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Sample records for artificial groundwater recharge

  1. INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL GROUND-WATER RECHARGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial ground-water recharge has been practiced for scores of years throughout the world. The purpose of artificial recharge is to increase the rate at which water infiltrates the land surface in order to supplement the quantity of ground water in storage. A variety of rechar...

  2. Artificial recharge of groundwater: hydrogeology and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Herman

    2002-02-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater is achieved by putting surface water in basins, furrows, ditches, or other facilities where it infiltrates into the soil and moves downward to recharge aquifers. Artificial recharge is increasingly used for short- or long-term underground storage, where it has several advantages over surface storage, and in water reuse. Artificial recharge requires permeable surface soils. Where these are not available, trenches or shafts in the unsaturated zone can be used, or water can be directly injected into aquifers through wells. To design a system for artificial recharge of groundwater, infiltration rates of the soil must be determined and the unsaturated zone between land surface and the aquifer must be checked for adequate permeability and absence of polluted areas. The aquifer should be sufficiently transmissive to avoid excessive buildup of groundwater mounds. Knowledge of these conditions requires field investigations and, if no fatal flaws are detected, test basins to predict system performance. Water-quality issues must be evaluated, especially with respect to formation of clogging layers on basin bottoms or other infiltration surfaces, and to geochemical reactions in the aquifer. Clogging layers are managed by desilting or other pretreatment of the water, and by remedial techniques in the infiltration system, such as drying, scraping, disking, ripping, or other tillage. Recharge wells should be pumped periodically to backwash clogging layers. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0182-4.

  3. Artificial recharge of groundwater and its role in water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimrey, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses the various aspects and methods of artificial recharge with particular emphasis on its uses and potential role in water management in the Arabian Gulf region. Artificial recharge occurs when man's activities cause more water to enter an aquifer, either under pumping or non-pumping conditions, than otherwise would enter the aquifer. Use of artificial recharge can be a practical means of dealing with problems of overdraft of groundwater. Methods of artificial recharge may be grouped under two broad types: (a) water spreading techniques, and (b) well-injection techniques. Successful use of artificial recharge requires a thorough knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the aquifier system, and extensive onsite experimentation and tailoring of the artificial-recharge technique to fit the local or areal conditions. In general, water spreading techniques are less expensive than well injection and large quantities of water can be handled. Water spreading can also result in significant improvement in quality of recharge waters during infiltration and movement through the unsaturated zone and the receiving aquifer. In comparison, well-injection techniques are often used for emplacement of fresh recharge water into saline aquifer zones to form a manageable lens of fresher water, which may later be partially withdrawn for use or continue to be maintained as a barrier against salt-water encroachment. A major advantage in use of groundwater is its availability, on demand to wells, from a natural storage reservoir that is relatively safe from pollution and from damage by sabotage or other hostile action. However, fresh groundwater occurs only in limited quantities in most of the Arabian Gulf region; also, it is heavily overdrafted in many areas, and receives very little natural recharge. Good use could be made of artificial recharge by well injection in replenishing and managing aquifers in strategic locations if sources of

  4. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hashemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  5. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hashemi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady- and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events, the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system, the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events, while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  6. ENGINEERING ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A PROGRAM FOR ARTIFICIAL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Eric G.; Bredehoeft, John D.

    1984-01-01

    This study describes and demonstrates two alternate methods for evaluating the relative costs and benefits of artificial groundwater recharge using percolation ponds. The first analysis considers the benefits to be the reduction of pumping lifts and land subsidence; the second considers benefits as the alternative costs of a comparable surface delivery system. Example computations are carried out for an existing artificial recharge program in Santa Clara Valley in California. A computer groundwater model is used to estimate both the average long term and the drought period effects of artificial recharge in the study area. Results indicate that the costs of artificial recharge are considerably smaller than the alternative costs of an equivalent surface system. Refs.

  7. Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge

    OpenAIRE

    Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth’s surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative...

  8. Radio-ecological aspects in artificial groundwater recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In increasing extent surface waters, especially those of rivers and streams, are contaminated by radionuclides. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the possibility of impairement of the quality of artificially recharged groundwater and drinking water by radionuclides. Hazards for man are possible by drinking water, that was affected by waste and during exposition to air, as well as indirectly by irrigation water and the food chain. In a model calculation using realistic conditions the order of magnitude of these hazards for man by incorporation of radioactively contaminated artificially recharged drinking water are to be assessed. Here the parameters are discussed which must be considered in such an assessment. The model includes the use of river water for artificial recharge. All models and assessments assume the most unfavourable preconditions, which may lead to an impact to man. (orig.)

  9. Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus-Dieter BALKE; Yan ZHU

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and fiver water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant puri- fication and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth's surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quanti-tative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated fiver water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hy-droxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing fiver discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the fiver discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save.

  10. Extracellular enzyme activities and nutrient availability during artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Korpela, Jaana P; Münster, Uwe; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2009-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) removal is the main objective of artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) for drinking water production and biodegradation plays a substantial role in this process. This study focused on the biodegradation of NOM and nutrient availability for microorganisms in AGR by the determination of extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and nutrient concentrations along a flow path in an AGR aquifer (Tuusula Water Works, Finland). Natural groundwater in the same area but outside the influence of recharge was used as a reference. Determination of the specific alpha-d-glucosidase (alpha-Glu), beta-d-glucosidase (beta-Glu), phosphomonoesterase (PME), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acetate esterase (AEST) activities by fluorogenic model substrates revealed major increases in the enzymatic hydrolysis rates in the aquifer within a 10m distance from the basin. The changes in the EEAs along the flow path occurred simultaneously with decreases in nutrient concentrations. The results support the assumption that the synthesis of extracellular enzymes in aquatic environments is up and down regulated by nutrient availability. The EEAs in the basin sediment and pore water samples (down to 10cm) were in the same order of magnitude as in the basin water, suggesting similar nutritional conditions. Phosphorus was likely to be the limiting nutrient at this particular AGR site. Furthermore, the extracellular enzymes functioned in a synergistic and cooperative way. PMID:19028394

  11. Multi-component transport and transformation in deep confined aquifer during groundwater artificial recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing

    2015-04-01

    Taking an artificial groundwater recharge site in Shanghai, China as an example, this study employed a combination of laboratory experiment and numerical modeling to investigate the transport and transformation of major solutes, as well as the mechanism of associated water-rock interactions in groundwater during artificial groundwater recharge. The results revealed that: (1) Major ions in groundwater were mainly affected by mixing, ion exchanging (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)), as well as dissolution of Calcite, Dolomite. Dissolution of carbonate minerals was not entirely dependent on the pattern of groundwater recharge, the reactivity of the source water itself as indicated by the sub-saturation with respect to the carbonate minerals is the primary factor. (2) Elemental dissolution of As, Cr and Fe occurred in aquifer was due to the transformation of subsurface environment from anaerobic to aerobic systems. Different to bank filtration recharge or pond recharge, the concentration of Fe near the recharge point was mainly controlled by oxidation dissolution of Siderite, which was followed by a release of As, Cr into groundwater. (3) Field modeling results revealed that the hydro chemical type of groundwater gradually changed from the initial Cl-HCO3-Na type to the Cl-HCO3-Na-Ca type during the recharge process, and its impact radius would reach roughly 800 m in one year. It indicated that the recharge pressure (approx. 0.45 Mpa) would enlarge the impact radius under deep well recharge conditions. According to different recharge modes, longer groundwater resident time will associate with minerals' fully reactions. Although the concentrations of major ions were changing during the artificial recharge process, it did not pose a negative impact on the environmental quality of groundwater. The result of trace elements indicated that controlling the environment factors (especially Eh, DO, flow rate) during the recharge was effective to reduce the potential threats to

  12. Artificial groundwater recharge zones mapping using remote sensing and GIS: a case study in Indian Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amanpreet; Panda, S N; Kumar, K S; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge plays a vital role in sustainable management of groundwater resources. The present study was carried out to identify the artificial groundwater recharge zones in Bist Doab basin of Indian Punjab using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) for augmenting groundwater resources. The study area has been facing severe water scarcity due to intensive agriculture for the past few years. The thematic layers considered in the present study are: geomorphology (2004), geology (2004), land use/land cover (2008), drainage density, slope, soil texture (2000), aquifer transmissivity, and specific yield. Different themes and related features were assigned proper weights based on their relative contribution to groundwater recharge. Normalized weights were computed using the Saaty's analytic hierarchy process. Thematic layers were integrated in ArcGIS for delineation of artificial groundwater recharge zones. The recharge map thus obtained was divided into four zones (poor, moderate, good, and very good) based on their influence to groundwater recharge. Results indicate that 15, 18, 37, and 30 % of the study area falls under "poor," "moderate," "good," and "very good" groundwater recharge zones, respectively. The highest recharge potential area is located towards western and parts of middle region because of high infiltration rates caused due to the distribution of flood plains, alluvial plain, and agricultural land. The least effective recharge potential is in the eastern and middle parts of the study area due to low infiltration rate. The results of the study can be used to formulate an efficient groundwater management plan for sustainable utilization of limited groundwater resources. PMID:23775493

  13. Identification of potential artificial groundwater recharge zones in Northwestern Saudi Arabia using GIS and Boolean logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Faisal K.; Nazzal, Yousef; Ahmed, Izrar; Naeem, Muhammad; Jafri, Muhammad Kamran

    2015-11-01

    Identifying potential groundwater recharge zones is a pre-requisite for any artificial recharge project. The present study focuses on identifying the potential zones of Artificial Groundwater Recharge (AGR) in Northwestern Saudi Arabia. Parameters including slope, soil texture, vadose zone thickness, groundwater quality (TDS) and type of water bearing formation were integrated in a GIS environment using Boolean logic. The results showed that 17.90% of the total studied area is suitable for AGR. The identified zones were integrated with the land use/land cover map to avoid agricultural and inhabited lands which reduced the total potential area to 14.24%. Geomorphologically the wadi beds are the most suitable sites for recharge. On the basis of the potential AGR zones closeness to the available recharge water supply (rain water, desalinated sea water and treated waste water) the potential zones were classified as Category A (high priority) and Category B (low priority).

  14. Removal of Organic Pollutants in Municipal Wastewater for Artificial Groundwater Recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to construct a demonstration artificial groundwater recharge system for wastewater reuse in China, three years of laboratory work has been conducted on advanced treatment technologies in combination with soil aquifer treatment of secondary effluent from sewage treatment plants. An effective and inexpensive process was selected, which uses DGB adsorption, PAC coagulation, sedimentation, sand filtration, ozone disinfection, and soil aquifer treatment. The effluent meets the recommended water quality criteria for groundwater recharge. Ozonation is effective for disinfection as well as for water quality improvement. Results showed that the total N in the SAT system remained constant thus the secondary effluent must have a low NH3-N concentration for groundwater recharge.

  15. An innovative artificial recharge system to enhance groundwater storage in basaltic terrain: example from Maharashtra, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusari, Vijay; Katpatal, Y. B.; Kundal, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    The management of groundwater poses challenges in basaltic terrain as its availability is not uniform due to the absence of primary porosity. Indiscriminate excessive withdrawal from shallow as well as deep aquifers for meeting increased demand can be higher than natural recharge, causing imbalance in demand and supply and leading to a scarcity condition. An innovative artificial recharge system has been conceived and implemented to augment the groundwater sources at the villages of Saoli and Sastabad in Wardha district of Maharashtra, India. The scheme involves resectioning of a stream bed to achieve a reverse gradient, building a subsurface dam to arrest subsurface flow, and installation of recharge shafts to recharge the deeper aquifers. The paper focuses on analysis of hydrogeological parameters like porosity, specific yield and transmissivity, and on temporal groundwater status. Results indicate that after the construction of the artificial recharge system, a rise of 0.8-2.8 m was recorded in the pre- and post-monsoon groundwater levels in 12 dug wells in the study area; an increase in the yield was also noticed which solved the drinking water and irrigation problems. Spatial analysis was performed using a geographic information system to demarcate the area of influence of the recharge system due to increase in yields of the wells. The study demonstrates efficacy, technical viability and applicability of an innovative artificial recharge system constructed in an area of basaltic terrain prone to water scarcity.

  16. An innovative artificial recharge system to enhance groundwater storage in basaltic terrain: example from Maharashtra, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusari, Vijay; Katpatal, Y. B.; Kundal, Pradeep

    2016-08-01

    The management of groundwater poses challenges in basaltic terrain as its availability is not uniform due to the absence of primary porosity. Indiscriminate excessive withdrawal from shallow as well as deep aquifers for meeting increased demand can be higher than natural recharge, causing imbalance in demand and supply and leading to a scarcity condition. An innovative artificial recharge system has been conceived and implemented to augment the groundwater sources at the villages of Saoli and Sastabad in Wardha district of Maharashtra, India. The scheme involves resectioning of a stream bed to achieve a reverse gradient, building a subsurface dam to arrest subsurface flow, and installation of recharge shafts to recharge the deeper aquifers. The paper focuses on analysis of hydrogeological parameters like porosity, specific yield and transmissivity, and on temporal groundwater status. Results indicate that after the construction of the artificial recharge system, a rise of 0.8-2.8 m was recorded in the pre- and post-monsoon groundwater levels in 12 dug wells in the study area; an increase in the yield was also noticed which solved the drinking water and irrigation problems. Spatial analysis was performed using a geographic information system to demarcate the area of influence of the recharge system due to increase in yields of the wells. The study demonstrates efficacy, technical viability and applicability of an innovative artificial recharge system constructed in an area of basaltic terrain prone to water scarcity.

  17. Ecotoxicity assessment of artificial groundwater recharge with reclaimed water: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhao, Xuan

    2013-11-01

    A demonstration of artificial groundwater recharge with tertiary effluent was evaluated using a set of bioassays (acute toxicity to Daphnia, genotoxicity, estrogenic and antiestrogenic toxicity). Around 95 % genotoxicity and 53 % antiestrogenicity were removed from the feed water by ozonation, whereas significant reduction of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna was achieved during a 3 days vadose soil treatment. The toxicity was further removed to the same level as the local groundwater during a 20 days aquifer soil treatment. The pilot study has shown that ozonation and soil treatments can improve the quality of municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents for possible groundwater recharge purposes. PMID:24072260

  18. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial groundwater recharge using carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing the concentration of dissolved organic C (DOC) in water is one of the main challenges in the process of artificial groundwater recharge. At the Tuusula waterworks in southern Finland, surface water is artificially recharged into an esker by pond infiltration and an equal amount of groundwater is daily pumped from the aquifer. This groundwater study was conducted to consider the role of redox processes in the decomposition of DOC. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic C (δ 13CDIC) in the recharged water was used as a tracer for redox reactions. The isotopic composition of O and H in water was determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between the local groundwater and the infiltrated surface water. Three distinct processes in the reduction of the DOC content were traced using isotopic methods and concentration analyses of DIC and DOC: (1) the decomposition of DOC (2) adsorption of DOC on mineral matter, and (3) the dilution of artificially recharged water by mixing with local groundwater. The largest decrease (44%) in the DOC content occurred during the early stage of subsurface flow, within 350 m of the infiltration ponds. The reduction of DOC was accompanied by an equal increase in DIC and a significant drop in δ 13CDIC. This change is attributed to the oxidative decomposition of DOC. A further 23% decrease in DOC is attributed to adsorption and a final drop of 14% to dilution with local groundwater

  19. EFFECTS OF ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE ON GROUND-WATER QUALITY, LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brian J.; Ku, Henry F.H.; Oaksford, Edward T.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial-recharge experiments were conducted at East Meadow in central Nassau County, Long Island, N. Y. , from October 1982 through January 1984, to evaluate the degree of ground-water mounding and chemical effects of artificially replenishing the ground-water system with tertiary-treated wastewater. Reclaimed water was provided by the Cedar Creek wastewater-treatment plant in Wantagh. Recharge with reclaimed water increased the concentration of sodium and chloride in ground water but lowered the concentrations of total nitrogen (nitrate plus nitrite) and some low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. Reclaimed water was well within the New York State effluent standards for ground-water recharge. Specific-conductance measurements and Stiff diagrams of chemical analyses were used to help define the extent and shape of the plume formed by reclaimed water.

  20. Applicability of Artificial Recharge of Groundwater in the Yongding River Alluvial Fan in Beijing through Numerical Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qichen Hao; Jingli Shao; Yali Cui; Zhenhua Xie

    2014-01-01

    A groundwater transient flow model was developed to evaluate the applicability and ef-fectiveness of artificial recharge scenarios in the middle-upper part of the Yongding River alluvial fan in Beijing. These scenarios were designed by taking into account different types of recharge facilities and their infiltration rate with the Middle Route Project for South-to-North Water Transfer (MRP) as the recharge water source. The simulation results suggest that: (1) the maximum amount of artificial recharge water, for scenario I, would be 127.42×106 m3 with surface infiltration facilities;and would be 243.48×106 m3 for scenario II with surface infiltration and recharge wells under the constraint of the upper limit of groundwater;(2) with preferred pattern of recharge facilities, groundwater levels in both optimized recharge scenarios would not exceed the upper limit within the given recharge period;and (3) implementation of the recharge scenarios would efficiently increase the aquifer replenishment and the groundwater budget will change from-54.11×106 to 70.89×104 and 183.36×104 m3, respectively. In addi-tion, under these two scenarios groundwater level would rise up to 30 and 34 m, respectively, without increasing the amount of evaporation. The simulation results indicate that the proposed recharge sce-narios are practically feasible, and artificial recharge can also contribute to an efficient recovery of groundwater storage in Beijing.

  1. Estimation of the groundwater recharge in laterita using the artificial tritium method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An estimation of the groundwater recharge was made, for the first time, in laterita, which is a alteration of dunite. This work was carried out at the city of Cajati-Jacupiranga, situated in the Ribeira Valley, state of Sao Paulo. The moisture migration in unsaturated zones was analized using water tagget with artificial tritium. In the place studied, an annual recharge of 1070mm was estimated. This value corresponds to 65% of local precipitation (1650 mm/year). The difference can be considered as a loss through evaporation, evapotranspiration and run off. (author)

  2. Determination of groundwater recharge in semiarid zones by artificial tritium tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The movement of the moisture in an unsaturated zone can be monitored using both environmental and artificial tritium. Artificially tritiated water is used as a tracer in this study for determining groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge is the influx of rain into the saturated zone and is essential for urban water supply, agriculture, and resource evaluation. The technique was used on a large scale in Rio Grande do Norte state in northeastern Brazil, covering an area of ∼1500 km2. The region of the study has a semiarid climate, and most of the soil was very sandy, except one site that was pure clay. This study was part of a larger water resource evaluation project

  3. The influence of artificial recharge for controlling land subsidence on groundwater quality in Shanghai area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanghai City is supplied mainly by river water, therefore, quality of tap water is not good enough. In this connection it has been decided to exploit high quality groundwater from deep confined aquifer. This drinking water will be supplied separately form the normal tap water. Groundwater in Quaternary aquifers in Shanghai area up to date was exploited mainly for industrial use. Since 1965, the artificial recharge of aquifers using tap water has been carried out in order to control land subsidence. The influence of artificial recharge on groundwater quality thus should be assessed if groundwater will be used as drinking water. For this purpose, isotope techniques, especially tritium measurement, were used in combination with ICP-MS trace element analyses, and GC/MSD analyses for natural organic tracers. 36 samples from production and injection wells, 2 tap water samples, 3 samples from Huangpu River and Yangtze River were taken in 1998 and 1999. Results obtained show, that tritium content is sensitive to presence of artificially recharged water. Some major chemical constituents, such as sulphate and bicarbonate, some volatile organic compounds, such as chloroform, bromo-dichloro-methane and 1,2-dichloro-ethane, are also good for tracing recharge water. Some trace elements in water samples, such as Li, Cr, which may derived from the base rock, show relatively high content in deep groundwater. While some other trace elements, such as Pb, Mn and Ni, are obviously from the wastewater. They are characteristic for surface water. Based on results obtained for these available indicators, it was concluded, that a few production wells of the IV layer, which is the major layer for drinking water exploitation, are in the sphere of influence of injection wells. (author)

  4. A field study of advanced municipal wastewater treatment technology for artificial groundwater recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PI Yun-zheng; WANG Jian-long

    2006-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to investigate the advanced treatment of the municipal secondary effluent and a subsequent artificial groundwater recharge at Gaobeidian Wastewater Treatment Plant, Beijing. To improve the secondary effluent quality, the combined process of powdered activated carbon adsorption, flocculation and rapid sand filtration was applied, which could remove about 40% dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 70% adsorbable organic halogens. The results of liquid size exclusion chromatography indicate that in the adsorption unit the removed organic fiaction was mainly low molecular weight compounds. The fiactions removed by the flocculation unit were polysaccharides and high molecular weight compounds. The retention of water in summer in the open recharge basins resulted in a growth of algae. Consequently, DOC increased in the polysaccharide and high molecular weight humic substances fiaction. The majority of the DOC removal during soil passage took place in the unsaturated area.A limited reduction of DOC was observed in the aquifer zone.

  5. Evaluation of artificial recharge in the Mojave River Ground-Water Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Christina L.; Martin, Peter; Predmore, Steven K.

    2002-01-01

    The Mojave River Basin relies almost entirely on ground water to meet the needs of its growing population and agriculture, which has resulted in overdraft conditions. Some of the ground-water management alternatives being proposed to mitigate the effects of overdraft include artificial recharge using water from the California State Water Project (SWP) and using SWP water in lieu of ground-water pumpage. A calibrated ground-water flow model was used to evaluate six proposed water-management alternatives using SWP water during a 20-year simulation period, 2000-2019, using constant rates from 1999 for recharge and pumpage (with the exception of recharge derived from Mojave River streamflows which were variable). The measured streamflow for the period of 1970-1989 was used to simulate the Mojave River streamflow. Water-management alternative 1 assumed that none of the Mojave Water Agency allocation of SWP water was available for mitigation measures and resulted in increases in hydraulic head in the floodplain aquifer in years of above-average streamflow (2008-2010, 2013) and decreases in years of below average streamflow. In general, simulated hydraulic heads in the regional aquifer declined with the exception of the El Mirage and Harper Lake areas. Also, average storage depletion for the entire ground-water basin over the 20-year simulation was 40,940 acre-feet per year. Water-management alternative 2 assumed that 30,000 acre-feet per year of SWP water was artificially recharged at Rock Springs Road Outlet (RSO). By 2019, the simulated hydraulic heads were as much as 75 feet higher in the Alto at the recharge site, 24 feet higher in the Transition zone, 15 feet higher in the Centro, and 17 feet higher in the Baja model subareas than the hydraulic heads resulting from water-management alternative 1. Water-management alternative 2 affected simulated hydraulic heads by as much as 5 feet in an area totalling 290 square miles; most of the change occurred in the Alto and

  6. Hydrogeophysical characterization of shallow unconsolidated sediments for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Won, Byeongho; Kim, Yongcheol

    2013-04-01

    A water curtain cultivation system is usually used to offer a stable heat source using a geothermal heat of groundwater. However, it may cause groundwater drawdown by an excessive use of groundwater such as over-pumping. Therefore, as part of an effort to develop a sustainable water curtain system, artificial groundwater recharge is projected to minimize groundwater shortage problem and recover groundwater level. Geophysical approaches are systematically applied to characterize unconsolidated sediments and riverside porous aquifers for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area. Resistivity survey is applied to map the distribution of subsurface structure, especially unconsolidated sediments. A series of test holes are drilled, and water level, temperature, and groundwater electrical conductivity are monitored to characterize hydrogeological properties of the site. The natural gamma and induction profiles enable us to estimate stratigraphic cross section and interpret inter-borehole. Borehole compensated neutron porosity is derived for a small-diameter, dual-detector neutron logs. Consequently, geophysical methods could enhance knowledge of the physical properties of unconsolidated sediments, and they are expected to evaluate injection feasibility of artificial groundwater recharge systems to the sustainable water resource management.

  7. Ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge estimates for calendar year 2000 and average annual natural recharge and interbasin flow by hydrographic area, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Evetts, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Nevada's reliance on ground-water resources has increased because of increased development and surface-water resources being fully appropriated. The need to accurately quantify Nevada's water resources and water use is more critical than ever to meet future demands. Estimated ground-water pumpage, artificial and natural recharge, and interbasin flow can be used to help evaluate stresses on aquifer systems. In this report, estimates of ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge during calendar year 2000 were made using data from a variety of sources, such as reported estimates and estimates made using Landsat satellite imagery. Average annual natural recharge and interbasin flow were compiled from published reports. An estimated 1,427,100 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in Nevada during calendar year 2000. This total was calculated by summing six categories of ground-water pumpage, based on water use. Total artificial recharge during 2000 was about 145,970 acre-feet. At least one estimate of natural recharge was available for 209 of the 232 hydrographic areas (HAs). Natural recharge for the 209 HAs ranges from 1,793,420 to 2,583,150 acre-feet. Estimates of interbasin flow were available for 151 HAs. The categories and their percentage of the total ground-water pumpage are irrigation and stock watering (47 percent), mining (26 percent), water systems (14 percent), geothermal production (8 percent), self-supplied domestic (4 percent), and miscellaneous (less than 1 percent). Pumpage in the top 10 HAs accounted for about 49 percent of the total ground-water pumpage. The most ground-water pumpage in an HA was due to mining in Pumpernickel Valley (HA 65), Boulder Flat (HA 61), and Lower Reese River Valley (HA 59). Pumpage by water systems in Las Vegas Valley (HA 212) and Truckee Meadows (HA 87) were the fourth and fifth highest pumpage in 2000, respectively. Irrigation and stock watering pumpage accounted for most ground-water withdrawals in the HAs with the sixth

  8. Potential for using the Upper Coachella Valley ground-water basin, California, for storage of artificially recharged water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Michael J.; Swain, Lindsay A.; Tyley, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the geohydrologic factors affecting storage of water by artificial recharge in the upper Coachella Valley, Calif. The ground-water basin of the upper Coachella Valley seems to be geologically suitable for large-scale artificial recharge. A minimum of 900 ,000 acre-feet of water could probably be stored in the basin without raising basinwide water levels above those that existed in 1945. Preliminary tests indicate that a long-term artificial recharge rate of 5 feet per day may be feasible for spreading grounds in the basin if such factors as sediment and bacterial clogging can be controlled. The California Department of Water Resources, through the Future Water Supply Program, is investigating the use of ground-water basins for storage of State Water Project water in order to help meet maximum annual entitlements to water project contractors. (USGS)

  9. Removal of F-specific RNA bacteriophages in artificial recharge of groundwater--a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, R M; Kytövaara, A; Pääkkönen, J; Lahti, K

    2004-01-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater offers a semi-natural means to produce raw water for drinking-water plants. Surface water works are increasingly being replaced by artificial groundwater works in Finland. Two municipalities, one serving 30,000 and the other 170,000 inhabitants, have considered filtering river water through eskers for the production of potable water. In this study the removal of bacteriophages during infiltration of river water was estimated, for the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a field study. A 5-m-deep column of sand was constructed and used to mimic the percolating phase in infiltration. An artificial esker was constructed on the riverbank by isolating a 2-m-wide, 2-m-deep and 18-m-long bed of coarse sand with plastic. The sand bed represented the saturated zone. River water was pumped at a rate of 40 L/h to the sand column. The river water was spiked with F+ specific RNA phage MS2 by adding phage suspension during one week at an average concentration of 4.3 x 10(9) PFU/mL. Samples for phage assays were taken during one month, from four sampling sites, on the basis of detention time as estimated by a tracer experiment with sodium chloride. The median count of MS2 for percolated water was 2.4 x 10(5) PFU/mL, representing a 96.7% reduction. During the passage of 6 m in the saturated zone, a further reduction of 98.5% occurred. During the passage from 6 m to 12 m the additional reduction was 99.97%. The overall reduction was between 6 and 7 log10 units. The removal of MS2 phages was rather efficient, although the esker material was coarse, mainly sandy, gravel. PMID:15318502

  10. Information Entropy Evolution for Groundwater Flow System: A Case Study of Artificial Recharge in Shijiazhuang City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater flow system is typical dissipative structure system, and its evolution can be described with system information entropies. The information entropies of groundwater in Shijiazhuang City had been calculated between 1960 and 2005, and the results show that the entropies have a decreasing trend throughout the research period, and they can be divided into our stages based on the groundwater flow system entropy variation as follows: entropy steady period (1960–1965, entropy decreasing period (1965–1980, entropy increasing period (1980–1995 and secondary entropy decreasing period (1995–2005; understanding the major and significant driving the pattern changing forces of groundwater levels is essential to groundwater management,. A new method of grey correlation analysis has been presented, and the results show that, the grey correlation grade between groundwater flow system information entropies and precipitation series is γ01 = 0.749, the grey correlation grade between groundwater flow system information entropies and groundwater withdrawal series is γ02 = 0.814, as the groundwater withdrawal is the main driving force of groundwater flow system entropy variation; based on the numerical simulation results, information entropy increased with artificial recharge, and a smaller recharge water volume would enhance the information entropy drastically, but then doubled water would not increase the information correspondingly, which could be useful to assess the health state of groundwater flow systems.

  11. Hydrogeological evaluation of an over-exploited aquifer in Dhaka, Bangladesh towards the implementation of groundwater artificial recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Rusteberg, Bernd; Sauter, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The population of Dhaka City is presently about 12 million and according to present trends in population growth, that number will most likely increase to 17.2 million by the year 2025. A serious water crisis is expected due to the extremely limited quality and quantity of water resources in the region. Previous studies have shown that the current trend in groundwater resource development is non-sustainable due to over-exploitation of the regional aquifer system, resulting in rapidly decreasing groundwater levels of about 2 to 3 meters per year. Today, annual groundwater extraction clearly exceeds natural groundwater recharge. New water management strategies are needed to guarantee future generations of Dhaka City a secured and sustained water supply as well as sustainable development of the city. The implementation of groundwater artificial recharge (AR) is one potential measure. As the first step towards a new water management strategy for Dhaka City, the authors report on the hydrogeological conditions of the greater Dhaka region and from this are able to present the location of potential recharge sites and identify appropriate recharge technologies for AR implementation. The aquifers of greater Dhaka can be grouped in three major categories: Holocene Deposit, Pleistocene Deposit and Plio-Pleistocene Deposit. The aquifers are generally thick and multilayered with relatively high transmissivity and storage coefficients. AR is considered feasible due to the fact these aquifers are alluvium deposit aquifers which characteristically have moderate to high hydraulic conductivity. Low costs for recovery of recharged water and large recharge volume capacity are generally associated with aquifers of unconsolidated sediments. Spatial analysis of the region has shown that Karaniganj, Kotoali, Savar, Dhamrai, Singair upazila, which are situated in greater Dhaka region and close to Dhaka City, could serve as recharge sites to the subsurface by pond infiltration technique. A

  12. Land subsidence and uplift due to long-term groundwater extraction and artificial recharge in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Wu, Jichun; Xue, Yuqun; Wang, Zhecheng; Yao, Yiguang; Yan, Xuexin; Wang, Hanmei

    2015-12-01

    Increasing artificial water recharge and restriction on groundwater pumpage have caused land displacements in Shanghai (China) to shift from subsidence to uplift. On the basis of field and laboratory data, the characteristics and mechanism of land subsidence and uplift are analyzed and discussed. Under the condition of long-term groundwater extraction, the deformation of aquifer and aquitard units consists of elastic, plastic, visco-elastic, and visco-plastic components. The recoverable elastic and visco-elastic deformation is only a small portion of the total deformation for both aquitard and aquifer units, especially when the groundwater level in the units is lower than the historically lowest values. When the groundwater level in aquifer and aquitard units rises, whether their expansion occurs immediately or not, depends on the changing modes of groundwater level they have experienced. Even aquifer units do not always rebound closely following the rise of groundwater level in them. The lagging of the occurrence of arrested land subsidence and uplift, clearly behind the rise of groundwater level in aquifer units, can be attributed to the visco-plastic deformation of all units and the consolidation deformation of aquitard units. Artificial recharge and limitation of pumpage are efficient measures for controlling land subsidence, but earlier actions are necessary to keep groundwater levels in all aquifer units above their historically lowest values all the time, if a more effective outcome is expected.

  13. Is artificial recharge promoting microbial activity and biodegradation processes in groundwater systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba Ferrer, Carme; Folch, Albert; Gaju, Núria; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Carrasquilla, Marc; Grau-Martínez, Alba; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Managed Artificial Recharge (MAR) represents a strategic tool for managing water resources, especially during scarce periods. On one hand, it can increase water stored in aquifers and extract it when weather conditions do not permit exclusive exploitation of surface resources. On the other, it allows improve water quality due the processes occurring into the soil whereas water crosses vadose zone. Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) conurbation is suffering significant quantitative and qualitative groundwater disturbances. For this reason, Sant Vicenç MAR system, constituted by a sedimentation and an infiltration pond, was constructed in 2009 as the strategic water management infrastructure. Compared with other MAR facilities, this infiltration pond has a reactive bed formed by organic compost and local material. The objective is to promote different redox states allowing more and different degradation of chemical compounds than regular MAR systems. In previous studies in the site, physical and hydrochemical parameters demonstrated that there was indeed a degradation of different pollutants. However, to go a step further understanding the different biogeochemical processes and the related degradation processes occurring in the system, we studied the existing microbial communities. So, molecular techniques were applied in water and soil samples in two different scenarios; the first one, when the system was fully operating and the second when the system was not operating during some months. We have specifically compared microbial diversity and richness indexes and both cluster dendrograms obtained from DGGEs analysis made in each sampling campaign.

  14. Spatial and temporal changes in Actinobacterial dominance in experimental artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Tiirola, Marja; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2008-11-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) is used in the drinking water industry to supplement groundwater resources and to minimise the use of chemicals in water treatment. This study analysed the spatial and temporal changes of microbial communities in AGR using two test systems: a nutrient-amended fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and a sand column. Structural changes in the feed lake water (Lake Roine), FBR, and sand column bacterial communities were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes (LH-PCR). Two clone libraries were created to link the LH-PCR results to the dominant bacterial groups. The lake water bacterial community was relatively stable, with three bands dominating in all LH-PCR products. The most dominant fragment accounted for up to 72% and was derived from Actinobacteria. Based on the clone libraries and LH-PCR data, Actinobacteria also dominated in the unattached bacterial community of the FBR, whereas several Proteobacterial groups were more abundant on the FBR carrier particles. In the stabilised AGR system a major change in the community structure of the lake water bacteria took place during passage within the first 0.6m in the sand column as the community composition shifted from Actinobacteria-dominated populations to a diverse, mainly Proteobacterial communities. Concurrently, most of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was removed at this stage. In summary, the study showed that the make-up of microbial communities in experimental AGR systems responded to changes in their environment. LH-PCR showed potential as a method to determine microbial community dynamics in long-term studies at real-scale AGR sites. This is the first step to provide data on microbial community dynamics in AGR for drinking water production. PMID:18757075

  15. Atrazine in Source Water Intended for Artificial Ground-Water Recharge, South-Central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    1998-01-01

    Atrazine, an herbicide commonly applied to row crops, is of concern because of potential effects on water quality. This fact sheet describes atrazine in water from the Little Arkansas River in south-central Kansas. The river is being evaluated as a source of artificial recharge into the Equus Beds aquifer, which provides water for the city of Wichita.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF GROUNDWATER RECHARGE ZONES AND ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE STRUCTURES FOR PART OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA - A GEOSPATIAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Venkata Ramireddy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential for the existence of all forms of life for human consumption, agriculture and industrial. This is the reason why the man has moved and settled only in areas of rich water resources. As the population has started growing and unregulated usage of surface water resources has been initiated in multiple fronts the available water is not able to cope up to human needs. So, the man has aggressively and competitively started mining the ground water reservoirs all over the world using all the possible and available modern technologies. Hence the ground water have started playing some dividend, so to replenish the extracted water from the underground reservoirs definite newer avenues are to be created, so that there exists equilibrium between the extraction and the replenishments. A large amount of rain water is lost through runoff, a problem compounded by the lack of rainwater harvesting practices (Murugiah M & Venkatraman P 2013. So, a technique of pushing the rain water into the deeper part of the aquifer system is called Artificial Recharge. The main objective of the study is to identify suitable sites for artificial recharge and also to identify the site specific mechanisms such as sites for desiltation of tanks, percolation ponds, check dams, pittings and enechelon dams etc, in the study area through Geospatial technology. To attain this Remote Sensing Technology is the good tool in mapping such geological features related to artificial recharge, due to its multispectral photo capturing capacity and repeativity coverage, where as GIS Technology got special and advanced merits, in storing archiving, manipulating, modelling and retrieving of huge amount of various spatial and non spatial data.

