WorldWideScience

Sample records for artificial heart perspectives

  1. Artificial Heart Research: An Historical Perspective

    Joshi, Rayan

    2001-01-01

    This paper tracks the historical evolution of artificial heart technology, from its humble beginnings, to its relatively staggering current potential. While examining various milestones along this fascinating timeline, the paper attempts to shed light on some of the ethical, economic, and social dilemmas that have infused this history. In doing so, it strives to provide the reader with a sense of the various factors, some technical in nature and others purely societal, that have wielded influ...

  2. Artificial heart

    1984-10-18

    Super-pure plutonium-238 could use heat produced during fission to power an implanted artificial heart. Three model hearts have worked for some time. Concern that excess heat would make the procedure unsafe for humans has broadened the search for another energy source, such as electrohydraulic drive or an external power battery. A back pack approach may provide an interim solution until materials are developed which can withstand heart activity and be small enough for implantation.

  3. [Total artificial heart].

    Antretter, H; Dumfarth, J; Höfer, D

    2015-09-01

    To date the CardioWest™ total artificial heart is the only clinically available implantable biventricular mechanical replacement for irreversible cardiac failure. This article presents the indications, contraindications, implantation procedere and postoperative treatment. In addition to a overview of the applications of the total artificial heart this article gives a brief presentation of the two patients treated in our department with the CardioWest™. The clinical course, postoperative rehabilitation, device-related complications and control mechanisms are presented. The total artificial heart is a reliable implant for treating critically ill patients with irreversible cardiogenic shock. A bridge to transplantation is feasible with excellent results.

  4. The total artificial heart.

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  5. Mechanism of artificial heart

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  6. Artificial heart for humanoid robot

    Potnuru, Akshay; Wu, Lianjun; Tadesse, Yonas

    2014-03-01

    A soft robotic device inspired by the pumping action of a biological heart is presented in this study. Developing artificial heart to a humanoid robot enables us to make a better biomedical device for ultimate use in humans. As technology continues to become more advanced, the methods in which we implement high performance and biomimetic artificial organs is getting nearer each day. In this paper, we present the design and development of a soft artificial heart that can be used in a humanoid robot and simulate the functions of a human heart using shape memory alloy technology. The robotic heart is designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate someone blushing or when someone is angry by the use of elastomeric substrates and certain features for the transport of fluids.

  7. Prologue: ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts. A historical perspective.

    Frazier, O H

    2003-02-01

    In the 1960s, when LVADs and TAHs were introduced into clinical use, researchers estimated that, with this technology, the problem of heart failure could be solved within 20 years. Unfortunately, the evolution of these devices has taken much longer than anticipated. Nevertheless, significant advances have been achieved in both cardiac assistance and replacement, and today's cardiac surgeons have a wide range of devices from which to choose (Table 4). This progress has largely been due to the support of the NHLBI, especially the Devices and Technology Division headed by John Watson, and of the devoted commitment of the investigators. Because of the long-term commitment required for both basic and clinical research, commercial medical technology companies are unable to assume this burden. Advances in mechanical circulatory support and replacement have benefited numerous patients worldwide who would otherwise have died of heart failure, and devices now exist for use as bridges to recovery, bridges to transplant, and destination therapy. The current challenge is to refine what we have and to apply these technologies to broader patient populations with maximal safety and at a reasonable cost.

  8. Airway Complications of Total Artificial Heart.

    Pathak, Vikas; Donovan, Colin; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The total artificial heart is the mechanical device which is used as a bridge to the heart transplant in patients with biventricular failure. Due to the mechanical nature of the device, patients receiving total artificial heart (TAH) require to be on anticoagulation therapy. Hemorrhage and coagulopathy are few of the known complications of TAH.

  9. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  10. Radionuclide power source for artificial heart autonomic apparatus

    Lazarenko, Yu V; Gusev, V V; Pustovalov, A A

    1988-02-01

    Works on creating autonomous artificial heart devices with radionuclide heat source are described. Calculated and experimental parameters of /sup 238/Pu base radionuclide thermoelectric RITEG generators designed for supplying perspective blood pump electric drives are presented. RITEG structure is described and the prospects of increasing its efficiency are shown.

  11. Combined heart-kidney transplantation after total artificial heart insertion.

    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; Ihnken, K A; Sasevich, M; Trento, A; Ramzy, D; Esmailian, F; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Arabia, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first single-center report of 2 consecutive cases of combined heart and kidney transplantation after insertion of a total artificial heart (TAH). Both patients had advanced heart failure and developed dialysis-dependent renal failure after implantation of the TAH. The 2 patients underwent successful heart and kidney transplantation, with restoration of normal heart and kidney function. On the basis of this limited experience, we consider TAH a safe and feasible option for bridging carefully selected patients with heart and kidney failure to combined heart and kidney transplantation. Recent FDA approval of the Freedom driver may allow outpatient management at substantial cost savings. The TAH, by virtue of its capability of providing pulsatile flow at 6 to 10 L/min, may be the mechanical circulatory support device most likely to recover patients with marginal renal function and advanced heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implanted artificial heart with radioisotope power source

    Shumakov, V I; Griaznov, G M; Zhemchuzhnikov, G N; Kiselev, I M; Osipov, A P

    1983-02-01

    An atomic artificial heart for orthotopic implantation was developed with the following characteristics: volume, 1.2 L; weight, 1.5 kg; radioisotope power, 45 W; operating life, up to 5 years; hemodynamics, similar to natural hemodynamics. The artificial heart includes a thermal drive with systems for regulating power, feeding steam into the cylinders, return of the condensate to the steam generator, and delivery of power to the ventricles and heat container. The artificial heart is placed in an artificial pericardium partially filled with physiologic solution. It uses a steam engine with two operating cylinders that separately drive the left and right ventricles. There is no electronic control system in the proposed design. The operation of the heat engine is controlled, with preservation of autoregulation by the vascular system of the body. The separate drives for the ventricles is of primary importance as it provides for operation of the artificial heart through control of cardiac activity by venous return. Experimental testing on a hydromechanical bench demonstrated effective autoregulation.

  13. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart And Valve

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum discusses computations of flow of blood through artificial heart and through tilting-disk artificial heart valve. Represents further progress in research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478). One purpose of research to exploit advanced techniques of computational fluid dynamics and capabilities of supercomputers to gain understanding of complicated internal flows of viscous, essentially incompressible fluids like blood. Another to use understanding to design better artificial hearts and valves.

  14. Mathematical problems in modeling artificial heart

    Ahmed N. U.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss some problems arising in mathematical modeling of artificial hearts. The hydrodynamics of blood flow in an artificial heart chamber is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation, coupled with an equation of hyperbolic type subject to moving boundary conditions. The flow is induced by the motion of a diaphragm (membrane inside the heart chamber attached to a part of the boundary and driven by a compressor (pusher plate. On one side of the diaphragm is the blood and on the other side is the compressor fluid. For a complete mathematical model it is necessary to write the equation of motion of the diaphragm and all the dynamic couplings that exist between its position, velocity and the blood flow in the heart chamber. This gives rise to a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations; the Navier-Stokes equation being of parabolic type and the equation for the membrane being of hyperbolic type. The system is completed by introducing all the necessary static and dynamic boundary conditions. The ultimate objective is to control the flow pattern so as to minimize hemolysis (damage to red blood cells by optimal choice of geometry, and by optimal control of the membrane for a given geometry. The other clinical problems, such as compatibility of the material used in the construction of the heart chamber, and the membrane, are not considered in this paper. Also the dynamics of the valve is not considered here, though it is also an important element in the overall design of an artificial heart. We hope to model the valve dynamics in later paper.

  15. Nuclear-powered artificial heart system

    Pouchot, W.D.; Lehrfeld, D.

    1976-01-01

    As reported to the 9th IECEC, a bench model version of a nuclear-powered artificial heart system to be used as a replacement for the natural heart was constructed and tested as part of a broader U.S. ERDA program. A report is given of the system design and integration, bench testing, and field support equipment of an implantable and advanced version of the bench model incorporating some of the component developments reported to the 10th IECEC. The basic elements of the system are a 32-watt Pu-238 heat source, a Stirling engine thermal converter, a coupling mechanism, and a mechanical blood pump drive actuating, alternatively, two artificial ventricles of polymeric material. As tested on the bench using a mock circulation, the system provides approximately 9 liters/minute at 120/80 mm Hg aortic pressure. At 190/145 mm Hg aortic pressure, the maximum flow decreases to about 7 liters/minute

  16. Liver failure in total artificial heart therapy.

    Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Dapunt, Otto; Knez, Igor; Wasler, Andrae; Oberwalder, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios

    2016-07-01

    Congestive hepatopathy (CH) and acute liver failure (ALF) are common among biventricular heart failure patients. We sought to evaluate the impact of total artificial heart (TAH) therapy on hepatic function and associated clinical outcomes. A total of 31 patients received a Syncardia Total Artificial Heart. Preoperatively 17 patients exhibited normal liver function or mild hepatic derangements that were clinically insignificant and did not qualify as acute or chronic liver failure, 5 patients exhibited ALF and 9 various hepatic derangements owing to CH. Liver associated mortality and postoperative course of liver values were prospectively documented and retrospectively analyzed. Liver associated mortality in normal liver function, ALF and CH cases was 0%, 20% (P=0.03) and 44.4% (P=0.0008) respectively. 1/17 (5.8%) patients with a normal liver function developed an ALF, 4/5 (80%) patients with an ALF experienced a markedly improvement of hepatic function and 6/9 (66.6%) patients with CH a significant deterioration. TAH therapy results in recovery of hepatic function in ALF cases. Patients with CH prior to surgery form a high risk group with increased liver associated mortality.

  17. Hybrid Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Fox, Carson; Chopski, Steven; Murad, Nohra; Allaire, Paul; Mentzer, Robert; Rossano, Joseph; Arabia, Francisco; Throckmorton, Amy

    2018-05-01

    Clinical studies using total artificial hearts (TAHs) have demonstrated that pediatric and adult patients derive quality-of-life benefits from this form of therapy. Two clinically-approved TAHs and other pumps under development, however, have design challenges and limitations, including thromboembolic events, neurologic impairment, infection risk due to large size and percutaneous drivelines, and lack of ambulation, to name a few. To address these limitations, we are developing a hybrid-design, continuous-flow, implantable or extracorporeal, magnetically-levitated TAH for pediatric and adult patients with heart failure. This TAH has only two moving parts: an axial impeller for the pulmonary circulation and a centrifugal impeller for the systemic circulation. This device will utilize the latest generation of magnetic bearing technology. Initial geometries were established using pump design equations, and computational modeling provided insight into pump performance. The designs were the basis for prototype manufacturing and hydraulic testing. The study results demonstrate that the TAH is capable of delivering target blood flow rates of 1-6.5 L/min with pressure rises of 1-92 mm Hg for the pulmonary circulation and 24-150 mm Hg for the systemic circulation at 1500-10 000 rpm. This initial design of the TAH was successful and serves as the foundation to continue its development as a novel, more compact, nonthrombogenic, and effective therapeutic alternative for infants, children, adolescents, and adults with heart failure. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [An artificial heart: bridge to transplantation or permanent?].

    de Mol, Bas A J M; Lahpor, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    An artificial heart is a continuous-flow pump device with a constant output, which usually supports the left ventricle. Over the past five years, survival rates with an artificial heart have increased dramatically, but with an annual mortality of 10% per year compared with 6% for heart transplantation the artificial heart is mainly a 'bridge to transplantation' or an alternative for those patients who are not suitable for heart transplant, 'destination therapy'. It is anticipated that the number and severity of complications will decrease as a result of technological progress. The artificial heart could then become a long-term treatment option providing a good quality of life and thus become equivalent to a heart transplant.

  19. [Review of wireless energy transmission system for total artificial heart].

    Zhang, Chi; Yang, Ming

    2009-11-01

    This paper sums up the fundamental structure of wireless energy transmission system for total artificial heart, and compares the key parameters and performance of some representative systems. After that, it is discussed that the future development trend of wireless energy transmission system for total artificial heart.

  20. COMPUTER MODELING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL VENTRICLES OF HEART

    L. V. Belyaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In article modern researches of processes of development of artificial ventricles of heart are described. Advanta- ges of application computer (CAD/CAE technologies are shown by development of artificial ventricles of heart. The systems developed with application of the given technologies are submitted. 

  1. Future Prospects for the Total Artificial Heart.

    Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Karimov, Jamshid H; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    A total artificial heart (TAH) is the sole remaining option for patients with biventricular failure who cannot be rescued by left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) alone. However, the pulsatile TAH in clinical use today has limitations: large pump size, unknown durability, required complex anticoagulation regimen, and association with significant postsurgical complications. That pump is noisy; its large pneumatic driving lines traverse the body, with bulky external components for its drivers. Continuous-flow pumps, which caused a paradigm shift in the LVAD field, have already contributed to the rapidly evolving development of TAHs. Novel continuous-flow TAHs are only in preclinical testing or developmental stages. We here review the current state of TAHs, with recommended requirements for the TAH of the future.

  2. Artificial UV sources in perspective

    Coppell, R.

    1993-01-01

    With rare exceptions, the sun is by far the most important source of exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This is the conclusion of a brief examination into use of artificial sources in New Zealand. (author). 1 tab

  3. Numerical Simulation Of Flow Through An Artificial Heart

    Rogers, Stuart; Kutler, Paul; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Centin

    1991-01-01

    Research in both artificial hearts and fluid dynamics benefits from computational studies. Algorithm that implements Navier-Stokes equations of flow extended to simulate flow of viscous, incompressible blood through articifial heart. Ability to compute details of such flow important for two reasons: internal flows with moving boundaries of academic interest in their own right, and many of deficiencies of artificial hearts attributable to dynamics of flow.

  4. Successful heart transplantation in patients with total artificial heart infections.

    Taimur, Sarah; Sullivan, Timothy; Rana, Mennakshi; Patel, Gopi; Roldan, Julie; Ashley, Kimberly; Pinney, Sean; Anyanwu, Anelechi; Huprikar, Shirish

    2018-02-01

    Data are limited on clinical outcomes in patients awaiting heart transplant (HT) with total artificial heart (TAH) infections. We retrospectively reviewed all TAH recipients at our center. TAH infection was classified as definite if a microorganism was isolated in cultures from the exit site or deep tissues around the TAH; as probable in patients without surgical or microbiologic evidence of infection but no other explanation for persistent or recurrent bloodstream infection (BSI); or possible in patients with clinical suspicion and radiographic findings suggestive of TAH infection, but without surgical intervention or microbiologic evidence. From 2012 to 2015, a total of 13 patients received a TAH, with a median age at implantation of 52 years (range: 28-60). TAH infection occurred in nine patients (seven definite, one probable, one possible) a median of 41 days after implant (range: 17-475). The majority of TAH infections were caused by Staphylococcus species. Seven of nine patients underwent HT (four had pre-HT mediastinal washout, and five had positive HT operative cultures). Three patients had an active BSI caused by the same pathogen causing TAH infection at the time of HT, with one developing a post-HT BSI with the same bacteria. No patient developed post-HT surgical site infection caused by the TAH infection pathogen. No deaths among HT recipients were attributed to infection. TAH infection is frequently associated with BSI and mediastinitis and Staphylococcus was the most common pathogen. A multimodal approach of appropriate pre- and post-HT antimicrobial therapy, surgical drainage, and heart transplantation with radical mediastinal debridement was successful in curing infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Perioperative Prophylaxis for Total Artificial Heart Transplantation.

    Chambers, H E; Pelish, P; Qiu, F; Florescu, D F

    2017-11-01

    Practice variation regarding perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis in total artificial heart transplantations (TAH-t) across institutions is unknown. The aim of our survey was to assess the current practices for prevention of infection in TAH-t recipients among different programs. An electronic survey was sent to programs that implant Syncardia TAH (Syncardia Systems, Tuscon, Ariz, USA). Proportions were analyzed for categorical variables; means and SDs were analyzed for continuous variables. The majority of centers (80.8%) had a formal surgical infection prophylaxis protocol. For non-penicillin-allergic patients, five (20.1%) institutions reported using a 4-drug regimen, seven (29.2%) used a 3-drug regimen, five (20.1%) used a 2-drug regimen, and seven (29.2%) used a cephalosporin alone. Similar data was seen in the penicillin-allergic patients. Infections were reported to occur postoperatively in 52.2% centers. During the first month after TAH-t, bacteremia represented 27.3%, driveline infections 27.2%, pulmonary infections 9%, and mediastinal infections 18.2%. The most common organisms seen within the first month were Candida spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (21.4%). In 65% of centers, the mean rate of death post-TAH-t due to infection was 14.5% (SD, 22.3%). The mean rate of patients surviving until orthotopic heart transplantation was 58.6% (SD, 27.7%). Preventing infections post-TAH-t is key to decreasing morbidity and mortality. All institutions administered perioperative prophylaxis for TAH-t with significant variation among the centers. The majority of the centers have a formal perioperative prophylactic protocol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Artificial heart system thermal insulation component development

    Svedberg, R.C.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A concentric cup vacuum multifoil insulation system has been selected by virtue of its size, weight, and thermal performance to insulate the hot radioisotope portion of the thermal converter of an artificial implantable heart system. A factor of 2 improvement in thermal performance, based on the heat loss per number of foil layers (minimum system weight and volume) has been realized over conventional spiral wrapped multifoil vacuum insulation. This improvement is the result of the concentric cup construction to maintain a uniform interfoil spacing and the elimination of corner heat losses. Based on external insulation system dimensions (surface area in contact with host body), heat losses of 0.019 W/ cm 2 at 1140 0 K (1600 0 F) and 0.006 W/cm 2 at 920 0 K (1200 0 F) have been achieved. Factors which influence thermal performance of the nickel foil concentric cup insulation system include the number of cups, configuration and method of application of zirconia (ZrO 2 ) spacer material, system pressure, emittance of the cups, and operating temperature

  7. Simulation of Blood flow in Artificial Heart Valve Design through Left heart

    Hafizah Mokhtar, N.; Abas, Aizat

    2018-05-01

    In this work, an artificial heart valve is designed for use in real heart with further consideration on the effect of thrombosis, vorticity, and stress. The design of artificial heart valve model is constructed by Computer-aided design (CAD) modelling and simulated using Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software. The effect of blood flow pattern, velocity and vorticity of the artificial heart valve design has been analysed in this research work. Based on the results, the artificial heart valve design shows that it has a Doppler velocity index that is less than the allowable standards for the left heart with values of more than 0.30 and less than 2.2. These values are safe to be used as replacement of the human heart valve.

  8. Artificial heart pumps: bridging the gap between science, technology and personalized medicine by relational medicine.

    Raia, Federica; Deng, Mario C

    2017-01-01

    In the US population of 300 million, 3 million have heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and 300,000 have advanced heart failure. Long-term mechanical circulatory support will, within the next decade, be recommended to 30,000 patients annually in the USA, 3000 undergo heart transplantation annually. What do these advances mean for persons suffering from advanced heart failure and their loved ones/caregivers? In this perspective article, we discuss - by exemplifying a case report of a 27-year-old man receiving a Total Artificial Heart - a practice concept of modern medicine that fully incorporates the patient's personhood perspective which we have termed Relational Medicine™. From this case study, it becomes apparent that the successful practice of modern cardiovascular medicine requires the person-person encounter as a core practice element.

  9. Perioperative Care of the Patient With the Total Artificial Heart.

    Yaung, Jill; Arabia, Francisco A; Nurok, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Advanced heart failure continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality despite improvements in pharmacologic therapy. High demand for cardiac transplantation and shortage of donor organs have led to an increase in the utilization of mechanical circulatory support devices. The total artificial heart is an effective biventricular assist device that may be used as a bridge to transplant and that is being studied for destination therapy. This review discusses the history, indications, and perioperative management of the total artificial heart with emphasis on the postoperative concerns.

  10. Multigated radionuclide study of the total artificial heart

    Datz, F L; Christian, P E; Taylor, A Jr; Hastings, W L; De Vries, W C

    1987-07-01

    A permanent total artificial heart, the Jarvik-7, was implanted into a 61-year-old male with a severe cardiomyopathy. Gated radionuclide studies were performed in the patient both prior to surgery and following implantation. Preoperative gated radionuclide cardiac studies revealed marked left ventricular enlargement, severe hypokinesis and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 10%. The right ventricle was moderately enlarged with a 27% ejection fraction. Following implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, gated cardiac studies were performed with a computer gated by a signal from the heart controller. The left ventricular ejection fraction was 69% and the right ventricular ejection fraction was 62%. This compared to a theoretical ejection fraction of 74% for each ventricle based on chamber anatomy. There was excellent ventricular emptying. Phase analysis showed uniform diaphragm motion. The use of gated cardiac studies in humans may prove helpful in evaluating mechanical problems with the artificial heart, such as manlfunction of the diaphragm, before they become clinically apparent.

  11. Current state of total artificial heart therapy and introduction of the most important total artificial heart systems.

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Hergesell, Vera; Wasler, Andrae; Dapunt, Otto

    2018-06-14

    Due to the declining instances of organ donation, total artificial heart (TAH) therapy is of increasing importance for the management of end-stage biventricular heart failure. We introduce the currently most important established and novel TAH systems (SynCardia, CARMAT, ReinHeart, BiVACOR), report clinical outcomes and discuss technical requirements for the successful implementation of TAH therapy as an alternative to cardiac transplantation.

  12. Ethical Analysis of Withdrawing Total Artificial Heart Support.

    DeMartino, Erin S; Wordingham, Sara E; Stulak, John M; Boilson, Barry A; Fuechtmann, Kayla R; Singh, Nausheen; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Pajaro, Octavio E; Mueller, Paul S

    2017-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of patients who undergo withdrawal of total artificial heart support and to explore the ethical aspects of withdrawing this life-sustaining treatment. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all adult recipients of a total artificial heart at Mayo Clinic from the program's inception in 2007 through June 30, 2015. Management of other life-sustaining therapies, approach to end-of-life decision making, engagement of ethics and palliative care consultation, and causes of death were analyzed. Of 47 total artificial heart recipients, 14 patients or their surrogates (30%) requested withdrawal of total artificial heart support. No request was denied by treatment teams. All 14 patients were supported with at least 1 other life-sustaining therapy. Only 1 patient was able to participate in decision making. It is widely held to be ethically permissible to withdraw a life-sustaining treatment when the treatment no longer meets the patient's health care-related goals (ie, the burdens outweigh the benefits). These data suggest that some patients, surrogates, physicians, and other care providers believe that this principle extends to the withdrawal of total artificial heart support. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracorporeal total artificial heart as bailout surgery.

    Perrodin, Stéphanie F; Muller, Olivier; Gronchi, Fabrizio; Liaudet, Lucas; Hullin, Roger; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    We report the use of a total extracorporeal heart for uncontrolled bleeding following a proximal left anterior descending artery perforation, using two centrifugal ventricular assist devices after heart explantation. The literature describing similar techniques and patient outcomes for this "bailout" technique are reviewed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Control system for an artificial heart

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Inexpensive industrial pneumatic components are combined to produce control system to drive sac-type heart-assistance blood pump with controlled pulsatile pressure that makes pump rate of flow sensitive to venous /atrial/ pressure, while stroke is centered about set operating point and pump is synchronized with natural heart.

  15. Total artificial heart implantation in a young Marfan syndrome patient.

    Rao, Prashant; Keenan, Jack B; Rajab, Taufiek K; Kim, Samuel; Smith, Richard; Amabile, Orazio; Khalpey, Zain

    2018-03-01

    Cardiovascular complications represent the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with Marfan syndrome. Here, we describe a unique case where a total artificial heart was implanted in a young Marfan syndrome woman. A 22-year-old postpartum African American female with Marfan syndrome developed multiple severe valve dysfunction and biventricular failure that was refractory to medical management. She previously had a Bentall procedure for Type A aortic dissection and repair of a Type B dissection. We implanted a total artificial heart with a good outcome. Total artificial heart is a durable option for severe biventricular failure and multiple valvular dysfunction as a bridge to transplant in a young patient with Marfan syndrome.

  16. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy following total artificial heart implantation.

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Serrano, Maria Rosario; Guersoy, Dilek; Autschbach, Ruediger; Goetzenich, Andreas; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-07-01

    Coagulation disorders and an immune-altered state are common among total artificial heart patients. In this context, we sought to evaluate the safety of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy in cases of prolonged need for mechanical ventilatory support. We retrospectively analysed the charts of 11 total artificial heart patients who received percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. We focused on early and late complications. We observed no major complications and no procedure-related deaths. Early minor complications included venous oozing (45.4%) and one case of local infection. Late complications, including subglottic stenosis, stomal infection or infections of the lower respiratory tract, were not observed. In conclusion, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy in total artificial heart patients is safe. Considering the well-known benefits of early tracheotomy over prolonged translaryngeal intubation, we advocate early timing of therapy in cases of prolonged mechanical ventilation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial heart thermal converter component research and development

    Goldowsky, M.; Lehrfeld, D.

    1977-01-01

    Under U.S. ERDA contract, a radioisotope powered artificial heart system to be used as a replacement for the diseased natural heart is under development by the Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems Division and Philips Laboratories. A portion of the program activity is in research and development of components for the Stirling cycle thermal converter. Developments in current areas of thermal converter R and D investigation are discussed, including the control system, lubrication system, magnetic shaft coupling, rotary seals, and materials joining

  18. Design and performance of heart assist or artificial heart control systems

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    The factors leading to the design of a controlled driving system for either a heart assist pump or artificial heart are discussed. The system provides square pressure waveform to drive a pneumatic-type blood pump. For assist usage the system uses an R-wave detector circuit that can detect the R-wave of the electrocardiogram in the presence of electrical disturbances. This circuit provides a signal useful for synchronizing an assist pump with the natural heart. It synchronizes a square wave circuit, the output of which is converted into square waveforms of pneumatic pressure suitable for driving both assist device and artificial heart. The pressure levels of the driving waveforms are controlled by means of feedback channels to maintain physiological regulation of the artificial heart's output flow. A more compact system that could achieve similar regulatory characteristics is also discussed.

  19. Reliability studies for the nuclear-powered artificial heart program

    Horita, M.; Zeigler, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    By assuming that the failures of an artificial heart system with a mean life of 10 y can be modeled by a particular probability distribution, both the probability of a failure in the system within t years and the reliability required of each subsystem and component were investigated

  20. On the feasibility of detecting flaws in artificial heart valves

    Lepelaars, E.S.A.M.; Ooijen, van W.D.R.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the feasibility of detecting defects in certain artificial heart valves by determining the electromagnetic behavior of some simple models with the aid of thin-wire integral equations. The idea is to use the stationary current that occurs at late times after the excitation of a closed

  1. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    Pugliesi, R.; Geraldo, L.P.; Andrade, M.L.G.; Menezes, M.O.; Pereira, M.A.S.; Maizato, M.J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process

  2. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    Pugliesi, R; Andrade, M L G; Menezes, M O; Pereira, M A S; Maizato, M J S

    1999-01-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process.

  3. Total Artificial Heart Implantation Blood Pressure Management as Resolving Treatment for Massive Hemolysis following Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    Ghodsizad, Ali; Koerner, Michael M; El-Banayosy, A; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Loebe, Matthias

    2016-10-21

    The SynCardia Total Artificial Heart (TAH) has been used for patients with biventricular failure, who cannot be managed with implantation of a left ventricular (LV) assist device. Following TAH implantation, our patient developed severe hemolysis, which could only be managed successfully by aggressive blood pressure control [Ohashi 2003; Nakata 1998].

  4. Physiological characterization of the SynCardia total artificial heart in a mock circulation system.

    Crosby, Jessica R; DeCook, Katrina J; Tran, Phat L; Smith, Richard G; Larson, Douglas F; Khalpey, Zain I; Burkhoff, Daniel; Slepian, Marvin J

    2015-01-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) has emerged as an effective, life-saving biventricular replacement system for a wide variety of patients with end-stage heart failure. Although the clinical performance of the TAH is established, modern physiological characterization, in terms of elastance behavior and pressure-volume (PV) characterization has not been defined. Herein, we examine the TAH in terms of elastance using a nonejecting left ventricle, and then characterize the PV relation of the TAH by varying preload and afterload parameters using a Donovan Mock Circulatory System. We demonstrate that the TAH does not operate with time-varying elastance, differing from the human heart. Furthermore, we show that the TAH has a PV relation behavior that also differs from that of the human heart. The TAH does exhibit Starling-like behavior, with output increasing via preload-dependent mechanisms, without reliance on an alteration of inotropic state within the operating window of the TAH. Within our testing range, the TAH is insensitive to variations in afterload; however, this insensitivity has a limit, the limit being the maximum driving pressure of the pneumatic driver. Understanding the physiology of the TAH affords insight into the functional parameters that govern artificial heart behavior providing perspective on differences compared with the human heart.

  5. Human technology after cardiac epigenesis. Artificial heart versus cardiac transplantation.

    Losman, J G

    1977-09-24

    Cardiovascular disease is the chief cause of death in technologically advanced countries and accounts for more than 50% of all deaths in the USA. For a patient with end-stage cardiac failure the only treatment presently available is organ replacement, either by transplantation or by the use of a mechanical heart. Transplantation has demonstrated its value: survival of more than 8 years and restoration of a normal quality of life to patients who were in end-stage cardiac decompensation. However, the prospect of routine clinical application of an artificial heart remains distant. The development of a totally implantable artificial heart still presents a series of challenging engineering problems with regard to strict constraints of size, weight, blood-material compatibility, adaptability of output to demand, efficiency and reliability of the power supply, and safety if nuclear fuel is used. The totally artificial heart is presently not an alternative to the cardiac allograft, but could provide short-term support for patients awaiting cardiac transplantation.

  6. Multigated radionuclide study of the total artificial heart

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Taylor, A. Jr.; Hastings, W.L.; De Vries, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A permanent total artificial heart, the Jarvik-7, was implanted into a 61-year-old male with a severe cardiomyopathy. Gated radionuclide studies were performed in the patient both prior to surgery and following implantation. Preoperative gated radionuclide cardiac studies revealed marked left ventricular enlargement, severe hypokinesis and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 10%. The right ventricle was moderately enlarged with a 27% ejection fraction. Following implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, gated cardiac studies were performed with a computer gated by a signal from the heart controller. The left ventricular ejection fraction was 69% and the right ventricular ejection fraction was 62%. This compared to a theoretical ejection fraction of 74% for each ventricle based on chamber anatomy. There was excellent ventricular emptying. Phase analysis showed uniform diaphragm motion. The use of gated cardiac studies in humans may prove helpful in evaluating mechanical problems with the artificial heart, such as manlfunction of the diaphragm, before they become clinically apparent. (orig.)

  7. Artificial muscle for end-stage heart failure.

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Michalis, Alexandre; Hayoz, Daniel; Locca, Didier; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2012-01-01

    We describe a device made of artificial muscle for the treatment of end-stage heart failure as an alternative to current heart assist devices. The key component is a matrix of nitinol wires and aramidic fibers called Biometal muscle (BM). When heated electrically, it produces a motorless, smooth, and lifelike motion. The BM is connected to a carbon fiber scaffold, tightening the heart and providing simultaneous assistance to the left and right ventricles. A pacemaker-like microprocessor drives the contraction of the BM. We tested the device in a dedicated bench model of diseased heart. It generated a systolic pressure of 75 mm Hg and ejected a maximum of 330 ml/min, with an ejection fraction of 12%. The device required a power supply of 6 V, 250 mA. This could be the beginning of an era in which BMs integrate or replace the mechanical function of natural muscles.

  8. Stirling/hydraulic artificial heart power source

    Johnston, R.P.; Bennett, A.; Emigh, S.G.; Griffith, W.R.; Noble, J.E.; Perrone, R.E.; White, M.A.; Martini, W.R.; Alexander, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The REL power source combines the high efficiency of Stirling engines with the reliability, efficiency, and flexibility of hydraulic power transfer and control to ensure long system life and physiological effectiveness. Extended life testing has been achieved with an engine (2.6 years) and hydraulic actuator/controller (1.6 years). Peak power source efficiency is 15.5 percent on 5 to 10 watts delivered to the blood pump push plate with 33 watts steady thermal input. Planned incorporation of power source output control is expected to reduce daily average thermal input to 18 watts. Animal in-vivo tests with an assist heart have consistently demonstrated required performance by biological synchronization and effective ventricle relief. Volume and weight are 0.93 liter and 2.4 kg (excluding blood pump) with an additional 0.4 liter of low temperature foam insulation required to preclude tissue thermal damage. Carefully planned development of System 7 is expected to produce major reductions in size

  9. Total Artificial Heart Implantation after Excision of Right Ventricular Angiosarcoma.

    Bruckner, Brian A; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Copeland, Jack G; Estep, Jerry D; Loebe, Matthias; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas, although rare, are aggressive and lethal, requiring thorough surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for the best possible outcome. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman who underwent total artificial heart implantation for right-sided heart failure caused by right ventricular angiosarcoma. For the first several weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered uneventfully. However, a postoperative liver biopsy indicated hepatocellular injury consistent with preoperative chemotherapy. She developed continuing liver failure, from which she died despite good cardiac function.

  10. Radiological symptoms of the disfunction of artificial heart valves

    Erdelyi, M Jr [Orszagos Roentgen es Sugarfizikai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1981-01-31

    The possible causes of the disfunction of artificial valves are detailed. Routine X-ray examinations of the chest only rarely reveal direct signs of disfunction, but the haemodynamic alterations (dilated heart chambers, or veins) must be considered as important indirect signs. The characteristics and possibly the cause of the valve insufficience can be analyzed on the basis of kino- and spot radiograms. The symptoms observed by these methods are reported in detail.

  11. Successful heart transplant after 1374 days living with a total artificial heart.

    Gerosa, Gino; Gallo, Michele; Bottio, Tomaso; Tarzia, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The CardioWest Total Artificial Heart (CW-TAH) has been approved as a temporary device for bridge to cardiac transplantation and is under investigation for destination therapy by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We herein report the longest worldwide survival out of hospital (1374 days) of a patient supported with Cardio West Total Artificial Heart (CW-TAH). This experience is intended as a proof of concept of using CW-TAH as the destination therapy in patients with biventricular failure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomy studies for an artificial heart. Final summary report

    Kiraly, R.J.; Nose, Y.

    1977-12-01

    In the interval from February of 1972 through December of 1977, studies were conducted relating to the anatomical feasibility of implanting a total artificial heart system. These studies included both the calf as an experimental animal as well as the ultimate human recipient of the artificial heart system. Studies with the calf included definition of the thoracic anatomy relative to the size, shape, and vascular connections for implanting the blood pump. To test the animal's tolerance to an implanted engine system, mockups of the thermal converter were implanted chronically in various locations within the calf. No problems developed in retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal implants ranging from 8 to 15 months. A study to determine accelerations experienced by an abdominally implanted thermal converter was performed in calves. Under the most severe conditions, accelerations of a maximum of 34 Gs were experienced. The largest effort was devoted to defining the human anatomy relative to implanting an artificial heart in the thorax. From a number of data sources, including cadavers as well as living patients, a quantitative, statistical analysis of the size and shape of the male thorax was obtained. Finally, an in vivo study of a functional intrathoracic compliance bag in a calf demonstrated the feasibility of this method

  13. Physical principles of artificial stimulation of the heart : Stimulation of the canine heart in situ

    Schneider, H.

    1. 1. In artificial heart stimulation, the essential quantity is the density of current, , in the intramyocardial wall. Dosage of the pulse amplitude in volts can have serious consequences for the patient. Curve indications in volts on pacemakers and in publications and records must, therefore, be

  14. System overview of the fully implantable destination therapy--ReinHeart-total artificial heart.

    Pelletier, Benedikt; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Graef, Felix; Kuipers, Kristin; Laumen, Marco; Guersoy, Dilek; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the lack of suitable allografts, the demand for long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with biventricular end-stage heart failure is rising. Currently available Total Artificial Heart (TAH) systems consist of pump units with only limited durability, percutaneous tubes and bulky external equipment that limit the quality of life. Therefore we are focusing on the development of a fully implantable, highly durable destination therapy total artificial heart. The ReinHeart-TAH system consists of a passively filling pump unit driven by a low-wear linear drive between two artificial ventricles, an implantable control unit and a compliance chamber. The TAH is powered by a transcutaneous energy transmission system. The flow distribution inside the ventricles was analysed by fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements. Along with durability tests, the hydrodynamic performance and flow balance capability were evaluated in a mock circulation loop. Animal trials are ongoing. Based on fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry, blood stagnation areas have been significantly reduced. In the mock circulation loop the ReinHeart-TAH generated a cardiac output of 5 l/min at an operating frequency of 120 bpm and an aortic pressure of 120/80 mmHg. The highly effective preload sensitivity of the passively filling ventricles allowed the sensorless integration of the Frank Starling mechanism. The ReinHeart-TAH effectively replaced the native heart's function in animals for up to 2 days. In vitro and in vivo testing showed a safe and effective function of the ReinHeart-TAH system. This has the potential to become an alternative to transplantation. However, before a first-in-man implant, chronic animal trials still have to be completed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Renal Function Recovery with Total Artificial Heart Support.

    Quader, Mohammed A; Goodreau, Adam M; Shah, Keyur B; Katlaps, Gundars; Cooke, Richard; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna F; Wolfe, Luke G; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure patients requiring total artificial heart (TAH) support often have concomitant renal insufficiency (RI). We sought to quantify renal function recovery in patients supported with TAH at our institution. Renal function data at 30, 90, and 180 days after TAH implantation were analyzed for patients with RI, defined as hemodialysis supported or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m. Between January 2008 and December 2013, 20 of the 46 (43.5%) TAH recipients (age 51 ± 9 years, 85% men) had RI, mean preoperative eGFR of 48 ± 7 ml/min/1.73 m. Renal function recovery was noted at each follow-up interval: increment in eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m) at 30, 90, and 180 days was 21 ± 35 (p = 0.1), 16.5 ± 18 (p = 0.05), and 10 ± 9 (p = 0.1), respectively. Six patients (30%) required preoperative dialysis. Of these, four recovered renal function, one remained on dialysis, and one died. Six patients (30%) required new-onset dialysis. Of these, three recovered renal function and three died. Overall, 75% (15 of 20) of patients' renal function improved with TAH support. Total artificial heart support improved renal function in 75% of patients with pre-existing significant RI, including those who required preoperative dialysis.

  16. [Hydrodynamics of disk artificial heart valves with different design characteristics].

    Dobrova, N B; Zaretskiĭ, Iu V

    1989-01-01

    Bench tests for 38 models of artificial heart valves (AHV) with different design parameters allowed us to decide in favour of the valves with reduced eccentricity (compared to the serial AHV of the EMAHV type) according to its resistance in the constant flow. Out of the compatibility checks of the design parameters tested it was concluded that the disk did not make the complete calculated angle when rotated. The dependence of AHV resistance on the disk rotation angle showed that there is no necessity to increase that angle more than 70 degrees for the mitral valve and more than 75 degrees for the aortic AHV.

  17. Artificial heart for humanoid robot using coiled SMA actuators

    Potnuru, Akshay; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we have presented the design and characterization of artificial heart using cylindrical shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for humanoids [1]. The robotic heart was primarily designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate blushing or anger by the use of elastomeric substrates for the transport of fluids. It can also be used for other applications. In this paper, we present an improved design by using high strain coiled SMAs and a novel pumping mechanism that uses sequential actuation to create peristalsis-like motions, and hence pump the fluid. Various placements of actuators will be investigated with respect to the silicone elastomeric body. This new approach provides a better performance in terms of the fluid volume pumped.

  18. An example of the use of the DELPHI method: future prospects of artificial heart techniques in France; Un exemple d'utilisation de la methode DELPHI: perspectives de developpement en France des techniques de coeur artificiel

    Derian, Jean-Claude [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, Departement des Programmes, Section des Etudes Economiques Generales (France); Morize, Francoise [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (France); Vernejoul, Pierre de [Faculte de Medecine Necker - Enfants Malades (France); Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (France); Vial, Renee [Direction de Protection et Surete Radiologiques (France)

    1971-07-01

    The artificial heart is still only a research project surrounded by numerous uncertainties which make it very difficult to estimate, at the moment, the possibilities for future development of this technique in France. A systematic analysis of the hazards which characterize this project has been undertaken in the following report: restricting these uncertainties has required a taking into account of opinions of specialists concerned with type of research or its upshot. We have achieved this by adapting an investigation technique which is still unusual in France, the DELPHI method. This adaptation has allowed the confrontation and statistical aggregation of the opinions given by a body of a hundred experts who were consulted through a program of sequential interrogations which studied in particular, the probable date of the research issue, the clinical cases which require the use of an artificial heart, as well as the probable future needs. After having taken into account the economic constraints, we can deduce from these results the probable amount of plutonium 238 needed in the hypothesis where isotopic generator would be retained for the energetics feeding of the artificial heart [French] Le coeur artificiel n'est encore actuellement qu'un projet de recherche auquel sont attachees de nombreuses incertitudes qui rendent difficile l'appreciation des possibilites de developpement futures de cette technique en France. Une analyse systematique des aleas qui caracterisent ce projet est entreprise dans l'etude ci-apres: circonscrire ces aleas necessite la prise en compte d'opinions emanant des specialistes concernes par cette recherche ou par son issue: c'est ce qui a ete realise en adaptant une methodologie non classique en France, la methode DELPHI. Cette adaptation a permis la confrontation et l'agregation statistique des opinions fournies par un college d'une centaine d'experts consultes par un programme d'interrogations sequentielles, envisageant en particulier les

  19. Automatic Emboli Detection System for the Artificial Heart

    Steifer, T.; Lewandowski, M.; Karwat, P.; Gawlikowski, M.

    In spite of the progress in material engineering and ventricular assist devices construction, thromboembolism remains the most crucial problem in mechanical heart supporting systems. Therefore, the ability to monitor the patient's blood for clot formation should be considered an important factor in development of heart supporting systems. The well-known methods for automatic embolus detection are based on the monitoring of the ultrasound Doppler signal. A working system utilizing ultrasound Doppler is being developed for the purpose of flow estimation and emboli detection in the clinical artificial heart ReligaHeart EXT. Thesystem will be based on the existing dual channel multi-gate Doppler device with RF digital processing. A specially developed clamp-on cannula probe, equipped with 2 - 4 MHz piezoceramic transducers, enables easy system setup. We present the issuesrelated to the development of automatic emboli detection via Doppler measurements. We consider several algorithms for the flow estimation and emboli detection. We discuss their efficiency and confront them with the requirements of our experimental setup. Theoretical considerations are then met with preliminary experimental findings from a) flow studies with blood mimicking fluid and b) in-vitro flow studies with animal blood. Finally, we discuss some more methodological issues - we consider several possible approaches to the problem of verification of the accuracy of the detection system.

  20. The Total Artificial Heart in End-Stage Congenital Heart Disease.

    Villa, Chet R; Morales, David L S

    2017-01-01

    The development of durable ventricular assist devices (VADs) has improved mortality rates and quality of life in patients with end stage heart failure. While the use of VADs has increased dramatically in recent years, there is limited experience with VAD implantation in patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD), despite the fact that the number of patients with end stage CHD has grown due to improvements in surgical and medical care. VAD use has been limited in patients with CHD and end stage heart failure due to anatomic (systemic right ventricle, single ventricle, surgically altered anatomy, valve dysfunction, etc.) and physiologic constraints (diastolic dysfunction). The total artificial heart (TAH), which has right and left sided pumps that can be arranged in a variety of orientations, can accommodate the anatomic variation present in CHD patients. This review provides an overview of the potential use of the TAH in patients with CHD.

