on implants.

  19. Self-assembling peptide amphiphile nanostructures for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukasene, Stephen

    The application of nanotechnology to cancer therapy shows great promise for reducing the burden of the disease. By virtue of their size, nanoscale objects preferentially accumulate in tumor tissue through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, to fully overcome the issues that limit current cancer treatments, viable nanostructures must also impart multifunctionality and be fully compatible with their biological surrounds. The self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) materials studied extensively in the Stupp Research Group form very biocompatible high aspect ratio nanostructures that meet these criteria. This thesis investigates the development of PA nanostructures designed to treat cancer. We first look to use the PA as a drug delivery vehicle by entrapping a small hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, camptothecin, in the core of the nanostructures. Using a solvent evaporation technique to load the drug into the PA nanofibers, we are able to improve the aqueous solubility of the molecule by nearly 30-fold. TEM and AFM studies show that entrapment of drug molecules does not disrupt the self-assembled morphology of the nanofiber. In vitro and in vivo studies are also conducted to demonstrate the bioactivity of the drug after its entrapment. As a potential platform for novel therapeutics, we next develop techniques for using light irradiation to trigger self-assembly inside the confined space of liposomes. We encapsulate PA monomers that assemble under acidic conditions along with a photoacid generator inside liposomes. Upon exposure to 254 nm light, the PA monomers self assemble inside the liposome to form nanostructures, which we observe through a quick freeze/deep etch technique that allows us to look inside the liposomes by SEM and TEM. Last of all, the development and discovery of epitopes for targeting PA nanostructures to tumors are explored. Using phage display technology we generate two groups of peptide sequences, one of which can potentially

  20. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Directed Formation of DNA Nanoarrays through Orthogonal Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Stulz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis of terpyridine modified DNA strands which selectively form DNA nanotubes through orthogonal hydrogen bonding and metal complexation interactions. The short DNA strands are designed to self-assemble into long duplexes through a sticky-end approach. Addition of weakly binding metals such as Zn(II and Ni(II induces the formation of tubular arrays consisting of DNA bundles which are 50-200 nm wide and 2-50 nm high. TEM shows additional long distance ordering of the terpy-DNA complexes into fibers.

  2. Electrically addressing a single self-assembled quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, D J P; Atkinson, P; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the use of an aperture in an aluminum oxide layer to restrict current injection into a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot, from an ensemble of such dots within a large mesa. The insulating aperture is formed through the wet-oxidation of a layer of AlAs. Under photoluminescence we observe that only one quantum dot in the ensemble exhibits a Stark shift, and that the same single dot is visible under electroluminescence. Autocorrelation measurements performed on the electroluminescence confirm that we are observing emission from a single quantum dot.

  3. Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architectures Lyotropic Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Garti, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This book will describe fundamentals and recent developments in the area of Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architecture and their relevance to the  understanding of the functionality of  membranes  as delivery systems for active ingredients. As the heirarchial architectures determine their performance capabilities, attention will be paid to theoretical and design aspects related to the construction of lyotropic liquid crystals: mesophases such as lamellar, hexagonal, cubic, sponge phase micellosomes. The book will bring to the reader mechanistic aspects, compositional c

  4. Long lived coherence in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Leosson, Kristjan; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    We report measurements of ultralong coherence in self-assembled quantum dots. Transient four-wave mixing experiments at 5 K show an average dephasing time of 372 ps, corresponding to a homogeneous linewidth of 3.5 mu eV, which is significantly smaller than the linewidth observed in single-dot...... luminescence. Time-resolved luminescence measurements show a lifetime of the dot ground state of 800 ps, demonstrating the presence of pure dephasing at finite temperature. The homogeneous width is lifetime limited only at temperatures approaching 0 K....

  5. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Barbe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol.

  6. The self assembly of thymine at Au(110)/liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Contreras, J.R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica y Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Mexico (Mexico); Smith, C.I.; Bowfield, A.; Weightman, P. [Physics Department, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Tillner, F. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We show that thymine self-assembles into an ordered structure when adsorbed at a Au(110)/liquid interface. Reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) shows that as found for cytosine and adenine the adsorbed thymine molecules are oriented essentially vertically on the Au(110) surface with the molecule aligned along one of the principal axes of the Au(110) surface. Simulations of the RA spectra to an empirical model indicates that as found for adsorbed cytosine and adenine, thymine is aligned along the [1 anti 10] direction on the Au(110) surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Directed self-assembly defectivity assessment. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencher, Chris; Yi, He; Zhou, Jessica; Cai, Manping; Smith, Jeffrey; Miao, Liyan; Montal, Ofir; Blitshtein, Shiran; Lavi, Alon; Dotan, Kfir; Dai, Huixiong; Cheng, Joy Y.; Sanders, Daniel P.; Tjio, Melia; Holmes, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The main concern for the commercialization of directed self-assembly (DSA) for semiconductor manufacturing continues to be the uncertainty in capability and control of defect density. Our research investigates the defect densities of various DSA process applications in the context of a 300mm wafer fab cleanroom environment; this paper expands substantially on the previously published DSA defectivity study by reporting a defect density process window relative to chemical epitaxial pre-pattern registration lines; as well as investigated DSA based contact hole shrinking and report critical dimension statistics for the phase separated polymers before and after etch, along with positional accuracy measurements and missing via defect density.

  8. Surface modifications of photoanodes in dye sensitized solar cells: enhanced light harvesting and reduced recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vibha; Aswal, D. K.

    2015-06-01

    In a quest to harvest solar power, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have potential for low-cost eco-friendly photovoltaic devices. The major processes which govern the efficiency of a DSSC are photoelectron generation, injection of photo-generated electrons to the conduction band (CB) of the mesoporous nanocrystalline semiconductor (nc-SC); transport of CB electrons through nc-SC and subsequent collection of CB electrons at the counter electrode (CE) through the external circuit; and dye regeneration by redox couple or hole transport layer (HTL). Most of these processes occur at various interfaces of the photoanode. In addition, recombination losses of photo-generated electrons with either dye or redox molecules take place at the interfaces. Therefore, one of the key requirements for high efficiency is to improve light harvesting of the photoanode and to reduce the recombination losses at various interfaces. In this direction, surface modification of the photoanode is the simplest method among the various other approaches available in the literature. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion on surface modification of the photoanode, which has been adopted in the literature for not only enhancing light harvesting but also reducing recombination. Various approaches towards surface modification of the photoanode discussed are (i) fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)/nc-SC interface modified via a compact layer of semiconductor material which blocks exposed sites of FTO to electrolyte (or HTL), (ii) nc-SC/dye interface modification either through acid treatment resulting in enhanced dye loading due to a positively charged surface or by depositing insulating/semiconducting blocking layer on the nc-SC surface, which acts as a tunneling barrier for recombination, (iii) nc-SC/dye interface modified by employing co-adsorbents which helps in reducing the dye aggregation and thereby recombination, and (iv) dye/electrolyte (or dye/HTL) interface modification using

  9. Multi-step excitation energy transfer engineered in genetic fusions of natural and synthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A; Kodali, Goutham; Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bryant, Donald A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic proteins designed and constructed from first principles with minimal reference to the sequence of any natural protein have proven robust and extraordinarily adaptable for engineering a range of functions. Here for the first time we describe the expression and genetic fusion of a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting subunit with a synthetic protein designed for light energy capture and multi-step transfer. We demonstrate excitation energy transfer from the bilin of the CpcA subunit (phycocyanin α subunit) of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting phycobilisome to synthetic four-helix-bundle proteins accommodating sites that specifically bind a variety of selected photoactive tetrapyrroles positioned to enhance energy transfer by relay. The examination of combinations of different bilin, chlorin and bacteriochlorin cofactors has led to identification of the preconditions for directing energy from the bilin light-harvesting antenna into synthetic protein-cofactor constructs that can be customized for light-activated chemistry in the cell.

  10. On Improving the Performance of Nonphotochemical Quenching in CP29 Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Gennady P; Sayre, Richard T; Still, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We model and simulate the performance of charge-transfer in nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in the CP29 light-harvesting antenna-complex associated with photosystem II (PSII). The model consists of five discrete excitonic energy states and two sinks, responsible for the potentially damaging processes and charge-transfer channels, respectively. We demonstrate that by varying (i) the parameters of the chlorophyll-based dimer, (ii) the resonant properties of the protein-solvent environment interaction, and (iii) the energy transfer rates to the sinks, one can significantly improve the performance of the NPQ. Our analysis suggests strategies for improving the performance of the NPQ in response to environmental changes, and may stimulate experimental verification.

  11. Enhancement of coherent energy transfer by disorder and temperature in light harvesting processes

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Shi-Jie; Zhao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of static disorder and thermal excitations on excitonic energy transport in the light-harvesting apparatus of photosynthetic systems by solving the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and taking into account the coherent hoppings of excitons, the rates of exciton creation and annihilation in antennas and reaction centers, and the coupling to thermally excited phonons. The antennas and reaction centers are modeled, respectively, as the sources and drains which provide the channels for creation and annihilation of excitons. Phonon modes below a maximum frequency are coupled to the excitons that are continuously created in the antennas and depleted in the reaction centers, and the phonon population in these modes obeys the Bose-Einstein distribution at a given temperature. It is found that the energy transport is not only robust against the static disorder and the thermal noise, but it can also be enhanced by increasing the randomness and temperature in most parameter regimes. Relevance of our ...

  12. Excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting system: Effect of initial state

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, B; Oh, C H

    2012-01-01

    The light-harvesting is a problem of long interest. It becomes active again in recent years stimulated by suggestions of quantum effects in energy transport. Recent experiments found evidence that BChla 1 and BChla 6 are the first to be excited in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson(FMO) protein, theoretical studies, however, are mostly restricted to consider the exciton in BChla 1 initially. In this paper, we study the energy transport in the FMO complex by taking different initial states into account. Optimizations are performed for the decoherence rates as to maximal transport efficiency. Dependence of the energy transfer efficiency on the initial states is given and discussed. Effects of fluctuations in the site energies and couplings are also examined.

  13. The fundamental role of localised vibrations in excitation dynamics in photosynthetic light-harvesting systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kolli, Avinash; Scholes, Gregory D; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The importance of fast vibrations in enhancing and controlling energy transfer and conversion in biomolecules is an issue of current debate. In this article we show that coupling between localised high-frequency vibrations and electronic degrees of freedom is fundamental for efficient excitation transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting systems with high degree of disorder. We consider the cryptophyte antennae protein phycoerythrin 545 and discuss how the balance between electronic interactions and coupling to fast vibronic modes supports the biological function of these antennae by generating a non-cascaded transport that leads to a rapid, directed and wider spatial distribution of excitation energy across the complex. Furthermore, we illustrate signatures of vibronic influence in the beating of excitonic coherences and show that mechanisms supporting coherent evolution of excitons also assist coupling to selected modes that enhance energy transfer to preferential sites in the complex. We therefore argue ...

  14. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range...... of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all...... bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We find that the excitation energies vary among the bacteriochlorophyll monomers and that they are regulated by the curvature of the macrocycle ring and the dihedral angle of an acetyl moiety. Increasing the curvature lifts the ground state energy, which causes a red shift...

  15. Photoprotection Mechanism of Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex from Purple Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Horibe, Tomoko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2016-02-11

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus efficiently capture sunlight and transfer the energy to reaction centers, while they safely dissipate excess energy to surrounding environments for a protection of their organisms. In this study, we performed pump-probe spectroscopic measurements with a temporal window ranging from femtosecond to submillisecond on the purple bacterial antenna complex LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 to clarify its photoprotection functions. The observed excited state dynamics in the time range from subnanosecond to microsecond exhibits that the triplet-triplet excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a to carotenoid takes place with a time constant of 16.7 ns. Furthermore, ultrafast spectroscopic data suggests that a molecular assembly of bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 efficiently suppresses a generation of triple bacteriochlorophyll a.

  16. Bio-hydrogen Production Using the Visible Light-harvesting Function of Chlorophyll-a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yutaka Amao; Noriko Himeshima [Department of Applied Chemistry, Oita University, Dannoharu 700, Oita 870-1192, (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    A Bio-hydrogen production system, coupling D-maltose hydrolysis by gluco-amylase and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and hydrogen production with platinum nano-particle colloid catalyst using the photo-sensitization based on the visible light harvesting of Mg chlorophyll-a (Mg Chl-a), was developed. Hydrogen gas was continuously produced when the reaction mixture containing D-maltose, gluco-amylase, GDH, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), Mg Chl-a, methyl-viologen (MV2+) and platinum nano-particle colloid was irradiated by visible light. The amount of hydrogen production was estimated to be 5.0 {mu}mol after 4 h irradiation and the yield of conversion of D-maltose to hydrogen gas was about 1.8%. The quantum yield was 3.1%. (authors)

  17. Quantum dynamics in light-harvesting complexes: Beyond the single-exciton limit

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, B; Yi, X X

    2011-01-01

    Primitive photosynthetic cells appear over three billion years prior to any other more complex life-forms, thus it is reasonable to assume that Nature has designed a photosynthetic mechanism using minimal resources but honed to perfection under the action of evolution. A number of different quantum models have been proposed to understand the high degree of efficient energy transport, most of them are limited to the scenario of single-exciton. Here we present a study on the dynamics in light-harvesting complexes beyond the single exciton limit, and show how this model describes the energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex. We find that the energy transfer efficiency above 90% under realistic conditions is achievable.