  17. Functional microbial community response to nutrient pulses by artificial groundwater recharge practice in surface soils and subsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Kirsten; Kandeler, Ellen; Nagel, Peter; Scheu, Stefan; Ruess, Liliane

    2010-06-01

    Subsurface microorganisms are essential constituents of the soil purification processes associated with groundwater quality. In particular, soil enzyme activity determines the biodegradation of organic compounds passing through the soil profile. Transects from surface soil to a depth of 3.5 m were investigated for microbial and chemical soil characteristics at two groundwater recharge sites and one control site. The functional diversity of the microbial community was analyzed via the activity of eight enzymes. Acid phosphomonoesterase was dominant across sites and depths, followed by L-leucine aminopeptidase and beta-glucosidase. Structural [e.g. phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern] and functional microbial diversities were linked to each other at the nonwatered site, whereas amendment with nutrients (DOC, NO(3)(-)) by flooding uncoupled this relationship. Microbial biomass did not differ between sites, whereas microbial respiration was the highest at the watered sites. Hence, excess nutrients available due to artificial groundwater recharge could not compensate for the limitation by others (e.g. phosphorus as assigned by acid phosphomonoesterase activity). Instead, at a similar microbial biomass, waste respiration via overflow metabolism occurred. In summary, ample supply of carbon by flooding led to a separation of decomposition and microbial growth, which may play an important role in regulating purification processes during groundwater recharge. PMID:20557572

  18. Risk of Giardia intestinalis infection in children from an artificially recharged groundwater area in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Suárez, Leticia; Espinosa, Martha; Juárez-Figueroa, Luis; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the risk of infection with Giardia intestinalis in children living in an area with artificial groundwater recharge and potable water reuse in Mexico City. Eligible wells and surrounding homesteads were defined by using a geographic information system. Five wells were tested for G. intestinalis cysts per 400 liters of water. A total of 750 eligible households were visited during two cross-sectional surveys. Stool samples were provided by 986 children in the rainy season study and 928 children during the dry season survey for parasitologic tests. Their guardians provided information on water, sanitation, hygiene, and socioeconomic variables. The prevalence rates of G. intestinalis infection were 9.4% in the rainy season and 4.4% in the dry season. Higher rates of infection were observed in older individuals (9.5% and 10.6%) and girls had a lower risk of infection than boys (odds ratio [OR] =0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.34, 0.88 in the rainy season and OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.25, 0.90 in the dry season). During the wet season survey, a health risk was detected among those storing water in unprotected receptacles (OR = 4.00, 4.69, and 5.34 for those using uncovered jars, cisterns or tanks, and buckets, respectively), and bathing outside the dwelling, i.e., using a tap (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.10, 3.39). A health risk was also detected among children from households with unsafe food hygiene practices (OR =2.41, 95% CI =1.10, 5.30) and those with no hand-washing habits (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.00, 5.20). Groundwater reserves are at risk of fecal pollution, as indicated by the presence of G. intestinalis cysts. However, the endemic pattern of intestinal infection reflects low standards of personal hygiene and unsafe drinking water storage and food-related practices at household level. Prevention activities must address health education and environmental protection policies. PMID:15238691

  19. Understanding infiltration and groundwater flow at an artificial recharge facility using time-lapse gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey

    Groundwater provides a fundamental resource for modern life. Throughout the world, groundwater is managed by storing (recharging) it underground in natural aquifers for future withdrawal and consumptive use. In Arizona, over 4 million people benefit from managed aquifer storage, but little effort is made to track the movement of recharged water through the subsurface. Motivated by current limitations in our ability to monitor percolation and groundwater movement at the scale of a recharge facility, an effort to collect time-lapse gravity data was carried out at the Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) operated by the City of Tucson, Arizona. In addition to collecting water-level data 12 wells, there were three primary gravity experiments: (1) five continuously-recording gravity meters (2 iGrav superconducting gravity meters and 3 gPhone gravity meters) were installed semi-permanently in control buildings adjacent to the recharge basins, (2) absolute gravity measurements were made at nine locations over a 17 month period, and (3) three relative-gravity campaigns were carried out on a network of 70 stations. This large-scale controlled experiment, with known infiltration and pumping rates, resulted in one of the most comprehensive datasets of its kind. Gravity data led to several hydrologic insights, both through direct measurement and modeling. First, the infiltration rate could be estimated accurately based on the initial rate of gravity change during infiltration, regardless of the specific yield. Using two gravity meters, the depth, and therefore speed, of the wetting front beneath a recharge basin was observed, including the time at which the water table was reached. Spatial maps of gravity change from relative gravity surveys show areas where infiltration efficiency is highest, and where groundwater accumulates; storage accumulated preferentially to the west of the recharge basins, away from pumping wells. Such information would be

  20. Adsorption and biodegradation of three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals in river-based artificial groundwater recharge with reclaimed municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weifang; Nie, Chao; Chen, Bin; Cheng, Xiang; Lun, Xiaoxiu; Zeng, Fangang

    2015-05-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) pollution in river-based artificial groundwater recharge using reclaimed municipal wastewater poses a potential threat to groundwater-based drinking water supplies in Beijing, China. Lab-scale leaching column experiments simulating recharge were conducted to study the adsorption, biodegradation, and transport characteristics of three selected EDCs: 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and bisphenol A (BPA). The three recharge columns were operated under the conditions of continual sterilization recharge (CSR), continual recharge (CR), and wetting and drying alternative recharge (WDAR). The results showed that the attenuation effect of the EDCs was in the order of WDAR>CR>CSR system and E2>EE2>BPA, which followed first-order kinetics. The EDC attenuation rate constants were 0.0783, 0.0505, and 0.0479 m(-1) for E2, EE2 and BPA in the CR system, respectively. The removal rates of E2, EE2, and BPA in the CR system were 98%, 96% and 92%, which mainly depended on biodegradation and were affected by water temperature. In the CR system, the concentrations of BPA, EE2, and E2 in soil were 4, 6 and 10 times higher than in the WDAR system, respectively. According to the DGGE fingerprints, the bacterial community in the bottom layer was more diverse than in the upper layer, which was related to the EDC concentrations in the water-soil system. The dominant group was found to be proteobacteria, including Betaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, suggesting that these microbes might play an important role in EDC degradation. PMID:25968269

  1. Use of environmental isotopes and artificial tracers to study recharge to groundwater in the Burdekin Delta, Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear techniques have been applied to the study of the groundwater hydrology of the Burdekin River Delta of Queensland. Recharge occurs from the river, from the artificial recharge facilities and from precipitation. The approximate boundary between the aquifer sands and the overlying alluvium has been determined from the natural gamma logs of available bores. Portions of the aquifer which are confined, or partly confined, were delineated by comparison with available standing water level contours. An extensive survey of tritium levels has been made. The results have been interpreted on the basis that the underground water is stored in a single homogeneous aquifer and moves from defined recharge areas along the maximum piezometric gradient at about 0.4 m·d-1. The decrease in the tritium levels with sampling depth is discussed. Tracer techniques are being developed to study the clogging of recharge pits with river sediments. A new seepage meter has been developed to facilitate the rapid, quantitative measure of seepage rates at specific points. (author)

  2. Evaluation of artificial groundwater recharge effects with MIKE-SHE: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, M.; Martínez-García, I.; Carreño, F.; de Bustamante, I.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In many areas where the technical and financial resources are limited, the treatment and disposal of wastewater comprise a problem. With increasing frequency, the wastewater reuse is considered as another alternative for water management alternative. In this way, the wastewater is converted into an added value resource. Treated wastewater infiltration into the soil could be a viable tertiary treatment, especially for small communities where the availability of land is not a problem and the wastewater has not industrial waste contribution and is highly biodegradable. The Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville, Spain) develops non-conventional wastewater treatments for small villages. Currently, a project regarding wastewater reutilization for aquifer recharge through a horizontal permeable reactive barrier and a subsequent soil infiltration is being carried out. One of the aspects to be evaluated within this context is the impact on aquifer. Consequently, the main goal of the present study is to assess the effects on the water flow derived from the future recharge activities by using the MIKE-SHE hydrological code. The unsaturated and saturated zones have been integrated in the model, which requires geological, land use, topography, piezometric head, soil and climate data to build up the model. The obtained results from the model show that with the annual recharge volume contributed by the experimental plant (3 m3 or 0.19 L/s) there is no effect in the groundwater flow. A volume of 400 m3/year (25 L/s) would be required to yield a variation in the piezometric head and therefore, in the groundwater flow i.e. a volume about 100 times larger than the estimated is necessary. To calibrate the model, simulated piezometric head values have been compared to the measured field data at a number of locations. In the calibration, the percent error had to be lower than 15 % at each location. Future works concerning groundwater quality and reactive transport

  3. Changes in dissolved organic carbon during artificial recharge of groundwater in a forested esker in Southern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Kitunen, Veikko; Derome, John; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2002-12-01

    Sprinkling infiltration in a forested esker leading to artificial recharge of groundwater was studied in Southern Finland. Changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the molecular size distribution and chemical properties of the organic carbon were investigated during the infiltration process. Artificial groundwater was produced using sprinkling infiltration directly onto the forest floor. One result of lake water infiltration through the organic horizon and I m thick mineral soil layer was a slight net increase in the DOC concentrations from 9.4 mg/L in the infiltration water to 13.2 mg/ L in percolation water. This indicates that the forest soil represents a potential input of organic matter into infiltration water. However, the DOC concentrations decreased by 27-38% as the infiltration water percolated down through the unsaturated soil layer into the groundwater zone. At a distance of 1450 m from the infiltration area, the mean DOC concentration in the groundwater was below the recommended value for drinking water in Finland of 2.0 mg/L. There was a strong reduction in the concentrations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic acids, but only a slight decrease in hydrophilic neutral organic compounds during the infiltration process. The DOC in the production well consisted of low molecular size fractions. Larger molecular size fractions were removed effectively from the water during the infiltration process. PMID:12448542

  4. Natural organic matter (NOM) removal and structural changes in the bacterial community during artificial groundwater recharge with humic lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Langwaldt, Jörg H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluated the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and structural changes in the microbial community during infiltration of humic lake water at three artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) sites in Finland. The three sites were at waterworks in Hämeenlinna, Jyväskylä and Tuusula, sites A, B and C, respectively. Site A used groundwater recharge by both basin and sprinkling infiltration, site B used only sprinkling infiltration, and site C used only basin infiltration. Reductions of total organic carbon at sites A, B and C were 91%, 84% and 74%, respectively, in the winter, and 88%, 77% and 73%, respectively, in the summer. The Finnish national recommended value of 2 mg/l for TOC was achieved at all sites and the TOC of natural groundwater at site C was much lower, at 0.6 mg/l. Large molecular fractions of NOM were removed more efficiently than the smaller ones. Total amount of DAPI-stained cells decreased during infiltration at sites A, B and C in winter by 94%, 94% and 75% and in summer by 96%, 97% and 94%, respectively. Bacterial communities in raw waters and extracted groundwaters were diverse with changes occurring during infiltration, which was shown by DNA extraction followed by PCR of 16S rRNA genes and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting. While the natural groundwater microbial community was diverse, it was different from that of the extracted groundwater in the AGR area. Simultaneous organic carbon removal and the decrease of bacterial counts during infiltration indicated biodegradation. In addition, the changing DGGE profiles during the process of infiltration, demonstrated that changing environmental conditions were reflected by changes in bacterial community composition. PMID:17434565

  5. Quantitative PCR Monitoring of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Bacterial Pathogens in Three European Artificial Groundwater Recharge Systems▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Böckelmann, Uta; Dörries, Hans-Henno; Ayuso-Gabella, M. Neus; Salgot de Marçay, Miquel; Tandoi, Valter; Levantesi, Caterina; Masciopinto, Costantino; Van Houtte, Emmanuel; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Wintgens, Thomas; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Aquifer recharge presents advantages for integrated water management in the anthropic cycle, namely, advanced treatment of reclaimed water and additional dilution of pollutants due to mixing with natural groundwater. Nevertheless, this practice represents a health and environmental hazard because of the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and chemical contaminants. To assess the quality of water extracted from recharged aquifers, the groundwater recharge systems in Torreele, Belgium, Sabade...

  6. Application of the 222Rn technique for estimating the residence times of artificially recharged groundwater: Hengsen water catchment area, Dortmunder Stadtwerke AG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a new technique was established to estimate groundwater residence times of up to about 15 days. The technique assumes that the ingrowth of 222Rn upon infiltration and movement in the ground can be described by the growth law of radioactivity. Radon-222 emanates from mineral grains by alpha recoil or by diffusion. It dissolves in the groundwater and migrates in the aquifer without interactions. This was confirmed at two sites of naturally infiltrating rivers and at a canal where the saturated aquifer is recharged. In this poster, we give results from the application of the method to a water catchment area with artificial groundwater recharge. 2 refs, 1 fig

  7. APPLICATION OF THE OVERLAY WEIGHTED MODEL AND BOOLEAN LOGIC TO DETERMINE THE BEST LOCATIONS FOR ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Billib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With population increase, lack of conventional fresh water resources and uncertainties due to climate change, there is growing interest in the arid and semi-arid areas to increase groundwater recharge with recycled water. Finding the best locations for artificial recharge of groundwater in such areas is one of the most crucial design steps to guarantee the long life and the sustainability of these projects. This study presents two ways to go about performing analysis; creating a suitability map to find out the suitability of every location on the map and another way is querying the created data sets to obtain a Boolean result of true or false map. These techniques have been applied on Sadat Industrial City which is located in a semi arid area in the western desert fringes of The Nile delta in the north west of Egypt. Thematic layers for number of parameters were prepared from some maps and satellite images and they have been classified, weighted and integrated in ArcGIS environment. By the means of the overlay weighted model in ArcGIS a suitability map which is classified into number of priority zones was obtained and it could be compared with the obtained true-false map of Boolean logic. Both methods suggested mostly the northern parts of the city for groundwater recharge; however the weighted model could give more accurate suitability map while Boolean logic suggested wider ranges of areas. This study recommends Boolean logic as a first estimator for locating the best locations as it is easier and not time consuming, while the overlay weighted model for more accurate results.

  8. Evaluation of simulations to understand effects of groundwater development and artificial recharge on the surface water and riparian vegetation Sierra Vista subwatershed, Upper San Pedro Basin, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Gungle, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey documented a five-layer groundwater flow model of the Sierra Vista and Sonoran subwatersheds of the Upper San Pedro Basin. The model has been applied by a private consultant to evaluate the effects of projected groundwater pumping through 2105 and effects of artificial recharge at three near-stream sites for 2012-2111. The main concern regarding simulations of long-term groundwater pumping is the effect of artificial model boundaries on modeled response, particularly for pumping near Cananea, Sonora, Mexico, which is adjacent to an artificial no-flow boundary. Concerns regarding the simulations of the effects of artificial recharge near streams include the resolution of the model and the representation of the model properties at the site scale; a possible limited ability of the model to correctly apportion recharge response between increased streamflow and increased evapotranspiration; a limited ability of the model to simulate detailed geometries of artificial recharge areas and evapotranspiration areas; and stream locations with the 820-foot grid spacing of the basin-scale model. In spite of these concerns, use of the U.S. Geological Survey five-layer groundwater flow model by the consultant are reasonable and valid.

  9. The impact of long term artificial recharge on the quality of groundwater from the coastal aquifer of Israel: Isotopic constraints and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial recharge of imported water into depleted aquifers is one of the important remediation mechanisms for compensating water deficit and a long term storage. While water balance can be deduced from known volumes of recharge, the water-quality changes that are induced by the artificial recharge are often neglected. Here we examine the impact of recharged water on the quality of groundwater by using geochemical investigation. Numerical simulation is also used to examine the transport of recharged water in the aquifer. Systematic analyses of the chemical (Cl, B, Br) and isotopic (O, H) compositions of more than 400 pumping wells in the Mediterranean coastal aquifer of Israel enabled us to distinguish between the recharge water (Sea of Galilee; δ18O=-1 per mille; Br/Cl=3x10-3) and the regional groundwater (Br/Cl≥1.5x10-3; δ18O=-4 to -5 per mille). We also detected the impact of wastewater (δ18O>-4 per mille; Br/Cl∼1x10-3; B/Cl≥5x10-3) and saline groundwater (δ18O-3) in the aquifer. We used the δ18O distribution in the aquifer to reconstruct the flow paths and mixing relationships of the recharged water in the aquifer. The two-dimensional simulation results show that the size of the recharge plume is depended on the amount of recharge, aquifer configuration, and the spatial distribution of pumping wells around the recharging site. Both the geochemical data and numerical simulations show that the rate of salinization in the eastern part of the coastal aquifer has been decreased due to extensive (accumulated volume of 280 x 106 m3) recharge of imported water. (author)

  10. Impact of artificial recharge and drought in Tafilalet Oasis system: First investigation by GIS and groundwater modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaamlat, I.; Larabi, A.; Faouzi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The geographical location of Tafilalet oasis system (TOS) in the south of the valley of Ziz (Morocco) offers him a particular advantage on the plane of water potential. The surface water which comes from humid regions of the High Atlas and intercepted by a dam then converged through the watercourse of Ziz towards the plain of the TOS, have created the conditions for the formation of a water table relatively rich with regard to the local climatic conditions (arid climate with recurrent drought). Because of this situation, the region has one of the largest palms of North Africa. Thus there is an agricultural activity that is practiced in a 21 irrigation areas whose size rarely exceeds 2,000 hectare. Given the role of the water table in the economic development of the region, a hydrogeological study was conducted to understand the impact of artificial recharge and recurrent droughts on the development of the groundwater reserves of TOS. In this study, a three-dimensional model of groundwater flow was developed for the Tafilalet oasis system aquifer, to assist the decision makers as a "management tool" in order to assess alternative schemes for development and exploitation of groundwater resources based on the variation of artificial recharge and drought, using for the first time the Modflow code. This study takes into account the most possible real hydrogeological conditions and using the geographical information system (GIS) for the organisation and treatment of data and applying a multidisciplinary approach combining geostatistical and hydrogeological modeling. The results from this numerical investigation of the TOS aquifer shows that the commissioning of the dam to control the flows of extreme flood and good management of water releases, has avoided the losses of irrigation water and consequently the non-overexploitation of the groundwater. So that with one or two water releases per year from the dam of flow rate more than 14 million m3/year it is possible to

  11. Investigating the Energy-Water Usage Efficiency of the Reuse of Treated Municipal Wastewater for Artificial Groundwater Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric D; Keller, Arturo A; Geyer, Roland; Frew, James

    2016-02-16

    This project investigates the energy-water usage efficiency of large scale civil infrastructure projects involving the artificial recharge of subsurface groundwater aquifers via the reuse of treated municipal wastewater. A modeling framework is introduced which explores the various ways in which spatially heterogeneous variables such as topography, landuse, and subsurface infiltration capacity combine to determine the physical layout of proposed reuse system components and their associated process energy-water demands. This framework is applied to the planning and evaluation of the energy-water usage efficiency of hypothetical reuse systems in five case study regions within the State of California. Findings from these case study analyses suggest that, in certain geographic contexts, the water requirements attributable to the process energy consumption of a reuse system can exceed the volume of water that it is able to recover by as much as an order of magnitude. PMID:26760055

  12. Optimized removal of dissolved organic carbon and trace organic contaminants during combined ozonation and artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, U; Miehe, U; Jekel, M

    2012-11-15

    Pilot scale experiments using an 8 g/h ozonation unit and a 1.4 m(2) slow sand filter have demonstrated that the combination of ozonation and artificial groundwater recharge is suitable for efficient reduction of bulk and trace organics. The biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the slow sand filter was enhanced from 22% without pre-treatment to 34% by pre-ozonation. In addition, realistic surface water concentrations of most investigated trace organic compounds (TrOCs) including carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, phenazone and metoprolol were reduced below the limits of quantification. Only a few TrOCs, e.g. primidone and benzotriazole, were not efficiently removed in both treatment steps and could be detected regularly in the filter effluent. For these compounds, enhanced treatment, such as advanced oxidation processes, needs to be considered. Testing for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity did not reveal any systematic adverse effects for human health. The formation of the by-product bromate from bromide was below the limit of the German drinking water directive of 10 μg/L. No removal of bromate was observed in the aerobic slow sand filter. Additional experiments with sand columns showed that operating a preceding bank filtration step to reduce DOC can reduce oxidant demand by approximately 20%. PMID:23014565

  13. Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In response to the increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in eastern San Joaquin County, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, Calif. Phase 1 of this study evaluated the geologic and hydrological conditions in the area and selected 20 drill sites in three areas of high potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system. In phase 2, test holes were drilled. This report is on phase 2, and summarizes the data collected during the drilling and evaluates the suitability of the drilled areas for their potential for artificial recharge. Two areas seem to have a fair potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system using the basin-spreading method: (1) The flood plain area along the Mokelumne River north of Lockeford, and (2) an area northeast of Linden along the Calaveras River. (USGS)

  14. Proposed artificial recharge studies in northern Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimrey, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    The aquifer system in northern Qatar comprises a water-table aquifer in the Rus Formation which is separated by an aquitard from a partially confined aquifer in the top of the overlying Umm er Radhuma Formation. These two aquifers are composed of limestone and dolomite of Eocene and Paleocene age and contain a fragile lens of freshwater which is heavily exploited as a source of water for agricultural irrigation. Net withdrawals are greatly in excess of total recharge, and quality of ground water is declining. Use of desalinated seawater for artificial recharge has been proposed for the area. Artificial recharge, on a large scale, could stabilize the decline in ground-water quality while allowing increased withdrawals for irrigation. The proposal appears technically feasible. Recharge should be by injection to the Umm er Radhuma aquifer whose average transmissivity is about 2,000 meters squared per day (as compared to an average of about 200 meters squared per day for the Rus aquifer). Implementation of artificial recharge should be preceded by a hydrogeologic appraisal. These studies should include test drilling, conventional aquifer tests, and recharge-recovery tests at four sites in northern Qatar. (USGS)

  15. Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infiltration tests were used to evaluate the potential of basin spreading surface water as a means of artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, California. Two infiltration sites near Lockeford and Linden were selected on the basis of information collected during the first two phases of the study. Data from the infiltration tests indicate that the two sites are acceptable for recharge by the basin-spreading method. Infiltration rates ranged between 6.7 and 10.5 ft/day near Lockeford and between 2.6 and 11.2 ft/day near Linden. Interpretation of these data is limited by lack of information on the response of the saturated zone during testing and by the inherent difficulty in extrapolating the results of small-scale tests to larger long-term operations. Lithology is a major factor that controls infiltration rates at the test sites. The unsaturated zone is characterized by heterogeneous layers of coarse- and fine- grained materials. Clay layers of low hydraulic conductivity commonly form discontinuous lenses that may cause a transient perched water table to develop during recharge. Water level measurements from wells screened in the unsaturated zone indicate that the perched water table could reach the land surface after 2 and 5 months of recharge near Lockeford and Linden, respectively. These figures probably represent the minimum time necessary for saturation of the land. Another major factor that affects infiltration rates is the quality of the recharge water, particularly the suspended sediment content. The clogging action of suspended sediment may be minimized by: (1) pretreatment of recharge water in a settling pond, (2) adherence to a routine program of monitoring and maintenance, and (3) proper design of the recharge facility. Other factors that affect infiltration rates include basin excavation technique, basin shape, and maintenance procedures. Efficient operation of the recharge facility requires careful attention to the

  16. Simulated impacts of artificial groundwater recharge and discharge of the source area and source volume of an Atlantic Coastal Plain Stream, Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Joshua W.; Denver, Judish M.; McKenna, Thomas E.; Ullman, William J.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical groundwater-flow model was used to characterize the source area and volume of Phillips Branch, a baseflow-dominated stream incising a highly permeable unconfined aquifer on the low relief Delmarva Peninsula, USA. Particle-tracking analyses indicate that the source area (5.51 km2) is ~20% smaller than the topographically defined watershed (6.85 km2), and recharge entering ~37% of the surface watershed does not discharge to Phillips Branch. Groundwater residence time within the source volume ranges from a few days to almost 100 years, with 95% of the volume "flushing" within 50 years. Artificial discharge from groundwater pumping alters the shape of the source area and reduces baseflow due to the interception of stream flow paths, but has limited impacts on the residence time of groundwater discharged as baseflow. In contrast, artificial recharge from land-based wastewater disposal substantially reduces the source area, lowers the range in residence time due to the elimination of older flow paths to the stream, and leads to increased discharge to adjacent surface-water bodies. This research suggests that, in this and similar hydrogeologic settings, the "watershed" approach to water-resource management may be limited, particularly where anthropogenic stresses alter the transport of soluble contaminants through highly permeable unconfined aquifers.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    In response to increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in San Joaquin County, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, California. Through a well canvass and analyses of existing data on geology, soils, and drillers logs, this study (phase one of three phases) resulted in identification of 20 sites for exploratory test drilling in areas potentially favorable for artificial recharge. Ten of the sites are in areas adjacent to the Mokelumne River, six are in areas adjacent to the Calaveras River and Mormon Slough, and four are north of Littlejohns Creek. (USGS)

  18. Quantitative PCR monitoring of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial pathogens in three European artificial groundwater recharge systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckelmann, Uta; Dörries, Hans-Henno; Ayuso-Gabella, M Neus; Salgot de Marçay, Miquel; Tandoi, Valter; Levantesi, Caterina; Masciopinto, Costantino; Van Houtte, Emmanuel; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Wintgens, Thomas; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Aquifer recharge presents advantages for integrated water management in the anthropic cycle, namely, advanced treatment of reclaimed water and additional dilution of pollutants due to mixing with natural groundwater. Nevertheless, this practice represents a health and environmental hazard because of the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and chemical contaminants. To assess the quality of water extracted from recharged aquifers, the groundwater recharge systems in Torreele, Belgium, Sabadell, Spain, and Nardò, Italy, were investigated for fecal-contamination indicators, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistance genes over the period of 1 year. Real-time quantitative PCR assays for Helicobacter pylori, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, human pathogens with long-time survival capacity in water, and for the resistance genes ermB, mecA, blaSHV-5, ampC, tetO, and vanA were adapted or developed for water samples differing in pollutant content. The resistance genes and pathogen concentrations were determined at five or six sampling points for each recharge system. In drinking and irrigation water, none of the pathogens were detected. tetO and ermB were found frequently in reclaimed water from Sabadell and Nardò. mecA was detected only once in reclaimed water from Sabadell. The three aquifer recharge systems demonstrated different capacities for removal of fecal contaminators and antibiotic resistance genes. Ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis in the Torreele plant proved to be very efficient barriers for the elimination of both contaminant types, whereas aquifer passage followed by UV treatment and chlorination at Sabadell and the fractured and permeable aquifer at Nardò posed only partial barriers for bacterial contaminants. PMID:19011075

  19. Simulation of groundwater flow, effects of artificial recharge, and storage volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer near the city of Wichita, Kansas well field, 1935–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Pickett, Linda L.; Hansen, Cristi V.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Arkansas River for the transient simulation is 7,916,564 cubic feet per day (91.6 cubic feet per second) and the RMS error divided by (/) the total range in streamflow (7,916,564/37,461,669 cubic feet per day) is 22 percent. The RMS error calculated for observed and simulated streamflow gains or losses for the Little Arkansas River for the transient simulation is 5,610,089 cubic feet per day(64.9 cubic feet per second) and the RMS error divided by the total range in streamflow (5,612,918/41,791,091 cubic feet per day) is 13 percent. The mean error between observed and simulated base flow gains or losses was 29,999 cubic feet per day (0.34 cubic feet per second) for the Arkansas River and -1,369,250 cubic feet per day (-15.8 cubic feet per second) for the Little Arkansas River. Cumulative streamflow gain and loss observations are similar to the cumulative simulated equivalents. Average percent mass balance difference for individual stress periods ranged from -0.46 to 0.51 percent. The cumulative mass balance for the transient calibration was 0.01 percent. Composite scaled sensitivities indicate the simulations are most sensitive to parameters with a large areal distribution. For the steady-state calibration, these parameters include recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and vertical conductance. For the transient simulation, these parameters include evapotranspiration, recharge, and hydraulic conductivity. The ability of the calibrated model to account for the additional groundwater recharged to the Equus Beds aquifer as part of the Aquifer Storage and Recovery project was assessed by using the U.S. Geological Survey subregional water budget program ZONEBUDGET and comparing those results to metered recharge for 2007 and 2008 and previous estimates of artificial recharge. The change in storage between simulations is the volume of water that estimates the recharge credit for the aquifer storage and recovery system. The estimated increase in storage of 1,607 acre-ft in the basin

  20. Artificial recharge in the northern part of Chino ground-water basin, upper Santa Ana Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This study was made to help management design and implement a recharge-recapture system for State Water Project water in Chino Basin. Nine test holes were drilled in the study area. Analyses of data from these test holes and drillers ' logs of water wells indicate the presence of clay deposits. The clay deposits cannot be correlated between holes which indicates that they are in the form of discontinuous beds or lenses. The existence and location of two ground-water barriers (Barrier ' J ' and Red Hill Barrier) have been postulated in previous reports. Water-level data indicate that Barrier ' J ' is probably not effectively stopping the movement of ground water. Data are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of the Red Hill barrier. Five existing recharge facilities in the study area were previously constructed to control floodflow. Infiltration tests were conducted at three of the facilities, and results of these tests indicate infiltration rates of 2.6 feet per day at Day Creek, 2.0 feet per day at East Etiwanda, and 1.3 feet per day at San Sevaine. A total of about 9,000 acre-feet of State Water Project water was recharged between June 1980 and July 1981. Rising water levels in wells indicate that recharge water is percolating down to the water table. (USGS)

  1. Application of a new model for groundwater age distributions: Modeling and isotopic analysis of artificial recharge in the Rialto-Colton basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T.R.; Woolfenden, L.

    2002-01-01

    A project for modeling and isotopic analysis of artificial recharge in the Rialto-Colton basin aquifer in California, is discussed. The Rialto-Colton aquifer has been divided into four primary and significant flowpaths following the general direction of groundwater flow from NW to SE. The introductory investigation include sophisticated chemical reaction modeling, with highly simplified flow path simulation. A comprehensive reactive transport model with the established set of geochemical reactions over the whole aquifer will also be developed for treating both reactions and transport realistically. This will be completed by making use of HBGC123D implemented with isotopic calculation step to compute Carbon-14 (C14) and stable Carbon-13 (C13) contents of the water. Computed carbon contents will also be calibrated with the measured carbon contents for assessment of the amount of imported recharge into the Linden pond.

  2. Artificial Recharge via Boreholes Using Treated Wastewater: Possibilities and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Voudouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in artificial recharge of groundwater using pretreated wastewater continues to increase, especially in semi-arid countries. After the artificial recharge and natural treatment, the water could be extracted through boreholes pumping for direct irrigation. The selection of suitable locations for artificial recharge should be based on hydrogeological conditions, economic evaluation and environmental considerations. Clogging of boreholes that are used for artificial recharge is a serious problem and requires proper planning to reduce it. This paper deals with the investigation of the possibilities and prospects of aquifer recharge via boreholes using treated wastewater. Firstly, the aquifer recharge techniques, the proposed criteria of waste and the clogging effect are presented. Secondly, the possibility of application of artificial recharge in the South-Eastern Mesaoria aquifer of Cyprus is examined. Based on hydrogeological results, artificial recharge using tertiary treated wastewater via boreholes is one of the options available for increasing the groundwater reserves of this aquifer. The recycled water will infiltrate through gravel pack, providing favorable conditions for ventilation and laminar flow due to small water flow velocity. The treatment works include the removal of the fat, oil and grease (FOG and cyanides (CN− content in order to meet the upper acceptable limits.

  3. Effects of boundary conditions on the cleaning efficiency of riverbank filtration and artificial groundwater recharge systems regarding bulk parameters and trace pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Florian R; Schmidt, Carsten K; Wülser, Richard; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Drinking water is often produced from surface water by riverbank filtration (RBF) or artificial groundwater recharge (AGR). In this study, an AGR system was exemplarily investigated and results were compared with those of RBF systems, in which the effects of redox milieu, temperature and surface water discharge on the cleaning efficiency were evaluated. Besides bulk parameters such as DOC (dissolved organic carbon), organic trace pollutants including iodinated X-ray contrast media, personal care products, complexing agents, and pharmaceuticals were investigated. At all studied sites, levels of TOC (total organic carbon), DOC, AOX (adsorbable organic halides), SAC (spectral absorption coefficient at 254 nm), and turbidity were reduced significantly. DOC removal was stimulated at higher groundwater temperatures during AGR. Several substances were generally easily removable during both AGR and RBF, regardless of the site, season, discharge or redox regime. For some more refractory substances, however, removal efficiency turned out to be significantly influenced by redox conditions. PMID:22678210

  4. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agrilcultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3-, N2, Cl, SO42-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3-, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

  5. Pre- and post-reservoir ground-water conditions and assessment of artificial recharge at Sand Hollow, Washington County, Utah, 1995-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.; Gardner, Philip M.; Watt, Dennis E.

    2005-01-01

    Sand Hollow, Utah, is the site of a surface-water reservoir completed in March 2002, which is being operated by the Washington County Water Conservancy District primarily as an aquifer storage and recovery project. The reservoir is an off-channel facility receiving water from the Virgin River, diverted near the town of Virgin, Utah. It is being operated conjunctively, providing both surface-water storage and artificial recharge to the underlying Navajo aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Reclamation conducted a study to document baseline ground-water conditions at Sand Hollow prior to the operation of the reservoir and to evaluate changes in ground-water conditions caused by the reservoir. Pre-reservoir age dating using tritium/helium, chlorofluorocarbons, and carbon-14 shows that shallow ground water in the Navajo Sandstone in some areas of Sand Hollow entered the aquifer from 2 to 25 years before sample collection. Ground water in low-recharge areas and deeper within the aquifer may have entered the aquifer more than 8,000 years ago. Ground-water levels in the immediate vicinity of Sand Hollow Reservoir have risen by as much as 80 feet since initial filling began in March 2002. In 2005, ground water was moving laterally away from the reservoir in all directions, whereas the pre-reservoir direction of ground-water flow was predominantly toward the north. Tracers, or attributes, of artificial recharge include higher specific conductance, higher dissolved-solids concentrations, higher chloride-to-bromide ratios, more-depleted stable isotopes (2H and 18O), and higher total-dissolved gas pressures. These tracers have been detected at observation and production wells close to the reservoir. About 15,000 tons of naturally occurring salts that previously accumulated in the vadose zone beneath the reservoir are being flushed into the aquifer. Except for the shallowest parts of the aquifer, this is generally not affecting water quality, largely because of

  6. Artificial Recharge Coupled with Flood Mitigation in Jeju, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Koo, M.; Lee, K.; Moon, D.; Barry, J. M.; Park, W.

    2010-12-01

    The primary goal of this study is to develop and apply the artificial recharge system at Han Stream in Jeju Island, Korea, for not only securing sustainable groundwater resources, but also mitigating severe floods occurred due to the global climate changes. Jeju-friendly Aquifer Recharge Technology (J-ART) in this study has been developed by capturing ephemeral stream water with no interference in the environments such as natural recharge or eco-system, storing the flood water in the reservoirs, recharging it through designed borehole after appropriate water treatment, and then making it to be used at down-gradient production wells. For optimal design of J-ART, we conducted injection tests at the monitoring well (MW5) as well as at the planned recharge site during drilling the recharge wells and performed a modeling with the data obtained. Based on the modeling results, the artificial recharge wells were developed with a design of 10-meter spacing between the wells and 35-40 meter depths, which has a capacity of more than 2,500,000 m3 of groundwater resources in a year. Characterizing groundwater flow from recharge area to discharge area should be achieved to assess the efficiency of J-ART. The resistivity logging employed to predict water flow in unsaturated zone during artificial recharge based on the inverse modeling and resistivity change patterns. Stable isotope studies of deuterium and oxygen-18 of surface waters and groundwaters were carried out to interpret mixing and flow in groundwaters impacted by artificial recharge. Transient models were developed to predict the effects of artificial recharge using the hydraulic properties of aquifers, groundwater levels, and meteorological data. Time series changes of water balance after artificial recharge were analyzed, and residence time of the recharged water was also predicted with a certain degree of uncertainty. Keywords: J-ART, Hydrogeological methods, Geophysical survey, Stable isotopes, Groundwater modeling

  7. Water Supply in the Mojave River Ground-Water Basin, 1931-99, and the Benefits of Artificial Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Christina L.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The Mojave River and the associated aquifer system are important water supplies in the Mojave Desert of southern California. The river and aquifer system are in hydraulic connection in many areas, and when flow conditions change in one, the other usually is affected. The river is an unpredictable source of water; therefore, residents of the basin rely almost entirely on ground water for their water supply. This reliance on ground water has resulted in overdraft conditions that have caused water-level declines, changes in the quantity and spatial distribution of recharge from the Mojave River, and loss of riparian habitat. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Mojave Water Agency (MWA), has completed several studies to determine the likely effects of overdraft on the ground-water and surface-water relations along the Mojave River. This report summarizes those studies, highlighting some of the simulation results from a ground-water flow model, and describes the ground-water and surface-water conditions of the Mojave River Basin.

  8. Availability of Surface Water of Wadi Rajil as a Source of Groundwater Artificial Recharge: A Case Study of Eastern Badia /Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakad A. Ta'any

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wadi Rajil catchment area is considered as one of the major wadis entering the Azraq Basin from the north. It is ungauged wadi and covers an area of about 3910km2. The annual average rainfall on Wadi Rajil catchment area is about 126.6mm. Heavy thunderstorms occur in April and May, causing significant floods covering the area. The flood waters are not utilized, and a small portion infiltrates into the ground, where the great portion of these waters remain over Qaa’ Azraqfew months before evaporation. Due to the absence of the hydrometric stream flow station, no data are available about surface water runoff in Wadi Rajil catchment area. Therefore, the first part of this study calculates the surface water potential of Wadi Rajil to be utilized for groundwater artificial recharge, applying the SCS curvilinear synthetic unit hydrograph method. The synthesis unit hydrograph of Wadi Rajil catchment is characterized by a peak value of 1146 m3/s (4047 cfs per one inch of rainfall excess. Flood hydrographs for 10,25,50, and 100 years return periods were derived and their peak flow are found to be 10,8,186,412, and 680 m3/s, respectively and the corresponding flood volumes are 0.95, 16.53, 36.89, and 61.5 MCM, respectively.Groundwater artificial recharge conditions are suitably prevailing in the most northern and central part of the catchment area, whereas, geological, Hydrogeological, and water quality characteristics of the floodwater encourage artificial replenishment of the exploited aquifer in the study area.

  9. Identifying Groundwater Recharge in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recharge epodicity in arid regions provides a method to estimate annual groundwater recharge given a relationship expressed as the recharge to precipitation ratio. Traditionally, in-situ observations are required to identify aquifer recharge events, while more advanced approaches such as the water-table fluctuation method or the episodic master recession method are necessary to delineate the recharge event. Our study uses the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations to estimate monthly changes in groundwater storage which are attributed to the combination of groundwater abstraction and episodic recharge in the arid southwestern United States. Our results illustrate the ability of remote sensing technologies to identify episodic groundwater recharge in arid regions which can be used within sustainable groundwater management frameworks to effectively manage groundwater resources.

  10. Enriched noble gas isotopes: Ideal tracers for groundwater recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel approach for tracing recharge and groundwater movement has been applied for the first time using isotopically-enriched xenon as an artificial tracer. Xenon has nine stable isotopes to choose from so recharge from multiple surface water sources can be examined. Noble gases are ideal tracers because they are inert and therefore pose no heath concerns. Furthermore, because of their low natural abundance we can dissolve small quantities into a recharge basin and still achieve a large dynamic range during dilution with native groundwater with respect to the detection limit. Once xenon is dissolved in the water and remains out of contact with the atmosphere the xenon will move conservatively with the groundwater. Absorption and retardation, associated with most other artificial tracers, is not a concern for the noble gas tracer. The goal of the first tracer experiment was to determine whether deep wells below confining layers were under the influence of recently recharged water

  11. Numerical Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Assessment of the Effects of Artificial Recharge in the Rialto-Colton Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    The Rialto?Colton Basin, in western San Bernardino County, California, was chosen for storage of imported water because of the good quality of native ground water, the known storage capacity for additional ground-water storage in the basin, and the availability of imported water. To supplement native ground-water resources and offset overdraft conditions in the basin during dry periods, artificial-recharge operations during wet periods in the Rialto?Colton Basin were begun in 1982 to store surplus imported water. Local water purveyors recognized that determining the movement and ultimate disposition of the artificially recharged imported water would require a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. In this study, a finite-difference model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Rialto?Colton Basin to gain a better understanding of the ground-water flow system and to evaluate the hydraulic effects of artificial recharge of imported water. The ground-water basin was simulated as four horizontal layers representing the river- channel deposits and the upper, middle, and lower water-bearing units. Several flow barriers bordering and internal to the Rialto?Colton Basin influence the direction of ground-water flow. Ground water may flow relatively unrestricted in the shallow parts of the flow system; however, the faults generally become more restrictive at depth. A particle-tracking model was used to simulate advective transport of imported water within the ground-water flow system and to evaluate three artificial-recharge alternatives. The ground-water flow model was calibrated to transient conditions for 1945?96. Initial conditions for the transient-state simulation were established by using 1945 recharge and discharge rates, and assuming no change in storage in the basin. Average hydrologic conditions for 1945?96 were used for the predictive simulations (1997?2027). Ground-water-level measurements made during 1945 were used for comparison with the

  12. Use of nuclear techniques in the study of artificial recharge of groundwater: case of groundwater table in Kairouan plane in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groundwater table studied here is located in the plain of Kairouan and it is one of the main underground resources in the Centre of Tunisia. This region is characterized by a semi arid climate with high intensity of rain that causes flooding of Kairouan City. This study has two objectives namely: 1- To develop a technical process of this recharge. The experiment was realized at two sites. In each site were installed 3 neutron probe access tubes to the depth of the level of the ground water table.Successive measurements were taken in each tube in function of depth and time to follow up the hydrodynamics of the recharge of the water table. Neutron and gamma probes were used and compared with respect to measured water content.Each access tube for a fixed time give a water content profile which shows the dynamics of actual recharge and the previous recharge. this technique can help the developer to make decision concerning the recharge parameters and, particularly, the flow rate and the opportunity time to get the best recharge water efficiency. 2- To analyse the concentration of stable and radioactive isotopes in the water of the plain of kairouan. Samples were taken from the shallow and deep water table. The obtained results are helpful to specify the origin of the water. Geochemical analysis were also done to clear the spatial variability of the quality of water. To reach the fore mentioned objectives, a survey of wells using those resources was made. Samples were taken from all surveilled wells in this investigation. water samples were taken from the deep and shallow aquifers and to determine salt concentration as well as stable and radioactive element (O18, H2, C13, C14, H3). The results obtained from chemical analysis showed no clear spatial variability of water quality between the two aquifers. However the isotopic study gave two types of results: First: A significant difference between ages of the water coming from the shallow and the deep ground water

  13. Simulation of Groundwater Mound Resulting from Proposed Artificial Recharge of Treated Sewage Effluent Case study – Gaza waste water treatment plant, Palestine

    OpenAIRE

    Aish, Adnan Mousa

    2010-01-01

    Mounding of the groundwater table beneath recharge sources is of concern as the raised water table approaches closely to near-surface facilities or features. The shape and height of the mound depend on several factors including the recharge rate, hydraulic conductivity and thickness of the aquifer. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the suitability of the study area for a rapid infiltration system of treated wastewater effluent without causing excessive mounding of the water table. A ...

  14. Tracer test modeling for local scale residence time distribution characterization in an artificial recharge site

    OpenAIRE

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martínez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Tubau, Isabel; Pourcq, Katrien; Grau-Martínez, Alba; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers is a technique for improving water quality and increasing groundwater resources. Understanding the fate of a potential contaminant requires knowledge of the residence times distribution (RTD) of the water beneath the artificial recharge infrastructure. A simple way to obtain the RTDs is to perform a tracer test. We performed a pulse injection tracer test in an artificial recharge system through an infiltration basin to obtain the breakthrough curves, which y...