  1. Machines versus medication for biventricular heart failure: focus on the total artificial heart.

    Arabia, Francisco A; Moriguchi, Jaime D

    2014-09-01

    The medical/surgical management of advanced heart failure has evolved rapidly over the last few decades. With better understanding of heart failure pathophysiology, new pharmacological agents have been introduced that have resulted in improvements in survival. For those patients that fail to improve, mechanical circulatory support with left ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts (TAHs) have served as a beneficial bridge to transplantation. The TAH has continued to play a significant role as a bridge to transplantation in patients with biventricular failure and more selected indications that could not be completely helped with left ventricular assist devices. Improved survival with the TAH has resulted in more patients benefiting from this technology. Improvements will eventually lead to a totally implantable device that will permanently replace the failing human heart.

  2. Stirling engine with hydraulic power output for powering artificial hearts

    Johnston, R.P.; Noble, J.E.; Emigh, S.G.; White, M.A.; Griffith, W.R.; Perrone, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The DWDL heart power source combines the high efficiency of Stirling engines with the reliability, efficiency, and flexibility of hydraulic power transfer and control to ensure long system life and physiological effectiveness. Extended life testing has already been achieved with an engine module; animal in-vivo tests with an assist heart have consistently demonstrated required performance by biological synchronization and effective ventricle relief. The present System 5 can reliably meet near-term thousand-hour animal in-vivo test goals as far as the durability and efficacy of the power source are concerned. Carefully planned development of System 6 has produced major reductions in size and required input power. Research engine tests have provided the basis for achieving performance goals and the approach for further improvement is well established. The near term goal is 33 W heat input with 16 W input projected for normal physical activity. The goal of reduction of engine module volume to 0.9 liter has been achieved. Demonstrated reliability of 292 d for the engine and 35 d for the full system, as well as effectiveness of the artificial heart power source in short-term in-vivo tests indicate that life-limiting problems are now blood pump reliability and the machine-animal interface

  3. A Physical Heart Failure Simulation System Utilizing the Total Artificial Heart and Modified Donovan Mock Circulation.

    Crosby, Jessica R; DeCook, Katrina J; Tran, Phat L; Betterton, Edward; Smith, Richard G; Larson, Douglas F; Khalpey, Zain I; Burkhoff, Daniel; Slepian, Marvin J

    2017-07-01

    With the growth and diversity of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) systems entering clinical use, a need exists for a robust mock circulation system capable of reliably emulating and reproducing physiologic as well as pathophysiologic states for use in MCS training and inter-device comparison. We report on the development of such a platform utilizing the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart and a modified Donovan Mock Circulation System, capable of being driven at normal and reduced output. With this platform, clinically relevant heart failure hemodynamics could be reliably reproduced as evidenced by elevated left atrial pressure (+112%), reduced aortic flow (-12.6%), blunted Starling-like behavior, and increased afterload sensitivity when compared with normal function. Similarly, pressure-volume relationships demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to afterload and decreased Starling-like behavior in the heart failure model. Lastly, the platform was configured to allow the easy addition of a left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II at 9600 RPM), which upon insertion resulted in improvement of hemodynamics. The present configuration has the potential to serve as a viable system for training and research, aimed at fostering safe and effective MCS device use. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Rapid Speed Modulation of a Rotary Total Artificial Heart Impeller.

    Kleinheyer, Matthias; Timms, Daniel L; Tansley, Geoffrey D; Nestler, Frank; Greatrex, Nicholas A; Frazier, O Howard; Cohn, William E

    2016-09-01

    Unlike the earlier reciprocating volume displacement-type pumps, rotary blood pumps (RBPs) typically operate at a constant rotational speed and produce continuous outflow. When RBP technology is used in constructing a total artificial heart (TAH), the pressure waveform that the TAH produces is flat, without the rise and fall associated with a normal arterial pulse. Several studies have suggested that pulseless circulation may impair microcirculatory perfusion and the autoregulatory response and may contribute to adverse events such as gastrointestinal bleeding, arteriovenous malformations, and pump thrombosis. It may therefore be beneficial to attempt to reproduce pulsatile output, similar to that generated by the native heart, by rapidly modulating the speed of an RBP impeller. The choice of an appropriate speed profile and control strategy to generate physiologic waveforms while minimizing power consumption and blood trauma becomes a challenge. In this study, pump operation modes with six different speed profiles using the BiVACOR TAH were evaluated in vitro. These modes were compared with respect to: hemodynamic pulsatility, which was quantified as surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE); maximum rate of change of pressure (dP/dt); pulse power index; and motor power consumption as a function of pulse pressure. The results showed that the evaluated variables underwent different trends in response to changes in the speed profile shape. The findings indicated a possible trade-off between SHE levels and flow rate pulsatility related to the relative systolic duration in the speed profile. Furthermore, none of the evaluated measures was sufficient to fully characterize hemodynamic pulsatility. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Making Artificial Heart Components – Selected Aspects Of Casting Technology

    Sobczak J.J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study shown possibilities of Rapid Prototyping techniques (RP and metal casting simulation software (MCSS, including non inertial reference systems. RP and MCSS have been used in order to design and produce essential elements for artificial heart. Additionally it has been shown possibilities of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and DodJet technology using prototyped elements of rotodynamic pump. MAGMASOFT® software allowed to verify the cast kit heart valves model. Optical scanner Atos III enabled size verification of experimental elements supplied by rapid prototyping together with metal casting elements. Due to the selection of ceramic materials and assessment of molten metal – ceramic reactivity at high temperatures together with pattern materials selection model it was possible to design, manufacture a ceramic mould for titanium based alloys. The casting structure modification has been carried out by means of high isostatic pressure technique (HIP. The quality assessment of the casting materials has been performed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF, ARL 4460 Optical Emission Spectrometer, metallographic techniques and X-ray computed tomography.

  6. First North American 50 cc Total Artificial Heart Experience: Conversion from a 70 cc Total Artificial Heart.

    Khalpey, Zain; Kazui, Toshinobu; Ferng, Alice S; Connell, Alana; Tran, Phat L; Meyer, Mark; Rawashdeh, Badi; Smith, Richard G; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Friedman, Mark; Lick, Scott; Slepian, Marvin J; Copeland, Jack G

    2016-01-01

    The 70 cc total artificial heart (TAH) has been utilized as bridge to transplant (BTT) for biventricular failure. However, the utilization of 70 cc TAH has been limited to large patients for the low output from the pulmonary as well as systemic vein compression after chest closure. Therefore, the 50 cc TAH was developed by SynCardia (Tucson, AZ) to accommodate smaller chest cavity. We report the first TAH exchange from a 70 to 50 cc due to a fit difficulty. The patient failed to be closed with a 70 cc TAH, although the patient met the conventional 70 cc TAH fit criteria. We successfully closed the chest with a 50 cc TAH.

  7. Total Artificial Heart as Rescue Therapy for Primary Graft Failure in an Infant.

    Ziegler, Luke A; Sainathan, Sandeep; Morell, Victor O; Sharma, Mahesh S

    2018-04-01

    An infant unable to be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass after orthotopic heart transplantation was cannulated for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. During the next 3 days, allograft failure and intracardiac thrombosis necessitated cardiectomy. To provide acute mechanical circulatory support, artificial atrial chambers were constructed with Gore-Tex conduits and PediMag centrifugal pumps were connected to each by Berlin Heart EXCOR cannulae. The PediMag pumps were subsequently exchanged for 10-mL Berlin Heart EXCOR pumps. After 60 days of support by total artificial heart, the patient was bridged successfully to a second heart transplant. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The 50/50 cc Total Artificial Heart Trial: Extending the Benefits of the Total Artificial Heart to Underserved Populations.

    Wells, Dennis; Villa, Chet R; Simón Morales, David Luís

    2017-01-01

    While use of the total artificial heart (TAH) is growing, the use of the device is not uniform across the gender and age spectrum because the vast majority of implants are in adult males. SynCardia has recently developed a smaller 50 cc TAH that was designed to accommodate patients with a body surface area as low as 1.2 m 2 (potentially even lower using virtual implantation). Herein, we describe the early use of the 50 cc TAH (10 implants in the US and 18 outside the US). Twenty-eight devices have been implanted worldwide. Nineteen (68%) patients were female, 4 (14%) were 21 years of age or younger, and 2 (7%) had a diagnosis of congenital heart disease (1 Fontan). The smallest patient, by body surface area, was 1.35 m 2 . Six patients (21%) have been placed on the Freedom Driver, all of whom have survived. Fourteen patients (50%) have had a positive outcome to date. The development of the 50 cc TAH has expanded the population of patients who may benefit from TAH support and thus may help improve outcomes for patients who have had limited biventricular support options to date. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension After Heart Transplantation in Patients Bridged with the Total Artificial Heart.

    Shah, Rachit; Patel, Dhavalkumar B; Mankad, Anit K; Rennyson, Stephen L; Tang, Daniel G; Quader, Mohammed A; Smallfield, Melissa C; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Shah, Keyur B

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) among heart transplant recipients is associated with an increased risk of mortality. Pulmonary hemodynamics improves after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation; however, the impact of PH before total artificial heart (TAH) implantation on posttransplant hemodynamics and survival is unknown. This is a single center retrospective study aimed to evaluate the impact of TAH implantation on posttransplant hemodynamics and mortality in two groups stratified according to severity of PH: high (≥3 Woods units [WU]) and low (heart catheterization performed at baseline (before TAH) and posttransplant at 1 and 12 months. Patients in the high PVR group (n = 12) experienced improvement in PVR (baseline = 4.31 ± 0.7; 1-month = 1.69 ± 0.7, p heart transplantation (HT), but remained elevated. There was no significant difference in survival between the two groups at 12 months follow-up. Patients with high PVR who are bridged to transplant with TAH had improvement in PVR at 12 months after transplant, and the degree of PVR did not impact posttransplant survival.

  10. Robotics and artificial intelligence: Jewish ethical perspectives.

    Rappaport, Z H

    2006-01-01

    In 16th Century Prague, Rabbi Loew created a Golem, a humanoid made of clay, to protect his community. When the Golem became too dangerous to his surroundings, he was dismantled. This Jewish theme illustrates some of the guiding principles in its approach to the moral dilemmas inherent in future technologies, such as artificial intelligence and robotics. Man is viewed as having received the power to improve upon creation and develop technologies to achieve them, with the proviso that appropriate safeguards are taken. Ethically, not-harming is viewed as taking precedence over promoting good. Jewish ethical thinking approaches these novel technological possibilities with a cautious optimism that mankind will derive their benefits without coming to harm.

  11. Demikhov's "Mechanical Heart": The Circumstances Surrounding Creation of the World's First Implantable Total Artificial Heart in 1937.

    Glyantsev, Sergey P; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Bockeria, Leo A

    2016-01-01

    The world's first implantable total artificial heart was designed by Vladimir Demikhov as a fourth year biology student in Voronezh, Soviet Union, in 1937. As a prototype of his device, Demikhov must have used an apparatus for extracorporeal blood circulation invented by Sergei Bryukhonenko of Moscow. The device was the size of a dog's native heart and consisted of two diaphragm pumps brought into motion by an electric motor. A dog with an implanted device lived for 2.5 hours. In addition to having the prototype, the preconditions for Demikhov's artificial heart creation were his manual dexterity, expertise in animal physiology, and his mechanistic worldview.

  12. Moderate hypothermia technique for chronic implantation of a total artificial heart in calves.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Grady, Patrick; Sinkewich, Martin; Sunagawa, Gengo; Dessoffy, Raymond; Byram, Nicole; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The benefit of whole-body hypothermia in preventing ischemic injury during cardiac surgical operations is well documented. However, application of hypothermia during in vivo total artificial heart implantation has not become widespread because of limited understanding of the proper techniques and restrictions implied by constitutional and physiological characteristics specific to each animal model. Similarly, the literature on hypothermic set-up in total artificial heart implantation has also been limited. Herein we present our experience using hypothermia in bovine models implanted with the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart.

  13. The OregonHeart Total Artificial Heart: Design and Performance on a Mock Circulatory Loop.

    Glynn, Jeremy; Song, Howard; Hull, Bryan; Withers, Stanley; Gelow, Jill; Mudd, James; Starr, Albert; Wampler, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Widespread use of heart transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor organs. Total artificial heart (TAH) development has been pursued to address this shortage, especially to treat patients who require biventricular support. We have developed a novel TAH that utilizes a continuously spinning rotor that shuttles between two positions to provide pulsatile, alternating blood flow to the systemic and pulmonary circulations without artificial valves. Flow rates and pressures generated by the TAH are controlled by adjusting rotor speed, cycle frequency, and the proportion of each cycle spent pumping to either circulation. To validate the design, a TAH prototype was placed in a mock circulatory loop that simulates vascular resistance, pressure, and compliance in normal and pathophysiologic conditions. At a systemic blood pressure of 120/80 mm Hg, nominal TAH output was 7.4 L/min with instantaneous flows reaching 17 L/min. Pulmonary artery, and left and right atrial pressures were all maintained within normal ranges. To simulate implant into a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension, the pulmonary vascular resistance of the mock loop was increased to 7.5 Wood units. By increasing pump speed to the pulmonary circulation, cardiac output could be maintained at 7.4 L/min as mean pulmonary artery pressure increased to 56 mm Hg while systemic blood pressures remained normal. This in vitro testing of a novel, shuttling TAH demonstrated that cardiac output could be maintained across a range of pathophysiologic conditions including pulmonary hypertension. These experiments serve as a proof-of-concept for the design, which has proceeded to in vivo testing. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Development of a nuclear-powered artificial heart

    Mott, W.E.; Cole, D.W. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Of the few known methods of furnishing power for a completely implantable artificial heart one of the most promising involves the conversion of the thermal energy from the decay of man-made radioisotopes. Serious consideration of radioisotopic, or nuclear, heat sources for implantable power supplies began in early 1964. Since then there have been some notable accomplishments on the road to a nuclear-powered system but a large number of important and difficult problems remain to be clarified. The overall objective of the Atomic Energy Commission's current program is to examine critically these problems and to provide information so that the reasonableness and practicability of the nuclear approach can be assessed at an early date. Research and development projects are underway on radioisotope heat source fuel and containment materials, on a highly reliable, long-life thermal energy conversion system and its requisite high performance thermal insulation package, on the coupling of the converter output power to the diaphragm of a suitable blood pump in such a manner that the system is fully responsive to the needs of the body, and on the radiobiological implications of large-scale heat source implantation. (auth)

  15. Artificial skin in perspective: concepts and applications.

    Brohem, Carla A; Cardeal, Laura B da Silva; Tiago, Manoela; Soengas, María S; Barros, Silvia B de Moraes; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2011-02-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, is organized into an elaborate layered structure consisting mainly of the outermost epidermis and the underlying dermis. A subcutaneous adipose-storing hypodermis layer and various appendages such as hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerves, lymphatics, and blood vessels are also present in the skin. These multiple components of the skin ensure survival by carrying out critical functions such as protection, thermoregulation, excretion, absorption, metabolic functions, sensation, evaporation management, and aesthetics. The study of how these biological functions are performed is critical to our understanding of basic skin biology such as regulation of pigmentation and wound repair. Impairment of any of these functions may lead to pathogenic alterations, including skin cancers. Therefore, the development of genetically controlled and well characterized skin models can have important implications, not only for scientists and physicians, but also for manufacturers, consumers, governing regulatory boards and animal welfare organizations. As cells making up human skin tissue grow within an organized three-dimensional (3D) matrix surrounded by neighboring cells, standard monolayer (2D) cell cultures do not recapitulate the physiological architecture of the skin. Several types of human skin recombinants, also called artificial skin, that provide this critical 3D structure have now been reconstructed in vitro. This review contemplates the use of these organotypic skin models in different applications, including substitutes to animal testing. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Total Artificial Heart as Bridge to Heart Transplantation in Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Case Report.

    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; De Robertis, M; Luthringer, D; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Trento, A; Arabia, F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is becoming an increasingly recognized cause of dilated cardiomyopathy outside of Latin America, where it is endemic, due to population shifts and migration. Heart transplantation (HTx) is a therapeutic option for end-stage cardiomyopathy due to CD, but may be considered a relative contraindication due to potential reactivation of the causative organism with immunosuppression therapy. The total artificial heart (TAH) can provide mechanical circulatory support in decompensated patients with severe biventricular dysfunction until the time of HTx, while avoiding immunosuppressive therapy and removing the organ most affected by the causative organism. We report herein a patient with CD and severe biventricular dysfunction, who had mechanical circulatory support with a TAH for more than 6 months, followed by successful orthotopic HTx and treatment with benznidazole for 3 months. The patient had no evidence of recurrent disease in the transplanted heart based on endomyocardial biopsy up to 1 year post-transplantation, and remains alive more than 30 months after insertion of a TAH and 24 months after HTx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reconstructed image of human heart for total artificial heart implantation, based on MR image and cast silicone model of heart

    Komoda, Takashi; Maeta, Hajime; Uyama, Chikao.

    1991-01-01

    Based on transverse (TRN) and LV long axis (LAX) MR images of two cadaver hearts, three-dimensional (3-D) computer models of the connecting interface between remaining heart and total artificial heart, i.e., mitral and tricuspid valvular annuli (MVA and TVA), ascending aorta (Ao) and pulmonary artery (PA), were reconstructed to compare the shape and the size of MVA and those of TVA, the distance between the center of MVA and TVA (D G ), the angle between the plane of MVA and that of TVA (R T ), and the angles of Ao and PA, respectively, to the plane of MVA (R A , R P ), with those obtained in cast silicone models. It was found that based on LAX rather than TRN MR image, MVA and TVA might be more precisely reconstructed. The data obtained in 3-D images of MVA, TVA, Ao and PA based on silicone models of 32 hearts were as follows: D G (cm): 4.17±0.43, R T (degrees): 22.1±11.3, R A (degrees): 54.9±15.3, R P (degrees): 30.8±17.1. (author)

  18. A bioprosthetic total artificial heart for end-stage heart failure: Results from a pilot study.

    Latrémouille, Christian; Carpentier, Alain; Leprince, Pascal; Roussel, Jean-Christian; Cholley, Bernard; Boissier, Elodie; Epailly, Eric; Capel, Antoine; Jansen, Piet; Smadja, David M

    2018-01-01

    The electro-hydraulically actuated Carmat total artificial heart (C-TAH) is designed to replace the heart in patients with end-stage heart failure, either as bridge to transplant or destination therapy. It provides pulsatile flow and contains bio-prosthetic blood contacting materials. A clinical feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the C-TAH safety and performance. Hospitalized patients, at imminent risk of death from irreversible biventricular failure despite optimal medical management, and not eligible for transplant or eligible but on extracorporeal life support, were enrolled. The primary endpoint was 30-days survival. Four patients were implanted with the C-TAH, three as destination therapy (ages 76, 68, 74) and one as bridge to transplant (age 58). They had implant times of 74, 270, 254 and 20 days respectively. All patients were free from hemolysis, clinical neurologic events, clinical evidence of thrombus and device-related infections. Hemodynamic and physical recovery allowed two patients to be discharged home for a cumulative duration of 7 months. The anticoagulation management strategy comprised initial unfractionated heparin, from postoperative day 2, followed by low molecular weight heparin and aspirin. An increased D-dimer level was observed in all patients during months 1 to 4. Temporary suspension of heparin anticoagulation resulted in thrombocytopenia and increased fibrin monomer, reversed by resuming anticoagulation with heparin. Causes of death were device-related (2 cases), respiratory failure and multi-organ failure. Preliminary clinical results with the C-TAH demonstrated good safety and performance profiles in patients suffering from biventricular failure, which need to be confirmed in a pivotal study. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomy of the bovine ascending aorta and brachiocephalic artery found unfavorable for total artificial heart implant.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Such, Kimberly A; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-12-01

    The biocompatibility assessment of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart is an important part of the device developmental program. Surgical and postoperative management are key factors in achieving optimal outcomes. However, the presence of vascular anatomical abnormalities in experimental animal models is often unpredictable and may worsen the expected outcomes. We report a technical impediment encountered during total artificial heart implantation complicated by unfavorable bovine anatomy of the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic arterial trunk.

  20. Animal studies with the Carmat bioprosthetic total artificial heart.

    Latrémouille, Christian; Duveau, Daniel; Cholley, Bernard; Zilberstein, Luca; Belbis, Guillaume; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Meleard, Denis; Bruneval, Patrick; Adam, Clovis; Neuschwander, Arthur; Perles, Jean-Christophe; Jansen, Piet; Carpentier, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The Carmat bioprosthetic total artificial heart (TAH) contains bioprosthetic blood-contacting surfaces, and is designed for orthotopic cardiac replacement. In preparation for clinical studies, we evaluated the TAH performance and its effects on end-organ function in an animal model. Twelve female Charolais calves, 2-3 months of age and weighing 102-122 kg, were implanted with the TAH through a mid-sternotomy to ensure an adequate anatomic fit. The intended support duration was 4-10 days. Haematological values, creatinine, bilirubin and lactate levels were measured and mean arterial and central venous pressure, central venous oxygen saturation and TAH parameters were monitored. The calves were placed in a cage immediately postoperatively, and extubated on postoperative day 1 in most cases. Average support duration was 3 days, with 4 of 12 calves supported for 4, 4, 8 and 10 days. The initial procedures were used to refine surgical techniques and postoperative care. Pump output ranged from 7.3 to 10 l/min. Haemodynamic parameters and blood analysis were within acceptable ranges. No device failures occurred. No anticoagulation was used in the postoperative phase. The calves were euthanized in case of discomfort compromising the animal well-being, such as respiratory dysfunction, severe blood loss and cerebral dysfunction. Device explant analysis showed no thrombus formation inside the blood cavities. Histological examination of kidneys showed isolated micro-infarction in 2/12 animals; brain histology revealed no thromboembolic depositions. The Carmat bioprosthetic TAH implanted in calves up to 10 days provided adequate blood flow to organs and tissues. Low levels of haemolysis and no visible evidence of thromboembolic depositions in major organs and device cavities, without the use of anticoagulation, may indicate early-phase haemocompatibility of the TAH. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  1. Initial in vitro testing of a paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Sunagawa, Gengo; Byram, Nicole A; Kuban, Barry D; Moazami, Nader

    2018-06-01

    Mechanical circulatory support has become standard therapy for adult patients with end-stage heart failure; however, in paediatric patients with congenital heart disease, the options for chronic mechanical circulatory support are limited to paracorporeal devices or off-label use of devices intended for implantation in adults. Congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathy often involve both the left and right ventricles; in such cases, heart transplantation, a biventricular assist device or a total artificial heart is needed to adequately sustain both pulmonary and systemic circulations. We aimed to evaluate the in vitro performance of the initial prototype of our paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart. The paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart pump was downsized from the adult continuous-flow total artificial heart configuration by a scale factor of 0.70 (1/3 of total volume) to enable implantation in infants. System performance of this prototype was evaluated using the continuous-flow total artificial heart mock loop set to mimic paediatric circulation. We generated maps of pump performance and atrial pressure differences over a wide range of systemic vascular resistance/pulmonary vascular resistance and pump speeds. Performance data indicated left pump flow range of 0.4-4.7 l/min at 100 mmHg delta pressure. The left/right atrial pressure difference was maintained within ±5 mmHg with systemic vascular resistance/pulmonary vascular resistance ratios between 1.4 and 35, with/without pump speed modulation, verifying expected passive self-regulation of atrial pressure balance. The paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart prototype met design requirements for self-regulation and performance; in vivo pump performance studies are ongoing.

  2. Assessment of the interface of beating heart with total artificial heart using magnetic resonance imaging

    Komoda, Tsuyoshi; Maeta, Hajime; Uyama, Chikao; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied three-dimensionally (3-D) reconstructed images of atrioventricular (AV) annuli based on four-chamber magnetic resonance (MR) images for total artificial heart (TAH) implantation. To assess the interrelationship among the AV annuli and the thorax, we applied the frame of reference of the vertebral canal to these images. The Z-axis was along the vertebral canal, the Y-axis in the anteroposterior direction. The angle alpha was defined as the angle between the X-axis and the intersection between the plane of the annulus and the X-Y plane. The angle beta was defined as the angle between the Z-axis and the intersection between the plane of annulus and X-Z plane. The angle gamma was defined as the angle between the plane of the annulus and the anterior thoracic wall. We determined each angle for the mitral annulus (MVA) and tricuspid annulus (TVA) in four normal subjects to be as follows: alpha-MVA, 20.5-39.5 degrees; alpha-TVA, 26.1-43.5 degrees; beta-MVA, 4.7-49.4 degrees; beta-TVA, 4.4-40.9 degrees; and gamma-TVA, 35.2-44.1 degrees. It is suggested that reconstruction of the thoracic wall and AV annuli using the frame of reference of the diaphragmatic surface of the heart would facilitate evaluation of the spacial requirements for TAH implantation. Research to define this new frame of reference is in progress. (author)

  3. Total artificial heart implantation for biventricular failure due to eosinophilic myocarditis.

    Kawabori, Masashi; Kurihara, Chitaru; Miller, Yair; Heck, Kent A; Bogaev, Roberta C; Civitello, Andrew B; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H; Morgan, Jeffrey A

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is a condition of unknown etiology characterized by proliferation of eosinophils and their infiltration into tissues. Although cardiac involvement is rare, eosinophilic myocarditis can lead to life-threating fulminant congestive heart failure. Treatment of patients with eosinophilic myocarditis is challenging as heart failure can be caused by biventricular dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature describing a patient with acute severe biventricular heart failure caused by eosinophilic myocarditis with mural left ventricular apical thrombus who was successfully treated with implantation of a total artificial heart as a bridge to heart transplant.

  4. A first step beyond traditional boundaries: destination therapy with the SynCardia total artificial heart.

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2014-06-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart is currently used as a bridge to transplantation therapy in cases of irreversible, acute or chronic, biventricular heart failure. We describe the implementation of this technology in the context of destination therapy in a patient with an end-stage heart failure on grounds of primary amyloidosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemodynamic deterioration during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation weaning in a patient with a total artificial heart.

    Hosseinian, Leila; Levin, Matthew A; Fischer, Gregory W; Anyanwu, Anelechi C; Torregrossa, Gianluca; Evans, Adam S

    2015-01-01

    The Total Artificial Heart (Syncardia, Tucson, AZ) is approved for use as a bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy in patients who have irreversible end-stage biventricular heart failure. We present a unique case, in which the inferior vena cava compression by a total artificial heart was initially masked for days by the concurrent placement of an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannula. This is the case of a 33-year-old man admitted to our institution with recurrent episodes of ventricular tachycardia requiring emergent total artificial heart and venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation placement. This interesting scenario highlights the importance for critical care physicians to have an understanding of exact anatomical localization of a total artificial heart, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and their potential interactions. In total artificial heart patients with hemodynamic compromise or reduced device filling, consideration should always be given to venous inflow compression, particularly in those with smaller body surface area. Transesophageal echocardiogram is a readily available diagnostic tool that must be considered standard of care, not only in the operating room but also in the ICU, when dealing with this complex subpopulation of cardiac patients.

  6. Establishing the framework to support bioartificial heart fabrication using fibrin-based three-dimensional artificial heart muscle.

    Hogan, Matthew; Mohamed, Mohamed; Tao, Ze-Wei; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi

    2015-02-01

    Only 3000 heart transplants are performed in the USA every year, leaving some 30 000-70 000 Americans without proper care. Current treatment modalities for heart failure have saved many lives yet still do not correct the underlying problems of congestive heart failure. Tissue engineering represents a potential field of study wherein a combination of cells, scaffolds, and/or bioreactors can be utilized to create constructs to mimic, replace, and/or repair defective tissue. The focus of this study was to generate a bioartificial heart (BAH) model using artificial heart muscle (AHM), composed of fibrin gel and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, and a decellularized scaffold, formed by subjecting an adult rat heart to a series of decellularization solutions. By suturing the AHM around the outside of the decellularized heart and culturing while suspended in media, we were able to retain functional cardiac cells on the scaffold as evinced by visible contractility. Observed contractility rate was correlated with biopotential measurements to confirm essential functionality of cardiac constructs. Cross-sections of the BAH show successful decellularization of the scaffold and contiguous cell-rich AHM around the perimeter of the heart. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Total artificial heart in the pediatric patient with biventricular heart failure.

    Park, S S; Sanders, D B; Smith, B P; Ryan, J; Plasencia, J; Osborn, M B; Wellnitz, C M; Southard, R N; Pierce, C N; Arabia, F A; Lane, J; Frakes, D; Velez, D A; Pophal, S G; Nigro, J J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support emerged for the pediatric population in the late 1980s as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The Total Artificial Heart (TAH-t) (SynCardia Systems Inc., Tuscon, AZ) has been approved for compassionate use by the Food and Drug Administration for patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation since 1985 and has had FDA approval since 2004. However, of the 1,061 patients placed on the TAH-t, only 21 (2%) were under the age 18. SynCardia Systems, Inc. recommends a minimum patient body surface area (BSA) of 1.7 m(2), thus, limiting pediatric application of this device. This unique case report shares this pediatric institution's first experience with the TAH-t. A 14-year-old male was admitted with dilated cardiomyopathy and severe biventricular heart failure. The patient rapidly decompensated, requiring extracorporeal life support. An echocardiogram revealed severe biventricular dysfunction and diffuse clot formation in the left ventricle and outflow tract. The decision was made to transition to biventricular assist device. The biventricular failure and clot formation helped guide the team to the TAH-t, in spite of a BSA (1.5 m(2)) below the recommendation of 1.7 m(2). A computed tomography (CT) scan of the thorax, in conjunction with a novel three-dimensional (3D) modeling system and team, assisted in determining appropriate fit. Chest CT and 3D modeling following implantation were utilized to determine all major vascular structures were unobstructed and the bronchi were open. The virtual 3D model confirmed appropriate device fit with no evidence of compression to the left pulmonary veins. The postoperative course was complicated by a left lung opacification. The left lung anomalies proved to be atelectasis and improved with aggressive recruitment maneuvers. The patient was supported for 11 days prior to transplantation. Chest CT and 3D modeling were crucial in assessing whether the device would

  8. Summary of the clinical use of the Symbion total artificial heart: a registry report.

    Johnson, K E; Prieto, M; Joyce, L D; Pritzker, M; Emery, R W

    1992-01-01

    Several models of total artificial hearts have been used for transient or permanent circulatory support in patients with decompensation. The most successful and widely used device, however, has been the Symbion total artificial heart. From Dec. 12, 1982, to Jan. 1, 1991, 180 Symbion total artificial hearts were implanted in 176 patients in 28 centers. Five patients received a Symbion total artificial heart as a permanent circulatory support device, whereas 171 patients received the device as a bridge to heart transplantation. Of the 175 bridge devices (171 patients) 141 were Symbion J7-70 hearts and 34 were Symbion J7-100 hearts. Four patients received two total artificial hearts, the second one after the failure of a transplanted heart because of either rejection (two patients) or donor heart failure (2 patients). Most of the recipients were males (152). The age was 42 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD) with a weight of 74 +/- 14 kg. The most common indications for implantation included deterioration while awaiting heart transplant (36%) and acute cardiogenic shock (32%). The cause of heart disease was primarily ischemic (52%) and idiopathic (35%) cardiomyopathy. Duration of implantation ranged from 0 to 603 days (mean 25 +/- 64 days). One hundred three (60%) patients had the device less than 2 weeks, 37 (22%) between 2 to 4 weeks and 31 (18%) more than 4 weeks. Complications during implantation included infection (37%), thromboembolic events (stroke 7%, transient ischemic attack 4%), kidney failure requiring dialysis (20%), bleeding requiring intervention (26%), and device malfunction (4%). Of the 171 patients, 118 (69%) underwent orthotopic heart transplantation. Actuarial survival for all patients with implants was 62% for 30 days and 42% for 1 year, and for patients with transplants was 72% for 30 days and 57% for 1 year. The main causes of death were sepsis (33%), multiorgan failure (21%), and posttransplant rejection (10%). The results indicate a relative success of

  9. Total Artificial Heart Implantation After Undifferentiated High-Grade Sarcoma Excision.

    Kremer, Jamila; Farag, Mina; Arif, Rawa; Brcic, Andreas; Sabashnikov, Anton; Schmack, Bastian; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Karck, Matthias; Dohmen, Pascal M; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-11-02

    BACKGROUND Total artificial heart (TAH) implantation in patients with aggressive tumor infiltration of the heart can be challenging. CASE REPORT We report on a patient with a rare primary undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma of the mitral valve and in the left atrium, first diagnosed in 2014. The referring center did a first resection in 2014. In the course of 17 months, computer tomography (CT) scan again showed massive invasion of the mitral valve and left atrium. Partial resection and mitral valve replacement was not an option. We did a subtotal heart excision with total artificial heart implantation. In this report we discuss complications, risk factors, and perioperative management of this patient. CONCLUSIONS Patients with aggressive tumors of the heart can be considered for TAH implantation.

  10. Total Artificial Heart Implantation as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation in an Active Duty Service Member With Amyloid Cardiomyopathy.

    Scully, Michael S; Wessman, Dylan E; McKee, James M; Francisco, Gregory M; Nayak, Keshav R; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac involvement by light-chain (AL) amyloid occurs in up to 50% of patients with primary AL amyloidosis. The prognosis of amyloid heart disease is poor with 1-year survival rates of 35 to 40%. Historically, heart transplantation was considered controversial for patients with AL amyloid cardiomyopathy (CM) given the systemic nature of the disease and poor survival. We present a case report of an active duty service member diagnosed with advanced cardiac amyloid who underwent total artificial heart transplant as a bridge to heart transplant and eventual autologous stem cell transplant. A 47-year-old active duty male initially evaluated for atypical chest pain was found to have severe concentric left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiogram but normal voltage on electrocardiogram. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory studies, and bone marrow biopsy established the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. At the time of diagnosis, the patient's prognosis was very poor with a median survival of 5 months on the basis of the Mayo Clinic revised prognostic staging system for amyloidosis. The patient developed rapidly progressive left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure leading to cardiac arrest. The patient received a total artificial heart as a bridge to orthotopic heart and kidney transplantation and eventual stem cell transplant. He continues to be in remission and has a fair functional capacity without restriction in activities of daily living or moderate exercise. Amyloid CM is a rare and devastating disease. The natural course of the disease has made heart transplant in these patients controversial. Modern advancements in chemotherapies and advanced heart failure treatments have improved outcomes for select patients with AL amyloid CM undergoing heart transplantation. There is ongoing research seeking improvement in treatment options and outcomes for patients with this deadly disease. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Total Artificial Heart Bridge to Transplantation for a Patient With Occult Intracardiac Malignancy: Case Report.

    Reich, H; Czer, L; Bannykh, S; De Robertis, M; Wolin, E; Amersi, F; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Arabia, F

    2015-09-01

    Malignancy is the leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality after heart and other solid organ transplantation; therefore, great emphasis is placed on pre- and post-transplantation cancer screening. Even with meticulous screening during evaluation for heart transplant candidacy, an occult cancer may not be apparent. Here, we share the case of a 51-year-old man with refractory heart failure who underwent total artificial heart implantation as a bridge to transplantation with the surprise finding of an isolated deposit of metastatic carcinoid tumor nested within a left ventricular papillary muscle in his explanted heart. The primary ileal carcinoid tumor was identified and resected completely. After remaining cancer-free for 14 months, he was listed for heart transplantation and was transplanted 2 months later. He is currently 3.5 months out from heart transplantation and doing well, without evidence of recurring malignancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of Artificial Neural Networks in the Heart Electrical Axis Position Conclusion Modeling

    Bakanovskaya, L. N.

    2016-08-01

    The article touches upon building of a heart electrical axis position conclusion model using an artificial neural network. The input signals of the neural network are the values of deflections Q, R and S; and the output signal is the value of the heart electrical axis position. Training of the network is carried out by the error propagation method. The test results allow concluding that the created neural network makes a conclusion with a high degree of accuracy.

  13. ERDA artificial heart program workshop. Final report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976

    Kantrowitz, A.; Altieri, F.; Beall, A.

    1976-08-01

    The major conclusions of the ERDA Artificial Heart Program Workshop are that the concept of a biologically compatible mechanical device which can totally replace the heart is sound, that such a device is needed as an alternative to cardiac transplantation and that its development is a realistic goal. The major recommendation of the committee is that an ERDA program with primary orientation toward development of a total heart replacement should continue, with assured funding about 50 percent higher than at present, for a minimum of 3 additional years at which time another major review should take place. To achieve better management of the program it is recommended that the present contract effort be reorganized under one prime contractor with responsibility for development and demonstration of the ERDA artificial heart system. The formation of a joint artificial heart advisory committee to improve coordination between ERDA and NHLI is also recommended. The committee suggests future policies and directions which it believes will lead to more effective use of funds available for specific aspects of the program. These include the nuclear heart source, engine, blood pump, biomaterials and overall system reliability. Possible future goals for the program are also proposed

  14. Past and Present of Total Artificial Heart Therapy: A Success Story

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Rahmanian, Parwis B.; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wippermann, Jens; Wahlers, Thorsten; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Karck, Matthias; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R.; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The totally artificial heart (TAH) is among the most prominent medical innovations of the 21st century, especially due to the increasing population with end-stage heart failure. The progressive course of the disease, its resistance to conventional therapy, and the scarcity of hearts available for transplantation were the prime impetus for developing a TAH, especially when other options of mechanical circulatory assist devices are exhausted. In this review, we narrate the history of TAH, give an overview of its technology, and address the pros and cons of the currently available TAH models in light of published clinical experience. PMID:26343363

  15. Past and Present of Total Artificial Heart Therapy: A Success Story.

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Rahmanian, Parwis B; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wippermann, Jens; Wahlers, Thorsten; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M; Karck, Matthias; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-09-07

    The totally artificial heart (TAH) is among the most prominent medical innovations of the 21st century, especially due to the increasing population with end-stage heart failure. The progressive course of the disease, its resistance to conventional therapy, and the scarcity of hearts available for transplantation were the prime impetus for developing a TAH, especially when other options of mechanical circulatory assist devices are exhausted. In this review, we narrate the history of TAH, give an overview of its technology, and address the pros and cons of the currently available TAH models in light of published clinical experience.

  16. A monitoring device for pressurised-air-driven diaphragm-based artificial heart assist devices

    Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Stokkink, J.S.D.; Stokkink, H.S.D.; Koelink, M.H.; Koelink, M.H.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive device has been developed to monitor the diaphragm position and the blood flow in artificial heart assist devices equipped with a pressurised-air-driven diaphragm. Light scattering from the diaphragm is used as a mechanism for measuring. Information about the position of several

  17. Surface Modifications of Polymeric Materials for Application in Artificial Heart and Circulatory Assist Devices

    Feijen, J.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; van Delden, C.J.; Poot, A.A.; Vaudaux, P.; Akutsu, Tetsuzo; Koyanagi, Hitoshi

    1996-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to modify the surfaces of materials used in artificial hearts and circulatory assist devices to suppress the host response, especially with respect to the occurrence of clotting, cellular damage, and infections. In this review, special attention is paid to

  18. Heart Rate Variability - A Historical Perspective

    George E Billman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval – the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration – the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of heart rate variability. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the Physician’s Pulse Watch (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733 was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895 and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960’s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations that are commonly used to measure heart rate variability.

  19. Thrombotic Depositions on Right Impeller of Double-Ended Centrifugal Total Artificial Heart In Vivo.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Okano, Shinji; Goodin, Mark; Sunagawa, Gengo; Byram, Nicole; Moazami, Nader; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-05-01

    The development of total artificial heart devices is a complex undertaking that includes chronic biocompatibility assessment of the device. It is considered particularly important to assess whether device design and features can be compatible long term in a biological environment. As part of the development program for the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH), we evaluated the device for signs of thrombosis and biological material deposition in four animals that had achieved the intended 14-, 30-, or 90-day durations in each respective experiment. Explanted CFTAHs were analyzed for possible clot buildup at "susceptible" areas inside the pump, particularly the right pump impeller. Depositions of various consistency and shapes were observed. We here report our findings, along with macroscopic and microscopic analysis post explant, and provide computational fluid dynamics data with its potential implications for thrombus formation. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dose-to-the-population exposure estimates for use of plutonium-238-powered artificial hearts

    McKee, R.W.; Clark, L.L.; Cole, B.M.

    1976-09-01

    Estimates of dose to the population from /sup 238/Pu-powered artificial hearts were developed using a calculational model called REPRIEVE. This model develops the projected user population by incorporating assumptions regarding future heart disease death rates, the fraction dying who would be eligible candidates for artificial hearts, population projections, beginning implant rates, death rates after implant due to natural causes, and deaths caused by device failure. The user population was characterized by age, sex, household description, employment status and occupation. Census data on household descriptions and special surveys in selected cities provided the information necessary to describe persons exposed during both household and public activities. These surveys further defined distance and time of contact factors for these persons. Calculations using a dosemetry computer code defined the relationships between distance and dose. The validity of these calculations has been substantiated by experimental measurements.

  1. Dose-to-the-population exposure estimates for use of plutonium-238-powered artificial hearts

    McKee, R.W.; Clark, L.L.; Cole, B.M.

    1976-09-01

    Estimates of dose to the population from 238 Pu-powered artificial hearts were developed using a calculational model called REPRIEVE. This model develops the projected user population by incorporating assumptions regarding future heart disease death rates, the fraction dying who would be eligible candidates for artificial hearts, population projections, beginning implant rates, death rates after implant due to natural causes, and deaths caused by device failure. The user population was characterized by age, sex, household description, employment status and occupation. Census data on household descriptions and special surveys in selected cities provided the information necessary to describe persons exposed during both household and public activities. These surveys further defined distance and time of contact factors for these persons. Calculations using a dosemetry computer code defined the relationships between distance and dose. The validity of these calculations has been substantiated by experimental measurements

  2. Novel technique for airless connection of artificial heart to vascular conduits.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Gao, Shengqiang; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sunagawa, Gengo; Sinkewich, Martin; Grady, Patrick; Sale, Shiva; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-12-01

    Successful implantation of a total artificial heart relies on multiple standardized procedures, primarily the resection of the native heart, and exacting preparation of the atrial and vascular conduits for pump implant and activation. Achieving secure pump connections to inflow/outflow conduits is critical to a successful outcome. During the connection process, however, air may be introduced into the circulation, traveling to the brain and multiple organs. Such air emboli block blood flow to these areas and are detrimental to long-term survival. A correctly managed pump-to-conduit connection prevents air from collecting in the pump and conduits. To further optimize pump-connection techniques, we have developed a novel connecting sleeve that enables airless connection of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) to the conduits. In this brief report, we describe the connecting sleeve design and our initial results from two acute in vivo implantations using a scaled-down version of the CFTAH.

  3. Heart rate variability - a historical perspective.

    Billman, George E

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval - the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration - the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the "Physician's Pulse Watch" (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV.

  4. [History, present and future of biomaterials used for artificial heart valves].