  18. Realistic and verifiable coherent control of excitonic states in a light harvesting complex

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Stephan; Montangero, Simone; Sarovar, Mohan; Calarco, Tommaso; Plenio, Martin B; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of coherent control of excitonic dynamics in light harvesting complexes despite the open nature of these quantum systems. We establish feasible targets for phase and phase/amplitude control of the electronically excited state populations in the Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) complex and analyze the robustness of this control. We further present two possible routes to verification of the control target, with simulations for the FMO complex showing that steering of the excited state is experimentally verifiable either by extending excitonic coherence or by producing novel states in a pump-probe setup. Our results provide a first step toward coherent control of these systems in an ultrafast spectroscopy setup.

  19. Design principles and fundamental trade-offs in biomimetic light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Sarovar, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in synthetic and supramolecular chemistry have created opportunities to design organic systems with tailored nanoscale structure for various technological applications. A key application area is the capture of light energy and its conversion into electrochemical or chemical forms for photovoltaic or sensing applications. In this work we consider cylindrical assemblies of chromophores that model structures produced by several supramolecular techniques. Our study is especially guided by the versatile structures produced by virus-templated assembly. We use a multi-objective optimization framework to determine design principles and limitations in light harvesting performance for such assemblies, both in the presence and absence of disorder. We identify a fundamental trade-off in cylindrical assemblies that is encountered when attempting to maximize both efficiency of energy transfer and absorption bandwidth. We also rationalize the optimal design strategies and provide explanations for why var...

  20. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  1. Primary light harvesting system: phycobilisomes and associated membranes. Progress report, January 1, 1978--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, E.

    1978-01-01

    Phycobilisomes, attached to photosynthetic membranes of the red and blue-green algae, function as the major light harvesters for photosynthesis. They represent one of the most efficient energy transfer systems in photosynthetic organisms. Allophycocyanin is the terminal pigment in the transfer chain. One of the far emitting allophycocyanin forms has been under study because it is the probable bridging pigment between the phycobilisomes and the photosynthetic membrane. Vesicles with attached phycobilisomes from Anabaena variabilis have been isolated and shown to transfer excitation energy from phycobiliproteins to photosystem II chlorophy11 and to actively evolving oxygen. With the availability of such conditions, and with the capability of being able to isolate phycobilisomes from any algae, probes for the phycobilisome attachment site can now be undertaken. Our isolation, characterization, and in vitro recombination of a phycocyanin and phycoerythrin complex represents the first crucial step in being able to explore the in vitro formation of phycobilisomes.

  2. Primary light harvesting system: phycobilisomes and associated membranes. Progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, E.

    1976-01-01

    Phycobilisomes, which function as light harvesting antennae in red and blue-green algae, are structured for maximum energy transfer from the phycobiliproteins to chlorophyll in the photosynthetic lamellae. An immunoelectron microscopic procedure was devised by which it was possible to show that allophycocyanin is located on the photosynthetic membrane, but apparently is not a structural component thereof. Location of allophycocyanin on the membrane is significant because it facilitates the energy transfer to chlorophyll. In attempts at reconstitution of phycobilisomes, from isolated phycobiliproteins, it was found that association of these pigments is more complex than had thus far been inferred from in vitro studies. In reconstituting complexes of phycocyanin and phycoerythrin, the previous apparent confirmational state of each protein was very important. Several allophycocyanin fms, derived from phycobilisomes, similarly showed absorption, fluorescence and sedimentation behavior which suggested minor but significant changes in the state of confirmation and or aggregation.

  3. Distinguishing the roles of energy funnelling and delocalization in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-03-14

    Photosynthetic complexes improve the transfer of excitation energy from peripheral antennas to reaction centers in several ways. In particular, a downward energy funnel can direct excitons in the right direction, while coherent excitonic delocalization can enhance transfer rates through the cooperative phenomenon of supertransfer. However, isolating the role of purely coherent effects is difficult because any change to the delocalization also changes the energy landscape. Here, we show that the relative importance of the two processes can be determined by comparing the natural light-harvesting apparatus with counterfactual models in which the delocalization and the energy landscape are altered. Applied to the example of purple bacteria, our approach shows that although supertransfer does enhance the rates somewhat, the energetic funnelling plays the decisive role. Because delocalization has a minor role (and is sometimes detrimental), it is most likely not adaptive, being a side-effect of the dense chlorophyll packing that evolved to increase light absorption per reaction center.

  4. Disentangling electronic and vibrational coherence in the Phycocyanin-645 light-harvesting complex

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gethin H; Curmi, Paul M G; Davis, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Energy transfer between chromophores in photosynthesis proceeds with near unity quantum efficiency. Understanding the precise mechanisms of these processes is made difficult by the complexity of the electronic structure and interactions with different vibrational modes. Two-dimensional spectroscopy has helped resolve some of the ambiguities and identified quantum effects that may be important for highly efficient energy transfer. Many questions remain, however, including whether the coherences observed are electronic and/or vibrational in nature and what role they play. We utilise a two-colour four-wave mixing experiment with control of the wavelength and polarization to selectively excite specific coherence pathways. For the light-harvesting complex PC645, from cryptophyte algae, we reveal and identify specific contributions from both electronic and vibrational coherences and determine an excited state structure based on two strongly-coupled electronic states and two vibrational modes. Separation of the cohe...

  5. On improving the performance of nonphotochemical quenching in CP29 light-harvesting antenna complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P. [Theoretical Division, T-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Nesterov, Alexander I., E-mail: nesterov@cencar.udg.mx [Departamento de Física, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Revolución 1500, Guadalajara, CP 44420, Jalisco (Mexico); Sayre, Richard T. [Biological Division, B-11, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Still, Susanne [Department of Information and Computer Sciences, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, 1860 East–West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2016-03-22

    We model and simulate the performance of charge-transfer in nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in the CP29 light-harvesting antenna-complex associated with photosystem II (PSII). The model consists of five discrete excitonic energy states and two sinks, responsible for the potentially damaging processes and charge-transfer channels, respectively. We demonstrate that by varying (i) the parameters of the chlorophyll-based dimer, (ii) the resonant properties of the protein-solvent environment interaction, and (iii) the energy transfer rates to the sinks, one can significantly improve the performance of the NPQ. Our analysis suggests strategies for improving the performance of the NPQ in response to environmental changes, and may stimulate experimental verification. - Highlights: • Improvement of the efficiency of the charge-transfer nonphotochemical quenching in CP29. • Strategy for restoring the NPQ efficiency when the environment changes. • By changing of energy transfer rates to the sinks, one can significantly improve the performance of the NPQ.

  6. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    of the excitation energy. Increasing the torsion of the acetyl moiety raises the excited state energy, resulting in a blue shift of the excitation energy. The obtained results mark a giant leap for multiconfigurational multireference quantum chemical methods in the photochemistry of biological systems, which can......Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range...... of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all...

  7. Efficiency Enhancement of InGaN-Based Solar Cells via Stacking Layers of Light-Harvesting Nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Amri, Amal M.

    2016-06-24

    An effective light-harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells is demonstrated using stacking layers of polystyrene nanospheres. Light-harvesting efficiencies on the solar cells covered with varied stacks of nanospheres are evaluated through numerical and experimental methods. The numerical simulation reveals that nanospheres with 3 stacking layers exhibit the most improved optical absorption and haze ratio as compared to those obtained by monolayer nanospheres. The experimental demonstration, agreeing with the theoretical analyses, shows that the application of 3-layer nanospheres improves the conversion efficiency of the solar cell by ~31%.

  8. Amphiphilic Janus gold nanoparticles prepared by interface-directed self-assembly: synthesis and self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Tian, Jia; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Hanying

    2014-09-01

    Materials with Janus structures are attractive for wide applications in materials science. Although extensive efforts in the synthesis of Janus particles have been reported, the synthesis of sub-10 nm Janus nanoparticles is still challenging. Herein, the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on interface-directed self-assembly is reported. Polystyrene (PS) colloidal particles with AuNPs on the surface were prepared by interface-directed self-assembly, and the colloidal particles were used as templates for the synthesis of Janus AuNPs. To prepare colloidal particles, thiol-terminated polystyrene (PS-SH) was dissolved in toluene and citrate-stabilized AuNPs were dispersed in aqueous solution. Upon mixing the two solutions, PS-SH chains were grafted to the surface of AuNPs and amphiphilic AuNPs were formed at the liquid-liquid interface. PS colloidal particles decorated with AuNPs on the surfaces were prepared by adding the emulsion to excess methanol. On the surface, AuNPs were partially embedded in the colloidal particles. The outer regions of the AuNPs were exposed to the solution and were functionalized through the grafting of atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Poly[2-(dimethamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) on AuNPs were prepared by surface-initiated ATRP. After centrifugation and dissolving the colloidal particles in tetrahydrofuran (THF), Janus AuNPs with PS and PDMAEMA on two hemispheres were obtained. In acidic pH, Janus AuNPs are amphiphilic and are able to emulsify oil droplets in water; in basic pH, the Janus AuNPs are hydrophobic. In mixtures of THF/methanol at a volume ratio of 1:5, the Janus AuNPs self-assemble into bilayer structures with collapsed PS in the interiors and solvated PDMAEMA at the exteriors of the structures.

  9. Photophysics in single light-harvesting complexes II: from micelle to native nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. Michael; Scheidelaar, Stefan; van Roon, Henny; Dekker, Jan P.; Killian, J. Antoinette; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Most photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes of algae and higher plants are integral membrane proteins and are thus usually isolated in the presence of detergent to provide a hydrophobic interface and prevent aggregation. It was recently shown that the styrene maleic acid (SMA) copolymer can be used instead to solubilize and isolate protein complexes with their native lipid environment into nanodisk particles. We isolated LHCII complexes in SMA and compared their photophysics with trimeric LHCII complexes in β-DM detergent micelles to understand the effect of the native environment on the function of light-harvesting antennae. The triplet state kinetics and the calculated relative absorption cross section of single complexes indicate the successful isolation of trimeric complexes in SMA nanodisks, confirming the trimeric structure as the likely native configuration. The survival time of complexes before they photobleach is increased in SMA compared to detergent which might be explained by a stabilizing effect of the co-purified lipids in nanodisks. We furthermore find an unquenched fluorescence lifetime of 3.5 ns for LHCII in SMA nanodisks which coincides with detergent isolated complexes and notably differs from 2 ns typically found in native thylakoid structures. A large dynamic range of partially quenched complexes both in detergent micelles and lipid nanodisks is demonstrated by correlating the fluorescence lifetime with the intensity and likely reflects the conformational freedom of these complexes. This further supports the hypothesis that fluorescence intermittency is an intrinsic property of LHCII that may be involved in excess energy dissipation in native light-harvesting.

  10. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  11. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Mesostructured Spherical Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C.J.; Fan,; H.; Lu, Y.; Rieker, T.; Stump, A.; Ward, T.L.

    1999-03-23

    Nanostructured particles exhibiting well-defined pore sizes and pore connectivities (1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional) are of interest for catalysis, chromatography, controlled release, low dielectric constant fillers, and custom-designed pigments and optical hosts. During the last several years considerable progress has been made on controlling the macroscopic forms of mesoporous silicas prepared by surfactant and block copolymer liquid crystalline templating procedures. Typically interfacial phenomena are used to control the macroscopic form (particles, fibers, or films), while self-assembly of amphiphilic surfactants or polymers is used to control the mesostructure. To date, although a variety of spherical or nearly-spherical particles have been prepared, their extent of order is limited as is the range of attainable mesostructures. They report a rapid, aerosol process that results in solid, completely ordered spherical particles with stable hexagonal, cubic, or vesicular mesostructures. The process relies on evaporation-induced interfacial self-assembly (EISA) confined to a spherical aerosol droplet. The process is simple and generalizable to a variety of materials combinations. Additionally, it can be modified to provide the first aerosol route to the formation of ordered mesostructured films.