  15. Determining the most suitable areas for artificial groundwater recharge via an integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in GIS environment (case study: Garabaygan Basin, Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hossein; Boloorani, Ali Darvishi; Sabokbar, Hassan Ali Faraji; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Hamzeh, Mohamad; Rafii, Yusef

    2013-01-01

    Flood spreading is a suitable strategy for controlling and benefiting from floods. Selecting suitable areas for flood spreading and directing the floodwater into permeable formations are amongst the most effective strategies in flood spreading projects. Having combined geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria decision analysis approaches, the present study sought to locate the most suitable areas for flood spreading operation in the Garabaygan Basin of Iran. To this end, the data layers relating to the eight effective factors were prepared in GIS environment. This stage was followed by elimination of the exclusionary areas for flood spreading while determining the potentially suitable ones. Having closely examined the potentially suitable areas using the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE) II and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods, the land suitability map for flood spreading was produced. The PROMETHEE II and AHP were used for ranking all the alternatives and weighting the criteria involved, respectively. The results of the study showed that most suitable areas for the artificial groundwater recharge are located in Quaternary Q(g) and Q(gsc) geologic units and in geomorphological units of pediment and Alluvial fans with slopes not exceeding 3%. Furthermore, significant correspondence between the produced map and the control areas, where the flood spreading projects were successfully performed, provided further evidence for the acceptable efficiency of the integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in locating suitable flood spreading areas. PMID:22402992

  16. Multi-bioindicators to assess soil microbial activity in the context of an artificial groundwater recharge with treated wastewater: a large-scale pilot experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Caroline; Joulian, Catherine; Ollivier, Patrick; Nyteij, Audrey; Cote, Rémi; Surdyk, Nicolas; Hellal, Jennifer; Casanova, Joel; Besnard, Katia; Rampnoux, Nicolas; Garrido, Francis

    2014-06-28

    In the context of artificial groundwater recharge, a reactive soil column at pilot-scale (4.5 m depth and 3 m in diameter) fed by treated wastewater was designed to evaluate soil filtration ability. Here, as a part of this project, the impact of treated wastewater filtration on soil bacterial communities and the soil's biological ability for wastewater treatment as well as the relevance of the use of multi-bioindicators were studied as a function of depth and time. Biomass; bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity fingerprints; potential nitrifying, denitrifying, and sulfate-reducing activities; and functional gene (amo, nir, nar, and dsr) detection were analyzed to highlight the real and potential microbial activity and diversity within the soil column. These bioindicators show that topsoil (0 to 20 cm depth) was the more active and the more impacted by treated wastewater filtration. Nitrification was the main activity in the pilot. No sulfate-reducing activity or dsr genes were detected during the first 6 months of wastewater application. Denitrification was also absent, but genes of denitrifying bacteria were detected, suggesting that the denitrifying process may occur rapidly if adequate chemical conditions are favored within the soil column. Results also underline that a dry period (20 days without any wastewater supply) significantly impacted soil bacterial diversity, leading to a decrease of enzyme activities and biomass. Finally, our work shows that treated wastewater filtration leads to a modification of the bacterial genetic and functional structures in topsoil. PMID:24608565

  17. Removal of dissolved organic matter in municipal effluent with ozonation, slow sand filtration and nanofiltration as high quality pre-treatment option for artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linlin, Wu; Xuan, Zhao; Meng, Zhang

    2011-04-01

    In the paper the combination process of ozonation, slow sand filtration (SSF) and nanofiltration (NF) was investigated with respect to dissolved organic matter (DOM) removal as high quality pre-treatment option for artificial groundwater recharge. With the help of ozonation leading to breakdown of the large organic molecules, SSF preferentially removes soluble microbial by-product-like substances and DOM with molecular weight (MW) less than 1.0 kDa. NF, however, removes aromatic, humic acid-like and fulvic acid-like substances efficiently and specially removes DOM with MW above 1.0 kDa. The residual DOM of the membrane permeate is dominated by small organics with MW 500 Da, which can be further reduced by the aquifer treatment, despite of the very low concentration. Consequently, the O(3)/SSF/NF system offers a complementary process in DOM removal. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) can be reduced from 6.5±1.1 to 0.7±0.3 mg L(-1) and from 267±24 to 52±6 μg L(-1), respectively. The very low DOC concentration of 0.6±0.2 mg L(-1) and THMFP of 44±4 μg L(-1) can be reached after the aquifer treatment. PMID:21382634

  18. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps. The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961–1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3

  19. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps. The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961–1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3

  20. Effect of redox conditions on the fate of emergin organic micropollutants during artificial recharge of groundwater: batch experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    La recarrega artificial de les aigües subterrànies consisteix en infiltrar aigua als aqüífers per mitjà de les instal·lacions dissenyades per a tal fi i representa una eina important en la gestió dels recursos. A més de l’augment dels recursos d'aigües subterrànies, la recàrrega pot suposar una millora natural de la seva qualitat durant el seu pas pel subsòl. Els processos que tenen lloc en el sistema sòl-aqüífer (filtració, adsorció, reaccions de mescla , redox, biodegradació, et...

  1. Monitoring induced denitrification in an artificial aquifer recharge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Martinez, Alba; Torrentó, Clara; Folch, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-05-01

    As demands on groundwater increase, artificial recharge is becoming a common method for enhancing groundwater supply. The Llobregat River is a strategic water supply resource to the Barcelona metropolitan area (Catalonia, NE Spain). Aquifer overexploitation has leaded to both a decrease of groundwater level and seawater intrusion, with the consequent deterioration of water quality. In the middle section of the aquifer, in Sant Vicenç del Horts, decantation and infiltration ponds recharged by water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from wastewater treatment plant effluents), were installed in 2007, in the framework of the ENSAT Life+ project. At the bottom of the infiltration pond, a vegetal compost layer was installed to promote the growth of bacteria, to induce denitrification and to create favourable conditions for contaminant biodegradation. This layer consists on a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. Understanding the fate of contaminants, such as nitrate, during artificial aquifer recharge is required to evaluate the impact of artificial recharge in groundwater quality. In order to distinguish the source of nitrate and to evaluate the capability of the organic reactive layer to induce denitrification, a multi-isotopic approach coupled with hydrogeochemical data was performed. Groundwater samples, as well as river samples, were sampled during artificial and natural recharge periods. The isotopic analysis included: δ15N and δ18O of dissolved nitrate, δ34S and δ18O of dissolved sulphate, δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon, and δ2H and δ18O of water. Dissolved nitrate isotopic composition (δ15NNO3 from +9 to +21 o and δ18ONO3 from +3 to +16 ) demonstrated that heterotrophic denitrification induced by the reactive layer was taking place during the artificial recharge periods. An approximation to the extent of nitrate attenuation was calculated, showing a range between 95 and 99% or between 35 and 45%, by using the extreme

  2. Characteristics of groundwater recharge on the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiu-Cui; Wu, Jing-Wei; Cai, Shu-Ying; Yang, Jin-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater recharge is an important component of the groundwater system. On the North China Plain (NCP), groundwater is the main water supply. Because of large-scale overexploitation, the water table has declined, which has produced severe adverse effects on the environment and ecosystem. In this article, tracer experiment and watershed model were used to calculate and analyze NCP groundwater recharge. In the tracer experiment, average recharge was 108 mm/year and recharge coefficient 0.16. With its improved irrigation, vegetation coverage and evapotranspiration modules, the INFIL3.0 model was used for calculation of groundwater recharge. Regional modeling results showed an average recharge of 102 mm/year and recharge coefficient 0.14, for 2001-2009. These values are very similar to those from the field tracer experiment. Influences in the two methods were analyzed. The results can provide an important reference for NCP groundwater recharge. PMID:24032445

  3. Quantifying Potential Groundwater Recharge In South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, S.; Zhou, Y.; Leite, P. A.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater in South Texas is heavily relied on for human consumption and irrigation for food crops. Like most of the south west US, woody encroachment has altered the grassland ecosystems here too. While brush removal has been widely implemented in Texas with the objective of increasing groundwater recharge, the linkage between vegetation and groundwater recharge in South Texas is still unclear. Studies have been conducted to understand plant-root-water dynamics at the scale of plants. However, little work has been done to quantify the changes in soil water and deep percolation at the landscape scale. Modeling water flow through soil profiles can provide an estimate of the total water flowing into deep percolation. These models are especially powerful with parameterized and calibrated with long term soil water data. In this study we parameterize the HYDRUS soil water model using long term soil water data collected in Jim Wells County in South Texas. Soil water was measured at every 20 cm intervals up to a depth of 200 cm. The parameterized model will be used to simulate soil water dynamics under a variety of precipitation regimes ranging from well above normal to severe drought conditions. The results from the model will be compared with the changes in soil moisture profile observed in response to vegetation cover and treatments from a study in a similar. Comparative studies like this can be used to build new and strengthen existing hypotheses regarding deep percolation and the role of soil texture and vegetation in groundwater recharge.

  4. Transient, spatially varied groundwater recharge modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Kibreab Amare; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work is to integrate field data and modeling tools in producing temporally and spatially varying groundwater recharge in a pilot watershed in North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using the Richards equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D), ArcGIS™, ROSETTA, in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture, and a long-term gridded climate data. The public version of HYDUS-1D and another version with detailed freezing and thawing module are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack, and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGIS™ to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8 mm/year. Previous studies in the Okanagan Basin used Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance without any attempt of model performance evaluation, notwithstanding its inherent limitations. Thus, climate change impact results from this previous study and similar others, such as Jyrkama and Sykes (2007), need to be interpreted with caution.

  5. Preliminary simulation of chloride transport in the Equus Beds aquifer and simulated effects of well pumping and artificial recharge on groundwater flow and chloride transport near the city of Wichita, Kansas, 1990 through 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klager, Brian J.; Kelly, Brian P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas is a primary water-supply source for the city of Wichita. Water-level declines because of groundwater pumping for municipal and irrigation needs as well as sporadic drought conditions have caused concern about the adequacy of the Equus Beds aquifer as a future water supply for Wichita. In March 2006, the city of Wichita began construction of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project, a plan to artificially recharge the aquifer with excess water from the Little Arkansas River. Artificial recharge will raise groundwater levels, increase storage volume in the aquifer, and deter or slow down a plume of chloride brine approaching the Wichita well field from the Burrton, Kansas area caused by oil production activities in the 1930s. Another source of high chloride water to the aquifer is the Arkansas River. This study was prepared in cooperation with the city of Wichita as part of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project. Chloride transport in the Equus Beds aquifer was simulated between the Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers near the Wichita well field. Chloride transport was simulated for the Equus Beds aquifer using SEAWAT, a computer program that combines the groundwater-flow model MODFLOW-2000 and the solute-transport model MT3DMS. The chloride-transport model was used to simulate the period from 1990 through 2008 and the effects of five well pumping scenarios and one artificial recharge scenario. The chloride distribution in the aquifer for the beginning of 1990 was interpolated from groundwater samples from around that time, and the chloride concentrations in rivers for the study period were interpolated from surface water samples. Five well-pumping scenarios and one artificial-recharge scenario were assessed for their effects on simulated chloride transport and water levels in and around the Wichita well field. The scenarios were: (1) existing 1990 through 2008 pumping conditions, to serve as a

  6. Numerical approaches for approximating technical effectiveness of artificial recharge structures

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, I.; Barker, J; MacDonald, D; Gale, I.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes various numerical approaches to quantify technical effectiveness of low-technology artificial recharge structures as seen commonly in rural environment and communities in semi-arid developing countries. The described methodologies enable benefits of artificial recharge facilities, i.e. their ability to replenish the aquifer, to be approximated. Technical effectiveness of recharge facilities is thereby evaluated on three scales: On a recharge basin scale, the rate of i...

  7. Numerical approaches for approximating technical effectivessness of artificial recharge structures

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, I.; Barker, J; MacDonald, D; Gale, I.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes various numerical approaches to quantify technical effectiveness of low-technology artificial recharge structures as seen commonly in rural environment and communities in semi-arid developing countries. The described methodologies enable benefits of artificial recharge facilities, i.e. their ability to replenish the aquifer, to be approximated. Technical effectiveness of recharge facilities is thereby evaluated on three scales: On a recharge basin scale, the rate of i...

  8. Karst and artificial recharge: Theoretical and practical problems. A preliminary approach to artificial recharge assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Walid; Pistre, Séverin; Kneppers, Angeline; Bakalowicz, Michel; Najem, Wajdi

    2011-10-01

    SummaryManaged Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is an emerging sustainable technique that has already generated successful results and is expected to solve many water resource problems, especially in semi-arid and arid zones. It is of great interest for karst aquifers that currently supply 20-25% of the world's potable water, particularly in Mediterranean countries. However, the high heterogeneity in karst aquifers is too complex to be able to locate and describe them simply via field observations. Hence, as compared to projects in porous media, MAR is still marginal in karst aquifers. Accordingly, the present work presents a conceptual methodology for Aquifer Rechargeability Assessment in Karst - referred to as ARAK. The methodology was developed noting that artificial recharge in karst aquifers is considered an improbable challenge to solve since karst conduits may drain off recharge water without any significant storage, or recharge water may not be able to infiltrate. The aim of the ARAK method is to determine the ability of a given karst aquifer to be artificially recharged and managed, and the best sites for implementing artificial recharge from the surface. ARAK is based on multi-criteria indexation analysis modeled on karst vulnerability assessment methods. ARAK depends on four independent criteria, i.e. Epikarst, Rock, Infiltration and Karst. After dividing the karst domain into grids, these criteria are indexed using geological and topographic maps refined by field observations. ARAK applies a linear formula that computes the intrinsic rechargeability index based on the indexed map for every criterion, coupled with its attributed weighting rate. This index indicates the aptitude for recharging a given karst aquifer, as determined by studying its probability first on a regional scale for the whole karst aquifer, and then by characterizing the most favorable sites. Subsequently, for the selected sites, a technical and economic feasibility factor is applied, weighted

  9. An approach to identify urban groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vázquez-Suñé

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the proportion in which waters from different origins are mixed in a given water sample is relevant for many hydrogeological problems, such as quantifying total recharge, assessing groundwater pollution risks, or managing water resources. Our work is motivated by urban hydrogeology, where waters with different chemical signature can be identified (losses from water supply and sewage networks, infiltration from surface runoff and other water bodies, lateral aquifers inflows, .... The relative contribution of different sources to total recharge can be quantified by means of solute mass balances, but application is hindered by the large number of potential origins. Hence, the need to incorporate data from a large number of conservative species, the uncertainty in sources concentrations and measurement errors. We present a methodology to compute mixing ratios and end-members composition, which consists of (i Identification of potential recharge sources, (ii Selection of tracers, (iii Characterization of the hydrochemical composition of potential recharge sources and mixed water samples, and (iv Computation of mixing ratios and reevaluation of end-members. The analysis performed in a data set from samples of the Barcelona city aquifers suggests that the main contributors to total recharge are the water supply network losses (22%, the sewage network losses (30%, rainfall, concentrated in the non-urbanized areas (17%, from runoff infiltration (20%, and the Besòs River (11%. Regarding species, halogens (chloride, fluoride and bromide, sulfate, total nitrogen, and stable isotopes (18O, 2H, and 34S behaved quite conservatively. Boron, residual alkalinity, EDTA and Zn did not. Yet, including these species in the computations did not affect significantly the proportion estimations.

  10. Potential for, and possible effects of, artificial recharge in Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Douglas K.; Peltz, Lorri A.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid population growth in Carson Valley, west- central Nevada, requires a dependable municipal water source. Artificial recharge of aquifers using available flow of the Carson River is one way to increase the amount of water in underground storage and maintain a dependable ground-water supply. Ground water can be artificially recharged by routing excess surface water or, after proper treatment, routing wastewater to infiltration basins or injection wells. Withdrawal wells would remove stored water when needed. As a first step, maps showing areas in Carson Valley with high, low, moderate and unknown potential for artificial recharge were developed on the basis of the distribution of geologic units, depth to water, specific yield, infiltration rate, and location of natural recharge and discharge. For recharge by means of infiltration, areas totaling 5,700 acres have high potential, 23,900 acres have moderate potential, and 6,200 acres have low potential. For recharge through injection, areas totaling 7,800 acres have high potential and 43,500 acres have moderate potential; 23,000 acres have unknown potential because data are lacking on subsurface conditions. A ground-water-flow model was used to assess the possible results of artificial recharge. Simulations with no accompanying ground-water withdrawal show that, when recharge by injection is simulated near the valley floor, heads in the semiconfined aquifer increase over much of the valley, floor; only about 20 percent of the recharged water is stored in the aquifer after 5 years and as much as 80 percent is lost to streamflow and evapotranspiration. When recharge is simulated on the eastern side of the valley, 80 percent of the recharged water remains in storage after 5 years. When recharge is simulated near the valley floor, more water is lost to discharge than when recharge is on the eastern side of the valley. When recharge is applied for long periods without accompanying withdrawal, recharged water moves

  11. An approach to delineate groundwater recharge potential sites in Ambalantota, Sri Lanka using GIS techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.P. Senanayake; D.M.D.O.K. Dissanayake; B.B. Mayadunna; W.L. Weerasekera

    2016-01-01

    The demand for fresh water in Hambantota District, Sri Lanka is rapidly increasing with the enormous amount of ongoing development projects in the region. Nevertheless, the district experiences periodic water stress conditions due to seasonal precipitation patterns and scarcity of surface water resources. Therefore, management of available groundwater resources is critical, to fulfil potable water re-quirements in the area. However, exploitation of groundwater should be carried out together with artificial recharging in order to maintain the long term sustainability of water resources. In this study, a GIS approach was used to delineate potential artificial recharge sites in Ambalantota area within Ham-bantota. Influential thematic layers such as rainfall, lineament, slope, drainage, land use/land cover, li-thology, geomorphology and soil characteristics were integrated by using a weighted linear combination method. Results of the study reveal high to moderate groundwater recharge potential in approximately 49%of Ambalantota area.

  12. Long-term improvement of agricultural vegetation by floodwater spreading in the Gareh Bygone Plain, Iran. In the pursuit of human security, is artificial recharge of groundwater more lucrative than selling oil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Sayyed Hamid; Mohammadnia, Mehrdad; Kowsar, Sayyed Ahang

    2016-03-01

    In southern Iran's Gareh Bygone Plain, water-supply qanats in four mixed farming communities were desiccated by over-pumping of illegal dug wells throughout the area. Emergency situations developed, resulting in city-ward migration. Since 1983, 193 million m3 of water has been supplied to those communities by floodwater spreading (FWS) to facilitate spate irrigation of sandy rangeland (2,034 ha) and artificial recharge of groundwater (ARG), of which 76 % has recharged the aquifer. This resulted in a reverse migration of the population. The irrigated area in the 2010-2011 growing season increased 13.2 fold when compared to the pre-FWS period, and year-round forage for about 700 sheep has been provided since 1991. The ARG is a logical alternative to building large dams in Iran; 420,000 km2 of coarse-grained alluvium provides capacity to store 5,000 km3 of water, representing more than ten times the annual precipitation of the whole country. As the equivalent cost for building dams to accommodate that volume is estimated at US12.5 × 1012, the potential value of the alluvium may be realized. ARG on the recharge areas of 33,000 of the desiccated qanats eventually could rejuvenate them. As agricultural commodities absorb 19 % of the monetary value of Iran's imports, and ARG activities could supply the water to produce them, alluvium is even more valuable than oil, which provides foreign exchange. More importantly, ARG on 140,000 km2 of the alluvium could strengthen the capacity to adapt to droughts and reduce the number and impact of water-related emergency situations.

  13. ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE TO THE SNAKE PLAIN AQUIFER, AN EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL AND EFFECT, 1969

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major factors involved in using surplus water for artificial recharge of the Snake Plain aquifer in southern and southeastern Idaho (17040212, 17040209, 17040206, 17040201) are the availability of water, the probably effects of water mixing on ground-water quality and physica...

  14. Artificial Groundwater Recharge With Reclaimed Water Using EnhancedDirect Injection Well Recharge Process%组合式强化井灌工艺回灌再生水的中试研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温保印; 张薛; 赵璇; 吴琳琳

    2011-01-01

    再生水地下回灌是缓解城市水资源短缺的有效途径之一.通过中试考察了污水厂二级出水经过反硝化生物滤池(DNBF)、超滤(UF)和臭氧(O3)预处理后,采用组合式强化井灌工艺(EnDir)回灌到地下含水层的工艺路线的可行性.在1年多的运行过程中,系统研究了回灌水水质特别是硝酸盐氮(NO3--N)浓度的变化情况.结果表明,该工艺对二级出水中DOC的去除率为59.7%,对UV254的去除率为61.0%,对硝酸盐氮的去除率为87.1%,对PO3-4-P的去除率为93.4%.氨氮主要在土壤处理单元被去除,去除率为45.9%.DNBF工艺能去除81.2%的硝酸盐氮,使其浓度降低至4.66 mg/L,同时不影响其他水质参数的变化.回灌水中SUVA值的变化规律显示,该系统对芳香族和脂肪族有机物的去除没有显著的选择性.%Groundwater recharge with reclaimed water is one of the effective ways to relieve urban water resource shortage. A pilot-scale experiment was carried out to investigate the feasibility of using the enhanced direct injection-well recharge (EnDir) process to recharge the secondary effluent from WWTP into the aquifer after the effluent was pretreated by denitrification biofilter (DNBF) , ultrafiltration (UF) and ozonation. During the operation for more than one year, the variation of the recharged water quality, especially of nitrate was studied. The results show that the total removal rates of DOC, UV254, NO3- - N and PO3-4 - P are 59.7% , 61.0% , 87. 1 % and 93.4% respectively. NH4+ - N of 45. 9% is removed by the soil treatment units. NO3- - N is reduced to 4. 66 mg/L (the removal rate of 81. 2% ) by the DNBF , without negative effects on the other parameters. Judging from the SUVA, this system has no significant selectivity in the removal of aromatic and aliphatic organic compounds.

  15. Simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals and artificial recharge on discharge to streams, springs, and riparian vegetation in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed of the Upper San Pedro Basin, southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Pool, Donald R.; Leenhouts, James M.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of ground-water resources, “capture” or “streamflow depletion” refers to withdrawal-induced changes in inflow to or outflow from an aquifer. These concepts are helpful in understanding the effects of long-term development of ground-water resources. For the Upper San Pedro Basin in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, a recently developed ground-water flow model is available to help quantify capture of water from the river and riparian system. A common method of analysis is to compute curves of capture and aquifer-storage change for a range of time at select points of interest. This study, however, presents results of a method to show spatial distributions of total change in inflow and outflow from withdrawal or injection for select times of interest. The mapped areal distributions show the effect of a single well in terms of the ratio of the change in boundary flow rate to rate of withdrawal or injection by the well. To the extent that the system responds linearly to ground-water withdrawal or injection, fractional responses in the mapped distributions can be used to quantify response for any withdrawal or injection rate. Capture distributions calculated using the Upper San Pedro model include response to (1) withdrawal in the lower basin-fill aquifer for times of 10 and 50 years following the initiation of pumping from predevelopment conditions and (2) artificial recharge to the water table in the area underlain by the lower basin-fill aquifer after 10 and 50 years. The mapped distributions show that response to withdrawals and injections is greatest near the river/riparian system. Presence of clay layers in the vertical interval between withdrawal locations and the river/riparian system, however, can delay the response.

  16. Environmental tritium as a tool in groundwater recharge investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the use of environmental tritium to gain quantitative information on the rate of groundwater recharge to two different aquifers. Bomb derived tritium was used to determine actual groundwater recharge rates, first to a homogeneous unconfined aquifer and then to a heterogeneous unconfined aquifer. In the first study the aquifer of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, was used. The aquifer is an unconfined phreatic lens within a homogeneous outwash deposit. In the second study a heterogeneous unconfined aquifer in southwest Michigan, USA, was used. This aquifer consists of poorly sorted outwash materials. In both studies the vertical depth of penetration of bomb derived tritium into the saturated zone at groundwater divides, was used in conjunction with porosity data to calculate the rate of groundwater recharge to the aquifers. The major assumption in this method of recharge rate determination is that the flow of groundwater at groundwater divides is essentially vertical and downward, approaching piston-type flow. Although the validity of this assumption has been questioned various groundwater transport models were applied to the tritium data in the two study areas. It was found that in these investigations hydrodynamic dispersion was not a significant process and that the flow of groundwater at groundwater divides could be considered, for the purposes of these investigations, to be piston-type. In both investigations the rate of groundwater recharge determined by the bomb tritium method was in close agreement with rates previously determined by conventional hydrologic techniques. Environmental tritium has been successfully used in these investigations to determine accurately the rate of groundwater recharge to homogeneous and heterogeneous unconfined aquifers. When employing the method outlined in this paper, it is necessary to identify the groundwater divides within the aquifer being studied and to sample groundwater for tritium analysis only from

  17. Partitioning sources of recharge in environments with groundwater recirculation using carbon-14 and CFC-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Sarah A.; Cook, Peter G.; Dogramaci, Shawan; Kipfer, Rolf

    2015-06-01

    Groundwater recirculation occurs when groundwater is pumped from an aquifer onto the land surface, and a portion of that water subsequently infiltrates back to the aquifer. In environments where groundwater is recirculated, differentiation between various sources of recharge (e.g. natural rainfall recharge vs. recirculated water) can be difficult. Groundwater age indicators, in particular transient trace gases, are likely to be more sensitive tracers of recharge than stable isotopes or chloride in this setting. This is because, unlike stable isotopes or chloride, they undergo a process of equilibration with the atmosphere, and historical atmospheric concentrations are known. In this paper, groundwater age indicators (14C and CFC-12) were used as tracers of recharge by surplus mine water that is discharged to streams. Ternary mixing ratios were calculated based on 14C and CFC-12 concentrations measured along three transects of piezometers and monitoring wells perpendicular to the creeks, and from dewatering wells. Uncertainty in calculated mixing ratios was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach. Ternary mixing ratios in dewatering wells suggest that recharge by mine water accounted for between 10% and 87% of water currently abstracted by dewatering wells. The calculated mixing ratios suggest that recharge by mine water extends to a distance of more than 550 m from the creeks. These results are supported by seepage flux estimates based on the water and chloride balance along the creeks, which suggest that 85-90% of mine water discharged to the creeks recharges the aquifer and recharge by mine water extends between 110 and 730 m from the creeks. Mixing calculations based on gaseous groundwater age indicators could also be used to partition recharge associated with agricultural irrigation or artificial wetland supplementation.

  18. Theory of the generalized chloride mass balance method for recharge estimation in groundwater basins characterised by point and diffuse recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Somaratne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of the conventional chloride mass balance (CMB method to point recharge dominant groundwater basins can substantially under-estimate long-term average annual recharge by not accounting for the effects of localized surface water inputs. This is because the conventional CMB method ignores the duality of infiltration and recharge found in karstic systems, where point recharge can be a contributing factor. When point recharge is present in groundwater basins, recharge estimation is unsuccessful using the conventional CMB method with, either unsaturated zone chloride or groundwater chloride. In this paper we describe a generalized CMB that can be applied to groundwater basins with point recharge. Results from this generalized CMB are shown to be comparable with long-term recharge estimates obtained using the watertable fluctuation method, groundwater flow modelling and Darcy flow calculations. The generalized CMB method provides an alternative, reliable long-term recharge estimation method for groundwater basins characterised by both point and diffuse recharge.

  19. Pilot Test of Advanced Treatments Combination of Wastewater for Groundwater Recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成徐洲; 杨磊; 吴天宝; 甘一苹; 胡俊

    2002-01-01

    To solve the water shortage problem, an artificial groundwater recharge system will be constructed in Beijing for wastewater reuse as a demonstration and training center. Design and operating experience for the demonstration plant was gained through pilot tests of advanced treatment technologies with soil infiltration of well treated secondary effluent. The test results showed that the selected treatment technology meets the recommended water quality criteria for groundwater recharge and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis results showed significantly improved water quality.

  20. Coupled modeling approach to assess climate change impacts on groundwater recharge and adaptation in arid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, H.; Uvo, C. B.; Berndtsson, R.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of future climate scenarios on surface and groundwater resources was simulated using a modeling approach for an artificial recharge area in arid southern Iran. Future climate data for the periods of 2010-2030 and 2030-2050 were acquired from the Canadian Global Coupled Model (CGCM 3.1) for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1. These scenarios were adapted to the studied region using the delta-change method. A conceptual rainfall-runoff model (Qbox) was used to simulate runoff in a flash flood prone catchment. The model was calibrated and validated for the period 2002-2011 using daily discharge data. The projected climate variables were used to simulate future runoff. The rainfall-runoff model was then coupled to a calibrated groundwater flow and recharge model (MODFLOW) to simulate future recharge and groundwater hydraulic heads. As a result of the rainfall-runoff modeling, under the B1 scenario the number of floods is projected to slightly increase in the area. This in turn calls for proper management, as this is the only source of fresh water supply in the studied region. The results of the groundwater recharge modeling showed no significant difference between present and future recharge for all scenarios. Owing to that, four abstraction and recharge scenarios were assumed to simulate the groundwater level and recharge amount in the studied aquifer. The results showed that the abstraction scenarios have the most substantial effect on the groundwater level and the continuation of current pumping rate would lead to a groundwater decline by 18 m up to 2050.

  1. Isotopic investigation of groundwater recharge mechanism in thal doab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope techniques were applied in a selected area of Punjab known as Thal Doab for investigating origin, recharge and age/residence time of groundwater. Surface water and groundwater samples were collected from 211 sampling points spread over the entire study area. The sampling points included rivers/canals representing the surface water, hand pumps representing shallow groundwater and tube wells representing deep groundwater. Rain samples were also collected at Chashma. The collected samples were analyzed for environmental isotopes (2H, 3H, 180). Isotopic data of recharge sources indicated that rivers/canals and rainfall have quite different signatures. Data of groundwater clearly demonstrated spatial variation of isotopic composition illustrating recharge from different sources and in varying proportions. Rain appears to be the main source of recharge in upper eastern part of the doab. Rest of the area is mainly recharged by surface water. Delta180 values of shallow and deep groundwater showed similar geographical distribution proving that they are interconnected and have same recharge mechanism. Groundwater has different age/residence time in various zones ranging from fresh to more than 50 years. (author)

  2. Climatic controls on diffuse groundwater recharge across Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Barron, O. V.; R. S. Crosbie; W. R. Dawes; S. P. Charles; T. Pickett; M. J. Donn

    2012-01-01

    Reviews of field studies of groundwater recharge have attempted to investigate how climate characteristics control recharge, but due to a lack of data have not been able to draw any strong conclusions beyond that rainfall is the major determinant. This study has used numerical modelling for a range of Köppen-Geiger climate types (tropical, arid and temperate) to investigate the effect of climate variables on recharge for different soil and vegetation types. For the majority of climate types, ...

  3. Climatic controls on diffuse groundwater recharge across Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Barron, O. V.; R. S. Crosbie; D. Pollock; W. R. Dawes; S. P. Charles; T. Pickett; M. Donn

    2012-01-01

    Reviews of field studies of groundwater recharge have attempted to investigate how climate characteristics control recharge, but due to a lack of data have not been able to draw any strong conclusions beyond that rainfall is the major determinant. This study has used numerical modeling for a range of Köppen-Geiger climate types (tropical, arid and temperate) to investigate the effect of climate variables on recharge for different soil and vegetation types. For the majority of climate t...

  4. Study on Artificial Groundwater Recharge of Changxiao Water Source By Pumping Test in Jinan City%由抽水试验成果谈济南长孝水源地回灌补源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丽爽; 于大潞; 赵宇辉

    2015-01-01

    通过4.5万m3/d开采性抽水试验的观测表明长孝水源地具有较好的富水性及调蓄能力,开采潜力巨大。为保证长孝水源地的长期开采,应尽早采用外引内拦等工程措施,在孝里铺洼地地区实现地表水的回灌补源。这对提高城市供水保证率,恢复当地生态环境均具有十分深远的意义。%Through exploitation pumping test observation with the water amount of 45000 m3/d of No.1 Changxiao water source , it is showed that Changxiao water source has a good water enrichment and storage capacity and exploi -tation potentiality .In order to ensure long term extraction of Changxiao water source , some countermeasures should be adopted, such as outward water diversion and internal water stop .Thus, artificial groundwater recharge of sur-face water in Xiaolipu depression area can be realized .It will have a very significance in improving rate of water supply in city , and recoverying local ecological environment .

  5. Identification of suitable locations for artificial groundwater recharge in a mining area of India by using remote sensing and GIS techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Lavy, Muriel; Amanzio, Gianpiero; De Maio, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Mining is one of the major activities causing water pollution and threating the quality and quantity of surface and groundwater resources in many parts of the world. Mining and related activities also damage the aquifer and decrease the water availability in the area. Groundwater may be considered as one of the most precious and basic needs for human existence and the survival of people providing the luxuries and comforts in addition to fulfilling the basic necessities of life. In India, more...

  6. Application of Isotope Techniques for the Estimation of Artificial Recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical studies on the alluvial aquifer system near the Nakdong River were carried out for the basic investigation of the estimation of artificial recharge for the river bank filtration. In-situ data do not show any distinct difference between the pumping well and river. Most of waters belong Ca-HCO3 and Ca-SO4 types and show high Mn concentration. In the borehole installed with Multi-packer (MP) system, Na, Ca, Mg, HCO3 contents of the groundwater are increased with depth increasing. Cl and SO4 contents of the groundwater show the lowest values at the bottom level (18m depth) and Mn content is very high at the middle level (13.5m depth) of MP system. There is no distinct difference in the δ18O and D values and tritium content between MP, borehole and surface water samples. The sulfur isotope data indicate that the possible sulfur source is dissolution of sulfate mineral from sedimentary rock. Strontium isotope ratio shows a little differences between the pumping well and observation borehole samples. Nitrogen isotope data indicate that the nitrogen of water samples is originated from fertilizer or organic materials

  7. Theory of the generalized chloride mass balance method for recharge estimation in groundwater basins characterised by point and diffuse recharge

    OpenAIRE

    N. Somaratne; Smettem, K. R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Application of the conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) method to point recharge dominant groundwater basins can substantially under-estimate long-term average annual recharge by not accounting for the effects of localized surface water inputs. This is because the conventional CMB method ignores the duality of infiltration and recharge found in karstic systems, where point recharge can be a contributing factor. When point recharge is present in groundwater basins,...

  8. A VISUAL BASIC PPREADSHEET MACRO FOR ESTIMATING GROUNDWATER RECHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Posavec

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A Visual Basic spreadsheet macro was written to automate the estimation of groundwater recharge from stream or spring hydrographs using the adapted Meyboom’s method. The program fits exponential regression model available in widely accessible platform (i.e. MS Excel to baseflow recessions that precede and follow groundwater recharge, and uses regression equations to calculate recharge volume that occur between these recessions. An example of field data from Croatia (Bulaž spring is given to illustrate its application.

  9. Simulated effects of groundwater pumping and artificial recharge on surface-water resources and riparian vegetation in the Verde Valley sub-basin, Central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Pool, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    In the Verde Valley sub-basin, groundwater use has increased in recent decades. Residents and stakeholders in the area have established several groups to help in planning for sustainability of water and other resources of the area. One of the issues of concern is the effect of groundwater pumping in the sub-basin on surface water and on groundwater-dependent riparian vegetation. The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater-Flow Model by Pool and others (in press) is the most comprehensive and up-to-date tool available to understand the effects of groundwater pumping in the sub-basin. Using a procedure by Leake and others (2008), this model was modified and used to calculate effects of groundwater pumping on surface-water flow and evapotranspiration for areas in the sub-basin. This report presents results for the upper two model layers for pumping durations of 10 and 50 years. Results are in the form of maps that indicate the fraction of the well pumping rate that can be accounted for as the combined effect of reduced surface-water flow and evapotranspiration. In general, the highest and most rapid responses to pumping were computed to occur near surface-water features simulated in the modified model, but results are not uniform along these features. The results are intended to indicate general patterns of model-computed response over large areas. For site-specific projects, improved results may require detailed studies of the local hydrologic conditions and a refinement of the modified model in the area of interest.

  10. Groundwater chemical methods for recharge studies. The basic of recharge and discharge. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater chemical methods for estimating recharge can provide useful information on groundwater sources and the location of major recharge areas. Two geochemical approaches that have been used successfully to quantify groundwater recharge rates are outlined. The first involves the use of mass balance and mixing cell models, mainly using conservative (non-reacting) dissolved species (3H, 2H, 18O, chloride). The methods range in complexity from simple calculations ( zero-dimensional chloride mass balance) to complex three-dimensional computer models. The second approach seeks to estimate the age or residence time of the groundwater by measuring compounds which are radioactive (14C) or whose input to the aquifer has been changing over time (chlorofluorocarbons). The methodology and some case studies are described. (authors)

  11. Removal of organic micropollutants in an artificial recharge system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, C.; Nödler, K.; Köck-Schulmeyer, M.; Hernandez, M.; Licha, T.; Ayora, C.; Carrera, J.

    2012-04-01

    Emerging contaminants including pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), personal care products (PCPs) and pesticides are increasingly being identified in the environment. Emerging pollutants and their transformation products show low concentration in the environment (ng/L), but the effects of the mixtures and lifelong exposure to humans are currently unknown. Many of these contaminants are removed under aerobic conditions in water treatment plants. However, several pharmaceuticals and metabolites present in wastewater are not eliminated by conventional treatment processes. Several lab studies, however, show that the behaviour of many of these micropollutants is affected by the dominant redox conditions. However, data from field experiments are limited and sometimes contradictory. Artificial recharge is a widespread technology to increase the groundwater resources. In this study we propose a design to enhance the natural remediation potential of the aquifer with the installation of a reactive layer at the bottom of the infiltration pond. This layer is a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. This layer is intended to provide an extra amount of DOC to the recharge water and to promote biodegradation by means of the development of different redox zones along the travel path through the unsaturated zone and within the aquifer. Moreover, compost, clay and iron oxide of the layer are assumed to increase sorption surfaces for neutral, cationic and anionic compounds, respectively. The infiltration system is sited in Sant Vicenç dels Horts (Barcelona, Spain). It consists of a decantation pond, receiving raw water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from treatment plant effluents), and an infiltration pond (5600 m2). The infiltration rate is around 1 m3/m2/day. The system is equipped with a network of piezometers, suction cups and tensiometers. Infiltration periods have been performed before and after the installation of the reactive layer

  12. Global synthesis of groundwater recharge in semiarid and arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Keese, Kelley E.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Gaye, Cheikh B.; Edmunds, W. Michael; Simmers, Ian

    2006-10-01

    Global synthesis of the findings from 140 recharge study areas in semiarid and arid regions provides important information on recharge rates, controls, and processes, which are critical for sustainable water development. Water resource evaluation, dryland salinity assessment (Australia), and radioactive waste disposal (US) are among the primary goals of many of these recharge studies. The chloride mass balance (CMB) technique is widely used to estimate recharge. Average recharge rates estimated over large areas (40-374 000 km2) range from 0.2 to 35 mm year-1, representing 0.1-5% of long-term average annual precipitation. Extreme local variability in recharge, with rates up to 720 m year-1, results from focussed recharge beneath ephemeral streams and lakes and preferential flow mostly in fractured systems. System response to climate variability and land use/land cover (LU/LC) changes is archived in unsaturated zone tracer profiles and in groundwater level fluctuations. Inter-annual climate variability related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) results in up to three times higher recharge in regions within the SW US during periods of frequent El Niños (1977-1998) relative to periods dominated by La Niñas (1941-1957). Enhanced recharge related to ENSO is also documented in Argentina. Climate variability at decadal to century scales recorded in chloride profiles in Africa results in recharge rates of 30 mm year-1 during the Sahel drought (1970-1986) to 150 mm year-1 during non-drought periods. Variations in climate at millennial scales in the SW US changed systems from recharge during the Pleistocene glacial period (10 000 years ago) to discharge during the Holocene semiarid period. LU/LC changes such as deforestation in Australia increased recharge up to about 2 orders of magnitude. Changes from natural grassland and shrublands to dryland (rain-fed) agriculture altered systems from discharge (evapotranspiration, ET) to recharge in the SW US. The impact of LU

  13. Climatic controls on diffuse groundwater recharge across Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Barron

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviews of field studies of groundwater recharge have attempted to investigate how climate characteristics control recharge, but due to a lack of data have not been able to draw any strong conclusions beyond that rainfall is the major determinant. This study has used numerical modeling for a range of Köppen-Geiger climate types (tropical, arid and temperate to investigate the effect of climate variables on recharge for different soil and vegetation types. For the majority of climate types the total annual rainfall had a weaker correlation with recharge than the rainfall parameters reflecting rainfall intensity. In regions with winter-dominated rainfall, annual recharge under the same annual rainfall, soils and vegetation conditions is greater than in regions with summer-dominated rainfall. The relative importance of climate parameters other than rainfall is higher for recharge under annual vegetation, but overall is highest in the tropical climate type. Solar radiation and vapour pressure deficit show a greater relative importance than mean annual daily mean temperature. Climate parameters have lowest relative importance in the arid climate type (with cold winters and the temperate climate type. For 75% of all considered cases of soil, vegetation and climate types recharge elasticity varies between 2 and 4, indicating a 20% to 40% change in recharge for a 10% change in annual rainfall Understanding how climate controls recharge under the observed historical climate allows more informed choices of analogue sites if they are to be used for climate change impact assessments.