    Kostrzewa, Benita; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Artificial heart valves can be classified into mechanical and biological. We have three types of mechanical heart valves: caged ball, tilting disc and bileaflet. Mechanical heart valves are made from various materials. They may be produced from metals, ceramics and polymers, e.g.: stainless steel, titanium, silicone, pyrolytic carbon. Biological valves are made from synthetic components (e.g.: PTFE, Dacron) and materials of biological origin (e.g.: cow pericardium, pig heart valve). We have also identified transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI may be produced from metals, ceramics and polymers (e.g.: stainless steel, titanium, Dacron) and biological material (e.g.: pig heart valve). This paper describes advantages and disadvantages of different types of artificial heart valves. The lifespan of mechanical valves is 20-30 years and they can be used for patients of any age. Mechanical valves have also disadvantages--anticoagulants are required to prevent thrombosis. Biological valves are made from natural materials, so they do not require prolonged anticoagulation. Their lifetime is 10-15 years, so they are offered to patients over 40 years. Another problem is the occurrence of calcification.

  5. Domestic and foreign trends in the prevalence of heart failure and the necessity of next-generation artificial hearts: a survey by the Working Group on Establishment of Assessment Guidelines for Next-Generation Artificial Heart Systems.

    Tatsumi, Eisuke; Nakatani, Takeshi; Imachi, Kou; Umezu, Mitsuo; Kyo, Shun-Ei; Sase, Kazuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2007-01-01

    A series of guidelines for development and assessment of next-generation medical devices has been drafted under an interagency collaborative project by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The working group for assessment guidelines of next-generation artificial hearts reviewed the trend in the prevalence of heart failure and examined the potential usefulness of such devices in Japan and in other countries as a fundamental part of the process of establishing appropriate guidelines. At present, more than 23 million people suffer from heart failure in developed countries, including Japan. Although Japan currently has the lowest mortality from heart failure among those countries, the number of patients is gradually increasing as our lifestyle becomes more Westernized; the associated medical expenses are rapidly growing. The number of heart transplantations, however, is limited due to the overwhelming shortage of donor hearts, not only in Japan but worldwide. Meanwhile, clinical studies and surveys have revealed that the major causes of death in patients undergoing long-term use of ventricular assist devices (VADs) were infection, thrombosis, and mechanical failure, all of which are typical of VADs. It is therefore of urgent and universal necessity to develop next-generation artificial hearts that have excellent durability to provide at least 2 years of event-free operation with a superior quality of life and that can be used for destination therapy to save patients with irreversible heart failure. It is also very important to ensure that an environment that facilitates the development, testing, and approval evaluation processes of next-generation artificial hearts be established as soon as possible.

  6. Simulation of blood flow through an artificial heart

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan

    1991-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the incompressible viscous flow through a prosthetic tilting disk heart valve is presented in order to demonstrate the current capability to model unsteady flows with moving boundaries. Both steady state and unsteady flow calculations are done by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in 3-D generalized curvilinear coordinates. In order to handle the moving boundary problems, the chimera grid embedding scheme which decomposes a complex computational domain into several simple subdomains is used. An algebraic turbulence model for internal flows is incorporated to reach the physiological values of Reynolds number. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical results and experimental measurements. It is found that the tilting disk valve causes large regions of separated flow, and regions of high shear.

  7. Simulation of a pulsatile total artificial heart: Development of a partitioned Fluid Structure Interaction model

    Sonntag, Simon J.; Kaufmann, Tim A. S.; Büsen, Martin R.; Laumen, Marco; Linde, Torsten; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Due to a shortage in donor organs artificial hearts can be a bridge to transplantation or even serve as a destination therapy for patients with terminal heart insufficiency. A pusher plate driven pulsatile membrane pump, the Total Artificial Heart (TAH) ReinHeart, is currently under development at the Institute of Applied Medical Engineering of RWTH Aachen University.This paper presents the methodology of a fully coupled three-dimensional time-dependent Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation of the TAH using a commercial partitioned block-Gauss-Seidel coupling package. Partitioned coupling of the incompressible fluid with the slender flexible membrane as well as a high fluid/structure density ratio of about unity led inherently to a deterioration of the stability (‘artificial added mass instability’). The objective was to conduct a stable simulation with high accuracy of the pumping process. In order to achieve stability, a combined resistance and pressure outlet boundary condition as well as the interface artificial compressibility method was applied. An analysis of the contact algorithm and turbulence condition is presented. Independence tests are performed for the structural and the fluid mesh, the time step size and the number of pulse cycles. Because of the large deformation of the fluid domain, a variable mesh stiffness depending on certain mesh properties was specified for the fluid elements. Adaptive remeshing was avoided. Different approaches for the mesh stiffness function are compared with respect to convergence, preservation of mesh topology and mesh quality. The resulting mesh aspect ratios, mesh expansion factors and mesh orthogonalities are evaluated in detail. The membrane motion and flow distribution of the coupled simulations are compared with a top-view recording and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements, respectively, of the actual pump.

  8. Reasons for readmission in heart failure : Perspectives of patients, caregivers, cardiologists, and heart failure nurses

    Annema, Coby; Luttik, Marie-Louise; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite efforts to improve outcomes in heart failure (HF), readmission rates remain relatively high. Reasons for readmission from different perspectives (patient, caregiver, health care providers) may help to optimize the future management of patients with HF. The aims of this study are

  9. An original valveless artificial heart providing pulsatile flow tested in mock circulatory loops.

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Maertens, Audrey; Emery, Jonathan; Joseph, Samuel; Kirsch, Matthias; Avellan, François

    2017-11-24

    We present the test bench results of a valveless total artificial heart that is potentially compatible with the pediatric population. The RollingHeart is a valveless volumetric pump generating pulsatile flow. It consists of a single spherical cavity divided into 4 chambers by 2 rotating disks. The combined rotations of both disks produce changes in the volumes of the 4 cavities (suction and ejection). The blood enters/exits the spherical cavity through 4 openings that are symmetrical to the fixed rotation axis of the first disk.Mock circulatory system: The device pumps a 37% glycerin solution through 2 parallel circuits, simulating the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Flow rates are acquired with a magnetic inductive flowmeter, while pressure sensors collect pressure in the left and right outflow and inflow tracts.In vitro test protocol: The pump is run at speeds ranging from 20 to 180 ejections per minute. The waveform of the pressure generated at the inflow and outflow of the 4 chambers and the flow rate in the systemic circulation are measured. At an ejection rate of 178 min-1, the RollingHeart pumps 5.3 L/min for a systemic maximal pressure gradient of 174 mmHg and a pulmonary maximal pressure gradient of 75 mmHg. The power input was 14 W, corresponding to an efficiency of 21%. The RollingHeart represents a new approach in the domain of total artificial heart. This preliminary study endorses the feasibility of a single valveless device acting as a total artificial heart.

  10. The evolving role of the total artificial heart in the management of end-stage congenital heart disease and adolescents.

    Ryan, Thomas D; Jefferies, John L; Zafar, Farhan; Lorts, Angela; Morales, David L S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in medical therapies have yielded improvement in morbidity and a decrease in mortality for patients with congenital heart disease, both surgically palliated and uncorrected. An unintended consequence is a cohort of adolescent and adult patients with heart failure who require alternative therapies. One intriguing option is placement of a total artificial heart (TAH) either as a bridge to transplant or as a destination therapy. Of the 1091 Jarvik-7 type TAH (Symbion, CardioWest and SynCardia) placed between 1985 and 2012, only 24 have been performed in patients with congenital heart disease, and a total of 51 were placed in patients younger than 21. At our institution, the SynCardia TAH was implanted in a 19-year-old patient with cardiac allograft failure because of chronic rejection and related multisystem organ failure including need for hemodialysis. Over the next year, she was nutritionally and physically rehabilitated, as were her end organs, allowing her to come off dialysis, achieve normal renal function and eventually be successfully transplanted. Given the continued growth of adolescent and adult congenital heart disease populations with end-stage heart failure, the TAH may offer therapeutic options where previously there were few. In addition, smaller devices such as the SynCardia 50/50 will open the door for applications in smaller children. The Freedom Driver offers the chance for patients to leave the hospital with a TAH, as does the AbioCor, which is a fully implantable TAH option. In this report, we review the history of the TAH and potential applications in adolescent patients and congenital heart disease.

  11. Worldwide Experience with the Syncardia Total Artificial Heart in the Pediatric Population.

    Morales, David L S; Lorts, Angela; Rizwan, Raheel; Zafar, Farhan; Arabia, Francisco A; Villa, Chet R

    Individual centers have documented the use of the Syncardia Total Artificial Heart (TAH) in adolescents with heart failure; however, the number of patients at any given center is small. Herein, we describe the worldwide experience for all patients ≤21 years old supported with the TAH between May 2005 and May 2015 (n = 43). The number of patients experiencing a positive outcome at 60, 90, and 120 days were 30 (70%), 27 (63%), and 25 (58%), respectively. Successful bridge to transplantation varied by diagnosis, but outcomes reported are similar to adults supported with the TAH or biventricular assist devices.

  12. Design of a portable artificial heart drive system based on efficiency analysis.

    Kitamura, T

    1986-11-01

    This paper discusses a computer simulation of a pneumatic portable piston-type artificial heart drive system with a linear d-c-motor. The purpose of the design is to obtain an artificial heart drive system with high efficiency and small dimensions to enhance portability. The design employs two factors contributing the total efficiency of the drive system. First, the dimensions of the pneumatic actuator were optimized under a cost function of the total efficiency. Second, the motor performance was studied in terms of efficiency. More than 50 percent of the input energy of the actuator with practical loads is consumed in the armature circuit in all linear d-c-motors with brushes. An optimal design is: the piston cross-sectional area of 10.5 cm2 cylinder longitudinal length of 10 cm. The total efficiency could be up to 25 percent by improving the gasket to reduce the frictional force.

  13. Attitude of the Saudi community towards heart donation, transplantation, and artificial hearts.

    AlHabeeb, Waleed; AlAyoubi, Fakhr; Tash, Adel; AlAhmari, Leenah; AlHabib, Khalid F

    2017-07-01

    To understand the attitudes of the Saudi population towards heart donation and transplantation. Methods: A survey using a questionnaire addressing attitudes towards organ transplantation and donation was conducted across 18 cities in Saudi Arabia between September 2015 and March 2016.  Results: A total of 1250 respondents participated in the survey. Of these, approximately 91% agree with the concept of organ transplantation but approximately 17% do not agree with the concept of heart transplantation; 42.4% of whom reject heart transplants for religious reasons. Only 43.6% of respondents expressed a willingness to donate their heart and approximately 58% would consent to the donation of a relative's organ after death. A total of 59.7% of respondents believe that organ donation is regulated and 31.8% fear that the doctors will not try hard enough to save their lives if they consent to organ donation. Approximately 77% believe the heart is removed while the donor is alive; although, the same proportion of respondents thought they knew what brain death meant. Conclusion: In general, the Saudi population seem to accept the concept of transplantation and are willing to donate, but still hold some reservations towards heart donation.

  14. [Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial pulmonary valves in patients with congenital heart defects].

    Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Aaberge, Lars; Thaulow, Erik; Døhlen, Gaute

    2011-07-01

    Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial heart valves is a new technique that may supplement surgery and which may be used more in the future. We here report our first experience with implantation of artificial pulmonary valves in children with congenital heart defects. Eligible patients were those with symptoms of heart failure combined with stenosis and/or insufficiency in an established artificial right ventricular outflow tract. The valve was inserted through a catheter from a vein in the groin or neck. Symptoms, echocardiography, invasive measurements and angiography were assessed for evaluation of treatment effect. Our treatment results are reported for the period April 2007-September 2009. Ten patients (seven men and three women, median age 17 years) were assessed. The procedure reduced pressure in the right ventricle (p = 0.008) and resolved the pulmonary insufficiency in all patients. The median time in hospital was two days. No patients had complications that were directly associated with the implantation procedure. One patient developed a pseudoaneurysm in the femoral artery, another had a short-lasting fever two days after the procedure and one patient experienced a stent fracture that required surgery 9 months after the implantation. After 6 months all patients had a reduced pressure gradient in the right ventricular outflow tract (p = 0.008), the pulmonary insufficiency had improved (p = 0.006) and they all reported improval of symptoms. These results persisted for at least 24 months for the four patients who were monitored until then. Percutaneous catheter-based implantation of artificial pulmonary valves improves hemodynamics in the right ventricle of selected patients with congenital heart defects. A randomized controlled study should be undertaken to provide a stronger evidence-base for usefulness of this procedure.

  15. A Soft Total Artificial Heart-First Concept Evaluation on a Hybrid Mock Circulation.

    Cohrs, Nicholas H; Petrou, Anastasios; Loepfe, Michael; Yliruka, Maria; Schumacher, Christoph M; Kohll, A Xavier; Starck, Christoph T; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Meboldt, Mirko; Falk, Volkmar; Stark, Wendelin J

    2017-10-01

    The technology of 3D-printing has allowed the production of entirely soft pumps with complex chamber geometries. We used this technique to develop a completely soft pneumatically driven total artificial heart from silicone elastomers and evaluated its performance on a hybrid mock circulation. The goal of this study is to present an innovative concept of a soft total artificial heart (sTAH). Using the form of a human heart, we designed a sTAH, which consists of only two ventricles and produced it using a 3D-printing, lost-wax casting technique. The diastolic properties of the sTAH were defined and the performance of the sTAH was evaluated on a hybrid mock circulation under various physiological conditions. The sTAH achieved a blood flow of 2.2 L/min against a systemic vascular resistance of 1.11 mm Hg s/mL (afterload), when operated at 80 bpm. At the same time, the mean pulmonary venous pressure (preload) was fixed at 10 mm Hg. Furthermore, an aortic pulse pressure of 35 mm Hg was measured, with a mean aortic pressure of 48 mm Hg. The sTAH generated physiologically shaped signals of blood flow and pressures by mimicking the movement of a real heart. The preliminary results of this study show a promising potential of the soft pumps in heart replacements. Further work, focused on increasing blood flow and in turn aortic pressure is required. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while patients await orthotopic heart transplantation

    Sadler, L.; Fuhrman, C.; Hardesty, R.; Griffith, B.

    1987-01-01

    At the University of Pittsburgh, the authors have had 15 patients in whom Jarvik-7 hearts were implanted as a temporary measure while the patients awaited suitable donors for cardiac transplantation. The paper presents a brief description of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and reviews the chest radiographic complications seen in this patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  17. Prototype Development of an Implantable Compliance Chamber for a Total Artificial Heart.

    Schmitz, Stephanie; Unthan, Kristin; Sedlaczek, Marc; Wald, Felix; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Koerfer, Reiner; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    At our institute a total artificial heart is being developed. It is directly actuated by a linear drive in between two ventricles, which comprise membranes to separate the drive and blood flow. A compliance chamber (CC) is needed to reduce pressure peaks in the ventricles and to increase the pump capacity. Therefore, the movement of the membrane is supported by applying a negative pressure to the air volume inside the drive unit. This study presents the development of the implantable CC which is connected to the drive unit of the total artificial hearts (TAH). The anatomical fit of the CC is optimized by analyzing CT data and adapting the outer shape to ensure a proper fit. The pressure peaks are reduced by the additional volume and the flexible membrane of the CC. The validation measurements of change in pressure peaks and flow are performed using the complete TAH system connected to a custom mock circulation loop. Using the CC, the pressure peaks could be damped below 5 mm Hg in the operational range. The flow output was increased by up to 14.8% on the systemic side and 18.2% on the pulmonary side. The described implantable device can be used for upcoming chronic animal trials. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. AbioCor totally implantable artificial heart. How will it impact hospitals?

    2002-09-01

    Although heart transplantation remains the most effective treatment for severe heart failure, there are far fewer donor hearts available than there are patients who could benefit from them. One approach to addressing this shortfall is the total artificial heart, or TAH. To date, however, no TAH design has been able to achieve one of the ultimate goals of heart replacement: to allow a patient to live a reasonably normal life without being connected to external machinery. A new design, the AbioCor TAH developed by Abiomed Inc., may make this goal achievable. Thanks to a power system that transfers energy through the skin without the aid of wires, the AbioCor--currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States--allows the patient to be completely mobile. The lack of transcutaneous wires also eliminates the primary source of the infections that have plagued TAH patients in the past. Though it is not without drawbacks, the AbioCor could represent a crucial advance in TAH technology. In this Technology Overview, we describe the operation of the AbioCor and discuss its likely impact on hospitals if it is approved for marketing in the United States. We also discuss a related cardiac-support technology: ventricular assist devices (VADs), which may also be used for permanent cardiac support someday.

  19. First clinical use of a bioprosthetic total artificial heart: report of two cases.

    Carpentier, Alain; Latrémouille, Christian; Cholley, Bernard; Smadja, David M; Roussel, Jean-Christian; Boissier, Elodie; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Gueffet, Jean-Pierre; Treillot, Michèle; Bizouarn, Philippe; Méléard, Denis; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Ponzio, Olivier; Grimmé, Marc; Capel, Antoine; Jansen, Piet; Hagège, Albert; Desnos, Michel; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Duveau, Daniel

    2015-10-17

    The development of artificial hearts in patients with end-stage heart disease have been confronted with the major issues of thromboembolism or haemorrhage. Since valvular bioprostheses are associated with a low incidence of these complications, we decided to use bioprosthetic materials in the construction of a novel artificial heart (C-TAH). We report here the device characteristics and its first clinical applications in two patients with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of the study was to evaluate safety and feasibility of the CARMAT TAH for patients at imminent risk of death from biventricular heart failure and not eligible for transplant. The C-TAH is an implantable electro-hydraulically actuated pulsatile biventricular pump. All components, batteries excepted, are embodied in a single device positioned in the pericardial sac after excision of the native ventricles. We selected patients admitted to hospital who were at imminent risk of death, having irreversible biventricular failure, and not eligible for heart transplantation, from three cardiac surgery centres in France. The C-TAH was implanted in two male patients. Patient 1, aged 76 years, had the C-TAH implantation on Dec 18, 2013; patient 2, aged 68 years, had the implantation on Aug 5, 2014. The cardiopulmonary bypass times for C-TAH implantation were 170 min for patient 1 and 157 min for patient 2. Both patients were extubated within the first 12 postoperative hours and had a rapid recovery of their respiratory and circulatory functions as well as a normal mental status. Patient 1 presented with a tamponade on day 23 requiring re-intervention. Postoperative bleeding disorders prompted anticoagulant discontinuation. The C-TAH functioned well with a cardiac output of 4·8-5·8 L/min. On day 74, the patient died due to a device failure. Autopsy did not detect any relevant thrombus formation within the bioprosthesis nor the different organs, despite a 50-day anticoagulant-free period. Patient 2

  20. Histopathology Image Analysis in Two Long-Term Animal Experiments with Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Wotke, Jiri; Homolka, Pavel; Vasku, Jaromír; Dobsak, Petr; Palanova, Petra; Mrkvicova, Veronika; Konecny, Petr; Soska, Vladimir; Pohanka, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Yurimoto, Terumi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-12-01

    Histopathological analysis can provide important information in long-term experiments with total artificial heart (TAH). Recently, a new type of blood pump, the helical flow total artificial heart (HF-TAH) was developed. This study aimed to investigate the changes in selected vital organs in animal experiments with implanted HF-TAH. Samples from lung, liver, and kidneys from two female goats (No. 1301 and No. 1304) with implanted HF-TAH were analyzed. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 4 µm thick transverse sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). Additional staining was done for detection of connective tissue (Masson-Goldner stain) and for detection of iron (hemosiderin) deposits (Perls stain). Sections were scanned at 100× and 500× magnification with a light microscope. Experiment no. 1301 survived 100 days (cause of termination was heavy damage of the right pump); experimental goat no.1304 survived 68 days and was sacrificed due to severe right hydrodynamic bearing malfunction. Histopathological analysis of liver samples proved signs of chronic venostasis with limited focal necrotic zones. Dilated tubules, proteinaceous material in tubular lumen, and hemosiderin deposits were detected in kidney samples. Contamination of the organs by embolized micro-particles was suspected at the autopsy after discovery of visible damage (scratches) of the pump impeller surface (made from titanium alloy) in both experiments. Sporadic deposits of foreign micro-particles (presumably titanium) were observed in most of the analyzed parenchymal organs. However, the described deposits were not in direct connection with inflammatory reactions in the analyzed tissues. Histopathological analysis showed the presence of minimal contamination of the lung, kidney, and liver tissue samples by foreign material (titanium very likely). The analysis showed only limited pathological changes, especially in liver and kidneys, which might be attributed to the influence of

  1. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    Ling, Zhijian; Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  2. Total Artificial Heart and Chronic Haemodialysis: A Possible Bridge to Transplantation?

    Demiselle, Julien; Besson, Virginie; Sayegh, Johnny; Subra, Jean-François; Augusto, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Total artificial heart (TAH) device is sometimes necessary to treat end stage heart failure (HF). After surgery, renal impairment can occur with the need of renal replacement therapy. We report the case of a 51-year-old man who was treated with conventional hemodialysis (HD) while on support with TAH. The patient underwent HD while on TAH support during 14 months. He benefited from conventional HD, 6 sessions per week. HD sessions were well tolerated, and patient's condition and quality of life improved significantly. The main difficulty was to maintain red blood cell level because of chronic hemolysis due to TAH, which required repetitive blood transfusions, resulting in a high rate of human leukocyte antigen sensitization. Unfortunately, the patient died of mesenteric ischemia due to anticoagulation under dosing. We conclude that HD treatment is possible despite TAH and should be considered in patients with both end stage renal and HF. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Electrical Stimulation of Artificial Heart Muscle: a look into the electrophysiological and genetic implications

    Mohamed, Mohamed A; Islas, Jose F; Schwartz, Robert J; Birla, Ravi K

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue-engineered hearts for treatment of myocardial infarction or biological pacemakers has been hindered by the production of mostly arrhythmic or in-synergistic constructs. Electrical stimulation (ES) of these constructs has been shown to produce tissues with greater twitch force and better adrenergic response. In order to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effect of ES, we fabricated a bioreactor capable of delivering continuous or intermittent waveforms of various types to multiple constructs simultaneously. In this study, we examined the effect of an intermittent biphasic square wave on our artificial heart muscle (AHM) composed of neonatal rat cardiac cells and fibrin gel. Twitch forces, spontaneous contraction rates, biopotentials, gene expression profiles, and histological observations were examined for the ES protocol over a 12 day culture period. We demonstrate improved consistency between samples for twitch force and contraction rate, and higher normalized twitch force amplitudes for electrically stimulated AHM. Improvements in electrophysiology within the AHM was noted by higher conduction velocities and lower latency in electrical response for electrically stimulated AHM. Genes expressing key electrophysiological and structural markers peaked at days 6 and 8 of culture, only a few days after the initiation of ES. These results may be used for optimization strategies to establish protocols for producing AHM capable of replacing damaged heart tissue in either a contractile or electrophysiological capacity. Optimized AHM can lead to alternative treatments to heart failure and alleviate the limited donor supply crisis. PMID:28459744

  4. Electrical Stimulation of Artificial Heart Muscle: A Look Into the Electrophysiologic and Genetic Implications.

    Mohamed, Mohamed A; Islas, Jose F; Schwartz, Robert J; Birla, Ravi K

    Development of tissue-engineered hearts for treatment of myocardial infarction or biologic pacemakers has been hindered by the production of mostly arrhythmic or in-synergistic constructs. Electrical stimulation (ES) of these constructs has been shown to produce tissues with greater twitch force and better adrenergic response. To further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effect of ES, we fabricated a bioreactor capable of delivering continuous or intermittent waveforms of various types to multiple constructs simultaneously. In this study, we examined the effect of an intermittent biphasic square wave on our artificial heart muscle (AHM) composed of neonatal rat cardiac cells and fibrin gel. Twitch forces, spontaneous contraction rates, biopotentials, gene expression profiles, and histologic observations were examined for the ES protocol over a 12 day culture period. We demonstrate improved consistency between samples for twitch force and contraction rate, and higher normalized twitch force amplitudes for electrically stimulated AHMs. Improvements in electrophysiology within the AHM were noted by higher conduction velocities and lower latency in electrical response for electrically stimulated AHMs. Genes expressing key electrophysiologic and structural markers peaked at days 6 and 8 of culture, only a few days after the initiation of ES. These results may be used for optimization strategies to establish protocols for producing AHMs capable of replacing damaged heart tissue in either a contractile or electrophysiologic capacity. Optimized AHMs can lead to alternative treatments to heart failure and alleviate the limited donor supply crisis.

  5. Numerical model of total artificial heart hemodynamics and the effect of its size on stress accumulation.

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a bi-ventricular mechanical circulatory support device that replaces the heart in patients with end-stage congestive heart failure. The device acts as blood pump via pneumatic activation of diaphragms altering the volume of the ventricular chambers. Flow in and out of the ventricles is controlled by mechanical heart valves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the flow regime in the TAH and to estimate the thrombogenic potential during systole. Toward that goal, three numerical models of TAHs of differing sizes, that include the deforming diaphragm and the blood flow from the left chamber to the aorta, are introduced. A multiphase model with injection of platelet particles is employed to calculate their trajectories. The shear stress accumulation in the three models are calculated along the platelets trajectories and their probability density functions, which represent the `thrombogenic footprint' of the device are compared. The calculated flow regime successfully captures the mitral regurgitation and the flows that open and close the aortic valve during systole. Physiological velocity magnitudes are found in all three models, with higher velocities and increased stress accumulation predicted for smaller devices.

  6. Investigation of the Durability of a Diaphragm for a Total Artificial Heart.

    Gräf, Felix; Rossbroich, Ralf; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    One of the most critical components regarding the durability of the ReinHeart total artificial heart (TAH) is its biocompatible diaphragm, which separates the drive unit from the ventricles. Hence, a durability tester was designed to investigate its required 5-year lifetime. The aim of this study was to prove the validity of accelerated testing of the polyurethane diaphragm. The durability tester allows simultaneous testing of 12 diaphragms and mimics physiological conditions. To accelerate the time of testing, it operates with an increased speed at a frequency of 8 Hz. To prove the correctness of this acceleration, a servo-hydraulic testing machine was used to study the effect of different frequencies and their corresponding loads. Thereby the viscoelastic behavior of the polyurethane was investigated. Additionally, high-speed video measurements were performed. The force against frequency and the high-speed video measurements showed constant behavior. In the range of 1-10 Hz, the maximum resulting forces varied by 3%, and the diaphragm movement was identical. Frequencies below 10 Hz allow a valid statement of the diaphragm's mechanical durability. Viscoelasticity of the polyurethane in the considered frequency-range is negligible. The accelerated durability test is applicable to polyurethane diaphragms, and the results are applicable to TAH use. The reliability of the diaphragm for a lifetime of 5 years was found to be 80% with a confidence of 62%. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Estimation of Filling and Afterload Conditions by Pump Intrinsic Parameters in a Pulsatile Total Artificial Heart.

    Cuenca-Navalon, Elena; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    A physiological control algorithm is being developed to ensure an optimal physiological interaction between the ReinHeart total artificial heart (TAH) and the circulatory system. A key factor for that is the long-term, accurate determination of the hemodynamic state of the cardiovascular system. This study presents a method to determine estimation models for predicting hemodynamic parameters (pump chamber filling and afterload) from both left and right cardiovascular circulations. The estimation models are based on linear regression models that correlate filling and afterload values with pump intrinsic parameters derived from measured values of motor current and piston position. Predictions for filling lie in average within 5% from actual values, predictions for systemic afterload (AoPmean , AoPsys ) and mean pulmonary afterload (PAPmean ) lie in average within 9% from actual values. Predictions for systolic pulmonary afterload (PAPsys ) present an average deviation of 14%. The estimation models show satisfactory prediction and confidence intervals and are thus suitable to estimate hemodynamic parameters. This method and derived estimation models are a valuable alternative to implanted sensors and are an essential step for the development of a physiological control algorithm for a fully implantable TAH. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Syncardia™ total artificial heart: in vivo, in vitro, and computational modeling studies

    Slepian, Marvin J.; Alemu, Yared; Soares, João Silva; Smith, Richard G.; Einav, Shmuel; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The SynCardia™ total artificial heart (TAH) is the only FDA-approved TAH in the world. The SynCardia™ TAH is a pneumatically driven, pulsatile system capable of flows of >9 L/min. The TAH is indicated for use as a bridge to transplantation (BTT) in patients at imminent risk of death from non-reversible bi-ventricular failure. In the Pivotal US approval trial the TAH achieved a BTT rate of >79%. Recently a multi-center, post-market approval study similarly demonstrated a comparable BTT rate. A major milestone was recently achieved for the TAH, with over 1100 TAHs having been implanted to date, with the bulk of implantation occurring at an ever increasing rate in the past few years. The TAH is most commonly utilized to save the lives of patients dying from end-stage bi-ventricular heart failure associated with ischemic or non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Beyond progressive chronic heart failure, the TAH has demonstrated great efficacy in supporting patients with acute irreversible heart failure associated with massive acute myocardial infarction. In recent years several diverse clinical scenarios have also proven to be well served by the TAH including severe heart failure associated with advanced congenital heart disease. failed or burned-out transplants, infiltrative and restrictive cardiomyopathies and failed ventricular assist devices. Looking to the future a major unmet need remains in providing total heart support for children and small adults. As such, the present TAH design must be scaled to fit the smaller patient, while providing equivalent, if not superior flow characteristics, shear profiles and overall device thrombogenicity. To aid in the development of a new “pediatric,” TAH an engineering methodology known as “Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE)”, that we have recently developed and described, is being employed. Recently, to further our engineering understanding of the TAH, as steps towards next generation designs we have: (1

  9. Artificial heart system thermal converter and blood pump component research and development

    Pouchot, W.D.; Bifano, N.J.; Hanson, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    A bench model version of a nuclear-powered artificial heart system to be used as a replacement for the natural heart was constructed and tested as a part of a broader U. S. ERDA program. The objective of the broader program has been to develop a prototype of a fully implantable nuclear-powered total artificial heart system powered by the thermal energy of plutonium-238 and having minimum weight and volume and a minimum life of ten years. As a forward step in this broader program, component research and development has been carried out directed towards a fully implantable and advanced version of the bench model (IVBM). Some of the results of the component research and development effort on a Stirling engine, blood pump drive mechanisms, and coupling mechanisms are presented. The Stirling-mechanical system under development is shown. There are three major subassemblies: the thermal converter, the coupling mechanism, and the blood pump drive mechanism. The thermal converter uses a Stirling cycle to convert the heat of the plutonium-238 fueled heat source to a rotary shaft power output. The coupling mechanism changes the orientation of the output shaft by 90 degrees and transmits the pumping power by wire-wound core flexible shafting to the pumping mechanism. The coupling mechanism also provides routing of the coolant lines which carry the cycle waste heat from the thermal converter to the blood pump. The change in orientation of the thermal converter output shaft is for convenience in implanting in a calf. This orientation of thermal converter to blood pump seemed to give the best overall system fit in a calf based on fit trials with wooden models in a calf cadaver

  10. Research on micro-structure and hemo-compatibility of the artificial heart valve surface

    Ye Xia; Shao Yunliang; Zhou Ming; Li Jian; Cai Lan

    2009-01-01

    In order to seek the method to improve the hemo-compatibility of artificial mechanical heart valve, the surface of rabbit's heart valve was observed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the dual-scale structure which consists of cobblestones-like structure of 8 μm in underside diameter and 3 μm in height, and the fine cilia of about 150 nm in diameter, was helpful to the hemo-compatibility of the heart valve. Therefore, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface with hierarchical micro-structure was fabricated using femtosecond laser fabrication technique and soft lithography. At the same time, the tests of apparent contact angle and platelet adhesion on both smooth and textured PDMS surfaces were carried out to study their wettability and hemo-compatibility. The results demonstrated that the surface with textured structure displayed more excellent wettabililty and anti-coagulation property than that of smooth surface. The apparent contact angle of textured surface enhanced from 113.1 deg. to 163.6 deg. and the amount of adsorbed platelet on such surface was fewer, no distortion and no activation were found.

  11. Interagency registry for mechanically assisted circulatory support report on the total artificial heart.

    Arabía, Francisco A; Cantor, Ryan S; Koehl, Devin A; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Gregoric, Igor; Moriguchi, Jaime D; Esmailian, Fardad; Ramzy, Danny; Chung, Joshua S; Czer, Lawrence S; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Smith, Richard G; Kirklin, James K

    2018-04-26

    We sought to better understand the patient population who receive a temporary total artificial heart (TAH) as bridge to transplant or as bridge to decision by evaluating data from the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) database. We examined data related to survival, adverse events, and competing outcomes from patients who received TAHs between June 2006 and April 2017 and used hazard function analysis to explore risk factors for mortality. Data from 450 patients (87% men; mean age, 50 years) were available in the INTERMACS database. The 2 most common diagnoses were dilated cardiomyopathy (50%) and ischemic cardiomyopathy (20%). Risk factors for right heart failure were present in 82% of patients. Most patients were INTERMACS Profile 1 (43%) or 2 (37%) at implantation. There were 266 patients who eventually underwent transplantation, and 162 died. Overall 3-, 6-, and 12-month actuarial survival rates were 73%, 62%, and 53%, respectively. Risk factors for death included older age (p = 0.001), need for pre-implantation dialysis (p = 0.006), higher creatinine (p = 0.008) and lower albumin (p Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of INTERMACS Profile on Clinical Outcomes for Patients Supported With the Total Artificial Heart.

    Shah, Keyur B; Thanavaro, Kristin L; Tang, Daniel G; Quader, Mohammed A; Mankad, Anit K; Tchoukina, Inna; Thacker, Leroy R; Smallfield, Melissa C; Katlaps, Gundars; Hess, Michael L; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2016-11-01

    Insufficient data delineate outcomes for Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) profile 1 patients with the total artificial heart (TAH). We studied 66 consecutive patients implanted with the TAH at our institution from 2006 through 2012 and compared outcome by INTERMACS profile. INTERMACS profiles were adjudicated retrospectively by a reviewer blinded to clinical outcomes. Survival after TAH implantation at 6 and 12 months was 76% and 71%, respectively. INTERMACS profile 1 patients had decreased 6-month survival on the device compared with those in profiles 2-4 (74% vs 95%, log rank: P = .015). For the 50 patients surviving to heart transplantation, the 1-year posttransplant survival was 82%. There was no difference in 1-year survival when comparing patients in the INTERMACS 1 profile with less severe profiles (79% vs 84%; log rank test P = .7; hazard ratio [confidence interval] 1.3 [0.3-4.8]). Patients implanted with the TAH as INTERMACS profile 1 had reduced survival to transplantation compared with less sick profiles. INTERMACS profile at the time of TAH implantation did not affect 1-year survival after heart transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functionality of albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based artificial oxygen carriers in the Langendorff-heart †.

    Wrobeln, Anna; Schlüter, Klaus D; Linders, Jürgen; Zähres, Manfred; Mayer, Christian; Kirsch, Michael; Ferenz, Katja B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prove whether albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based nanoparticles (capsules) can operate as a novel artificial oxygen carrier in a rat Langendorff-heart perfusion model. Hearts perfused with capsules showed increased left ventricular pressure and rate pressure product compared to hearts perfused with pure Krebs-Henseleit (KH)-buffer. The capsules prevented the myocardium from functional fail when in their absence a noxious ischemia was observed. Capsules did not change rheological properties of KH-buffer and could repeatedly reload with oxygen. This albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based artificial oxygen carrier preserved the function of rat hearts due to the transport of oxygen in a satisfactory manner. Because of these positive results, the functionality of the applied capsules should be verified in living animals.

  14. Exploiting Artificial Intelligence To Enhance Training: A Short- and Medium-Term Perspective.

    Cumming, Geoff

    This paper is an introductory discussion of industrial training, artificial intelligence (AI), and AI applications in training, prepared in the context of the United Kingdom Training Commission (TC) program. Following an outline of the activities and aims of the program, individual sections describe perspectives on: (1) training needs, including…

  15. Incorporating an Exercise Detection, Grading, and Hormone Dosing Algorithm Into the Artificial Pancreas Using Accelerometry and Heart Rate

    Jacobs, Peter G.; Resalat, Navid; El Youssef, Joseph; Reddy, Ravi; Branigan, Deborah; Preiser, Nicholas; Condon, John; Castle, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present several important contributions necessary for enabling an artificial endocrine pancreas (AP) system to better respond to exercise events. First, we show how exercise can be automatically detected using body-worn accelerometer and heart rate sensors. During a 22 hour overnight inpatient study, 13 subjects with type 1 diabetes wearing a Zephyr accelerometer and heart rate monitor underwent 45 minutes of mild aerobic treadmill exercise while controlling their glucose ...

  16. Hemodynamics of a functional centrifugal-flow total artificial heart with functional atrial contraction in goats.

    Shiga, Takuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sano, Kyosuke; Taira, Yasunori; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamada, Akihiro; Miura, Hidekazu; Katahira, Shintaro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) is one of the therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. There is no report on the hemodynamics of the functional centrifugal-flow TAH with functional atrial contraction (fCFTAH). We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow by atrial contraction in acute animal models. The goats received fCFTAH that we created from two centrifugal-flow ventricular assist devices. Some hemodynamic parameters maintained acceptable levels: heart rate 115.5 ± 26.3 bpm, aortic pressure 83.5 ± 10.1 mmHg, left atrial pressure 18.0 ± 5.9 mmHg, pulmonary pressure 28.5 ± 9.7 mmHg, right atrial pressure 13.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, pump flow 4.0 ± 1.1 L/min (left) 3.9 ± 1.1 L/min (right), and cardiac index 2.13 ± 0.14 L/min/m(2). fCFTAH with atrial contraction was able to maintain the TAH circulation by forming a pulsatile flow in acute animal experiments. Taking the left and right flow rate balance using the low internal pressure loss of the VAD pumps may be easier than by other pumps having considerable internal pressure loss. We showed that the remnant atrial contraction effected the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump, and the atrial contraction waves reflected the heart rate. These results indicate that remnant atria had the possibility to preserve autonomic function in fCFTAH. We may control fCFTAH by reflecting the autonomic function, which is estimated with the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump.

  17. Early in vivo experience with the pediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Kuban, Barry D; Gao, Shengqiang; Dessoffy, Raymond; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2018-03-30

    Heart transplantation in infants and children is an accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure, but donor organ availability is low and always uncertain. Mechanical circulatory support is another standard option, but there is a lack of intracorporeal devices due to size and functional range. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of our initial prototype of a pediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart (P-CFTAH), comprising a dual pump with one motor and one rotating assembly, supported by a hydrodynamic bearing. In acute studies, the P-CFTAH was implanted in 4 lambs (average weight: 28.7 ± 2.3 kg) via a median sternotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass. Pulmonary and systemic pump performance parameters were recorded. The experiments showed good anatomical fit and easy implantation, with an average aortic cross-clamp time of 98 ± 18 minutes. Baseline hemodynamics were stable in all 4 animals (pump speed: 3.4 ± 0.2 krpm; pump flow: 2.1 ± 0.9 liters/min; power: 3.0 ± 0.8 W; arterial pressure: 68 ± 10 mm Hg; left and right atrial pressures: 6 ± 1 mm Hg, for both). Any differences between left and right atrial pressures were maintained within the intended limit of ±5 mm Hg over a wide range of ratios of systemic-to-pulmonary vascular resistance (0.7 to 12), with and without pump-speed modulation. Pump-speed modulation was successfully performed to create arterial pulsation. This initial P-CFTAH prototype met the proposed requirements for self-regulation, performance, and pulse modulation. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Materials testing and requirements for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1974--May 1, 1975

    Andrade, J.D.; Coleman, D.L.; Leigh, A.; Hufferd, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Progress on the materials research and development effort for the ERDA-sponsored nuclear-powered artificial heart program is presented. Progress made during the first three years on hydrogel grafting and biological studies is summarized. Progress during the fourth year on studies of implanted artificial hearts, development of albumin surfaces, and in vitro mechanical studies is presented. (U.S.)

  19. Heart failure analysis dashboard for patient's remote monitoring combining multiple artificial intelligence technologies.

    Guidi, G; Pettenati, M C; Miniati, R; Iadanza, E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe an Heart Failure analysis Dashboard that, combined with a handy device for the automatic acquisition of a set of patient's clinical parameters, allows to support telemonitoring functions. The Dashboard's intelligent core is a Computer Decision Support System designed to assist the clinical decision of non-specialist caring personnel, and it is based on three functional parts: Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Follow-up management. Four Artificial Intelligence-based techniques are compared for providing diagnosis function: a Neural Network, a Support Vector Machine, a Classification Tree and a Fuzzy Expert System whose rules are produced by a Genetic Algorithm. State of the art algorithms are used to support a score-based prognosis function. The patient's Follow-up is used to refine the diagnosis.

  20. Development of a microcontroller-based automatic control system for the electrohydraulic total artificial heart.

    Kim, H C; Khanwilkar, P S; Bearnson, G B; Olsen, D B

    1997-01-01

    An automatic physiological control system for the actively filled, alternately pumped ventricles of the volumetrically coupled, electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH) was developed for long-term use. The automatic control system must ensure that the device: 1) maintains a physiological response of cardiac output, 2) compensates for an nonphysiological condition, and 3) is stable, reliable, and operates at a high power efficiency. The developed automatic control system met these requirements both in vitro, in week-long continuous mock circulation tests, and in vivo, in acute open-chested animals (calves). Satisfactory results were also obtained in a series of chronic animal experiments, including 21 days of continuous operation of the fully automatic control mode, and 138 days of operation in a manual mode, in a 159-day calf implant.

  1. Deairing Techniques for Double-Ended Centrifugal Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Grady, Patrick; Sinkewich, Martin; Moazami, Nader; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The unique device architecture of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) requires dedicated and specific air-removal techniques during device implantation in vivo. These procedures comprise special surgical techniques and intraoperative manipulations, as well as engineering design changes and optimizations to the device itself. The current study evaluated the optimal air-removal techniques during the Cleveland Clinic double-ended centrifugal CFTAH in vivo implants (n = 17). Techniques and pump design iterations consisted of developing a priming method for the device and the use of built-in deairing ports in the early cases (n = 5). In the remaining cases (n = 12), deairing ports were not used. Dedicated air-removal ports were not considered an essential design requirement, and such ports may represent an additional risk for pump thrombosis. Careful passive deairing was found to be an effective measure with a centrifugal pump of this design. In this report, the techniques and design changes that were made during this CFTAH development program to enable effective residual air removal and prevention of air embolism during in vivo device implantation are explained. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Median Sternotomy or Right Thoracotomy Techniques for Total Artificial Heart Implantation in Calves.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Moazami, Nader; Sunagawa, Gengo; Kobayashi, Mariko; Byram, Nicole; Sale, Shiva; Such, Kimberly A; Horvath, David J; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2016-10-01

    The choice of optimal operative access technique for mechanical circulatory support device implantation ensures successful postoperative outcomes. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the median sternotomy and lateral thoracotomy incisions for placement of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) in a bovine model. The CFTAH was implanted in 17 calves (Jersey calves; weight range, 77.0-93.9 kg) through a median sternotomy (n = 9) or right thoracotomy (n = 8) for elective chronic implantation periods of 14, 30, or 90 days. Similar preoperative preparation, surgical techniques, and postoperative care were employed. Implantation of the CFTAH was successfully performed in all cases. Both methods provided excellent surgical field visualization. After device connection, however, the median sternotomy approach provided better visualization of the anastomoses and surgical lines for hemostasis confirmation and repair due to easier device displacement, which is severely limited following right thoracotomy. All four animals sacrificed after completion of the planned durations (up to 90 days) were operated through full median sternotomy. Our data demonstrate that both approaches provide excellent initial field visualization. Full median sternotomy provides larger viewing angles at the anastomotic suture line after device connection to inflow and outflow ports. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Heart murmur detection based on wavelet transformation and a synergy between artificial neural network and modified neighbor annealing methods.