  12. Silver nanoprisms self-assembly on differently functionalized silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipavicius, J.; Chodosovskaja, A.; Beganskiene, A.; Kareiva, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work colloidal silica/silver nanoprisms (NPRs) composite coatings were made. Firstly colloidal silica sols were synthesized by sol-gel method and produced coatings on glass by dip-coating technique. Next coatings were silanized by (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (AEAPTMS), (3- Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Silver NPRs where synthesized via seed-mediated method and high yield of 94±15 nm average edge length silver NPRs were obtained with surface plasmon resonance peak at 921 nm. Silica-Silver NPRs composite coatings obtained by selfassembly on silica coated-functionalized surface. In order to find the most appropriate silanization way for Silver NPRs self-assembly, the composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), water contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) methods. Results have showed that surface functionalization is necessary to achieve self-assembled Ag NPRs layer. MPTMS silanized coatings resulted sparse distribution of Ag NPRs. Most homogeneous, even distribution composite coatings obtained on APTES functionalized silica coatings, while AEAPTMS induced strong aggregation of Silver NPRs.

  13. Preparation and self-assembly of amphiphilic polylysine dendrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsharghi, Sahar; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Bagherifam, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Polylysine dendrons with lipid tails prepared by divergent solid-phase synthesis showed self-assembling properties in aqueous solutions., Herein, we present the synthesis of new amphiphilic polylysine dendrons with variable alkyl chain lengths (C1–C18) at the C-terminal. The dendrons were synthes...... and 20 μM concentrations. The dendrons showed low cytotoxicity, displaying cell viability well above 80%....... were influenced by the length of the alkyl chain and the generation number (Gn). Increasing the temperature and concentration did not have significant impact on the hydrodynamic diameter, but the self-assembling properties were influenced by the pH value. This demonstrated the need for positively...... with alkyl chain lengths above C12 are ascribed to intermicellar aggregates stabilized by hydrophobic and electrostatic forces in accordance with the observed pH effect. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the dendrons was evaluated in mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) and human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells at 5, 10...

  14. Functional self-assembled DNA nanostructures for molecular recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2012-03-01

    Nucleic acids present a wonderful toolkit of structural motifs for nanoconstruction. Functional DNA nanostructures can enable protein recognition by the use of aptamers attached to a basic core shape formed by DNA self-assembly. Here, we present a facile, programmable strategy for the assembly of discrete aptamer-tagged DNA shapes and nanostructures that can function for molecular recognition and binding in an aqueous environment. These nanostructures, presented here to bind two different protein targets, are easily synthesized in large numbers, and are portable and stable over long periods of time. This construction modality can facilitate on-demand production of libraries of diverse shapes to recognize and bind proteins or catalyze reactions via functional nucleic acid tags.Nucleic acids present a wonderful toolkit of structural motifs for nanoconstruction. Functional DNA nanostructures can enable protein recognition by the use of aptamers attached to a basic core shape formed by DNA self-assembly. Here, we present a facile, programmable strategy for the assembly of discrete aptamer-tagged DNA shapes and nanostructures that can function for molecular recognition and binding in an aqueous environment. These nanostructures, presented here to bind two different protein targets, are easily synthesized in large numbers, and are portable and stable over long periods of time. This construction modality can facilitate on-demand production of libraries of diverse shapes to recognize and bind proteins or catalyze reactions via functional nucleic acid tags. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11711h

  15. Self-assembly of organic films on a liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Olaf M.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Regan, Michael J.; Pershan, Peter S.; Abernathy, Douglas; Grübel, Gerhard; Legrand, Jean-François

    1996-11-01

    THE structure and phase behaviour of organic thin films result from the subtle interplay of intermolecular Van der Waals interactions, which promote self-assembly and long-ranged order, and the more complex interactions between the end groups of the organic chains and the substrate. The structure of molecular films of amphiphiles has been extensively studied on subphases of dielectric liquids, notably water (Langmuir mono-layers) and on solid surfaces (self-assembled monolayers, SAMs)1-4. Here we report structural studies, by synchrotron X-ray scattering, of an intermediate case: densely packed alka-nethiol films on the surface of liquid mercury. While, like SAMs, these films form strong chemical bonds to the subphase, this subphase is smooth and unstructured, as in the case of Langmuir monolayers. But unlike either of these1,2,5-7, our films have no in-plane long-range order. We suggest that the strong interaction of the thiol group with the underlying disordered liquid dominates here over the order-promoting interactions of the alkyl chains.

  16. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds accelerate wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Schneider

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound repair regenerates skin integrity, but a chronic failure to heal results in compromised tissue function and increased morbidity. To address this, we have used an integrated approach, using nanobiotechnology to augment the rate of wound reepithelialization by combining self-assembling peptide (SAP nanofiber scaffold and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF. This SAP bioscaffold was tested in a bioengineered Human Skin Equivalent (HSE tissue model that enabled wound reepithelialization to be monitored in a tissue that recapitulates molecular and cellular mechanisms of repair known to occur in human skin. We found that SAP underwent molecular self-assembly to form unique 3D structures that stably covered the surface of the wound, suggesting that this scaffold may serve as a viable wound dressing. We measured the rates of release of EGF from the SAP scaffold and determined that EGF was only released when the scaffold was in direct contact with the HSE. By measuring the length of the epithelial tongue during wound reepithelialization, we found that SAP scaffolds containing EGF accelerated the rate of wound coverage by 5 fold when compared to controls without scaffolds and by 3.5 fold when compared to the scaffold without EGF. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrated that biomaterials composed of a biofunctionalized peptidic scaffold have many properties that are well-suited for the treatment of cutaneous wounds including wound coverage, functionalization with bioactive molecules, localized growth factor release and activation of wound repair.

  17. Low-temperature photoluminescence in self-assembled diphenylalanine microtubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, T. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kopyl, S. [Physics Department & CICECO – Materials Institute of Aveiro, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Shur, V.Ya. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kopelevich, Y.V., E-mail: kopel@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-859 (Brazil); Kholkin, A.L., E-mail: kholkin@gmail.com [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Physics Department & CICECO – Materials Institute of Aveiro, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-04-22

    Bioinspired self-assembled structures are increasingly important for a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to electronic and energy harvesting devices. An important class of these structures is diphenylalanine microtubes which are potentially important for optical applications including light emitting diodes and optical biomarkers. In this work we present the data on their photoluminescent properties at low temperatures (down to 12 K) and discuss the origin of the emission in the near ultraviolet (UV) range seen earlier in a number of reports. UV luminescence increases with decreasing temperature and exhibits several equidistant lines that are assigned to zero-phonon exciton emission line and its phonon replicas. We infer that the exciton is localized on the defect sites and significant luminescence decay is due to thermal quenching arising from the carrier excitation from these defects and non-radiative recombination. - Highlights: • Low-temperature luminescence is studied in bioinspired self-assembled FF peptide microtubes. • The mechanism of the optical emission is assigned to the luminescence of excitonic states localized at defects. • Luminescence in FF microtubes can be used as an absolute temperature probe at low temperature.

  18. Self-assembled rosette nanotubes encapsulate and slowly release dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Yupeng Chen1,2, Shang Song2, Zhimin Yan3, Hicham Fenniri3, Thomas J Webster2,41Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 4Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Rosette nanotubes (RNTs are novel, self-assembled, biomimetic, synthetic drug delivery materials suitable for numerous medical applications. Because of their amphiphilic character and hollow architecture, RNTs can be used to encapsulate and deliver hydrophobic drugs otherwise difficult to deliver in biological systems. Another advantage of using RNTs for drug delivery is their biocompatibility, low cytotoxicity, and their ability to engender a favorable, biologically-inspired environment for cell adhesion and growth. In this study, a method to incorporate dexamethasone (DEX, an inflammatory and a bone growth promoting steroid into RNTs was developed. The drug-loaded RNTs were characterized using diffusion ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Results showed for the first time that DEX can be easily and quickly encapsulated into RNTs and released to promote osteoblast (bone-forming cell functions over long periods of time. As a result, RNTs are presented as a novel material for the targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs otherwise difficult to deliver.Keywords: nanotubes, drug delivery, self-assembly, physiological conditions

  19. Molecular self-assembly at metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh Hai; Wandelt, Klaus

    2013-02-25

    The self-assembly of molecular layers has become an important strategy in modern design of functional materials. However, in particular, large organic molecules may no longer be sufficiently volatile to be deposited by vapor deposition. In this case, deposition from solution may be a promising route; in ionic form, these molecules may even be soluble in water. In this contribution, we present and discuss results on the electrochemical deposition of viologen- and porphyrin molecules as well as their co-adsorption on chloride modified Cu(100) and Cu(111) single crystal electrode surfaces from aqueous acidic solutions. Using in situ techniques like cyclic voltametry and high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as ex-situ photoelectron spectroscopy data the highly ordered self-assembled organic layers are characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior, lateral order and inner conformation as well as phase transitions thereof as a function of their redox-state and the symmetry of the substrate. As a result, detailed structure models are derived and are discussed in terms of the prevailing interactions.

  20. Molecular Self-Assembly at Metal-Electrolyte Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Hai Phan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The self-assembly of molecular layers has become an important strategy in modern design of functional materials. However, in particular, large organic molecules may no longer be sufficiently volatile to be deposited by vapor deposition. In this case, deposition from solution may be a promising route; in ionic form, these molecules may even be soluble in water. In this contribution, we present and discuss results on the electrochemical deposition of viologen- and porphyrin molecules as well as their co-adsorption on chloride modified Cu(100 and Cu(111 single crystal electrode surfaces from aqueous acidic solutions. Using in situ techniques like cyclic voltametry and high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as ex-situ photoelectron spectroscopy data the highly ordered self-assembled organic layers are characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior, lateral order and inner conformation as well as phase transitions thereof as a function of their redox-state and the symmetry of the substrate. As a result, detailed structure models are derived and are discussed in terms of the prevailing interactions.

  1. Synthesis and self-assembly of complex hollow materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hua Chun

    2011-01-01

    Hollow materials with interiors or voids and pores are a class of lightweight nanostructured matters that promise many future technological applications, and they have received significant research attention in recent years. On the basis of well-known physicochemical phenomena and principles, for example, several solution-based protocols have been developed for the general preparation of these complex materials under mild reaction conditions. This article is thus a short introductory review on the synthetic aspects of this field of development. The synthetic methodologies can be broadly divided into three major categories: (i) template-assisted synthesis, (ii) self-assembly with primary building blocks, and (iii) induced matter relocations. In most cases, both synthesis and self-assembly are involved in the above processes. Further combinations of these methodologies appear to be very important, as they will allow one to prepare functional materials at a higher level of complexity and precision. The synthetic strategies are introduced through some simple case studies with schematic illustrations. Salient features of the methods developed have been summarized, and some urgent issues of this field have also been indicated. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Self-Assembling Multifunctional Peptide Dimers for Gene Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitae Ryu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembling multifunctional peptide was designed for gene delivery systems. The multifunctional peptide (MP consists of cellular penetrating peptide moiety (R8, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 specific sequence (GPLGV, pH-responsive moiety (H5, and hydrophobic moiety (palmitic acid (CR8GPLGVH5-Pal. MP was oxidized to form multifunctional peptide dimer (MPD by DMSO oxidation of thiols in terminal cysteine residues. MPD could condense pDNA successfully at a weight ratio of 5. MPD itself could self-assemble into submicron micelle particles via hydrophobic interaction, of which critical micelle concentration is about 0.01 mM. MPD showed concentration-dependent but low cytotoxicity in comparison with PEI25k. MPD polyplexes showed low transfection efficiency in HEK293 cells expressing low level of MMP-2 but high transfection efficiency in A549 and C2C12 cells expressing high level of MMP-2, meaning the enhanced transfection efficiency probably due to MMP-induced structural change of polyplexes. Bafilomycin A1-treated transfection results suggest that the transfection of MPD is mediated via endosomal escape by endosome buffering ability. These results show the potential of MPD for MMP-2 targeted gene delivery systems due to its multifunctionality.

  3. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  4. Probabilistic Performance Guarantees for Distributed Self-Assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Fox, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    In distributed self-assembly, a multitude of agents seek to form copies of a particular structure, modeled here as a labeled graph. In the model, agents encounter each other in spontaneous pairwise interactions and decide whether or not to form or sever edges based on their two labels and a fixed set of local interaction rules described by a graph grammar. The objective is to converge on a graph with a maximum number of copies of a given target graph. Our main result is the introduction of a simple algorithm that achieves an asymptotically maximum yield in a probabilistic sense. Notably, agents do not need to update their labels except when forming or severing edges. This contrasts with certain existing approaches that exploit information propagating rules, effectively addressing the decision problem at the level of subgraphs as opposed to individual vertices. We are able to obey more stringent locality requirements while also providing smaller rule sets. The results can be improved upon if certain requirements on the labels are relaxed. We discuss limits of performance in self-assembly in terms of rule set characteristics and achievable maximum yield.