  14. Technologies and multi-barrier systems for sustainable groundwater recharge and irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Besancon, Axelle

    2010-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) consists of artificially replenishing groundwater to facilitate reuse and/or the associated environmental benefits. Meanwhile, soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is a process of geo-purification designed and operated to improve the quality of the infiltrating water and is thus a type of MAR. SAT consists of a basin operating under rotation of drying and wetting periods. Often, SAT involves water of impaired quality applied onto soil and consequently ...

  15. Determining Groundwater Recharge from Stream Flow with Seasonal Recession Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumono

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Volume of groundwater recharge showed a picture of a watershed to determine the flow instability due to the physical characteristics of the watershed and precipitation. Many methods had been constructed to understand the dynamic movement of water discharge. One of them was the analysis of the stream hydrograph with Seasonal Recession Method. Information about groundwater recharge condition at several sub watershed in Krueng Peusangan Watershed was really needed in management of watershed for sustainable water resources. The study aimed to determine groundwater recharge from stream flow with seasonal recession method was conducted in Krueng Peusangan watershed, Aceh Province, Indonesia. The results showed that the trend pattern of the stream hydrograph could be explained using the exponential function where the dots lowest discharge that is the end of the recession (y than any period of time on stream hydrograph semi logarithmic (x. The pattern of results that occurred in the watershed of Krueng Peusangan: (A Krueng Seumpo had a trend for y = 9.2x-0.35, (B Simpang Jaya for y = 559.7x-0.5, (C Beukah village for y = 142x-0.32 , (D Sub watershed of Lut Tawar (Wih Nareh for y = 1.3x-0.12 and (E Sub watershed of Teupin Mane (Krueng Teumbo for y = 1.94x-0.42. It also showed that the location of A, B, C, E had a higher slope and a decreased recharge pattern compared to the location of D (sub watershed of Lut Tawar that tended to flat. The volume of groundwater recharge that occurred in a region (A and D increased while the other location was very volatile. Moreover, recharge instability occurred in Krueng Teumbo. Therefore, it needed a clear direction for land use and functions of forests, especially in the recharge area, in order to maintain the balance of the hydrological cycle, and the quantity of groundwater

  16. Groundwater suitability recharge zones modelling - A GIS application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabral, S.; Bhatt, B.; Joshi, J. P.; Sharma, N.

    2014-11-01

    Groundwater quality in Gujarat state is highly variable and due to multiplicity of factors viz. influenced by direct sea water encroachment, inherent sediment salinity, water logging, overexploitation leading to overall deterioration in ground water quality, coupled with domestic and industrial pollution etc. The groundwater scenario in the state is not very encouraging due to imbalance between recharge and groundwater exploitation. Further, the demand for water has increased manifold owing to agricultural, industrial and domestic requirement and this has led to water scarcity in many parts of the state, which is likely to become more severe in coming future due to both natural and manmade factors. Therefore, sustainable development of groundwater resource requires precise quantitative assessment based on reasonably valid scientific principles. Hence, delineation of groundwater potential zones (GWPZ), has acquired great significance. The present study focuses on the integrated Geospatial and Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) techniques to determine the most important contributing factors that affect the groundwater resources and also to delineate the potential zones for groundwater recharge. The multiple thematic layers of influencing parameters viz. geology, geomorphology, soil, slope, drainage density and land use, weightages were assigned to the each factor according to their relative importance as per subject experts opinion owing to the natural setup of the region. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was applied to these factors and potential recharge zones were identified. The study area for the assessment of groundwater recharge potential zones is Mahi-Narmada inter-stream region of Gujarat state. The study shows that around 28 % region has the excellent suitability of the ground water recharge.

  17. Climatic controls on diffuse groundwater recharge across Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Barron

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviews of field studies of groundwater recharge have attempted to investigate how climate characteristics control recharge, but due to a lack of data have not been able to draw any strong conclusions beyond that rainfall is the major determinant. This study has used numerical modelling for a range of Köppen-Geiger climate types (tropical, arid and temperate to investigate the effect of climate variables on recharge for different soil and vegetation types. For the majority of climate types, the correlation between the modelled recharge and total annual rainfall is weaker than the correlation between recharge and the annual rainfall parameters reflecting rainfall intensity. Under similar soil and vegetation conditions for the same annual rainfall, annual recharge in regions with winter-dominated rainfall is greater than in regions with summer-dominated rainfall. The importance of climate parameters other than rainfall in recharge estimation is highest in the tropical climate type. Mean annual values of solar radiation and vapour pressure deficit show a greater importance in recharge estimation than mean annual values of the daily mean temperature. Climate parameters have the lowest relative importance in recharge estimation in the arid climate type (with cold winters and the temperate climate type. For 75% of all soil, vegetation and climate types investigated, recharge elasticity varies between 2 and 4 indicating a 20% to 40% change in recharge for a 10% change in annual rainfall. Understanding how climate controls recharge under the observed historical climate allows more informed choices of analogue sites if they are to be used for climate change impact assessments.

  18. PRINCIPALS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANT BEHAVIOR DURING ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavior of a variety of organic contaminants having low molecular weight has been observed during groundwater recharge with reclaimed water. The evidence is site-specific, but is believed to have broader implications regarding the general behavior of organic contaminants in ...

  19. Estimating groundwater recharge through glacial till at Bacon Hall, Shropshire

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald, D.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A study was undertaken to obtain estimates for recharge to groundwater through glacial till. The work was carried out in support of the Hydrogeological Classification of Superficial Clays programme; a cofunded programme of research between BGS and the National Rivers Authority. Estimates were made using data from Bacon Hall, one of a series of sites used to monitor the Shropshire Groundwater Scheme. The sites are instrumented to measure the effect on soil moisture due to the pu...

  20. Chemical evolution of rapidly recharging groundwaters in shield environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes results of a multidisciplinary study of the geochemical and microbiological evolution of groundwaters that are recharged into two overburden/surface-bedrock environments in the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) lease area, Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. Sampling of groundwaters in overburden and shallow bedrock piezometers in the East Swamp area and in packer-isolated bedrock borehole zones in the main shaft of the URL facility was performed during consecutive winter, spring, summer and fall seasons over a one-year period in 1995/1996. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the hydrochemical, isotopic and microbiological responses to seasonal variations in the groundwater flow regime in the upper ∼200 m of granitic bedrock and overburden sediments in the URL lease area. The study showed that small amounts of oxygenated, 18O-depleted spring-melt water penetrated the bedrock at the URL, to depths of ∼200 m, under the influence of the pronounced water-table drawdown surrounding the URL. The travel times of recharge to this depth were less than two months. A similar pulse was not seen in the outcrop recharge area of the East Swamp where only natural gradients exist. No significant seasonal variations in groundwater chemistry were observed in either environment. Variations in 3 H content between borehole zones indicates mixing between deeper (older) groundwater and shallow (recent) recharge. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) showed seasonal variations in groundwaters at both study areas whereas only a limited seasonal relationship was seen in micro-organism concentrations. However, the general observation that micro-organism content is highest in groundwaters containing high levels of DOC and dissolved 02, and lower concentrations are found in low-DOC and O2-deficient groundwaters, indicates that microbially mediated oxidation of DOC may be occurring to cause the trend towards reducing conditions along the flow

  1. Effects of artificial-recharge experiments at Ship Creek alluvial fan on water levels at Spring Acres Subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William; Patrick, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the artificial recharge experiments on water levels at Spring Acres subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska, was evaluated using two digital models constructed to simulate groundwater movement and water-level rises induced by the artificial recharge. The models predicted that the artificial recharge would have caused water levels in the aquifer immediately underlying Spring Acres subdivision to rise 0.2 foot from May 20 to August 7, 1975. The models also predicted a total rise in groundwater levels of 1.1 feet at this location from July 16, 1973 to August 7, 1975, as a result of the artificial-recharge experiments. Water-level data collected from auger holes in March 1975 by a consulting firm for the contractor indicated a depth to water of 6-7 feet below land surface at Spring Acres subdivision at this time. Water levels measured in and near Spring Acres subdivision several years before and after the 1973-75 artificial-recharge experiments showed seasonal rises of 2 to 12.4 feet. A depth to water below land surface of 2.6 feet was measured 600 feet from the subdivision in 1971 and in the subdivision in 1977. Average measured depth to water in the area was 7.0 feet from early 1976 to September 1979. (USGS)

  2. Water Conservation and Artificial Recharge of Aquifers in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandha, D. K.

    2014-10-01

    India has proud traditions and wisdom which have evolved over thousands of years for developing technologies for water conservation and groundwater recharge using surplus monsoon precipitation runoff. This is imperative as the average rainfall/precipitation period is about 27 days/year and with uneven distribution across the country. Groundwater development is now the mainstay for sustaining agricultural production and rural water supplies. As such, groundwater development is increasing at an exponential rate and the estimated draft is now 231 000 hm{sup 3} with the result that almost 15% of the groundwater development areas are showing a continuous decline of water levels. There is an anomalous situation whereby water levels are declining in 831 blocks (assessment units) out of a total of 5 723 blocks across the country, and availability of excessive 864 000 hm{sup 3} runoff in different river basins brings floods and creates water logging in some parts of the country. This non-utilizable water can be planned for creating small surface water storage and to create additional sub-surface storage through groundwater recharge. At present, total water available is estimated at 660 000 hm{sup 3} and the minimum estimated water demand will be 843 000 hm{sup 3} in 2025 and 973 000 hm{sup 3} in 2050. Therefore, if India wants sustainable food supplies and to meet domestic/industrial water requirements, there is no other option than to implement projects for water conservation/groundwater recharge. Although a number of forward looking steps have been planned by the government and other institutions, many lacunae have been observed which need to be addressed for the successful implementation of water conservation and recharge programmes. This paper discusses various practices from the pre-historic to the present day, with case studies showing technological intervention. (Author)

  3. Water Conservation and Artificial Recharge of Aquifers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India has proud traditions and wisdom which have evolved over thousands of years for developing technologies for water conservation and groundwater recharge using surplus monsoon precipitation runoff. This is imperative as the average rainfall/precipitation period is about 27 days/year and with uneven distribution across the country. Groundwater development is now the mainstay for sustaining agricultural production and rural water supplies. As such, groundwater development is increasing at an exponential rate and the estimated draft is now 231 000 hm3 with the result that almost 15% of the groundwater development areas are showing a continuous decline of water levels. There is an anomalous situation whereby water levels are declining in 831 blocks (assessment units) out of a total of 5 723 blocks across the country, and availability of excessive 864 000 hm3 runoff in different river basins brings floods and creates water logging in some parts of the country. This non-utilizable water can be planned for creating small surface water storage and to create additional sub-surface storage through groundwater recharge. At present, total water available is estimated at 660 000 hm3 and the minimum estimated water demand will be 843 000 hm3 in 2025 and 973 000 hm3 in 2050. Therefore, if India wants sustainable food supplies and to meet domestic/industrial water requirements, there is no other option than to implement projects for water conservation/groundwater recharge. Although a number of forward looking steps have been planned by the government and other institutions, many lacunae have been observed which need to be addressed for the successful implementation of water conservation and recharge programmes. This paper discusses various practices from the pre-historic to the present day, with case studies showing technological intervention. (Author)

  4. Using Isotopes for Design and Monitoring of Artificial Recharge Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past years, the IAEA has provided support to a number of Member States engaged in the implementation of hydrological projects dealing with the design and monitoring of artificial recharge (AR) systems, primarily situated in arid and semiarid regions. AR is defined as any engineered system designed to introduce water to, and store water in, underlying aquifers. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR used with the purpose of increasing groundwater resources. Different water management strategies have been tested under various geographical, hydrological and climatic regimes. However, the success of such schemes cannot easily be predicted, since many variables need to be taken into account in the early stages of every AR project. As often occurs in the case of the assessment and management of groundwater and aquifers, information on hydrological behaviour and response to human-made actions is difficult to obtain and often very costly, especially if only conventional hydrological methods are used. Classical methods in AR and ASR are meant to provide information on changes in the volume and quality of the artificially introduced water to ensure its sustainability. Although the use of isotopes and geochemical tracers to plan and monitor AR and ASR has been limited, there is a growing number of publications reporting the successful application of tracers in the different phases of AR and ASR schemes. This publication discusses several theoretical aspects important to the understanding, planning and monitoring of AR and ASR schemes and presents a selected number of examples illustrating the usefulness of isotopes and other tracers. One section presents the list of available isotope tracers, indicating the type of information that can be obtained from each. The case studies presented in this publication illustrate the use of these tools in the different stages of AR and ASR schemes. The publication is expected to be of interest to hydrologists

  5. Survey of land subsidence – case study: The land subsidence formation in artificial recharge ponds at South Hamadan Power Plant, northwest of Iran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmad Khorsandi Aghai

    2015-02-01

    The artificial recharge is a technique of aquifer conservation for land subsidence. But in this article, the phenomenon of land subsidence and the resulting cracks and fissures at the study area are formed in recharge ponds. This is a new phenomenon and in this research the geometrical properties of the fissures of recharge ponds are measured. The results reveal the existence of fine layers in the geology of the aquifer, which are displaced in the long run as the consequence of groundwater overdraft. At the site of the artificial recharge subject of this research, the difference between the quality of recharge water and the aquifer and their interaction have intensified the instability and the movement of the fine sediments. In addition, the neglect of hydraulic principles of the groundwater during the construction and operation of the recharge wells has resulted in turbulent and speed flows, intensified displacement of fine sediments and ultimately the localized subsidence at the site of the plan.

  6. Experiments on the formation of excess air in groundwater under various recharge regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess air is a contribution to the gases dissolved in groundwater in addition to the solubility equilibrium component, formed by partial or total dissolution of air trapped during water level rises in the unsaturated zone. The amount of excess air can be quite large, mainly if the water level increase is significant, for example in case of recharge from ephemeral streams in semi-arid regions or artificial recharge. The increased gas amount, especially of oxygen, can have an influence on biological activity, water treatment, and quality. In order to investigate the applicability of excess air as a tool to identify recharge mechanisms, we examine the formation of excess air under field and laboratory conditions using all five noble gases. In laboratory experiments with plexiglas columns filled with different types of sand, we investigate how the excess air amount and composition depend on the hydrostatic pressure as well as the size distribution of the sand and the entrapped air bubbles. In field experiments we study the relationship between excess air and water level fluctuations. Two study sites were selected where the groundwater level increased due to artificial recharge (Basel, Switzerland) and due to river floods (Danube River, Hungary). (author)

  7. Application of GIS Based Tools for Groundwater Recharge and Evapotranspiration Estimation: Arc-Recharge and RIPGIS-NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, H.; Hogan, J.; Maddock, T.; Meixner, T.

    2007-12-01

    Water managers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of climate variability and change on groundwater resources. Climate impacts on groundwater resources are primarily determined by altering the amount of recharge and evapotranspiration (ET). Typically, groundwater models employ temporally static recharge or ET rates with limited spatial variability across the basin. As a result most groundwater models cannot be used to assess the impacts of climate on groundwater resources. A primary challenge addressing this shortcoming is the need for spatially and temporally explicit recharge and ET model inputs. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatially explicit data can be applied to develop these improved model inputs by quantifying and distributing recharge and ET across the model domain. Two ArcGIS desktop applications were developed for ArcGIS 9.2 to enhance recharge and ET estimation- Arc- Recharge and RIPGIS-NET. Arc-Recharge an ArcGIS 9.2 custom application is developed to quantify and distribute recharge along MODFLOW cells. Using spatially explicit precipitation data and Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Arc-Recharge routes water through the landscape and distributes the recharge to the appropriate groundwater model cells. RIPGIS-NET is an ArcGIS custom application that was developed to provide parameters for the RIP-ET package. RIP-ET is an improved MODFLOW ET module that simulates ET using a set of eco-physiologically based ET curves. RIPGIS-NET improves alluvial recharge estimation by providing spatially explicit information about the riparian/wetland ET. Application of Arc-Recharge and RIPGIS-NET in groundwater modeling enhances recharge and ET estimation by incorporating temporally and spatially explicit data. Using such tools, assessment of climate variability on groundwater resources will be enhanced.

  8. Soil moisture movement and groundwater recharge by tritium tracer tagging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of rate of soil moisture movement and recharge to groundwater system at Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) farm for the years 1973, 1974 and 1975 has been reported. The utility of artificially injected tritium, experimental techniques adopted and a quantitative determination of recharge and moisture movement rates are discussed. Corrections for upward movement of moisture after the end of monsoon have been used to calculate the average rates of water movement below the injection level and groundwater recharge. Average rates of soil moisture movement and recharge are 9.4 mm/d and 27.4% (193 mm) of monsoon precipitation for three years respectively. Under favourable conditions the diffusion coefficients for soil water system are calculated assuming Gaussian distribution of tritium concentrations in the soil profiles. The average value of diffusion coefficient is 2.5 x 10-5 cm2/s for the sandy loam soils. The variation in recharge is mainly due to inherent variability in soil physical properties and vegetative cover. The technique is not found reliable for hiqher water table conditions on account of lateral flow. (author)

  9. 二级出水经地下水回灌后的梯级利用及安全评价%Step Utilization of Secondary Effluent Based on Artificial Groundwater Recharge and Safety Risk Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏亮亮; 赵庆良; 薛爽; 张金娜; 王丽娜; 王韶华; 钟卉元; 贾婷; 柳成才

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of pollutants during the reuse of the secondary effluent via soil aquifer treatment (SAT) in agricultural irrigation and industrial cooling water circulation was studied. Step u-tilization of secondary effluent was achieved by using artificial groundwater recharge as a " usage reduced, reused and recycled" water source. Compared to the secondary effluent without SAT, the reuse of the SAT effluent at 1.5 m depth could decrease the corrosion rate by 3/4 and scale formation by 55.1 % in the cooling systems. The structure of scale would become denser and less thick. In addition, the risk of chemical carcinogens within the SAT effluent at 1. 5 m depth in agricultural irrigation declined by 1 orders of magnitude compared with the secondary effluent without SAT.%在研究了污水厂二级出水经土壤含水层处理(SAT)以及在农业灌溉、工业冷却水等回用过程中污染物迁移转化的基础上,构建了以人工地下水回灌所得再生水作为回用水源,用于农业灌溉、工业冷却水的再生水梯级利用模式,实现了水资源的“减量化、再利用、再循环”.将SAT土壤柱1.5m处出水作为工业冷却水水源,可使冷却水系统的腐蚀速率较使用二级出水时低3/4,结垢量减少55.1%,且结垢物的结构致密、厚度变薄.将SAT土壤柱1.5m处出水作为农业灌溉水源时,可使化学致癌风险较单独使用二级出水时低1个数量级,躯体毒害物致癌风险明显降低.

  10. Recharge and discharge calculations to characterize the groundwater hydrologic balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods are presented to quantify the ground water component of the hydrologic balance; including (1) hydrograph separation techniques, (2) water budget calculations, (3) spoil discharge techniques, and (4) underground mine inflow studies. Stream hydrograph analysis was used to calculate natural groundwater recharge and discharge rates. Yearly continuous discharge hydrographs were obtained for 16 watersheds in the Cumberland Plateau area of Tennessee. Baseflow was separated from storm runoff using computerized hydrograph analysis techniques developed by the USGS. The programs RECESS, RORA, and PART were used to develop master recession curves, calculate ground water recharge, and ground water discharge respectively. Station records ranged from 1 year of data to 60 years of data with areas of 0.67 to 402 square miles. Calculated recharge ranged from 7 to 28 inches of precipitation while ground water discharge ranged from 6 to 25 inches. Baseflow ranged from 36 to 69% of total flow. For sites with more than 4 years of data the median recharge was 20 inches/year and the 95% confidence interval for the median was 16.4 to 23.8 inches of recharge. Water budget calculations were also developed independently by a mining company in southern Tennessee. Results showed about 19 inches of recharge is available on a yearly basis. A third method used spoil water discharge measurements to calculate average recharge rate to the mine. Results showed 21.5 inches of recharge for this relatively flat area strip mine. In a further analysis it was shown that premining soil recharge rates of 19 inches consisted of about 17 inches of interflow and 2 inches of deep aquifer recharge while postmining recharge to the spoils had almost no interflow component. OSM also evaluated underground mine inflow data from northeast Tennessee and southeast Kentucky. This empirical data showed from 0.38 to 1.26 gallons per minute discharge per unit acreage of underground workings. This is the

  11. Ground water modelling in artificial recharge projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision-making is strongly based on modelling in two of our water supply projects concerning artificial ground water. The model used is a 2-dimensional flow and transport model using the element method. Due to sharp variations in Finnish soils, the modelling process is based on careful and detailed evaluation of basic hydrogeological data before and during model calibration

  12. Application of isotope hydrology for the assessment of artificial ground water recharge in some areas of UAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to recharge - discharge imbalance, severe depletion of groundwater table has occurred in most of the aquifers in United Arab Emirates. Evolved from its prime role to develop the water resources in the country, the Ministry of Environment and Water has constructed a large number of detention and retention dams across the main wadies. To assess groundwater recharge increase due to these dams, isotope methods were used to calculate such increase in three major wadies as Wuraiah, Bih and Tawean. Hydrochemical and isotopic data (18O, 2H and 3H) have clearly showed a meaningful contribution to the recharge from the dams. A tentative isotopic balance based on stable isotopes of rains water stored by these dams drove to a quantification of the artificial recharge ranging from 20 to 40%. (author)

  13. Modelling of recharge and pollutant fluxes to urban groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban groundwater resources are of considerable importance to the long-term viability of many cities world-wide, yet prediction of the quantity and quality of recharge is only rarely attempted at anything other than a very basic level. This paper describes the development of UGIf, a simple model written within a GIS, designed to provide estimates of spatially distributed recharge and recharge water quality in unconfined but covered aquifers. The following processes (with their calculation method indicated) are included: runoff and interception (curve number method); evapotranspiration (Penman-Grindley); interflow (empirical index approach); volatilization (Henry's law); sorption (distribution coefficient); and degradation (first order decay). The input data required are: meteorological data, landuse/cover map with event mean concentration attributes, geological maps with hydraulic and geochemical attributes, and topographic and water table elevation data in grid form. Standard outputs include distributions of: surface runoff, infiltration, potential recharge, ground level slope, interflow, actual recharge, pollutant fluxes in surface runoff, travel times of each pollutant through the unsaturated zone, and the pollutant fluxes and concentrations at the water table. The process of validation has commenced with a study of the Triassic Sandstone aquifer underlying Birmingham, UK. UGIf predicts a similar average recharge rate for the aquifer as previous groundwater flow modelling studies, but with significantly more spatial detail: in particular the results indicate that recharge through paved areas may be more important than previously thought. The results also highlight the need for more knowledge/data on the following: runoff estimation; interflow (including the effects of lateral flow and channelling on flow times and therefore chemistry); evapotranspiration in paved areas; the nature of unsaturated zone flow below paved areas; and the role of the pipe network

  14. Estimating Groundwater Recharge Using Empirical Method: A Case Study in the Tropical Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation and forecast of groundwater recharge and capacity of aquifer are essential issues in water resources investigation. In the current research, groundwater recharge, recharge coefficient and effective rainfall were determined through a case study using empirical methods applicable to the tropical zones. The related climatological data between January 2000 and December 2010 were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. The results showed that groundwater recharge was 326.39 mm per year, effective precipitation was 1807.97 mm per year and recharge coefficient was 18% for the study area. In summary, the precipitation converted to recharge, surface runoff and evapotranspiration are 12, 32 and 56% of rainfall, respectively. Correlation between climatic parameters and groundwater recharge showed positive and negative relationships. The highest correlation was found between precipitation and recharge. Linear multiple regressions between recharge and measured climatologic data proved significant relationship between recharge and rainfall and wind speed. It was also proven that the proposed model provided an accurate estimation for similar projects. (author)

  15. Study of groundwater recharge in Rechna Doab using isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic studies were performed in the Rechna Doab area to understand the recharge mechanism, investigate the relative contributions from various sources such as rainfall, rivers and canal system and to estimate the turn over times and replenishment rate of groundwater. The isotopic data suggest that the groundwater in the project area can be divided into different zones each having its own characteristic isotopic composition. The enriched isotopic values show rain recharge and depleted isotopic values are associated with river/canal system while the intermediate isotopic values show a mixing of two or more sources of water. The major contribution, however, comes from canal system. The isotopic data suggest that there is no quick movement of groundwater in the area. 18 figs. (author)

  16. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  17. Groundwater recharge estimation and water resources assessment in a tropical crystalline basement aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagwambo, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    While most groundwater recharge estimation methods give reasonable long-term annual average estimates very few if any methods offer guidance on monthly recharge. In crystalline basement aquifers (CBAs) the problem is compounded by the high seasonal, intra-annual and inter-annual variability. The chloride mass balance (CMB), the daily catchment water balance (WB) and the water table fluctuation (WTF) groundwater recharge estimation methods have been used to estimate groundwater recharge in a s...

  18. Quantifying Groundwater Recharge During Dynamic Seasonality in Cold Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, E.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating groundwater recharge in cold climates, during periods of dynamic seasonality such as winter and spring freshets is challenging due to subsurface heterogeneities and the complexity of vadose zone processes under partially frozen conditions. In order to obtain robust recharge estimates, numerical models simulating these complex processes need to be based on reliable parameter estimates and closely calibrated to field observations. This study focuses on quantifying recharge under an ephemeral stream that develops in the vicinity of a municipal well field during spring and winter freshets at a site in Southern Ontario. Temperature and moisture content profiles in the vadose zone were obtained during the 2015 spring melt at three different locations, using a variety of hydrogeological instruments. Temperature thermisters and Tid-Bit transducers were both installed at 15-30 cm spacings to the depth of the water table in order to compare and calibrate the results. Similarly, Time Domain Reflectometry probes were placed to the depth of the water table and the results were calibrated to daily moisture content readings taken with a Neutron Probe. Water table fluctuations were monitored and regular water samples were taken for analysis of geochemistry and isotope fractionation. This data provided the boundary conditions for the numerical model (Hydrus 1D) and allowed for its calibration and validation. Regions of rapid infiltration were observed at the site, as well as steep temperature gradients that could be used as a tracer for estimating recharge in cold climates. The geochemistry and isotope fractionation results provided support of surface water groundwater interaction within event based time periods predicted by the numerical models. Furthermore, the surface water samples were found to have high concentrations of microbial indicator species, and therefore the intense recharge phenomena observed at the site has significant implications to groundwater

  19. Precipitation Intensity Effects on Groundwater Recharge in the Southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F. Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Episodic recharge as a result of infrequent, high intensity precipitation events comprises the bulk of groundwater recharge in arid environments. Climate change and shifts in precipitation intensity will affect groundwater continuity, thus altering groundwater recharge. This study aims to identify changes in the ratio of groundwater recharge and precipitation, the R:P ratio, in the arid southwestern United States to characterize observed changes in groundwater recharge attributed to variations in precipitation intensity. Our precipitation metric, precipitation intensity magnification, was used to investigate the relationship between the R:P ratio and precipitation intensity. Our analysis identified significant changes in the R:P ratio concurrent with decreases in precipitation intensity. The results illustrate the importance of precipitation intensity in relation to groundwater recharge in arid regions and provide further insights for groundwater management in nonrenewable groundwater systems and in a changing climate.

  20. An extended modeling approach to assess climate change impacts on groundwater recharge and adaptation in arid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hashemi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of future climate scenarios on surface and groundwater resources was simulated using a modeling approach for an artificial recharge area in arid southern Iran. Future climate data for the periods of 2010–2030 and 2030–2050 were acquired from the Canadian Global Coupled Model (CGCM 3.1 for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1. These scenarios were adapted to the studied region using the delta-change method. The modified version of the HBV model (Qbox was used to simulate runoff in a flash flood prone catchment. The model was calibrated and validated for the period 2002–2011 using daily discharge data. The projected climate variables were used to simulate future runoff. The rainfall–runoff model was then coupled to a calibrated groundwater flow and recharge model (MODFLOW to simulate future recharge and groundwater hydraulic head. The results of the rainfall–runoff modeling showed that under the B1 scenario the number of floods might increase in the area. This in turn calls for a proper management, as this is the only source of fresh water supply in the studied region. The results of the groundwater recharge modeling showed no significant difference between present and future recharge for all scenarios. Owing to that, four abstraction and recharge scenarios were assumed to simulate the groundwater level and recharged water in the studied aquifer. The results showed that the abstraction scenarios have the most substantial effect on the groundwater level and the continuation of current pumping rate would lead to a groundwater decline by 18 m up to 2050.

  1. Changes in vegetation diversity caused by artificial recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Efforst to increase the rate of artificial recharge through basins often necessitates scrapping and ditching before and during operations. Such operations can result in more or less drastic changes in vegetation (depending on what was there before), characterized by diminisched numbers of species and lowered diversity. Two examples, one from Texas and one from the Netherlands are presented showing how similar treatments cause similar changes in two completely difference plant communities. ?? 1979 Dr. W. Junk b.v. - Publishers.

  2. Groundwater recharge in Pleistocene sediments overlying basalt aquifers in the Palouse Basin, USA: modeling of distributed recharge potential and identification of water pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Dijksma, R.; Brooks, E.S.; Boll, J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater levels in basalt aquifers around the world have been declining for many years. Understanding water pathways is needed for solutions like artificial drainage. Water supply in the Palouse Basin, Washington and Idaho, USA, primarily relies on basalt aquifers. This study presents a combination of modeling and field observations to understand the spatial distribution of recharge pathways in the overlying Pleistocene sediments. A spatially distributed model was used to quantify potentia...

  3. 222Rn and stable nuclides as natural tracers in an artificial recharge system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and stable nuclides were used as a tracer of groundwater/surface water interaction study in a artificial groundwater recharge system near Nakdong river in Korea. The 222Rn concentration at the observation well groundwater was decreased. The activity variation of each monitoring wells during short and long term experiment were 6.5-12.4 Bq/L at OBS-1, 3.8-6.8 Bq/L at OBS-2, 30.9-55.9 Bq/L at OBS-3, 5.9-25.5 Bq/L at OBS-4, 22.1-34.6 Bq/L at OBS-5 and 7.1-28.3 Bq/L at OBS-6. The 222Rn concentration of OBS-1 and 5 were decrease about 35 % but OBS-6 was increased. (author)

  4. California GAMA Special Study: Importance of River Water Recharge to Selected Groundwater Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, Jean E. [California State Univ. East Bay (CalState), Hayward, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    River recharge represents 63%, 86% and 46% of modern groundwater in the Mojave Desert, Owens Valley, and San Joaquin Valley, respectively. In pre-modern groundwater, river recharge represents a lower fraction: 36%, 46%, and 24% respectively. The importance of river water recharge in the San Joaquin valley has nearly doubled and is likely the result of a total increase of recharge of 40%, caused by river water irrigation return flows. This emphasizes the importance of recharge of river water via irrigation for renewal of groundwater resources. Mountain front recharge and local precipitation contribute to recharge of desert groundwater basins in part as the result of geological features focusing scarce precipitation promoting infiltration. River water recharges groundwater systems under lower temperatures and with larger water table fluctuations than local precipitation recharge. Surface storage is limited in time and volume, as evidenced by cold river recharge temperatures resulting from fast recharge, compared to the large capacity for subsurface storage. Groundwater banking of seasonal surface water flows therefore appears to be a natural and promising method for increasing the resilience of water supply systems. The distinct isotopic and noble gas signatures of river water recharge, compared to local precipitation recharge, reflecting the source and mechanism of recharge, are valuable constraints for numerical flow models.

  5. Groundwater and climate change in Africa : review of recharge studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsor, H. C.; A M. Macdonald

    2010-01-01

    The review of recharge studies was conducted as part of a one year DFID-funded research programme, aimed at improving understanding of the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources and local livelihoods – see http://www.bgs.ac.uk/GWResilience/. The review is one of a series of components within the project. The overall outputs of the project are: Two hydrogeological case studies in West and East Africa – which assess the storage and availability of groundwater in different aquifers a...

  6. Environmental isotope application for determination artificial recharge efficiency, cases from arid and semi-arid areas of Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four dams have been taken under study of environmental isotope hydrology to define the efficiency of the artificial recharge to the groundwater, two dams are located in the highland areas (altitude ∼ 740m above see level) and the other two dams at the main escarpment of the Jordan Valley graben (altitude is around -150m below sea level). Monthly and several sampling campaigns from the dams and the surrounding wells of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 (18O), Deuterium (2H) and radioactive tritium (3H) including complete chemical have been sampled and analyzed within the period 1995-2001 (technical cooperation projects with the IAEA, RER/8/002 and RAW/8/007). One of the main conclusions indicates that tritiated groundwater recharged after 1963 in Siwaqa and Khaldiya dams present only in a thin layer overlying the old groundwater without tritium. As main recommendation, protection of artificial recharge dams from silts and sediments is required. Accumulation of silt should be a major factor to be considered in the evaluation and design of artificial recharge systems in Jordan

  7. Changes in groundwater recharge under projected climate in the upper Colorado River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; Pruitt, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Understanding groundwater-budget components, particularly groundwater recharge, is important to sustainably manage both groundwater and surface water supplies in the Colorado River basin now and in the future. This study quantifies projected changes in upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) groundwater recharge from recent historical (1950–2015) through future (2016–2099) time periods, using a distributed-parameter groundwater recharge model with downscaled climate data from 97 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 climate projections. Simulated future groundwater recharge in the UCRB is generally expected to be greater than the historical average in most decades. Increases in groundwater recharge in the UCRB are a consequence of projected increases in precipitation, offsetting reductions in recharge that would result from projected increased temperatures.

  8. Changes in groundwater recharge under projected climate in the upper Colorado River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; Pruitt, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Understanding groundwater-budget components, particularly groundwater recharge, is important to sustainably manage both groundwater and surface water supplies in the Colorado River basin now and in the future. This study quantifies projected changes in upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) groundwater recharge from recent historical (1950-2015) through future (2016-2099) time periods, using a distributed-parameter groundwater recharge model with downscaled climate data from 97 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 climate projections. Simulated future groundwater recharge in the UCRB is generally expected to be greater than the historical average in most decades. Increases in groundwater recharge in the UCRB are a consequence of projected increases in precipitation, offsetting reductions in recharge that would result from projected increased temperatures.

  9. Uncertainties in the simulation of groundwater recharge at different scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bogena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital spatial data always imply some kind of uncertainty. The source of this uncertainty can be found in their compilation as well as the conceptual design that causes a more or less exact abstraction of the real world, depending on the scale under consideration. Within the framework of hydrological modelling, in which numerous data sets from diverse sources of uneven quality are combined, the various uncertainties are accumulated. In this study, the GROWA model is taken as an example to examine the effects of different types of uncertainties on the calculated groundwater recharge. Distributed input errors are determined for the parameters' slope and aspect using a Monte Carlo approach. Landcover classification uncertainties are analysed by using the conditional probabilities of a remote sensing classification procedure. The uncertainties of data ensembles at different scales and study areas are discussed. The present uncertainty analysis showed that the Gaussian error propagation method is a useful technique for analysing the influence of input data on the simulated groundwater recharge. The uncertainties involved in the land use classification procedure and the digital elevation model can be significant in some parts of the study area. However, for the specific model used in this study it was shown that the precipitation uncertainties have the greatest impact on the total groundwater recharge error.

  10. Geochemical and isotopic methods for management of artificial recharge in mazraha station (Damascus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial recharge of shallow groundwater at specially designed facilities is an attractive option increasing the storage capacity of potable water in arid and semi arid region such as Syria, Damascus Oasis. This operation needs integral management and detailed knowledge of groundwater dynamics and quantity and quality development of water. The objective of this study is to determine the temporal and spatial variations of chemical and environmental isotopic characteristics of groundwater during injection and recovery process. The geochemical and environmental isotope techniques are ideally suited for these investigations. 400 to 500 x103 m3 of spring water were injected annually into the ambient groundwater in Mazraha station, Damascus Oasis, which is used later for drinking purpose. Native groundwater and injected water are calcium bicarbonate type with EC of about 850±100 μS/cm and 300±50 μS/cm respectively. The injected water is under saturated with respect to calcite, while ambient groundwater is over saturated and the mixed water is in equilibrium after injection. It was observed that The injection process created a dilution cloud decreasing chemical concentrations progressively that improve the groundwater quality. After completed injection, the dilution center moved about 200 m during 85 days to the south southeast according to the ambient groundwater flow path. Based on this observation, the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is estimated about 7.5±1.3x10-4 m/s. The spatial distribution maps of CFC-11 and CFC-12, after injection, showed the same shape and flow direction of the spatial distribution of chemical elements. The effective diameter of artificial recharge is limited to about 250 m from the injection wells, as EC, Cl- and NO3- concentrations are effected significantly. Mixing ratio of 30% is required in order to lower nitrate concentration to less than 50 mg/l in native groundwater for potable water. Depending on pumping rate, the recovery

  11. Tritium concentration table of groundwater recharge for groundwater dating in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater dating with tritium is an important substantiation of groundwater research. The application of tritium measurement can be expected to be a new research industry. The precipitation tritium data by monthly sampling have been observed for 56 years in Tokyo area, and it has been shown as an open access database in the web site of National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The tritium concentration of groundwater recharge should be necessary for groundwater dating. It was estimated from the annual maximum and minimum concentrations in the database by using the theoretical equation and area constants proposed in our previous paper. This paper presents the tritium concentration table of groundwater recharge at four sampling sites widely dispersed across Japan, i.e., Sapporo, Niigata, Tokyo, and Matsuyama. The tritium concentration table with logical significance should be useful for hydrological study. (author)

  12. Transient,spatially-varied recharge for groundwater modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Kibreab; Woodbury, Allan

    2013-04-01

    This study is aimed at producing spatially and temporally varying groundwater recharge for transient groundwater modeling in a pilot watershed in the North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using a Richard's equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D) [Simunek et al., 2002], ArcGISTM [ESRI, 2011], ROSETTA [Schaap et al., 2001], in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture and a long term gridded climate data [Nielsen et al., 2010]. The public version of HYDUS-1D [Simunek et al., 2002] and another beta version with a detailed freezing and thawing module [Hansson et al., 2004] are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. Correlation coefficients for soil temperature simulation were estimated at 0.9 and 0.8, at depths of 10 cm and 50 cm respectively; and for soil moisture, 0.8 and 0.6 at 10 cm and 50 cm respectively. This and other standard measures of model performance (root mean square error and average error) showed a promising performance of the HYDRUS-1D code in our pilot watershed. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGISTM to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8mm /year. This significant variation over the years, caused by antecedent soil moisture condition and climatic condition, illustrates the common flaw of assigning a constant percentage of precipitation throughout the simulation period. Groundwater recharge modeling has previously been attempted in the Okanagan Basin

  13. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations is vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge from rainfall and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flow paths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. The water table fluctuates by 0.9 to 3.7 m annually, implying recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1. However, residence times of shallow (11 to 29 m) groundwater determined by 14C are between 100 and 10 000 years, 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater, and groundwater electrical conductivity remains constant over the period of study. Deeper groundwater with older 14C ages has lower δ18O values than younger, shallower groundwater, which is consistent with it being derived from greater altitudes. The combined geochemistry data indicate that local recharge from precipitation within the valley occurs through the aquifer window, however much of the groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High. The Gellibrand Valley is a regional discharge zone with upward head gradients that limits local recharge to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Additionally, the groundwater head gradients adjacent to the Gellibrand River are generally upwards, implying that it does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10

  14. Hydrologic effects of artificial-recharge experiments with reclaimed water at East Meadow, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B.J.; Ku, H.F.; Oaksford, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial recharge experiments were conducted at East Meadow, Long Island, New York, from October 1982 through January 1984 to evaluate the degree of groundwater mounding and the chemical effects of artificially replenishing the groundwater system with tertiary-treated wastewater. More than 800 million gallons of treated effluent was returned to the upper glacial aquifer through recharge basins and injection wells in the 15-month period. Reclaimed water was provided by the Cedar Creek advanced wastewater treatment facility in Wantagh, 6 miles away. The chlorinated effluent was pumped to the recharge facility, where it was fed to basins by gravity flow and to injection wells by pumps. Observations during the recharge tests indicate that the two most significant factors in limiting the rate of infiltration through the basin floor were the recharge test duration and quality of reclaimed water. Head buildup in the aquifer beneath the basins ranged from 4.3 to 6.7 ft, depending on the quantity and duration of water application. Head buildup near the injection wells within the aquifer ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 ft. Recharge basins provided a more effective means of moving large quantities of reclaimed water into the aquifer than injection wells. Results of 3-day and 176-day ponding tests in two basins indicate that reclaimed water is relatively unchanged chemically by percolation through the unsaturated zone because: (1) the sand and gravel of the upper glacial aquifer is unreactive, (2) the water moves to the water table rapidly, and (3) the water is highly treated before recharge. The quality of water in the aquifer zones affected by recharge improved, on the whole. Groundwater concentrations of nitrate nitrogen and several low molecular weight hydrocarbons, decreased to well within drinking water standards as a direct result of recharge. Sodium and chloride concentrations increased above background levels as a result of recharge but remained well within drinking water

  15. Estimated ground-water recharge from streamflow in Fortymile Wash near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two purposes of this report are to qualitatively document ground-water recharge from stream-flow in Fortymile Wash during the period 1969--95 from previously unpublished ground-water levels in boreholes in Fortymile Canyon during 1982--91 and 1995, and to quantitatively estimate the long-term ground-water recharge rate from streamflow in Fortymile Wash for four reaches of Fortymile Wash (Fortymile Canyon, upper Jackass Flats, lower Jackass Flats, and Amargosa Desert). The long-term groundwater recharge rate was estimated from estimates of the volume of water available for infiltration, the volume of infiltration losses from streamflow, the ground-water recharge volume from infiltration losses, and an analysis of the different periods of data availability. The volume of water available for infiltration and ground-water recharge in the four reaches was estimated from known streamflow in ephemeral Fortymile Wash, which was measured at several gaging station locations. The volume of infiltration losses from streamflow for the four reaches was estimated from a streamflow volume loss factor applied to the estimated streamflows. the ground-water recharge volume was estimated from a linear relation between infiltration loss volume and ground-water recharge volume for each of the four reaches. Ground-water recharge rates were estimated for three different periods of data availability (1969--95, 1983--95, and 1992--95) and a long-term ground-water recharge rate estimated for each of the four reaches

  16. Estimated ground-water recharge from streamflow in Fortymile Wash near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savard, C.S.