    Eslamizadeh, Gholamhossein; Barati, Ramin

    2017-05-01

    Early recognition of heart disease plays a vital role in saving lives. Heart murmurs are one of the common heart problems. In this study, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is trained with Modified Neighbor Annealing (MNA) to classify heart cycles into normal and murmur classes. Heart cycles are separated from heart sounds using wavelet transformer. The network inputs are features extracted from individual heart cycles, and two classification outputs. Classification accuracy of the proposed model is compared with five multilayer perceptron trained with Levenberg-Marquardt, Extreme-learning-machine, back-propagation, simulated-annealing, and neighbor-annealing algorithms. It is also compared with a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) ANN. The proposed model is trained and tested using real heart sounds available in the Pascal database to show the applicability of the proposed scheme. Also, a device to record real heart sounds has been developed and used for comparison purposes too. Based on the results of this study, MNA can be used to produce considerable results as a heart cycle classifier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elective Inactivation of Total Artificial Heart Technology in Non-Futile Situations: Inpatients, Outpatients and Research Participants

    Bramstedt, Katrina A.

    2004-01-01

    Total artificial heart technology as a potential clinical therapy raises the issue of elective device inactivation in both futile and non-futile situations. This article explores elective device inactivation in non-futile situations. In reply to such requests for inactivation, the medical team should reflect on the individual's decision-making…

  5. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation using an innovative dual-lumen cannula following implantation of a total artificial heart.

    Youdle, Jemma; Penn, Sarah; Maunz, Olaf; Simon, Andre

    2017-01-01

    We report our first clinical use of the new Protek Duo TM cannula for peripheral veno-venous extra-corporeal life support (ECLS). A 53-year-old male patient underwent implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) for biventricular failure. However, due to the development of post-operative respiratory dysfunction, the patient required ECLS for six days.

  6. Noninvasive Measurement of EKG Properties of 3D Artificial Heart Muscle

    Betsy H. Salazar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing and testing a custom fabricated 16-electrode noninvasive direct contact system was necessary to assess the electrical properties of bioengineered heart muscle and to further evaluate the efficacy of cardiac constructs. By culturing neonatal rat primary cardiac cells on a fibrin gel, we constructed 3D artificial heart muscle (3D-AHM, as described in previous studies, which were used in validating this novel system. Electrical and mechanical functional assessment of the tissues was performed, which yielded contractile forces of the tissues, electrical field potential characteristics, and tissue conduction velocities (CV (20–170 cm/s. Immunohistological evaluation revealed the formation of cardiac tissue structures and cardiomyocyte proliferation. EKG data analysis also yielded time delays between signals in the range of 0–38 ms with electrical maps showing some evidence of synchronous contraction within the fabricated tissues. This study demonstrates the effectiveness and practicality of our novel EKG measuring system to acquire distinct electrical metrics of 3D-AHM, which will aid in increasing the viability and applicability of cardiac tissue constructs.

  7. Human Fitting Studies of Cleveland Clinic Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    Karimov, Jamshid H.; Steffen, Robert J.; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Cruz, Vincent; Golding, Leonard A.R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Moazami, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of mechanical circulatory support devices is challenging, especially in patients with a small chest cavity. We evaluated how well the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) fit the anatomy of patients about to receive a heart transplant. A mock pump model of the CFTAH was rapid-prototyped using biocompatible materials. The model was brought to the operative table, and the direction, length, and angulation of the inflow/outflow ports and outflow conduits were evaluated after the recipient's ventricles had been resected. Thoracic cavity measurements were based on preoperative computed tomographic data. The CFTAH fit well in all five patients (height, 170 ± 9 cm; weight, 75 ± 24 kg). Body surface area was 1.9 ± 0.3 m2 (range, 1.6-2.1 m2). The required inflow and outflow port orientation of both the left and right housings appeared consistent with the current version of the CFTAH implanted in calves. The left outflow conduit remained straight, but the right outflow direction necessitated a 73 ± 22 degree angulation to prevent potential kinking when crossing over the connected left outflow. These data support the fact that our design achieves the proper anatomical relationship of the CFTAH to a patient's native vessels. PMID:25806613

  8. Validation of measurements of Fourier phase and amplitude analysis of technetium99 gated cardiac scans using artificial hearts

    Yiannikas, J.; Takatani, S.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Underwood, D.A.; Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; Napoli, C.; Nose, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The use of artificial hearts, developed for total heart replacement programs, allows assessment of the accuracy of measuring the first Fourier component phase and amplitude when applied to gated cardiac technetium 99 scans. In the extreme example of asynchrony of ventricular contraction in coronary artery disease that of ventricular aneurysms, the first Fourier component measurements of amplitude were highly correlated to volume increases suggesting that the calculated amplitude accurately reflects volume changes. The calculated asynchrony using Fourier analysis of the gated technetium 99 studies of two artificial hearts was highly accurate when compared to the predetermined calculation of phase angle difference and hence degree of asynchrony. The studies suggest that measurement of phase and amplitude using the first Fourier component of time-activity waves of gated cardiac technetium 99 studies accurately measure degree of asynchrony and volume changes respectively

  9. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while awaiting orthotopic heart transplantation: Experience with five cases

    Sadler, L.R.; Fuhrman, C.R.; Hardesty, R.A.; Griffith, B.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Jarvik-7 artificial heart was originally introduced as a therapeutic alternative to cardiac transplantation in patients with endstage refractory cardiac disease. Its use has been expanded to those patients awaiting cardiac transplantation in whom death is impending and for whom a suitable donor match is unavailable. At Presbyterian-University Hospital of Pittsburgh five patients have had Jarvik-7 hearts implanted as a temporary measure while awaiting compatible donors for cardiac transplantation. The authors believe this is the largest patient group to undergo this procedure at a single institution. They present a brief description of the Jarvik-7 heart, the clinical factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and review the chest radiographic complications seen in the patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  10. The challenge of home discharge with a total artificial heart: the La Pitie Salpetriere experience.

    Demondion, Pierre; Fournel, Ludovic; Niculescu, Michaela; Pavie, Alain; Leprince, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) helps to counteract the current decrease in heart donors and is likely to bridge patients to transplant under favourable conditions. Today's mobile consoles facilitate home discharge. The aim of this study was to report on the La Pitie Hospital experience with CardioWest TAH recipients, and more particularly, on generally successful outpatient' management. A retrospective analysis was performed on clinical and biological data from patients implanted with a TAH between December 2006 and July 2010 in a single institution. Morbi-mortality during hospital stay, number and causes of rehospitalizations, quality of life during home discharge, bridge to transplant results and survival have all been analysed. Twenty-seven patients were implanted with the CardioWest. Fifteen patients (55.5%) died during support. Prior to home discharge, the most frequent cause of death was multi-organ failure (46.6%). Twelve patients were discharged home from hospital within a median of 88 days [range 35-152, interquartile range 57] postimplantation. Mean rehospitalization rate was 1.2 by patient, on account of device infection (n = 7), technical problems with the console (n = 3) and other causes (n = 4). Between discharge and transplant, patients spent 87% of their support time out of hospital. All patients who returned home with the TAH were subsequently transplanted, and 1 died in post-transplant. Despite the morbidity and mortality occurring during the postimplantation period, home discharge with a TAH is possible. Portables drivers allow for a safe return home. Aside from some remaining weak points such as infectious complications or noise, CardioWest TAH allows for successful rehabilitation of graft candidates, and assures highly satisfactory transplant results.

  11. Experience with the SynCardia total artificial heart in a Canadian centre.

    Nguyen, Anthony; Pellerin, Michel; Perrault, Louis P; White, Michel; Ducharme, Anique; Racine, Normand; Carrier, Michel

    2017-12-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) provides complete circulatory support by replacing both native ventricles. Accepted indications include bridge to transplantation and destination therapy. We review our experience with TAH implantation during a period when axial flow pump became available. We retrospectively analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics and survival of all patients receiving the TAH. From September 2004 to November 2016, 13 patients (12 men, mean age 45 ± 13 yr) received the TAH for refractory cardiogenic shock secondary to idiopathic (56%) or ischemic (17%) cardiomyopathy and to other various causes (33%). Before implantation, mean ejection fraction was 14% ± 4%, 7 (54%) patients had previous cardiac surgery, 4 (31%) were on mechanical ventilation, and 3 (23%) patients were on dialysis. The mean duration of TAH support was 46 ± 40 days. Three (23%) patients died while on support after a mean of 15 days. Actuarial survival on support was 77% ± 12% at 30 days after implantation. Complications on support included stroke ( n = 1, 8%), acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring prolonged intubation ( n = 5, 38%) and acute renal failure requiring temporary dialysis ( n = 5, 38%). Ten (77%) patients survived to be transplanted after a mean of 52 ± 42 days of support. Actuarial survival rates after transplant were 67% ± 16% at 1 month and 56% ± 17% at 1 year after transplantation. The TAH provides an alternative with low incidence of neurologic events in extremely fragile and complex patients waiting for heart transplantation. Complex and unusual anatomic conditions explained the current use of TAH.

  12. Comparison of total artificial heart and biventricular assist device support as bridge-to-transplantation.

    Cheng, Allen; Trivedi, Jaimin R; Van Berkel, Victor H; Massey, H Todd; Slaughter, Mark S

    2016-10-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has increased significantly in the last decade. However, right heart dysfunction remains a problem despite the improved outcomes with continuous-flow LVADs. Surgical options for bridge to transplantation (BTT) in patients with biventricular failure are total artificial heart (TAH) or biventricular support (BiVAD). This study examines the differences in pre- and post-transplantation outcomes and survival in patients with TAH or BiVAD support as BTT. The United Network of Organ Sharing database was retrospectively queried from January 2005 to December 2014 to identify adult patients undergoing heart transplantation (n = 17,022). Patients supported with either TAH (n = 212) or BiVAD (n = 366) at the time of transplantation were evaluated. Pre- and post-transplantation Kaplan-Meier survival curves were examined. Cox regression model was used to study the hazard ratios of the association between TAH versus BiVAD support and post-transplant survival. The median age of the study groups was 49.8 ± 12.9 (TAH) and 47.2 ± 13.9 (BiVAD) years (range 18-74 years). There were more men, 87% versus 74%, in the TAH group (p < 0.0001) with greater body mass index, 27.3 ± 5.2 versus 25.6 ± 4.7 (p < 0.0001), compared to those with BiVADs. Creatinine was higher, 1.7 + 1.2 versus 1.3 + 0.8 mg/dL (p < 0.0001), in the TAH group before transplant. The 30-day, one-, and three-year post-transplantation survival was 88%, 78%, and 67%, respectively, for patients with TAH support versus 93%, 83%, and 73% (p = 0.06) for patients with BiVAD support. Cox regression model shows pre-transplant creatinine (HR = 1.21, p = 0.008) is associated with a lower post-transplant survival. TAH is not associated with a worse post-transplant survival (p = 0.1). There was no difference in wait-list survival in patients supported with TAH or BiVAD (p = 0.8). Although there has been a recent

  13. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report

    1977-01-01

    The report documents efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power systems portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the Pu-238 heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The work performed had two parallel themes. The first of these was the development of an integrated implantable model for bench and animal experiments plus design effort on a more advanced model. The second was research and development on components of the system done in conjunction with the development of the implantable model and to provide technology for incorporation into advanced models plus support to implantations, at the University of Utah, of the systems blood pumping elements when driven by electric motor. The efforts and results of implantable model development are covered, mainly, in the text of the report. The research and development efforts and results are reported, primarily, in the appendices (Vol. 2).

  14. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report

    1977-01-01

    The report documents efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power systems portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the Pu-238 heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The work performed had two parallel themes. The first of these was the development of an integrated implantable model for bench and animal experiments plus design effort on a more advanced model. The second was research and development on components of the system done in conjunction with the development of the implantable model and to provide technology for incorporation into advanced models plus support to implantations, at the University of Utah, of the systems blood pumping elements when driven by electric motor. The efforts and results of implantable model development are covered, mainly, in the text of the report. The research and development efforts and results are reported, primarily, in the appendices

  15. New concepts and new design of permanent maglev rotary artificial heart blood pumps.

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2006-05-01

    According to tradition, permanent maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium. The authors have developed, to the contrary, two stable permanent maglev impeller blood pumps. The first pump is an axially driven uni-ventricular assist pump, in which the rotor with impeller is radially supported by two passive magnetic bearings, but has one point contact with the stator axially at standstill. As the pump raises its rotating speed, the increasing hydrodynamic force of fluid acting on the impeller will make the rotor taking off from contacting point and disaffiliate from the stator. Then the rotor becomes fully suspended. The second pump is a radially driven bi-ventricular assist pump, i.e., an impeller total artificial heart. Its rotor with two impellers on both ends is supported by two passive magnetic bearings, which counteract the attractive force between rotor magnets and stator coil iron core. The rotor is affiliated to the stator radially at standstill and becomes levitated during rotation. Therefore, the rotor keeps concentric with stator during rotation but eccentric at standstill, as is confirmed by rotor position detection with Honeywell sensors. It concludes that the permanent maglev needs action of a non-magnetic force to achieve stability but a rotating magnetic levitator with high speed and large inertia can maintain its stability merely with passive magnetic bearings.

  16. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Transcutaneous Energy Transmission Systemfor Totally Implantable Artificial Heart

    Shiba, Kenji; Koshiji, Kohji

    Transcutaneous Energy Transmission (TET) is one way of providing the energy needed to power a totally implantable artificial heart (TIAH). In the present study, an externally coupled TET system was implanted in a prototype human phantom to evaluate emission and immunity. In the emission evaluation, measurements were conducted based on CISPR Pub.11 and VDE 0871 standards, while immunity tests were based on the standards of the IEC 61000-4 series. The magnetic field of the radiated emission was measured using a loop antenna. At 0.1[MHz], we found the greatest magnetic field of 47.8 [dBμA/m], somewhat less than CISPR’s upper limit of 54 [dBμA/m]. For the conducted emission, by installing a noise filter and ferrite beads in the input section of the DC-power supply, conducted emission could be kept within the allowable limits of CISPR Pub.11 and VDE 0871. Finally, the immunity tests against radiated and conducted emission, electrostatic discharge and voltage fluctuation proved that the prototype could withstand the maximum level of disturbance. These results confirmed that the TET system implanted in a human phantom could, through modification, meet the emission and immunity standards.

  17. Biocompatibility of Hydrogen-Diluted Amorphous Silicon Carbide Thin Films for Artificial Heart Valve Coating

    Rizal, Umesh; Swain, Bhabani S.; Rameshbabu, N.; Swain, Bibhu P.

    2018-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films were synthesized using trichloromethylsilane by a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process. The deposited films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm its chemical bonding, structural network and composition of the a-SiC:H films. The optical microscopy images reveal that hydrogen dilution increased the surface roughness and pore density of a-SiC:H thin film. The Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectra reveal chemical network consisting of Si-Si, C-C and Si-C bonds, respectively. The XRD spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate a-SiC:H still has short-range order. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity test ensures the behavior of cell-semiconductor hybrid to monitor the proper coordination. The live-dead assays and MTT assay reveal an increase in green nucleus cell, and cell viability is greater than 88%, respectively, showing non-toxic nature of prepared a-SiC:H film. Moreover, the result indicated by direct contact assay, and cell prefers to adhere and proliferate on a-SiC:H thin films having a positive effect as artificial heart valve coating material.

  18. Driver electronics design and control for a total artificial heart linear motor.

    Unthan, Kristin; Cuenca-Navalon, Elena; Pelletier, Benedikt; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2018-01-27

    For any implantable device size and efficiency are critical properties. Thus, a linear motor for a Total Artificial Heart was optimized with focus on driver electronics and control strategies. Hardware requirements were defined from power supply and motor setup. Four full bridges were chosen for the power electronics. Shunt resistors were set up for current measurement. Unipolar and bipolar switching for power electronics control were compared regarding current ripple and power losses. Here, unipolar switching showed smaller current ripple and required less power to create the necessary motor forces. Based on calculations for minimal power losses Lorentz force was distributed to the actor's four coils. The distribution was determined as ratio of effective magnetic flux through each coil, which was captured by a force test rig. Static and dynamic measurements under physiological conditions analyzed interaction of control and hardware and all efficiencies were over 89%. In conclusion, the designed electronics, optimized control strategy and applied current distribution create the required motor force and perform optimal under physiological conditions. The developed driver electronics and control offer optimized size and efficiency for any implantable or portable device with multiple independent motor coils. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  20. Application of Adaptive Starling-Like Controller to Total Artificial Heart Using Dual Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Ng, Boon C; Smith, Peter A; Nestler, Frank; Timms, Daniel; Cohn, William E; Lim, Einly

    2017-03-01

    The successful clinical applicability of rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has led to research interest in devising a total artificial heart (TAH) using two rotary blood pumps (RBPs). The major challenge when using two separately controlled LVADs for TAH support is the difficulty in maintaining the balance between pulmonary and systemic blood flows. In this study, a starling-like controller (SLC) hybridized with an adaptive mechanism was developed for a dual rotary LVAD TAH. The incorporation of the adaptive mechanism was intended not only to minimize the risk of pulmonary congestion and atrial suction but also to match cardiac demand. A comparative assessment was performed between the proposed adaptive starling-like controller (A-SLC) and a conventional SLC as well as a constant speed controller. The performance of all controllers was evaluated by subjecting them to three simulated scenarios [rest, exercise, head up tilt (HUT)] using a mock circulation loop. The overall results showed that A-SLC was superior in matching pump flow to cardiac demand without causing hemodynamic instabilities. In contrast, improper flow regulation by the SLC resulted in pulmonary congestion during exercise. From resting supine to HUT, overpumping of the RBPs at fixed speed (FS) caused atrial suction, whereas implementation of SLC resulted in insufficient flow. The comparative study signified the potential of the proposed A-SLC for future TAH implementation particularly among outpatients, who are susceptible to variety of clinical scenarios.

  1. Multi-Targeted Antithrombotic Therapy for Total Artificial Heart Device Patients.

    Ramirez, Angeleah; Riley, Jeffrey B; Joyce, Lyle D

    2016-03-01

    To prevent thrombotic or bleeding events in patients receiving a total artificial heart (TAH), agents have been used to avoid adverse events. The purpose of this article is to outline the adoption and results of a multi-targeted antithrombotic clinical procedure guideline (CPG) for TAH patients. Based on literature review of TAH anticoagulation and multiple case series, a CPG was designed to prescribe the use of multiple pharmacological agents. Total blood loss, Thromboelastograph(®) (TEG), and platelet light-transmission aggregometry (LTA) measurements were conducted on 13 TAH patients during the first 2 weeks of support in our institution. Target values and actual medians for postimplant days 1, 3, 7, and 14 were calculated for kaolinheparinase TEG, kaolin TEG, LTA, and estimated blood loss. Protocol guidelines were followed and anticoagulation management reduced bleeding and prevented thrombus formation as well as thromboembolic events in TAH patients postimplantation. The patients in this study were susceptible to a variety of possible complications such as mechanical device issues, thrombotic events, infection, and bleeding. Among them all it was clear that patients were at most risk for bleeding, particularly on postoperative days 1 through 3. However, bleeding was reduced into postoperative days 3 and 7, indicating that acceptable hemostasis was achieved with the anticoagulation protocol. The multidisciplinary, multi-targeted anticoagulation clinical procedure guideline was successful to maintain adequate antithrombotic therapy for TAH patients.

  2. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  3. Artificial hearts-recent progress: republication of the article published in the Japanese Journal of Artificial Organs.

    Nishida, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    This review was created based on a translation of the Japanese review written in the Japanese Journal of Artificial Organs in 2015 (Vol.44, No. 3, pp.130-135), with some modifications regarding several references published in 2015 or later.

  4. Implantation technique of the 50-cm3 SynCardia Total Artificial Heart: does size make a difference?

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Guersoy, Dilek; Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Despite downsizing, implantation technique of the 50-cm(3) SynCardia Total Artificial Heart and settings of the Companion driver remain unchanged. Owing to the absence of de-airing nipples, de-airing procedure is even more crucial and has to be performed carefully. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. An example of the use of the DELPHI method: future prospects of artificial heart techniques in France

    Derian, Jean-Claude; Morize, Francoise; Vernejoul, Pierre de; Vial, Renee

    1971-01-01

    The artificial heart is still only a research project surrounded by numerous uncertainties which make it very difficult to estimate, at the moment, the possibilities for future development of this technique in France. A systematic analysis of the hazards which characterize this project has been undertaken in the following report: restricting these uncertainties has required a taking into account of opinions of specialists concerned with type of research or its upshot. We have achieved this by adapting an investigation technique which is still unusual in France, the DELPHI method. This adaptation has allowed the confrontation and statistical aggregation of the opinions given by a body of a hundred experts who were consulted through a program of sequential interrogations which studied in particular, the probable date of the research issue, the clinical cases which require the use of an artificial heart, as well as the probable future needs. After having taken into account the economic constraints, we can deduce from these results the probable amount of plutonium 238 needed in the hypothesis where isotopic generator would be retained for the energetics feeding of the artificial heart [fr

  6. Post-explant visualization of thrombi in outflow grafts and their junction to a continuous-flow total artificial heart using a high-definition miniaturized camera.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David; Sunagawa, Gengo; Byram, Nicole; Moazami, Nader; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-12-01

    Post-explant evaluation of the continuous-flow total artificial heart in preclinical studies can be extremely challenging because of the device's unique architecture. Determining the exact location of tissue regeneration, neointima formation, and thrombus is particularly important. In this report, we describe our first successful experience with visualizing the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart using a custom-made high-definition miniature camera.

  7. Development of data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave for implantable artificial hearts.

    Tsujimura, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Hiroto; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize infection risks of patients with artificial hearts, wireless data transmission methods with electromagnetic induction or light have been developed. However, these methods tend to become difficult to transmit data if the external data transmission unit moves from its proper position. To resolve this serious problem, the purpose of this study is to develop a prototype wireless data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave and confirm its performance. Due to its high-speed communication rate, low power consumption, high tolerance to electromagnetic disturbances, and secure wireless communication, we adopted Bluetooth radio wave technology for our system. The system consists of an internal data transmission unit and an external data transmission unit (53 by 64 by 16 mm, each), and each has a Bluetooth module (radio field intensity: 4 dBm, receiver sensitivity: -80 dBm). The internal unit also has a micro controller with an 8-channel 10-bit A/D converter, and the external unit also has a RS-232C converter. We experimented with the internal unit implanted into pig meat, and carried out data transmission tests to evaluate the performance of this system in tissue thickness of up to 3 mm. As a result, data transfer speeds of about 20 kbps were achieved within the communication distance of 10 m. In conclusion, we confirmed that the system can wirelessly transmit the data from the inside of the body to the outside, and it promises to resolve unstable data transmission due to accidental movements of an external data transmission unit.

  8. Totally implantable total artificial heart and ventricular assist device with multipurpose miniature electromechanical energy system.

    Takatani, S; Orime, Y; Tasai, K; Ohara, Y; Naito, K; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Damm, G; Glueck, J; Ling, J

    1994-01-01

    A multipurpose miniature electromechanical energy system has been developed to yield a compact, efficient, durable, and biocompatible total artificial heart (TAH) and ventricular assist device (VAD). Associated controller-driver electronics were recently miniaturized and converted into hybrid circuits. The hybrid controller consists of a microprocessor and controller, motor driver, Hall sensor, and commutation circuit hybrids. The sizing study demonstrated that all these components can be incorporated in the pumping unit of the TAH and VAD, particularly in the centerpiece of the TAH and the motor housing of the VAD. Both TAH and VAD pumping units will start when their power line is connected to either the internal power pack or the external battery unit. As a redundant driving and diagnostic port, an emergency port was newly added and will be placed in subcutaneous location. In case of system failure, the skin will be cut down, and an external motor drive or a pneumatic driver will be connected to this port to run the TAH. This will minimize the circulatory arrest time. Overall efficiency of the TAH without the transcutaneous energy transmission system was 14-18% to deliver pump outputs of 4-9 L/min against the right and left afterload pressures of 25 and 100 mm Hg. The internal power requirement ranged from 6 to 13 W. The rechargeable batteries such as NiCd or NiMH with 1 AH capacity can run the TAH for 30-45 min. The external power requirement, when TETS efficiency of 75% was assumed, ranged from 8 to 18 W. The accelerated endurance test in the 42 degrees C saline bath demonstrated stable performance over 4 months. Long-term endurance and chronic animal studies will continue toward a system with 5 years durability by the year 2000.

  9. Analysis, design, and control of a transcutaneous power regulator for artificial hearts.

    Qianhong Chen; Siu Chung Wong; Tse, C K; Xinbo Ruan

    2009-02-01

    Based on a generic transcutaneous transformer model, a remote power supply using a resonant topology for use in artificial hearts is analyzed and designed for easy controllability and high efficiency. The primary and secondary windings of the transcutaneous transformer are positioned outside and inside the human body, respectively. In such a transformer, the alignment and gap may change with external positioning. As a result, the coupling coefficient of the transcutaneous transformer is also varying, and so are the two large leakage inductances and the mutual inductance. Resonant-tank circuits with varying resonant-frequency are formed from the transformer inductors and external capacitors. For a given range of coupling coefficients, an operating frequency corresponding to a particular coupling coefficient can be found, for which the voltage transfer function is insensitive to load. Prior works have used frequency modulation to regulate the output voltage under varying load and transformer coupling. The use of frequency modulation may require a wide control frequency range which may extend well above the load insensitive frequency. In this paper, study of the input-to-output voltage transfer function is carried out, and a control method is proposed to lock the switching frequency at just above the load insensitive frequency for optimized efficiency at heavy loads. Specifically, operation at above resonant of the resonant circuits is maintained under varying coupling-coefficient. Using a digital-phase-lock-loop (PLL), zero-voltage switching is achieved in a full-bridge converter which is also programmed to provide output voltage regulation via pulsewidth modulation (PWM). A prototype transcutaneous power regulator is built and found to to perform excellently with high efficiency and tight regulation under variations of the alignment or gap of the transcutaneous transformer, load and input voltage.

  10. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Heart pacemaker

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation; Artificial pacemaker; Permanent pacemaker; Internal pacemaker; Cardiac resynchronization therapy; CRT; Biventricular pacemaker; Arrhythmia - pacemaker; Abnormal heart ...

  12. Heart rate and leukocytes after air and ground transportation in artificially ventilated neonates: a prospective observational study.

    Grosek, Stefan; Mlakar, Gorazd; Vidmar, Ivan; Ihan, Alojz; Primozic, Janez

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of interhospital air and ground transportation of artificially ventilated neonates on heart rate and peripheral blood leukocyte counts. Prospective, observational study. Level III multidisciplinary Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Fifty-eight near-term artificially ventilated transported neonates between May 2006 and April 2007. Day-helicopter, day- and night-ground transportation. Heart rate at retrieval, on admission to the ICU and 1 h later, and peripheral blood leukocyte counts on admission and 1 d later were compared. Fifteen neonates were transported by helicopter during the daytime (D-HEL), 20 by daytime ground and 23 by nighttime ground transportation (D-GROUND, N-GROUND). No differences in delivery mode, birth weight, gestational age, gender, primary diagnoses for transportation, response time and duration of transportation were found between the groups. Similarly, no differences in pH, pCO(2), blood pressure and skin temperature at retrieval and on admission to the ICU were found between the three groups. The mean heart rate at retrieval did not differ significantly, while on arrival in the ICU and 1 h later the D-GROUND group of patients showed a significantly higher mean heart rate compared to the D-HEL and N-GROUND groups. Moreover, leukocyte counts on arrival in the ICU showed significantly higher leukocyte counts in the D-GROUND group of patients compared to the D-HEL group of patients. These results demonstrate that there is an association between daytime ground transportation and higher heart rate and peripheral blood leukocytes.

  13. "Artificial humans": Psychology and neuroscience perspectives on embodiment and nonverbal communication.

    Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

    2010-01-01

    "Artificial humans", so-called "Embodied Conversational Agents" and humanoid robots, are assumed to facilitate human-technology interaction referring to the unique human capacities of interpersonal communication and social information processing. While early research and development in artificial intelligence (AI) focused on processing and production of natural language, the "new AI" has also taken into account the emotional and relational aspects of communication with an emphasis both on understanding and production of nonverbal behavior. This shift in attention in computer science and engineering is reflected in recent developments in psychology and social cognitive neuroscience. This article addresses key challenges which emerge from the goal to equip machines with socio-emotional intelligence and to enable them to interpret subtle nonverbal cues and to respond to social affordances with naturally appearing behavior from both perspectives. In particular, we propose that the creation of credible artificial humans not only defines the ultimate test for our understanding of human communication and social cognition but also provides a unique research tool to improve our knowledge about the underlying psychological processes and neural mechanisms. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Initial Experience with IV Ketamine Infusion for Treatment of Post Sternotomy Pain in a Patient with a Total Artificial Heart.

    Maher, Dermot P; Loyferman, Rusty; Yumul, Roya; Louy, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The implantation of total artificial hearts (TAH) via midline sternotomy for the treatment of severe biventricular cardiac dysfunction is associated with complex postoperative pain management. Ketamaine increases blood pressure by raising sympathetic outflow and cardiac output; however, ketamine is a direct vasodilator on isolated arterial tissues. In the setting of a TAH with a mechanically fixed cardiac output, a ketamine infusion for postoperative pain control has the potential to decrease blood pressure due to direct arterial vasodilation. We present the initial experience with a ketamine infusion in a patient with a TAH with minimal observed decreases in blood pressure and significantly improved postoperative pain.

  15. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart are discussed. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power system's portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the 238 Pu heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The 238 Pu heat sources and blood pump ventricles were provided as Government Furnished Equipment as developed and fabricated by other contractors

  16. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart are discussed. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power system's portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the /sup 238/Pu heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The /sup 238/Pu heat sources and blood pump ventricles were provided as Government Furnished Equipment as developed and fabricated by other contractors.

  17. Perspective on the Ongoing Replacement of Artificial and Animal-Based Dyes with Alternative Natural Pigments in Foods and Beverages.

    Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2018-03-28

    This perspective highlights current trends, advances, and challenges related to the replacement of artificial dyes and the insect-based carmine with alternative natural pigments. Briefly reviewing the history of food coloration, key publications and public events leading to diverse concerns about artificial dyes and carmine will be summarized. An overview about promising alternatives in the market and those under development is provided, including a separate section on coloring foodstuffs. The perspective aims at supporting readers to keep abreast with the enormous efforts undertaken by the food and beverage industry to replace certain food dyes.

  18. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing responses to different external portable drivers in a patient with a CardioWest Total Artificial Heart.

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Braccioni, Fausto; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Buratto, Edward; Gallo, Michele; Bottio, Tomaso; Vianello, Andrea; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-06-01

    Management of patients treated with CardioWest Total Artificial Heart (CW-TAH) as a bridge to heart transplantation (HTx) is complicated by difficulties in determining the optimal timing of transplantation. We present a case of a 53-year-old man supported as an outpatient with a CW-TAH, whose condition deteriorated following exchange of the portable driver. The patient was followed-up with serial cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) which demonstrated a fall of peak VO2 to below 12 ml/kg/min following driver substitution, and the patient was subsequently treated with urgent orthotopic HTx. This case highlights the potential utility of CPET as a means for monitoring and indicating timing of HTx in patients with CW-TAH, as well as the potential for clinical deterioration following portable driver substitution.

  19. [Flowmetric assessment of coronary bypass grafts in the conditions of artificial circulation and on the beating heart].

    Bazylev, V V; Nemchenko, E V; Karnakhin, V A; Pavlov, A A; Mikulyak, A I

    2016-01-01

    Advantages and shortcomings of aortocoronary bypass grafting on the beating heart and in the conditions of artificial circulation (AC) have long been discussed. The data on patency of bypass grafts in the remote period are indicative of comparable results of operations with and without AC or advantages of using AC. In order to determine benefits of each method it is necessary to reveal intraoperative predictors of bypass grafts occlusion in the remote period. We analyzed the results of ultrasound flowmetry of the blood flow through the left internal thoracic artery during bypass grafting of the anterior descending artery with the use of AC and on the beating heart. A retrospective study included a total of 352 patients subdivided into 2 groups: Group One was composed of 120 patients undergoing surgery in the conditions of AC and Group Two comprised 232 patients subjected to similar operations on the beating heart. Blood flow was measured with the help of flowmeter VeryQ MediStim® after termination of AC and inactivation of heparin by protamine, with systolic pressure of 100-110 mm Hg. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups by the diameter and degree of stenosis of the anterior descending artery, diameter of the left internal thoracic artery. The mean volumetric blood flow velocity (Qmean) along the shunts in Group One was higher (p=0.01). No statistically significant differences by the pulsatility index (PI) between the groups were revealed (p=0.2). A conclusion was drawn that coronary bypass grafting of the anterior descending artery by the left internal thoracic artery in the conditions of artificial circulation made it possible to achieve higher volumetric velocity of blood flow through the conduit as compared with operations on the beating heart, with similar resistance index. The immediate results of the operations with the use of the both techniques did not differ.

  20. Nebivolol in chronic heart failure : current evidence and future perspectives

    Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Areas covered in the review: We describe the role of the sympathetic nervous system, beta-blockers and specifically nebivolol in chronic heart failure. What the reader will gain: Nebivolol is a third-generation beta-blocker, with high beta(1)/beta(2) selectivity. Moreover, it has important

  1. Examination of mitral regurgitation with a goat heart model for the development of intelligent artificial papillary muscle.

    Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Yoshizawa, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamada, A; Miura, H; Hashem, M; Kitano, T; Shiga, T; Homma, D

    2012-01-01

    Annuloplasty for functional mitral or tricuspid regurgitation has been made for surgical restoration of valvular diseases. However, these major techniques may sometimes be ineffective because of chamber dilation and valve tethering. We have been developing a sophisticated intelligent artificial papillary muscle (PM) by using an anisotropic shape memory alloy fiber for an alternative surgical reconstruction of the continuity of the mitral structural apparatus and the left ventricular myocardium. This study exhibited the mitral regurgitation with regard to the reduction in the PM tension quantitatively with an originally developed ventricular simulator using isolated goat hearts for the sophisticated artificial PM. Aortic and mitral valves with left ventricular free wall portions of isolated goat hearts (n=9) were secured on the elastic plastic membrane and statically pressurized, which led to valvular leaflet-papillary muscle positional change and central mitral regurgitation. PMs were connected to the load cell, and the relationship between the tension of regurgitation and PM tension were measured. Then we connected the left ventricular specimen model to our hydraulic ventricular simulator and achieved hemodynamic simulation with the controlled tension of PMs.

  2. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives

    Samad F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatima Samad,1 Anushree Agarwal,2 Zainab Samad3 1Aurora Cardiovascular Services, Aurora Sinai/Aurora St Luke’s Medical Centers, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m2, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the

  3. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives.

    Samad, Fatima; Agarwal, Anushree; Samad, Zainab

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m 2 ), smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the management of SIHD in women.

  4. [PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS IN CHILDREN, OPERATED ON FOR INBORN HEART FAILURES IN THE ARTIFICIAL BLOOD CIRCULATION ENVIRONMENT].

    Moshkivska, L V; Nastenko, E A; Golovenko, O S; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2015-11-01

    The risk factors of pulmonary complications occurrence were analyzed in children, operated on for inborn heart failures in atrificial blood circulation environment. Pulmonary complications rate and the risk factors of their occurrence were analyzed.

  5. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  6. Heart Palpitation From Traditional and Modern Medicine Perspectives

    Ershadifar, Tabassom; Minaiee, Bagher; Gharooni, Manouchehr; Isfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Nazem, Esmaiel; Gousheguir, Ashraf Aldin; Kazemi Saleh, Davod

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palpitation is a sign of a disease and is very common in general population. For this purpose we decided to explain it in this study. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the palpitation in both modern and traditional medicine aspect. It may help us to diagnose and cure better because the traditional medicine view is holistic and different from modern medicine. Materials and Methods: We addressed some descriptions to the articles of traditional medicine subjects which have published recently. Palpitation in modern medicine was extracted from medical books such as Braunwald, Harrison and Guyton physiology and some related articles obtained from authentic journals in PubMed and Ovid and Google scholar between1990 to 2013. Results: According to modern medicine, there are many causes for palpitation and in some cases it is cured symptomatically. In traditional medicine view, palpitation has been explained completely and many causes have been described. Its aspect is holistic and it cures causatively. The traditional medicine scientists evaluated the body based on Humors and temperament. Temperament can be changed to dis-temperament in diseases. Humors are divided in 4 items: sanguine, humid or phlegm, melancholy and bile. Palpitation is a disease, it is heart vibration and is caused by an abnormal substance in the heart itself or its membrane or other adjacent organs that would result in the heart suffering. Conclusions: Our data of this article suggests that causes of palpitation in the aspect of traditional medicine are completely different from modern medicine. It can help us to approach and treat this symptom better and with lower side effects than chemical drugs. According to this article we are able to detect a new approach in palpitation. PMID:24719741

  7. Future Perspectives for Management of Stage A Heart Failure.

    Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2018-05-07

    Patients with Stage A heart failure (HF) show no HF symptoms but have related comorbid diseases with a high risk of progressing to HF. Screening for comorbid diseases warrants closer attention because of the growing interest in addressing Stage A HF as the best means of preventing eventual progression to overt HF such as Stages C and D. The identification of individuals of Stage A HF is potentially useful for the implementation of HF-prevention strategies; however, not all Stage A HF patients develop left ventricular (LV) structural heart disease or symptomatic HF, which lead to advanced HF stages. Therefore, Stage A HF requires management with the long-term goal of avoiding HF development; likewise, Stage B HF patients are ideal targets for HF prevention. Although the early detection of subclinical LV dysfunction is, thus, essential for delaying the progression to HF, the assessment of subclinical LV dysfunction can be challenging. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) as assessed by speckle-tracking echocardiography has recently been reported to be a sensitive marker of early subtle LV myocardial abnormalities, helpful for the prediction of the outcomes for various cardiac diseases, and superior to conventional echocardiographic indices. GLS reflects LV longitudinal myocardial systolic function, and can be assessed usually by means of two-dimensional speckle-tracking. This article reviews the importance of the assessment of subclinical LV dysfunction in Stage A HF patients by means of GLS, and its current potential to prevent progression to later stage HF.

  8. Wireless patient monitoring system for a moving-actuator type artificial heart.

    Nam, K W; Chung, J; Choi, S W; Sun, K; Min, B G

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we developed a wireless monitoring system for outpatients equipped with a moving-actuator type pulsatile bi-ventricular assist device, AnyHeart. The developed monitoring system consists of two parts; a Bluetooth-based short-distance self-monitoring system that can monitor and control the operating status of a VAD using a Bluetooth-embedded personal digital assistant or a personal computer within a distance of 10 meters, and a cellular network-based remote monitoring system that can continuously monitor and control the operating status of AnyHeart at any location. Results of in vitro experiments demonstrate the developed system's ability to monitor the operational status of an implanted AnyHeart.

  9. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  10. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested

  11. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report. Period covered: July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Appendix A covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detail procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested

  12. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report. Period covered: July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Appendix A covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detail procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  13. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  14. Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Progress report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Wentworth, R.A.; Cady, K.B.

    1976-01-01

    A total of sixty dogs were implanted with radioisotope-powered artificial heart systems producing radiation fluxes similar to that of plutonium-238, but having no associated heat, at levels of from one to seventy times the radiation flux expected from a 30-watt plutonium-238 source. Results from studies lasting up to 6 years after implantation indicate that these animals, and by inference human beings, may be able to tolerate the radiation flux from 30-watt 238 Pu power sources. Results of heat dissipation studies in calves indicate that it may be possible to induce a vascularized connective tissue capsule sufficient to dissipate 30 watts of additional heat from a surface area of approximately 500 cm sq., allowing a heat flux of 0.06 watts per cm sq

  15. Comparative analysis of von Willebrand factor profiles after implantation of left ventricular assist device and total artificial heart.

    Reich, H J; Morgan, J; Arabia, F; Czer, L; Moriguchi, J; Ramzy, D; Esmailian, F; Lam, L; Dunhill, J; Volod, O

    2017-08-01

    Essentials Bleeding is a major source of morbidity during mechanical circulatory support. von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimer loss may contribute to bleeding. Different patterns of VWF multimer loss were seen with the two device types. This is the first report of total artificial heart associated VWF multimer loss. Background Bleeding remains a challenge during mechanical circulatory support and underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Functional von Willebrand factor (VWF) impairment because of loss of high-molecular-weight multimers (MWMs) produces acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) after left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Little is known about VWF multimers with total artificial hearts (TAHs). Here, VWF profiles with LVADs and TAHs are compared using a VWD panel. Methods VWD evaluations for patients with LVAD or TAH (2013-14) were retrospectively analyzed and included: VWF activity (ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo), VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), ratio of VWF:RCo to VWF:Ag, and quantitative VWF multimeric analysis. Results Twelve patients with LVADs and 12 with TAHs underwent VWD evaluation. All had either normal (47.8%) or elevated (52.2%) VWF:RCo, normal (26.1%) or elevated (73.9%) VWF:Ag and 50.0% were disproportional (ratio ≤ 0.7). Multimeric analysis showed abnormal patterns in all patients with LVADs: seven with high MWM loss; five with highest MWM loss. With TAH, 10/12 patients had abnormal patterns: all with highest MWM loss. High MWM loss correlated with presence of LVAD and highest MWM loss with TAH. Increased low MWMs were detected in 22/24. Conclusion Using VWF multimeric analysis, abnormalities after LVAD or TAH were detected that would be missed with measurements of VWF level alone: loss of high MWM predominantly in LVAD, loss of highest MWM in TAH, and elevated levels of low MWM in both. This is the first study to describe TAH-associated highest MWM loss, which may contribute to bleeding. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and

  16. Materials testing and requirement for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1975--May 30, 1976. [BIOMER and AVCOTHANE

    Andrade, J. D.; Hufferd, W. L.; Lyman, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The two materials currently being used for the artificial heart fabrication are BIOMER and AVCOTHANE. BIOMER is a polyether urethane polymer. AVCOTHANE is a proprietary polyurethane/polydimethylsiloxane polymer blend. Research progress on the chemical degradation, mechanical strength, and blood compatibility is reported. (TFD)

  17. Materials testing and requirement for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1975--May 30, 1976

    Andrade, J.D.; Hufferd, W.L.; Lyman, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    The two materials currently being used for the artificial heart fabrication are BIOMER and AVCOTHANE. BIOMER is a polyether urethane polymer. AVCOTHANE is a proprietary polyurethane/polydimethylsiloxane polymer blend. Research progress on the chemical degradation, mechanical strength, and blood compatibility is reported

  18. An innovative, sensorless, pulsatile, continuous-flow total artificial heart: device design and initial in vitro study.