  5. Parallelism and Time in Hierarchical Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ho-Lin

    2011-01-01

    We study the role that parallelism plays in time complexity of Winfree's abstract Tile Assembly Model (aTAM), a model of molecular algorithmic self-assembly. In the "hierarchical" aTAM, two assemblies, both consisting of multiple tiles, are allowed to aggregate together, whereas in the "seeded" aTAM, tiles attach one at a time to a growing assembly. Adleman, Cheng, Goel, and Huang ("Running Time and Program Size for Self-Assembled Squares", STOC 2001) showed how to assemble an n x n square in O(n) time in the seeded aTAM using O(log n / log log n) unique tile types, where both of these parameters are optimal. They asked whether the hierarchical aTAM could allow a tile system to use the ability to form large assemblies in parallel before they attach to break the Omega(n) lower bound for assembly time. We show that there is a tile system with the optimal O(log n / log log n) tile types that assembles an n x n square using O(log^2 n) parallel "stages", which is close to the optimal Omega(log n) stages, forming t...

  6. Delivery of therapeutics and molecules using self-assembled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, S; Chen, Y; Tong, Y W

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanobiotechnology in the formulation of drug carriers has been gaining popularity in recent years. Peptide self-assembly technology is a particularly attractive option due to its simplicity and programmability. Selfassembling peptide amphiphiles are surfactant-like molecules that are capable of spontaneous organization into a variety of nanostructures. The structural and functional features of these nanostructures can be designed through alterations to the peptide sequence. With a keen understanding of the supramolecular principles governing the non-covalent interactions involved, drug loading strategies can be customised. Hydrophobic drugs can be hidden within the core via aromatic interactions while gene-based therapeutics can be complexed with a cationic region of lysine residues. This review article focuses on the application of self-assembling peptide amphiphiles to drug delivery in the area of anti-cancer therapeutics, protein- and peptide-based therapeutics and nucleic acid-based therapeutics. Specific examples are used to discuss the various systems available and emphasis is given to the encapsulation and release mechanism.

  7. Self-assembled biomimetic monolayers using phospholipid-containing disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi Chang; Chiu, Yi Hong; Wu, Yin Wei; Tao, Yu Tai

    2005-05-01

    Several phospholipid-based disulfide molecules were synthesized and attached onto the gold-coated silicon wafer using the self-assembling method. The syntheses of these surface-modifying agents were conducted by introducing bromoethylphosphorate (PBr), phosphorylcholine (PC) or phosphorylethanolamine (PE) groups on the terminals of a dialkyl disulfide. After disulfides adsorption onto gold substrate surfaces, the composition, the film thickness, and the conformational order of self-assembled monolayer surfaces were explored and discussed in detail based on reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and so on. The monolayer having the PBr end group could also be converted to a PC surface by treating with trimethylamine. The model functional surfaces of Au-SC11-PC, -PE, -PBr, -OH or corresponding mixed layers were used to mimic biomembrane surfaces. The monolayer having PC groups was found to reduce fibrinogen adsorption as evaluated from protein adsorption experiments using quartz crystal microbalance. It also showed relatively low platelet adherence compare to the glass, PBr and PE surfaces. The cell viability test also revealed that the PC surface displayed lower cytotoxicity than other surfaces.

  8. Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Composites under Cylindrical Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Peter; Thorkelsson, Kari; Ercius, Peter; Xu, Ting

    2014-03-01

    Block copolymer (BCP) or BCP-based supramolecules are useful platforms to direct nanoparticle (NP) assemblies. However, the variety of NP assemblies is rather limited in comparison to those shown by DNA-guided approach. By subjecting supramolecular nanocomposites to 2-D cylindrical confinement afforded by anodic aluminum oxide membranes, a range of new NP assemblies such as stacked rings, and single and double helices can be readily obtained, as confirmed by TEM and TEM tomography. At low NP loadings (3 v%), the nanostructure conforms to the supramolecule morphology. However, at higher NP loadings (6-9 v%), the nanostructure deviates significantly from the morphology of supramolecular nanocomposites in bulk or in thin film, suggesting that frustrated NP packing, in addition to simple supramolecule templating, may play a significant role in the self-assembly process. The present studies demonstrate that 2-D confinement can be an effective means to tailor self-assembled NP structures and may open further opportunities to manipulate the macroscopic properties of NP assemblies.

  9. Self-assembled Nano-layering at the Adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Hayakawa, S; Torii, Y; Ogawa, T; Osaka, A; Meerbeek, B Van

    2012-04-01

    According to the 'Adhesion-Decalcification' concept, specific functional monomers within dental adhesives can ionically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) to manifest in the form of self-assembled 'nano-layering'. However, it remained to be explored if such nano-layering also occurs on tooth tissue when commercial MDP-containing adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) were applied following common clinical application protocols. We therefore characterized adhesive-dentin interfaces chemically, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and ultrastructurally, using (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM). Both adhesives revealed nano-layering at the adhesive interface, not only within the hybrid layer but also, particularly for Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), extending into the adhesive layer. Since such self-assembled nano-layering of two 10-MDP molecules, joined by stable MDP-Ca salt formation, must make the adhesive interface more resistant to biodegradation, it may well explain the documented favorable clinical longevity of bonds produced by 10-MDP-based adhesives.

  10. Self-assembling and self-limiting monolayer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foest, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Martin; Gargouri, Hassan

    2014-02-01

    Effects of spatial ordering of molecules on surfaces are commonly utilized to deposit ultra-thin films with a thickness of a few nm. In this review paper, several methods are discussed, that are distinguished from other thin film deposition processes by exactly these effects that lead to self-assembling and self-limiting layer growth and eventually to coatings with unique and fascinating properties and applications in micro-electronics, optics, chemistry, or biology. Traditional methods for the formation of self-assembled films of ordered organic molecules, such as the Langmuir-Blodgett technique along with thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of inorganic molecules are evaluated. The overview is complemented by more recent developments for the deposition of organic or hybrid films by molecular layer deposition. Particular attention is given to plasma assisted techniques, either as a preparative, supplementary step or as inherent part of the deposition as in plasma enhanced ALD or plasma assisted, repeated grafting deposition. The different methods are compared and their film formation mechanisms along with their advantages are presented from the perspective of a plasma scientist. The paper contains lists of established film compounds and a collection of the relevant literature is provided for further reading.

  11. Synthesis and simultaneous self-assembly of novel antibacterial polyurethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J. H.; Yin, F.; Jiang, G. C.

    2016-07-01

    Novel physically crosslinked polyurethane (PUII) based on isophorone diisocyanates (IPDI) was prepared by a conventional two step method. The chemical structures of the PUII were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The PUII hydrogels were subjected to solvent-induced self-assembly in THF + water to construct a variety of morphologies. The self-assembly morphology of the PUII was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Different amounts (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, 1.0%) of 1,3,5-Tris(2-hydroxyethyl)hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (TNO) was added as antibacterial agent to the polyurethane prepolymers. The inhibiting capacity of the antibacterial films to the Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Gray mold has been studied. The inhibiting capacity of films for each strain effect became obvious with the increase of content of antibacterial agent and the sensitive degree to all kind of bacterial species was different.

  12. Self assembled monolayers on silicon for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswal, D K; Lenfant, S; Guerin, D; Yakhmi, J V; Vuillaume, D

    2006-05-24

    We present an overview of various aspects of the self-assembly of organic monolayers on silicon substrates for molecular electronics applications. Different chemical strategies employed for grafting the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanes having different chain lengths on native oxide of Si or on bare Si have been reviewed. The utility of different characterization techniques in determination of the thickness, molecular ordering and orientation, surface coverage, growth kinetics and chemical composition of the SAMs has been discussed by choosing appropriate examples. The metal counterelectrodes are an integral part of SAMs for measuring their electrical properties as well as using them for molecular electronic devices. A brief discussion on the variety of options available for the deposition of metal counterelectrodes, that is, soft metal contacts, vapor deposition and soft lithography, has been presented. Various theoretical models, namely, tunneling (direct and Fowler-Nordheim), thermionic emission, Poole-Frenkel emission and hopping conduction, used for explaining the electronic transport in dielectric SAMs have been outlined and, some experimental data on alkane SAMs have been analyzed using these models. It has been found that short alkyl chains show excellent agreement with tunneling models; while more experimental data on long alkyl chains are required to understand their transport mechanism(s). Finally, the concepts and realization of various molecular electronic components, that is, diodes, resonant tunnel diodes, memories and transistors, based on appropriate architecture of SAMs comprising of alkyl chains (sigma- molecule) and conjugated molecules (pi-molecule) have been presented.

  13. Self-Assembled Peptide- and Protein-Based Nanomaterials for Antitumor Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Manzar; Zou, Qianli; Li, Shukun; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-01-06

    Tremendous interest in self-assembly of peptides and proteins towards functional nanomaterials has been inspired by naturally evolving self-assembly in biological construction of multiple and sophisticated protein architectures in organisms. Self-assembled peptide and protein nanoarchitectures are excellent promising candidates for facilitating biomedical applications due to their advantages of structural, mechanical, and functional diversity and high biocompability and biodegradability. Here, this review focuses on the self-assembly of peptides and proteins for fabrication of phototherapeutic nanomaterials for antitumor photodynamic and photothermal therapy, with emphasis on building blocks, non-covalent interactions, strategies, and the nanoarchitectures of self-assembly. The exciting antitumor activities achieved by these phototherapeutic nanomaterials are also discussed in-depth, along with the relationships between their specific nanoarchitectures and their unique properties, providing an increased understanding of the role of peptide and protein self-assembly in improving the efficiency of photodynamic and photothermal therapy.

  14. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  15. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-12-01

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, --fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, ``common frequency point'' is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future.

  16. Nanoparticulate hollow TiO2 fibers as light scatterers in dye-sensitized solar cells: layer-by-layer self-assembly parameters and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masoud; Tajabadi, Fariba; Shooshtari, Leyla; Taghavinia, Nima

    2011-04-04

    Hollow structures show both light scattering and light trapping, which makes them promising for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. In this work, nanoparticulate hollow TiO(2) fibers are prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly deposition of TiO(2) nanoparticles on natural cellulose fibers as template, followed by thermal removal of the template. The effect of LbL parameters such as the type and molecular weight of polyelectrolyte, number of dip cycles, and the TiO(2) dispersion (amorphous or crystalline sol) are investigated. LbL deposition with weak polyelectrolytes (polyethylenimine, PEI) gives greater nanoparticle deposition yield compared to strong polyelectrolytes (poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), PDDA). Decreasing the molecular weight of the polyelectrolyte results in more deposition of nanoparticles in each dip cycle with narrower pore size distribution. Fibers prepared by the deposition of crystalline TiO(2) nanoparticles show higher surface area and higher pore volume than amorphous nanoparticles. Scattering coefficients and backscattering properties of fibers are investigated and compared with those of commercial P25 nanoparticles. Composite P25-fiber films are electrophoretically deposited and employed as the photoanode in DSSC. Photoelectrochemical measurements showed an increase of around 50% in conversion efficiency. By employing the intensity-modulated photovoltage and photocurrent spectroscopy methods, it is shown that the performance improvement due to addition of fibers is mostly due to the increase in light-harvesting efficiency. The high surface area due to the nanoparticulate structure and strong light harvesting due to the hollow structure make these fibers promising scatterers in DSSCs.

  17. Self Assembly of Nano Metric Metallic Particles for Realization of Photonic and Electronic Nano Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaf Shahmoon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the self assembly procedure as well as experimental results of a novel method for constructing well defined arrangements of self assembly metallic nano particles into sophisticated nano structures. The self assembly concept is based on focused ion beam (FIB technology, where metallic nano particles are self assembled due to implantation of positive gallium ions into the insulating material (e.g., silica as in silicon on insulator wafers that acts as intermediary layer between the substrate and the negatively charge metallic nanoparticles.