    1998-10-01

    The two purposes of this report are to qualitatively document ground-water recharge from stream-flow in Fortymile Wash during the period 1969--95 from previously unpublished ground-water levels in boreholes in Fortymile Canyon during 1982--91 and 1995, and to quantitatively estimate the long-term ground-water recharge rate from streamflow in Fortymile Wash for four reaches of Fortymile Wash (Fortymile Canyon, upper Jackass Flats, lower Jackass Flats, and Amargosa Desert). The long-term groundwater recharge rate was estimated from estimates of the volume of water available for infiltration, the volume of infiltration losses from streamflow, the ground-water recharge volume from infiltration losses, and an analysis of the different periods of data availability. The volume of water available for infiltration and ground-water recharge in the four reaches was estimated from known streamflow in ephemeral Fortymile Wash, which was measured at several gaging station locations. The volume of infiltration losses from streamflow for the four reaches was estimated from a streamflow volume loss factor applied to the estimated streamflows. the ground-water recharge volume was estimated from a linear relation between infiltration loss volume and ground-water recharge volume for each of the four reaches. Ground-water recharge rates were estimated for three different periods of data availability (1969--95, 1983--95, and 1992--95) and a long-term ground-water recharge rate estimated for each of the four reaches.

  17. Groundwater recharge studies in Maharashtra. Development of isotope techniques and field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some regional groundwater recharge investigations both in hard rock and in alluvial areas were carried out in the State of Maharashtra, India, by using isotope techniques. A simple stable isotope approach was evolved and applied in an investigation on the extent of artificial recharge in the command area of Shindawane percolation tank in the Pune district. A similar investigation in the Bhangarwadi percolation tank in the Osmanabad district was made using radioactive tracers. A method for the in-situ determination of soil-moisture transport rates using K360Co(CN)6 as tracer has been proposed, which compares well with the tritiated water method in laboratory investigations, and the results obtained in the limited field studies carried out in the Tapti-Purna alluvial tract are promising. (author)

  18. Groundwater recharge studies in Maharashtra development of isotope techniques and field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some regional groundwater recharge investigations both in hard rock and alluvial areas have been carried out using isotope techniques in the State of Maharashtra, India. A simple stable isotope approach has been evolved and applied in an investigation on the extent of artificial recharge in the command area of Shindawane Percolation Tank in the Pune district. A similar investigation in the Bangarwadi Percolation Tank in the Osmanabad district has been made using radioactive tracers. A method for the 'in situ' determination of soil moisture transport rates using K360Co(CN)6 as tracer has been proposed. The method compares well with the triated water method in laboratory investigations and the results obtained in the limited field studies carried out in the Tapti-Purna alluvial tract are promising. (orig.)

  19. Estimation of Groundwater Recharges in Odeda Local Government Area, Ogun State, Nigeria using Empirical Formulae

    OpenAIRE

    Oluseyi O. Adeleke; Victor Makinde; Ayobami O. Eruola; Oluwaseun F. Dada; Ojo, Akintayo O.; Taiwo J. Aluko

    2015-01-01

    Estimation and forecast of groundwater recharge and capacities of aquifers are essential issues in water resource investigation. In the current research, groundwater recharge and the recharge coefficient were determined through a case study using empirical methods applicable to the tropical zones. The related climatological data between January 1983 and December 2014 were collected in Ogun-Oshun River Basin Development Authority (OORBDA), Ogun State, Nigeria. The results showed that groundwat...

  20. Valuing groundwater recharge through agricultural production in the Hadejia-Nguru wetlands in northern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Gayatri; Edward B. Barbier

    2000-01-01

    This study applies a production function approach to value the groundwater recharge function of the Hadejia-Nguru wetlands in northern Nigeria. The groundwater recharge function supports dry season agricultural production which is dependent on groundwater abstraction for irrigation. Using survey data this paper first carries out an economic valuation of agricultural production, per hectare of irrigated land. We then value the recharge function as an environmental input into the dry season agr...

  1. Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA-Johnson Space Center, Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sergio

    1977-01-01

    Regional decline of aquifer head due to ground-water withdrawal in the Houston area has caused extensive land-surface subsidence. The NASA-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) in southeastern Harris County, Texas, was about 13 to 19 feet above mean sea level in 1974 and sinking at a rate of more than 0.2 foot per year. NASA-JSC officials, concerned about the hurricane flooding hazard, requested the U.S. Geological Survey to study the feasibility of artificially recharging the aquifers for subsidence abatement. Hydrologic digital models were developed for theoretical determinations of quantities of water needed, under various well-array plans, for artificial recharge of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in order to halt the local subsidence at NASA-JSC. The programs for the models were developed for analysis of three-dimensional ground-water flow. Total injection rates of between 2,000 and 14,000 gallons per minute under three general well-array plans were determined for a range of residual clay pore pressures of 10 to 70 feet of hydraulic head. The space distributions of the resultant hydraulic heads, illustrated for injection rates of 3,600 and 8 ,400 gallons per minute, indicated that, for the same rate, increasing the number and spread of the injection locations reduces the head gradients within NASA-JSC. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Investigation of discharge-area groundwaters for recharge source characterization on different scales: the case of Jinan in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiale; Jin, Menggui; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Dele; Kang, Fengxin; Jia, Baojie

    2016-05-01

    Discharge-area groundwater in Jinan, a typical karst region in northern China, was investigated by studying both the hydrological and chemical processes evolving from the recharge in mountainous terrains to the karst-spring outflows in the metropolitan area. Large-scale exploitation of karst groundwater has led to a disturbing trend in the ever-decreasing spring outflow rates and groundwater level. There is insufficient information about the Jinan karst aquifers, which provide the main water sources to meet human demand and to sustain spring outflow. The coupling of hydrological and chemical processes quantifies the flow system through aqueous chemistry characterization of the water sources. This approach is used to study the groundwater flow discharges in different locations and geological settings. The potentiometric data indicated limited vertical connectivity between distinct hydrogeological units and alteration of the recharge regime by the faults and by artificial exploitation. Shallow groundwater primarily belongs to the local flow system, with high nitrate concentration and enriched stable isotopic contents. Thermal groundwater has high concentrations of chloride and total dissolved solids, derived from a regional flow system with the highest recharge altitudes and long residence time. Non-thermal karst water may be attributed to the intermediate flow system, with uniform HCO3-Ca(Mg) facies and low nitrate concentration. This work highlighted discharge as a fingerprint of groundwater flow conditions and provides a better insight into the hydrogeological system.

  3. Hydrodynamic analysis of the artificial recharge of aquifers during the planning stage. Results obtained in the Quaternary aquifer in the Valley of the Guadalquivir (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows a study on the viability of an artificial recharge in the flood-plain aquifer of the Guadalquivir River (Andalucia, Spain). The method used to the evaluation of the artificial recharge project is as follows: A simple model (one cell). The code has been made on the use of an EXCEL spreadsheet. A distributed parameters-flow model using a standard code (Modflow). A pilot recharge plant. The simple model has been applied in different zones. The model has only 5 parameters. It evaluates the artificial recharge by means of the depletion coefficient. The model was calibrated for a monthly time-step, although the water balances in the soil and in the aquifer were calculated daily. The calibration the distributed parameter-flow model shows a high transmissivity, storage coefficient and porosity. The pilot recharge plant is a trench with recharge wells within it. The water available for recharge is obtained from an irrigation canal. A network of control points has been established to monitor the piezometric levels. The results obtained show a high storage coefficient and porosity. These parameters show a rapid groundwater velocity. Finally, the paper compares and contrasts the results obtained with the simple model, distributed parameter- flow model and the pilot recharge plant. The results are quite similar. The groundwater velocity is rapid. Water remains in the aquifer for a few days before returning to the river. (Author)

  4. The artificial recharge as a tool for the water resources management: case of the aquifer recharge system of Geneva (Switzerland); La recarga artificial de acuifero como ayuda a la gestion de los recursos hidricos; el ejemplo del sistema de Ginebra (Suiza)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobos, G. de los

    2009-07-01

    The drinking water supply for the Geneva area comes partly (80%) from the lake Geneva and partly (20%) from a large transboundary aquifer called Genevois aquifer. During the 70's, over pumping lowered the groundwater level by more than 7m. Artificial recharge has been carried out from the Arve river into the Genevois aquifer in order to maintain the groundwater level and enable water resources management. Located near the Arve river, this artificial recharge plant started its activity in 1980. For the last almost 30 years the artificial recharge system of Geneva has brought over 230 hm{sup 3} of treated water into the Genevois aquifer. The impacts of the recharge on the Genevois aquifer and on the aquifer management are described in this paper. (Author) 20 refs.

  5. The preliminary study of groundwater recharge system in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to identify the groundwater recharge systems of Kathmandu Valley using isotopic compositions of water (δ18O and δ2H) along with other hydrochemistry data. The preliminary study consisted of 15 deep groundwater and 5 shallow groundwater samples that were collected from northern and central part of the valley. Three types of the deep groundwater isotope compositions were observed while δ18O is plotted against δ2H. The results indicate that the deep groundwater has two main aquifers: north part and central part aquifers. In addition, the oxygen isotopic values of all samples when plotted against chloride indicate that deep groundwater is not being recharged by the shallow groundwater of the sampled area. It was also observed that the third type of groundwater is formed by the mixing of first and second types of groundwater. The next study will be focused on detailed investigation in finding source and recharge of this groundwater. (author)

  6. A Spatiotemporal Analysis of Groundwater Level Changes in Relation to Urban Growth and Groundwater Recharge Potential for Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Woonsup; Galasinski, Ulrike; Cho, Sung-Jin; Hwang, Chul-sue

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze spatially and temporally groundwater level changes using geographic information systems and spatial analysis with respect to urban development, groundwater withdrawal, and groundwater recharge potential. The study focused on Waukesha County in southeastern Wisconsin, where urban development has been accelerating while groundwater has been declining over the last several decades. We analyzed data about groundwater withdrawal, groundwater level, l...

  7. Hydrologic analysis of the proposed Badger-Beaver Creeks Artificial-Recharge Project : Morgan County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alan W.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrologic analysis of the proposed Badger-Beaver Creeks artificial-recharge project in Morgan County, Colo., was made with the aid of three digital computer models: A canal-distribution model, a ground-water flow model, and a stream-aquifer model. Statistical summaries of probable diversions from the South Platte River based on a 27-year period of historical flows indicate that an average-annual diversion of 96,000 acre-feet and a median-annual diversion of 43,000 acre-feet would be available. Diversions would sustain water in ponds for waterfowl habitat for an average of about five months per year, with a miximum pond surface area of about 300 acres with the median diversions and a maximum pond surface area of about 1,250 acres at least one-half of the years with the historic diversions. If the annual diversion were 43,000 acre-feet, recharge to the two alluvial aquifers would raise water levels sufficiently to create flowing streams in the channels of Beaver and Badger Creeks while allowing an increase in current ground-water pumping. The only area of significant waterlogging would be along the proposed delivery canal on the west edge of Badger Creek valley. If the total water available were diverted, the aquifer system could not transmit the water fast enough to the irrigation areas to avoid considerable waterlogging in the recharge areas. The impact of the proposed project on the South Platte River basin would be minimal once the ground-water system attained steady-state conditions, but that may take decades with a uniform diversion of the 43,000 acre-feet annually. (USGS)

  8. Groundwater recharge at five representative sites in the Hebei Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Jin, Menggui; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Wang, Bingguo

    2011-01-01

    Accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are essential for effective management of groundwater, especially when supplies are limited such as in many arid and semiarid areas. In the Hebei Plain, China, water shortage is increasingly restricting socioeconomic development, especially for agriculture, which heavily relies on groundwater. Human activities have greatly changed groundwater recharge there during the past several decades. To obtain better estimates of recharge in the plain, five representative sites were selected to investigate the effects of irrigation and water table depth on groundwater recharge. At each site, a one-dimensional unsaturated flow model (Hydrus-1D) was calibrated using field data of climate, soil moisture, and groundwater levels. A sensitivity analysis of evapotranspirative fluxes and various soil hydraulic parameters confirmed that fine-textured surface soils generally generate less recharge. Model calculations showed that recharge on average is about 175 mm/year in the piedmont plain to the west, and 133 mm/year in both the central alluvial and lacustrine plains and the coastal plain to the east. Temporal and spatial variations in the recharge processes were significant in response to rainfall and irrigation. Peak time-lags between infiltration (rainfall plus irrigation) and recharge were 18 to 35 days in the piedmont plain and 3 to 5 days in the central alluvial and lacustrine plains, but only 1 or 2 days in the coastal plain. This implies that different time-lags corresponding to different water table depths must be considered when estimating or modeling groundwater recharge. PMID:20100294

  9. Treatment of Organic Compounds in Reclaimed Wastewater for Groundwater Recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮运正; 胡俊; 云桂春

    2004-01-01

    To study water quality problems associated with groundwater recharge,a tertiary treatment process,consisting of coagulation,sand filtration,and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption,was used in combination with a simulated soil aquifer treatment.The process significantly improved secondary effluent quality.GAC adsorption reduced organic substances expressed by UV-254,dissolved organic carbon as well as partially adsorbable organic halogens.The results of the Ames test show that the secondary effluent contains a high concentration of mutagens.GAC filtration removed adsorbable organic bromine slightly whereas GAC adsorption removed mutagens effectively.The simulated soil aquifer treatment was able to further reduce UV-254,dissolved organic carbon,and adsorbable organic halogens through biodegradation.Adsorbable organic bromine levels were also reduced by the soil aquifer treatment process.The given reclamation technology used for groundwater recharge is of benefit to the removal of dissolved organic carbon,UV-254,adsorbable organic halogens,and mutagenicity.

  10. Effect of irrigation return flow on groundwater recharge in an overexploited aquifer in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture has an important role in the food production to ensure food security of Bangladesh that is home to over 150 million people. However, overexploitation of groundwater for irrigation, particularly during the dry season, causes groundwater-level decline in areas where abstraction is high and surface geology inhibits direct recharge to underlying shallow aquifer. This is causing a number of potential adverse socio-economic, hydrogeological, and environmental problems in Bangladesh. Alluvial aquifers are primarily recharged during monsoon season from rainfall and surface sources. However, return flow from groundwater-fed irrigation can recharge during the dry months. Quantification of the effect of return flow from irrigation in the groundwater system is currently unclear but thought to be important to ensure sustainable management of the overexploited aquifer. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of irrigation return flow on groundwater recharge in the north-western part of Bangladesh, also known as Barind Tract. A semi-physically based distributed water balance model (WetSpass-M) is used to simulate spatially distributed monthly groundwater recharge. Results show that, groundwater abstraction for irrigation in the study area has increased steadily over the last 29 years. During the monsoon season, local precipitation is the controlling factor of groundwater recharge; however, there is no trend in groundwater recharge during that period. During the dry season, however, irrigation return-flow plays a major role in recharging the aquifer in the irrigated area compared to local precipitation. Therefore, during the dry season, mean seasonal groundwater recharge has increased and almost doubled over the last 29 years as a result of increased abstraction for irrigation. The increase in groundwater recharge during dry season has however no significant effect in the improvement of groundwater levels. The relation between groundwater

  11. Ground-water recharge in Fortymile Wash near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, 1992--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantification of the ground-water recharge from streamflow in the Fortymile Wash watershed will contribute to regional ground-water studies. Regional ground-water studies are an important component in the studies evaluating the ground-water flow system as a barrier to the potential migration of radionuclides from the potential underground high-level nuclear waste repository. Knowledge gained in understanding the ground-water recharge mechanisms and pathways in the Pah Canyon area, which is 10 km to the northeast of Yucca Mountain, may transfer to Yucca site specific studies. The current data collection network in Fortymile Canyon does not permit quantification of ground-water recharge, however a qualitative understanding of ground-water recharge was developed from these data

  12. Groundwater Level Predictions Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛晓敏; 尚松浩; 刘翔

    2002-01-01

    The prediction of groundwater level is important for the use and management of groundwater resources. In this paper, the artificial neural networks (ANN) were used to predict groundwater level in the Dawu Aquifer of Zibo in Eastern China. The first step was an auto-correlation analysis of the groundwater level which showed that the monthly groundwater level was time dependent. An auto-regression type ANN (ARANN) model and a regression-auto-regression type ANN (RARANN) model using back-propagation algorithm were then used to predict the groundwater level. Monthly data from June 1988 to May 1998 was used for the network training and testing. The results show that the RARANN model is more reliable than the ARANN model, especially in the testing period, which indicates that the RARANN model can describe the relationship between the groundwater fluctuation and main factors that currently influence the groundwater level. The results suggest that the model is suitable for predicting groundwater level fluctuations in this area for similar conditions in the future.

  13. Baseline water quality and preliminary effects of artificial recharge on ground water, south-central Kansas, 1995-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Andrew C.; Christensen, Victoria G.; Ross, Heather C.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the feasbility of artificial recharge as a method of meeting future water-supply needs and to protect the Equus Beds aquifer from saltwater intrusion from natural and anthropogenic sources to the west, the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge from Demonstration Project was begun in 1995. The project is a cooperative effort between the city of Wichita and the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior. During the project, high flows from the Little Arkansas River are captured and recharged into the Equus Beds aquifer through recharge basins, a trench, or a recharge well, located at two recharge sites near Halstead and Sedgwick, Kansas. To document baseline concentrations and compatibility of stream (recharge) and aquifer water, the U.S. Geological Survey collected water samples from February 1995 through August 1998. These samples were analyzed for dissolved solids, total and dissolved inorganic constituents, nutrients, organic and volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and bacteria. Results of baseline sampling indicated that the primary constituents of concern for recharge were sodium, chloride, nitrite plus nitrate, iron and manganese, total coliform bacteria, and atrazine. Chloride and atrazine were of particular concern because concentrations of these constituents in water from the Little Arkansas River frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. The Little Arkansas River is used as the source water for recharge. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for chloride is 250 mg/L (milligrams per liter), and the Maximum Contaminant Level for atrazine is 3.0 ?g/L (micrograms per liter) as an annual mean. Baseline concentrations of chloride in surface water ranged from 8.0 to 400 ?g/L. Baseline concentrations of atrazine in surface water ranged from less than 0.10 to 46 ?g/L. Concentrations of chloride and atrazine have increased in water from some of the wells at both the Halstead and Sedgwick recharge

  14. Hydrological functions of sinkholes and characteristics of point recharge in groundwater basins

    OpenAIRE

    N. Somaratne; K. Smettem; Lawson, J; Nguyen, K.; J. Frizenschaf

    2013-01-01

    Karstic limestone aquifers are hydrologically and hydrochemically extremely heterogeneous and point source recharge via sinkholes and fissures is a common feature. We studied three groundwater systems in karstic settings dominated by point source recharge in order to assess the relative contributions to total recharge from point sources using chloride and δ18O relations. Preferential groundwater flows were observed through an inter-connected network of highly conductive zone...

  15. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Atkinson

    2014-06-01

    14C ages are between 100 and 10 000 years. 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater and groundwater electrical conductivity in individual areas remains constant over the period of study. Although diffuse local recharge is evident, the depth to which it penetrates is limited to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Rather, groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High, and acts as a regional discharge zone where upward head gradients are maintained annually, limiting local recharge. Additionally, the Gellibrand River does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

  16. Artificial recharge through a thick, heterogeneous unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Stamos, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, heterogeneous unsaturated zones away from large streams in desert areas have not previously been considered suitable for artificial recharge from ponds. To test the potential for recharge in these settings, 1.3 ?? 10 6 m3 of water was infiltrated through a 0.36-ha pond along Oro Grande Wash near Victorville, California, between October 2002 and January 2006. The pond overlies a regional pumping depression 117 m below land surface and is located where thickness and permeability of unsaturated deposits allowed infiltration and saturated alluvial deposits were sufficiently permeable to allow recovery of water. Because large changes in water levels caused by nearby pumping would obscure arrival of water at the water table, downward movement of water was measured using sensors in the unsaturated zone. The downward rate of water movement was initially as high as 6 m/d and decreased with depth to 0.07 m/d; the initial time to reach the water table was 3 years. After the unsaturated zone was wetted, water reached the water table in 1 year. Soluble salts and nitrate moved readily with the infiltrated water, whereas arsenic and chromium were less mobile. Numerical simulations done using the computer program TOUGH2 duplicated the downward rate of water movement, accumulation of water on perched zones, and its arrival at the water table. Assuming 10 ?? 10 6 m3 of recharge annually for 20 years, a regional ground water flow model predicted water level rises of 30 m beneath the ponds, and rises exceeding 3 m in most wells serving the nearby urban area.

  17. Impact assessment of artificial recharge and geo-chemical characterization of the waters of the slick Tebolba (Eastern Tunisia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study concerned the impact assessment of artificial recharge of a coastal aquifer (Tebolba) from the waters of the dam Nebhana and chemical characterization of its waters. The analysis maps piezometric drawn and salinity at various dates since 1940, the establishment of chronic recharge from the years 1992 to 2006, as well as geochemical study of groundwater in the slick Tebolba have enabled us to reach the many results. This study using a multidisciplinary approach (hydrodynamics and geochemical) seeks an assessment of impacts of recharging the water table in Tebolba from the waters of the dam Nebhana through the history of the qualitative and quantitative water the water and a hydro-geochemical study the current state of the waters of the water. (Author). 45 refs

  18. Simulated artificial recharge in the Big Sioux Aquifer in Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Big Sioux aquifer in Minnehaha County is a water-table aquifer hydraulically connected to the Big Sioux River. A digital-computer model previously developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was used to simulate potential effects of artificial recharge on the aquifer. A simulation was made by recharging water at the rate of 870 gallons per minute for four 30-day periods. Total water recharged to the aquifer during the 120 days was 150.3 million gallons. About 24.4 million gallons of water discharged from the aquifer to the river during the 120-day recharge period and about 30 million gallons discharged from the aquifer to the river during three 30-day recovery periods, both as a result of the artificial recharge, therefore, a total of 54.4 million gallons or 36 percent of the 150.3 million gallons that was artificially recharged from the aquifer to the river. (USGS)

  19. Hydrological functions of sinkholes and characteristics of point recharge in groundwater basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Somaratne

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Karstic limestone aquifers are hydrologically and hydrochemically extremely heterogeneous and point source recharge via sinkholes and fissures is a common feature. We studied three groundwater systems in karstic settings dominated by point source recharge in order to assess the relative contributions to total recharge from point sources using chloride and δ18O relations. Preferential groundwater flows were observed through an inter-connected network of highly conductive zones with groundwater mixing along flow paths. Measurements of salinity and chloride indicated that fresh water pockets exist at point recharge locations. A measurable fresh water plume develops only when a large quantity of surface water enters the aquifer as a point recharge source. The difference in chloride concentrations in diffuse and point recharge zones decreases as aquifer saturated thickness increases and the plumes become diluted through mixing. The chloride concentration in point recharge fluxes crossing the watertable plane can remain at or near surface runoff chloride concentrations, rather than in equilibrium with groundwater chloride. In such circumstances the conventional chloride mass balance method that assumes equilibrium of recharge water chloride with groundwater requires modification to include both point and diffuse recharge mechanisms.

  20. Using Isotope Methods to Assess Groundwater Recharge in Some Hydraulic Catchments in a Semiarid Region in Central Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water resource issues constitute a major concern in arid and semiarid areas in Tunisia. To meet rising demand for different human activities considerable importance is being given to improving the natural groundwater recharge by the installation of hydraulic catchments. In central Tunisia, numerous retention sites and dams have been built since 1990, for example, the el Ogla dam in the Nadhour-Saouaf basin. In order to determine the implication of these hill reservoirs on the hydrodynamic functioning and water quality of the aquifer system, hydrochemical (major elements) and isotopic methods have been employed. The interpretation of these results showed that the shallow aquifer is recharged mainly by surface water and water dam infiltration from the el Ogla and Sahel catchments. A tentative isotopic mass balance based on stable isotope contents leads to the quantification of the artificial recharge rate, which ranges between 42% and 86% of precipitation in the humid period. (author)

  1. Present-day groundwater recharge estimation in parts of the Indian Sub-Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanja, S. N.; Mukherjee, A.; Wada, Y.; Scanlon, B. R.; Taylor, R. G.; Rodell, M.; Malakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    Large part of global population has been dependent on groundwater as a source of fresh water. The demand would further increase with increasing population and stress associated with climate change. We tried to provide regional-scale groundwater recharge estimates in a large part of Indian Sub-Continent. A combination of ground-based, satellite-based and numerical model simulated recharge estimates were presented in the densely populated region. Three different methods: an intense network of observational wells (n>13,000 wells), a satellite (TRMM) and global land-surface model (CLM) outputs, and a global-scale hydrological model (PCR GLOBWB) were employed to calculate recharge estimates. Groundwater recharge values exhibit large spatial variations over the entire region on the basis of aquifer hydrogeology, precipitation and groundwater withdrawal patterns. Groundwater recharge estimates from all three estimation techniques were found to be higher (>300 mm/year) in fertile planes of Indus-Ganges-Brahmaputra (IGB) river basins. A combination of favorable hydrogeologic conditions (porosity, permeability etc.), comparatively higher rates of precipitation, and return flow from rapidly withdrawn irrigation water might influence occurrence of high recharge rates. However, central and southern study area experiences lower recharge rates (<200 mm/year), might be associated with unfavorable hydrogeologic conditions associated with cratonic provinces. Statistical analysis of inter-comparison between the three different recharge estimates show good matches in some of the areas. Recharge estimates indicate dynamic nature of groundwater recharge as a function of precipitation, land use pattern, and hydrogeologic parameters. On a first hand basis, the estimates will help policy makers to understand groundwater recharge process over the densely populated region and finally would facilitate to implement sustainable policy for securing water security.

  2. Tracing groundwater recharge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: Groundwater contamination susceptibility in an agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tanya; Hindshaw, Ruth; Singer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Water is a vital resource in any agricultural watershed, yet in the arid western United States farming practices threaten the quality and availability of groundwater. This is a pressing concern in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, where agriculture comprises 30% of the local economy, and employs over half the valley population. Although 54 % of the water used for irrigation is surface water, farmers do not usually apply this water directly to their fields. Instead, the water is often diverted into pits which recharge the aquifer, and the water is subsequently pumped during the following irrigation season. The Rio Grande Water Conservation District recognises that recharge to the unconfined aquifer has been outpaced by commercial irrigation for at least four decades, resulting in a decline in groundwater levels. Recycled irrigation water, and leakage from unlined canals now represent the greatest recharge contribution to the unconfined aquifer in this region. This makes the shallow groundwater particularly susceptible to agricultural contamination. The purpose of this study is to assess groundwater contamination in the unconfined and upper confined aquifers of the San Luis Valley, which are the most susceptible to contamination due to their close proximity to the surface. Although concentrations of potentially harmful contaminants from agricultural runoff are regularly monitored, the large spatial and temporal fluctuations in values make it difficult to determine long-term trends. We have analysed δ18O, δ2H and major-ion chemistry of 57 groundwater, stream and precipitation samples, collected in June 2014, and interpreted them alongside regional stream flow data and groundwater levels. This will allow us to study the seasonality and locality of groundwater recharge to provide greater insight into the watershed's potential for pollution. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed using the model DRASTIC (Depth to water, Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil

  3. Understanding and quantifying focused, indirect groundwater recharge from ephemeral streams using water table fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Acworth, R. I.; Andersen, M. S.; Larsen, J. R.; McCallum, A. M.; Rau, G. C.; Tellam, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding and managing groundwater resources in drylands is a challenging task, but one that is globally important. The dominant process for dryland groundwater recharge is thought to be as focused, indirect recharge from ephemeral stream losses. However, there is a global paucity of data for understanding and quantifying this process and transferable techniques for quantifying groundwater recharge in such contexts are lacking. Here we develop a generalized conceptual model for understanding water table and groundwater head fluctuations due to recharge from episodic events within ephemeral streams. By accounting for the recession characteristics of a groundwater hydrograph, we present a simple but powerful new water table fluctuation approach to quantify focused, indirect recharge over both long term and event time scales. The technique is demonstrated using a new, and globally unparalleled, set of groundwater observations from an ephemeral stream catchment located in NSW, Australia. We find that, following episodic streamflow events down a predominantly dry channel system, groundwater head fluctuations are controlled by pressure redistribution operating at three time scales from vertical flow (days to weeks), transverse flow perpendicular to the stream (weeks to months), and longitudinal flow parallel to the stream (years to decades). In relative terms, indirect recharge decreases almost linearly away from the mountain front, both in discrete monitored events as well as in the long-term average. In absolute terms, the estimated indirect recharge varies from 80 to 30 mm/a with the main uncertainty in these values stemming from uncertainty in the catchment-scale hydraulic properties.

  4. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the 18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The δ18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  5. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the δ18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The 18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  6. Seasonality of Groundwater Recharge in the Basin and Range Province, Western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, K. L.; Meixner, T.; Ajami, H.; De La Cruz, L.

    2015-12-01

    For water-scarce communities in the western U.S., it is critical to understand groundwater recharge regimes and how those regimes might shift in the face of climate change and impact groundwater resources. Watersheds in the Basin and Range Geological Province are characterized by a variable precipitation regime of wet winters and variable summer precipitation. The relative contributions to groundwater recharge by summer and winter precipitation vary throughout the province, with winter precipitation recharge dominant in the northern parts of the region, and recharge from summer monsoonal precipitation playing a more significant role in the south, where the North American Monsoon (NAM) extends its influence. Stable water isotope data of groundwater and seasonal precipitation from sites in Sonora, Mexico and the U.S. states of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas were examined to estimate and compare groundwater recharge seasonality throughout the region. Contributions of winter precipitation to annual recharge vary from 69% ± 41% in the southernmost Río San Miguel Basin in Sonora, Mexico, to 100% ± 36% in the westernmost Mojave Desert of California. The Normalized Seasonal Wetness Index (NSWI), a simple water budget method for estimating recharge seasonality from climatic data, was shown to approximate recharge seasonality well in several winter precipitation-dominated systems, but less well in basins with significant summer precipitation.

  7. Multi-scale experimental programs for estimating groundwater recharge in hydrologically changing basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Neil; Larsen, Josh; Reading, Lucy; Bulovic, Nevenka; Jarihani, Abdollah; Finch, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater recharge estimates are required to evaluate sustainable groundwater abstractions and to support groundwater impacts assessments associated with minerals and energy extraction. Increasingly, recharge estimates are also needed for regional and global scale water cycle modelling. This is especially the case in the great arid and semi-arid basins of the world due to increased water scarcity and dependence of ecosystems and livelihoods on their water supplies, and the considerable potential influence of groundwater on the hydrological cycle. Groundwater resources in the semi-arid Surat Basin of south-east Queensland, Australia, support extensive groundwater-dependent ecosystems and have historically been utilised for regional agriculture and urban water-use. Large volumes of water are currently being produced and will continue to do so as a part of coal seam gas extraction. There is considerable uncertainty about the impacts of gas extraction on water resources and the hydrological cycle, and much of this uncertainty stems from our limited knowledge about recharge processes and how to upscale them. Particular questions are about the role of storm events in controlling annual recharge, the relative contributions of local 'recharge zones' versus diffuse recharge and the translation of (relatively easily quantified) shallow drainage estimates to groundwater recharge. A multi-scale recharge research program is addressing these questions, using multiple approaches in estimating groundwater recharge, including plot and catchment scale monitoring, use of remote sensed data and simulation models. Results during the first year of the program have resulted in development of process hypotheses and experimental designs at three field sites representing key gaps in knowledge. The presentation will overview the process of designing the experimental program; how the results from these sites will be integrated with existing knowledge; and how results will be used to advance

  8. Measuring artificial recharge with fiber optic distributed temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew W; Bauer, Brian; Hutchinson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat was used as a tracer to measure infiltration rates from a recharge basin. The propagation of diurnal oscillation of surface water temperature into the basin bed was monitored along a transect using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FODTS). The propagation rate was related to downward specific discharge using standard theory of heat advection and dispersion in saturated porous media. An estimate of the temporal variation of heat propagation was achieved using a wavelet transform to find the phase lag between the surface temperature diurnal oscillation and the correlated oscillation at 0.33 and 0.98 m below the bed surface. The wavelet results compared well to a constant velocity model of thermal advection and dispersion during periods of relatively constant discharge rates. The apparent dispersion of heat was found to be due primarily to hydrodynamic mechanisms rather than thermal diffusion. Specific discharge estimates using the FODTS technique also compared well to water balance estimates over a four month period, although there were occasional deviations that have yet to be adequately explained. The FODTS technique is superior to water balance in that it produces estimates of infiltration rate every meter along the cable transect, every half hour. These high resolution measurements highlighted areas of low infiltration and demonstrated the degradation of basin efficiency due to source waters of high suspended solids. FODTS monitoring promises to be a useful tool for diagnosing basin performance in an era of increasing groundwater demand. PMID:23110559

  9. Evaluation of drought impact on groundwater recharge rate using SWAT and Hydrus models on an agricultural island in western Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, G.; Shimizu, Y.; Onodera, S.; Saito, M.; Matsumori, K.

    2015-06-01

    Clarifying the variations of groundwater recharge response to a changing non-stationary hydrological process is important for efficiently managing groundwater resources, particularly in regions with limited precipitation that face the risk of water shortage. However, the rate of aquifer recharge is difficult to evaluate in terms of large annual-variations and frequency of flood events. In our research, we attempt to simulate related groundwater recharge processes under variable climate conditions using the SWAT Model, and validate the groundwater recharge using the Hydrus Model. The results show that annual average groundwater recharge comprised approximately 33% of total precipitation, however, larger variation was found for groundwater recharge and surface runoff compared to evapotranspiration, which fluctuated with annual precipitation variations. The annual variation of groundwater resources is shown to be related to precipitation. In spatial variations, the upstream is the main surface water discharge area; the middle and downstream areas are the main groundwater recharge areas. Validation by the Hydrus Model shows that the estimated and simulated groundwater levels are consistent in our research area. The groundwater level shows a quick response to the groundwater recharge rate. The rainfall intensity had a great impact on the changes of the groundwater level. Consequently, it was estimated that large spatial and temporal variation of the groundwater recharge rate would be affected by precipitation uncertainty in future.

  10. Downstream of downtown: urban wastewater as groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. S. D.; Chilton, P. J.

    Wastewater infiltration is often a major component of overall recharge to aquifers around urban areas, especially in more arid climates. Despite this, such recharge still represents only an incidental (or even accidental) byproduct of various current practices of sewage effluent handling and wastewater reuse. This topic is reviewed through reference to certain areas of detailed field research, with pragmatic approaches being identified to reduce the groundwater pollution hazard of these practices whilst attempting to retain their groundwater resource benefit. Since urban sewage effluent is probably the only `natural resource' whose global availability is steadily increasing, the socioeconomic importance of this topic for rapidly developing urban centres in the more arid parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East will be apparent. L'infiltration des eaux usées est souvent la composante essentielle de toute la recharge des aquifères des zones urbaines, particulièrement sous les climats les plus arides. Malgré cela, une telle recharge ne constitue encore qu'un sous-produit incident, ou même accidentel, de pratiques courantes variées du traitement de rejets d'égouts et de réutilisation d'eaux usées. Ce sujet est passé en revue en se référant à certaines régions étudiées en détail, par des approches pragmatiques reconnues pour permettre de réduire les risques de pollution des nappes dues à ces pratiques tout en permettant d'en tirer profit pour leur ressource en eau souterraine. Puisque les effluents d'égouts urbains sont probablement la seule « ressource naturelle » dont la disponibilité globale va croissant constamment, l'importance socio-économique de ce sujet est évidente pour les centres urbains à développement rapide de l'Asie, de l'Afrique, de l'Amérique latine et du Moyen-Orient. La infiltración de aguas residuales es a menudo un componente principal de la recarga total en acuíferos ubicados en torno a zonas urbanas

  11. Precision Gravity Monitoring of Artificial Recharge at Little Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Front, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. S.; Gettings, P.; Chapman, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Repeated high-precision (± 5 μGal) gravity surveys are used to monitor artificial groundwater recharge at the Little Cottonwood Water Treatment Plant (LCWTP) in the southern portion of the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The gravity survey network consists of 30 sites arranged to capture the expected horizontal migration (> 500 meters/yr) of the infiltrated water. An additional 4 stations are arranged 1500 meters from the LCWTP infiltration sites for regional and environmental background control. Prior to starting recharge operations, a set of five background surveys were made between spring 2006 and summer 2007. Background (natural/environmental) variability is reliably estimated at 20 μGals. Infiltration commenced in mid-September 2007 and bimonthly gravity surveys were conducted until July 2008. A peak gravity change of 100 μGals was observed at the end of infiltration. The campaigns following cessation of infiltration showed a decreasing gravity anomaly indicating a dispersion of the ground water mound produced by the infiltration. The final gravity results from July of 2008 showed a 70 μGal decrease from the peak gravity value. Observations suggest the subsurface water flowed to the west of the LCWTP; however the control stations at the western most extent of the survey area show no increase in gravity. The gravity observations are comparable to a previous study conducted in the Weber River delta, which showed that the gravity decay over 3-5 months can be used to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the area.

  12. Modeled impacts of predicted climate change on recharge and groundwater levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibek, J.; Allen, D. M.

    2006-11-01

    A methodology is developed for linking climate models and groundwater models to investigate future impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. An unconfined aquifer, situated near Grand Forks in south central British Columbia, Canada, is used to test the methodology. Climate change scenarios from the Canadian Global Coupled Model 1 (CGCM1) model runs are downscaled to local conditions using Statistical Downscaling Model (SDSM), and the change factors are extracted and applied in LARS-WG stochastic weather generator and then input to the recharge model. The recharge model simulated the direct recharge to the aquifer from infiltration of precipitation and consisted of spatially distributed recharge zones, represented in the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) hydrologic model linked to a geographic information system (GIS). A three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model, implemented in MODFLOW, is then used to simulate four climate scenarios in 1-year runs (1961-1999 present, 2010-2039, 2040-2069, and 2070-2099) and compare groundwater levels to present. The effect of spatial distribution of recharge on groundwater levels, compared to that of a single uniform recharge zone, is much larger than that of temporal variation in recharge, compared to a mean annual recharge representation. The predicted future climate for the Grand Forks area from the downscaled CGCM1 model will result in more recharge to the unconfined aquifer from spring to the summer season. However, the overall effect of recharge on the water balance is small because of dominant river-aquifer interactions and river water recharge.