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Horvath, David J; Massiello, Alex L; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Horai, Tetsuya; Rao, Santosh; Golding, Leonard A R

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a very small, innovative, continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) that passively self-balances left and right pump flows and atrial pressures without sensors. This report details the CFTAH design concept and our initial in vitro data. System performance of the CFTAH was evaluated using a mock circulatory loop to determine the range of systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance (SVR and PVR) levels over which the design goal of a maximum absolute atrial pressure difference of 10 mm Hg is achieved for a steady-state flow condition. Pump speed was then modulated at 2,600 +/- 900 rpm to induce flow and arterial pressure pulsation to evaluate the effects of speed pulsations on the system performance. An automatic control mode was also evaluated. Using only passive self-regulation, pump flows were balanced and absolute atrial pressure differences were maintained at mode adjusted pump speed to achieve targeted pump flows based on sensorless calculations of SVR and CFTAH flow. The initial in vitro testing of the CFTAH with a single, valveless, continuous-flow pump demonstrated its passive self-regulation of flows and atrial pressures and a new automatic control mode. Copyright (c) 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The incidence of congenital heart disease: Previous findings and perspectives

    Miranović Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD are the most common of all congenital anomalies, and represent a significant global health problem. Involvement of medical professionals of different profiles has led to drastic changes in survival and quality of life of children with CHD. The motivation for the implementation of the first large population studies on this subject was not only to obtain answers to the question on the level of incidence of CHD, but the harmonization of criteria and protocols for monitoring and treatment of certain defects as well as the planning of medical staff dealing with children with CHD. Data on the incidence varies from 4-10/1000 live births. Fetal echocardiography can have potential impact on decrease of CHD incidence. The increase in incidence may be due to the possibility that children with CHD will grow up and have offsprings. Owing to the progress that has been made, an increasing number of patients experiences adulthood, creating an entirely new and growing population of patients: patients with “adult” CHD. Survivors suffer morbidity resulting from their circulatory abnormalities as well as from medical and surgical therapies they have been subjected to. Application of the achievements of human genome projects will in time lead to drastic changes in the approach to the patients with CHD. Until the time when it is possible, the goal will be further improvement of the existing system of service: networking in a unique, multicenter clinical registry of patients with CHD, as well as upgrading of technical and non-technical conditions for the treatment of patients with CHD. We are in an unprecedented time of change, but are actually at the end of the beginning of making pediatric cardiac care a highly reliable institution.

  20. Self-efficacy in the context of heart transplantation - a new perspective.

    Almgren, Matilda; Lennerling, Annette; Lundmark, Martina; Forsberg, Anna

    2017-10-01

    An in-depth exploration of self-efficacy among heart transplant recipients by means of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. An essential component of chronic illness management is self-management, which refers to activities carried out by people to create order, structure and control in their lives. Self-efficacy is an important aspect of self-management, which seems to have become the main paradigm for long-term management after solid organ transplantation. A directed content analysis using Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Open-ended, in-depth interviews were conducted with 14 heart transplant recipients at their 12-month follow-up after heart transplantation. This study generated the hypothesis that from the patients' perspective, self-efficacy after heart transplantation concerns balancing expectations to find the optimum level of self-efficacy. Performance accomplishment was found to have the greatest impact on self-efficacy, while its absence was the main source of disappointments. It was also revealed that the gap between performance accomplishment and efficacy expectations can be understood as uncertainty. It is essential to assess both expectations and disappointments from the patient perspective in order to promote an optimum level of self-efficacy among heart transplant recipients. This includes supporting the heart recipient to adopt mental and physical adjustment strategies to balance her/his expectations as a means of minimising disappointments. The understanding that uncertainty can undermine self-efficacy is crucial. The merging of the uncertainty in illness and self-efficacy theories provides an excellent framework for the provision of self-management support. In addition, focusing on a partnership between the transplant professionals and the recipient is essential because it minimises the use of a behavioural approach. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Intelligent postoperative morbidity prediction of heart disease using artificial intelligence techniques.

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Hung, Lun-Ping; Shih, Chun-Che; Keh, Huan-Chao; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an advanced minimally invasive surgical technology that is helpful for reducing patients' recovery time, postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study proposes an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR. The ensemble model was developed using a training set of consecutive patients who underwent EVAR between 2000 and 2009. All data required for prediction modeling, including patient demographics, preoperative, co-morbidities, and complication as outcome variables, was collected prospectively and entered into a clinical database. A discretization approach was used to categorize numerical values into informative feature space. Then, the Bayesian network (BN), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM) were adopted as base models, and stacking combined multiple models. The research outcomes consisted of an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR, the occurrence of postoperative complications prospectively recorded, and the causal effect knowledge by BNs with Markov blanket concept.

  2. The patient perspective: Quality of life in advanced heart failure with frequent hospitalisations.

    Nieminen, Markku S; Dickstein, Kenneth; Fonseca, Cândida; Serrano, Jose Magaña; Parissis, John; Fedele, Francesco; Wikström, Gerhard; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Atar, Shaul; Baholli, Loant; Brito, Dulce; Colet, Josep Comín; Édes, István; Gómez Mesa, Juan E; Gorjup, Vojka; Garza, Eduardo Herrera; González Juanatey, José R; Karanovic, Nenad; Karavidas, Apostolos; Katsytadze, Igor; Kivikko, Matti; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Merkely, Béla; Morandi, Fabrizio; Novoa, Angel; Oliva, Fabrizio; Ostadal, Petr; Pereira-Barretto, Antonio; Pollesello, Piero; Rudiger, Alain; Schwinger, Robert H G; Wieser, Manfred; Yavelov, Igor; Zymliński, Robert

    2015-07-15

    End of life is an unfortunate but inevitable phase of the heart failure patients' journey. It is often preceded by a stage in the progression of heart failure defined as advanced heart failure, and characterised by poor quality of life and frequent hospitalisations. In clinical practice, the efficacy of treatments for advanced heart failure is often assessed by parameters such as clinical status, haemodynamics, neurohormonal status, and echo/MRI indices. From the patients' perspective, however, quality-of-life-related parameters, such as functional capacity, exercise performance, psychological status, and frequency of re-hospitalisations, are more significant. The effects of therapies and interventions on these parameters are, however, underrepresented in clinical trials targeted to assess advanced heart failure treatment efficacy, and data are overall scarce. This is possibly due to a non-universal definition of the quality-of-life-related endpoints, and to the difficult standardisation of the data collection. These uncertainties also lead to difficulties in handling trade-off decisions between quality of life and survival by patients, families and healthcare providers. A panel of 34 experts in the field of cardiology and intensive cardiac care from 21 countries around the world convened for reviewing the existing data on quality-of-life in patients with advanced heart failure, discussing and reaching a consensus on the validity and significance of quality-of-life assessment methods. Gaps in routine care and research, which should be addressed, were identified. Finally, published data on the effects of current i.v. vasoactive therapies such as inotropes, inodilators, and vasodilators on quality-of-life in advanced heart failure patients were analysed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. [Artificial organs].

    Raguin, Thibaut; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Debry, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research has been fighting against organ failure and shortage of donations by supplying artificial organs for many years. With the raise of new technologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, many organs can benefit of an artificial equivalent: thanks to retinal implants some blind people can visualize stimuli, an artificial heart can be proposed in case of cardiac failure while awaiting for a heart transplant, artificial larynx enables laryngectomy patients to an almost normal life, while the diabetic can get a glycemic self-regulation controlled by smartphones with an artificial device. Dialysis devices become portable, as well as the oxygenation systems for terminal respiratory failure. Bright prospects are being explored or might emerge in a near future. However, the retrospective assessment of putative side effects is not yet sufficient. Finally, the cost of these new devices is significant even if the advent of three dimensional printers may reduce it. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Heart rate informed artificial pancreas system enhances glycemic control during exercise in adolescents with T1D.

    DeBoer, Mark D; Cherñavvsky, Daniel R; Topchyan, Katarina; Kovatchev, Boris P; Francis, Gary L; Breton, Marc D

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and performance of using a heart rate (HR) monitor to inform an artificial pancreas (AP) system during exercise among adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). In a randomized, cross-over trial, adolescents with T1D age 13 - 18 years were enrolled to receive on separate days either the unmodified UVa AP (stdAP) or an AP system connected to a portable HR monitor (AP-HR) that triggered an exercise algorithm for blood glucose (BG) control. During admissions participants underwent a structured exercise regimen. Hypoglycemic events and CGM tracings were compared between the two admissions, during exercise and for the full 24-hour period. Eighteen participants completed the trial. While number of hypoglycemic events during exercise and rest was not different between visits (0.39 AP-HR vs 0.50 stdAP), time below 70 mg dL -1 was lower on AP-HR compared to stdAP, 0.5±2.1% vs 7.4±12.5% (P = 0.028). Time with BG within 70-180 mg dL -1 was higher for the AP-HR admission vs stdAP during the exercise portion and overall (96% vs 87%, and 77% vs 74%), but these did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.075 and P = 0.366). Heart rate signals can safely and efficaciously be integrated in a wireless AP system to inform of physical activity. While exercise contributes to hypoglycemia among adolescents, even when using an AP system, informing the system of exercise via a HR monitor improved time <70 mg dL -1 . Nonetheless, it did not significantly reduce the total number of hypoglycemic events, which were low in both groups. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Bleeding with the artificial heart: Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in CF-LVAD patients.

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Fradkov, Elena

    2017-06-14

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have significantly improved outcomes for patients with end-stage heart failure when used as a bridge to cardiac transplantation or, more recently, as destination therapy. However, its implantations carries a risk of complications including infection, device malfunction, arrhythmias, right ventricular failure, thromboembolic disease, postoperative and nonsurgical bleeding. A significant number of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) recipients may experience recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage, mainly due to combination of antiplatelet and vitamin K antagonist therapy, activation of fibrinolytic pathway, acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency, and tendency to develop small intestinal angiodysplasias due to increased rotary speed of the pump. Gastrointestinal bleeding in LVAD patients remains a source of increased morbidity including the need for blood transfusions, extended hospital stays, multiple readmissions, and overall mortality. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding in LVAD patients involves multidisciplinary approach in stabilizing the patients, addressing risk factors and performing structured endoluminal evaluation with focus on upper gastrointestinal tract including jejunum to find and eradicate culprit lesion. Medical and procedural intervention is largely successful and universal bleeding cessation occurs in transplanted patients.

  6. Exploring partners' perspectives on participation in heart failure home care: a mixed-method design.

    Näsström, Lena; Luttik, Marie Louise; Idvall, Ewa; Strömberg, Anna

    2017-05-01

    To describe the partners' perspectives on participation in the care for patients with heart failure receiving home care. Partners are often involved in care of patients with heart failure and have an important role in improving patients' well-being and self-care. Partners have described both negative and positive experiences of involvement, but knowledge of how partners of patients with heart failure view participation in care when the patient receives home care is lacking. A convergent parallel mixed-method design was used, including data from interviews and questionnaires. A purposeful sample of 15 partners was used. Data collection lasted between February 2010 - December 2011. Interviews were analysed with content analysis and data from questionnaires (participation, caregiving, health-related quality of life, depressive symptoms) were analysed statistically. Finally, results were merged, interpreted and labelled as comparable and convergent or as being inconsistent. Partners were satisfied with most aspects of participation, information and contact. Qualitative findings revealed four different aspects of participation: adapting to the caring needs and illness trajectory, coping with caregiving demands, interacting with healthcare providers and need for knowledge to comprehend the health situation. Results showed confirmatory results that were convergent and expanded knowledge that gave a broader understanding of partner participation in this context. The results revealed different levels of partner participation. Heart failure home care included good opportunities for both participation and contact during home visits, necessary to meet partners' ongoing need for information to comprehend the situation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Progress report, September 1, 1974--August 31, 1975

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Wentworth, R.A.; Cady, K.B.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the biological effects of radiation from mock plutonium power sources in dogs and a study of the feasibility of a tissue heat sink for waste heat from such sources in calves. It is also designed to evaluate effects of heat and radiation from plutonium sources in calves. The work is part of a program to evaluate the use of plutonium as a power source for an artificial heart device. A total of 60 dogs have been implanted with mock plutonium sources (producing a similar radiation flux as plutonium but having no associated heat) at levels of from 1 to 70 times the expected radiation flux from a 30 watt plutonium source. Results up to 4.5 years after implantation indicate that mammals may be able to tolerate the radiation flux from such sources. Results in calves indicate that 30 watts of additional endogenous heat can be dissipated to a connective tissue covered heat exchanger with a surface area of 494 cm 2 providing a heat flux of 0.06 watts/cm 2 . (U.S.)

  8. Advancements in artificial heart valve disks using nano-sized thin films deposited by CVD and sol-gel techniques

    Kousar, Y.; Ali, N.; Neto, V.F.; Mei, S.; Gracio, J.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although, PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti- coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimise the formation of thrombosis. However, the anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, namely, strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and the coefficient of friction values were obtained from the pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also, in this paper we report the preparation of free standing nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapor deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO/sub 2/) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO/sub 2/ coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis. (author)

  9. The Carmat Bioprosthetic Total Artificial Heart Is Associated With Early Hemostatic Recovery and no Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome in Calves.

    Smadja, David M; Susen, Sophie; Rauch, Antoine; Cholley, Bernard; Latrémouille, Christian; Duveau, Daniel; Zilberstein, Luca; Méléard, Denis; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Belle, Eric Van; Gaussem, Pascale; Capel, Antoine; Jansen, Piet; Carpentier, Alain

    2017-10-01

    To determine hemostasis perturbations, including von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers, after implantation of a new bioprosthetic and pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH). Preclinical study SETTING: Single-center biosurgical research laboratory. Female Charolais calves, 2-to-6 months old, weighing 102-to-122 kg. Surgical implantation of TAH through a mid-sternotomy approach. Four of 12 calves had a support duration of several days (4, 4, 8, and 10 days), allowing for the exploration of early steps of hemostasis parameters, including prothrombin time; coagulation factor levels (II, V, VII+X, and fibrinogen); and platelet count. Multimeric analysis of VWF was performed to detect a potential loss of high-molecular weight (HMW) multimers, as previously described for continuous flow rotary blood pumps. Despite the absence of anticoagulant treatment administered in the postoperative phase, no signs of coagulation activation were detected. Indeed, after an immediate postsurgery decrease of prothrombin time, platelet count, and coagulation factor levels, most parameters returned to baseline values. HMW multimers of VWF remained stable either after initiation or during days of support. Coagulation parameters and platelet count recovery in the postoperative phase of the Carmat TAH (Camat SA, Velizy Villacoublay Cedex, France) implantation in calves, in the absence of anticoagulant treatment and associated with the absence of decrease in HMW multimers of VWF, is in line with early hemocompatibility that is currently being validated in human clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Flow Rate Through Pigtail Catheter Used for Left Heart Decompression in an Artificial Model of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuit.

    Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Tae Hee; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Moon, Sung Ho; Park, Hyun Oh; Choi, Jun Young; Yang, Jun Ho; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Chung Eun; Yun, Jeong Hee

    In refractory cardiogenic shock, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be initiated. Although left heart decompression can be accomplished by insertion of a left atrial (LA) or left ventricular (LV) cannula using a percutaneous pigtail catheter, the venting flow rate according to catheter size and ECMO flow rate is unknown. We developed an artificial ECMO circuit. One liter saline bag with its pressure set to 20 mm Hg was connected to ECMO to mimic LV failure. A pigtail catheter was inserted into the 1 L saline bag to simulate LV unloading. For each pigtail catheter size (5-8 Fr) and ECMO flow rate (2.0-4.0 L/min), the moving distance of an air bubble that was injected through a three-way stopcock was measured in the arterial pressure line between the pigtail catheter and ECMO inflow limb. The flow rate was then calculated. We obtained the following equation to estimate the pigtail catheter flow rate.Pigtail vent catheter flow rate (ml/min) = 8×ECMOflow rate(L /min)+9×pigtail catheter size(Fr)- 57This equation would aid in designing of a further study to determine optimal venting flow rate. To achieve optimal venting flow, our equation would enable selection of an adequate catheter size.

  11. Patient with a total artificial heart maintained on outpatient dialysis while listed for combined organ transplant, a single center experience.

    Hanna, Ramy M; Hasnain, Huma; Kamgar, Mohammad; Hanna, Mina; Minasian, Raffi; Wilson, James

    2017-10-01

    Advanced mechanical circulatory support is increasingly being used with more sophisticated devices that can deliver pulsatile rather than continuous flow. These devices are more portable as well, allowing patients to await cardiac transplantation in an outpatient setting. It is known that patients with renal failure are at increased risk for developing worsening acute kidney injury during implantation of a ventricular assist device (VAD) or more advanced modalities like a total artificial heart (TAH). Dealing with patients who have an implanted TAH who develop renal failure has been a challenge with the majority of such patients having to await a combined cardiac and renal transplant prior to transition to outpatient care. Protocols do exist for VAD implanted patients to be transitioned to outpatient dialysis care, but there are no reported cases of TAH patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) being successfully transitioned to outpatient dialysis care. In this report, we identify a patient with a TAH and ESRD transitioned successfully to outpatient hemodialysis and maintained for more than 2 years, though he did not survive to transplant. It is hoped that this report will raise awareness of this possibility, and assist in the development of protocols for similar patients to be successfully transitioned to outpatient dialysis care. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  12. Experimental method to reveal the effect of rotor magnet size and air gap on artificial heart driving motor torque and efficiency.

    Qian, K X; Yuan, H Y; Ru, W M; Zeng, P

    2002-01-01

    To investigate experimentally the effect of rotor magnet design on artificial heart driving motor performance, seven rotors with different magnet lengths or thicknesses, as well as different peripheral angles, were manufactured and tested in the same motor stator with different rotating speeds. The input power (voltage and current) and output torque were measured and the motor efficiency was computed. The results demonstrated that the reduction of rotor magnet size and the enlargement of the air gap between the rotor magnets and the stator coil core have no significant effect on motor efficiency, but will reduce the torque value on which the motor achieves the highest efficiency; it could be remedied however by increasing the rotating speed, because the torque at the high efficiency point will increase along with the rotating speed. These results may provide a basis for developing small rotor magnets, large air gap and high efficiency motors for driving an artificial heart pump.

  13. Perspectives of Puerto Rican Adults about Heart Health and a Potential Community Program.

    Todorova, Irina L G; Tejada, Shirley; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    Puerto Ricans are the second largest Hispanic group in the U.S. and older adults have significant health disparities. Educational programs that address heart disease risk for this population have rarely been developed and implemented. To address this gap, the Heart Healthy Initiative for Puerto Rican adults is being developed. To develop it as a participatory program, the community members were asked about their perspectives. Five focus groups with 28 participants, aged 45-60, were conducted, transcribed and analyzed using Thematic Analysis. In-depth analysis of meanings of health promoting behaviors, in the context of cultural beliefs and values was carried out. The following themes were identified: Health as balance and integration; Health as connection of self, connection with others; Cultural meanings of lifestyle choices; Stresses and struggles. Participants suggested that the program should have significant variety and a holistic perspective, be sensitive to different needs and motivations, stimulate mutual understanding and shared cultural meanings. The program needs to support lifestyle changes which maximally preserve traditions and to introduce multi-level changes. The identified cultural meanings of diet, physical activity and relationships were taken into account to develop the educational curriculum.

  14. Perspectives for the information approach application to natural and artificial ecosystems investigation

    Lankin, Yuliy

    As a methodological matter, all modern conceptions of life development can be subdivided into the substrate (S), the energetic (E) and the informational (I). The S-conception is based on biochemical, genetic and morphological ideas. The E-conception deals with an idea of development of complicated open systems (COS) which are characterized by energy getting constantly from the outside, by improvement of substance cycles and as speeding-up and increasing of "power" of them as well, and by increasing of energy intensity transformation by the each structure of COS. The I-conception has been developing so far in the main within the frameworks of the traditional both cybernetic ideas and information theory that are convenient for many technical applications but are deficient for investigation of ecoand bio-systems. Situation was changed when the conception of adaptive systems (CAS) based on the ideas of ecology, biology and neurocybernetic (neuroinforamtic) had offered. As a consequence of this, the I-conception based on the CAS well accords with the S- and the E-conceptions and allows to hope to their combine into one the S + E + I conception that will include all virtues of the S-, the E-, and the I-conceptions and eliminate of their limitations. Thanks to relative easiness of hierarchic adaptive nonlinear models making using of the CAS, it is possible overcome effectively both of the problems as the "dimensionality problem" and the "loss of stability" as well for complicated models of ecosystems (CME). Optimization of energy and substance consumption process and adaptation of the CME to changes of current conditions are well realized in ranges given by goal function. A use adaptive networks (including neural nets) in frames of the CAS allows to realize any continuous function in control loops and at information processing. The considered features of the S + E + I proposed approach based on the CAS make it perspective for construction as biosphere models and

  15. Bridge to transplantation using paracorporeal biventricular assist devices or the syncardia temporary total artificial heart: is there a difference?

    Nguyen, A; Pozzi, M; Mastroianni, C; Léger, P; Loisance, D; Pavie, A; Leprince, P; Kirsch, M

    2015-06-01

    Biventricular support can be achieved using paracorporeal ventricular assist devices (p-BiVAD) or the Syncardia temporary total artificial heart (t-TAH). The purpose of the present study was to compare survival and morbidity between these devices. Data from 2 French neighboring hospitals were reviewed. Between 1996 and 2009, 148 patients (67 p-BiVADs and 81 t-TAH) underwent primary, planned biventricular support. There were 128 (86%) males aged 44±13 years. Preoperatively, p-BiVAD recipients had significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures, more severe hepatic cytolysis and higher white blood cell counts than t-TAH recipients. In contrast, t-TAH patients had significantly higher rates of pre-implant ECLS and hemofiltration. Mean support duration was 79±100 days for the p-BiVAD group and 71±92 for t-TAH group (P=0.6). Forty two (63%) p-BiVAD recipients were bridged to transplantation (39, 58%) or recovery (3, 5%), whereas 51 (63%) patients underwent transplantation in the t-TAH group. Death on support was similar between groups (p-BiVAD, 26 (39%); t-TAH, 30 (37%); P=0.87). Survival while on device was not significantly different between patient groups and multivariate analysis showed that only preimplant diastolic blood pressure and alanine amino-transferase levels were significant predictors of death. Post-transplant survival in the p-BiVAD group was 76±7%, 70±8%, and 58±9% at 1, 3, and 5 years after transplantation, respectively, and was similar to that of the t-TAH group (77±6%, 72±6%, and 70±7%, P=0.60). Survival while on support and up to 5 years after heart transplantation was not significantly different in patients supported by p-BiVADs or t-TAH. Multivariate analysis revealed that survival while on transplantation was not affected by the type of device implanted.

  16. First Report of 90-Day Support of Two Calves with a Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    Karimov, Jamshid H.; Moazami, Nader; Kobayashi, Mariko; Sale, Shiva; Such, Kimberly; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Gao, Shengqiang; Kuban, Barry; Golding, Leonard A.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) is a compact, single-piece, valveless, pulsatile pump providing self-regulated hemodynamic output to left/right circulation. We evaluated chronic in vivo pump performance, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters, and biocompatibility of the CFTAH in a well-established calf model. Methods CFTAH pumps have been implanted in 17 calves total. Hemodynamics, pump performance, and device-related adverse events were evaluated during studies and at necropsy. Results In vivo experiments demonstrated good hemodynamic performance (pump flow, 7.3 ± 0.7 L/min; left atrial pressure [LAP], 16 ± 3 mm Hg; right atrial pressure [RAP], 17 ± 3 mm Hg; RAP-LAP difference, 1 ± 2 mm Hg; mean arterial pressure, 103 ± 7 mm Hg; arterial pulse pressure, 30 ± 11 mm Hg; pulmonary arterial pressure, 34 ± 5 mm Hg). The CFTAH has operated within design specifications and never failed. With ever-improving pump design, the implants have shown no chronic hemolysis. Three recent animals with the CFTAH recovered well, with no postoperative anticoagulation, during planned in vivo durations of 30, 90, and 90 days (last two were intended to be 90-day studies). All these longest-surviving cases showed good biocompatibility, with no thromboembolism in organs. Conclusions The current CFTAH has demonstrated reliable self-regulation of hemodynamic output and acceptable biocompatibility without anticoagulation throughout 90 days of chronic implantation in calves. Meeting these milestones is in accord with our strategy to achieve transfer of this unique technology to surgical practice, thus filling the urgent need for cardiac replacement devices as destination therapy. PMID:26173607

  17. Cyclic stress-strain behavior of polymeric nonwoven structures for the use as artificial leaflet material for transcatheter heart valve prostheses

    Arbeiter Daniela

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xenogenic leaflet material, bovine and porcine pericardium, is widely used for the fabrication of surgically implanted and transcatheter heart valve prostheses. As a biological material, long term durability of pericardium is limited due to calcification, degeneration and homogeneity. Therefore, polymeric materials represent a promising approach for a next generation of artificial heart valve leaflets with improved durability. Within the current study we analyzed the mechanical performance of polymeric structures based on elastomeric materials. Polymeric cast films were prepared and nonwovens were manufactured in an electrospinning process. Analysis of cyclic stress-strain behavior was performed, using a universal testing machine. The uniaxial cyclic tensile experiments of the elastomeric samples yielded a non-linear elastic response due to viscoelastic behavior with hysteresis. Equilibrium of stress-strain curves was found after a specific number of cycles, for cast films and nonwovens, respectively. In conclusion, preconditioning was found obligatory for the evaluation of the mechanical performance of polymeric materials for the use as artificial leaflet material for heart valve prostheses.

  18. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective

    Fangerau, H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis—obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs—seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859–1924), the founding father of artificial parthogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  19. First report of 90-day support of 2 calves with a continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Moazami, Nader; Kobayashi, Mariko; Sale, Shiva; Such, Kimberly; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Gao, Shengqiang; Kuban, Barry; Golding, Leonard A R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-09-01

    The Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) is a compact, single-piece, valveless, pulsatile pump providing self-regulated hemodynamic output to left/right circulation. We evaluated chronic in vivo pump performance, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters, and biocompatibility of the CFTAH in a well-established calf model. CFTAH pumps have been implanted in 17 calves total. Hemodynamic parameters, pump performance, and device-related adverse events were evaluated during studies and at necropsy. In vivo experiments demonstrated good hemodynamic performance (pump flow, 7.3 ± 0.7 L/min; left atrial pressure, 16 ± 3 mm Hg; right atrial pressure, 17 ± 3 mm Hg; right atrial pressure-left atrial pressure difference, 1 ± 2 mm Hg; mean arterial pressure, 103 ± 7 mm Hg; arterial pulse pressure, 30 ± 11 mm Hg; and pulmonary arterial pressure, 34 ± 5 mm Hg). The CFTAH has operated within design specifications and never failed. With ever-improving pump design, the implants have shown no chronic hemolysis. Three animals with recent CFTAH implantation recovered well, with no postoperative anticoagulation, during planned in vivo durations of 30, 90, and 90 days (last 2 were intended to be 90-day studies). All these longest-surviving cases showed good biocompatibility, with no thromboembolism in organs. The current CFTAH has demonstrated reliable self-regulation of hemodynamic output and acceptable biocompatibility without anticoagulation throughout 90 days of chronic implantation in calves. Meeting these milestones is in accord with our strategy to achieve transfer of this unique technology to human surgical practice, thus filling the urgent need for cardiac replacement devices as destination therapy. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass print media depictions of cancer and heart disease: community versus individualistic perspectives?

    Clarke, Juanne; van Amerom, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a critical discourse content analysis of 40 stories from the 20 highest circulating English-language mass magazines available in Canada and published in Canada or the USA in 2001. It examines the presence or absence of the social determinants perspective in the portrayal of the two most significant causes of morbidity and mortality in these countries: cancer and heart disease. The media analysis documents an absence of reflection of the social determinants viewpoint on these, the most important causes of disease and death. Thus, magazine stories ignore the role of such considerations as income, education level, ethnicity, visible minority or, Aboriginal status, early life experiences, employment and working conditions, food accessibility and quality, housing, social services, social exclusion, or unemployment and employment security in explaining health. Instead, the magazine articles underscore an individualistic approach to disease that assumes that health care is accessible and available to all, and that these diseases are preventable and treatable through individual lifestyle choices in combination with the measures prescribed through conventional medicine. Although cancer and heart disease are framed by a medical discourse, articles tended to emphasise the independence, freedom and power of the individual within the medical care system. The research documents a continuation of the dominance of conventional medicine buttressed by individualism in media stories. Theoretical and methodological issues are discussed. Some of the practical consequences for policy-makers and professionals are noted.

  1. Scientific approaches and techniques for negotiation : a game theoretic and artificial intelligence perspective

    E.H. Gerding (Enrico); D.D.B. van Bragt; J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDue to the rapid growth of electronic environments (such as the Internet) much research is currently being performed on autonomous trading mechanisms. This report contains an overview of the current literature on negotiations in the fields of game theory and artificial intelligence (AI).

  2. Getting a New Heart

    ... may be able to replace it with an artificial (man-made) valve. Cardiac size reduction . During this procedure, your doctor removes a piece of the heart muscle from an enlarged heart. This makes your heart ...

  3. Hydro-mechanical foundation for blood swirling vortex flows formation in the cardio-vascular system and the problem of artificial heart creation

    Sergey G. Chefranov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Leonardo da Vinci perhaps was the first who paid attention to the energetic efficiency of existence of vortices emerging near sines of Valsalva and defining normal functioning (opening of aortal valve. However up to now a fundamental problem of defining of mechanisms of mysterious energetic efficiency of functioning of cardio-vascular system (CVS of blood feeding of the organism is still remaining significantly not solved and this is, for example, one of the main restriction for the creation of artificial heart and corresponding valve systems. In the present paper, results witnessing possible important role of the very hydro-mechanical mechanism in the realization of the noted energetic efficiency of CVS due to formation in the CVS of spiral structural organization of the arterial blood flow observed by methods of MRT and color Doppler-measuring in the left ventricular of the heart and in aorta.

  4. Experimental study of physical properties of artificial materials for the development of the tissue-engineered valvular heart apparatus in comparison with biological analogs

    Chiryatyeva, Aleksandra; Trebushat, Dmitry; Prokhorokhin, Aleksei; Khakhalkin, Vladimir; Andreev, Mark; Novokhreschenov, Aleksei; Kretov, Evgeny

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Valvular heart disease often requires valve repair or replacement. Today, surgery uses xenograft—porcine or bovine pericardium. However, bioprosthetic valves do not ensure sufficient durability. We investigated 0.6% glutaraldehyde-treated porcine pericardium to define its properties. Using a tensile test stand, we studied characteristics of the polymeric material—expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)—and compared it to xenopericardium. The artificial material provides a better durability; it has higher elastic modulus and ultimate tensile strength. However, ePTFE samples demonstrated direction anisotropy due to extrusion features. It requires the enhancement of quality of the ePTFE sheet or investigation of other polymeric materials to find the adequate replacement for bioprosthetic heart valves.

  5. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  6. Translation of First North American 50 and 70 cc Total Artificial Heart Virtual and Clinical Implantations: Utility of 3D Computed Tomography to Test Fit Devices.

    Ferng, Alice S; Oliva, Isabel; Jokerst, Clinton; Avery, Ryan; Connell, Alana M; Tran, Phat L; Smith, Richard G; Khalpey, Zain

    2017-08-01

    Since the creation of SynCardia's 50 cc Total Artificial Hearts (TAHs), patients with irreversible biventricular failure now have two sizing options. Herein, a case series of three patients who have undergone successful 50 and 70 cc TAH implantation with complete closure of the chest cavity utilizing preoperative "virtual implantation" of different sized devices for surgical planning are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images were used for preoperative planning prior to TAH implantation. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of preoperative chest CT images were generated and both 50 and 70 cc TAHs were virtually implanted into patients' thoracic cavities. During the simulation, the TAHs were projected over the native hearts in a similar position to the actual implantation, and the relationship between the devices and the atria, ventricles, chest wall, and diaphragm were assessed. The 3D reconstructed images and virtual modeling were used to simulate and determine for each patient if the 50 or 70 cc TAH would have a higher likelihood of successful implantation without complications. Subsequently, all three patients received clinical implants of the properly sized TAH based on virtual modeling, and their chest cavities were fully closed. This virtual implantation increases our confidence that the selected TAH will better fit within the thoracic cavity allowing for improved surgical outcome. Clinical implantation of the TAHs showed that our virtual modeling was an effective method for determining the correct fit and sizing of 50 and 70 cc TAHs. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prospects for using implanted systems of assisted circulation and artificial heart with a radioisotope power source (biomedical, thermal, and radiation aspects)

    Kiselev, I M; Dubrovskii, G P; Mosidze, T G; Bazhanov, A I.U.

    1983-02-01

    The capacity of dogs to diffuse heat (up to 50 W) from an artificial heart and to tolerate prolonged intracorporeal ionizing radiation from a radioisotope power source (/sup 238/Pu) was investigated, using electrical models of vascular blood heat exchangers that permit reproduction of elimination and heat transmission in autonomous systems. It was shown that up to 50 W can be discharged at temperatures of the wall-blood interface that do not exceed 43 degrees C. Clotting indexes, concentration of total protein, hemolysis, and serum enzyme activity during 1-1.5 months of heating remained within physiologically normal limits. A specific power load of up to 1.5 W/kg at ambient temperatures of 18-20 degrees C revealed no evidence of changes in heat production. By measuring the distribution of power of the dose absorbed around a 45-W plutonium source it was possible to estimate dose loads on critical organs and to assess overall risk of death from malignant tumors induced by radiation over a 10-year period: 6-12% for males and 8-14% for females. It is not very probable that use of the artificial heart with a radioisotope power source will be limited by thermal and radiational effects.

  8. Artificial reefs as a conservation tool: biodiversity assessment and perspectives in SE Brazil

    Marcelo Soeth

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Artificial reefs (ARs has been suggested as a possible tool for reef fish restoration and biodiversity rehabilitation. In Brazil, and since 1996, ARs has been implemented in the continental shelf between latitudes of 25.6-25.8 S. Underwater visual censuses (UVC of fishes were conducted from 2010 to 2015 at both artificial (AR and natural rocky (NR reefs to assess similarity at local sites. NR were natural formations with an average depth of 10 meters, and UVC were performed between 6 to 8 meters. Protected AR (PAR were installed between the years 1996 to 2001 at depths ranging from 15 to 18 meters. It consist of a total of 1788 hollow blocks (2.4-3.6 m2 divided into eleven groups. Non protected AR (NPAR have been implemented between the years 2010 and 2012 at depths between 9 to 12 meters. It consist of a total of 2832 rectangular hollow blocks (1.2 m2 distributed in 10 parallel groups near the coastal line. Since 2013, NR and PAR were classified as marine protected areas (MPAs. A total of 69 fish species, distributed in 38 families and 10 orders were recorded during the UVC. PERMANOVA analysis showed a decreasing similarity between the NPAR and PAR (20.3%, NR and PAR (15.9%, and NR and NPAR (10.5%. The density of fish showed a strong correlation with the ARs, probably due to a higher perimeter-to-area ratio. Species richness and Shannon diversity index were correlated with NR, such as taxonomic distinctness was correlated to NPAR. Pielou's evenness index and taxonomic diversity were negatively correlated with PAR. Five threatened species (following IUCN, Epinephelus itajara, Epinephelus marginatus, Hyporthodus niveatus, Lutjanus cyanopterus and Lutjanus analis were recorded, which were noticeably more abundant in PAR, namely the former. The hereby data suggested the importance of the implementation of artificial reefs for conservation purposes, namely within MPAs.

  9. Architecture and biological applications of artificial neural networks: a tuberculosis perspective.

    Darsey, Jerry A; Griffin, William O; Joginipelli, Sravanthi; Melapu, Venkata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of science and technology has prompted researchers to develop new intelligent systems that can solve a variety of problems such as pattern recognition, prediction, and optimization. The ability of the human brain to learn in a fashion that tolerates noise and error has attracted many researchers and provided the starting point for the development of artificial neural networks: the intelligent systems. Intelligent systems can acclimatize to the environment or data and can maximize the chances of success or improve the efficiency of a search. Due to massive parallelism with large numbers of interconnected processers and their ability to learn from the data, neural networks can solve a variety of challenging computational problems. Neural networks have the ability to derive meaning from complicated and imprecise data; they are used in detecting patterns, and trends that are too complex for humans, or other computer systems. Solutions to the toughest problems will not be found through one narrow specialization; therefore we need to combine interdisciplinary approaches to discover the solutions to a variety of problems. Many researchers in different disciplines such as medicine, bioinformatics, molecular biology, and pharmacology have successfully applied artificial neural networks. This chapter helps the reader in understanding the basics of artificial neural networks, their applications, and methodology; it also outlines the network learning process and architecture. We present a brief outline of the application of neural networks to medical diagnosis, drug discovery, gene identification, and protein structure prediction. We conclude with a summary of the results from our study on tuberculosis data using neural networks, in diagnosing active tuberculosis, and predicting chronic vs. infiltrative forms of tuberculosis.

  10. The economic aspects of artificial snow production in the perspective of climate change

    Gonseth, C.

    2012-04-01

    Snowmaking is now used by ski resorts worldwide as a measure to cope with both natural snow reduction and variability. This extensive recourse casts doubt on its sustainability mainly because of the large amount of natural resources being used (energy, water). In the middle to long run, this problem is expected to increase with future climate change triggering the production of more snow. The research field that focuses on the economic aspects of artificial snow production is still in its infancy but potentially covers a wide array of issues. Among these issues, benefits and costs of snowmaking are important ones. On the one hand, benefits arise as snowmaking extends or preserves the operating period of ski areas. Several empirical studies speculate or show that snowmaking considerably reduces the sensitivity of tourism consumption to variations in snow conditions. These benefits have long been neglected in studies analyzing the consequences of climate change for the winter tourism sector. While failing to introduce these benefits, many studies have generated overly high costs of climate change. On the other hand, investments and operating costs of artificial snow production depend upon several factors, such as technology and local conditions. Consequently, costs vary considerably from one location to another and over time, yet indicative values can be found in the literature. In addition, artificial snow production generates external costs, i.e. costs that are not born by those producing it. Typical of these external costs are environmental ones that are related to CO2 emissions or biodiversity losses. To our knowledge, very little has been done so far to integrate these costs in economic studies. To the extent that vertical integration is absent, it may happen as well that snow production generates important external benefits for different stakeholders at a given ski resort. From an economic point of view, both types of externalities could lead to investment

  11. Development of the hearts of lizards and snakes and perspectives to cardiac evolution

    Jensen, Bjarke; van den Berg, Gert; van den Doel, Rick; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Wang, Tobias; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Birds and mammals both developed high performance hearts from a heart that must have been reptile-like and the hearts of extant reptiles have an unmatched variability in design. Yet, studies on cardiac development in reptiles are largely old and further studies are much needed as reptiles are

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation patient's perspectives on the recovery following heart valve surgery: a narrative analysis

    Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina

    2016-01-01

    collected data over 18 months (April 2013-October 2014). We recruited nine patients undergoing heart valve surgery from a randomized trial, CopenHeartVR and conducted 27 individual narrative interviews at 2-3 weeks, 3-4 months and 8-9 months after surgery. FINDINGS: Following heart valve surgery...

  13. An Artificial Neural Networks Approach to Estimate Occupational Accident: A National Perspective for Turkey

    Hüseyin Ceylan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational accident estimation models were developed by using artificial neural networks (ANNs for Turkey. Using these models the number of occupational accidents and death and permanent incapacity numbers resulting from occupational accidents were estimated for Turkey until the year of 2025 by the three different scenarios. In the development of the models, insured workers, workplace, occupational accident, death, and permanent incapacity values were used as model parameters with data between 1970 and 2012. 2-5-1 neural network architecture was selected as the best network architecture. Sigmoid was used in hidden layers and linear function was used at output layer. The feed forward back propagation algorithm was used to train the network. In order to obtain a useful model, the network was trained between 1970 and 1999 to estimate the values of 2000 to 2012. The result was compared with the real values and it was seen that it is applicable for this aim. The performances of all developed models were evaluated using mean absolute percent errors (MAPE, mean absolute errors (MAE, and root mean square errors (RMSE.

  14. A positive perspective of knowledge, attitude, and practices for health-promoting behaviors of adolescents with congenital heart disease.

    Huang, Hui-Ru; Chen, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chin-Mi; Yang, Hsiao-Ling; Su, Wen-Jen; Wang, Jou-Kou; Tsai, Pei-Kwei

    2018-03-01

    Health-promoting behaviors could serve as a major strategy to optimize long-term outcomes for adolescents with congenital heart disease. The associations assessed from a positive perspective of knowledge, attitudes, and practice model would potentially cultivate health-promoting behaviors during adolescence. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between disease knowledge, resilience, family functioning, and health-promoting behaviors in adolescents with congenital heart disease. A total of 320 adolescents with congenital heart disease who were aged 12-18 years were recruited from pediatric cardiology outpatient departments, and participated in a cross-sectional survey. The participants completed the Leuven Knowledge Questionnaire for Congenital Heart Disease; Haase Adolescent Resilience in Illness Scale; Family Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve; and Adolescent Health Promotion scales. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and three multiple regression models. Greater knowledge of prevention of complications and higher resilience had a more powerful effect in enhancing health-promoting behaviors. Having symptoms and moderate or severe family dysfunction were significantly more negatively predictive of health-promoting behaviors than not having symptoms and positive family function. The third model explained 40% of the variance in engaging in health-promoting behaviors among adolescents with congenital heart disease. The findings of this study provide new insights into the role of disease knowledge, resilience, and family functioning in the health-promoting behavior of adolescents with congenital heart disease. Continued efforts are required to plan family care programs that promote the acquisition of sufficient disease knowledge and the development of resilience for adolescents with congenital heart disease.

  15. Patient, carer and professional perspectives on barriers and facilitators to quality care in advanced heart failure.

    Susan Browne

    Full Text Available Those with advanced heart failure (HF experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care.Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30, carers (n = 20, and professionals (n = 65. Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT as the underpinning conceptual framework.Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom.Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor experiences could be improved to a large extent by

  16. Application, difficulties and perspectives of artificial recharge of groundwater in Spain; Aplicacion, dificultades y perspectivas de la recarga artificial de acuiferos en Espana

    Perez-Paricio, A.

    2001-07-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater is an extremely useful techniques for the management of water resources. This is why artificial recharge is viewed as an essential component of water supply systems in some countries. Because spreading scientific-technical knowledge is a key to combat misconceptions, this paper describes the results obtained in an European project, where the author participated as representative of the Technical University of Catalonia. the variety of topics addressed by this project and the status of artificial recharge in other regions contrast notoriously with the current situation in Spain, as explained in the paper. Nowadays, there are symptoms of improvement, but it is still necessary a conceptual change. This requires more imaginative plants that take advantage of treated waste-water and storm water, as well as their integration with alternative measures, such as desalination, reuse, optimization of water distribution and irrigation networks and the management of water demand. (Author) 25 refs.