  18. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  19. Electrochemical Properties of Organosilane Self Assembled Monolayers on Aluminum 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2004-01-01

    Self assembled monolayers are commonly used to modify surfaces. Within the last 15 years, self assembled monolayers have been investigated as a way to protect from corrosion[1,2] or biofouling.[3] In this study, self assembled monolayers of decitriethoxysilane (C10H21Si(OC2H5)3) and octadecyltriethoxysilane (C18H37Si(OC2H5)3) were formed on aluminum 2024-T3. The modified surfaces and bare Al 2024 were characterized by dynamic water contact angle measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XIPS) and infrared spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M NaCl was used to characterize the monolayers and evaluate their corrosion protection properties. The advancing water contact angle and infrared measurements show that the mono layers form a surface where the hydrocarbon chains are packed and oriented away from the surface, consistent with what is found in similar systems. The contact angle hysteresis measured in these systems is relatively large, perhaps indicating that the hydrocarbon chains are not as well packed as monolayers formed on other substrates. The results of the EIS measurements were modeled using a Randle's circuit modified by changing the capacitor to a constant phase element. The constant phase element values were found to characterize the monolayer. The capacitance of the monolayer modified surface starts lower than the bare Al 2024, but approaches values similar to the bare Al 2024 within 24 hours as the monolayer is degraded. The n values found for bare Al 2024 quickly approach the value of a true capacitor and are greater than 0.9 within hours after the start of exposure. For the monolayer modified structure, n can stay lower than 0.9 for a longer period of time. In fact, n for the monolayer modified surfaces is different from the bare surface even after the capacitance values have converged. This indicates that the deviation from ideal capacitance is the most sensitive indicator of the presence of the monolayer.

  20. Controlled self-assembly in homopolymer and diblock copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lei

    This thesis work studies the process, mechanism and control of self-assembly in homopolymers and diblock copolymers. These studies are aimed at finding novel patterning methods that can lead to low cost lithography technologies capable of creating micrometer to nanometer patterns over a large area. We first present a new phenomenon called Lithographically-Induced Self-Assembly (LISA) that can create ordered arrays of pillars in a homopolymer film with a mask placed close to its surface. We demonstrate that the shape, size and morphology of the ordered pillar arrays can be controlled with a patterned mask. A model is developed based on the instability in a fluidic film induced by the Coulomb force from charge accumulation in the polymer film and the mask. Experimental results are shown to support the model. We also investigate the behavior of defects that destroy the ordering of the LISA array and propose ways to prevent them. This self-assembly phenomenon is used as a patterning technique to define the active area of an organic light emitting diode (OLED). The device shows significantly improved lifetime due to the restriction of defect growth. Another patterning technology that is closely related to LISA, Lithographically-Induced Self-Construction (LISC), is also introduced. LISC can form mesas of polymer from the initial thin film and they inherit the shape and size of the mask patterns. A model based on the dynamics of LISA pillar formation and mass conservation is presented and provides a guideline for choosing LISC process parameters. In the final part of the thesis, we study a technique to control the orientation of diblock copolymer phase separation in a thin film by applying a pressure on the film through a flat mask. The result is a well-ordered grating pattern of the phase separation with a period of tens of nanometers. The effect of pressure and film thickness on the final pattern is investigated by experiments. We suggest that the increased ordering is

  1. Charge Conduction and Breakdown Mechanisms in Self-Assembled Nanodielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiBenedetto, S.; Facchetti, A; Ratner, M; Marks, T

    2009-01-01

    Developing alternative high dielectric constant (k) materials for use as gate dielectrics is essential for continued advances in conventional inorganic CMOS and organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Thicker films of high-k materials suppress tunneling leakage currents while providing effective capacitances comparable to those of thin films of lower-k materials. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and multilayers offer attractive options for alternative OTFT gate dielectrics. One class of materials, organosilane-based self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs), has been shown to form robust films with excellent insulating and surface passivation properties, enhancing both organic and inorganic TFT performance and lowering device operating voltages. Since gate leakage current through the dielectric is one factor limiting continued TFT performance improvements, we investigate here the current (voltage, temperature) (I (V,T)) transport characteristics of SAND types II ({Pi}-conjugated layer) and III ({sigma}-saturated + {Pi}-conjugated layers) in Si/native SiO{sub 2}/SAND/Au metal-insulator-metal (MIS) devices over the temperature range -60 to +100 C. It is found that the location of the {Pi}-conjugated layer with respect to the Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate surface in combination with a saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier is crucial in controlling the overall leakage current through the various SAND structures. For small applied voltages, hopping transport dominates at all temperatures for the {Pi}-conjugated system (type II). However, for type III SANDs, the {sigma}- and {Pi}- monolayers dominate the transport in two different transport regimes: hopping between +25 C and +100 C, and an apparent switch to tunneling for temperatures below 25 C. The {sigma}-saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier functions to reduce type III current leakage by blocking injected electrons, and by enabling bulk-dominated (Poole-Frenkel) transport vs electrode-dominated (Schottky) transport in

  2. Principles Governing the Self Assembly of Polypeptide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahome, Newton

    Self assembling systems on the nanometer scale afford the advantage of being able to control submicron level events. In this study, we focus on the self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles (SAPN). The SAPN scaffold is made up of oligomerizing domains that align along the principle rotational axes of icosahedral symmetry. By aligning them along these axes, a particle with spherical geometry can be achieved. This particle can be utilized as a vaccine, as a drug delivery vehicle, or as a biomedical imaging device. This research will try to answer why the SAPN self-assembles into distinct molecular weight ranges while mostly maintaining a spherical morphology. The first means will be theoretical and computational, where we will utilize a mathematical formalism to find out how the packing of SAPN's monomeric units can occur within symmetric space. Then molecular dynamics will be run within this symmetric space to test the per amino acid residue susceptibility of SAPN towards becoming polymorphic in nature. Means for examining the aggregation propensity of SAPN will be also be tested. Specifically, the relationship of different sequences of SAPN with pH will be elucidated. Co-assembly of SAPN to reduce the surface density of an aggregation prone epitope will be tested. Also, aggregation reduction consisting of the exchange of an anionic denaturant with a positively charged suppressor in order to mitigate a priori peptide association and misfolding, will also be attempted. SAPN has been shown to be an immunogenic platform for the presentation of pathogen derived antigens. We will attempt to show the efficacy of presenting an antigen from HIV-1 which is structurally restrained to best match the native conformation on the virus. Immunological studies will be performed to test the effect of this approach, as well testing the antigenicity of the nanoparticle in the absence of adjuvant. Finally, the antigen presenting nanoparticles will undergo formulation testing, to measure

  3. Crops: a green approach toward self-assembled soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; John, George

    2008-06-01

    To date, a wide range of industrial materials such as solvents, fuels, synthetic fibers, and chemical products are being manufactured from petroleum resources. However, rapid depletion of fossil and petroleum resources is encouraging current and future chemists to orient their research toward designing safer chemicals, products, and processes from renewable feedstock with an increased awareness of environmental and industrial impact. Advances in genetics, biotechnology, process chemistry, and engineering are leading to a new manufacturing concept for converting renewable biomass to valuable fuels and products, generally known as the biorefinery concept. The swift integration of crop-based materials synthesis and biorefinery manufacturing technologies offers the potential for new advances in sustainable energy alternatives and biomaterials that will lead to a new manufacturing paradigm. This Account presents a novel and emerging concept of generating various forms of soft materials from crops (an alternate feedstock). In future research, developing biobased soft materials will be a fascinating yet demanding practice, which will have direct impact on industrial applications as an economically viable alternative. Here we discuss some remarkable examples of glycolipids generated from industrial byproducts such as cashew nut shell liquid, which upon self-assembly produced soft nanoarchitectures including lipid nanotubes, twisted/helical nanofibers, low-molecular-weight gels, and liquid crystals. Synthetic methods applied to a "chiral pool" of carbohydrates using the selectivity of enzyme catalysis yield amphiphilic products derived from biobased feedstock including amygdalin, trehalose, and vitamin C. This has been achieved with a lipase-mediated regioselective synthetic procedure to obtain such amphiphiles in quantitative yields. Amygdalin amphiphiles showed unique gelation behavior in a broad range of solvents such as nonpolar hexanes to polar aqueous solutions

  4. From self-assembly fundamental knowledge to nanomedicine developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monduzzi, Maura; Lampis, Sandrina; Murgia, Sergio; Salis, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    This review highlights the key role of NMR techniques in demonstrating the molecular aspects of the self-assembly of surfactant molecules that nowadays constitute the basic knowledge which modern nanoscience relies on. The aim is to provide a tutorial overview. The story of a rigorous scientific approach to understand self-assembly in surfactant systems and biological membranes starts in the early seventies when the progresses of SAXRD and NMR technological facilities allowed to demonstrate the existence of ordered soft matter, and the validity of Tanford approach concerning self-assembly at a molecular level. Particularly, NMR quadrupolar splittings, NMR chemical shift anisotropy, and NMR relaxation of dipolar and quadrupolar nuclei in micellar solutions, microemulsions, and liquid crystals proved the existence of an ordered polar-apolar interface, on the NMR time scale. NMR data, rationalized in terms of the two-step model of relaxation, allowed to quantify the dynamic aspects of the supramolecular aggregates in different soft matter systems. In addition, NMR techniques allowed to obtain important information on counterion binding as well as on size of the aggregate through molecular self-diffusion. Indeed NMR self-diffusion proved without any doubt the existence of bicontinuous microemulsions and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals, suggested by pioneering and brilliant interpretation of SAXRD investigations. Moreover, NMR self-diffusion played a fundamental role in the understanding of microemulsion and emulsion nanostructures, phase transitions in phase diagrams, and particularly percolation phenomena in microemulsions. Since the nineties, globalization of the knowledge along with many other technical facilities such as electron microscopy, particularly cryo-EM, produced huge progresses in surfactant and colloid science. Actually we refer to nanoscience: bottom up/top down strategies allow to build nanodevices with applications spanning from ICT to food

  5. Molecular engineering and characterization of self-assembled biorecognition surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng

    The development of molecular engineering techniques for the fabrication of biomaterial surfaces is of importance in the field of biomaterials. It offers opportunities for better understanding of biological processes on material surfaces and rational design of contemporary biomaterials. Our work in this area aims to develop novel engineering strategies to design biorecognition surfaces via self-assembly and surface derivatization. Fundamental issues regarding self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure, formation kinetics, and chemical derivatization were investigated systematically using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle measurements. Novel engineering concepts based on multifunctionality and statistical pattern matching were introduced and applied to develop biomimetic surfaces. Our study illustrated that molecules underwent structural transition and orientation development during self-assembly formation, from a disordered, low-density, more liquid-like structure to a highly ordered, closed-packed crystalline-like structure. Surface properties, such as wettability and the reactivity of outermost functional groups can be related to film structure, packing density, as well as molecular orientation. Given the order and organization of SAMs, the accessibility and reactivity of the outermost functional groups, reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and SAMs stability were studied systematically by surface derivatization of trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The TFAA derivatization reactions exhibited rapid kinetics on the hydroxyl-terminated SAMs. The data from complementary surface analytical techniques consistently indicated a nearly complete surface reaction. Biomimetic surfaces were made by random immobilization of amino acid of arginine (R), glycine (G), and aspartic acid (D) on well-defined SAMs

  6. Charge conduction and breakdown mechanisms in self-assembled nanodielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBenedetto, Sara A; Facchetti, Antonio; Ratner, Mark A; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-05-27

    Developing alternative high dielectric constant (k) materials for use as gate dielectrics is essential for continued advances in conventional inorganic CMOS and organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Thicker films of high-k materials suppress tunneling leakage currents while providing effective capacitances comparable to those of thin films of lower-k materials. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and multilayers offer attractive options for alternative OTFT gate dielectrics. One class of materials, organosilane-based self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs), has been shown to form robust films with excellent insulating and surface passivation properties, enhancing both organic and inorganic TFT performance and lowering device operating voltages. Since gate leakage current through the dielectric is one factor limiting continued TFT performance improvements, we investigate here the current (voltage, temperature) (I (V,T)) transport characteristics of SAND types II (pi-conjugated layer) and III (sigma-saturated + pi-conjugated layers) in Si/native SiO(2)/SAND/Au metal-insulator-metal (MIS) devices over the temperature range -60 to +100 degrees C. It is found that the location of the pi-conjugated layer with respect to the Si/SiO(2) substrate surface in combination with a saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier is crucial in controlling the overall leakage current through the various SAND structures. For small applied voltages, hopping transport dominates at all temperatures for the pi-conjugated system (type II). However, for type III SANDs, the sigma- and pi-monolayers dominate the transport in two different transport regimes: hopping between +25 degrees C and +100 degrees C, and an apparent switch to tunneling for temperatures below 25 degrees C. The sigma-saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier functions to reduce type III current leakage by blocking injected electrons, and by enabling bulk-dominated (Poole-Frenkel) transport vs electrode-dominated (Schottky) transport

  7. Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Light Harvesting Complex 1 of R. Sphaeroides by Solid State NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Ann E [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Studies of the structure and dynamics of a light harvesting complex from photosynthetic bacteria are described. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance methods, we explored the idea that optical properties are modulated via a conformational switch in the BChl chromophores, in a way that provides benefits for the efficiency of energy conversion.