  13. Impacts of thickening unsaturated zone on groundwater recharge in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guoliang; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Han, Dongmei; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-06-01

    Unsustainable groundwater development shown by rapid groundwater depletion in the North China Plain (NCP) underscores the need to quantify spatiotemporal variability in groundwater recharge for improved management of the resource. The objective of this study was to assess spatiotemporal variability in recharge in response to thickening of the unsaturated zone in the NCP. Recharge was estimated by linking a soil water balance (SWB) model, on the basis of monthly meteorological data, irrigation applications, and soil moisture monitoring data (1993-2008), to the water table using a deep unsaturated zone flow model. The dynamic bottom boundary (water table) position was provided by the saturated zone flow component, which simulates regional pumping. The model results clearly indicate the effects of unsaturated zone thickening on both temporal distribution and magnitude of recharge: smoothing temporal variability in recharge, and increasing unsaturated storage and lag time between percolation and recharge. The thickening unsaturated zone can result in average recharge reduction of up to ∼70% in loam soils with water table declines ⩾30 m. Declining groundwater levels with irrigation sourced by groundwater converts percolation to unsaturated zone storage, averaging 14 mm equivalent water depth per year in mostly loam soil over the study period, accounting for ∼30% of the saturated groundwater storage depletion. This study demonstrates that, in thickening unsaturated zones, modeling approaches that directly equate deep drainage with recharge will overestimate the amount and underestimate the time lag between percolation and recharge, emphasizing the importance of more realistic simulation of the continuity of unsaturated and saturated storage to provide more reliable estimates of spatiotemporal variability in recharge.

  14. Estimated mean annual natural ground-water recharge in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This 1-kilometer resolution raster (grid) dataset is an index of mean annual natural ground-water recharge. The dataset was created by multiplying a grid of...

  15. Hydrogeology, Kennedy-Jenks groundwater recharge report, Published in 2004, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrogeology dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2004. It is described as 'Kennedy-Jenks groundwater recharge...

  16. Estimation of Groundwater Recharges Using Empirical Formulae in Odeda Local Government Area, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluseyi O. Adeleke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimation and forecast of groundwater recharge and capacities of aquifers are essential issues in water resource investigation. In the current research, groundwater recharge and the recharge coefficient were determined through a case study using empirical methods applicable to the tropical zones. The related climatological data between January 1983 and December 2014 were collected in Ogun-Oshun River Basin Development Authority (OORBDA, Ogun State, Nigeria. The results showed that groundwater recharge was 194.7 mm per year, evapotranspiration was 1296.2 mm per year, and the recharge coefficient was 20.2% for the study area. The result showed that about 11% of rainfall infiltrated the aquifer, 73% was loss to evapotranspiration, and 36% ended up as run-off. Correlation between climatic parameters and groundwater recharge showed the highest correlation between recharge and rainfall. Temperature, humidity, solar radiation and evapotranspiraton were at the 0.01 significance level, and the results of linear regressions proved that precipitation has a significant effect (with R2 = 0.983 on estimated recharge.

  17. MODIS-aided statewide net groundwater-recharge estimation in Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Jozsa, Janos

    2013-01-01

    Monthly evapotranspiration (ET) rates (2000 to 2009) across Nebraska at about 1-km resolution were obtained by linear transformations of the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) daytime surface temperature values with the help of the Priestley-Taylor equation and the complementary relationship of evaporation. For positive values of the mean annual precipitation and ET differences, the mean annual net recharge was found by an additional multiplication of the power-function-transformed groundwater vulnerability DRASTIC-code values. Statewide mean annual net recharge became about 29 mm (i.e., 5% of mean annual precipitation) with the largest recharge rates (in excess of 100 mm/year) found in the eastern Sand Hills and eastern Nebraska. Areas with the largest negative net recharge rates caused by declining groundwater levels due to large-scale irrigation are found in the south-western region of the state. Error bounds of the estimated values are within 10% to 15% of the corresponding precipitation rates and the estimated net recharge rates are sensitive to errors in the precipitation and ET values. This study largely confirms earlier base-flow analysis-based statewide groundwater recharge estimates when considerations are made for differences in the recharge definitions. The current approach not only provides better spatial resolution than available earlier studies for the region but also quantifies negative net recharge rates that become especially important in numerical modeling of shallow groundwater systems. PMID:23216050

  18. Application of radioisotope techniques to control flow process during artificial coastal aquifer recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope techniques was applied for studying the flow and transport processes in a coastal confined aquifer during an artificial recharge experiment to check the feasibility of controlling salt water intrusion by a hydrodynamic barrier. As no other water source is available, artificial recharge is done using treated wastewaters. Flow and effective velocity, hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, diffusivity and effective porosity have been determined by means of I-131 radioisotope in single- and multi-well tests. (author)

  19. Mechanisms, timing and quantities of recharge to groundwater in semi-arid and tropical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater being exploited in many and and semi-arid regions at the present day was recharged during former humid episodes of the Pleistocene or Holocene and, in contrast, the amounts derived from modem recharge are small generally small and variable. Geochemical and isotopic techniques provide the most effective way to calculate modem recharge and to investigate recharge history, since physically- based water-balance methods are generally inapplicable in semiarid regions. Examples from Africa (Senegal, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan as well as Cyprus) show that direct recharge rates may vary from zero to around 40% of mean rainfall, dependent primarily on the soil depth and the lithology. Spatial variability presents a real problem in any recharge investigation but results from Senegal show that unsaturated zone profiles may be extrapolated using the chemistry of shallow groundwater. Unsaturated-zone studies show that there are limiting conditions to direct recharge through soil, but that present day replenishment of aquifers takes place via wadis and channels. In the Butana area of central Sudan the regional groundwater was also recharged during a mid-Holocene wet phase and is now in decline. The only current recharge sources, which can be recognised distinctly using stable isotopes, are Nile baseflow and ephemeral wadi floods. (author)

  20. Recharge sources and hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in the coal-mining district of Jiaozuo, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pinghua; Chen, Jiansheng

    2012-06-01

    Investigations in the Jiaozuo coal-mining district (China) aim to link water-inrush aquifers with the sources of groundwater recharge. Concentrations of TDS, HCO{3/-}, Cl- and Na+ in the groundwater samples gradually decrease with increasing depth; in contrast, the factor 1 value of the Q-mode analysis gradually increases, which indicates that the deep groundwater may upflow, recharging the aquifers near the faulted zone. Some groundwater samples (above the local meteoric water line and `evaporation line 1') may originate from recharge by infiltrating local rainfall. Spring and river samples are symmetrically distributed on the regression line of the Ordovician and Carboniferous limestone aquifer groundwater (δ2H = 3.76 × δ18O - 31.77) and may, therefore, originate from groundwater recharge in the northern Taihang mountains. This mechanism is supported by the observation that groundwater levels change with rainfall. According to radiocarbon residence-time estimates, two groundwater sample sites may have been recharged during the late glacial stage.

  1. Rainfall intensity and groundwater recharge: empirical evidence from the Upper Nile Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Owor, M.; Taylor, R. G.; Tindimugaya, C.; Mwesigwa, D.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the intensity of precipitation as a result of global warming are expected to be especially pronounced in the tropics. The impact of changing rainfall intensities on groundwater recharge remains, however, unclear. Analysis of a recently compiled data set of coincidental, daily observations of rainfall and groundwater levels remote from abstraction for four stations in the Upper Nile Basin over the period 1999-2008 shows that the magnitude of observed recharge events is better relate...

  2. Conceptual model of recharge to southeastern Badain Jaran Desert groundwater and lakes from environmental tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, John B.; Edmunds, W. Michael; Darling, George; Ma, Jinzhu; Pang, Zhonghe; De Young, A

    2008-01-01

    Sources of groundwater recharge to the Badain Jaran Desert in China have been investigated using geochemical and isotopic techniques. Stable isotope compositions (δ18O and δ2H) of shallow groundwater and surface water from oasis lakes evolve from a starting composition considerably depleted compared to local unsaturated zone moisture, confirming inferences from chloride mass balance that direct infiltration of precipitation is not a volumetrically important source of recharge to the shallow a...

  3. Silt and gas accumulation beneath an artificial recharge spreading basin, Southwestern Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, D.K.; Ortiz, G.

    2009-01-01

    Sand Hollow Reservoir in southwestern Utah, USA, is operated for both surface-water storage and artificial recharge to the underlying Navajo Sandstone. The total volume of estimated artificial recharge between 2002 and 2007 is 85 million cubic meters (69,000 acre-feet). Since 2002, artificial recharge rates have generally been declining and are inversely correlated with the increasing surface area of the reservoir. Permeability testing of core samples retrieved from beneath the reservoir indicates that this decline may not be due to silt accumulation. Artificial recharge rates also show much seasonal variability. Calculations of apparent intrinsic permeability show that these variations can only partly be explained by variation in water viscosity associated with seasonal changes in water temperature. Sporadic seasonal trends in recharge rates and intrinsic permeability during 2002-2004 could be associated with the large fluctuations in reservoir elevation and wetted area. From 2005 through 2007, the reservoir was mostly full and there has been a more consistent seasonal pattern of minimum recharge rates during the summer and maximum rates during the autumn. Total dissolved-gas pressure measurements indicate the presence of biogenic gas bubbles in the shallow sediments beneath the shallower parts of Sand Hollow Reservoir when the water is warmer. Permeability reduction associated with this gas clogging may contribute to the decrease in artificial recharge rates during the spring and summer, with a subsequently increasing recharge rates in the autumn associated with a decline in volume of gas bubbles. Other possible causes for seasonal variation in artificial recharge rates require further investigation.

  4. Sensitivity of groundwater recharge using climatic analogues and HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Leterme

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of groundwater recharge to different climate conditions was simulated using the approach of climatic analogue stations, i.e. stations presently experiencing climatic conditions corresponding to a possible future climate state. The study was conducted in the context of a safety assessment of a future near-surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive waste in Belgium; this includes estimation of groundwater recharge for the next millennia. Groundwater recharge was simulated using the Richards based soil water balance model HYDRUS-1D and meteorological time series from analogue stations. This study used four analogue stations for a warmer subtropical climate with changes of average annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration from −42% to +5% and from +8% to +82%, respectively, compared to the present-day climate. Resulting water balance calculations yielded a change in groundwater recharge ranging from a decrease of 72% to an increase of 3% for the four different analogue stations. The Gijon analogue station (Northern Spain, considered as the most representative for the near future climate state in the study area, shows an increase of 3% of groundwater recharge for a 5% increase of annual precipitation. Calculations for a colder (tundra climate showed a change in groundwater recharge ranging from a decrease of 97% to an increase of 32% for four different analogue stations, with an annual precipitation change from −69% to −14% compared to the present-day climate.

  5. Sensitivity of groundwater recharge using climatic analogues and HYDRUS-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterme, B.; Mallants, D.; Jacques, D.

    2012-08-01

    The sensitivity of groundwater recharge to different climate conditions was simulated using the approach of climatic analogue stations, i.e. stations presently experiencing climatic conditions corresponding to a possible future climate state. The study was conducted in the context of a safety assessment of a future near-surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive waste in Belgium; this includes estimation of groundwater recharge for the next millennia. Groundwater recharge was simulated using the Richards based soil water balance model HYDRUS-1D and meteorological time series from analogue stations. This study used four analogue stations for a warmer subtropical climate with changes of average annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration from -42% to +5% and from +8% to +82%, respectively, compared to the present-day climate. Resulting water balance calculations yielded a change in groundwater recharge ranging from a decrease of 72% to an increase of 3% for the four different analogue stations. The Gijon analogue station (Northern Spain), considered as the most representative for the near future climate state in the study area, shows an increase of 3% of groundwater recharge for a 5% increase of annual precipitation. Calculations for a colder (tundra) climate showed a change in groundwater recharge ranging from a decrease of 97% to an increase of 32% for four different analogue stations, with an annual precipitation change from -69% to -14% compared to the present-day climate.

  6. Evaluating storm-scale groundwater recharge dynamics with coupled weather radar data and unsaturated zone modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, P.; Gates, J. B.; Lock, N.; Houston, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater recharge rates through the unsaturated zone emerge from complex interactions within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system that derive from nonlinear relationships amongst atmospheric boundary conditions, plant water use and soil hydraulic properties. While it is widely recognized that hydrologic models must capture soil water dynamics in order to provide reliable recharge estimates, information on episodic recharge generation remains uncommon, and links between storm-scale weather patterns and their influence on recharge is largely unexplored. In this study, the water balance of a heterogeneous one-dimensional soil domain (3 m deep) beneath a typical rainfed corn agro-ecosystem in eastern Nebraska was numerically simulated in HYDRUS-1D for 12 years (2001-2012) on hourly time steps in order to assess the relationships between weather events and episodic recharge generation. WSR-88D weather radar reflectivity data provided both rainfall forcing data (after estimating rain rates using the z/r ratio method) and a means of storm classification on a scale from convective to stratiform using storm boundary characteristics. Individual storm event importance to cumulative recharge generation was assessed through iterative scenario modeling (773 total simulations). Annual cumulative recharge had a mean value of 9.19 cm/yr (about 12 % of cumulative rainfall) with coefficient of variation of 73%. Simulated recharge generation events occurred only in late winter and spring, with a peak in May (about 35% of total annual recharge). Recharge generation is observed primarily in late spring and early summer because of the combination of high residual soil moisture following a winter replenishment period, heavy convective storms, and low to moderate potential evapotranspiration rates. During the growing season, high rates of root water uptake cause rapid soil water depletion, and the concurrent high potential evapotranspiration and low soil moisture prevented recharge

  7. Groundwater recharge in a hard rock aquifer: A conceptual model including surface-loading effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhe, Allan; Bockgård, Niclas

    2006-11-01

    SummaryThe groundwater level in a fractured rock aquifer in Sweden was found to respond quickly to rainfall, although the bedrock was covered by 10-m-thick till soil. A considerable portion of the response was caused by surface loading, i.e., by the weight increase of the soil due to the addition of water from precipitation, whereas the rest reflected recharge. The hypothesis that the bedrock aquifer was recharged by vertical flow from groundwater in the overlying soil was tested with a simple recharge model, in which the bedrock-groundwater levels were simulated from the soil-groundwater and estimated surface-loading variation. The model had three parameters: the ratio between the equivalent vertical hydraulic conductivity governing the recharge and the storage coefficient of the bedrock reservoir, the recession coefficient for the bedrock-groundwater level, and the bedrock-groundwater level at which the outflow ceases. The model could be reasonably well calibrated and validated to head observations in one of two boreholes. The fit to the seasonal variation was similar when calibrating the model with or without surface loading, but surface loading had to be included to properly simulate individual recharge events. The relative temporal variation in the fluxes could be determined by the calibration. The variation in the recharge was from -10% to +25% in relation to the mean flux. The variation in the discharge was only ±1%. By applying a storage coefficient of the reservoir of 5 × 10 -4, the simulated mean recharge was about 20 mm yr -1. The results support the hypothesis that the bedrock-groundwater at the site is fed by local recharge from the overlying soil aquifer.

  8. Model-estimated ground-water recharge and hydrograph of ground-water discharge to a stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1997-01-01

    The computer model PULSE, described in this report, can be used to construct a hydrograph of ground-water discharge to a stream. The model is applicable to a ground-water flow system that is driven by areally uniform recharge to the water table, and in which ground water discharges to a gaining stream. One of the two formulations used by the model allows for an instantaneous recharge pulse and subsequent ground-water discharge to the stream. The other formulation, which allows for a gradual hydrologic gain or loss term in addition to the instantaneous pulse, can be used to simulate the effects of gradual recharge to the water table, ground-water evapotranspiration, or downward leakage to a deeper aquifer.

  9. Impact of climate on groundwater recharge in the crystalline basement rocks aquifer of Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Water is the cornerstone of human life and for all economic developments. West Africa and specifically Ghana are no exception to this reality.Northern Ghana is characterized by a semi-arid climate, with prolonged dry season (7 months of very few rainfall) leading to the drying up of many rivers and streams. In addition, rainfall is highly variable in space and time. Therefore, surface water is unreliable and insufficient to meet the water demands for socio-economic development in this area. As a result, the area is heavily dependent on groundwater for domestic water supply as well as for dry season irrigation of vegetables (cash crops).However, aquifers in northern Ghana are dominantly the hard rock type (Crystalline basement rock). This aquifer has no primary porosity and may not be able to sustain the increasing demand on the resource. Further, climate change may worsen the situation as recharge is dependent on rainfall in northern Ghana. Therefore, it is important to understand exactly how climate change will impact on recharge to the groundwater for sustainable development and management of the resource.Previous groundwater studies in Northern Ghana barely analyzed the combined impacts of Climate change on the recharge to the groundwater. This research is aimed at determining the current relationship between groundwater recharge and rainfall and to use the relationships to determine the impacts of changes in climate on the groundwater recharge. The results will inform plans and strategies for sustainably managing groundwater resources in Ghana and the Volta basin.

  10. Environmental isotope and hydrochemical investigation on groundwater recharge and dynamics of the coastal sedimentary aquifers of Tiruvadanai, Tamilnadu State, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recharge processes and dynamics of the Tiruvadanai aquifers were investigated using environmental isotopes and hydrochemistry, in conjunction with hydrogeological data. Hydrochemical characterization of the groundwaters indicated that the shallow (3-Cl) to saline type waters and the deeper (350-500 m) Cretaceous aquifer (confined) is a NaCl type. The concentration of various chemical species along the general groundwater flow direction (northwest to east) showed a trend with a decrease in Mg2+ and Ca2+ and an increase in Na+ and K+ in both the aquifers. This change could be attributed to ion-exchange process. Higher pH values of Cretaceous aquifer samples (7.4-8.6) could also be responsible for the lowering of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations by facilitating precipitation of carbonates. A δ2H-δ18O plot shows that the Tertiary aquifer samples fall on an evaporation line. The aquifer 3H values near the ephemeral rivers range from 2 to 5 TU while those away from the rivers have 14CDIC model ages range from 1 to 13 Ka BP. The Cretaceous aquifer samples had 3H values 14CDIC model ages are >20 ka BP, indicating palaeo-waters. Based on 14C model ages, the groundwater velocity was estimated (Tertiary aquifers: 10-2-10-3 m·d-1; Cretaceous aquifer: 10-3 m·d-1). A 13CDIC enrichment along the flowpath of the Cretaceous aquifer was observed and could be due to carbonate mineral dissolution. From the investigation, four types of recharge processes to the aquifer system are discerned, with the overall modern recharge component being low. The Cretaceous aquifer contains fossil groundwaters and hence, the resources may be finite and thus, their exploitation is mining. The most suitable river for implementing large-scale artificial recharge measures was also identified. (author)

  11. Groundwater recharge and time lag measurement through Vertosols using impulse response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Mark; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the world there are many stressed aquifers used to support irrigated agriculture. The Condamine River catchment (southern Queensland, Australia) is one example of a globally significant agricultural region where groundwater use has exceeded recharge over the last 50 years. There is a high dependence on groundwater in this catchment, because yearly rainfall is highly variable, and actual evapotranspiration often exceeds rainfall. To better manage the aquifer there is a need to correctly conceptualise the primary inputs and outputs of the system, and characterise the lags in system response to all forcings. In catchment models it is particularly important to correctly proportion diffuse (areal) rainfall recharge and to account for the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table. Throughout large portions of the Condamine Catchment, groundwater levels are now 20 or more metres below the ground surface. This study aimed to better quantify the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table using the predefined impulse response function in continuous time method (PIRFICT; von Asmuth et al., 2002; von Asmuth, 2012). The PIRFICT method was applied to 255 multi-decadal groundwater level data sets throughout the catchment. Inputs into the modelling include rainfall, irrigation deep drainage, stream water level, evapotranspiration, and groundwater extractions. As an independent check the PIRFICT model derived diffuse recharge estimates are compared to point lysimeter and geochemical recharge estimates in the Vertosol soils within this catchment. It is estimated using the PIRFICT method that in the Condamine Catchment between 1990 and 2012, the mean rain-derived groundwater recharge is 4.4 mm/year. Mean groundwater response from rainfall was determined to be 5.3 years: range 188 days to 48 years. The recharge estimates are consistent with both geochemical and lysimeter point measurements of recharge. It is concluded that where extensive groundwater

  12. Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the δ18O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 ± 0.5 per-thousand), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high 18O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low 18O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in δ18O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are ∼10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for ∼40 years, creating cones of depression ∼25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low 18O water (-11.0 per-thousand) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp 18O gradients in our groundwater isotope map

  13. Groundwater Diffuse Recharge and its Response to Climate Changes in Semi-Arid Northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes and rates of groundwater recharge in arid and semi-arid areas is crucial for utilizing and managing groundwater resources sustainably. We obtained three chloride profiles of the unsaturated-zone in the desert/loess transition zone of northwestern China and reconstructed the groundwater recharge variations over the last 11, 21, and 37 years, respectively, using the generalized chloride mass balance (GCMB method. The average recharge rates were 43.7, 43.5, and 45.1 mm yr-1, respectively, which are similar to those evaluated by the chloride mass balance (CMB or GCMB methods in other semi-arid regions. The results indicate that the annual recharge rates were not in complete linear proportion to the corresponding annual precipitations, although both exhibited descending tendencies on the whole. Comparisons between the daily precipitation aggregate at different intensity and recharge rates reveal that the occurrence of relatively heavy daily precipitation per year may contribute to such nonlinearity between annual precipitation and recharge. The possible influences of vegetation cover alterations following precipitation change cannot be excluded as well. The approximately negative correlation between the average annual recharge and temperature suggests that changes in temperature have had significant influences on recharge.

  14. Sustainable Hydro Assessment and Groundwater Recharge Projects (SHARP) in Germany - Water Balance Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemand, C.; Kuhn, K.; Schwarze, R.

    2010-12-01

    SHARP is a European INTERREG IVc Program. It focuses on the exchange of innovative technologies to protect groundwater resources for future generations by considering the climate change and the different geological and geographical conditions. Regions involved are Austria, United Kingdom, Poland, Italy, Macedonia, Malta, Greece and Germany. They will exchange practical know-how and also determine know-how demands concerning SHARP’s key contents: general groundwater management tools, artificial groundwater recharge technologies, groundwater monitoring systems, strategic use of groundwater resources for drinking water, irrigation and industry, techniques to save water quality and quantity, drinking water safety plans, risk management tools and water balance models. SHARP Outputs & results will influence the regional policy in the frame of sustainable groundwater management to save and improve the quality and quantity of groundwater reservoirs for future generations. The main focus of the Saxon State Office for Environment, Agriculture and Landscape in this project is the enhancement and purposive use of water balance models. Already since 1992 scientists compare different existing water balance models on different scales and coupled with groundwater models. For example in the KLIWEP (Assessment of Impacts of Climate Change Projections on Water and Matter Balance for the Catchment of River Parthe in Saxony) project the coupled model WaSiM-ETH - PCGEOFIM® has been used to study the impact of climate change on water balance and water supplies. The project KliWES (Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change Projections on Water and Matter Balance for Catchment Areas in Saxony) still running, comprises studies of fundamental effects of climate change on catchments in Saxony. Project objective is to assess Saxon catchments according to the vulnerability of their water resources towards climate change projections in order to derive region-specific recommendations for

  15. Design, operation, and monitoring capability of an experimental artificial-recharge facility at East Meadow, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B.J.; Oaksford, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial recharge with tertiary-treated sewage is being tested at East Meadow to evaluate the physical and chemical effects on the groundwater system. The recharge facility contains 11 recharge basins and 5 injection wells and is designed to accept 4 million gallons of reclaimed water per day. Of the 11 basins, 7 are recently constructed and will accept 0.5 million gallons per day each. An observation manhole (12-foot inside diameter and extending 16 feet below the basin floor) was installed in each of two basins to enable monitoring and sampling of percolating reclaimed water in the unsaturated zone with instruments such as tensiometers, gravity lysimeters, thermocouples, and soil-gas samplers. Five shallow (100-feet deep) injection wells will each return 0.5 million gallons per day to the groundwater reservoir. Three types of injection-well design are being tested; the differences are in the type of gravel pack around the well screen. When clogging at the well screen occurs, redevelopment should restore the injection capability. Flow to the basins and wells is regulated by automatic flow controllers in which a desired flow rate is maintained by electronic sensors. Basins can also operate in a constant-head mode in which a specified head is maintained in the basin automatically. An observation-well network consisting of 2-inch- and 6-inch-diameter wells was installed within a 1-square-mile area at the recharge facility to monitor aquifer response and recharge. During 48 days of operation within a 17-week period (October 1982 through January 1983), 88.5 million gallons of reclaimed water was applied to the shallow water table aquifer through the recharge basins. A 4.29-foot-high groundwater mound developed during a 14-day test; some water level increase associated with the mound was detected 1,000 ft from the basins. Preliminary water quality data from wells affected by reclaimed water show evidence that mechanisms of mixing, dilution, and dispersion are

  16. Groundwater recharge in the tropics: a pan-African analysis of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater is a vital source of freshwater in sub-Saharan Africa where rainfall and river discharge are unreliable and per-capita reservoir storage is among the lowest in the world. Groundwater is widely considered a distributed, low-cost and climate-resilient option to meet rapidly growing freshwater demand and alleviate endemic poverty by expanding access to safe water and improving food security through irrigation. Recent research indicates that groundwater storage in Africa is about 100 times greater than annual river discharge yet major uncertainties remain in the magnitude and nature of replenishment through recharge as well as the impacts of land-use and climate change. Here, we present newly compiled, multi-decadal observations of groundwater levels from 5 countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Niger, Tanzania, Uganda) and paired measurements of stable isotope ratios of O and H in precipitation and groundwater at 11 locations. These data reveal both a distinct bias in groundwater recharge to intensive rainfall and rapid recharge pathways (e.g. focused, macropore flow) that are inconsistent with conventional recharge models assuming pore-matrix flow defined by the Darcy-Richards equation. Further the records highlight the substantial influence of land-use change (e.g. conversion of natural, perennial cover to croplands) on groundwater recharge. The compiled observations also provide, for the first time, a pan-African baseline to evaluate the performance of large-scale hydrological models and Land-Surface Models incorporating groundwater in this region. Our results suggest that the intensification of precipitation brought about by global warming favours groundwater replenishment in sub-Saharan Africa. As such, groundwater may prove to be a climate-resilient source of freshwater in the tropics, enabling adaptive strategies such as groundwater-fed irrigation and sustaining domestic and industrial water supplies.

  17. Effects of artificial recharge on the Ogallala aquifer, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richmond Flint; Keys, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    Four recharge tests were conducted by injecting water from playa lakes through wells into the Ogallala Formation. Injection was by gravity flow and by pumping under pressure. At one site, 34-acre feet of water was injected by gravity and produced a significant increase in yield of the well. At a second site, gravity injection of only 0.58 acre-foot caused a significant decrease in permeability due to plugging by suspended sediment. At two other sites, injection by pumping 6 and 14 acre-feet respectively, resulted in discharge of water at the surface and in perching of water above the water table. Differences in success of recharge were largely due to aquifer lithology and, therefore, the type of permeability; the concentration of suspended solids in the recharge water; and the injection technique. The injection technique can be controlled and the concentration of suspended solids can be minimized by treatment, but the site for well recharge will accept water most rapidly if it is selected on the basis of a favorable geohydrologic environment. Geophysical logs were used to study the effect of aquifer lithology on recharge and to understand the movement of injected water. Temperature logs were particularly useful in tracing the movement of recharged water. Natural-gamma, gamma-gamma, and neutron logs provided important data on lithology and porosity in the aquifer and changes in porosity and water distribution resulting from recharge. Effective recharge of the Ogallala Formation, using water from playa lakes, is possible where geohydrologic conditions are favorable and the recharge system is properly constructed.

  18. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: Insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, JF; Hudson, GB; Avisar, D

    2005-01-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (∼4 m day-1). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two ...

  19. Sources and Relative Timing of Groundwater Recharge in Northwest India Using Environmental Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, S. P.; Joshi, S. K.; Sinha, R.; Gupta, S.; Densmore, A. L.; Rawat, Y. S.; Shekhar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic basin in northwest India is a major hotspot of groundwater depletion over the last four decades, with significant consequences for future agricultural productivity. However, little is known about groundwater dynamics in this region. We use environmental isotope analysis of rainfall, groundwater and surface water to characterize zones and sources of groundwater recharge in the Ghaggar basin lying between the Himalayan-fed Yamuna and Sutlej river systems. Around 700 groundwater samples were collected from 182 locations within the Ghaggar basin during pre- and post-monsoon periods of 2013. The δ18O values of river water vary from -7.3‰ to -5.3‰ and δ2H varies from -50.6‰ to -46.4‰, suggesting source of water from lower altitude. Depleted isotopic values of δ18O between -12.1‰ and -11.5‰, and δ2H between -79.1‰ and -74.9‰, are observed in canal water sourced from the Sutlej. The δ18O values of groundwater vary from -12.6‰ to -3.1‰ and δ2H from -84.8‰ to -28.6‰. Groundwater isotopic values fall on the LMWL, indicating local precipitation as the main recharge source, although a few depleted samples falling above the LMWL suggest local canal recharge. A key point in our data is the marked longitudinal as well as vertical variability in composition of groundwater samples reflecting differences in age and recharge sources. Longitudinal variability in groundwater is reflected from a much larger scatter in both δ18O and δ2H values for the downstream reaches compared to the upstream reaches, suggesting mixing of various sources of recharge. Also, groundwater in downstream reaches is saline or brackish with EC values of >4000 μS/cm reflecting evaporation of irrigation water. Further, groundwater samples above 60 m bgl show tritium values in range of 1.88-8.0 TU indicating sub-modern to modern recharge whereas those below 60m bgl show a much lower values of 0.3-1.88 TU suggesting groundwater is sub-modern to older than 50 yrs

  20. An Analysis on Groundwater Recharge by Mathematical Model in Inclined Porous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Shreekant P.; Singh, Twinkle

    2014-01-01

    The present paper discusses the analysis of solution of groundwater flow in inclined porous media. The problem related to groundwater flow in inclined aquifers is usually common in geotechnical and hydrogeology engineering activities. The governing partial differential equation of one-dimensional groundwater recharge problem has been formed by Dupuit's assumption. Three cases have been discussed with suitable boundary conditions and different slopes of impervious incline boundary. The numeric...

  1. Implications of projected climate change for groundwater recharge in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, Thomas; Manning, Andrew H.; Stonestrom, David A.; Allen, Diana M.; Ajami, Hoori; Blasch, Kyle W.; Brookfield, Andrea E.; Castro, Christopher L.; Clark, Jordan F.; Gochis, David J.; Flint, Alan L.; Neff, Kirstin L.; Niraula, Rewati; Rodell, Matthew; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Singha, Kamini; Walvoord, Michelle A.

    2016-03-01

    Existing studies on the impacts of climate change on groundwater recharge are either global or basin/location-specific. The global studies lack the specificity to inform decision making, while the local studies do little to clarify potential changes over large regions (major river basins, states, or groups of states), a scale often important in the development of water policy. An analysis of the potential impact of climate change on groundwater recharge across the western United States (west of 100° longitude) is presented synthesizing existing studies and applying current knowledge of recharge processes and amounts. Eight representative aquifers located across the region were evaluated. For each aquifer published recharge budget components were converted into four standard recharge mechanisms: diffuse, focused, irrigation, and mountain-systems recharge. Future changes in individual recharge mechanisms and total recharge were then estimated for each aquifer. Model-based studies of projected climate-change effects on recharge were available and utilized for half of the aquifers. For the remainder, forecasted changes in temperature and precipitation were logically propagated through each recharge mechanism producing qualitative estimates of direction of changes in recharge only (not magnitude). Several key patterns emerge from the analysis. First, the available estimates indicate average declines of 10-20% in total recharge across the southern aquifers, but with a wide range of uncertainty that includes no change. Second, the northern set of aquifers will likely incur little change to slight increases in total recharge. Third, mountain system recharge is expected to decline across much of the region due to decreased snowpack, with that impact lessening with higher elevation and latitude. Factors contributing the greatest uncertainty in the estimates include: (1) limited studies quantitatively coupling climate projections to recharge estimation methods using detailed

  2. Isotope investigation of groundwater recharge by delay action dams in the arid region of Balochistan, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope techniques (2H, 18O, 3H) were applied to investigate effectiveness of delay action dam reservoirs in Ziarat Valley of Balochistan. These reservoirs are meant to collect water in rainy seasons and supplement discharge of downstream karezes (subsurface water channels emerging on the ground surface after receiving groundwater through open wells) in dry season by recharging groundwater. The data indicate that the mean values of δ2H, δ18O and tritium of precipitation are: -6.4 per mille, -37 per mille and 9 TU respectively. Ranges of δ18O and δ2H values of the groundwater samples (wells, karezes, springs) are -6.6 to -2.2 per mille and -40 to -16 per mille respectively. The reservoirs have ranges of δ2H and δ18O values from -6.7 to +15.6 per mille and -42 to +86 per mille respectively and they follow evaporation lines on the δ18O-δ2H plots. Isotope data indicate that there is no significant groundwater recharge from the Pechi Dam and Manna Dam reservoirs. Vouch Ghouski Dam has some contribution in groundwater recharge while Warchoom Dam reservoir is much effective in contributing to groundwater recharge. Results of tritium suggest that the residence time of groundwater is quite short (fresh water). (author)

  3. Environmental isotope and hydrochemical investigation on groundwater recharge and dynamics of the coastal sedimentary aquifers of Tiruvadanai, Tamilnadu State, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recharge processes and dynamics of the Tiruvadanai aquifers were investigated using environmental isotopes and hydro-chemistry, in conjunction with hydrogeological data. Hydro-chemical characterization of the groundwaters indicated that the shallow (2+ and Ca2+ and an increase in Na+ and K+ in both the aquifers. This could be attributed to ion-exchange process. A higher pH value of Cretaceous aquifer samples (7.4-8.6) could also be responsible for the lowering of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations by facilitating precipitation of carbonates in them. δ2H-δ18O plot of the Tertiary aquifer samples fall on an evaporation line. Its 3H values near the ephemeral rivers range from 2 to 5 TU while those away from the rivers have 14CDIC model ages range from 1 to 13 ka BP. The Cretaceous aquifer samples measured 3H values 14CDIC model ages are >20 ka BP, indicating palaeo-waters. Based on 14C model ages, the groundwater velocity was estimated (Tertiary aquifers: 10-2 - 10-3 m.d-1; Cretaceous aquifer: 10-3 m.d-1). The 13CDIC enrichment along the flowpath of Cretaceous aquifer was observed and that could be due to carbonate minerals dissolution. From the investigation, four types of recharge processes to the aquifer system are discerned, with the overall modern recharge component being low. The Cretaceous aquifer contains fossil groundwaters and hence the resources may be finite and their exploitation is mining. The suitable river for implementing large-scale artificial recharge measures was identified. (author)

  4. Setting up a groundwater recharge model for an arid karst system using time lapse camera data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Stephan; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; Michelsen, Nils; Rausch, Randolf; Siebert, Christian; Schüth, Christoph; Merz, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is the principal water resource in most dryland areas. Therefore, its replenishment rate is of great importance for water management. The amount of groundwater recharge depends on the climatic conditions, but also on the geological conditions, soil properties and vegetation. In dryland areas, outcrops of karst aquifers often receive enhanced recharge rates compared to other geological settings. Especially in areas with exposed karst features like sinkholes or open shafts rainfall accumulates in channels and discharges directly into the aquifer. Using the example of the As Sulb plateau in Saudi Arabia this study introduces a cost-effective and robust method for recharge monitoring and modelling in karst outcrops. The measurement of discharge of a small catchment (4.0 x 104 m2) into a sinkhole, and hence the direct recharge into the aquifer, was carried out with a time lapse camera observing a v-notch weir. During the monitoring period of two rainy seasons (autumn 2012 to spring 2014) four recharge events were recorded. Afterwards, recharge data as well as proxy data about the drying of the sediment cover are used to set up a conceptual water balance model. This model was run for 17 years (1971 to 1986 and 2012 to 2014). Simulation results show highly variable seasonal recharge-precipitation-ratios, which underlines the nonlinearity between recharge and precipitation in dryland areas. Besides the amount of precipitation this ratio is strongly influenced by the interannual distribution of rainfall events.

  5. Artificial-recharge investigation near Aurora, Nebraska: 2-year progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtler, William F.; Stannard, David I.; Kouma, Edwin

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first 2 years of a 4-year investigation of potential for artificial recharge and recharge methods that might be used to mitigate excessive aquifer depletion in Nebraska. A Quaternary sand-and-gravel aquifer near Aurora, Nebr., was recharged by injecting water through a well at a rate of approximately 730 gallons per minute for nearly 6 months. Total recharge was 530 acre-feet. Recharge was intermittent during the first 2 months, but was virtually continuous during the last 4 months. Buildup of the water level in the recharge well was 17 feet. The rate of buildup indicates that the well could have accepted water by gravity flow at more than 3,000 gallons per minute for at least 1 year. The cause of a continuing slow rise in water levels in the recharge well in contrast to nearly stable water levels in observation wells as close as 10 feet from the recharge well is as yet uncertain. The recharge water and the native ground water appeared to be chemically compatible. Infiltration rates from 24-foot-diameter surface impoundments ranged from 0.04 to 0.66 feet per day. The higher rates may have resulted in part from leakage down incompletely sealed holes that were drilled to install monitoring equipment. The investigation, including a report on the entire project, is scheduled for completion by 1980.

  6. Dynamics of Floodwater Infiltration and Groundwater Recharge Under Ephemeral Channels in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarsky, B.; Dahan, O.; Enzel, Y.

    2007-05-01

    Shallow alluvial aquifers underneath ephemeral streams are often the only reliable source of water that can sustain human habitation in arid environments (e.g. Arava Valley, Israel; Rio Andarax, Spain; Kuiseb River, Namibia). The main source of replenishment of these alluvial aquifers is recharge from floodwater infiltration. Accordingly, effective management of surface water and groundwater in arid regions requires a better understanding of the processes controlling floodwater infiltration and recharge of alluvial aquifers. This study focuses on understanding the dynamic process of floodwater infiltration from ephemeral channels while implementing innovative methods specifically designed to quantify the recharge fluxes. The monitoring system provides real-time continuous measurements of the hydraulic conditions in all three domains involved in the recharge process: (a) the flood, (b) water-content variations along the unsaturated profile, (c) the groundwater response to the recharge event. Water-content variations along the unsaturated profile were monitored using flexible TDR (FTDR) probes installed along slanted boreholes underneath the stream channel. Water levels and salinity of both the flood and the groundwater were measured simultaneously. Two study sites were selected for this work: the Buffels River, South Africa and the Kuiseb River, Namibia. The monitoring stations installed at those sites recorded several flood events during 2005/2006. Data collected during this period revealed the dynamic process in which floodwater percolates through the vadose zone and recharges the groundwater. Each flood initiated an infiltration event expressed by wetting of the vadose zone and a rise in the water table. The sequential wetting of the vadose zone allowed direct calculations of the wetting-front propagation velocities and percolation fluxes from land surface down to the groundwater. With the arrival of the wetting front to the water table, groundwater began to rise

  7. Water balance-based estimation of groundwater recharge in the Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamaaji, R. A.; Lee, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Chad Basin (LCB) has experienced drastic changes of land cover and poor water management practices during the last 50 years. The successive droughts in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the shortage of surface water and groundwater resources. This problem of drought and shortage of water has a devastating implication on the natural resources of the Basin with great consequence on food security, poverty reduction and quality of life of the inhabitants in the LCB. Therefore, understanding the change of land use and its characteristics must be a first step to find how such changes disturb the water cycle especially the groundwater in the LCB. The abundance of groundwater is affected by the climate change through the interaction with surface water, such as lakes and rivers, and vertical recharge through an infiltration process. Quantifying the impact of climate change on the groundwater resource requires not only reliable forecasting of changes in the major climatic variables, but also accurate estimation of groundwater recharge. Spatial variations in the land use/land cover, soil texture, topographic slope, and meteorological conditions should be accounted for in the recharge estimation. In this study, we employed a spatially distributed water balance model WetSpass to simulate a long-term average change of groundwater recharge in the LCB of Africa. WetSpass is a water balance-based model to estimate seasonal average spatial distribution of surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. The model is especially suitable for studying the effect of land use/land cover change on the water regime in the LCB. The present study describes the concept of the model and its application to the development of recharge map of the LCB.