  17. Home Discharge and Out-of-Hospital Follow-Up of Total Artificial Heart Patients Supported by a Portable Driver System

    2014-01-01

    To enhance ambulation and facilitate hospital discharge of total artificial heart (TAH)–supported patients, we adapted a mobile ventricular assistance device (VAD) driver (Excor) for TAH use and report on the performance of Excor-driven TAH patients discharged home. Ten patients stabilized on a TAH, driven by the CSS (“Circulatory Support System”), were progressively switched over to the Excor in hospital over 14 days as a pilot, with daily hemodynamics and laboratory parameters measured. Twenty-two stable TAH patients were subsequently placed on the Excor, trained, and discharged home. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters were followed. All pilot study patients were clinically stable on the Excor, with no decrease in TAH output noted (6.3 + 0.3 L/min [day 1] vs. 5.8 + 0.2 L/min [day 14], p = 0.174), with a trend suggesting improvement of both hepatic and renal function. Twenty-two TAH patients were subsequently successfully discharged home on the portable driver and were supported out of hospital for up to 598 days (range, 2–598; mean = 179 ± 140 days), remaining ambulatory, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I or II, and free of readmission for 88.5% of the time of support. TAH patients may be effectively and safely supported by a mobile drive system. As such, the utility of the TAH may be extended to support patients beyond the hospital, at home, with overall ambulatory freedom. PMID:24577369

  18. [Analysis of the causes of potential wear and breakdown of elements of artificial heart valves of the disk type].

    Dobrova, N B; Iofis, N A; Kozyrkin, B I; Agafonov, A V; Zaretskiĭ, Iu V

    1987-01-01

    The reliability analysis of the artificial cardiac valve and experiments made it possible to establish that the ACV reliability is ensured by the physical and mechanical properties of the material, technology observance and thorough control over each operation during the manufacturing process. The accelerated testing of the new MX disk valve made in the USSR showed a satisfactory degree of the disk wear and the absence of breaks-down after 400 million working cycles which is equivalent to ten-years' work in a human body.

  19. Infection and twiddler syndrome in a dog with addison's disease, complete heart block, and wandering artificial pacemakers

    Hill, R.C.; Buchanan, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Third degree heart block developed in an obese, 10-year-old Labrador retriever with adrenocortical failure. A permanent transthoracic pacemaker was fitted, but the pulse generator migrated 2 years later, to the ventral part of the flank, where an abscess formed. A new pacemaker was fitted, but also migrated and rotated and a syndrome analogous to Twiddler's syndrome in man developed. After a further 2 years the second pacemaker was located, encapsulated within the right pleural cavity. Culture of the brownish exudate around the pulse generator yielded Pseudomonas sp

  20. Fear and distress disorders as predictors of heart disease : A temporal perspective

    Roest, A M; de Jonge, P; Lim, C W W; Stein, D J; Al-Hamzawi, A; Alonso, J; Benjet, C; Bruffaerts, R; Bunting, B; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M; Ciutan, M; de Girolamo, G; Hu, C; Levinson, D; Nakamura, Y; Navarro-Mateu, F; Piazza, M; Posada-Villa, J; Torres, Y; Wojtyniak, B; Kessler, R C; Scott, K M

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have been able to contrast associations of anxiety and depression with heart disease. These disorders can be grouped in fear and distress disorders. Aim of this study was to study the association between fear and distress disorders with subsequent heart disease, taking into

  1. Perspectives of Puerto Rican Adults about Heart Health and a Potential Community Program

    Todorova, Irina L. G.; Tejada, Shirley; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Puerto Ricans are the second largest Hispanic group in the United States, and older adults have significant health disparities. Educational programs that address heart disease risk for this population have rarely been developed and implemented. Purpose: To address this gap, the Heart Healthy Initiative for Puerto Rican adults is being…

  2. Application of convolutional artificial neural networks to echocardiograms for differentiating congenital heart diseases in a pediatric population

    Perrin, Douglas P.; Bueno, Alejandra; Rodriguez, Andrea; Marx, Gerald R.; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we describe a pilot study, where machine learning methods are used to differentiate between congenital heart diseases. Our approach was to apply convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to echocardiographic images from five different pediatric populations: normal, coarctation of the aorta (CoA), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and single ventricle (SV). We used a single network topology that was trained in a pairwise fashion in order to evaluate the potential to differentiate between patient populations. In total we used 59,151 echo frames drawn from 1,666 clinical sequences. Approximately 80% of the data was used for training, and the remainder for validation. Data was split at sequence boundaries to avoid having related images in the training and validation sets. While training was done with echo images/frames, evaluation was performed for both single frame discrimination as well as sequence discrimination (by majority voting). In total 10 networks were generated and evaluated. Unlike other domains where this network topology has been used, in ultrasound there is low visual variation between classes. This work shows the potential for CNNs to be applied to this low-variation domain of medical imaging for disease discrimination.

  3. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  4. Development of the hearts of lizards and snakes and perspectives to cardiac evolution.

    Bjarke Jensen

    Full Text Available Birds and mammals both developed high performance hearts from a heart that must have been reptile-like and the hearts of extant reptiles have an unmatched variability in design. Yet, studies on cardiac development in reptiles are largely old and further studies are much needed as reptiles are starting to become used in molecular studies. We studied the growth of cardiac compartments and changes in morphology principally in the model organism corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus, but also in the genotyped anole (Anolis carolinenis and A. sagrei and the Philippine sailfin lizard (Hydrosaurus pustulatus. Structures and chambers of the formed heart were traced back in development and annotated in interactive 3D pdfs. In the corn snake, we found that the ventricle and atria grow exponentially, whereas the myocardial volumes of the atrioventricular canal and the muscular outflow tract are stable. Ventricular development occurs, as in other amniotes, by an early growth at the outer curvature and later, and in parallel, by incorporation of the muscular outflow tract. With the exception of the late completion of the atrial septum, the adult design of the squamate heart is essentially reached halfway through development. This design strongly resembles the developing hearts of human, mouse and chicken around the time of initial ventricular septation. Subsequent to this stage, and in contrast to the squamates, hearts of endothermic vertebrates completely septate their ventricles, develop an insulating atrioventricular plane, shift and expand their atrioventricular canal toward the right and incorporate the systemic and pulmonary venous myocardium into the atria.

  5. Surface engineering of artificial heart valve disks using nanostructured thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition and sol-gel methods.

    Jackson, M J; Robinson, G M; Ali, N; Kousar, Y; Mei, S; Gracio, J; Taylor, H; Ahmed, W

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti-coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimize the formation of thrombosis. However, anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, i.e. strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and coefficient of friction values were obtained from pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also in this paper we report the preparation of freestanding nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapour deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO2) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO2 coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis.

  6. Appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system in 1/R control of the total artificial heart.

    Mizuta, Sora; Saito, Itsuro; Isoyama, Takashi; Hara, Shintaro; Yurimoto, Terumi; Li, Xinyang; Murakami, Haruka; Ono, Toshiya; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Abe, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    1/R control is a physiological control method of the total artificial heart (TAH) with which long-term survival was obtained with animal experiments. However, 1/R control occasionally diverged in the undulation pump TAH (UPTAH) animal experiment. To improve the control stability of the 1/R control, appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system was investigated with frequency analysis and numerical simulation. In the frequency analysis, data of five goats in which the UPTAH was implanted were analyzed with first Fourier transform technique to examine the vasomotion frequency. The numerical simulation was carried out repeatedly changing baroreflex parameters and control time constant using the elements-expanded Windkessel model. Results of the frequency analysis showed that the 1/R control tended to diverge when very low frequency band that was an indication of the vasomotion frequency was relative high. In numerical simulation, divergence of the 1/R control could be reproduced and the boundary curves between the divergence and convergence of the 1/R control varied depending on the control time constant. These results suggested that the 1/R control tended to be unstable when the TAH recipient had high reflex speed in the baroreflex vascular system. Therefore, the control time constant should be adjusted appropriately with the individual vasomotion frequency.

  7. Mechanical ventilation and the total artificial heart: optimal ventilator trigger to avoid post-operative autocycling - a case series and literature review

    Arabia Francisco A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy are now being implanted with Total Artificial Hearts (TAHs. We have observed individual cases of post-operative mechanical ventilator autocycling with a flow trigger, and subsequent loss of autocycling after switching to a pressure trigger. These observations prompted us to do a retrospective review of all TAH devices placed at our institution between August 2007 and May 2009. We found that in the immediate post-operative period following TAH placement, autocycling was present in 50% (5/10 of cases. There was immediate cessation of autocycling in all patients after being changed from a flow trigger of 2 L/minute to a pressure trigger of 2 cm H2O. The autocycling group was found to have significantly higher CVP values than the non-autocycling group (P = 0.012. Our data suggest that mechanical ventilator autocycling may be resolved or prevented by the use of a pressure trigger rather than a flow trigger setting in patients with TAHs who require mechanical ventilation.

  8. Spectroscopic Study of the Interaction between Horse Heart Myoglobin and Zirconium(IV)-Substituted Polyoxometalates as Artificial Proteases.

    Ly, Hong Giang T; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2017-09-20

    A recent study [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 7391-7394] has shown that horse heart myoglobin (HHM) is selectively hydrolyzed by a range of zirconium(IV)-substituted polyoxometalates (POMs) under mild conditions. In this study, the molecular interactions between the Zr-POM catalysts and HHM are investigated by using a range of complementary techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), UV/Vis spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy, and 1 H and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. A tryptophan fluorescence quenching study reveals that, among all examined Zr-POMs, the most reactive POM, 2:2 Zr IV -Keggin, exhibits the strongest interaction with HHM. 31 P NMR spectroscopy studies show that this POM dissociates in solution, resulting in the formation of a monomeric 1:1 Zr IV -Keggin structure, which is likely to be a catalytically active species. In the presence of Zr IV -POMs, HHM does not undergo complete denaturation, as evidenced by CD, UV/Vis, tryptophan fluorescence, and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. CD spectroscopy shows a gradual decrease in the α-helical content of HHM upon addition of Zr IV -POMs. The largest effect is observed in the presence of a large Zr IV -Wells-Dawson structure, whereas small Zr IV -Lindqvist POM has the least influence on the decrease in the α-helical content of HHM. In all cases, the Soret band at λ=409 nm is maintained in the presence of all examined Zr-POMs, which indicates that no conformational changes in the protein occur near the heme group. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Report on the results of the FY 1999 R and D of the medical welfare equipment technology and the development of an implantable total artificial heart system using a non-pulsatile pump. R and D of an implantable total artificial heart system using a non-pulsatile pump (R and D of the functional/cure artificial heart); Iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu tainai umekomigata jinko shinzo system 1999 nendo seika hokokusho. 5. Renzokuryu pump wo mochiita tainai umekomigata jinko shinzo system no kenkyu kaihatsu (kinoteki chiryoteki jinko shinzo no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The R and D of element technology were made on non-pulsatile pump, drive/controller, energy supply storage system, structural coating materials, etc., and the prescribed target was achieved. In the R and D of a total system, a blood-removing conduit with movability was designed to avoid the functional inlet obstruction, and the animal experiment was carried out. In the short-term chronic animal experiment on the implantation of a single bypass model using this artificial conduit and in the animal experiment for implantation of functional/cure artificial heart, it was confirmed that the operation was conducted easily, the flow rate of the blood of the artificial heart is extremely stable, and the blood-removing conduit functions favorably. In the R and D on Tele-TAH with the aim of future home medical treatment, it became possible to acquire via monitor the pump drive information and blood circulation state information on the animals tested in the breeding farm. The remote medical simulation was made. (NEDO)

  10. Mechanical circulatory assist device development at the Texas Heart Institute: a personal perspective.

    Frazier, O H

    2014-01-01

    In December 2013, we performed our 1000th ventricular assist device implantation at the Texas Heart Institute. In my professional career, I have been fortunate to see the development of numerous mechanical circulatory support devices for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure. In fact, most of the cardiac pumps in wide use today were developed in the Texas Heart Institute research laboratories in cooperation with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute or device innovators and manufacturers and implanted clinically at our partner St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital. My early involvement in this field was guided by my mentors, Dr Michael E. DeBakey and, especially, Dr Denton A. Cooley. Also, many of the advances are directly attributable to my ongoing clinical experience. What I learned daily in my surgical practice allowed me to bring insights to the development of this technology that a laboratory researcher alone might not have had. Young academic surgeons interested in this field might be well served to be active not only in laboratory research but also in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  12. Atrial septum defect closure device in a beating heart, from the perspective of a researcher in artificial organs.

    Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter closure of atrial septum defect (ASD) with a closure device is increasing, but the history of clinical use of this procedure is still short, and the efficacy and long-term safety remain unproved. The total number of closure devices implanted throughout the world has not been counted accurately. Therefore, the probability of complications occurring after implantation is uncertain. Device-related complications that occur suddenly late after implantation are life-threatening, and quite often necessitate emergency surgical intervention. In Japanese medical journals, authors reporting closure devices have mentioned no complications and problems in their facilities. Detailed studies of device-related complications and device removal have not been reported in Japan. In fact, this literature search found an unexpectedly large number of reports of various adverse events from many overseas countries. When follow-up duration is short and the number of patients is small, the incidence of complications cannot be determined. Rare complications may emerge in a large series with a long observation period. Consequently, the actual number of incidents related to ASD closure devices is possibly several times higher than the number reported. Guidelines for long-term patient management for patients with an implanted closure device are necessary and post-marketing surveillance is appropriate. Development of a national database, a worldwide registration system, and continuous information disclosure will improve the quality of treatment. The devices currently available are not ideal in view of reports of late complications requiring urgent surgery and the need for life-long follow-up. An ideal device should be free from complications during life, and reliability is indispensable.

  13. Effective heart disease prevention: lessons from a qualitative study of user perspectives in Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani communities.

    Netto, G; McCloughan, L; Bhatnagar, A

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) has a high mortality, incidence and prevalence among Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in the UK, indicating the need for effective heart disease prevention initiatives for these communities. This paper considers how service user perspectives can be used to develop effective, culturally focused CHD prevention interventions for these target groups by addressing identified barriers, including deeply held cultural beliefs. A qualitative research study, using a longitudinal action research approach. This was a community-based study in Edinburgh. Six focus group discussions--two for each community--were organized with participants from these communities at the beginning of the project. A further six focus group discussions for the same communities were organized six months later. Over the period examined, participants reported varying changes in levels of knowledge relating to the nature, causes and symptoms of CHD. Some participants reported taking slight to significant steps to reduce or prevent heart disease, while others did not. The project was viewed as helpful in increasing knowledge about CHD and preventive measures and encouraging healthier lifestyles. However, persistent barriers to change were also identified, requiring changes to the project that involved not only matching intervention materials and messages to observable, superficial characteristics of the target population, but more fundamental changes that address the cultural, social, historical, environmental and psychological forces that influence health behaviour. CHD prevention initiatives need to identify and respond to deep-rooted influences on health-behaviour in 'at-risk' groups, in addition to superficial characteristics of the target populations. It is important for specific prevention initiatives to be linked into wider CHD frameworks to ensure transferability of learning and integration within wider service provision.

  14. Physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease: an international perspective

    Stewart, Ralph; Held, Claes; Brown, Rebekkah; Vedin, Ola; Hagstrom, Emil; Lonn, Eva; Armstrong, Paul; Granger, Christopher B.; Hochman, Judith; Davies, Richard; Soffer, Joseph; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Aims Despite the known benefits of regular exercise, the reasons why many coronary heart disease (CHD) patients engage in little physical activity are not well understood. This study identifies factors associated with low activity levels in individuals with chronic CHD participating in the STABILITY study, a global clinical outcomes trial evaluating the lipoprotein phospholipaseA2 inhibitor darapladib. Methods and results Prior to randomization, 15 486 (97.8%) participants from 39 countries c...

  15. The effects of exposure to environmental factors on Heart Rate Variability: An ecological perspective

    Schnell, Izhak; Potchter, Oded; Epstein, Yoram; Yaakov, Yaron; Hermesh, Hagai; Brenner, Shmuel; Tirosh, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    The impact of human exposure to environmental factors on Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was examined in the urban space of Tel-Aviv-Jaffa. Four environmental factors were investigated: thermal and social loads; CO concentrations and noise. Levels of HRV are explained mainly by subjective social stresses, noise and CO. The most interesting result is the fact that while subjective social stress and noise increase HRV, low levels of CO are reducing HRV to some extent moderating the impact of subjective social stress and noise. Beyond the poisoning effect of CO and the fact that extremely low levels of HRV associated with high dozes of CO increase risk for life, low levels of CO may have a narcotic effect, as it is measured by HRV. The effects of thermal loads on HRV are negligible probably due to the use of behavioral means in order to neutralize heat and cold effects. -- Highlights: ► The impact of human exposure to environmental factors on Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was examined. ► Previous studies measured human exposure to pollution by fixed monitoring stations. ► This study measured actual personal exposure by mini sensors. ► High level of subjective social load and noise increase HRV. ► Low levels of CO may have a narcotic effect, as it is measured by HRV. -- The research focuses on the effects of environmental factors; noise, subjective social stress, thermal load and CO on Heart Rate Variability

  16. The heart of McDonaldization: the perspective of the other.

    Brimm, Morissa

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation aims to investigate the effect of organisational culture change on job satisfaction and work motivation from the perspective of the employees. McDonald’s Restaurants have been chosen due to having embraced organisational change in the last five years. One particular branch has been chosen – Castle Marina McDonald’s, Nottingham – for analysis. Triangulation was used to collect the data needed for my research; methods used were both qualitative and quantitative to provide rich...

  17. Profile of sacubitril/valsartan in the treatment of heart failure: patient selection and perspectives.

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Andries, Gabriela; Biswas, Medha; Khera, Sahil

    2017-01-01

    With an estimated prevalence of 5.8 million in the USA and over 23 million people worldwide, heart failure (HF) is growing in epidemic proportions. Despite the use of guideline-directed medical therapies such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-adrenergic blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for chronic systolic HF for almost two decades, HF remains a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditures. The Prospective Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitor with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial provided compelling evidence for the cardiovascular and mortality benefit of sacubitril/valsartan when compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Sacubitril/valsartan performed better than enalapril across various HFrEF patient characteristics and showed substantial benefit in patients with other common comorbidities. Following the trial, the US Food and Drug Administration approved this drug for the treatment of HF. Various international HF consensus guidelines endorse sacubitril/valsartan as a class I recommendation for the management of symptomatic HFrEF. Although this high-quality clinical study is the largest and the most globally represented trial in HFrEF patients, concerns have been raised regarding the generalizability of the trial results in real-world HF population. The gaps in US Food and Drug Administration labeling and guideline recommendations might lead to this medication being used in a larger population than it was studied in. In this review, we will discuss the current role of sacubitril/valsartan in the management of HF, concerns related to PARADIGM-HF and answers, shortcomings of this novel drug, effects on patient characteristics, real-world eligibility, and the role of ongoing and further investigations to clarify

  18. Heart regeneration.

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Profile of sacubitril/valsartan in the treatment of heart failure: patient selection and perspectives

    Yandrapalli S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Srikanth Yandrapalli,1 Gabriela Andries,1 Medha Biswas,2 Sahil Khera2,3 1Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College at Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY, USA; 2Division of Cardiology, New York Medical College at Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY, USA; 3Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: With an estimated prevalence of 5.8 million in the USA and over 23 million people worldwide, heart failure (HF is growing in epidemic proportions. Despite the use of guideline-directed medical therapies such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-adrenergic blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for chronic systolic HF for almost two decades, HF remains a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditures. The Prospective Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitor with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF trial provided compelling evidence for the cardiovascular and mortality benefit of sacubitril/valsartan when compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. Sacubitril/valsartan performed better than enalapril across various HFrEF patient characteristics and showed substantial benefit in patients with other common comorbidities. Following the trial, the US Food and Drug Administration approved this drug for the treatment of HF. Various international HF consensus guidelines endorse sacubitril/valsartan as a class I recommendation for the management of symptomatic HFrEF. Although this high-quality clinical study is the largest and the most globally represented trial in HFrEF patients, concerns have been raised regarding the generalizability of the trial results in real-world HF population. The gaps in US Food and Drug Administration labeling and

  20. Multislice Spiral Computed Tomography of the Heart: Technique, Current Applications, and Perspective

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Koos, Ralf; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2005-01-01

    Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) is a rapidly evolving, noninvasive technique for cardiac imaging. Knowledge of the principle of electrocardiogram-gated MSCT and its limitations in clinical routine are needed to optimize image quality. Therefore, the basic technical principle including essentials of image postprocessing is described. Cardiac MSCT imaging was initially focused on coronary calcium scoring, MSCT coronary angiography, and analysis of left ventricular function. Recent studies also evaluated the ability of cardiac MSCT to visualize myocardial infarction and assess valvular morphology. In combination with experimental approaches toward the assessment of aortic valve function and myocardial viability, cardiac MSCT holds the potential for a comprehensive examination of the heart using one single examination technique

  1. Policy, Research and Residents’ Perspectives on Built Environments Implicated in Heart Disease: A Concept Mapping Approach

    Ivana Stankov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An underrepresentation of stakeholder perspectives within urban health research arguably limits our understanding of what is a multi-dimensional and complex relationship between the built environment and health. By engaging a wide range of stakeholders using a participatory concept mapping approach, this study aimed to achieve a more holistic and nuanced understanding of the built environments shaping disease risk, specifically cardiometabolic risk (CMR. Moreover, this study aimed to ascertain the importance and changeability of identified environments through government action. Through the concept mapping process, community members, researchers, government and non-government stakeholders collectively identified eleven clusters encompassing 102 built environmental domains related to CMR, a number of which are underrepresented within the literature. Among the identified built environments, open space, public transportation and pedestrian environments were highlighted as key targets for policy intervention. Whilst there was substantive convergence in stakeholder groups’ perspectives concerning the built environment and CMR, there were disparities in the level of importance government stakeholders and community members respectively assigned to pedestrian environments and street connectivity. These findings support the role of participatory methods in strengthening how urban health issues are understood and in affording novel insights into points of action for public health and policy intervention.

  2. A closer look at acute heart failure: Putting Portuguese and European data into perspective.

    Fonseca, Cândida; Araújo, Inês; Marques, Filipa; Brás, Daniel; Bettencourt, Paulo

    2016-05-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome requiring urgent therapy. The prognosis is poor after the index hospitalization, with a high risk for rehospitalization and early death. The costs of managing AHF are thus increasing rapidly. A literature review was performed to gather and compare data on prevalence and treatment and to identify gaps in AHF management, based on European and Portuguese studies. A literature search from 1995 to 2014 was conducted in selected databases (BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE and Ovid MEDLINE). Seven Portuguese and nine European studies were analyzed. The mean age of AHF patients was ≥65 years and 30-50% were women. Coronary artery disease (42.3% vs. 61.9%) and hypertension (53.3% vs. 76.7%) were identified as primary etiologies in Europe and in Portugal. Similar proportions of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction were found in the Portuguese (19.9-44.7%) and European (32.8-39.1%) studies. Overall, all-cause mortality rates were comparable (six months: 9.3-25.5% vs. 13.5-27.4%; one year: 15.9-31% vs. 17.4-46.5%), as was in-hospital mortality (5.5-14% vs. 3.8-12%) in Portuguese and European studies, respectively. Length of stay was comparable. The studies were performed in very different hospital settings and data on treatment were scarce. Gaps were identified in treatment and clinical pathways of patients with AHF. Based on the results of this review, collection and investigation of data on the disease and treatment solutions, training in disease management, and improved organization of healthcare should be the subject of further investment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. An audit of adherence to heart failure guidelines in an Australian hospital: A pharmacist perspective.

    Khalil, Viviane; Danninger, Melanie; Wang, Wei; Khalil, Hanan

    2017-12-01

    The Australian National Heart Foundation Guidelines have been developed to guide clinicians on how to best manage chronic heart failure (CHF) patients according to the current best available evidence. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the proportion of patients prescribed evidence-based therapy (EBT) for CHF on discharge at this Australian metropolitan hospital and factors affecting its prescribing. The secondary aims are to examine the proportion of patients prescribed EBT on discharge on cardiac wards compared to medical wards and to explore the role of the pharmacist in the management of these patients. A retrospective audit of patients' medical notes who were admitted consecutively for CHF management was conducted over 6 months to examine their management. The results showed at discharge, a total of 52% of patients were discharged on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, 49% were discharged on β-blockers, 15% were on Aldosterone receptor antagonists, 90% were discharged on diuretics, and 29% were discharged on Digoxin. The main determinants of prescribing EBT on discharge were the presence of prescribing contraindications and patients' comorbidities. Patients discharged from cardiac wards were more likely to be prescribed EBT than if discharged on medical wards. Furthermore, in the subset of the cohort who was reviewed by a pharmacist during admission, a higher percentage of patients were discharged on EBT compared with those who did not have a pharmaceutical input. This study highlighted existing gaps between the National CHF Guidelines and clinical prescribing practice in this hospital. Patients who were discharged from cardiac wards were more likely to be prescribed medications concordant with the guidelines, and there is further opportunity for pharmacists to assist in closing gaps in prescribing practice by the promotion of adherence to these guidelines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. An artificial neural network prediction model of congenital heart disease based on risk factors: A hospital-based case-control study.

    Li, Huixia; Luo, Miyang; Zheng, Jianfei; Luo, Jiayou; Zeng, Rong; Feng, Na; Du, Qiyun; Fang, Junqun

    2017-02-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the risks of congenital heart disease (CHD) in pregnant women.This hospital-based case-control study involved 119 CHD cases and 239 controls all recruited from birth defect surveillance hospitals in Hunan Province between July 2013 and June 2014. All subjects were interviewed face-to-face to fill in a questionnaire that covered 36 CHD-related variables. The 358 subjects were randomly divided into a training set and a testing set at the ratio of 85:15. The training set was used to identify the significant predictors of CHD by univariate logistic regression analyses and develop a standard feed-forward back-propagation neural network (BPNN) model for the prediction of CHD. The testing set was used to test and evaluate the performance of the ANN model. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed on SPSS 18.0. The ANN models were developed on Matlab 7.1.The univariate logistic regression identified 15 predictors that were significantly associated with CHD, including education level (odds ratio  = 0.55), gravidity (1.95), parity (2.01), history of abnormal reproduction (2.49), family history of CHD (5.23), maternal chronic disease (4.19), maternal upper respiratory tract infection (2.08), environmental pollution around maternal dwelling place (3.63), maternal exposure to occupational hazards (3.53), maternal mental stress (2.48), paternal chronic disease (4.87), paternal exposure to occupational hazards (2.51), intake of vegetable/fruit (0.45), intake of fish/shrimp/meat/egg (0.59), and intake of milk/soymilk (0.55). After many trials, we selected a 3-layer BPNN model with 15, 12, and 1 neuron in the input, hidden, and output layers, respectively, as the best prediction model. The prediction model has accuracies of 0.91 and 0.86 on the training and testing sets, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and Yuden Index on the testing set (training set) are 0.78 (0.83), 0.90 (0.95), and 0

  5. The role of stents in the treatment of congenital heart disease: Current status and future perspectives

    Peters, Bjoern; Ewert, Peter; Berger, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular or intracardiac stenoses occur in many forms of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, the implantation of stents has become an accepted interventional procedure for stenotic lesions in pediatric cardiology. Furthermore, stents are know to be used to exclude vessel aneurysm or to ensure patency of existing or newly created intracardiac communications. With the further refinement of the first generation of devices, a variety of “modern” stents with different design characteristics have evolved. Despite the tremendous technical improvement over the last 20 years, the “ideal stent” has not yet been developed. Therefore, the pediatric interventionalist has to decide which stent is suitable for each lesion. On this basis, currently available stents are discussed in regard to their advantages and disadvantages for common application in CHD. New concepts and designs developed to overcome some of the existing problems, like the failure of adaptation to somatic growth, are presented. Thus, in the future, biodegradable or growth stents might replace the currently used generation of stents. This might truly lead to widening indications for the use of stents in the treatment of CHD

  6. Physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease: an international perspective.

    Stewart, Ralph; Held, Claes; Brown, Rebekkah; Vedin, Ola; Hagstrom, Emil; Lonn, Eva; Armstrong, Paul; Granger, Christopher B; Hochman, Judith; Davies, Richard; Soffer, Joseph; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Despite the known benefits of regular exercise, the reasons why many coronary heart disease (CHD) patients engage in little physical activity are not well understood. This study identifies factors associated with low activity levels in individuals with chronic CHD participating in the STABILITY study, a global clinical outcomes trial evaluating the lipoprotein phospholipaseA2 inhibitor darapladib. Prior to randomization, 15 486 (97.8%) participants from 39 countries completed a lifestyle questionnaire. Total physical activity was estimated from individual subject self-reports of hours spend each week on mild, moderate, and vigorous exercise, corresponding approximately to 2, 4, and 8 METS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression evaluated clinical and demographic variables for the lowest compared with higher overall exercise levels, and for individuals who decreased rather than maintained or increased activity since diagnosis of CHD. The least active 5280 subjects (34%) reported exercise of ≤ 24 MET.h/week. A total of 7191 subjects (46%) reported less exercise compared with before diagnosis of CHD. The majority of participants were either 'not limited' or 'limited a little' walking 100 m (84%), climbing one flight of stairs (82%), or walking 1 km/1/2; mile (68%), and physical activity and decreasing exercise after diagnosis of CHD included more co-morbid conditions, poorer general health, fewer years of education, race, and country (P physical activity was only partly explained by cardiovascular symptoms. Potentially modifiable societal and health system factors are important determinants of physical inactivity in patients with chronic CHD.

  7. From the seat of heat and intelligence to regular heart activity as automatic movement: progress in cardiology up to 1900 from a Dutch perspective.

    van Tellingen, C

    2009-04-01

    The development in cardiovascular anatomy and physiology is described from a Dutch perspective. The newly formed Republic in the 17th century, with its pragmatism and business-like character, became an ideal breeding ground for Descartes' new philosophy. His separation of body and soul provided a mechanistic model of body structure and formed a firm basis for anatomical and physiological research to become catalysts for a tempestuous growth and progress in medicine. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:130-5.).

  8. A reformed perspective on taking mission and missiology to the heart of theological training

    Thinandavha D. Mashau

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mission and missiology have been driven to the periphery of the life of both the church and theological institutions. Missiology has, in many theological institutions in the world, struggled to find a home. It has in some instances been regarded as an intruder, in some as an interloper and in others as irrelevant. Missiology is without a doubt a voice from the margins. This article seeks to go beyond the exercise to identify reasons for such a marginalisation by looking at ways in which mission and missiology can be restored to the heart of theological education. This article reminds us that the definition and practice of missiology should be firmly grounded in the missio Dei; hence all theological disciplines should intentionally have a missionary dimension. This will in essence allow missiology to exist as an independent subject but at the same time exercise its multidimensionality. It is, therefore, critical to maintain a dynamic and creative tension between intention and dimension to understand the place of missiology in the theological encyclopaedia. 'n Gereformeerde perspektief op die neem van sending en sendingwetenskap na die hart van teologiese opleiding. Sending en sendingwetenskap is na die periferie van die lewe van sowel die kerk as teologiese instellings verdryf. Sendingwetenskap het by baie teologiese instellings gesukkel om 'n tuiste te vind. In sommige gevalle is dit as ‘n indringer beskou, in ander as 'n tussenganger, en in sommige gevalle as irrelevant. Sendingwetenskap is sonder twyfel 'n stem vanuit die buiterante. Hierdie navorsing poog om die redes vir so 'n marginalisasie te ontdek deur te kyk na maniere waarop sending en sendingwetenskap herstel kan word tot die hart van teologiese opleiding. Die artikel herinner ons dat die definisie en praktyk van sendingwetenskap stewig gegrond behoort te wees in die missio Dei, en daarom behoort alle teologiese dissiplines doelbewus 'n sendingdimensie te hê. Dit sal

  9. Artificial intelligence

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  10. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the research and development of medical and welfare apparatus/technology. Totally implantable artificial heart for clinical use; 2000 nendo iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Rinsho oyo ni muketa tainai umekomigata jinko shinzo system

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    In the development of control technologies for a pulsatile pump, studies proceeded with a view to using a mixed venous blood oxygen saturation sensor, an ultrasonic sensor, and an absolute pressure sensor. Efforts were started to downsize the hydraulic actuator and to enhance its efficiency. In the development of a non-pulsatile artificial heart, the GyroP1710 series of artificial heart systems of Japanese make was developed, which employed a curved inlet known to be highly compatible from the anatomical point of view. In the development of a total system, a pulsatile auxiliary artificial heart was given a chronic animal test which continued approximately three weeks, when it yielded a flow of approximately 4 liters/minute showing that it would be practical as an auxiliary heart. As for the non-pulsatile artificial heart, a cardiopulmonary bypass test was conducted, when the blood circulation behavior was normal and organ functions were sustained. The free hemoglobin level was 9.3mg/dl achieving the target value, and the test animal lived as long as 50 days. (NEDO)

  11. An Evolutionary Perspective of the Relationship Between Corporate Strategy and Performance, Through the Use of Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic AlgorithmsHttp://Dx.Doi.Org/10.5585/Riae.V9i3.1689

    Alexandre Teixeira Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the relationship between Corporate Strategy and Performance, from the perspective of the Evolutionary Theory. As methods of data processing, obtained in secondary databases, we used artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms. The results of processing neural networks and genetic algorithms demonstrate the importance of corporate strategies in determining performance. The evolutionary perspective emphasizes the importance of investing in operations as a factor influencing the adequacy of the organization, in order to achieve an improved performance, in addition to establishing relationships with other organizations, through members of the board.

  12. Implementing telemonitoring in heart failure care : Barriers from the perspectives of patients, healthcare professionals and healthcare organizations

    Boyne, J.J.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, such as heart failure, presents a substantial challenge to healthcare systems. Telemonitoring is believed to be a useful instrument in the delivery of heart failure care. However, a widespread use of telemonitoring is currently failing for various

  13. Artificial Intelligence.

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  14. Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Progress report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976. [Heat dissipation from /sup 238/Pu power sources implanted in dogs

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Wentworth, R.A.; Cady, K.B.

    1976-01-01

    A total of sixty dogs were implanted with radioisotope-powered artificial heart systems producing radiation fluxes similar to that of plutonium-238, but having no associated heat, at levels of from one to seventy times the radiation flux expected from a 30-watt plutonium-238 source. Results from studies lasting up to 6 years after implantation indicate that these animals, and by inference human beings, may be able to tolerate the radiation flux from 30-watt /sup 238/Pu power sources. Results of heat dissipation studies in calves indicate that it may be possible to induce a vascularized connective tissue capsule sufficient to dissipate 30 watts of additional heat from a surface area of approximately 500 cm sq., allowing a heat flux of 0.06 watts per cm sq.

  15. Perspectives

    Unknown

    Heart muscle was a favorite source of this reagent. ... was a freezing microtome, the gadget used for making the frozen ... covered the linear relationship between the growth rate ..... dency on medium and temperature of cell size and chemical.

  16. Artificial organs and transplantation.

    Splendiani, G; Cipriani, S; Vega, A; Casciani, C U

    2003-05-01

    Nowadays artificial devices are not able to totally and undefinitely replace the loss of function of all vital organs and artificial organs can be used only to bridge the time to transplantation, which must be considered the first choice in the therapeutical approach for many chronic diseases. Since general population aging process is leading to an increase of organ demand, the gap between performed and requested transplantation is hard to fill. Xenotransplantation is nowadays only an experimental alternative solution and we have to do our best using available artificial organs to increase and improve the survival of patients waiting for transplantation. In this meeting we particularly dealt about organ function replacing therapy, especially regarding the kidney, heart, liver, pancreas and ear.

  17. [Artificial muscle and its prospect in application for direct cardiac compression assist].

    Dong, Jing; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Zhejun; Yan, Guozheng

    2008-12-01

    Artificial heart is an effective device in solving insufficient native heart supply for heart transplant, and the research and application of novel actuators play an important role in the development of artificial heart. In this paper, artificial muscle is introduced as the actuators of direct cardiac compression assist, and some of its parameters are compared with those of native heart muscle. The open problems are also discussed.

  18. 123I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine myocardial scintigraphy and congestive heart failure: current data and perspective

    Agostini, D.; Darlas, Y.; Quennelle, F.; Bouvard, G.; Scanu, P.; Grollier, G.; Potier, J.C.; Babatasi, G.; Belin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is often associated with an impairment of the sympathetic nervous system, i.e., global hyperactivity and regional impairment of the adrenergic system. Cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy is a radionuclide technique which can explore the presynaptic adrenergic function. Myocardial MIBG fixation is decreased in congestive heart failure, reflecting a reduction of norepinephrine uptake by the myocardial presynaptic nerve endings. The impairment of presynaptic function occurs early in the disease and is actually involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac failure. Cardiac MIBG scintigraphy is a useful tool to explore the myocardial adrenergic stores in patients with congestive heart failure. It could be proposed in patients with severe ventricular dysfunction in order to assist physicians in setting-up the timing of heart transplantation. (authors)

  19. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  20. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology.

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-11-15

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  1. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  2. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    Sacha, G M; Varona, P

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines. (topical review)

  3. Coronary heart disease patients transitioning to a normal life: perspectives and stages identified through a grounded theory approach.

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Yadavar Nikravesh, Mansoureh; Emami, Azita

    2014-02-01

    To explore how Iranian patients with coronary heart disease experience their lives. Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death in Iran and worldwide. Understanding qualitatively how patients experience the acute and postacute stages of this chronic condition is essential knowledge for minimising the negative consequences of coronary heart disease. Qualitative study using grounded theory for the data analysis. Data for this study were collected through individual qualitative interviews with 24 patients with coronary heart disease, conducted between January 2009 and January 2011. Patients with angina pectoris were selected for participation through purposive sampling, and sample size was determined by data saturation. Data analysis began with initial coding and continued with focused coding. Categories were determined, and the core category was subsequently developed and finalised. The main categories of the transition from acute phase to a modified or 'new normal' life were: (1) Loss of normal life. Experiencing emotions and consequences of illness; (2) Coming to terms. Using coping strategies; (3) Recreating normal life. Healthcare providers must correctly recognise the stages of transition patients navigate while coping with coronary heart disease to support and educate them appropriately throughout these stages. Patients with coronary heart disease lose their normal lives and must work towards recreating a revised life using coping strategies that enable them to come to terms with their situations. By understanding Iranian patients' experiences, healthcare providers and especially nurses can use the information to support and educate patients with coronary heart disease on how to more effectively deal with their illness and its consequences. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The costs of heart failure in Poland from the public payer's perspective. Polish programme assessing diagnostic procedures, treatment and costs in patients with heart failure in randomly selected outpatient clinics and hospitals at different levels of care: POLKARD.

    Czech, Marcin; Opolski, Grzegorz; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Dubiel, Jacek S; Wizner, Barbara; Bolisęga, Dorota; Fedyk-Łukasik, Małgorzata; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic disease of great clinical and economic significance for both the healthcare system and patients themselves. To determine the consumption of medical resources for treatment and care of HF patients and to estimate the related costs. The study involved 400 primary care practices and 396 specialist outpatient clinics, as well as 259 hospitals at all reference levels. The sample was representative and supplemented with patient interview data. Based on the consumption of particular resources and the unit costs of services in 2011, costs of care for HF patients in Poland were estimated. Separate analyses were conducted depending on the stage of the disease (according to NYHA classification I-IV). The public payer's perspective and a one year time horizon were adopted. Direct annual costs of an HF patient's treatment in Poland may range between PLN 3,373.23 and 7,739.49 (2011), the main cost item being hospitalisation. The total costs for the healthcare system could be as high as PLN 1,703 million, which is 3.16% of the National Health Fund's budget (Ex. rate from 05.03.2012: 1 EUR = 4.14 PLN). The costs of treating heart failure in Poland are high; proper allocation of resources to diagnostic procedures and treatment may contribute to rationalisation of the relevant expenditure.

  5. Burst Activity and Heart Rhythm Modulation in the Sympathetic Outflow to the Heart

    Baselli, G

    2001-01-01

    In 13 decerebrate, artificially ventilated cats preganglionic sympathetic outflow to the heart was recorded with ECG and ventilation signal, A novel algorithm was implemented that extracts weighted...

  6. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    Spanache Florin

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus a...

  7. The value of the clinical geneticist caring for adults with congenital heart disease: diagnostic yield and patients' perspective

    van Engelen, Klaartje; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Felix, Joyce P.; Postma, Alex V.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2013-01-01

    For adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), knowledge about the origin and inheritance of their CHD is important. Clinical geneticists may play a significant role in their care. We explored the diagnostic yield of clinical genetic consultation of adult CHD patients, patients' motivations

  8. Heart MRI

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  9. "Open your heart first of all": perspectives of holistic providers in Costa Rica about communication in the provision of health care.

    Geist-Martin, Patricia; Bell, Keely K

    2009-10-01

    Research documents how the care the holistic providers offer represents the quality communication that patients often do not receive from their biomedical providers. However, research investigating the perspectives of holistic providers concerning the role they see themselves playing in the provision of health is limited. This research explores the perceptions of holistic providers in Costa Rica about their communication with their patients. The results reveal two practices of communication-authenticating and integrating as central to providers' communication with patients in the provision of holistic health care. Providers describe their communication as an exploration of an anatomy of pain/suffering, including investigating the location, timing, length, intensity, and overall rhythm of the patient's condition and sense making that leads them to seek the care of a holistic provider. Most holistic providers see their role as being careful or full of care and suggest that they have an obligation to open their heart first of all.

  10. [The appropriate use of pharmacological treatment in patients with chronic heart failure. A perspective from Primary Care].

    Naveiro-Rilo, J C; Diez-Juárez, D; Flores-Zurutuza, M L; Molina Mazo, R; Alberte Pérez, C; Arias Cobos, V

    2013-01-01

    The appropriate use of pharmacological treatment according to the indications in Clinical Guidelines reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). There are numerous studies regarding this in the hospital environment, but there are few studies done in Primary Care. The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of compliance by Primary Care doctors to the Clinical Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology in patients with CHF. A descriptive, observational study on the use of indication-prescription drugs was conducted. Primary Care teams of the Leon Health Area (9 urban and 19 rural). The study population included patients with a diagnosis of New York Heart Association (NYHA) Grade II-IV chronic heart failure, from a register of 2047 with chronic heart failure patients treated by 97 Primary Care doctors. A proportional representative random sample of 474 patients from the urban and rural areas was studied. Adherence to the drugs recommended in the Clinical Guidelines was evaluated using two indicators; one overall, and another for drugs with a higher level of evidence (A1: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors-angiotensin II receptor antagonists [ACE-I/ARA-II], β-blockers [BB] and spironolactone). A total of 456 patients were studied, with a mean age of 78.4 years, and 53.1% females. Arterial hypertension (AHT) and ischaemic heart disease were present in 64.7% of patients. The mean comorbidity rate, excluding CHF, was 2.9. Around 40% were diagnosed a NYHA Grade 11-1V. The overall compliance rate (diuretics, ACE-I/ARA-II, β-blockers, spironolactone, digoxin, and oral anticoagulants) and rate of adherence to evidence-based ones was 55.2% and 44.6%, respectively. There was low compliance by 39.5%, and only 12.9% of patients showed perfect compliance with the drugs with a higher level of evidence, while to be less than 70 years-old, a history of ischaemia, AHT, and a hospital admission, were variables associated with

  11. Perspective

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...... at different time points along this longitudinal investigation are performed with a comprehensive set of omics platforms. These data sets are generated in a biological context, rather than biochemical compound class-driven manner, which we term "systems omics."...