  8. Effect of Photo-Oxidation on Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting Complex (LH2) from Rhodobacter Sphaeroides 601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kang-Jun; LIU Wei-Min; YAN Yong-Li; DONG Zhi-Wei; LIU Yuan; XU Chun-He; QIAN Shi-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the photo-oxidation of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) in peripheral light harvesting complexes (LH2) from rhodobacter sphaeroides by using the steady absorption and the femtosecond pump-probe measurement, to realize the detailed dynamics of LH2 in the presence of photo-oxidation.

  9. Understanding the changes in the circular dichroism of light harvesting complex IIupon varying its pigment composition and organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgakopoulou, S.; Zwan, van der G.; Bassi, R.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.; Croce, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we modeled the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of LHCII, the main light harvesting antenna of photosystem II of higher plants. Excitonic calculations are performed for a monomeric subunit, taken from the crystal structure of trimeric LHCII from spinach. All of the major features of the

  10. Single-residue insertion switches the quaternary structure and exciton states of cryptophyte light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Stephen J; Wilk, Krystyna E; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Collini, Elisabetta; Mirkovic, Tihana; Teng, Chang Ying; Oblinsky, Daniel G; Green, Beverley R; Hoef-Emden, Kerstin; Hiller, Roger G; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G

    2014-07-01

    Observation of coherent oscillations in the 2D electronic spectra (2D ES) of photosynthetic proteins has led researchers to ask whether nontrivial quantum phenomena are biologically significant. Coherent oscillations have been reported for the soluble light-harvesting phycobiliprotein (PBP) antenna isolated from cryptophyte algae. To probe the link between spectral properties and protein structure, we determined crystal structures of three PBP light-harvesting complexes isolated from different species. Each PBP is a dimer of αβ subunits in which the structure of the αβ monomer is conserved. However, we discovered two dramatically distinct quaternary conformations, one of which is specific to the genus Hemiselmis. Because of steric effects emerging from the insertion of a single amino acid, the two αβ monomers are rotated by ∼73° to an "open" configuration in contrast to the "closed" configuration of other cryptophyte PBPs. This structural change is significant for the light-harvesting function because it disrupts the strong excitonic coupling between two central chromophores in the closed form. The 2D ES show marked cross-peak oscillations assigned to electronic and vibrational coherences in the closed-form PC645. However, such features appear to be reduced, or perhaps absent, in the open structures. Thus cryptophytes have evolved a structural switch controlled by an amino acid insertion to modulate excitonic interactions and therefore the mechanisms used for light harvesting.

  11. A structure-based model of energy transfer reveals the principles of light harvesting in photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Doran I G; Amarnath, Kapil; Fleming, Graham R

    2013-06-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) initiates photosynthesis in plants through the absorption of light and subsequent conversion of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII assemble in the grana membrane into PSII supercomplexes and surrounding light harvesting complex II trimers. To understand the high efficiency of light harvesting in PSII requires quantitative insight into energy transfer and charge separation in PSII supercomplexes. We have constructed the first structure-based model of energy transfer in PSII supercomplexes. This model shows that the kinetics of light harvesting cannot be simplified to a single rate limiting step. Instead, substantial contributions arise from both excitation diffusion through the antenna pigments and transfer from the antenna to the reaction center (RC), where charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to fluorescence lifetime data cannot be used to derive mechanistic insight on light harvesting in PSII. This model will clarify the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence data from PSII supercomplexes, grana membranes, and leaves.

  12. Economic photoprotection in photosystem II that retains a complete light-harvesting system with slow energy traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Kapitonova, Ekaterina; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ungerer, Petra; Valkunas, Leonas; Ruban, Alexander V

    2014-07-11

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II has an intrinsic capability for self-defence against intense sunlight. The thermal dissipation of excess energy can be measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. It has recently been proposed that the transition between the light-harvesting and self-defensive modes is associated with a reorganization of light-harvesting complexes. Here we show that despite structural changes, the photosystem II cross-section does not decrease. Our study reveals that the efficiency of energy trapping by the non-photochemical quencher(s) is lower than the efficiency of energy capture by the reaction centres. Consequently, the photoprotective mechanism works effectively for closed rather than open centres. This type of defence preserves the exceptional efficiency of electron transport in a broad range of light intensities, simultaneously ensuring high photosynthetic productivity and, under hazardous light conditions, sufficient photoprotection for both the reaction centre and the light-harvesting pigments of the antenna.

  13. From Atomistic Modeling to Excitation Transfer and Two-Dimensional Spectra of the FMO Light-Harvesting Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, Carsten; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Liebers, Joerg; Aghtar, Mortaza; Struempfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus; Knoester, Jasper; Kleinekathoefer, Ulrich; Strümpfer, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The experimental observation of long-lived quantum coherences in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex at low temperatures has challenged general intuition in the field of complex molecular systems and provoked considerable theoretical effort in search of explanations. Here we repo

  14. Economic photoprotection in photosystem II that retains a complete light-harvesting system with slow energy traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Kapitonova, Ekaterina; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Duffy, Christopher D. P.; Ungerer, Petra; Valkunas, Leonas; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2014-07-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II has an intrinsic capability for self-defence against intense sunlight. The thermal dissipation of excess energy can be measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. It has recently been proposed that the transition between the light-harvesting and self-defensive modes is associated with a reorganization of light-harvesting complexes. Here we show that despite structural changes, the photosystem II cross-section does not decrease. Our study reveals that the efficiency of energy trapping by the non-photochemical quencher(s) is lower than the efficiency of energy capture by the reaction centres. Consequently, the photoprotective mechanism works effectively for closed rather than open centres. This type of defence preserves the exceptional efficiency of electron transport in a broad range of light intensities, simultaneously ensuring high photosynthetic productivity and, under hazardous light conditions, sufficient photoprotection for both the reaction centre and the light-harvesting pigments of the antenna.

  15. Singlet Energy Dissipation in the Photosystem II Light-Harvesting Complex Does Not Involve Energy Transfer to Carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Marc G.; Lambrev, Petar; Reus, Michael; Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; Müller, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism in oligomers of the major light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from Arabidopsis thaliana mutants npq1 and npq2, zeaxanthin-deficient and zeaxanthin-enriched, respectively, has been studied by femtosecond transient absorption. The kinetics obtained at different excita

  16. Site-specific incorporation of perylene into an N-terminally modified light-harvesting complex II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peneva, Kalina; Gundlach, Kristina; Herrmann, Andreas; Paulsen, Harald; Muellen, Klaus; Müllen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Employing the utility of the native chemical ligation, site-specific attachment of an ultrastable perylene dye to a derivative of the major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) was demonstrated. Biochemical analysis of the conjugate indicated that the structure and function of LHCII remain largely unaff

  17. Nature-Like Photosynthesis of Water and Carbon Dioxide with Femtosecond Laser Induced Self-Assembled Metal Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Mengyan; Huo, Haibin; Ren, Haizhou; Yan, Fadong; Johnson, Michael

    Large-scale replication of the natural process of photosynthesis is a crucial subject of storing solar energy and saving our environment. Here, we report femtosecond laser induced self-assembled metal nanostructure arrays, which are easily mass producible on earth-abundant metals, can directly synthesize liquid and solid hydrocarbon compounds from carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight at a production rate of more than 1 × 105 μL/(gh) that is significantly (103-106 times) higher than those in previous studies.1,2 The efficiency for storing solar energy of the photosynthesis is about 10% in the present simple experimental setup which can be further improved. Moreover, different from previous artificial photosynthesis works, this phenomenon presents a new mechanism that, through a surface-enhanced photodissociation process, nature-like photosynthesis can be performed artificially.

  18. Nanophotonic Fabrication Self-Assembly and Deposition Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonics, a novel optical technology, utilizes the local interaction between nanometric particles via optical near fields. The optical near fields are the elementary surface excitations on nanometric particles, i.e. dressed photons that carry material energy. Of the variety of qualitative innovations in optical technology realized by nanophotonics, this books focuses on fabrication. To fabricate nano-scale photonic devices with nanometer-scale controllability in size and position, we developed a self-assembly method for size- and position-controlled ultra-long nanodot chains using a novel effect of near-field optical desorption. A novel deposition and etching scheme under nonresonant conditions is also demonstrated and its origin is reviewed.

  19. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research.

  20. Probing individual quantum dots: noise in self-assembled systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicaro, K O; Gutiérrez, H R; Seabra, A C; Schulz, P A; Cotta, M A

    2009-11-01

    In this work we explore the noise characteristics in lithographically-defined two terminal devices containing self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots. The experimental ensemble of InAs dots show random telegraph noise (RTN) with tuneable relative amplitude-up to 150%-in well defined temperature and source-drain applied voltage ranges. Our numerical simulation indicates that the RTN signature correlates with a very low number of quantum dots acting as effective charge storage centres in the structure for a given applied voltage. The modulation in relative amplitude variation can thus be associated to the altered electrostatic potential profile around such centres and enhanced carrier scattering provided by a charged dot.

  1. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm‑3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  2. Using Markov State Models to Study Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been demonstrated to be a powerful method for computationally studying intramolecular processes such as protein folding and macromolecular conformational changes. In this article, we present a new approach to construct MSMs that is applicable to modeling a broad class of multi-molecular assembly reactions. Distinct structures formed during assembly are distinguished by their undirected graphs, which are defined by strong subunit interactions. Spatial inhomogeneities of free subunits are accounted for using a recently developed Gaussian-based signature. Simplifications to this state identification are also investigated. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated on two different coarse-grained models for virus self-assembly. We find good agreement between the dynamics predicted by the MSMs and long, unbiased simulations, and that the MSMs can reduce overall simulation time by orders of magnitude.

  3. Engineering self-assembled bioreactors from protein microcompartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    The goals of this research are to understand how organisms such as bacteria segregate certain metabolic processes inside of specific structures, or “microcompartments,” in the cell and apply this knowledge to develop novel engineered microcompartments for use in nanotechnology and metabolic engineering. For example, in some bacteria, self-assembling protein microcompartments called carboxysomes encapsulate the enzymes involved in carbon fixation, enabling the cell to utilize carbon dioxide more effectively than if the enzymes were free in the cell. The proposed research will determine how structures such as carboxysomes assemble and function in bacteria and develop a means for creating novel, synthetic microcompartments for optimizing production of specific energy-rich compounds.

  4. Electrochemical metallization of self-assembled porphyrin monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nann, Thomas; Kielmann, Udo; Dietrich, Christoph

    2002-04-01

    Multifunctional sensor systems are becoming increasingly important in electroanalytical chemistry. Together with ongoing miniaturization there is a need for micro- and nanopatterning tools for thin electroactive layers (e.g. self-assembling monolayers). This paper documents a method for production of a micro-array of different metal-porphyrin monolayers with different sensor properties. A new method has been developed for the selective and local metallization of bare porphyrin monolayers by cathodic pulsing and sweeping. The metal-porphyrin monolayers obtained were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that porphyrin monolayers can be metallized with manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel by use of the new method. It is expected that all types of metal-porphyrin monolayers can be produced in the same manner.

  5. Nanoscale Nitrogen Doping in Silicon by Self-Assembled Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bin; Siampour, Hamidreza; Fan, Zhao; Wang, Shun; Kong, Xiang Yang; Mesli, Abdelmadjid; Zhang, Jian; Dan, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    This Report presents a nitrogen-doping method by chemically forming self-assembled monolayers on silicon. Van der Pauw technique, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and low temperature Hall effect measurements are employed to characterize the nitrogen dopants. The experimental data show that the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen dopants is 3.66 × 10-15 cm2 s-1, 2 orders magnitude lower than that of phosphorus dopants in silicon. It is found that less than 1% of nitrogen dopants exhibit electrical activity. The analysis of Hall effect data at low temperatures indicates that the donor energy level for nitrogen dopants is located at 189 meV below the conduction band, consistent with the literature value.

  6. Tribological properties of OTS self-assembled monolayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)were prepared on the substrates of silicon and glass. The tribological properties were tested with a self-made point-contact pure sliding micro tribometer. The effect of humidity on the tribological properties of both OTS SAMs and the naked substrates were studied. When the substrate is covered by OTS monolayer, the friction coefficient is reduced from 0.5 to 0.1 and the stick-slip phenomenon is weakened. OTS monolayer can keep its friction coefficient steady in a wide range of humidity, because it is highly hydrophobic and thus not sensitive to humidity. In addition, the OTS monolayer has a considerable anti-wear ability.