  8. Feasibility of artificial recharge to the 800-foot sand of the Kirkwood Formation in the coastal plain near Atlantic City, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Renewed development of the Atlantic City area since the mid-1970 's has increased the demand for water. Increased pumpage from the 800-foot sand of the Kirkwood Formation has reversed an antecedent water-level recovery in this aquifer, thus reducing water in storage and increasing the potential for saltwater intrusion. Practicable approaches to providing a dependable water supply while properly managing withdrawals from the 800-foot sand include development of surface- and ground-water supplies but artificial recharging the 800-foot sand is the principal alternative discussed. Investigation of its feasibility locally included a review of methods of artificial recharge and attendant operational problems, investigation of local hydrogeologic conditions, and collection and interpretation of water-quality data. System design and quality of injected water are important for successful artificial recharge. Mixtures of water from the 800-foot sand and from a representative local public-supply system may become supersaturated with oxygen. Significant temperature differences between two such waters would likely exacerbate that condition. Limited chemical analyses suggest that suspended solids concentration of water from local public supplies may at times be high enough to cause clogging of recharge-well screens. These problems are soluable by appropriate conditioning of recharge water. (USGS)

  9. Uncertainty and urban water recharge for managing groundwater availability using decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarello, M C; Pierce, S A; Sharp, J M

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying groundwater availability depends upon sound methods and the use of integrated models. To determine availability or sustainable yield, the influence of scientific uncertainty from key sources, such as anthropogenic recharge, must be considered. This study evaluates uncertainty in recharge interpretations on the modeled available water balance for an urban case in Texas, USA. Analyses are completed using the Groundwater Decision Support System, which is a research code-base for an integrated modeling. The case study develops spatially and temporally resolved recharge interpretations based on NEXRAD precipitation and detailed land use data. Results demonstrate the implications of scientific uncertainty as it influences recommendations for policy and urban water management decisions that are based on modeled outputs. Geospatial methods account for spatial and temporal components and can be replicated for other systems. These methods are also useful for resolving uncertainty in relation to the influence of urbanization on recharge through land use change. PMID:25500478

  10. Application of environmental isotopes for identification of groundwater recharge components in an interfluvival of the Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with the alluvial aquifer in an inter fluvial area of the Punjab. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the mechanism of its recharge. Samples of rain water, surface waters (rivers and canals) and groundwater were collected from different sampling stations and analyzed for their environmental isotopic (D, /Sup 3/H,/sup 18/ O) concentrations. Isotopic data suggest that there are two sources of groundwater recharge in the study area. In the upper part of the Doab, recharge is mainly from the rains (local or on adjoining hills) while the lower part receives replenishment from surface water sources. Major contribution to the recharge in the lower part of the doab is from the river Jhelum either directly or through canals and irrigation channels. The effect of the river Chenab was found to be limited to only few locations. (author)

  11. Environmental isotope application for determination artificial recharge efficiency, cases from arid and semi-arid areas of Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Jordan is one of the arid and semi arid regions where 90% of the country receives less than 200 mm of annual precipitation. Artificial recharge and surface water harvesting has been given an importance and priorities in the last years. Four dams have been taken under study of environmental isotope hydrology to define the efficiency of the artificial recharge to the groundwater, two dams are located in the highland areas (altitude ∼ 740m above see level) and the other two dams at the main escarpment of the Jordan Valley graben (altitude is around -150m below sea level). Monthly and several sampling campaigns from the dams and the surrounding wells of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 (18O), Deuterium (2H) and radioactive tritium (3H) including complete chemical have been sampled and analyzed within the period 1995-2001. This has existed within the framework of technical cooperation projects with the IAEA, RER/8/002 and RAW/8/007. The aquifer, which is outcropping at upper dams, is formed from chert and limestone of campanian and turonian age as Siwaqa dam and overlies by Basalt at Khlidiya dam (upland areas) where the aquifer is formed from sandstone aquifer at Kafrain and Shueib dams at the Jordan valley. The diagrams of 18O and 2H of Siwaqa and Khadiya dams and some selected surrounding wells indicates that there is significant enrichment of the stable isotopes in the groundwater wells near the dams especially at the first years of dams operation which indicates a natural recharge of the enriched water from both lakes. The significant accumulations of silts and sediments at the bottom of both dams makes clogging and reduce the recharge, unless infiltration to the groundwater could occur through dam's escarpment after flooding and water rising. The regression line of the diagram of 18O and deuterium (2H) of the four wells mentioned above including the dam water for the period 1995-2001 has high correlation coefficient, this is represented by the following

  12. Application of environmental tritium for studying groundwater salinity and recharge in Midnapore, West Bengal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The salinization and recharge processes to the groundwaters in coastal Midnapore were studied using environmental isotope techniques. Groundwater samples from shallow as well as deep zones, surface waters such as sea water, Hooghly river water were collected and analysed for 3H, D, 18O and chemistry. The results showed that (i)the salinity of groundwaters very near the coast could be due to present day sea water intrusion, (ii)salinity of groundwater away from the coast could be due to past sea water intrusion as well as contribution from saline rivers (Hooghly, Haldi, etc), (iii)the recharge to the groundwater in the area could be delineated using isotritium curves. (author). 3 figs

  13. Intermediate tree cover can maximize groundwater recharge in the seasonally dry tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilstedt, U.; Bargués Tobella, A.; Bazié, H. R.; Bayala, J.; Verbeeten, E.; Nyberg, G.; Sanou, J.; Benegas, L.; Murdiyarso, D.; Laudon, H.; Sheil, D.; Malmer, A.

    2016-02-01

    Water scarcity contributes to the poverty of around one-third of the world’s people. Despite many benefits, tree planting in dry regions is often discouraged by concerns that trees reduce water availability. Yet relevant studies from the tropics are scarce, and the impacts of intermediate tree cover remain unexplored. We developed and tested an optimum tree cover theory in which groundwater recharge is maximized at an intermediate tree density. Below this optimal tree density the benefits from any additional trees on water percolation exceed their extra water use, leading to increased groundwater recharge, while above the optimum the opposite occurs. Our results, based on groundwater budgets calibrated with measurements of drainage and transpiration in a cultivated woodland in West Africa, demonstrate that groundwater recharge was maximised at intermediate tree densities. In contrast to the prevailing view, we therefore find that moderate tree cover can increase groundwater recharge, and that tree planting and various tree management options can improve groundwater resources. We evaluate the necessary conditions for these results to hold and suggest that they are likely to be common in the seasonally dry tropics, offering potential for widespread tree establishment and increased benefits for hundreds of millions of people.

  14. Intermediate tree cover can maximize groundwater recharge in the seasonally dry tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilstedt, U; Bargués Tobella, A; Bazié, H R; Bayala, J; Verbeeten, E; Nyberg, G; Sanou, J; Benegas, L; Murdiyarso, D; Laudon, H; Sheil, D; Malmer, A

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity contributes to the poverty of around one-third of the world's people. Despite many benefits, tree planting in dry regions is often discouraged by concerns that trees reduce water availability. Yet relevant studies from the tropics are scarce, and the impacts of intermediate tree cover remain unexplored. We developed and tested an optimum tree cover theory in which groundwater recharge is maximized at an intermediate tree density. Below this optimal tree density the benefits from any additional trees on water percolation exceed their extra water use, leading to increased groundwater recharge, while above the optimum the opposite occurs. Our results, based on groundwater budgets calibrated with measurements of drainage and transpiration in a cultivated woodland in West Africa, demonstrate that groundwater recharge was maximised at intermediate tree densities. In contrast to the prevailing view, we therefore find that moderate tree cover can increase groundwater recharge, and that tree planting and various tree management options can improve groundwater resources. We evaluate the necessary conditions for these results to hold and suggest that they are likely to be common in the seasonally dry tropics, offering potential for widespread tree establishment and increased benefits for hundreds of millions of people. PMID:26908158

  15. Groundwater recharge and capillary rise in a clayey catchment: modulation by topography and the Arctic Oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Schrøder; D. Rosbjerg

    2004-01-01

    The signature left by capillary rise in the water balance is investigated for a 16 km2 clayey till catchment in Denmark. Integrated modelling for 1981–99 substantiates a 30% uphill increase in average net recharge, caused by the reduction in capillary rise when the water table declines. Calibration of the groundwater module is constrained by stream flow separation and water table wells. Net recharge and a priori parameterisation has been estimated from those same data, an automatic rain ga...

  16. Groundwater recharge and capillary rise in a clayey catchment: modulation by topography and the Arctic Oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Schrøder; D. Rosbjerg

    2002-01-01

    International audience The signature left by capillary rise in the water balance is investigated for a 16 km2 clayey till catchment in Denmark. Integrated modelling for 1981?99 substantiates a 30% uphill increase in average net recharge, caused by the reduction in capillary rise when the water table declines. Calibration of the groundwater module is constrained by stream flow separation and water table wells. Net recharge and a priori parameterisation has been estimated from those same dat...

  17. Modelling of groundwater mound formation resulting from transient recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, S. N.; Ramana, D. V.; Thiagarajan, S.; Manglik, A.

    2001-06-01

    An analytical solution of a linearized Boussinesq equation is obtained to predict water table fluctuations as a result of time varying recharge from a strip basin for any number of recharge cycles. The analytical solution is obtained by using finite Fourier sine transform. Applications of the solution for the prediction of water table fluctuations and sensitivity analysis are demonstrated with the help of example problems.

  18. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge Using Tracers and Numerical Modeling in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Water resource shortage has been a serious problem since the 1980s in the North China Plain (NCP, resulting in plenty of environmental problems. Estimating the groundwater recharge rate accurately is vital for managing groundwater effectively. This study applied several methods, including chloride mass-balance, tracers (bromide and tritium and numerical modeling (Hydrus-1D, to estimate groundwater recharge at three representative sites of the NCP: Zhengding (ZD, Luancheng (LC and Hengshui (HS. The chloride concentration of the soil profile in the ZD site showed that the mean recharge was 3.84 mm/year with the residence time of 105 years for soil water transferring through the vadose area of 45.0 m in depth in the preferential flow model mainly. Considering the influence of preferential flow on the soil water movement in the field scale, the traditional methods (e.g., peak method of bromide and tritium tracers based on piston flow described in the literature could be unsuitable to estimate groundwater recharge in the LC and HS sites, especially in areas with low recharge rates. Therefore, multi-region and mass balance methods were applied in this study. The results of this investigation showed that the mean values of recharge were 124.3 and 18.0 mm/year in the LC and HS sites, respectively, in 2010. Owing to complexity and uncertainty on the surface resulting from the measuring of evapotranspiration, the upper boundary of 1.4 m (under the ground where most of the plant roots did not reach was chosen for the numerical modeling of Hydrus-1D, and the result showed that the mean recharge was 225 mm/year from 2003 to 2007, consistent with the result of tracers in the previous literature. The result also showed that the positive relation of groundwater recharge and the sum of irrigation and rainfall was presented in the spatial and temporal scale. Additionally, human activities promoted the recharge rate, and recharge rates increased with greater

  19. Occurrence of human enteroviruses in a groundwater aquifer recharged with tertiary wastewater effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J M; Landry, E F

    1978-01-01

    A two-year study of the impact of human viruses on a tertiary treatment-groundwater recharge system located on Long Island is currently nearing completion. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and groundwater from beneath a uniquely designed recharge basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of indigenous human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. While high concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from sewage influents, the chlorinated tertiary effluents were positive for virus in only 3 of 20 samples. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were detected in the groundwater aquifer on several occasions indicating their ability to percolate through the recharge basin. This finding was confirmed by the results of two poliovirus seeding experiments carried out at the field installation. At both high (75 to 100 cm/hr) and low (6 cm/hr) infiltration rates seeded polioviruses were detected at all sampling levels as well as in the groundwater aquifer, 7.62 m below the recharge basin. It would appear that lower infiltration rates promote better virus removal in the specific type of soil used in this study.

  20. Estimation of future groundwater recharge using climatic analogues and Hydrus-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Leterme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate change on groundwater recharge is simulated using climatic analogue stations, i.e. stations presently under climatic conditions corresponding to a given climate state. The study was conducted in the context of a safety assessment of a future near-surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive waste in Belgium; this includes estimating groundwater recharge for the next millennia. Groundwater recharge was simulated using the Richard's based soil water balance model Hydrus-1D and meteorological time series from analogue stations. Water balance calculations showed that transition from a temperate oceanic to a warmer subtropical climate without rainfall seasonality is expected to yield a decrease in groundwater recharge (−12% for the chosen representative analogue station of Gijon, Northern Spain. Based on a time series of 24 yr of daily climate data, the long-term average annual recharge decreased from 314 to 276 mm, although total rainfall was higher (947 mm in the warmer climate compared to the current temperate climate (899 mm. This is due to a higher soil evaporation (233 mm versus 206 mm and higher plant transpiration (350 versus 285 mm under the warmer climate.

  1. Response to recharge variation of thin rainwater lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eeman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalised lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an empirical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase and the increase of recharge frequency causes a decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the centre of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens

  2. Response to recharge variation of thin lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eeman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalized lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an analytical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase, and increase of recharge frequency causes decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the center of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens

  3. Response to recharge variation of thin rainwater lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, S.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Maas, C.

    2012-10-01

    In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalised lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an empirical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase and the increase of recharge frequency causes a decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the centre of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens characteristics using

  4. Response to recharge variation of thin lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, S.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Maas, C.

    2012-01-01

    In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalized lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an analytical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase, and increase of recharge frequency causes decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the center of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens characteristics using basic

  5. Artificial recharge in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J.W.; Moreland, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    This is a study of the feasibility of recharging, in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, imported water from northern California by way of the State Water Project beginning in 1972. The feasibility of recharging 30,000 acre-feet of water a year in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area will depend on the effectiveness of fault K as a barrier to ground-water movement near the land surface. The results of test drilling and an infiltration test indicate that the subsurface material at the spreading grounds is permeable enough to allow recharged water to percolate to the water table. The data indicate that fault K extends into the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area and may impede the lateral movement of recharged water. Fault K has no known surface expression and therefore probably does not affect the highly permeable younger alluvium. If that is so, fault K will be less effective as a barrier to ground-water movement as the recharge mound rises. Monitoring of the observation wells near the spreading grounds as the planned recharge operation proceeds should provide data about the hydrologic effects of fault K near the land surface.

  6. Arid-zone groundwater recharge and palaeorecharge: insights from the radioisotope chlorine-36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, G.; Wischusen, J. [Australian Geological Survey Organization (AGSO), Canberra, ACT (Australia). Geohazards, Land and Water Resources; Cresswell, R.; Fifield, K. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1998-11-01

    AGSO`s collaborative `Western water` study of groundwater resources in Aboriginal lands in the southwest Northern Territory arid zone, has applied the radioisotope {sup 36}CI and {sup 14}C to investigate the sustainability of community water supplies drawn from shallow aquifers in the Papunya-Kintore-Yuendumu area. The {sup 36}CI results have important implications for groundwater management throughout the arid zone, because substantial recharge occurs only during favourable, wet, interglacial climatic regimes. this has important implications for groundwater management in this area and elsewhere in central Australia, where most of the community water supplies depend on `old` stored groundwater 5 figs.

  7. Arid-zone groundwater recharge and palaeorecharge: insights from the radioisotope chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGSO's collaborative 'Western water' study of groundwater resources in Aboriginal lands in the southwest Northern Territory arid zone, has applied the radioisotope 36CI and 14C to investigate the sustainability of community water supplies drawn from shallow aquifers in the Papunya-Kintore-Yuendumu area. The 36CI results have important implications for groundwater management throughout the arid zone, because substantial recharge occurs only during favourable, wet, interglacial climatic regimes. this has important implications for groundwater management in this area and elsewhere in central Australia, where most of the community water supplies depend on 'old' stored groundwater

  8. Assessment of groundwater recharge and discharge in sub-catchments of Indus basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater discharge and recharge investigation was carried out in a selected sub-catchment of Indus Basin (Chashma Area) under an IAEA CRP. Sixteen sampling points were selected in the study area including fourteen groundwater and two canal water samples. Seven groundwater sampling points were selected in discharging area and the same numbers of sampling points were selected in recharging area. The first sampling campaign from discharging area was conducted in February 2011 and the second sampling campaign was carried out in March 2011. The electrical conductivity, toital dissolved salts, pH and temperature were measured in the field. The coordinates of the sampling points were recorded using GPS. All the collected samples were analyzed for stable isotopes (/sup 18/O, /sup 2/H). Plot of /sup 18/O vs. /sup 2/H values of surface water and groundwater along with the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) is shown. /sup 18/O values of groundwater vary over a narrow range from -11.3 to -8.2% and /sup 2/H values vary from -76.3 to -53.8%. All groundwater samples except two shallow ones have highly depleted isotopic composition (close to the river/canal water). It means that these locations are recharged by the surface water. Two shallow groundwater samples show mixing of rain water with canal/river water. (orig./A.B.)

  9. Novel S-35 Intrinsic Tracer Method for Determining Groundwater Travel Time near Managed Aquifer Recharge Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urióstegui, S. H.; Bibby, R. K.; Esser, B. K.; Clark, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying groundwater travel times near managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facilities is a high priority for protecting public and environmental health. For MAR facilities in California that incorporate tertiary wastewater into their surface-spreading recharge practices, the target subsurface residence time is >9 months to allow for the natural inactivation and degradation of potential contaminants (less time is needed for full advanced treated water). Established intrinsic groundwater tracer techniques such as tritium/helium-3 dating are unable to resolve timescales of motivation for evaluating a novel groundwater tracer method using a naturally occurring radioisotope of sulfur, sulfur-35 (S-35). After its production in the atmosphere by cosmic ray interaction with argon, S-35 enters the hydrologic cycle as dissolved sulfate through precipitation The short half-life of S-35 (3 months) is ideal for investigating recharge and transport of MAR groundwater on the travel times have previously been characterized using deliberate tracers: 1) Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Los Angeles County, and 2) Orange County Groundwater Recharge Facilities in Orange County. Reasonable S-35 travel times of travel times, which may not be revealed by a deliberate tracer study that is dependent on the hydrologic conditions during the tracer injection period.

  10. Evaluation of Groundwater Recharge Estimates in a Partially Metamorphosed Sedimentary Basin in a Tropical Environment: Application of Natural Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the representativeness of groundwater recharge estimates through the chloride mass balance (CMB) method in a tropical environment. The representativeness of recharge estimates using this methodology is tested using evaporation estimates from isotope data, the general spatial distribution of the potential field, and the topographical variations in the area. This study suggests that annual groundwater recharge rates in the area ranges between 0.9% and 21% of annual precipitatio...

  11. GIS and SBF for estimating groundwater recharge of a mountainous basin in the Wu River watershed, Taiwan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hsin-Fu Yeh; Hung-I Lin; Shing-Tsz Lee; Min-Hsiang Chang; Kuo-Chin Hsu; Cheng-Haw Lee

    2014-04-01

    The temporal and spatial distributions of precipitation are extremely uneven; so, careful management of water resources in Taiwan is crucial. The long-term overexploitation of groundwater resources poses a challenge to water resource management in Taiwan. However, assessing groundwater resources in mountainous basins is challenging due to limited information. In this study, a geographic information system (GIS) and stable base-flow (SBF) techniques were used to assess the characteristics of groundwater recharge considering the Wu River watershed in central Taiwan as a study area. First, a GIS approach was used to integrate five contributing factors: lithology, land cover/land use, lineaments, drainage, and slope. The weights of factors contributing to the groundwater recharge were obtained from aerial photos, geological maps, a land use database, and field verification. Second, the SBF was used to estimate the groundwater recharge in a mountainous basin scale. The concept of the SBF technique was to separate the base-flow from the total streamflow discharge in order to obtain a measure of groundwater recharge. The SBF technique has the advantage of integrating groundwater recharge across an entire basin without complex hydro-geologic modelling and detailed knowledge of the soil characteristics. In this study, our approach for estimating recharge provides not only an estimate of how much water becomes groundwater, but also explains the characteristics of a potential groundwater recharge zone.

  12. Recharge behavior to groundwater in the command area of Heran distributary, Sanghar, Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of net recharge to the groundwater is of prime importance while managing irrigation and drainage system of the area. Without knowing the groundwater and recharge both systems irrigation and drainage, are two sides of one coin may mislead. In order to determine net recharge to the groundwater, the data of important parameters such as irrigation delivery at head of the channel, total losses, crop water requirement, water table fluctuation, operation hours of tube wells and surface drain discharge and shallow as well as deep ground water quality were measured for Rabi season (November, 1999 to March, 2000). Using different approaches such as actual observation of inflow and outflow components, change of water table and SURFER (Software), the net recharge was determined. Results have shown that in Rabi season, the groundwater is recharged except in the month of January (canal closure period) and March, depending on various irrigation and drainage factors, which are complex. Shallow groundwater quality was observed good and use able due to recharge by surface water. About 41 % of command area was under shallow water table with salinity of water 300-800 ppm, 29 % was under water quality of 800-1300 ppm, 9% was between 1800-2300 ppm and rest 12% of the area was observed more than 2300 ppm. The quality of fresh water pump lifting water from the depth of 40 ft was up to 2400 ppm and deeper pump water quality was about 25000 ppm in scavenger and saline tube wells. Average water table was about 3.0 ft and fluctuation was between 2.38-3.8 feet in spite of running the tube wells.(author)

  13. Estimate of shallow groundwater recharge in the Hadejia-Nguru Wetlands, semi-arid northeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, B. J. M.

    1999-06-01

    The Hadejia-Nguru Wetlands are annually inundated flood plains in semi-arid northeastern Nigeria. The area has a unique ecosystem that forms a natural barrier against the encroachment of the Sahara desert. Both the rich wetland vegetation and local farmers using shallow tube wells depend on a groundwater mound (with a water table less than 6 m below the surface) that is present in the unconfined aquifer under the flood-plain area. Using well records (1991-97) and a hydrogeologic profile based on piezometers that were monitored for two years, it is shown that recharge through the annually inundated flood plains is the source of the groundwater mound. Maintenance of the groundwater-recharge function of the flood plains depends on wet-season releases from two large upstream dams. On the basis of a water-budget method, the mean (1991-97) wet-season unconfined groundwater recharge in the flood-plain area between Hadejia and Nguru and in the immediate vicinity (1250 km2) is estimated to be 132 mm (range, 73-197 mm). Outflow from the unconfined flood-plain aquifer to the unconfined upland aquifer is approximately 10% of the wet-season flood-plain recharge. The unconfined groundwater outflow from the flood-plain area can provide a significant contribution to the present-day rural water supply in the surrounding uplands, but it does not offer much potential for additional groundwater abstraction. In addition to outflow to the upland aquifer (˜14 mm), the distribution of the annually recharged water volume of the shallow flood-plain aquifer is (1) domestic uses (3 mm), (2) small-scale irrigation (˜15 mm), and (3) evapotranspiration ( 1 100 mm). Along the hydrogeologic profile, the recharge in the upland (i.e., outflow from the unconfined flood-plain aquifer and possibly diffuse rain-fed recharge) is in balance with the water uses (i.e., domestic uses, groundwater outflow, and evapotranspiration). The absence of a seasonal water-level trend in the two piezometers in the

  14. Groundwater evolution and recharge determination of the Quaternary aquifer in the Shule River basin, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianhua; Ma, Jinzhu; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Shuang

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater recharge and evolution in the Shule River basin, Northwest China, was investigated by a combination of hydrogeochemical tracers, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon methods. Results showed the general chemistry of the groundwater is of SO4 2- type. Water-rock reactions of halite, Glauber's salt, gypsum and celestite, and reverse ionic exchange dictated the groundwater chemistry evolution, increasing concentrations of Cl-, Na+, SO4 2-, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ in the groundwater. The δ18O and δ2H values of groundwater ranged from -10.8 to -7.7 and -74.4 to -53.1 ‰, respectively. Modern groundwater was identified in the proluvial fan and the shallow aquifer of the fine soil plain, likely as a result of direct infiltration of rivers and irrigation returns. Deep groundwater was depleted in heavy isotopes with 14C ages ranging from 3,000 to 26,000 years, suggesting palaeowater that was recharged during the late Pleistocene and middle Holocene epochs under a cold climate. These results have important implications for groundwater management in the Shule River basin, since large amounts of groundwater are effectively being mined and a water-use strategy is urgently needed.

  15. Groundwater uptake of forest and agricultural land covers in regions of recharge and discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Móricz N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater uptake of vegetation in discharge regions is known to play an important role, e.g., in the Hungarian Great Plain. Nevertheless, only little detailed monitoring of water table fluctuations and groundwater uptake (ETgw were reported under varying hydrologic conditions and vegetation cover. In this study, results of water table monitoring under forest plantations and adjacent corn plots in discharge and recharge regions were analyzed to gain better understanding of the relation of vegetation cover to groundwater uptake. A poplar (Populus tremula plantation and adjacent corn field plot were surveyed in a local discharge area, while a black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia plantation and adjacent corn field plot were analyzed in a recharge area. The water table under the poplar plantation displayed a night-time recovery in the discharge region, indicating significant groundwater supply. In this case an empirical version of the water table fluctuation method was used for calculating the ETgw that included the groundwater supply. The mean ETgw of the poplar plantation was 3.6 mm day-1, whereas no water table fluctuation was observed at the nearby corn plot. Naturally, the root system of the poplar was able to tap the groundwater in depths of 3.0-3.3 m while the shallower roots of the corn did not reach the groundwater reservoir in depths of 2.7-2.8 m. In the recharge zone the water table under the black locust plantation showed step-like changes referring to the lack of groundwater supply. The mean ETgw was 0.7 mm day-1 (groundwater depths of 3.0-3.2 m and similarly no ETgw was detected at the adjacent corn plot with groundwater depths between 3.2 and 3.4 m. The low ETgw of the young black locust plantation was due to the lack of groundwater supply in recharge area, but also the shallow root system might have played a role. Our results suggest that considerations should be given to local estimations of ETgw from water table measurements that

  16. Experimental study of artificial recharge alternatives in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, William C.

    1977-01-01

    Extensive water withdrawal from the Floridan aquifer in the urban Tampa Bay area has induced leakage from the overlying surficial aquifer adversely effecting the water table and lake levels. Artificial recharge could reduce the impact of these effects. Four experiments were conducted to investigate possible recharge alternatives; sinkhole recharge, water-spreading, connector wells, and subsurface-tile drainage to a deep well. Experiments indicate that all four methods can be effective. However, the sink-hole recharge experiment moved the greatest volume of water into the Floridan aquifer. The drain-tile experiment indicated greatest potential for draining the surficial aquifer. Combinations of the four methods could be used where potential exists for downward movement of water and sufficient unsaturated aquifer for water storage. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Groundwater ages, recharge conditions and hydrochemical evolution of a barrier island freshwater lens (Spiekeroog, Northern Germany)

    OpenAIRE

    Roeper, T; K. F. Kroeger; Meyer, Hanno; Sueltenfuss, J.; Greskowiak, J.; Massmann, G

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater lenses below barrier islands are dynamic systems affected by changes in morphodynamic patterns, groundwater recharge and discharge. They are also vulnerable to pollution and overabstraction of groundwater. Basic knowledge on hydrogeological and hydrochemical processes of freshwater lenses is important to ensure a sustainable water management, especially when taking into account possible effects of climate change. This is the first study which gives a compact overview on...

  18. An integrated approach to estimating groundwater recharge and storage variability in southern Mali, Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Chris M.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater recharge in southern Mali is investigated using a variety of methods. The aquifer system comprises a surficial unconfined aquifer in laterite that is hydraulically connected by vertical fractures through a sedimentary rock layer to a deep fractured semi-confined aquifer. Observed groundwater storage fluctuations from historical water level data correlate with GRACE satellite terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations, with peaks in September and lows in May; however, soil-moisture...

  19. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable. PMID:15984768

  20. Early findings from artificial recharge efforts of the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term success and sustainability of agriculture in the Lower Mississippi River Basin will depend largely on water resources. Aquifer decline in the region has been documented since the 1980s and continues today. Artificial recharge is one possible tool that could help alleviate this declin...

  1. Hydrodynamic analysis of the artificial recharge of aquifers during the planning stage. Results obtained in the Quaternary aquifer in the Valley of the Guadalquivir (Spain); Analisis hidrodinamico de la recarga artificial de acuiferos durante la etapa de planificacion. Resultados obtenidos en el acuifero cuaternario del valle del Guadalquivir (Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper shows a study on the viability of an artificial recharge in the flood-plain aquifer of the Guadalquivir River (Andalucia, Spain). The method used to the evaluation of the artificial recharge project is as follows: A simple model (one cell). The code has been made on the use of an EXCEL spreadsheet. A distributed parameters-flow model using a standard code (Modflow). A pilot recharge plant. The simple model has been applied in different zones. The model has only 5 parameters. It evaluates the artificial recharge by means of the depletion coefficient. The model was calibrated for a monthly time-step, although the water balances in the soil and in the aquifer were calculated daily. The calibration the distributed parameter-flow model shows a high transmissivity, storage coefficient and porosity. The pilot recharge plant is a trench with recharge wells within it. The water available for recharge is obtained from an irrigation canal. A network of control points has been established to monitor the piezometric levels. The results obtained show a high storage coefficient and porosity. These parameters show a rapid groundwater velocity. Finally, the paper compares and contrasts the results obtained with the simple model, distributed parameter- flow model and the pilot recharge plant. The results are quite similar. The groundwater velocity is rapid. Water remains in the aquifer for a few days before returning to the river. (Author)

  2. A water-budget model and estimates of groundwater recharge for Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adam G.

    2012-01-01

    On Guam, demand for groundwater tripled from the early 1970s to 2010. The demand for groundwater is anticipated to further increase in the near future because of population growth and a proposed military relocation to Guam. Uncertainty regarding the availability of groundwater resources to support the increased demand has prompted an investigation of groundwater recharge on Guam using the most current data and accepted methods. For this investigation, a daily water-budget model was developed and used to estimate mean recharge for various land-cover and rainfall conditions. Recharge was also estimated for part of the island using the chloride mass-balance method. Using the daily water-budget model, estimated mean annual recharge on Guam is 394.1 million gallons per day, which is 39 percent of mean annual rainfall (999.0 million gallons per day). Although minor in comparison to rainfall on the island, water inflows from water-main leakage, septic-system leachate, and stormwater runoff may be several times greater than rainfall at areas that receive these inflows. Recharge is highest in areas that are underlain by limestone, where recharge is typically between 40 and 60 percent of total water inflow. Recharge is relatively high in areas that receive stormwater runoff from storm-drain systems, but is relatively low in urbanized areas where stormwater runoff is routed to the ocean or to other areas. In most of the volcanic uplands in southern Guam where runoff is substantial, recharge is less than 30 percent of total water inflow. The water-budget model in this study differs from all previous water-budget investigations on Guam by directly accounting for canopy evaporation in forested areas, quantifying the evapotranspiration rate of each land-cover type, and accounting for evaporation from impervious areas. For the northern groundwater subbasins defined in Camp, Dresser & McKee Inc. (1982), mean annual baseline recharge computed in this study is 159.1 million gallons

  3. Groundwater Recharge Estimation using Low-Cost Observation Techniques and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Hartmut; Wang, Zijian; Assefa, Kibreab; Woodbury, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Sustainable groundwater management requests groundwater recharge estimation as a critical quantity. We used physical-based modelling using data from a low-cost weather station and tested the feasibility and robustness of recharge estimation. The method was tested on two locations in British Columbia (B.C.), Canada. The main study was conducted in Southern Abbotsford, B.C. and applications related to water management in future climates and to water usage optimization were conducted in Okanagan Valley, B.C. Recharge was determined using HYDRUS-1D. The meteorological data were recorded by a HOBO weather station for a short observation period (about 1 year) and an existing weather station (Abbotsford A) for long-term study purpose (27 years). The derived soil hydraulic parameters of two undisturbed soil cores were used to characterize the soil. Model performance was evaluated by using observed soil moisture and soil temperature data. A rigorous sensitivity analysis was used to test the robustness of the model. Recharge during the short observation period was estimated at 863 mm and 816 mm. The mean annual recharge was estimated at 848 mm/year, and 859 mm/year based on a time series of 27 years. 80% of precipitation contributed to recharge in hydrologic winter period. The comparison of the recharge estimates with other studies indicates a good agreement. Being able to predict transient recharge estimates, this method can provide a tool for estimates on nutrient leaching which is often controlled by strong precipitation events and rapid infiltration of water and nitrate into the soil. Modeling supports that recharge estimates at high temporal resolution also increase the prediction quality of nitrate leaching. The application for water resources related problems in the Okanagan Valley showed that linking groundwater and surface water using regional groundwater estimates improved calibration of existing groundwater model strongly and that our method is capable to use

  4. Ecohydrologic process modeling of mountain block groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, Ian A; Woessner, William W; Running, Steve W

    2009-01-01

    Regional mountain block recharge (MBR) is a key component of alluvial basin aquifer systems typical of the western United States. Yet neither water scientists nor resource managers have a commonly available and reasonably invoked quantitative method to constrain MBR rates. Recent advances in landscape-scale ecohydrologic process modeling offer the possibility that meteorological data and land surface physical and vegetative conditions can be used to generate estimates of MBR. A water balance was generated for a temperate 24,600-ha mountain watershed, elevation 1565 to 3207 m, using the ecosystem process model Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles) (Running and Hunt 1993). Input data included remotely sensed landscape information and climate data generated with the Mountain Climate Simulator (MT-CLIM) (Running et al. 1987). Estimated mean annual MBR flux into the crystalline bedrock terrain is 99,000 m(3) /d, or approximately 19% of annual precipitation for the 2003 water year. Controls on MBR predictions include evapotranspiration (radiation limited in wet years and moisture limited in dry years), soil properties, vegetative ecotones (significant at lower elevations), and snowmelt (dominant recharge process). The ecohydrologic model is also used to investigate how climatic and vegetative controls influence recharge dynamics within three elevation zones. The ecohydrologic model proves useful for investigating controls on recharge to mountain blocks as a function of climate and vegetation. Future efforts will need to investigate the uncertainty in the modeled water balance by incorporating an advanced understanding of mountain recharge processes, an ability to simulate those processes at varying scales, and independent approaches to calibrating MBR estimates. PMID:19702780

  5. Using stable isotopes to characterize groundwater recharge sources in the volcanic island of Madeira, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Susana; Cruz, J. Virgílio; Figueira, Celso

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogeology of volcanic islands remains poorly understood, despite the fact that populations that live on them rely on groundwater as a primary water source. This situation is exacerbated by their complex structure, geological heterogeneity, and sometimes active volcanic processes that hamper easy analysis of their hydrogeological dynamics. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool that has been used to assess groundwater dynamics in complex terrains. In this work, stable isotopes are used to better understand the hydrogeology of Madeira Island and provide a case-study that can serve as a basis for groundwater studies in other similar settings. The stable isotopic composition (δ18O and δ2H) of rain at the main recharge areas of the island is determined, as well as the sources and altitudes of recharge of several springs, groundwater in tunnels and wells. The water in tunnels was found to be recharged almost exclusively by rain in the deforested high plateaus, whilst several springs associated with shallow perched aquifers are recharged from rain and cloud water interception by the vegetated slopes. Nevertheless some springs thought to be sourced from deep perched aquifers, recharge in the central plateaus, and their isotopic composition is similar to the water in the tunnels. Recharge occurs primarily during autumn and winter, as evidenced by the springs and tunnels Water Lines (WL). The groundwater in wells appears to originate from runoff from rain that falls along the slopes that infiltrates near the streams' mouths, where the wells are located. This is evident by the evaporation line along which the wells plot. Irrigation water is also a possible source of recharge. The data is compatible with the hydrogeological conceptual model of Madeira. This work also shows the importance of cloud water interception as a net contributor to groundwater recharge, at least in the perched aquifers that feed numerous springs. As the amount of rainfall is expected to

  6. Groundwater Recharge Evaluation in Semi-Arid Northeast Mexico in Response to Projected Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolaver, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    This research evaluates the effects of projected climate change on mountain recharge in the semi-arid Cuatrocinegas Basin (CCB) of northeast Mexico. The CCB UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is located in Coahuila, Mexico (~27° N, ~102° W) and includes > 500 springs that discharge from a regional flow system to wetlands with > 70 endemic species and to an irrigation network. This study tests the hypothesis that projected climate changes will reduce CCB recharge. In CCB, ~75% of annual precipitation (~220 mm at 700 m, ~400 mm at 2350 m) falls between May and October and ~40% falls during the North American Monsoon in June, July, and August. Environmental isotopes indicate aquifer residence times of > 50 years. Stable isotopes (O and H) show that mountain precipitation (at an elevation of ~1170 to 2350 m) dominates groundwater recharge. Recharge is insignificant at lower- elevation valleys that cover the majority of the study area due to high evapotranspiration rates. A Cl--balance water-budget recharge analysis estimates a spatially distributed recharge rate of ~1 to 3% of precipitation to provide at least 35x106 m3/year spring discharge (as measured in canals that drain dozens of springs). IPCC AR4 climate projections predict an annual temperature increase of 3.0 to 3.5°C and an annual precipitation decrease of 5 to 10% for Subregion CNA (located adjacent to CCB) by 2099. During June to August, models project a temperature increase of 3.5 to 4.0°C and a precipitation increase of 0 to 5%. Although global and regional circulation models evaluate mountain regions poorly, a first-order evaluation of climate projections on CCB recharge is needed input to develop effective long-term groundwater management policies. Climate projections suggest that the minimum elevation at which recharge occurs in CCB may increase by ~615 m to 1785 m, which would limit recharge to the highest mountain elevations. If annual precipitation is reduced by 5 to 10% and temperatures increase as

  7. Groundwater vulnerability and recharge or palaeorecharge in the Southeastern Chad Basin, Chari Baguirmi aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopes and major chemical elements have been used to investigate present or ancient groundwater renewal in the multilayered aquifer of the Chari-Baguirmi plain, South of Lake Chad. On the Western side, recharge mainly occurs from the Chari River during the flood period. Within the Ndjamena area, the rise of the piezometric level in the contaminated subsurface zone provokes an increase in nitrate concentrations. Rainfall recharge is mainly located close to the outcropping basement, i.e. on the Eastern side of the area and does not occurs in the central part of the plain where groundwater also presents a stronger evaporative signature. This supports the hypothesis attributing a major role to evaporation processes in the formation of piezometric depressions in the Sahel zone. There is no evidence of present day or ancient water recharge from Lake Chad. (author)

  8. Rainfall intensity and groundwater recharge: empirical evidence from the Upper Nile Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the intensity of precipitation as a result of global warming are expected to be especially pronounced in the tropics. The impact of changing rainfall intensities on groundwater recharge remains, however, unclear. Analysis of a recently compiled data set of coincidental, daily observations of rainfall and groundwater levels remote from abstraction for four stations in the Upper Nile Basin over the period 1999-2008 shows that the magnitude of observed recharge events is better related to the sum of heavy rainfalls, exceeding a threshold of 10 mm day-1, than to that of all daily rainfall events. Consequently, projected increases in rainfall intensities as a result of global warming may promote rather than restrict groundwater recharge in similar environments of the tropics. Further monitoring and research are required to test the robustness of these findings, but the evidence presented is consistent with recent modelling highlighting the importance of explicitly considering changing rainfall intensities in the assessment of climate change impacts on groundwater recharge.

  9. Comparing groundwater recharge and base flow in the Bukmoongol small-forested watershed, Korea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E A Combalicer; S H Lee; S Ahn; D Y Kim; S Im

    2008-10-01

    Groundwater recharge and base flow using different investigated methods are simulated in the 15-ha Bukmoongol small-forested watershed located at the southern part of Korea.The WHAT system, PART,RORA,PULSE,BFI,and RAP software are used to estimate groundwater recharge or base flow and base flow index from the measured stream flow.Results show that about 15 –31 per cent of annual rainfall might be contributed for base flow.The watershed groundwater recharge proportions are computed to about 10 –21 per cent during the wet period and 23 –32 per cent for the remainder periods.Mean annual base flow indices vary from 0.25 to 0.76 estimated using different methods. However,the study found out that all methods were significantly correlated with each other.The similarity of various methods is expressed as a weighted relationship provided by the matrix product from the principal component analysis.Overall,the BFI and WHAT software appeared consistent in estimating recharge or base flow,and base flow index under Korea ’s conditions.The case study recommends the application of different models to other watersheds as well as in low-lying areas where most observation groundwater wells are located with available stream flow data.