  12. Artificial intelligence

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  13. Biomaterials for artificial organs

    Lysaght, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide demand for organ transplants far exceeds available donor organs. Consequently some patients die whilst waiting for a transplant. Synthetic alternatives are therefore imperative to improve the quality of, and in some cases, save people's lives. Advances in biomaterials have generated a range of materials and devices for use either outside the body or through implantation to replace or assist functions which may have been lost through disease or injury. Biomaterials for artificial organs reviews the latest developments in biomaterials and investigates how they can be used to improve the quality and efficiency of artificial organs. Part one discusses commodity biomaterials including membranes for oxygenators and plasmafilters, titanium and cobalt chromium alloys for hips and knees, polymeric joint-bearing surfaces for total joint replacements, biomaterials for pacemakers, defibrillators and neurostimulators and mechanical and bioprosthetic heart valves. Part two goes on to investigate advanced and ...

  14. Artificial Reefs

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  15. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  16. Exploring the perspectives and preferences for HTA across German healthcare stakeholders using a multi-criteria assessment of a pulmonary heart sensor as a case study.

    Wahlster, Philip; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Schaller, Sandra; Kriza, Christine; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Health technology assessment and healthcare decision-making are based on multiple criteria and evidence, and heterogeneous opinions of participating stakeholders. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) offers a potential framework to systematize this process and take different perspectives into account. The objectives of this study were to explore perspectives and preferences across German stakeholders when appraising healthcare interventions, using multi-criteria assessment of a heart pulmonary sensor as a case study. An online survey of 100 German healthcare stakeholders was conducted using a comprehensive MCDA framework (EVIDEM V2.2). Participants were asked to provide i) relative weights for each criterion of the framework; ii) performance scores for a health pulmonary sensor, based on available data synthesized for each criterion; and iii) qualitative feedback on the consideration of contextual criteria. Normalized weights and scores were combined using a linear model to calculate a value estimate across different stakeholders. Differences across types of stakeholders were explored. The survey was completed by 54 participants. The most important criteria were efficacy, patient reported outcomes, disease severity, safety, and quality of evidence (relative weight >0.075 each). Compared to all participants, policymakers gave more weight to budget impact and quality of evidence. The quantitative appraisal of a pulmonary heart sensor revealed differences in scoring performance of this intervention at the criteria level between stakeholder groups. The highest value estimate of the sensor reached 0.68 (on a scale of 0 to 1, 1 representing maximum value) for industry representatives and the lowest value of 0.40 was reported for policymakers, compared to 0.48 for all participants. Participants indicated that most qualitative criteria should be considered and their impact on the quantitative appraisal was captured transparently. The study identified important

  17. Heart murmurs

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  18. Parental perspectives on suffering and quality of life at end-of-life in children with advanced heart disease: an exploratory study*.

    Blume, Elizabeth D; Balkin, Emily Morell; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Ziniel, Sonja; Beke, Dorothy M; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Taylor, Laura; Kulik, Thomas; Pituch, Kenneth; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-05-01

    To describe parent perspectives regarding the end-of-life experience of children with advanced heart disease. Cross-sectional multicenter survey study of bereaved parents. Two tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Parents of children younger than 21 years with primary cardiac diagnoses who died in the hospital 9 months to 4 years before the survey date. Parents were excluded if they were non-English speakers or had previously denied permission to contact. The Survey for Caring for Children with Advanced Heart Disease was developed, piloted, and then sent to parents of all children who died at two sites. Fifty bereaved parents responded (39% response rate) a mean of 2.7 years after their child's death. Median age at death was 6 months (3.6 d to 20.4 yr). At end-of-life, 86% of children were intubated and 46% were receiving mechanical circulatory support. Seventy-eight percent died during withdrawal of life-sustaining interventions and 16% during resuscitative efforts. Parents realized that their child had no realistic chance of survival a median of 2 days prior to death (0-30 d). According to parents, 47% of children suffered "a great deal," "a lot," or "somewhat" during the end-of-life period. The symptoms parents perceived to be causing the most suffering were breathing and feeding difficulties in children under 2 years and fatigue and sleeping difficulties in older children. Seventy-one percent of parents described the quality of life of their child during the last month of life as "poor" or "fair." Most parents (84%) described the quality of care delivered as "very good" or "excellent." According to their parents, many children with advanced heart disease experience suffering in the end-of-life care period. For most, realization that their child has no realistic chance of survival does not occur until late, some not until death is imminent. Once this realization occurs, however, parents perceive peacefulness, a "good death," and excellent quality of care

  19. The prognostic value of heart rate variability in the elderly, changing the perspective: from sympathovagal balance to chaos theory.

    Nicolini, Paola; Ciulla, Michele M; De Asmundis, Carlo; Magrini, Fabio; Brugada, Pedro

    2012-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is the temporal beat-to-beat variation in successive RR intervals on an electrocardiographic (ECG) recording and it reflects the regulation of the heart rate (HR) by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). HRV analysis is a noninvasive tool for the assessment of autonomic function that gained momentum in the late 1980s when its clinical relevance as a predictor of mortality was established by a milestone study by Kleiger et al. in patients with postacute myocardial infarction. In the last few decades, the increasing availability of commercial ECG devices offering HRV analysis has made HRV a favorite marker for risk stratification in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The rapid aging of the world population and the growing popularity of HRV have also fueled interest for the prognostic value of HRV in the elderly, outside a specific cardiological context. However, the discussion of HRV measures in the elderly is still very much centered on the rather reductionistic model of sympathovagal balance, with the orthosympathetic and parasympathetic limbs of the ANS exercising opposing effects on the heart via autonomic tone. The expanding application of nonlinear dynamics to medicine has brought to the forefront the notion of system complexity, embedded in the mathematical concepts of chaos theory and fractals, and provides an opportunity to suggest a broader interpretation for the prognostic significance of HRV, especially in the elderly. Although the use of novel indices of HRV may be hampered by practical issues, a more holistic approach to HRV may still be safeguarded if traditional time- and frequency-domain measures are viewed in terms of autonomic modulation. This review focuses on HRV in geriatric populations. It considers studies on the prognostic value of HRV in elderly subjects, discussing the potential confounding effect of erratic rhythm, and concentrates on the conceptual distinction between autonomic tone and autonomic modulation

  20. Artificial sweeteners

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containin......Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie......-containing sweeteners. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the effect of artificial sweeteners on body weight, appetite, and risk markers for diabetes and CVD in humans....

  1. Artificial Intelligence

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  2. Artificial intelligence

    Perret-Galix, D.

    1992-01-01

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  3. Uncertainty in artificial intelligence

    Kanal, LN

    1986-01-01

    How to deal with uncertainty is a subject of much controversy in Artificial Intelligence. This volume brings together a wide range of perspectives on uncertainty, many of the contributors being the principal proponents in the controversy.Some of the notable issues which emerge from these papers revolve around an interval-based calculus of uncertainty, the Dempster-Shafer Theory, and probability as the best numeric model for uncertainty. There remain strong dissenting opinions not only about probability but even about the utility of any numeric method in this context.

  4. Enlarged Heart

    ... rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may enlarge. Disease of the heart ...

  5. Antithrombotic artificial organs

    Takamatsu, T; Fukada, E; Saegusa, M; Hasegawa, T

    1971-07-12

    A new antithrombotic material useful for making artificial organs (artificial blood vessel, artificial heart, etc.) can be prepared by graft-polymerizing an acrylic ester (methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, etc.) with a synthetic fiber (teflon, etc.). The graft-polymerization can be carried out by means of gamma radiation with cobalt 60 (dose rate 2.6x10/sup 3/ r/min., total dose 8x10/sup 4/ to 3.5x10/sup 5/ r). A graft ratio of 5 to 80% is attainable. In one example, a tubular sample made of teflon fiber having an inner diameter of 5 to 10 mm was immersed into methyl methacrylate in an ampoule in the absence of air and exposed to cobalt 60 gamma ray at the dose rate of 3.18x10/sup 3/ rad/min. After extraction with acetone, the sample was dried. The total dose was 3.5x10/sup 5/ rad and the graft ratio was ca. 25%. The sample was transplanted to vena cava of dog. No formation of thrombus was observed by autopsy (4 months after the transplantation). In control (teflon tube not graft-polymerized) thrombus was observed by autopsy 7 days after the transplantation.

  6. Artificial Intelligence.

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  7. Experimental Model of Gene Transfection in Healthy Canine Myocardium: Perspectives of Gene Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    Renato A. K. Kalil

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the transfection of the gene that encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP through direct intramyocardial injection. METHODS: The pREGFP plasmid vector was used. The EGFP gene was inserted downstream from the constitutive promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus. Five male dogs were used (mean weight 13.5 kg, in which 0.5 mL of saline solution (n=1 or 0.5 mL of plasmid solution containing 0.5 µg of pREGFP/dog (n=4 were injected into the myocardium of the left ventricular lateral wall. The dogs were euthanized 1 week later, and cardiac biopsies were obtained. RESULTS: Fluorescence microscopy showed differences between the cells transfected and not transfected with pREGFP plasmid. Mild fluorescence was observed in the cardiac fibers that received saline solution; however, the myocardial cells transfected with pREGFP had overt EGFP expression. CONCLUSION: Transfection with the EGFP gene in healthy canine myocardium was effective. The reproduction of this efficacy using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF instead of EGFP aims at developing gene therapy for ischemic heart disease.

  8. What is a good educator? A qualitative study on the perspective of individuals with coronary heart disease.

    Svavarsdóttir, Margrét H; Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2016-12-01

    Patient views are especially important in patient education, as patient involvement is essential. However, no empirical research clarifies what knowledge, skills and competencies are needed for health professionals to competently serve as a good educator according to the patients themselves. To explore what qualities patients with coronary heart disease perceive in a good educator. A qualitative research method, with semi-structured individual interviews, was used in this study. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants from a general hospital in Iceland and in Norway. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. The participants included 17 patients who had been through a percutaneous coronary intervention and participated in formal patient education after discharge from hospital. The patients saw a good educator as one who they feel is trustworthy and who individualizes the education to patients' needs and context and translates general information to their personal situation in lay language. Building trust was dependent on the patients' perceiving the educator to be knowledgeable and good at connecting with the individual patient, so that the patients feel they are being treated as a whole person with equality and respect. The patients perceived the capability of building trust and tailoring the education to the individual as the most prominent characteristics of a good educator. Training skills that facilitate patients' trust, being observant of the patient and his learning needs and adjusting the patient education to individual needs and situations should be key objectives in health professionals' training in patient education. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  9. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    Spanache Florin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus automatic. But conscience is above these differences because it is neither conditioned by the self-preservation of autonomy, because a conscience is something that you use to help your neighbor, nor automatic, because one’s conscience is tested by situations which are not similar or subject to routine. So, artificial intelligence is only in science-fiction literature similar to an autonomous conscience-endowed being. In real life, religion with its notions of redemption, sin, expiation, confession and communion will not have any meaning for a machine which cannot make a mistake on its own.

  10. A Perspective on Promoting Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's PRIDE Program.

    Boyington, Josephine E A; Maihle, Nita J; Rice, Treva K; Gonzalez, Juan E; Hess, Caryl A; Makala, Levi H; Jeffe, Donna B; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Rao, Dabeeru C; Dávila-Román, Victor G; Pace, Betty S; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2016-07-21

    Aspiring junior investigators from groups underrepresented in the biomedical sciences face various challenges as they pursue research independence. However, the biomedical research enterprise needs their participation to effectively address critical research issues such as health disparities and health inequities. In this article, we share a research education and mentoring initiative that seeks to address this challenge: Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health Related Research (PRIDE), funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). This longitudinal research-education and mentoring program occurs through summer institute programs located at US-based academic institutions. Recruited participants are exposed to didactic and lab-based research-skill enhancement experiences, with year-round mentoring over the course of two years. Mentor-mentee matching is based on shared research interests to promote congruence and to enhance skill acquisition. Program descriptions and sample narratives of participants' perceptions of PRIDE's impact on their career progress are showcased. Additionally, we highlight the overall program design and structure of four of seven funded summer institutes that focus on cardiovascular disease, related conditions, and health disparities. Mentees' testimonials about the value of the PRIDE mentoring approach in facilitating career development are also noted. Meeting the clinical and research needs of an increasingly diverse US population is an issue of national concern. The PRIDE initiative, which focuses on increasing research preparedness and professional development of groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce, with an emphasis on mentoring as the critical approach, provides a robust model that is impacting the careers of future investigators.

  11. Artificial Intelligence.

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  12. Artificial intelligence

    Duda, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract : Issue of this work is to acquaint the reader with the history of artificial inteligence, esspecialy branch of chess computing. Main attention is given to progress from fifties to the present. The work also deals with fighting chess programs against each other, and against human opponents. The greatest attention is focused on 1997 and duel Garry Kasparov against chess program Deep Blue. The work is divided into chapters according to chronological order.

  13. The artificial heart: prototypes, policies, and patients

    Hogness, John R; VanAntwerp, Malin

    1991-01-01

    ... Institute Division of Health Care Services INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE John R. Hogness and Malin VanAntwerp, Editors NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1991 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-specific the as from created publication files XML from oth...

  14. Thermocompressor powered artificial heart assist system

    Moise, J.C.; Rudnicki, M.I.; Faeser, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a fully implantable, left ventricular assist system is described. The system utilizes a radioisotope-powered Stirling cycle thermocompressor and an all-pneumatic actuation and control system to drive a pusher-plate type blood pump. This basic approach has been shown to be efficient and workable by implantation experiments on calves. The recent effort has been directed toward the fabrication and development of a fourth-generation system, designed to reduce weight, volume and isotope inventory. Extensive endurance and accelerated-life testing has been undertaken. The improved design concepts utilized in the system and pertinent test results are discussed

  15. What Is a Total Artificial Heart?

    ... quality of life. Support from family and friends can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel and what they can do to help you. Problems with your device There is a ...

  16. The digitalization of the working environment: the advent of Robotics, Automation and Artificial Intelligence (RAAI) from the employees perspective – a scoping review

    Terminio, Rosanna; Gilabert, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Robotics, automation and artificial intelligence (RAAI) are changing how work gets done, to the point of putting 47% of existing jobs in the USA at risk of becoming redundant in 5 to 15 years. RAAI and their cognitive abilities have a potential impact on employees’ sense of self-worth and career satisfaction and, in turn, on organizations and the society as a whole. In spite of the significant debate on whether there is a real risk of job losses or simply a need of re-skilling, the impa...

  17. Conflicts versus analytical redundancy relations: a comparative analysis of the model based diagnosis approach from the artificial intelligence and automatic control perspectives.

    Cordier, Marie-Odile; Dague, Philippe; Lévy, François; Montmain, Jacky; Staroswiecki, Marcel; Travé-Massuyès, Louise

    2004-10-01

    Two distinct and parallel research communities have been working along the lines of the model-based diagnosis approach: the fault detection and isolation (FDI) community and the diagnostic (DX) community that have evolved in the fields of automatic control and artificial intelligence, respectively. This paper clarifies and links the concepts and assumptions that underlie the FDI analytical redundancy approach and the DX consistency-based logical approach. A formal framework is proposed in order to compare the two approaches and the theoretical proof of their equivalence together with the necessary and sufficient conditions is provided.

  18. Radiochemicals used to scan the heart

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for heart scanning using 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate are discussed. Thallium-201, produced artificially in a cyclotron, concentrates in normal heart muscle but not in abnormal tissue. Technetium-99m is deposited in mitochondria of heart cells that are irreversibly damaged. The combined use of 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc makes it possible to identify regions of recent heart damage as well as older heart damage. Advantages of using 129 Cs for heart scanning are also discussed

  19. Transplante cardíaco infantil: perspectivas e sentimentos maternos Trasplante cardiaco infantil: perspectivas y sentimientos maternos Heart transplant in children: maternal perspectives and feelings

    Kiarelle Lourenço Penaforte

    2009-12-01

    ó que la donación es un momento de felicidad vivido por todas las madres, por tratarse de la solución para la vida de sus hijos, y la presencia verdadera del enfermero en esta situación, se vuelve todavía más esencial, pues humanizar forma parte del proceso de cuidado de enfermería.It aims to describe the maternal perspectives and feelings face to the heart transplant in their children. Descriptive study with a qualitative approach developed in the Heart Hospital, in Messejana, Fortaleza-CE, from August through November, 2007. The subjects were seven mothers of children who had a transplant. It was used as technique the semi-structured interview and medical records analysis. The data were submitted to content analysis, in three stages according to Bardin, being organized, analyzed and interpreted according to the pertinent literature, the researchers' and the interviewees' experience. Out of the speeches analyzed, the following themes emerged: necessity of transplant; source of support; feelings expressed by mothers; the donation and perspectives. It concludes that the donation is a moment of happiness experienced by all mothers, being a solution for the lives of their children, and the nurse's authentic presence on this occasion becomes even more essential, as humanizing is part of the Nursing care.

  20. Artificial graphites

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  1. Man-made flows from a fish's perspective: autonomous classification of turbulent fishway flows with field data collected using an artificial lateral line.

    Tuhtan, Jeffrey A; Fuentes-Perez, Juan Francisco; Toming, Gert; Schneider, Matthias; Schwarzenberger, Richard; Schletterer, Martin; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2018-05-25

    The lateral line system provides fish with advanced mechanoreception over a wide range of flow conditions. Inspired by the abilities of their biological counterparts, artificial lateral lines have been developed and tested exclusively under laboratory settings. Motivated by the lack of flow measurements taken in the field which consider fluid-body interactions, we built a fish-shaped lateral line probe. The device is outfitted with 11 high-speed (2.5 kHz) time-synchronized pressure transducers, and designed to capture and classify flows in fish passage structures. A total of 252 field measurements, each with a sample size of 132 000 discrete sensor readings were recorded in the slots and across the pools of vertical slot fishways. These data were used to estimate the time-averaged flow velocity (R 2   =  0.952), which represents the most common metric to assess fishway flows. The significant contribution of this work is the creation and application of hydrodynamic signatures generated by the spatial distribution of pressure fluctuations on the fish-shaped body. The signatures are based on the collection of the pressure fluctuations' probability distributions, and it is shown that they can be used to automatically classify distinct flow regions within the pools of three different vertical slot fishways. For the first time, field data from operational fishway measurements are sampled and classified using an artificial lateral line, providing a completely new source of bioinspired flow information.

  2. Heart Failure

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  3. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using artificial muscle.

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using latissimus dorsi muscle was previously used to compensate for congestive heart failure. Now, however, this method is not acceptable because the long-term result was not as expected owing to fatigue of the skeletal muscle. BioMetal fiber developed by Toki Corporation is one of the artificial muscles activated by electric current. The behavior of this fiber is similar to that of organic muscle. We made an artificial muscle like the latissimus dorsi using BioMetal fiber and tested whether we could use this new muscle as a cardiac supporting device. Testing one Biometal fiber showed the following performance: practical use maximal generative force was 30 g, exercise variation was 50%, and the standard driving current was 220 mA. We created a 4 x 12-cm tabular artificial muscle using 8 BioMetal fibers as a cardiac support device. We also made a simulation circuit composed of a 6 x 8-cm soft bag with unidirectional valves, reservoir, and connecting tube. The simulation circuit was filled with water and the soft bag was wrapped with the artificial muscle device. After powering the device electrically at 9 V with a current of 220 mA for each fiber, we measured the inside pressure and observed the movement of the artificial device. The artificial muscle contracted in 0.5 s for peak time and squeezed the soft bag. The peak pressure inside the soft bag was measured as 10 mmHg. Although further work will be needed to enhance the speed of deformability and movement simulating contraction, we conclude that artificial muscle may be potentially useful as a cardiac assistance device that can be developed for dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

  4. The Japanese artificial organs scene: current status.

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Murabayashi, Shun

    2005-08-01

    Artificial organs and regenerative medicine are the subjects of very active research and development (R&D) in Japan and various artificial organs are widely used in patients. Results of the R&D are presented at the annual conference of the Japanese Society for Artificial Organs (JSAO). Progress in the fields of artificial organs and regenerative medicine are reviewed annually in the Japanese Journal of Artificial Organs. The official English-language journal of JSAO, Journal of Artificial Organs, also publishes many original articles by Japanese researchers. Although the annual conference and the publications of JSAO provide the world with update information on artificial organs and regenerative medicine in Japan, the information is not always understood appropriately in the rest of the world, mainly due to language problems. This article therefore introduces the current status of artificial organs and regenerative medicine in Japan. Artificial hearts and metabolic support systems are reviewed here and other interesting areas such as regenerative medicine can be found elsewhere.

  5. Artificial intelligence in radiology.

    Hosny, Ahmed; Parmar, Chintan; Quackenbush, John; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2018-05-17

    Artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms, particularly deep learning, have demonstrated remarkable progress in image-recognition tasks. Methods ranging from convolutional neural networks to variational autoencoders have found myriad applications in the medical image analysis field, propelling it forward at a rapid pace. Historically, in radiology practice, trained physicians visually assessed medical images for the detection, characterization and monitoring of diseases. AI methods excel at automatically recognizing complex patterns in imaging data and providing quantitative, rather than qualitative, assessments of radiographic characteristics. In this Opinion article, we establish a general understanding of AI methods, particularly those pertaining to image-based tasks. We explore how these methods could impact multiple facets of radiology, with a general focus on applications in oncology, and demonstrate ways in which these methods are advancing the field. Finally, we discuss the challenges facing clinical implementation and provide our perspective on how the domain could be advanced.

  6. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  7. Heart Diseases

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  8. Heart Transplantation

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  9. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN DETERMINATION OF MARKETING CUSTOMER STRATEGY

    Markić, Brano; Bijakšić, Sanja; Šantić, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a computer-based analytical process that tends to create computational systems which we would incline to be called intelligent. Expert systems are the most important part of the artificial intelligence from economic perspective. Expert systems attempt to mimic the human thought process including reasoning and optimization. “Knowledge” is represented by a set of “if-then” rules in a form of knowledge base. The results of artificial intelligence system implementation ...

  10. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN DETERMINATION OF MARKETING CUSTOMER STRATEGY

    Markić, Brano; Bijakšić, Sanja; Šantić, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a computer-based analytical process that tends to create computational systems which we would incline to be called intelligent. Expert systems are the most important part of the artificial intelligence from economic perspective. Expert systems attempt to mimic the human thought process including reasoning and optimization. “Knowledge” is represented by a set of “if-then” rules in a form of knowledge base. The results of artificial intelligence system implementation ...

  11. A Study on Narrative Perspectives in The Heart is a Lonely Hunter%论《心是孤独的猎手》中的叙事视角

    陈博

    2012-01-01

    The theme of loneliness in McCullers" works has always been the focus of which the connotations of feminism, poetic traits as well as cultural background of criticism have been circles, out explored to the fullest extent over the past few years. McCullers" genius is not only embodied in her keen and deep insight; but also in her unique and exquisite narrative skill. This thesis attempts to elaborate on the narrative strategies of McCullers" The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, of which the narrative perspective is of variety. That is mainly embodied in the applications of third person external perspective, zero perspective and internal perspective. These three kinds of perspective are switched back and forth tactfully, reflecting the unique creative concept of the author.%麦卡勒斯作品的孤独主题一直占据评论界的中心,其引申出的女性主义、诗性特征以及文化背景义涵都得到了充分的拓展。麦卡勒斯的天才不仅体现在其敏锐深刻的洞察力上,也体现在其独特精致的叙事技巧上。麦卡勒斯作品《心是孤独的猎手》的叙事视角具有多变性特征,主要表现在第三人称外视角的应用,零视角的应用,以及内视角的应用等方面。三种视角巧妙地来回切换,体现了作者独具匠心的创作理念。

  12. Artificial Intelligence, Counseling, and Cognitive Psychology.

    Brack, Greg; And Others

    With the exception of a few key writers, counselors largely ignore the benefits that Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cognitive Psychology (CP) can bring to counseling. It is demonstrated that AI and CP can be integrated into the counseling literature. How AI and CP can offer new perspectives on information processing, cognition, and helping is…

  13. Heart Truth

    ... health! Get a free badge or banner to post to your website or blog. Are you at risk for heart disease? Here's how to find out . Planning to use The Heart Truth logo? Check out our logo guidelines and downloads. ...

  14. Heart Disease

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  15. Heart Attack

    ... family history of heart attack race – African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and native Hawaiians are at ... Your doctor will prescribe the medicines that are right for you. If you have had a heart ...

  16. {sup 123}I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine myocardial scintigraphy and congestive heart failure: current data and perspective; Scintigraphie myocardique a la {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine et insuffisance cardiaque congestibe: donnees actuelles et perspectives

    Agostini, D.; Darlas, Y.; Quennelle, F.; Bouvard, G.; Scanu, P.; Grollier, G.; Potier, J.C.; Babatasi, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 14 - Caen (France); Belin, A. [Hopital de Trouville, Trouville (France)

    1997-12-31

    Congestive heart failure is often associated with an impairment of the sympathetic nervous system, i.e., global hyperactivity and regional impairment of the adrenergic system. Cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy is a radionuclide technique which can explore the presynaptic adrenergic function. Myocardial MIBG fixation is decreased in congestive heart failure, reflecting a reduction of norepinephrine uptake by the myocardial presynaptic nerve endings. The impairment of presynaptic function occurs early in the disease and is actually involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac failure. Cardiac MIBG scintigraphy is a useful tool to explore the myocardial adrenergic stores in patients with congestive heart failure. It could be proposed in patients with severe ventricular dysfunction in order to assist physicians in setting-up the timing of heart transplantation. (authors). 52 refs.

  17. Knowledge representation an approach to artificial intelligence

    Bench-Capon, TJM

    1990-01-01

    Although many texts exist offering an introduction to artificial intelligence (AI), this book is unique in that it places an emphasis on knowledge representation (KR) concepts. It includes small-scale implementations in PROLOG to illustrate the major KR paradigms and their developments.****back cover copy:**Knowledge representation is at the heart of the artificial intelligence enterprise: anyone writing a program which seeks to work by encoding and manipulating knowledge needs to pay attention to the scheme whereby he will represent the knowledge, and to be aware of the consequences of the ch

  18. Patient perspectives of participating in the cardiac CopenHeartRFA rehabilitation program for patients treated with ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Lind, Johanne; J McCabe, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    . As part of the evaluation of the CopenHeartRFA trial, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The intervention was delivered by a multidisciplinary team. Aim: This study aimed to understand the experience of patients treated for AF with ablation who participated in the CopenHeartRFA cardiac....... The interviews were analyzed individually by two researchers and themes were constructed and discussed. Results: The sample included 10 participants, mean age 54.6 years. Four categories were identified and labeled: 1) strengthening belief in one’s own physical capacity and survival; 2) still struggling...

  19. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  20. Artificial Disc Replacement

    ... Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR) Patient Education Committee Jamie Baisden The disc ... Disc An artificial disc (also called a disc replacement, disc prosthesis or spine arthroplasty device) is a ...

  1. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  2. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Electrocardiogram Pattern Recognition and Analysis Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines: A Review

    Mario Sansone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer systems for Electrocardiogram (ECG analysis support the clinician in tedious tasks (e.g., Holter ECG monitored in Intensive Care Units or in prompt detection of dangerous events (e.g., ventricular fibrillation. Together with clinical applications (arrhythmia detection and heart rate variability analysis, ECG is currently being investigated in biometrics (human identification, an emerging area receiving increasing attention. Methodologies for clinical applications can have both differences and similarities with respect to biometrics. This paper reviews methods of ECG processing from a pattern recognition perspective. In particular, we focus on features commonly used for heartbeat classification. Considering the vast literature in the field and the limited space of this review, we dedicated a detailed discussion only to a few classifiers (Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines because of their popularity; however, other techniques such as Hidden Markov Models and Kalman Filtering will be also mentioned.

  4. New twist on artificial muscles.

    Haines, Carter S; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aliev, Ali E; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-10-18

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy.

  5. Heart Failure

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  6. Types of Heart Failure

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  7. Machine learning an artificial intelligence approach

    Banerjee, R; Bradshaw, Gary; Carbonell, Jaime Guillermo; Mitchell, Tom Michael; Michalski, Ryszard Spencer

    1983-01-01

    Machine Learning: An Artificial Intelligence Approach contains tutorial overviews and research papers representative of trends in the area of machine learning as viewed from an artificial intelligence perspective. The book is organized into six parts. Part I provides an overview of machine learning and explains why machines should learn. Part II covers important issues affecting the design of learning programs-particularly programs that learn from examples. It also describes inductive learning systems. Part III deals with learning by analogy, by experimentation, and from experience. Parts IV a

  8. A novel dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle.

    Liu, Hao; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Changji

    2013-01-01

    With the development of methods and skills of minimally invasive surgeries, equipments for doctors' training and practicing are in high demands. Especially for the cardiovascular surgeries, operators are requested to be familiar with the surgical environment of a beating heart. In this paper, we present a new dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle to realize heartbeat. It's an artificial left ventricular of which the inner chamber is made of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) with an anatomical structure of the real human heart. It is covered by another layer of material forming the artificial muscle which actuates the systole and diastole uniformly and omnidirectionally as the cardiac muscle does. Preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the simulator. The results indicated that the pressure at the terminal of the aorta could be controlled within the range of normal human systolic pressure, which quantitatively validated the new actuating mode of the heart-beating is effective.

  9. Artificial Organs 2017: A Year in Review.

    Malchesky, Paul S

    2018-03-01

    In this Editor's Review, articles published in 2017 are organized by category and summarized. We provide a brief reflection of the research and progress in artificial organs intended to advance and better human life while providing insight for continued application of these technologies and methods. Artificial Organs continues in the original mission of its founders "to foster communications in the field of artificial organs on an international level." Artificial Organs continues to publish developments and clinical applications of artificial organ technologies in this broad and expanding field of organ Replacement, Recovery, and Regeneration from all over the world. Peer-reviewed Special Issues this year included contributions from the 12th International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion edited by Dr. Akif Undar, Artificial Oxygen Carriers edited by Drs. Akira Kawaguchi and Jan Simoni, the 24th Congress of the International Society for Mechanical Circulatory Support edited by Dr. Toru Masuzawa, Challenges in the Field of Biomedical Devices: A Multidisciplinary Perspective edited by Dr. Vincenzo Piemonte and colleagues and Functional Electrical Stimulation edited by Dr. Winfried Mayr and colleagues. We take this time also to express our gratitude to our authors for offering their work to this journal. We offer our very special thanks to our reviewers who give so generously of time and expertise to review, critique, and especially provide meaningful suggestions to the author's work whether eventually accepted or rejected. Without these excellent and dedicated reviewers the quality expected from such a journal could not be possible. We also express our special thanks to our Publisher, John Wiley & Sons for their expert attention and support in the production and marketing of Artificial Organs. We look forward to reporting further advances in the coming years. © 2018 International Center for

  10. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  11. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  12. Kant, Xunzi and the Artificiality of Manners

    Anja BERNINGER

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both Chinese and Western philosophers have argued for the ethical importance of manners. Their approaches are sometimes criticized on the grounds that manners are artificial. I compare Xunzi’s and Kant’s responses to this claim, and discuss the relevance of both positions for the development of a theory of manners. I show that there is no single artificiality claim, but rather four different claims: the claim that polite behavior lacks spontaneity, the claim that it is insincere, the claim that it goes against human nature, and the claim that it is arbitrary. While Kant is mainly concerned with the insincerity claim, Xunzi focusses on the claim that manners are arbitrary rules. Because of their different understandings of the function of manners both authors only provide a partial answer to the artificiality claim. To arrive at a full account of manners both perspectives must be combined.

  13. Artificial cognition architectures

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  14. Artificial Intelligence Study (AIS).

    1987-02-01

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGNECE HARDWARE ....... 2-50 AI Architecture ................................... 2-49 AI Hardware ....................................... 2...ftf1 829 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE STUDY (RIS)(U) MAY CONCEPTS 1/3 A~NLYSIS AGENCY BETHESA RD R B NOJESKI FED 6? CM-RP-97-1 NCASIFIED /01/6 M |K 1.0...p/ - - ., e -- CAA- RP- 87-1 SAOFŔ)11 I ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE STUDY (AIS) tNo DTICFEBRUARY 1987 LECT 00 I PREPARED BY RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

  15. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    Berrar, Daniel; Sato, Naoyuki; Schuster, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervou...

  16. Inteligencia artificial en vehiculo

    Amador Díaz, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Desarrollo de un robot seguidor de líneas, en el que se implementan diversas soluciones de las áreas de sistemas embebidos e inteligencia artificial. Desenvolupament d'un robot seguidor de línies, en el qual s'implementen diverses solucions de les àrees de sistemes encastats i intel·ligència artificial. Follower robot development of lines, in which various solutions are implemented in the areas of artificial intelligence embedded systems.

  17. Editor's Choice-The role of the emergency department in the management of acute heart failure: An international perspective on education and research.

    Pang, Peter S; Collins, Sean P; Miró, Òscar; Bueno, Hector; Diercks, Deborah B; Di Somma, Salvatore; Gray, Alasdair; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hollander, Judd E; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Levy, Phillip D; Papa, AnnMarie; Möckel, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Emergency departments are a major entry point for the initial management of acute heart failure (AHF) patients throughout the world. The initial diagnosis, management and disposition - the decision to admit or discharge - of AHF patients in the emergency department has significant downstream implications. Misdiagnosis, under or overtreatment, or inappropriate admission may place patients at increased risk for adverse events, and add costs to the healthcare system. Despite the critical importance of initial management, data are sparse regarding the impact of early AHF treatment delivered in the emergency department compared to inpatient or chronic heart failure management. Unfortunately, outcomes remain poor, with nearly a third of patients dying or re-hospitalised within 3 months post-discharge. In the absence of robust research evidence, consensus is an important source of guidance for AHF care. Thus, we convened an international group of practising emergency physicians, cardiologists and advanced practice nurses with the following goals to improve outcomes for AHF patients who present to the emergency department or other acute care setting through: (a) a better understanding of the pathophysiology, presentation and management of the initial phase of AHF care; (b) improving initial management by addressing knowledge gaps between best practices and current practice through education and research; and (c) to establish a framework for future emergency department-based international education and research.

  18. Clinicohemodynamic and roentgenologic correlations in patients with artificial pacemakers

    Tatarchenko, I.P.; Iskenderov, B.G.; Koledinov, V.I.; Zhivotovskaya, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical pattern, central hemodynamics and roentgenologic data are studied in 34 patients with artificial cardiac pacemaker (ACP) to solve the problem on adequate medicamental therapy of heart failure (HF). Heart sizes and the state of a pulmonary image are estimated roentgenologically. Two types of cardiac-vessel system reactions on physical load: adequate and nonadequate - are detected. Implantation of ACP in patients with the nonadequate reaction does not lead to total liquidation of HF

  19. Clinicohemodynamic and roentgenologic correlations in patients with artificial pacemakers

    Tatarchenko, I P; Iskenderov, B G; Koledinov, V I; Zhivotovskaya, G G

    1987-05-01

    The clinical pattern, central hemodynamics and roentgenologic data are studied in 34 patients with artificial cardiac pacemaker (ACP) to solve the problem on adequate medicamental therapy of heart failure (HF). Heart sizes and the state of a pulmonary image are estimated roentgenologically. Two types of cardiac-vessel system reactions on physical load: adequate and nonadequate - are detected. Implantation of ACP in patients with the nonadequate reaction does not lead to total liquidation of HF.

  20. STANFORD ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PROJECT.

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , GAME THEORY, DECISION MAKING, BIONICS, AUTOMATA, SPEECH RECOGNITION, GEOMETRIC FORMS, LEARNING MACHINES, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, SERVOMECHANISMS, SIMULATION, BIBLIOGRAPHIES.

  1. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  2. Heart Failure

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  3. Heart Attack

    ... properly causes your body's blood sugar levels to rise, increasing your risk of heart attack. Metabolic syndrome. This occurs when you have obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. Having metabolic ...

  4. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  5. Classes of Heart Failure

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  6. Men and Heart Disease

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  7. Wine and heart health

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  8. Artificial organs versus regenerative medicine: is it true?

    Nosé, Yukihiko; Okubo, Hisashi

    2003-09-01

    Individuals engaged in the fields of artificial kidney and artificial heart have often mistakenly stated that "the era of artificial organs is over; regenerative medicine is the future." Contrarily, we do not believe artificial organs and regenerative medicine are different medical technologies. As a matter of fact, artificial organs developed during the last 50 years have been used as a bridge to regeneration. The only difference between regenerative medicine and artificial organs is that artificial organs for the bridge to regeneration promote tissue regeneration in situ, instead of outside the body (for example, vascular prostheses, neuroprostheses, bladder substitutes, skin prostheses, bone prostheses, cartilage prostheses, ligament prostheses, etc.). All of these artificial organs are successful because tissue regeneration over a man-made prosthesis is established inside the patient's body (artificial organs to support regeneration). Another usage of the group of artificial organs for the bridge to regeneration is to sustain the functions of the patient's diseased organs during the regeneration process of the body's healthy tissues and/or organs. This particular group includes artificial kidney, hepatic assist, respiratory assist, and circulatory assist. Proof of regeneration of these healthy tissues and/or organs is demonstrated in the short-term recovery of end-stage organ failure patients (artificial organs for bridge to regeneration). A third group of artificial organs for the bridge to regeneration accelerates the regenerating process of the patient's healthy tissues and organs. This group includes neurostimulators, artificial blood (red cells) blood oxygenators, and plasmapheresis devices, including hemodiafiltrators. So-called "therapeutic artificial organs" fall into this category (artificial organs to accelerate regeneration). Thus, almost all of today's artificial organs are useful in the bridge to regeneration of healthy natural tissues and organs

  9. Northern Territory perspectives on heart failure with comorbidities – understanding trial validity and exploring collaborative opportunities to broaden the evidence base.

    Iyngkaran, P; Majoni, W; Cass, A; Sanders, Prashanthan; Ronco, C; Brady, S; Kangaharan, N; Ilton, M; Hare, D L; Thomas, M C

    2015-06-01

    Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is an ambulatory care sensitive condition, associated with significant morbidity and mortality, rarely with cure. Outpatient based pharmacological management represents the main and most important aspect of care, and is usually lifelong. This narrative styled opinion review looks at the pharmacological agents recommended in the guidelines in context of the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. We explore the concept of validity, a term used to describe the basis of standardising a particular trial or study and the population to which it is applicable. We aim to highlight the problems of the current guidelines based approach. We also present alternatives that could utilise the core principles from major trials, while incorporating regional considerations, which could benefit clients living in the NT and remote Australia. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Perception of a Three-Dimensional-Printed Heart Model from the Perspective of Different Stakeholders: A Complex Case of Truncus Arteriosus.

    Biglino, Giovanni; Moharem-Elgamal, Sarah; Lee, Matthew; Tulloh, Robert; Caputo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The case of an 11-year-old male patient with truncus arteriosus is presented. The patient has a right aortic arch, a repaired truncus arteriosus, pulmonary artery stenosis, as well as conduit stenosis, with a complex surgical plan being discussed. In order to gather additional insight into the patient's anatomy prior to the surgery and to facilitate communication with the patient's parents, a three-dimensional (3D) model of his heart and main vessels was created from computed tomography data. Feedback was collected from different stakeholders. The patient and his parents were both struck by the size of the heart, with the parents further elaborating on how the 3D model was more intuitive a tool than medical images as well as " an helpful talking point to the other members of the family " and potentially also at school. The surgeon and cardiologist commented on gaining better understanding of the 3D relationship between a markedly narrowed right pulmonary artery and the aorta, with the surgeon ultimately coming to a decision of dividing the ascending aorta quite high to access the right pulmonary artery for patch reconstruction and thus planning to arrest the circulation beforehand. The imaging expert remarked on the potential to " improve communication in multidisciplinary meetings ," while a medical trainee, who also had a chance to evaluate the model, remarked that " having the model in front of me and being able to see the exact abnormality makes this particular case much more memorable. [ … ] 3D printed models could have immense potential in pathology and anatomy teaching for the training of healthcare professionals ."

  11. The Perception of a Three-Dimensional-Printed Heart Model from the Perspective of Different Stakeholders: A Complex Case of Truncus Arteriosus

    Giovanni Biglino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The case of an 11-year-old male patient with truncus arteriosus is presented. The patient has a right aortic arch, a repaired truncus arteriosus, pulmonary artery stenosis, as well as conduit stenosis, with a complex surgical plan being discussed. In order to gather additional insight into the patient’s anatomy prior to the surgery and to facilitate communication with the patient’s parents, a three-dimensional (3D model of his heart and main vessels was created from computed tomography data. Feedback was collected from different stakeholders. The patient and his parents were both struck by the size of the heart, with the parents further elaborating on how the 3D model was more intuitive a tool than medical images as well as “an helpful talking point to the other members of the family” and potentially also at school. The surgeon and cardiologist commented on gaining better understanding of the 3D relationship between a markedly narrowed right pulmonary artery and the aorta, with the surgeon ultimately coming to a decision of dividing the ascending aorta quite high to access the right pulmonary artery for patch reconstruction and thus planning to arrest the circulation beforehand. The imaging expert remarked on the potential to “improve communication in multidisciplinary meetings,” while a medical trainee, who also had a chance to evaluate the model, remarked that “having the model in front of me and being able to see the exact abnormality makes this particular case much more memorable. […] 3D printed models could have immense potential in pathology and anatomy teaching for the training of healthcare professionals.”

  12. The professional perspective on patient involvement in the development of quality indicators: a qualitative analysis using the example of chronic heart failure in the German health care setting

    Pohontsch NJ

    2015-01-01

    problems while working together in the guideline/QI development team. Concerns existed, for example, regarding the recruitment of patient representatives for diseases without self-help organizations, the financing of patient representation, and the training of patient representatives. Only few potential strategies for improving the process of patient involvement were mentioned.Conclusion: Integrating the patients’ perspectives through the recruitment of a patient representative to participate in the development team was well established and broadly accepted. However, experts stated that the finally selected QIs represent only a small part of the patient-relevant aspects of medical care. According to the experts’ perceptions, the current processes provide a very limited scope for integrating the patients’ perspectives in a more extensive way. Supplementing the set of “conventional” QIs with additional, separately developed, “patient-side” QIs might help to include patient priorities in quality measurement. Keywords: quality indicators, patient involvement, national disease management guideline, qualitative expert interviews, chronic heart failure

  13. Analysis of Mental Processes Represented in Models of Artificial Consciousness

    Luana Folchini da Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Artificial Consciousness concept has been used in the engineering area as being an evolution of the Artificial Intelligence. However, consciousness is a complex subject and often used without formalism. As a main contribution, in this work one proposes an analysis of four recent models of artificial consciousness published in the engineering area. The mental processes represented by these models are highlighted and correlations with the theoretical perspective of cognitive psychology are made. Finally, considerations about consciousness in such models are discussed.