  7. Regulated growth of diatom cells on self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Koichi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We succeeded in regulating the growth of diatom cells on chemically modified glass surfaces. Glass surfaces were functionalized with -CF3, -CH3, -COOH, and -NH2 groups using the technique of self-assembled monolayers (SAM, and diatom cells were subsequently cultured on these surfaces. When the samples were rinsed after the adhesion of the diatom cells on the modified surfaces, the diatoms formed two dimensional arrays; this was not possible without the rinsing treatment. Furthermore, we examined the number of cells that grew and their motility by time-lapse imaging in order to clarify the interaction between the cells and SAMs. We hope that our results will be a basis for developing biodevices using living photosynthetic diatom cells.

  8. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Yassitepe, Emre; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Janmohamed, Alyf; Lan, Xinzheng; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-12-02

    Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  9. Self-assembly of Janus particles under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Bianchi, Emanuela; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2015-05-21

    We investigate the self-assembly of colloidal Janus particles under shear flow by employing hybrid molecular dynamics simulations that explicitly take into account hydrodynamic interactions. Under quiescent conditions, the amphiphilic colloids form spherical micellar aggregates of different sizes, where the solvophobic hemispheres are directed towards the core and the solvophilic caps are exposed to the solvent. When sufficiently strong shear is applied, the micelles disaggregate with a consequent decay of the average cluster size. Nonetheless, we find an intermediate shear rate regime where the balance between rearrangement and dissociation favors the growth of the aggregates. Additionally, our simulations show that clusters composed of either 6 or 13 particles are the most stable towards the shear flow due to their high geometric symmetry. Our findings open up a new range of applications for Janus particles, ranging from biotechnology to sensor systems.

  10. Mechanism for Rapid Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian K.; Prud'Homme, Robert K.

    2003-09-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers in solution spontaneously self-assemble when the solvent quality for one block is selectively decreased. We demonstrate that, for supersaturation ratio changes [d(S)/dt] over 105 per second from equilibrium, nanoparticles are obtained with a formation mechanism and size dependent on the jumping rate and magnitude. The threshold rate for homogeneous precipitation is determined by the induction time of a particle, equivalent to the diffusion limited fusion of copolymer chains to form a corona of overlapping soluble brushes. Via determination of the induction time with a novel confined impinging jets mixer and use of a scaling relation, the interfacial free energy of a block copolymer nanoparticle was measured for the first time.

  11. Self-Assembly of Cerium Oxide Nanostructures in Ice Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Baer, Donald R.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Sayle, Dean C.; Seal, Sudipta

    2008-08-01

    The formation of nanorods, driven by the physico-chemical phenomena during the freezing of ceria nanoparticle suspension is reported. During freezing a dilute solution of CeO2 nanocrystals, some nuclei remain in solution while others are trapped inside the voids formed within the growing ice front. Over time the particles trapped within the constrained geometries combined by an oriented attachment process to form ceria nanorods. The experimental observations are further supported through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. These observations suggest a new possible strategy for the templated formation of nanostructures through self assembly by exploiting natural phenomena such as freezing of water. "(A portion of) The research described in this paper (poster or presentation) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory."

  12. Fulleropeptide esters as potential self-assembled antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira S. Bjelaković

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of amphiphilic fullerene derivatives as a bionanomaterial was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the ferrous ion oxidation–xylenol orange (FOX method. Despite the disrupted delocalization of the π-electronic system over the C60 sphere, its antioxidant capacity remained high for all twelve derivatives. The compounds expressed up to two-fold and 5–12-fold better peroxide quenching capacity as compared to pristine C60 and standard antioxidant vitamin C, respectively. During precipitation and slow evaporation of the solvent, all compounds underwent spontaneous self-assembly giving ordered structures. The size and morphology of the resulting particles depend primarily on the sample concentration, and somewhat on the side chain structure.

  13. Phase Diagrams of Electrostatically Self-Assembled Amphiplexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Stanic; M Mancuso; W Wong; E DiMasi; H Strey

    2011-12-31

    We present the phase diagrams of electrostatically self-assembled amphiplexes (ESA) comprised of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl), dodecane, pentanol, and water at three different NaCl salt concentrations: 100, 300, and 500 mM. This is the first report of phase diagrams for these quinary complexes. Adding a cosurfactant, we were able to swell the unit cell size of all long-range ordered phases (lamellar, hexagonal, Pm3n, Ia3d) by almost a factor of 2. The added advantage of tuning the unit cell size makes such complexes (especially the bicontinuous phases) attractive for applications in bioseparation, drug delivery, and possibly in oil recovery.

  14. Controlling the photoconductivity: Graphene oxide and polyaniline self assembled intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vempati, Sesha, E-mail: svempati01@qub.ac.uk [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ozcan, Sefika [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Polymer Science and Technology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Uyar, Tamer, E-mail: uyar@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-02-02

    We report on controlling the optoelectronic properties of self-assembled intercalating compound of graphene oxide (GO) and HCl doped polyaniline (PANI). Optical emission and X-ray diffraction studies revealed a secondary doping phenomenon of PANI with –OH and –COOH groups of GO, which essentially arbitrate the intercalation. A control on the polarity and the magnitude of the photoresponse (PR) is harnessed by manipulating the weight ratios of PANI to GO (viz., 1:1.5 and 1:2.2 are abbreviated as PG1.5 and PG2.2, respectively), where ±PR = 100(R{sub Dark} – R{sub UV-Vis})/R{sub Dark} and R corresponds to the resistance of the device in dark or UV-Vis illumination. To be precise, the PR from GO, PANI, PG1.5, and PG2.2 are +34%, −111%, −51%, and +58%, respectively.

  15. Functional materials derived from block copolymer self-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao

    is to fabricate interconnected and highly ordered metal oxide films by using a nano-porous polymer with gyroid morphology as the template. This unique structure is ideal for the solar cell application where a mesoscopic metal oxide scaffold functions as the electron collection and transport material. Two......The main objective of this project is to explore block copolymer self-assembly for generating functional materials with well-defined morphology on sub-20 nanometer length scale, which can be utilized in many important applications such as solar cells and nanolithography. One of the specific targets......-casting, the block copolymer self-organizes into monolayer packed sphere pattern, without any surface treatment of the substrate and annealing process. Arrays of nano-pillars and nanowells of various materials are fabricated in dry etch processes over wafer scale without defects. We also show an in situ Al2O3 hard...

  16. Random lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Jiankai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based perovskite nanoparticles have been intensively studied in past few years due to their applications in both photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. Here, based on the common ground between the solution-based perovskite and random lasers, we have studied the mirrorless lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles. After the synthesis from solution, discrete lasing peaks have been observed from the optically pumped perovskites without any well-defined cavity boundaries. The obtained quality (Q) factors and thresholds of random lasers are around 500 and 60 uJ/cm2, respectively. Both values are comparable to the conventional perovskite microdisk lasers with polygon shaped cavity boundaries. From the corresponding studies on laser spectra and fluorescence microscope images, the lasing actions are considered as random lasers that are generated by strong multiple scattering in random gain media. In additional to conventional single-photon excitation, due to the strong nonlinear effects of...

  17. Self-Assembled Enzyme Nanoparticles for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Bhuvana Kamath; Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Haritos, Victoria S; He, Lizhong

    2016-05-11

    Enzyme-based processes have shown promise as a sustainable alternative to amine-based processes for carbon dioxide capture. In this work, we have engineered carbonic anhydrase nanoparticles that retain 98% of hydratase activity in comparison to their free counterparts. Carbonic anhydrase was fused with a self-assembling peptide that facilitates the noncovalent assembly of the particle and together were recombinantly expressed from a single gene construct in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes, when subjected to a reduced pH, form 50-200 nm nanoparticles. The CO2 capture capability of enzyme nanoparticles was demonstrated at ambient (22 ± 2 °C) and higher (50 °C) temperatures, under which the nanoparticles maintain their assembled state. The carrier-free enzymatic nanoparticles demonstrated here offer a new approach to stabilize and reuse enzymes in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  18. IONIC SELF-ASSEMBLY AND HUMIDITY SENSITIVITY OF POLYELECTROLYTE MULTILAYERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hu Yu; De-sheng Jiang

    2002-01-01

    Multilayer thin films of alternately adsorbed layers of polyelectrolytes PDDA and PS-119 were formed on both planar silica substrates and optical fibers through the ionic self-assembly technique. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavities were fabricated by stepwise assembling the polyelectrolytes onto the ends of optical fibers for the purposes of fiber optical device and sensor development. Ionically assembled polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films, in whichthere are hydrophilic side groups with strong affinity towards water molecules, are a category of humidity-sensitive functional materials. The polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film Fabry-Perot cavity-type fiber optical humidity sensor can work over a wide range from about 0% RH to about 100% RH with a response time less than 1 s.

  19. Self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Adam S.; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Palmer, Liam C.; McClendon, Mark; Koltonow, Andrew R.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Kiebala, Derek J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-11-01

    Integration into a soft material of all the molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles, such as plant chloroplasts, which colocalize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport and catalysis to create chemical bonds using light energy. We report here on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenon that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports.

  20. Characterization of the Casein/Keratin Self-Assembly Nanomicelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xiao-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanomicelles were made from casein and keratin through electrostatic self-assembly and transglutaminase fixation that was proved to be harmless and green. The complex nanomicelles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and steady-state florescence. The results show that the complex nanomcelles acquired at the neutral pH in the mass ratio of casein to keratin 4 : 1 exhibit an anomalous sphere shape with uniform size which the diameter is about 40–70 nm. The complex nanomicelles in solution possess excellent dilution and storage stability due to the fixation and their high ζ-potential (22.8 mV. The complex nanomicelles are relatively hydrophilic and have a good potential for industrial application.

  1. Confined self-assembly approach to produce ultrathin carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixia; Cui, Jiecheng; Tao, Cheng-An; Lin, Changxu; Wu, Yiguang; Li, Guangtao

    2009-07-21

    A surfactant containing a terminal carbon source moiety was synthesized and used simultaneously as both template molecule and carbon source. On the basis of this special structure-directing agent, an efficient strategy for producing uniform carbon nanowires with diameter below 1 nm was developed using a confined self-assembly approach. Besides the capability of producing ultralong and thin carbon wires inaccessible by the previously reported approaches, the method described here presents many advantages such as the direct use of residue iron complex as catalyst for carbonization and no requirement of conventional tedious infiltration process of carbon source into small channels. Different methods including SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and conductivity measurement were employed to characterize the formed ultrathin carbon nanofibers. Additionally, the described strategy is extendable. By designing an appropriate surfactant, it is also possible for the fabrication of the finely structured carbon network and ultrathin graphitic sheets through the construction of the corresponding cubic and lamellar mesostructured templates.

  2. Mechanical characterization of carbon nanomembranes from self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghui Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the mechanical characterization of carbon nanomembranes (CNMs with a thickness of 1 nm that are fabricated by electron-induced crosslinking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs. A novel type of in situ bulge test employing an atomic force microscope (AFM is utilized to investigate their mechanical properties. A series of biphenyl-based molecules with different types of terminal and/or anchor groups were used to prepare the CNMs, such as 4'-[(3-trimethoxysilylpropoxy]-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carbonitrile (CBPS, 1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol (BPT and 4-nitro-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol (NBPT. The elastic properties, viscoelastic behaviors and ultimate tensile strength of these biphenyl-based CNMs are investigated and discussed.