  14. A Perspective on Promoting Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s PRIDE Program

    Boyington, Josephine E.A.; Maihle, Nita J.; Rice, Treva K.; Gonzalez, Juan E.; Hess, Caryl A.; Makala, Levi H.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; Pace, Betty S.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aspiring junior investigators from groups underrepresented in the biomedical sciences face various challenges as they pursue research independence. However, the biomedical research enterprise needs their participation to effectively address critical research issues such as health disparities and health inequities. In this article, we share a research education and mentoring initiative that seeks to address this challenge: Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health Related Research (PRIDE), funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). This longitudinal research-education and mentoring program occurs through summer institute programs located at US-based academic institutions. Recruited participants are exposed to didactic and lab-based research-skill enhancement experiences, with year-round mentoring over the course of two years. Mentor-mentee matching is based on shared research interests to promote congruence and to enhance skill acquisition. Program descriptions and sample narratives of participants’ perceptions of PRIDE’s impact on their career progress are showcased. Additionally, we highlight the overall program design and structure of four of seven funded summer institutes that focus on cardiovascular disease, related conditions, and health disparities. Mentees’ testimonials about the value of the PRIDE mentoring approach in facilitating career development are also noted. Meeting the clinical and research needs of an increasingly diverse US population is an issue of national concern. The PRIDE initiative, which focuses on increasing research preparedness and professional development of groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce, with an emphasis on mentoring as the critical approach, provides a robust model that is impacting the careers of future investigators. PMID:27440978

  15. Heart valve surgery

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  16. Heart failure - tests

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  17. Willem J Kolff (1911-2009): physician, inventor and pioneer: father of artificial organs.

    Morrissey, Megan

    2012-08-01

    Medical pioneer Willem Johan Kolff was an inspirational father, son, physician and inventor. He founded the development of the first kidney dialysis machine, pioneered advances in the heart and lung machine, laid down the foundations for the first mainland blood bank in Europe and successfully implanted the first artificial heart into humans.

  18. Artificial intelligence in medicine: the challenges ahead.

    Coiera, E W

    1996-01-01

    The modern study of artificial intelligence in medicine (AIM) is 25 years old. Throughout this period, the field has attracted many of the best computer scientists, and their work represents a remarkable achievement. However, AIM has not been successful-if success is judged as making an impact on the practice of medicine. Much recent work in AIM has been focused inward, addressing problems that are at the crossroads of the parent disciplines of medicine and artificial intelligence. Now, AIM must move forward with the insights that it has gained and focus on finding solutions for problems at the heart of medical practice. The growing emphasis within medicine on evidence-based practice should provide the right environment for that change.

  19. Bibliography: Artificial Intelligence.

    Smith, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Annotates reference material on artificial intelligence, mostly at an introductory level, with applications to education and learning. Topics include: (1) programing languages; (2) expert systems; (3) language instruction; (4) tutoring systems; and (5) problem solving and reasoning. (JM)

  20. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of ...

  1. Minimally Naturalistic Artificial Intelligence

    Hansen, Steven Stenberg

    2017-01-01

    The rapid advancement of machine learning techniques has re-energized research into general artificial intelligence. While the idea of domain-agnostic meta-learning is appealing, this emerging field must come to terms with its relationship to human cognition and the statistics and structure of the tasks humans perform. The position of this article is that only by aligning our agents' abilities and environments with those of humans do we stand a chance at developing general artificial intellig...

  2. Artificial Intelligence Project

    1990-01-01

    Symposium on Aritificial Intelligence and Software Engineering Working Notes, March 1989. Blumenthal, Brad, "An Architecture for Automating...Artificial Intelligence Project Final Technical Report ARO Contract: DAAG29-84-K-OGO Artificial Intelligence LaboratO"ry The University of Texas at...Austin N>.. ~ ~ JA 1/I 1991 n~~~ Austin, Texas 78712 ________k A,.tificial Intelligence Project i Final Technical Report ARO Contract: DAAG29-84-K-0060

  3. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Summary Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiol...

  4. Principles of artificial intelligence

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  5. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  6. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter ... most common heart attack symptom in men and women is chest pain or discomfort. However, women also ...

  7. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  8. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  9. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  10. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    ... include: A previous heart attack Open heart surgery Chest trauma A heart attack that has affected the thickness of your heart muscle Symptoms Symptoms include: Anxiety Chest pain from the swollen pericardium rubbing on the ...

  11. Heart failure - home monitoring

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  12. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  13. Heart disease and diet

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  14. Coronary heart disease

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  15. Heart attack first aid

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  16. Polymeric materials as artificial muscles: an overview.

    Ariano, Paolo; Accardo, Daisy; Lombardi, Mariangela; Bocchini, Sergio; Draghi, Lorenza; De Nardo, Luigi; Fino, Paolo

    2015-03-18

    The accurate selection of materials and the fine tuning of their properties represent a fundamental aspect in the realization of new active systems able to produce actuating forces, such as artificial muscles. In this regard, exciting opportunities for the design of new advanced systems are offered by materials belonging to the emerging class of functional polymers: exploiting their actuation response, specific devices can be realized. Along this direction, materials showing either shape-memory effect (SME) or shape-change effect (SCE) have been the subject of extensive studies aimed at designing of actuators as artificial muscles. Here, we concisely review active polymers in terms of properties and main applications in artificial muscle design. The main aspects related to material properties in both shape-memory polymers (SMPs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) are reviewed, based on recent scientific literature. SME in thermally activated SMPs is presented by preliminarily providing a definition that encompasses the new theories regarding their fundamental properties. EAPs are briefly presented, describing the working mechanisms and highlighting the main properties and drawbacks, in view of their application as actuators. For both classes of materials, some key examples of effective application in artificial muscles are offered. The potential in polymer architecture design for the fabrication of actively moving systems is described to give a perspective on the main achievements and new research activities.

  17. Pediatric heart surgery

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  18. Artificial immune system applications in computer security

    Tan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art information on the use, design, and development of the Artificial Immune System (AIS) and AIS-based solutions to computer security issues. Artificial Immune System: Applications in Computer Security focuses on the technologies and applications of AIS in malware detection proposed in recent years by the Computational Intelligence Laboratory of Peking University (CIL@PKU). It offers a theoretical perspective as well as practical solutions for readers interested in AIS, machine learning, pattern recognition and computer security. The book begins by introducing the basic concepts, typical algorithms, important features, and some applications of AIS. The second chapter introduces malware and its detection methods, especially for immune-based malware detection approaches. Successive chapters present a variety of advanced detection approaches for malware, including Virus Detection System, K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN), RBF networ s, and Support Vector Machines (SVM), Danger theory, ...

  19. Fluid mechanics of heart valves.

    Yoganathan, Ajit P; He, Zhaoming; Casey Jones, S

    2004-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a life-threatening disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide and leads to approximately 250,000 valve repairs and/or replacements each year. Malfunction of a native valve impairs its efficient fluid mechanic/hemodynamic performance. Artificial heart valves have been used since 1960 to replace diseased native valves and have saved millions of lives. Unfortunately, despite four decades of use, these devices are less than ideal and lead to many complications. Many of these complications/problems are directly related to the fluid mechanics associated with the various mechanical and bioprosthetic valve designs. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art experimental and computational fluid mechanics of native and prosthetic heart valves in current clinical use. The fluid dynamic performance characteristics of caged-ball, tilting-disc, bileaflet mechanical valves and porcine and pericardial stented and nonstented bioprostheic valves are reviewed. Other issues related to heart valve performance, such as biomaterials, solid mechanics, tissue mechanics, and durability, are not addressed in this review.

  20. Artificial organ engineering

    Annesini, Maria Cristina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Artificial organs may be considered as small-scale process plants, in which heat, mass and momentum transfer operations and, possibly, chemical transformations are carried out. This book proposes a novel analysis of artificial organs based on the typical bottom-up approach used in process engineering. Starting from a description of the fundamental physico-chemical phenomena involved in the process, the whole system is rebuilt as an interconnected ensemble of elemental unit operations. Each artificial organ is presented with a short introduction provided by expert clinicians. Devices commonly used in clinical practice are reviewed and their performance is assessed and compared by using a mathematical model based approach. Whilst mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool for quantitative descriptions of clinical devices, models are kept simple to remain focused on the essential features of each process. Postgraduate students and researchers in the field of chemical and biomedical engineering will find that t...

  1. Charlas sobre inteligencia artificial

    Álvarez Sánchez, José Ramón; Ferrández Vicente, José Manuel; Paz López, Félix de la

    2014-01-01

    Serie: Informática en Radio 3 La Inteligencia Artificial es una de las ciencias que causa mayor impacto en la sociedad, mucho más si tenemos en cuenta que cambiará el futuro de la humanidad. En España existen actualmente un nutrido grupo de equipos de investigación relacionados con las tecnologías de computación natural-artificial que aúnan sus esfuerzos a través de la RTNAC la Red Temática en Tecnologías de Computación Natural-Artificial . La UNED participa en todas sus actividades desde ...

  2. Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology.

    Johnson, Kipp W; Torres Soto, Jessica; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Shameer, Khader; Miotto, Riccardo; Ali, Mohsin; Ashley, Euan; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-06-12

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning are poised to influence nearly every aspect of the human condition, and cardiology is not an exception to this trend. This paper provides a guide for clinicians on relevant aspects of artificial intelligence and machine learning, reviews selected applications of these methods in cardiology to date, and identifies how cardiovascular medicine could incorporate artificial intelligence in the future. In particular, the paper first reviews predictive modeling concepts relevant to cardiology such as feature selection and frequent pitfalls such as improper dichotomization. Second, it discusses common algorithms used in supervised learning and reviews selected applications in cardiology and related disciplines. Third, it describes the advent of deep learning and related methods collectively called unsupervised learning, provides contextual examples both in general medicine and in cardiovascular medicine, and then explains how these methods could be applied to enable precision cardiology and improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  4. Artificial intelligence executive summary

    Wamsley, S.J.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1984-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a high technology field that can be used to provide problem solving diagnosis, guidance and for support resolution of problems. It is not a stand alone discipline, but can also be applied to develop data bases for retention of the expertise that is required for its own knowledge base. This provides a way to retain knowledge that otherwise may be lost. Artificial Intelligence Methodology can provide an automated construction management decision support system, thereby restoring the manager's emphasis to project management

  5. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  6. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  7. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    Korb, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    As the power of Bayesian techniques has become more fully realized, the field of artificial intelligence has embraced Bayesian methodology and integrated it to the point where an introduction to Bayesian techniques is now a core course in many computer science programs. Unlike other books on the subject, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence keeps mathematical detail to a minimum and covers a broad range of topics. The authors integrate all of Bayesian net technology and learning Bayesian net technology and apply them both to knowledge engineering. They emphasize understanding and intuition but also provide the algorithms and technical background needed for applications. Software, exercises, and solutions are available on the authors' website.

  8. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction......Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...

  9. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  10. Generality in Artificial Intelligence

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Generality in Artificial Intelligence. John McCarthy. Classics Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 283-296. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/03/0283-0296. Author Affiliations.

  11. Artificial molecular motors

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Wilson, Miriam R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Leigh, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new

  12. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  13. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  14. Artificial skin and patient simulator comprising the artificial skin

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to an artificial skin (10, 12, 14), and relates to a patient simulator (100) comprising the artificial skin. The artificial skin is a layered structure comprising a translucent cover layer (20) configured for imitating human or animal skin, and comprising a light emitting layer

  15. Valvular Heart Disease in Heart Failure

    Giuseppe MC Rosano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural valvular heart disease may be the cause of heart failure or may worsen the clinical status of patients with heart failure. Heart failure may also develop in patients treated with valve surgery. Patients with heart failure with valvular heart disease are at increased risk of events including sudden cardiac death. Before considering intervention (surgical or percutaneous all patients should receive appropriate medical and device therapy taking into account that vasodilators must be used with caution in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Numerous percutaneous and/or hybrid procedures have been introduced in the past few years and they are changing the management of valvular heart disease. In patients with heart failure and valvular heart disease, either primary or functional, the whole process of decision-making should be staged through a comprehensive evaluation of the risk– benefit ratio of different treatment strategies and should be made by a multidisciplinary ‘heart team’ with a particular expertise in valvular heart disease. The heart team should include heart failure cardiologists, cardiac surgeons/structural valve interventionists, imaging specialists, anaesthetists, geriatricians and intensive care specialists. This article will review recent developments and distill practical guidance in the management of this important heart failure co-morbidity.

  16. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  17. Collective intelligence of the artificial life community on its own successes, failures, and future.

    Rasmussen, Steen; Raven, Michael J; Keating, Gordon N; Bedau, Mark A

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel Internet-based method for building consensus and clarifying conflicts in large stakeholder groups facing complex issues, and we use the method to survey and map the scientific and organizational perspectives of the artificial life community during the Seventh International Conference on Artificial Life (summer 2000). The issues addressed in this survey included artificial life's main successes, main failures, main open scientific questions, and main strategies for the future, as well as the benefits and pitfalls of creating a professional society for artificial life. By illuminating the artificial life community's collective perspective on these issues, this survey illustrates the value of such methods of harnessing the collective intelligence of large stakeholder groups.

  18. Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion

    Hartmanová, Leona

    2016-01-01

    Criminal Aspects of Artificial Abortion This diploma thesis deals with the issue of artificial abortion, especially its criminal aspects. Legal aspects are not the most important aspects of artificial abortion. Social, ethical or ideological aspects are of the same importance but this diploma thesis cannot analyse all of them. The main issue with artificial abortion is whether it is possible to force a pregnant woman to carry a child and give birth to a child when she cannot or does not want ...

  19. Parental overprotection and heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Ong, Lephuong; Nolan, Robert P; Irvine, Jane; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-09-01

    The care of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging from a mental health perspective, as these patients continue to face a variety of biopsychosocial issues that may impact emotional functioning. Despite these issues, there are limited data on the psychosocial functioning of adults with CHD, and there are no data on the impact of parental overprotection on heart-focused anxiety in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between patient recollections of parental overprotection and current heart-focused anxiety in adults with CHD. A cross-sectional sample of 190 adult patients with CHD (51% male; mean age = 32.28, SD = 11.86 years) completed validated measures of perceived parental overprotection (Parental Bonding Instrument) and heart-focused anxiety (Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire). The results indicated that perceived parental overprotection (β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and heart defect complexity (β = 0.17, p = 0.03) were significantly related to heart-focused anxiety. Contrary to hypotheses, perceived parental overprotection did not vary as a function of heart defect complexity (F (2, 169) = 0.02, p = 0.98). Perceived parental overprotection and heart defect complexity are associated with heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease. These results can inform the development of clinical interventions aimed at improving the psychosocial adjustment of this patient population.

  20. A tabela periódica dos elementos químicos prevista por redes neurais artificiais de Kohonen Periodic table of the elements in the perspective of artificial neural networks

    Maurício Ruv Lemes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several chemical elements were not known by end of the 18th century, Mendeleyev came up with an astonishing achievement: the periodic table of elements. He was not only able to predict the existence of (then new elements but also to provide accurate estimates of their chemical and physical properties. This is certainly a relevant example of the human intelligence. Here, we intend to shed some light on the following question: Can an artificial intelligence system yield a classification of the elements that resembles, in some sense, the periodic table? To achieve our goal, we have fed a self-organized map (SOM with information available at Mendeleyev's time. Our results show that similar elements tend to form individual clusters. Thus, SOM generates clusters of halogens, alkaline metals and transition metals that show a similarity with the periodic table of elements.

  1. Revealing Hearts

    Saghaug, Kristin Falck; Pattison, George; Lindgren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    with reference to Tillich’s account of the meaning of revelation through culture and art, summed up in the statement that “(...) revelation is the manifestation of the ground of being for human knowledge” (Tillich, 1951, p.94), which, we argue, can be extended to everyday experiences, for example, in business......Some small business owners want to balance personal values as well as economic values. “I have to follow my heart” or “it must be meaningful” some of them say. But how might they be able to know what gives meaning to the heart? The philosophical theologian Paul Tillich finds that the problem...... life. In Tillich’s own terms, even preliminary concerns may point at an ultimate concern (Tillich, 1964), which can also be understood as ‘knowledge of the heart’. Our account is also connected to wider discussions concerning the nature of intuition....

  2. Heart-Health Screenings

    ... Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Subscribe to Heart Insight magazine and monthly ... in Spanish . Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  3. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    ... recommendations to make a full recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions ... Support Network Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  4. Open heart surgery

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002950.htm Open heart surgery To use the sharing features on this ... large arteries connected to the heart. The term "open heart surgery" means that you are connected to a ...

  5. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  6. Congenital Heart Information Network

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  7. Heart disease and depression

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  8. Hypertensive heart disease

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  9. Left heart catheterization

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  10. Right heart ventriculography

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  11. Congenital heart disease

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  12. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  13. Mathematical Model Analysis of Heart-Arterial Interaction in Hypertension

    2001-10-25

    conscious dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy ,” ! " # , vol. 260, pp. H1903-H1911, 1991. [7] P. Segers, N...with data measured in the isolated canine [14] or cat [15] heart, pumping into an artificial load or in the intact sheep [16] and human [7]. Left...instantaneous pressure-volume ratio of the canine left ventricle and effects of epinephrine and heart rate on the ratio,” , vol. 32, pp. 314

  14. Artificial structures on Mars

    Van Flandern, T.

    2002-05-01

    Approximately 70,000 images of the surface of Mars at a resolution of up to 1.4 meters per pixel, taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, are now in public archives. Approximately 1% of those images show features that can be broadly described as `special shapes', `tracks, trails, and possible vegetation', `spots, stripes, and tubes', `artistic imagery', and `patterns and symbols'. Rather than optical illusions and tricks of light and shadow, most of these have the character that, if photographed on Earth, no one would doubt that they were the products of large biology and intelligence. In a few cases, relationships, context, and fulfillment of a priori predictions provide objective evidence of artificiality that is exempt from the influence of experimenter biases. Only controlled test results can be trusted because biases are strong and operate both for and against artificiality.

  15. Development of a Simple Structured Artificial Muscle Using SMA Wire

    Ibuki, Ryuta; Maruyama, Shigenao; Komiya, Atsuki

    2006-01-01

    Artificial heart muscle using SMA wire is developed to assist weaken heartbeat. Simple structure design was adopted for large output force, large displacement and rapid cyclic motion of the actuator. The actuator was designed and fabricated from the viewpoint of heat transfer. Moving performance of the actuator was experimentally measured under 10N of loading condition. Under the maximum efficiency condition, the actuator shows cyclic motion with 1mm of displacement and time period of about 2 seconds in one cycle

  16. Artificial intelligence in medicine

    Scerri, Mariella; Grech, Victor E.

    2016-01-01

    Various types of artificial intelligence programs are already available as consultants to physicians, and these help in medical diagnostics and treatment. At the time of writing, extant programs constitute “weak” AI—lacking in consciousness and intentionality. With AI currently making rapid progress in all domains, including those of healthcare, physicians face possible competitors—or worse, claims that doctors may become obsolete. We will explore the development of AI and robotics in medicin...

  17. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  18. Intelligible Artificial Intelligence

    Weld, Daniel S.; Bansal, Gagan

    2018-01-01

    Since Artificial Intelligence (AI) software uses techniques like deep lookahead search and stochastic optimization of huge neural networks to fit mammoth datasets, it often results in complex behavior that is difficult for people to understand. Yet organizations are deploying AI algorithms in many mission-critical settings. In order to trust their behavior, we must make it intelligible --- either by using inherently interpretable models or by developing methods for explaining otherwise overwh...

  19. Intelligence in Artificial Intelligence

    Datta, Shoumen Palit Austin

    2016-01-01

    The elusive quest for intelligence in artificial intelligence prompts us to consider that instituting human-level intelligence in systems may be (still) in the realm of utopia. In about a quarter century, we have witnessed the winter of AI (1990) being transformed and transported to the zenith of tabloid fodder about AI (2015). The discussion at hand is about the elements that constitute the canonical idea of intelligence. The delivery of intelligence as a pay-per-use-service, popping out of ...

  20. Artificial neural network modelling

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  1. Artificial sweetener; Jinko kanmiryo

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The patents related to the artificial sweetener that it is introduced to the public in 3 years from 1996 until 1998 are 115 cases. The sugar quality which makes an oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol the subject is greatly over 28 cases of the non-sugar quality in the one by the kind as a general tendency of these patents at 73 cases in such cases as the Aspartame. The method of manufacture patent, which included new material around other peptides, the oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol isn`t inferior to 56 cases of the formation thing patent at 43 cases, and pays attention to the thing, which is many by the method of manufacture, formation. There is most improvement of the quality of sweetness with 31 cases in badness of the aftertaste which is characteristic of the artificial sweetener and so on, and much stability including the improvement in the flavor of food by the artificial sweetener, a long time and dissolution, fluid nature and productivity and improvement of the economy such as a cost are seen with effect on a purpose. (NEDO)

  2. Target Heart Rates

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  3. Alcohol and Heart Health

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  4. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  5. Protein and Heart Health

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  6. Heart failure - medicines

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  7. Artificial muscle: the human chimera is the future.

    Tozzi, P

    2011-12-14

    Severe heart failure and cerebral stroke are broadly associated with the impairment of muscular function that conventional treatments struggle to restore. New technologies enable the construction of "smart" materials that could be of great help in treating diseases where the main problem is muscle weakness. These materials "behave" similarly to biological systems, because the material directly converts energy, for example electrical energy into movement. The extension and contraction occur silently like in natural muscles. The real challenge is to transfer this amazing technology into devices that restore or replace the mechanical function of failing muscle. Cardiac assist devices based on artificial muscle technology could envelope a weak heart and temporarily improve its systolic function, or, if placed on top of the atrium, restore the atrial kick in chronic atrial fibrillation. Artificial sphincters could be used to treat urinary incontinence after prostatectomy or faecal incontinence associated with stomas. Artificial muscles can restore the ability of patients with facial paralysis due to stroke or nerve injury to blink. Smart materials could be used to construct an artificial oesophagus including peristaltic movement and lower oesophageal sphincter function to replace the diseased oesophagus thereby avoiding the need for laparotomy to mobilise stomach or intestine. In conclusion, in the near future, smart devices will integrate with the human body to fill functional gaps due to organ failure, and so create a human chimera.

  8. Synthetic and Bio-Artificial Tactile Sensing: A Review

    Maria Chiara Carrozza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art of artificial tactile sensing, with a particular focus on bio-hybrid and fully-biological approaches. To this aim, the study of physiology of the human sense of touch and of the coding mechanisms of tactile information is a significant starting point, which is briefly explored in this review. Then, the progress towards the development of an artificial sense of touch are investigated. Artificial tactile sensing is analysed with respect to the possible approaches to fabricate the outer interface layer: synthetic skin versus bio-artificial skin. With particular respect to the synthetic skin approach, a brief overview is provided on various technologies and transduction principles that can be integrated beneath the skin layer. Then, the main focus moves to approaches characterized by the use of bio-artificial skin as an outer layer of the artificial sensory system. Within this design solution for the skin, bio-hybrid and fully-biological tactile sensing systems are thoroughly presented: while significant results have been reported for the development of tissue engineered skins, the development of mechanotransduction units and their integration is a recent trend that is still lagging behind, therefore requiring research efforts and investments. In the last part of the paper, application domains and perspectives of the reviewed tactile sensing technologies are discussed.

  9. Take heart!

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  10. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation - discharge; Artificial pacemaker - discharge; Permanent pacemaker - discharge; Internal pacemaker - discharge; Cardiac resynchronization therapy - discharge; CRT - discharge; ...

  11. Getting home with artifical heart – what is the everyday life experience of people with mechanical circulatory Support. A qualitative study

    Braunsdorf, Sandy

    2017-07-01

    Background: The growing number of mechanical circulatory support systems implanted with successful results in terms of quality of life and physical resilience means that more and more people are being discharged from hospital to live at home with an artificial heart. This puts high requirements on affected persons’ disease and therapy management – a subject which has attracted very little qualitative research to date. Aim: This study therefore sought to shed light on how people with mechanical circulatory support experience their everyday lives. The aim was to document the subjective associations of those affected from an insider perspective. Methods: Following the interpretative phenomenological paradigm, narrative interviews were conducted with two female and eight male participants. For qualitative analysis, a multi-step process guided by the methodology of hermeneutic philosophy was used. Results: The qualitative data analysis revealed five main topic areas. These describe patients’ state of health after implantation and the various adjustments, constraints and pressures necessitated by their illness and therapeutic requirements. On this basis, coping and management strategies are identified. Other significant aspects of patients’ everyday lives are social interaction and environment and health care with an artificial heart. Conclusions: The findings add to our knowledge of the day-to-day lives of people with mechanical circulatory support systems, giving us a better understanding of their specific situation.

  12. Advanced Heart Failure

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  13. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems.

  14. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    Srishti Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence (AI provides machines with the ability to learn and respond the way humans do and is also referred to as machine learning. The step to building an AI system is to provide the data to learn from so that it can map relations between inputs and outputs and set up parameters such as “weights”/decision boundaries to predict responses for inputs in the future. Then, the model is tested on a second data set. This article outlines the promise this analytic approach has in medicine and cardiology.

  15. Is Intelligence Artificial?

    Greer, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of intelligence is directed primarily at the level of human beings. This paper attempts to give a more unifying definition that can be applied to the natural world in general. The definition would be used more to verify a degree of intelligence, not to quantify it and might help when making judgements on the matter. A version of an accepted test for AI is then put forward as the 'acid test' for Artificial Intelligence itself. It might be what a free-thinking program or robot...

  16. Bayesian artificial intelligence

    Korb, Kevin B

    2010-01-01

    Updated and expanded, Bayesian Artificial Intelligence, Second Edition provides a practical and accessible introduction to the main concepts, foundation, and applications of Bayesian networks. It focuses on both the causal discovery of networks and Bayesian inference procedures. Adopting a causal interpretation of Bayesian networks, the authors discuss the use of Bayesian networks for causal modeling. They also draw on their own applied research to illustrate various applications of the technology.New to the Second EditionNew chapter on Bayesian network classifiersNew section on object-oriente

  17. Grasping versus knitting: A geometric perspective. Comment on "Hand synergies: Integration of robotics and neuroscience for understanding the control of biological and artificial hands" by M. Santello et al.

    Laumond, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-01

    Grasping an object is a matter of first moving a prehensile organ at some position in the world, and then managing the contact relationship between the prehensile organ and the object. Once the contact relationship has been established and made stable, the object is part of the body and it can move in the world. As any action, the action of grasping is ontologically anchored in the physical space while the correlative movement originates in the space of the body. Robots-as any living system-access the physical space only indirectly through sensors and motors. Sensors and motors constitute the space of the body where homeostasis takes place. Physical space and both sensor space and motor space constitute a triangulation, which is the locus of the action embodiment, i.e. the locus of operations allowing the fundamental inversion between world-centered and body-centered frames. Referring to these three fundamental spaces, geometry appears as the best abstraction to capture the nature of action-driven movements. Indeed, a particular geometry is captured by a particular group of transformations of the points of a space such that every point or every direction in space can be transformed by an element of the group to every other point or direction within the group. Quoting mathematician Poincaré, the issue is not find the truest geometry but the most practical one to account for the complexity of the world [1]. Geometry is then the language fostering the dialog between neurophysiology and engineering about natural and artificial movement science and technology. Evolution has found amazing solutions that allow organisms to rapidly and efficiently manage the relationship between their body and the world [2]. It is then natural that roboticists consider taking inspiration of these natural solutions, while contributing to better understand their origin.

  18. 3D Bioprinting of Artificial Tissues: Construction of Biomimetic Microstructures.

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lin, Xin; Huang, Peng

    2018-04-24

    It is promising that artificial tissues/organs for clinical application can be produced via 3D bioprinting of living cells and biomaterials. The construction of microstructures biomimicking native tissues is crucially important to create artificial tissues with biological functions. For instance, the fabrication of vessel-like networks to supply cells with initial nutrient and oxygen, and the arrangement of multiple types of cells for creating lamellar/complex tissues through 3D bioprinting are widely reported. The current advances in 3D bioprinting of artificial tissues from the view of construction of biomimetic microstructures, especially the fabrication of lamellar, vascular, and complex structures are summarized. In the end, the conclusion and perspective of 3D bioprinting for clinical applications are elaborated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ISLAMIC VALUES

    Ali Akbar Ziaee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Intelligence has the potential to empower humans through enhanced learning and performance. But if this potential is to be realized and accepted, the ethical aspects as well as the technical must be addressed. Many engineers claim that AI will be smarter than human brains, including scientific creativity, general wisdom and social skills, so we must consider it an important factor for making decisions in our social life and especially in our Islamic societies. The most important challenges will be the quality of representing the Islamic values like piety, obedience, Halal and Haram, and etc in the form of semantics. In this paper, I want to emphasize on the role of Divine Islamic values in the application of AI and discuss it according to philosophy of AI and Islamic perspective.Keywords- Value, expert, Community Development, Artificial Intelligence, Superintelligence, Friendly Artificial Intelligence

  20. Artificial intelligence and robot responsibilities: innovating beyond rights.

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2015-04-01

    The enduring innovations in artificial intelligence and robotics offer the promised capacity of computer consciousness, sentience and rationality. The development of these advanced technologies have been considered to merit rights, however these can only be ascribed in the context of commensurate responsibilities and duties. This represents the discernable next-step for evolution in this field. Addressing these needs requires attention to the philosophical perspectives of moral responsibility for artificial intelligence and robotics. A contrast to the moral status of animals may be considered. At a practical level, the attainment of responsibilities by artificial intelligence and robots can benefit from the established responsibilities and duties of human society, as their subsistence exists within this domain. These responsibilities can be further interpreted and crystalized through legal principles, many of which have been conserved from ancient Roman law. The ultimate and unified goal of stipulating these responsibilities resides through the advancement of mankind and the enduring preservation of the core tenets of humanity.

  1. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.

  2. How to teach artificial organs.

    Zapanta, Conrad M; Borovetz, Harvey S; Lysaght, Michael J; Manning, Keefe B

    2011-01-01

    Artificial organs education is often an overlooked field for many bioengineering and biomedical engineering students. The purpose of this article is to describe three different approaches to teaching artificial organs. This article can serve as a reference for those who wish to offer a similar course at their own institutions or incorporate these ideas into existing courses. Artificial organ classes typically fulfill several ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) criteria, including those specific to bioengineering and biomedical engineering programs.

  3. Artificial Photosynthesis: Beyond Mimicking Nature

    Dau, Holger; Fujita, Etsuko; Sun, Licheng

    2017-01-01

    In this Editorial, Guest Editors Holger Dau, Etsuko Fujita, and Licheng Sun introduce the Special Issue of ChemSusChem on “Artificial Photosynthesis for Sustainable Fuels”. Here, they discuss the need for non-fossil based fuels, introduce both biological and artificial photosynthesis, and outline various important concepts in artificial photosynthesis, including molecular and solid-state catalysts for water oxidation and hydrogen evolution, catalytic CO 2 reduction, and photoelectrochemical systems.

  4. Artificial Intelligence in Space Platforms.

    1984-12-01

    computer algorithms, there still appears to be a need for Artificial Inteligence techniques in the navigation area. The reason is that navigaion, in...RD-RI32 679 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPACE PLRTFORNSMU AIR FORCE 1/𔃼 INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PRTTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING M A WRIGHT DEC 94...i4 Preface The purpose of this study was to analyze the feasibility of implementing Artificial Intelligence techniques to increase autonomy for

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Moral intelligence

    Laura Pana

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the thesis that the implementation of a moral code in the behaviour of artificial intelligent systems needs a specific form of human and artificial intelligence, not just an abstract intelligence. We present intelligence as a system with an internal structure and the structural levels of the moral system, as well as certain characteristics of artificial intelligent agents which can/must be treated as 1- individual entities (with a complex, specialized, autonomous or selfdetermined,...

  6. Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network

    2011-01-01

    11th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation FAST 2011, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, September 2011 Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network Richard...Trimaran Resistance Artificial Neural Network 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e... Artificial Neural Network and is restricted to the center and side-hull configurations tested. The value in the parametric model is that it is able to

  7. Artificial Intelligence and Economic Theories

    Marwala, Tshilidzi; Hurwitz, Evan

    2017-01-01

    The advent of artificial intelligence has changed many disciplines such as engineering, social science and economics. Artificial intelligence is a computational technique which is inspired by natural intelligence such as the swarming of birds, the working of the brain and the pathfinding of the ants. These techniques have impact on economic theories. This book studies the impact of artificial intelligence on economic theories, a subject that has not been extensively studied. The theories that...

  8. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  9. THRESHOLD LOGIC IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    COMPUTER LOGIC, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , BIONICS, GEOMETRY, INPUT OUTPUT DEVICES, LINEAR PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION, NETWORKS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, PROBABILITY, SWITCHING CIRCUITS, SYNTHESIS

  10. Echocardiographic evaluation of simple versus complex congenital heart disease in a tertiary care Paediatrics Hospital

    Uttam Kumar Sarkar; Anish Chatterjee; Suprit Basu; Atanu Pan; Sumit Periwal

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objectives:Congenital heart diseases are treatable either by catheter based intervention or open heart surgery according to their quality. In our study we aim to analyze congenital heart disease echocardiographically into simple versus complex heart disease at a tertiary care centre with a public health planning and policy making perspective.Materials & Methods:This hospital based study was done on 1010 patients, both from in-patient and out-patient, who were clinically s...

  11. Generative Artificial Intelligence : Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence

    van der Zant, Tijn; Kouw, Matthijs; Schomaker, Lambertus; Mueller, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    The closed systems of contemporary Artificial Intelligence do not seem to lead to intelligent machines in the near future. What is needed are open-ended systems with non-linear properties in order to create interesting properties for the scaffolding of an artificial mind. Using post-structuralistic

  12. Artificial organs: recent progress in artificial hearing and vision.

    Ifukube, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    Artificial sensory organs are a prosthetic means of sending visual or auditory information to the brain by electrical stimulation of the optic or auditory nerves to assist visually impaired or hearing-impaired people. However, clinical application of artificial sensory organs, except for cochlear implants, is still a trial-and-error process. This is because how and where the information transmitted to the brain is processed is still unknown, and also because changes in brain function (plasticity) remain unknown, even though brain plasticity plays an important role in meaningful interpretation of new sensory stimuli. This article discusses some basic unresolved issues and potential solutions in the development of artificial sensory organs such as cochlear implants, brainstem implants, artificial vision, and artificial retinas.

  13. Valvular heart disease

    Carabello, B.; Crawford, F.

    1998-01-01

    The predicts of the patients with valvular heart disease it has improved substantially in the last 15 years.A better understanding of the appropriate programming of the surgery it is one of the key reasons .In general the surgery for the illness valvular stenosis it can take a long time until the appearance of the symptoms. Probably that in the future it progresses toward a conservation of the native valves in the patient.It will be beneficial because the valves modern prosthetic even have inherent risks .The aortic stenosis acquired it will follow requiring a valve prosthetic substitution .But the valvular disease it will be treated every time but by means of procedures that keep the native valves.They include the lung autograft for the aortic stenosis ,The balloonla commissurectomy with ball for the mitral stenosis ,the aortic valvular repair for aortic inadequacy .This procedures will make that the surgery is but attractive eliminating the risks associated with the prosthetics.The continuous advances in the valuation non invasive of the aortic and mitral valves, the of the appropriate selection moment for the derivation for surgical treatment, the improves of the surgical techniques for the valvular substitution and reconstruction and the very recent advances in less aggressive surgical focuses they should combine to improve the patients' perspectives with cardiopatia valvular [es

  14. Surface Modification using Plasma treatments and Adhesion Peptide for Durable Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves

    Jung, Young mee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Artificial heart valves are used in valvular heart diseases, but these valves have disadvantages that they cannot grow, repair and remodel. In current study, the strategies to development of in vitro cultured functional tissue by tissue engineering is available to heart valve disease. In the point of using viable autolougous cells, tissue engineered heart valves have some advantage to include that they can repair, remodel, and grow. Because heart valve is placed under the strong shear stress condition by pumping of heart, the durability of tissue-engineered heart valves is now questionable. The purpose of the study is to evaluate of the durability of tissue engineered heart valve with surface modified scaffolds under hemodynamic conditions

  15. Artificial Diets for Mosquitoes

    Kristina K. Gonzales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for more than a million human deaths every year. Modern mosquito control strategies such as sterile insect technique (SIT, release of insects carrying a dominant lethal (RIDL, population replacement strategies (PR, and Wolbachia-based strategies require the rearing of large numbers of mosquitoes in culture for continuous release over an extended period of time. Anautogenous mosquitoes require essential nutrients for egg production, which they obtain through the acquisition and digestion of a protein-rich blood meal. Therefore, mosquito mass production in laboratories and other facilities relies on vertebrate blood from live animal hosts. However, vertebrate blood is expensive to acquire and hard to store for longer times especially under field conditions. This review discusses older and recent studies that were aimed at the development of artificial diets for mosquitoes in order to replace vertebrate blood.

  16. A programmable artificial retina

    Bernard, T.M.; Zavidovique, B.Y.; Devos, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm 2 CMOS 2-μm circuit are presented

  17. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  18. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  19. Artificial resuspension studies

    Cooper, B.M.; Marchall, K.B.; Thomas, K.A.; Tracy, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial resuspension studies on a range of Taranaki and other major trial site soils were performed by use of a mechanical dust-raising apparatus. A cascade impactor was used to analyse airborne dust in terms of mass and 241 Am activities for particle sizes less than 7 μm. Plutonium and americium activities were found to be enhanced in the respirable fraction. Reported enhancement factors (defined as the ratio of activity concentration of the respirable fraction to that of the total soil) ranged from 3.7 to 32.5 for Taranaki soils with an average value of 6 appearing reasonable for general application in outer (plume) areas. Values close to unity were measured at major trial sites , One Tree and Tadje. Results of some experiments where uncontamined dust was raised by activities such as walking and driving over dusty ground are also presented. 7 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs

  20. Artificial Intelligence and brain.

    Shapshak, Paul

    2018-01-01

    From the start, Kurt Godel observed that computer and brain paradigms were considered on a par by researchers and that researchers had misunderstood his theorems. He hailed with displeasure that the brain transcends computers. In this brief article, we point out that Artificial Intelligence (AI) comprises multitudes of human-made methodologies, systems, and languages, and implemented with computer technology. These advances enhance development in the electron and quantum realms. In the biological realm, animal neurons function, also utilizing electron flow, and are products of evolution. Mirror neurons are an important paradigm in neuroscience research. Moreover, the paradigm shift proposed here - 'hall of mirror neurons' - is a potentially further productive research tactic. These concepts further expand AI and brain research.

  1. Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners

    Sørensen, Lone Brinkmann; Vasilaras, Tatjana H; Astrup, Arne

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of appetite studies in free-living subjects supplying the habitual diet with either sucrose or artificially sweetened beverages and foods. Furthermore, the focus of artificial sweeteners has only been on the energy intake (EI) side of the energy-balance equation. The data are from...

  2. Artificial insemination in marsupials.

    Rodger, John C; Paris, Damien B B P; Czarny, Natasha A; Harris, Merrilee S; Molinia, Frank C; Taggart, David A; Allen, Camryn D; Johnston, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Assisted breeding technology (ART), including artificial insemination (AI), has the potential to advance the conservation and welfare of marsupials. Many of the challenges facing AI and ART for marsupials are shared with other wild species. However, the marsupial mode of reproduction and development also poses unique challenges and opportunities. For the vast majority of marsupials, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding basic reproductive biology to guide an AI strategy. For threatened or endangered species, only the most basic reproductive information is available in most cases, if at all. Artificial insemination has been used to produce viable young in two marsupial species, the koala and tammar wallaby. However, in these species the timing of ovulation can be predicted with considerably more confidence than in any other marsupial. In a limited number of other marsupials, such precise timing of ovulation has only been achieved using hormonal treatment leading to conception but not live young. A unique marsupial ART strategy which has been shown to have promise is cross-fostering; the transfer of pouch young of a threatened species to the pouches of foster mothers of a common related species as a means to increase productivity. For the foreseeable future, except for a few highly iconic or well studied species, there is unlikely to be sufficient reproductive information on which to base AI. However, if more generic approaches can be developed; such as ICSI (to generate embryos) and female synchronization (to provide oocyte donors or embryo recipients), then the prospects for broader application of AI/ART to marsupials are promising.

  3. Heart rate index

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  4. Beyond AI: Artificial Dreams Conference

    Zackova, Eva; Kelemen, Jozef; Beyond Artificial Intelligence : The Disappearing Human-Machine Divide

    2015-01-01

    This book is an edited collection of chapters based on the papers presented at the conference “Beyond AI: Artificial Dreams” held in Pilsen in November 2012. The aim of the conference was to question deep-rooted ideas of artificial intelligence and cast critical reflection on methods standing at its foundations.  Artificial Dreams epitomize our controversial quest for non-biological intelligence, and therefore the contributors of this book tried to fully exploit such a controversy in their respective chapters, which resulted in an interdisciplinary dialogue between experts from engineering, natural sciences and humanities.   While pursuing the Artificial Dreams, it has become clear that it is still more and more difficult to draw a clear divide between human and machine. And therefore this book tries to portrait such an image of what lies beyond artificial intelligence: we can see the disappearing human-machine divide, a very important phenomenon of nowadays technological society, the phenomenon which i...

  5. Soft computing in artificial intelligence

    Matson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the concept of artificial intelligence based on knowledge-based algorithms. Given the current hardware and software technologies and artificial intelligence theories, we can think of how efficient to provide a solution, how best to implement a model and how successful to achieve it. This edition provides readers with the most recent progress and novel solutions in artificial intelligence. This book aims at presenting the research results and solutions of applications in relevance with artificial intelligence technologies. We propose to researchers and practitioners some methods to advance the intelligent systems and apply artificial intelligence to specific or general purpose. This book consists of 13 contributions that feature fuzzy (r, s)-minimal pre- and β-open sets, handling big coocurrence matrices, Xie-Beni-type fuzzy cluster validation, fuzzy c-regression models, combination of genetic algorithm and ant colony optimization, building expert system, fuzzy logic and neural network, ind...

  6. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  7. Uncertainty in artificial intelligence

    Levitt, TS; Lemmer, JF; Shachter, RD

    1990-01-01

    Clearly illustrated in this volume is the current relationship between Uncertainty and AI.It has been said that research in AI revolves around five basic questions asked relative to some particular domain: What knowledge is required? How can this knowledge be acquired? How can it be represented in a system? How should this knowledge be manipulated in order to provide intelligent behavior? How can the behavior be explained? In this volume, all of these questions are addressed. From the perspective of the relationship of uncertainty to the basic questions of AI, the book divides naturally i

  8. Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production

    2017-06-30

    collect light energy and separate charge for developing new types of nanobiodevices to construct ”artificial leaf” from solar to fuel. or Concept of...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0054 Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production Mamoru Nango NAGOYA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY)      30-06-2017 2

  9. The heart and hypothyroidism

    1983-04-09

    Apr 9, 1983 ... influenced by the thyroid disorder and vice versa. We recenrly ... hypothyroidism is a rare cause of heart failure other causes of heart failure must be excluded ... signs of cardiac tamponade and echocardiographic features of a.

  10. Valvular heart disease

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  11. Nuclear Heart Scan

    ... Home / Nuclear Heart Scan Nuclear Heart Scan Also known as Nuclear Stress Test , ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  12. Menopause and Heart Disease

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  13. Heart Attack Payment - National

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  14. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  15. Heart Attack Payment - State

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  16. Heart disease and women

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  17. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  18. Heart disease and intimacy

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Aspirin and heart disease

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  20. Heart disease - risk factors

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...