  3. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-02

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  4. Sequence dependent proton conduction in self-assembled peptide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner Yardeni, Jenny; Amit, Moran; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of diverse electrochemistry technologies depends on the development of novel proton conducting polymers. Inspired by the efficacy of proton transport through proteins, we show in this work that self-assembling peptide nanostructures may be a promising alternative for such organic proton conducting materials. We demonstrate that aromatic amino acids, which participate in charge transport in nature, unprecedentedly promote proton conduction under both high and low relative humidity conditions for d,l α-cyclic peptide nanotubes. For dehydrated networks long-range order of the assemblies, induced by the aromatic side chains, is shown to be a dominating factor for promoting conductivity. However, for hydrated networks this order of effect is less significant and conductivity can be improved by the introduction of proton donating carboxylic acid peptide side chains in addition to the aromatic side chains despite the lower order of the assemblies. Based on these observations, a novel cyclic peptide that incorporates non-natural naphthyl side chains was designed. Self-assembled nanotubes of this peptide show greatly improved dehydrated conductivity, while maintaining high conductivity under hydrated conditions. We envision that the demonstrated modularity and versatility of these bio inspired nanostructures will make them extremely attractive building blocks for the fabrication of devices for energy conversion and storage applications, as well as other applications that involve proton transport, whether dry or wet conductivity is desired.The advancement of diverse electrochemistry technologies depends on the development of novel proton conducting polymers. Inspired by the efficacy of proton transport through proteins, we show in this work that self-assembling peptide nanostructures may be a promising alternative for such organic proton conducting materials. We demonstrate that aromatic amino acids, which participate in charge transport in nature

  5. Construction of energy transfer pathways self-assembled from DNA-templated stacks of anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaura, Rika; Yui, Hiroharu; Someya, Yuu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi

    2014-01-05

    We describe optical properties of anthracene stacks formed from single-component self-assembly of thymidylic acid-appended anthracene 2,6-bis[5-(3'-thymidylic acid)pentyloxy] anthracene (TACT) and the binary self-assembly of TACT and complementary 20-meric oligoadenylic acid (TACT/dA20) in an aqueous buffer. UV-Vis and emission spectra for the single-component self-assembly of TACT and the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20 were very consistent with stacked acene moieties in both self-assemblies. Interestingly, time-resolved fluorescence spectra from anthracene stacks exhibited very different features of the single-component and binary self-assemblies. In the single-component self-assembly of TACT, a dynamic Stokes shift (DSS) and relatively short fluorescence lifetime (τ=0.35ns) observed at around 450nm suggested that the anthracene moieties were flexible. Moreover, a broad emission at 530nm suggested the formation of an excited dimer (excimer). In the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20, we detected a broad, red-shifted emission component at 534nm with a lifetime (τ=0.4ns) shorter than that observed in the TACT single-component self-assembly. Combining these results with the emission spectrum of the binary self-assembly of TACT/5'-HEX dA20, we concluded that the energy transfer pathway was constructed by columnar anthracene stacks formed from the DNA-templated self-assembly of TACT.

  6. Origami Inspired Self-assembly of Patterned and Reconfigurable Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shivendra; Gultepe, Evin; Gracias, David H.

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous techniques such as photolithography, electron-beam lithography and soft-lithography that can be used to precisely pattern two dimensional (2D) structures. These technologies are mature, offer high precision and many of them can be implemented in a high-throughput manner. We leverage the advantages of planar lithography and combine them with self-folding methods1-20 wherein physical forces derived from surface tension or residual stress, are used to curve or fold planar structures into three dimensional (3D) structures. In doing so, we make it possible to mass produce precisely patterned static and reconfigurable particles that are challenging to synthesize. In this paper, we detail visualized experimental protocols to create patterned particles, notably, (a) permanently bonded, hollow, polyhedra that self-assemble and self-seal due to the minimization of surface energy of liquefied hinges21-23 and (b) grippers that self-fold due to residual stress powered hinges24,25. The specific protocol described can be used to create particles with overall sizes ranging from the micrometer to the centimeter length scales. Further, arbitrary patterns can be defined on the surfaces of the particles of importance in colloidal science, electronics, optics and medicine. More generally, the concept of self-assembling mechanically rigid particles with self-sealing hinges is applicable, with some process modifications, to the creation of particles at even smaller, 100 nm length scales22, 26 and with a range of materials including metals21, semiconductors9 and polymers27. With respect to residual stress powered actuation of reconfigurable grasping devices, our specific protocol utilizes chromium hinges of relevance to devices with sizes ranging from 100 μm to 2.5 mm. However, more generally, the concept of such tether-free residual stress powered actuation can be used with alternate high-stress materials such as heteroepitaxially deposited semiconductor films5,7 to

  7. Novel self assembly behavior for γ-alumina nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osama Saber

    2012-01-01

    In this study,self assembly behavior was induced for γ-alumina nanoparticles by adsorption of dimethyl disulfide.Following this trend,we have developed a chemical process to obtain γ-alumina in the nano scale.Scanning electron microscopy images of the prepared γ-alumina showed big and strong agglomeration of the nanoparticles indicating that these nanoparticles have strong surface forces.Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that the γ-alumina nanoparticles 3-7 nm in size were converted to uniform spherical shape in the size range of 1-2 mm after shaking with dimethyl disulfide in the presence of n-hexane at room temperature.This phenomenon did not appear in the case of alumina in the micro scale.The surface properties of the prepared γ-alumina in the nano scale were characterized and compared with the γ-alumina in the micro scale by using low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption system,indicating that the specific surface area of the prepared γ-alumina nanoparticles is larger than that of the γ-alumina in the micro scale.Furthermore,micro-and meso-pores were observed for the γ-alumina nanoparticles while only mesoporous structure was detected for the γ-alumina in the micro scale.These experimental results suggested that the self assembly behavior of the γ-alumina nanoparticles may be due to the selective adsorption of dimethyl disulfide in the micropores of these nanoparticles to act as bridge linking the nanoparticles.

  8. Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Koplovitz, G.; Retzker, A.; Jelezko, F.; Yochelis, S.; Porath, D.; Nevo, Y.; Shoseyov, O.; Paltiel, Y.; Plenio, M. B.

    2014-09-01

    The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-centers in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited by the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and their beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11 nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-centers as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

  9. Dynamic self-assembly in living systems as computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-06-01

    Biochemical reactions taking place in living systems that map different inputs to specific outputs are intuitively recognized as performing information processing. Conventional wisdom distinguishes such proteins, whose primary function is to transfer and process information, from proteins that perform the vast majority of the construction, maintenance, and actuation tasks of the cell (assembling and disassembling macromolecular structures, producing movement, and synthesizing and degrading molecules). In this paper, we examine the computing capabilities of biological processes in the context of the formal model of computing known as the random access machine (RAM) [Dewdney AK (1993) The New Turing Omnibus. Computer Science Press, New York], which is equivalent to a Turing machine [Minsky ML (1967) Computation: Finite and Infinite Machines. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ]. When viewed from the RAM perspective, we observe that many of these dynamic self-assembly processes - synthesis, degradation, assembly, movement - do carry out computational operations. We also show that the same computing model is applicable at other hierarchical levels of biological systems (e.g., cellular or organism networks as well as molecular networks). We present stochastic simulations of idealized protein networks designed explicitly to carry out a numeric calculation. We explore the reliability of such computations and discuss error-correction strategies (algorithms) employed by living systems. Finally, we discuss some real examples of dynamic self-assembly processes that occur in living systems, and describe the RAM computer programs they implement. Thus, by viewing the processes of living systems from the RAM perspective, a far greater fraction of these processes can be understood as computing than has been previously recognized.

  10. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles and bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Scibilia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biohybrid nanostructured materials, composed of both inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules, offer prospects for many new applications in extremely diverse fields such as chemistry, physics, engineering, medicine and nanobiotechnology. In the recent years, Phage display technique has been extensively used to generate phage clones displaying surface peptides with functionality towards organic materials. Screening and selection of phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest because of their use for development of hybrid materials with multiple functionalities. Here, we present a self-assembly approach for the construction of hybrid nanostructured networks consisting of M13 P9b phage clone, specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, selected by Phage display technology, directly assembled with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, previously prepared by pulsed laser ablation. These networks are characterized by UV–vis optical spectroscopy, scanning/transmission electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. We investigated the influence of different ions and medium pH on self-assembly by evaluating different phage suspension buffers. The assembly of these networks is controlled by electrostatic interactions between the phage pVIII major capsid proteins and the AgNPs. The formation of the AgNPs-phage networks was obtained only in two types of tested buffers at a pH value near the isoelectric point of each pVIII proteins displayed on the surface of the clone. This systematic study allowed to optimize the synthesis procedure to assembly AgNPs and bacteriophage. Such networks find application in the biomedical field of advanced biosensing and targeted gene and drug delivery.

  11. The light-harvesting complexes of higher-plant Photosystem I : Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3 form two red-emitting heterodimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    The outer antenna of higher-plant PSI (Photosystem I) is composed of four complexes [Lhc (light-harvesting complex) al-Lhca4] belonging to the light-harvesting protein family. Difficulties in their purification have so far prevented the determination of their properties and most of the knowledge abo

  12. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  13. The Self-Assembly Properties of a Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stals, Patrick J. M.; Haveman, Jan F.; Palmans, Anja R. A.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments involving the synthesis and characterization of a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative and its self-assembly properties are reported. These laboratory experiments combine organic synthesis, self-assembly, and physical characterization and are designed for upper-level undergraduate students to introduce the topic of…

  14. Elucidating dominant pathways of the nano-particle self-assembly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangze; Li, Bin; Qiao, Qin; Zhu, Lizhe; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-09-14

    Self-assembly processes play a key role in the fabrication of functional nano-structures with widespread application in drug delivery and micro-reactors. In addition to the thermodynamics, the kinetics of the self-assembled nano-structures also play an important role in determining the formed structures. However, as the self-assembly process is often highly heterogeneous, systematic elucidation of the dominant kinetic pathways of self-assembly is challenging. Here, based on mass flow, we developed a new method for the construction of kinetic network models and applied it to identify the dominant kinetic pathways for the self-assembly of star-like block copolymers. We found that the dominant pathways are controlled by two competing kinetic parameters: the encounter time Te, characterizing the frequency of collision and the transition time Tt for the aggregate morphology change from rod to sphere. Interestingly, two distinct self-assembly mechanisms, diffusion of an individual copolymer into the aggregate core and membrane closure, both appear at different stages (with different values of Tt) of a single self-assembly process. In particular, the diffusion mechanism dominates the middle-sized semi-vesicle formation stage (with large Tt), while the membrane closure mechanism dominates the large-sized vesicle formation stage (with small Tt). Through the rational design of the hydrophibicity of the copolymer, we successfully tuned the transition time Tt and altered the dominant self-assembly pathways.

  15. Self-assembled vesicles of urea-tethered foldamers as hydrophobic drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingole, Tukaram S; Kale, Sangram S; Santhosh Babu, Sukumaran; Sanjayan, Gangadhar J

    2016-08-25

    Molecular self-assembly of nonamphiphilic α,β-hybrid foldamers based on urea-tethered anthranilic acid-proline (Ant-Pro) foldamers is reported. These self-assembled hollow vesicular architectures can take up and release the anticancer hydrophobic drug curcumin.

  16. From self-organization to self-assembly: a new materialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Bernadette Bensaude

    2016-09-01

    While self-organization has been an integral part of academic discussions about the distinctive features of living organisms, at least since Immanuel Kant's Critique of Judgement, the term 'self-assembly' has only been used for a few decades as it became a hot research topic with the emergence of nanotechnology. Could it be considered as an attempt at reducing vital organization to a sort of assembly line of molecules? Considering the context of research on self-assembly I argue that the shift of attention from self-organization to self-assembly does not really challenge the boundary between chemistry and biology. Self-assembly was first and foremost investigated in an engineering context as a strategy for manufacturing without human intervention and did not raise new perspectives on the emergence of vital organization itself. However self-assembly implies metaphysical assumptions that this paper tries to disentangle. It first describes the emergence of self-assembly as a research field in the context of materials science and nanotechnology. The second section outlines the metaphysical implications and will emphasize a sharp contrast between the ontology underlying two practices of self-assembly developed under the umbrella of synthetic biology. And unexpectedly, we shall see that chemists are less on the reductionist side than most synthetic biologists. Finally, the third section ventures some reflections on the kind of design involved in self-assembly practices.

  17. Vortex pinning in superconductors laterally modulated by nanoscale self-assembled arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanacken, J.; Vinckx, W.; Moshchalkov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Being the exponent of the so-called "bottom-up" approach, self-assembled structures are now-a-days attracting a lot of attention in the fields of science and technology. In this work, we show that nanoscale self-assembled arrays used as templates can provide periodic modulation in superconducting...

  18. Ultra-Thin Self-Assembled Protein-Polymer Membranes : A New Pore Forming Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Tutus, Murat; Kathrein, Christine; Mougin, Nathalie C.; Park, Hyunji; Hein, Christopher; Schuerings, Marco P.; Boeker, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembled membranes offer a promising alternative for conventional membrane fabrication, especially in the field of ultrafiltration. Here, a new pore-making strategy is introduced involving stimuli responsive proteinpolymer conjugates self-assembled across a large surface area using dryingmedia

  19. Self-assembling microsphere-based dextran hydrogels for pharmaceutical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tomme, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis novel self-assembling hydrogels, based on physical interactions between dextran microgels, potentially suitable for controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering, are presented. Two different approaches to self-assemble the hydrogels were investigated: ionic interactions and hydroph

  20. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of Co3+ complexes appended with phenol and catechol groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Afsar Ali; Deepak Bansal; Rajeev Gupt

    2014-09-01

    This work presents the syntheses, characterization and hydrogen bonding based self-assembly of Co3+ complexes of pyridine-amide based bidentate ligands containing appended phenol and catechol groups. Placement of multiple hydrogen bond donors (phenolic OH and amidic NH groups) and acceptors (Oamide groups) in these molecules results in interesting self-assembled architectures.