  10. Impact of climate change on groundwater recharge in dry areas: An ecohydrology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2011-09-01

    SummaryThis work proposes an ecohydrology-based approach to study the impact of climate change on groundwater recharge in dry areas. It is largely based on a concept that in dry areas, vegetation community can be divided into two different groups, shallow- and deep-rooted vegetation, with the growing-season average of root-zone soil water saturation tending to be at its optimum value for the growth of deep-rooted vegetation. The concept is supported by data sets collected from different dry areas. Analytical results of soil water dynamics developed in previous studies are adapted here for investigating the impact of climate change. Because the conceptual model allows deep-zone soil-water saturation, averaged over growing seasons, to remain fixed during different climate conditions, we can construct a relationship among groundwater recharge, the coverage of deep-rooted vegetation, and climate. As an illustrative example, we apply the developed approach to the Yucca Mountain area. Our estimated recharge value under the current climate and the vegetation coverage is generally consistent with results estimated from other methods or observed from the site. We also evaluate how the recharge will change under several assumed future climate scenarios. The results show that both groundwater recharge and deep-rooted vegetation coverage increase with decreasing rainfall frequency (for a given amount of annual rainfall), with increasing average rainfall depth per rainfall event (for a fixed frequency) and with increasing frequency (for a fixed rainfall depth per rainfall event). The latter indicates a relatively large degree of buffering effects of vegetation on changes in groundwater recharge.

  11. Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating groundwater flow and contaminant transport at a former uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. We estimated effects of temporal and spatial variability in evapotranspiration (ET) on recharge and discharge within a groundwater model domain (GMD) as part of this evaluation. We used remote sensing algorithms and precipitation (PPT) data to estimate ET and the ET/PPT ratios within the 3531 hectare GMD. For the period from 2000 to 2012, ET and PPT were nearly balanced (129 millimeters per year [mm yr-1] and 130 mm yr-1, respectively; ET/PPT = 0.99). However, seasonal and annual variability in ET and PPT were out of phase, and spatial variability in vegetation differentiated discharge and recharge areas within the GMD. Half of ET occurred during spring and early summer when PPT was low, and about 70% of PPT arriving in fall and winter was discharged as plant transpiration in the spring and summer period. Vegetation type and health had a significant effect on the site water balance. Plant cover and ET were significantly higher (1) during years of lighter compared to years of heavier grazing pressure, and (2) on rangeland protected from grazing compared to rangeland grazed by livestock. Heavy grazing increased groundwater recharge (PPT > ET over the 13-year period). Groundwater discharge (ET > PPT over the 13-year period) was highest in riparian phreatophyte communities but insignificant in desert phreatophyte communities impacted by heavy grazing. Grazing management in desert upland and phreatophyte communities may result in reduced groundwater recharge, increased groundwater discharge, and could be used to influence local groundwater flow.

  12. Groundwater recharge, circulation and geochemical evolution in the source region of the Blue Nile River, Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical and environmental isotope data were used to gain the first regional picture of groundwater recharge, circulation and its hydrochemical evolution in the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia. Q-mode statistical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify water into objective groups and to conduct inverse geochemical modeling among the groups. Two major structurally deformed regions with distinct groundwater circulation and evolution history were identified. These are the Lake Tana Graben (LTG) and the Yerer Tullu Wellel Volcanic Lineament Zone (YTVL). Silicate hydrolysis accompanied by CO2 influx from deeper sources plays a major role in groundwater chemical evolution of the high TDS Na-HCO 3 type thermal groundwaters of these two regions. In the basaltic plateau outside these two zones, groundwater recharge takes place rapidly through fractured basalts, groundwater flow paths are short and they are characterized by low TDS and are Ca-Mg-HCO 3 type waters. Despite the high altitude (mean altitude ∼2500 masl) and the relatively low mean annual air temperature (18 deg. C) of the region compared to Sahelian Africa, there is no commensurate depletion in δ 18O compositions of groundwaters of the Ethiopian Plateau. Generally the highland areas north and east of the basin are characterized by relatively depleted δ 18O groundwaters. Altitudinal depletion of δ 18O is 0.1%o/100 m. The meteoric waters of the Blue Nile River basin have higher d-excess compared to the meteoric waters of the Ethiopian Rift and that of its White Nile sister basin which emerges from the equatorial lakes region. The geochemically evolved groundwaters of the YTVL and LTG are relatively isotopically depleted when compared to the present day meteoric waters reflecting recharge under colder climate and their high altitude

  13. Groundwater recharge environments and hydrogeochemical evolution in the Jiuquan Basin, Northwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groundwater recharge environments and hydrogeochemical characteristics in the Quaternary aquifer of Jiuquan Basin was investigated using a combination of chemical indicators, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon dating. The d-excess values of winter precipitation and surface water revealed that the meltwater from snow and ice played the dominant role in the basin’s surface water supply. The unconfined groundwater showed gradual enrichment of heavy isotopes along the flow path, but δ18O and δ2H values were similar to those of surface water, suggesting recent recharge as a result of rapid seepage along rivers combined with the effects of high evaporation. The 14C (pmc) values of unconfined groundwater was between 71.5% and 90.9%, and since 80% modern carbon probably represents the upper limit of initial 14C activity, this suggests that the groundwater is relatively young. The confined groundwater was depleted in heavy isotopes; coupled with low 14C values (∼20–53%), indicating that the groundwater was mainly recharged as palaeowater during the late Pleistocene and Holocene epochs under a cold climate. The surface water and most groundwater samples were fresh rather than saline, with TDS −1, respectively. The chemistry of unconfined groundwater changed from HCO3-dominated to no dominant ions and then to SO42-dominated moving along the flow path from the Jiuquan-Jiayuguan Basin to the Jinta Basin, and the confined water was SO42-dominated. The results have important implications for groundwater management in the Basin, where a high proportion of the water being used is in effect being mined (i.e., extracted faster than its replacement rate); thus, significant changes are urgently needed in the regional water-use strategy.

  14. Fens as Whole-Ecosystem Gauges of Groundwater Recharge Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J. Z.; Knifong, D. L.; Tuil, J.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past century, mean air temperature has increased approximately 1 C in California. Since the 1950s, there has been an earlier onset of snowmelt and reduced snowpack (measured as snow water equivalent) in California as well as in much of the western United States. Because the snowpack is the main source of groundwater recharge in the mountainous west, reduced snowpack could result in decreased groundwater recharge through time. This could have important ramifications because groundwater recharge maintains groundwater springs, soil moisture, river baseflows and cool water temperatures. Reductions in groundwater recharge could not only impact water availability for human populations, but could also threaten long-term viability of ecosystems reliant on groundwater flows. Groundwater-fed peatlands called fens are potentially ideal ecosystems for studying changes in groundwater recharge, because they are groundwater discharge sites that rely upon corresponding recharge sites for their sustenance. When the amount of groundwater flow to a fen is reduced, the elevation of the water table decreases leading to desiccation, compaction and increased microbial oxidation of the organic soil. In cases where groundwater flow is reduced over an extended period of time, conversion of fen into wet or mesic meadow or even pine forest can occur resulting in contraction of fen boundaries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of fens as whole-ecosystem gauges of groundwater recharge. We studied 7 fens distributed throughout the Sierra Nevada by tracking their areas over 70+ years with aerial photography. All photos were geo-registered using the 2005 National Agricultural Inventory Program orthophotography as the base. Images were projected to UTM zone 10, NAD 83 using ArcGIS 10.0. Fen vegetation was identified in the aerial photos predominantly by (1) dark brownish-green coloring (or various shades of gray and black in black and white imagery) and (2) mottling

  15. Geochemical Effects of Induced Stream-Water and Artificial Recharge on the Equus Beds Aquifer, South-Central Kansas, 1995-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer is part of a strategy implemented by the city of Wichita, Kansas, to preserve future water supply and address declining water levels in the aquifer of as much as 30 feet caused by withdrawals for water supply and irrigation since the 1940s. Water-level declines represent a diminished water supply and also may accelerate migration of saltwater from the Burrton oil field to the northwest and the Arkansas River to the southwest into the freshwater of the Equus Beds aquifer. Artificial recharge, as a part of the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge Project, involves capturing flows larger than base flow from the Little Arkansas River and recharging the water to the Equus Beds aquifer by means of infiltration or injection. The geochemical effects on the Equus Beds aquifer of induced stream-water and artificial recharge at the Halstead and Sedgwick sites were determined through collection and analysis of hydrologic and water-quality data and the application of statistical, mixing, flow and solute-transport, and geochemical model simulations. Chloride and atrazine concentrations in the Little Arkansas River and arsenic concentrations in ground water at the Halstead recharge site frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. During 30 percent of the time from 1999 through 2004, continuous estimated chloride concentrations in the Little Arkansas River at Highway 50 near Halstead exceeded the Secondary Drinking-Water Regulation of 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations in shallow monitoring wells located adjacent to the stream exceeded the drinking-water criterion five times from 1995 through 2004. Atrazine concentrations in water sampled from the Little Arkansas River had large variability and were at or near the drinking-water Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter as an annual average established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine

  16. Assessment of Artificial Recharge at Sand Hollow Reservoir, Washington County, Utah, Updated to Conditions through 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Sand Hollow, Utah, is the site of a surface-water reservoir completed in March 2002 and operated by the Washington County Water Conservancy District (WCWCD) primarily as an aquifer storage and recovery project. The reservoir is an off-channel facility that receives water from the Virgin River, diverted near the town of Virgin, Utah. Hydrologic data collected are described and listed in this report, including ground-water levels, reservoir stage, reservoir-water temperature, meteorology, evaporation, and estimated ground-water recharge. Since the construction of the reservoir in 2002, diversions from the Virgin River have resulted in generally rising stage and surface area. Large spring run-off volumes during 2005-06 allowed the WCWCD to fill the reservoir to near capacity, with a surface area of about 1,300 acres in 2006. Reservoir stage reached a record altitude of about 3,060 feet in May 2006, resulting in a depth of nearly 90 feet and a reservoir storage of about 51,000 acre-feet. Water temperature in the reservoir shows large seasonal variation and has ranged from about 5 to 32?C. Estimated ground-water recharge rates have ranged from 0.01 to 0.43 feet per day. Estimated recharge volumes have ranged from about 200 to about 3,500 acre-feet per month. Total ground-water recharge from March 2002 through August 2006 is estimated to be about 51,000 acre-feet. Estimated evaporation rates have varied from 0.05 to 0.97 feet per month, resulting in evaporation losses of 20 to 1,200 acre-feet per month. Total evaporation from March 2002 through August 2006 is estimated to be about 17,000 acre-feet. The combination of generally declining recharge rates and increasing reservoir altitude and area explains the trend of an increasing ratio of evaporation to recharge volume over time, with the total volume of water lost through evaporation nearly as large as the volume of ground-water recharge during the first 8 months of 2006. With removal of the viscosity effects (caused by

  17. Methodology, results, and significance of an unsaturated-zone tracer test at an artificial-recharge facility, Tucson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    A tracer test conducted in 1987 at an artificial-recharge facility in Tucson, Arizona, indicates that solute movement through the poorly sorted stratified alluvial sediments in the unsaturated zone beneath a recharge basin takes place along preferential-flow paths. Movement of a tracer-laced pulse of reclaimed wastewater was monitored using pressure-vacuum lysimeters installed at depths that range from 11 to 45 ft below the bottom of the recharge basin. Tracer-breakthrough curves do not indicate a consistent relation between maximum tracer concentration and depth or between time of tracer breakthrough and depth. Apparent dispersion, as indicated by the slope of the rising leg of the tracer-breakthrough curve, shows no apparent relation with depth. In some cases, the tracer arrived earlier at deep sampling locations than at shallow ones. Velocity of solute flow ranged from 1.9 to 9.0 ft/day. Less interaction between recharge water and solid-phase materials in the unsaturated zone occurs under preferential-flow conditions than if flow occurred as a uniform wetting front. Flow of water through the unsaturated zone is concentrated into fingers or channels under preferential-flow conditions, and the renovating capability of soil is reduced because of the reduced surface area and reduced contact time in the biologically active part of the unsaturated profile. Chemical substances that normally would be decomposed by microbial activity or sorbed by sediment particles can move through the unsaturated zone and cause groundwater contamination under preferential-flow conditions. (USGS)

  18. Natural groundwater recharge and water balance at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present water-balance data collected in 1988 and 1989 from the 300 Area Buried Waste Test Facility and Grass Site, and the 200 East Area closed-bottom lysimeter. This report is an annual update of previous recharge status reports by Gee, Rockhold, and Downs, and Gee. Data from several other lysimeter sites are included for comparison. 43 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Natural groundwater recharge and water balance at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present water-balance data collected in 1988 and 1989 from the 300 Area Buried Waste Test Facility and Grass Site, and the 200 East Area closed-bottom lysimeter. This report is an annual update of previous recharge status reports by Gee, Rockhold, and Downs, and Gee. Data from several other lysimeter sites are included for comparison. 43 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Partitioning groundwater recharge between rainfall infiltration and irrigation return flows using stable isotopes: the Crau aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraphin, Pierre; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Gonçalvès, Julio

    2016-04-01

    Traditional flood irrigation is used since the 16th century in the Crau plain (Southern France) for hay production. To supply this high consuming irrigation practice, water is diverted from the Durance River, originating from the Alps, and the large amount of irrigation return flows constitutes the main recharge of the Crau aquifer, which is in turn largely exploited for domestic, industrial and agricultural water use. A possible reduction of irrigation fluxes due to a need of water saving or to a future land-use change could endanger the groundwater resource. A robust quantification of the groundwater mass balance is thus required to assess a sustainable water management in the region. The high isotopic contrast between these exogenous irrigation waters and local precipitations allows the use of stable isotopes of water as conservative tracers to deduce their contributions to the surface recharge. An extensive groundwater sampling was performed to obtain δ18O and δ2H over the whole aquifer. Based on a new piezometric contour map, combined with a reestimate of the aquifer geometry, the isotopic data are implemented in a geostatistical approach to produce a conceptual equivalent-homogeneous reservoir, in order to apply a simple water and isotope mass balance mixing model. The isotopic composition of the two end-members is assessed, and the quantification of groundwater flows is then used to calculate the two recharge fluxes. Near to steady-state condition, the set of isotopic data treated by geostatistics leads to a recharge by irrigation of 5.20 ± 0.93 m3 s-1 i.e. 1173 ± 210 mm yr-1, and a natural recharge of 2.26 ± 0.91 m3 s-1 i.e. 132 ± 53 mm yr-1. Thus, 70 ± 9% of the effective surface recharge comes from the irrigation return flow, consistent with the literature (between 67% and 78%). This study constitutes a straightforward and independent approach to assess groundwater surface recharges with uncertainties and will help to constrain a future transient

  1. Groundwater surface water interactions through streambeds and the role of phreatophytes in identifying important recharge zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Ahring

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater and surface water interactions within riparian corridors impact the distribution of phreatophytes that tap into groundwater stores. The changes in canopy area of phreatophytes over time is related to changes in depth to groundwater, distance from a stream or river, and hydrologic soil group. Remote sensing was used to determine the location of trees with predevelopment and post-development aerial photography over the Ogallala Aquifer in the central plains of the United States. It was found that once the depth to groundwater becomes greater than about 3 m, tree populations decrease as depth to water increases. This subsequently limited the extent of phreatophytes to within 700 m of the river. It was also found that phreatophytes have a higher likelihood of growing on hydrologic soil groups with higher saturated hydraulic conductivity. Phreatophytes exist along portions of the Arkansas River corridor where significant decreases in groundwater occurred as long as alluvium exists to create perched conditions where trees survive dry periods. Significant decreases (more that 50% in canopy cover exists along river segments where groundwater declined by more than 10 m, indicating areas with good hydraulic connectivity between surface water and groundwater. Thus, interpretation of changes in phreatophyte distribution using historical and recent aerial photophaphy is important in delineating zones of enhanced recharge where aquifers might be effectively recharged through diversion of surface water runoff.

  2. Groundwater surface water interactions and the role of phreatophytes in identifying recharge zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Ahring

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater and surface water interactions within riparian corridors impact the distribution of phreatophytes that tap into groundwater stores. The changes in canopy area of phreatophytes over time is related to changes in depth to groundwater, distance from a stream or river, and hydrologic soil group. Remote sensing was used to determine the location of trees with pre-development and post-development aerial photography over the Ogallala Aquifer in the central plains of the United States. It was found that once the depth to groundwater becomes greater than about 3 m, tree populations decrease as depth to water increases. This subsequently limited the extent of phreatophytes to within 700 m of the river. It was also found that phreatophytes have a higher likelihood of growing on hydrologic soil groups with higher saturated hydraulic conductivity. Phreatophytes exist along portions of the Arkansas River corridor where significant decreases in groundwater occurred as long as alluvium exists to create perched conditions where trees survive dry periods. Significant decreases (more that 50% in canopy cover exists along river segments where groundwater declined by more than 10 m, indicating areas with good hydraulic connectivity between surface water and groundwater. Thus, interpretation of changes in phreatophyte distribution using historical and recent aerial photography is important in delineating zones of enhanced recharge where aquifers might be effectively recharged through diversion of surface water runoff.

  3. Estimating annual groundwater recharge coefficient for karst aquifers of the southern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, V.; Manna, F.; De Vita, P.

    2014-02-01

    To assess the mean annual groundwater recharge of the karst aquifers in the southern Apennines (Italy), the estimation of the mean annual groundwater recharge coefficient (AGRC) was conducted by means of an integrated approach based on hydrogeological, hydrological, geomorphological, land use and soil cover analyses. Starting from the hydrological budget equation, the coefficient was conceived as the ratio between the net groundwater outflow and the precipitation minus actual evapotranspiration (P - ETR) for a karst aquifer. A large part of the southern Apennines, which is covered by a meteorological network containing 40 principal karst aquifers, was studied. Using precipitation and air temperature time series gathered through monitoring stations operating in the period 1926-2012, the mean annual P - ETR was estimated, and its distribution was modelled at a regional scale by considering the orographic barrier and rain shadow effects of the Apennine chain, as well as the altitudinal control. Four sample karst aquifers with available long spring discharge time series were identified for estimating the AGRC. The resulting values were correlated with other parameters that control groundwater recharge, such as the extension of outcropping karst rocks, morphological settings, land use and covering soil type. A multiple linear regression between the AGRC, lithology and the summit plateau and endorheic areas was found. This empirical model was used to assess the AGRC and mean annual groundwater recharge in other regional karst aquifers. The coefficient was calculated as ranging between 50 and 79%, thus being comparable with other similar estimations carried out for karst aquifers of European and Mediterranean countries. The mean annual groundwater recharge for karst aquifers of the southern Apennines was assessed by these characterizations and validated by a comparison with available groundwater outflow measurements. These results represent a deeper understanding of an

  4. Effects of acidic recharge on groundwater at the St. Kevin Gulch site, Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, S.S.; Harrison, W.J.; Walton-Day, K.

    2001-01-01

    The acid rock drainage-affected stream of St. Kevin Gulch recharges the Quaternary sand and gravel aquifer of Tennessee Park, near Leadville, Colorado, lowering pH and contributing iron, cadmium, copper, zinc and sulphate to the ground-water system. Dissolved metal mobility is controlled by the seasonal spring runoff as well as oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions in the aquifer. Oxidizing conditions occur in the unconfined portions of the aquifer whilst sulphate-reducing conditions are found down gradient where semi-confined groundwater flow occurs beneath a natural wetland. Iron-reducing conditions occur in the transition from unconfined to semi-confined groundwater flow. Dissolved iron concentrations are low to not detectable in the alluvial fan recharge zone and increase in a down gradient direction. The effects of low-pH, metal-rich recharge are pronounced during low-flow in the fall when there is a defined area of low pH groundwater with elevated concentrations of dissolved zinc, cadmium, copper and sulphate adjacent to St. Kevin Gulch. Dissolved metal and sulphate concentrations in the recharge zone are diluted during spring runoff, although the maximum concentrations of dissolved zinc, cadmium, copper and sulphate occur at selected down gradient locations during high flow. Dissolved zinc, cadmium and copper concentrations are low to not detectable, whereas dissolved iron concentrations are greatest, in groundwater samples from the sulphate-reducing zone. Attenuation of zinc, cadmium and copper beneath the wetland suggests sulphide mineral precipitation is occurring in the semi-confined aquifer, in agreement with previous site investigations and saturation index calculations. Adsorption of dissolved zinc, cadmium and copper onto iron hydroxides is a minor attenuation process due to the low pH of the groundwater system.

  5. A screening tool for delineating subregions of steady recharge within groundwater models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Bakker, Mark; Crompton, Becky

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a screening method for simplifying groundwater models by delineating areas within the domain that can be represented using steady-state groundwater recharge. The screening method is based on an analytical solution for the damping of sinusoidal infiltration variations in homogeneous soils in the vadose zone. The damping depth is defined as the depth at which the flux variation damps to 5% of the variation at the land surface. Groundwater recharge may be considered steady where the damping depth is above the depth of the water table. The analytical solution approximates the vadose zone diffusivity as constant, and we evaluated when this approximation is reasonable. We evaluated the analytical solution through comparison of the damping depth computed by the analytic solution with the damping depth simulated by a numerical model that allows variable diffusivity. This comparison showed that the screening method conservatively identifies areas of steady recharge and is more accurate when water content and diffusivity are nearly constant. Nomograms of the damping factor (the ratio of the flux amplitude at any depth to the amplitude at the land surface) and the damping depth were constructed for clay and sand for periodic variations between 1 and 365 d and flux means and amplitudes from nearly 0 to 1 × 10−3 m d−1. We applied the screening tool to Central Valley, California, to identify areas of steady recharge. A MATLAB script was developed to compute the damping factor for any soil and any sinusoidal flux variation.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of artificial recharge in northern Qater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchioli, John

    1976-01-01

    Fresh ground water in northern Qatar occurs as a lens in limestone and dolomite of Eocene age. Natural recharge from precipitation averages 17x106 cubic metres per year whereas current discharge averages 26.6x106 cubic metres per year. Depletion of storage is accompanied by a deterioration in quality due to encroachment of salty water from the Gulf and from underlying formations. Artificial recharge with desalted sea water to permit additional agricultural development appears technically feasible but its practicability needs to be examined further. A hydrogeological appraisal including test drilling, geophysical logging, pumping tests, and a recharge test, coupled with engineering analysis of direct surface storage/distribution of desalted sea water versus aquifer storage/distribution, is recommended.

  7. The effect of hydrogeological conditions on variability and dynamic of groundwater recharge in a carbonate aquifer at local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvory, Noam Zach; Livshitz, Yakov; Kuznetsov, Michael; Adar, Eilon; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater recharge in fractured karstic aquifers is particularly difficult to quantify due to the rock mass's heterogeneity and complexity that include preferential flow paths along karst conduits. The present study's major goals were to assess how the changes in lithology, as well as the fractured karst systems, influence the flow mechanism in the unsaturated zone, and to define the spatial variation of the groundwater recharge at local scale. The study area is located within the fractured carbonate Western Mountain aquifer (Yarkon-Taninim), west of the city of Jerusalem at the Ein Karem (EK) production well field. Field monitoring included groundwater level observations in nine locations in the study area during years 1990-2014. The measured groundwater level series were analyzed with the aid of one-dimensional, dual permeability numerical model of water flow in variably saturated fractured-porous media, which was calibrated and used to estimate groundwater recharge at nine locations. The recharge values exhibit significant spatial and temporal variation with mean and standard deviation values of 216 and 113 mm/year, respectively. Based on simulations, relationships were established between precipitation and groundwater recharge in each of the nine studied sites and compared with similar ones obtained in earlier regional studies. Simulations show that fast and slow flow paths conditions also influence annual cumulative groundwater recharge dynamic. In areas where fast flow paths exist, most of the groundwater recharge occurs during the rainy season (60-80% from the total recharge for the tested years), while in locations with slow flow path conditions the recharge rate stays relatively constant with a close to linear pattern and continues during summer.

  8. Feasibility of groundwater recharge dam projects in arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, H. H.

    2014-05-01

    A new method for determining feasibility and prioritizing investments for agricultural and domestic recharge dams in arid regions is developed and presented. The method is based on identifying the factors affecting the decision making process and evaluating these factors, followed by determining the indices in a GIS-aided environment. Evaluated parameters include results from field surveys and site visits, land cover and soils data, precipitation data, runoff data and modeling, number of beneficiaries, domestic irrigation demand, reservoir objectives, demography, reservoirs yield and reliability, dam structures, construction costs, and operation and maintenance costs. Results of a case study on more than eighty proposed dams indicate that assessment of reliability, annualized cost/demand satisfied and yield is crucial prior to investment decision making in arid areas. Irrigation demand is the major influencing parameter on yield and reliability of recharge dams, even when only 3 months of the demand were included. Reliability of the proposed reservoirs as related to their standardized size and net inflow was found to increase with increasing yield. High priority dams were less than 4% of the total, and less priority dams amounted to 23%, with the remaining found to be not feasible. The results of this methodology and its application has proved effective in guiding stakeholders for defining most favorable sites for preliminary and detailed design studies and commissioning.

  9. Groundwater recharge patterns in the Yobe river Fadama: evidence from hydrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty Groundwater monitor Piezometers installed linearly away from the channel of River Yobe, on opposing banks were monitored across the rainy and dry seasons of 1993. Results indicate that water levels rose rapidly in July attaining levels above ground surface in September, and by October the water level was at the decline. These coincided with the advance and the retreat of the Yobe River flood, suggestive of the Yobe River having a significant influence on the recharge to the alluvial aquifers of the Fadama. Results of chemical analyses of water samples collected from the piezometers, river water, and flood water, suggest that groundwater of the shallow alluvial aquifers do not seem to have a common immediate source with the surface water sources of the Fadama. Hydrochemical concentration trend show concentration gradient towards the river channel, implying that the river might not be the source of the groundwater recharge to the Yobe River Fadama aquifers. Groundwater flow characteristics, also seem to support this view, since there is flow gradient towards the river for the greater part of the year except during peak flood when there are indications of flow (by way of higher potentiometric surface) away from the river. These and other evidences discussed in the paper suggest that the Fadama alluvial aquifer gets most of its recharge directly from rainfall infiltration in regions devoid of clay cover

  10. Estimation of groundwater recharge to chalk and sandstone aquifers using simple soil models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, R.; Finch, J.; Harding, R.

    1997-03-01

    On the assumption that the water draining below the root zone is potentially available for groundwater recharge, two current UK methods for estimating annual groundwater recharge have been compared with a new soil model using data from four sites under permanent grass in the UK: two sites representative of the Chalk aquifer at Bridgest Farm (Hampshire) and Fleam Dyke (Cambridgeshire), and two sites on the Triassic sandstone at Bicton College (Devon) and Bacon Hall (Shropshire). A Four Root Layers Model (FRLM), the Penman-Grindley model and the UK Meteorological Office Rainfall and Evaporation Calculation System (MORECS) were used. The new soil model was run with potential evaporation as input both from the MORECS and from the Penman-Monteith equation. The models were run for the Chalk sites both with and without a bypass flow of 15% of rainfall. Bypass was not considered for the sandstone sites. The performance of the models was tested against neutron probes measurements of soil moisture deficits. In addition, the annual groundwater recharge estimated from the models was compared with the published values obtained from the 'zero flux plane' method. Generally, the Penman-Grindley model was more successful in predicting the time for soil to return to its field capacity than in predicting the magnitude of the soil moisture deficit. The annual groundwater recharge was predicted with reasonable accuracy. The MORECS relatively tended to overestimate the soil moisture deficits and to delay the time at which the soil returns to its field capacity. The consequences were underestimates of annual groundwater recharge, owing either to the higher values of potential evaporation calculated from the MORECS or tothe high available water capacity values associated with the soils under consideration. The new soil model (FRLM) predicts the soil moisture deficits successfully and hence is reliable in estimating the annual groundwater recharge. The model is capable of doing this with

  11. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Lyles, Brad F [DRI

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

  12. A review of groundwater recharge estimation in humid and semi-arid African regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Il-Moon; Kim, Nam Won

    2016-04-01

    For the review of African recharge estimation, the distinct methods such as the geochemical approach, a method using groundwater level data, the streamflow method, and the water balance methods were first outlined. The major challenge of an African recharge study is the lack of basic data. Thus, this work suggests how to deal with this limitation and from future perspective using recently developed technologies such as RS, GIS, etc. With the rapid growth of information technology, more and more data, in terms of both volume and variety, are expected to be made available on the internet in the near future. RS technology has a great potential to revolutionize the groundwater development and management in the future by providing unique and completely new hydrological and hydrogeological data. However, at present, the RS data should be considered along with the conventional field data. In spite of the weaknesses of water balance methods in semi-arid areas, recently developed water balance methods combined with GIS technology are powerful tools for estimating groundwater re-charge, when spatial-temporal variability of components in water balance is taken into account (Lerner et al., 1990; De Vries and Simmers, 2002; Eilers et al., 2007).When enough data sets are available, integrated surface-groundwater modeling is recommended for more accurate estimation of groundwater recharge and discharge. Acknowledgements This work was supported by a grant(14RDRP-B076275-01-000000) from Infrastructure and transportation technology promotion research Program funded by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  13. B-10 enriched boric acid, bromide, and heat as tracers of recycled groundwater flow near managed aquifer recharge operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. F.; Becker, T.; Johnson, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recycling wastewater for potable and nonpotable use by artificially recharging aquifers is a decades-old but increasingly popular practice. Natural attenuation processes in the subsurface, known as soil aquifer treatment (SAT), purify recycled water during recharge and subsequent groundwater flow. Travel time criteria are often used to regulate managed aquifer recharge (MAR) operations. California state draft regulations currently gives preference to groundwater tracers to quantify underground residence time, with a target retention time of >6 months from infiltration to drinking water extraction for surface spreading projects using tertiary treated wastewater (less time may be possible if full advanced treated water is utilized). In the past sulfur hexafluoride, a very strong greenhouse gas, has been the principle deliberate tracer for this work. However, its emission has recently become regulated in California and new tracers are needed. Here, two prospective tracers are evaluated: boron-10 (B-10), the least abundant boron isotope, and heat (with recharging water naturally warmed at the sewage treatment plants and in surface-spreading basins). An additional deliberate tracer, bromide (Br), which is a well-studied conservative tracer, was released as a control. Tracer injection occurred at the San Gabriel Spreading Grounds research test basin in Los Angeles County, CA, USA. The basin was constructed and characterized by the US Geological Survey in the mid-1990s. Recycled wastewater was piped directly to this basin at a known rate (about 1.5 m3/day). Down gradient from the test basin are nine high quality monitoring wells in a line that extends from the center of the basin to 150 m down gradient. All of the wells were equipped with temperature loggers that recorded groundwater temperatures every hour with an accuracy of one thousandth of a degree. The pre-experiment expected arrival times ranged from less than one day to six months. Arrival of Br was always

  14. Modeling hydrology, groundwater recharge and non-point nitrate loadings in the Himalayan Upper Yamuna basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mountainous Himalayan watersheds are important hydrologic systems responsible for much of the water supply in the Indian sub-continent. These watersheds are increasingly facing anthropogenic and climate-related pressures that impact spatial and temporal distribution of water availability. This study evaluates temporal and spatial distribution of water availability including groundwater recharge and quality (non-point nitrate loadings) for a Himalayan watershed, namely, the Upper Yamuna watershed (part of the Ganga River basin). The watershed has an area of 11 600 km2 with elevation ranging from 6300 to 600 m above mean sea level. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a physically-based, time-continuous model, has been used to simulate the land phase of the hydrological cycle, to obtain streamflows, groundwater recharge, and nitrate (NO3) load distributions in various components of runoff. The hydrological SWAT model is integrated with the MODular finite difference groundwater FLOW model (MODFLOW), and Modular 3-Dimensional Multi-Species Transport model (MT3DMS), to obtain groundwater flow and NO3 transport. Validation of various modules of this integrated model has been done for sub-basins of the Upper Yamuna watershed. Results on surface runoff and groundwater levels obtained as outputs from simulation show a good comparison with the observed streamflows and groundwater levels (Nash–Sutcliffe and R2 correlations greater than + 0.7). Nitrate loading obtained after nitrification, denitrification, and NO3 removal from unsaturated and shallow aquifer zones is combined with groundwater recharge. Results for nitrate modeling in groundwater aquifers are compared with observed NO3 concentration and are found to be in good agreement. The study further evaluates the sensitivity of water availability to climate change. Simulations have been made with the weather inputs of climate change scenarios of A2, B2, and A1B for end of the century. Water yield estimates under

  15. Modelling the effects of climate and land cover change on groundwater recharge in south-west Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dawes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater resource contained within the sandy aquifers of the Swan Coastal Plain, south west Western Australia, provides approximately 60% of the drinking water for the metropolitan population of Perth. Rainfall decline over the past three decades coupled with increasing water demand from a growing population has resulted in falling dam storage and groundwater levels. Projected future changes in climate across south-west Western Australia consistently show a decline in annual rainfall of between 5 and 15%. There is expected to be a continuing reduction of diffuse recharge across the Swan Coastal Plain. This study aims to quantify the change in groundwater recharge in response to a range of future climate and land cover patterns across south-west Western Australia.

    Modelling the impact on the groundwater resource of potential climate change was achieved with a dynamically linked unsaturated/saturated groundwater model. A Vertical Flux Manager was used in the unsaturated zone to estimate groundwater recharge using a variety of simple and complex models based on land cover type (e.g. native trees, plantation, cropping, urban, wetland, soil type, and taking into account the groundwater depth. These recharge estimates were accumulated on a daily basis for both observed and projected climate scenarios and used in a MODFLOW simulation with monthly stress periods.

    In the area centred on the city of Perth, Western Australia, the patterns of recharge change and groundwater level change are not consistent spatially, or consistently downward. In the Dandaragan Plateau to the north-east of Perth there has been groundwater level rise since the 1970s associated with land clearing, and with rainfall projected to reduce the least in this area the groundwater levels are estimated to continue to rise. Along the coastal zone north of Perth there is an interaction between projected rainfall decline and legislated removal to pine forests. This

  16. Utilization of Storm Runoff for Groundwater Recharge in Urban Areas- A Case Study of Gujranwala City in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqib Eh san

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research highlights the significance of storm runoff for groundwater recharge in urban areas. Due to excessive withdrawal of groundwater, the groundwater table is significantly depleting each year. The storm runoff in urban areas should be first stored then it can be used for possible groundwater recharge by adopting feasible recharge techniques. A proper storm drainage system should be functional in order to collect the surface run off from different parts of an urban area. As case study, the Gujranwala city in Pakistan has been taken into consideration. The city has strong potential for a storm water drainage system. Each year a significant amount of storm runoff in Gujranwala city is not utilized due to unavailability of a proper storm water drainage system. Different aspects of hydrology and hydrogeology of this city have been thoroughly studied. Further, design considerations for tube wells have also been elaborated. Based on the available data, different options for groundwater water recharge in city area have been investigated and also a typical design of an inverted well in city area has been proposed. This study strongly recommends the concerned authorities to first provide a suitable storm water drainage system in Gujranwala city and to investigate the feasible options of groundwater recharge keeping in view the hydrological and hydro-geological conditions. This research is intended to provide useful guidelines for feasibility of groundwater recharge techniques in other urban areas of Pakistan and also other parts of the world.

  17. Quantification of groundwater recharge through application of pilot techniques in the unsaturated zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioras, Andreas; Piepenbrink, Matthias; Schuth, Christoph; Pfletschinger, Heike; Dietrich, Peter; Koeniger, Franz; Rausch, Randolf

    2010-05-01

    Accurate determination of groundwater recharge is a key issue for the "smart mining" of groundwater resources. Groundwater recharge estimation techniques depend on the investigated hydrologic zone, and therefore main approaches are based on (a) unsaturated zone, (b) saturated zone and (c) surface water studies. This research contributes to the determination of groundwater recharge by investigating the infiltration of groundwater through the unsaturated zone. The investigations are conducted through the application of a combination of different pilot field as well as lab techniques. The field techniques include the installation of specially designed Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors, at different depths within the unsaturated zone for in-situ and continuous measurements of the volumetric pore water content. Additionally, the extraction of pore water -for analysis of its isotopic composition- from multilevel undisturbed soil samples through significant depths within the unsaturated zone column, enables the dating of the groundwater age through the determination of its isotopic composition. The in-situ investigation of the unsaturated zone is complemented by the determination of high resolution temperature profiles. The installation of the pilot TDR sensors is achieved by using direct push methods at significant depths within the unsaturated zone, providing continuous readings of the soil moisture content. The direct push methods are also ideal for multilevel sampling of undisturbed -without using any drilling fluids which affect the isotopic composition of the containing pore water- soil and consequent extraction of the included pore water for further isotopic determination. The pore water is extracted by applying the method of azeotropic distillation; a method which has the least isotopic fractionation effects on groundwater samples. The determination of different isotopic signals such as 18O, 2H, 3H, and 36Cl, aims to the investigation of groundwater transit

  18. Estimability of recharge through groundwater model calibration: Insights from a field-scale steady-state example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowling, Matthew J.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of groundwater models to inform recharge through calibration is hampered by the correlation between recharge and aquifer parameters such as hydraulic conductivity (K), and the insufficient information content of observation datasets. These factors collectively result in non-uniqueness of parameter estimates. Previous studies that jointly estimate spatially distributed recharge and hydraulic parameters are limited to synthetic test cases and/or do not evaluate the effect of non-uniqueness. The extent to which recharge can be informed by calibration is largely unknown for practical situations, in which complexities such as parameter heterogeneities are inherent. In this study, a systematic investigation of recharge, inferred through model calibration, is undertaken using a series of numerical experiments that include varying degrees of hydraulic parameter information. The analysis involves the use of a synthetic reality, based on a regional-scale, highly parameterised, steady-state groundwater model of Uley South Basin, South Australia. Parameter identifiability is assessed to evaluate the ability of parameters to be estimated uniquely. Results show that a reasonable inference of recharge (average recharge error 100 K values across the 129 km2 study area). The introduction of pumping data into the calibration reduces error in both the average recharge and its spatial variability, whereas submarine groundwater discharge (as a calibration target) reduces average recharge error only. Nonetheless, the estimation of steady-state recharge through inverse modelling may be impractical for real-world settings, limited by the need for unrealistic amounts of hydraulic parameter and groundwater level data. This study provides a useful benchmark for evaluating the extent to which field-scale groundwater models can be used to inform recharge subject to practical data-availability limitations.

  19. Integrating Raster Based GIS with Land Use, Surface Soil and Rainfall Records for the Estimation of Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. H.; Chen, Y. W.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    In Taiwan, groundwater resource plays a vital role in regional water supply because the quantity of groundwater pumpage has exceeded 1/3 of the total quantity of water supply. However, without proper management of groundwater usage, series environmental impacts such as land subsidence and seawater intrusions have occurred. To achieve the goal of sustainable management of groundwater resource, an accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is required. This study proposes to integrate PCRaster with maps of land use and surface soil and rainfall records to determine the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater recharge. PCRaster is a kind of raster based GIS software and its scripting interface is easy to create a spatio-temporal recharge estimation model. In the first step, the map of land use is re-grouped into three categories, impermeable zones, permeable zones and water bodies. For impermeable zones, the recharge quantities are assumed as zeros. Two kinds of estimating equations, a rainfall-infiltration equation and a saturated recharge equation, are respectively used to calculate the recharges of permeable zones and water bodies. The map of surface soil is used to define the spatial distribution of soil parameters in two equations. The temporal records of rainfall define the temporal variable in the rainfall-infiltration equation. The study area is Pingtung Plain which is 1,229 km2 in southern of Taiwan. In the process of estimation, the size of cells is 20 meters by 20 meters. The horizontal of estimation is during 1999 to 2010. The accumulated recharge is about 20.11 billion m3. (1.67 m3/yr). The annual recharge in 2008 is 1.89 billion m3. The annual recharges vary from 1.3 to 2.1 billion m3 because of different hydrological conditions. The infiltrated recharge in May and November in 2008 respectively are 430 (22.73%) and 67 (3.53%) million m3.

  20. Land cover or climate? In search of dominant factors inducing groundwater recharge and fen hydrology in European scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoruk, Mateusz; Kotowski, Wiktor

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater recharge plays the crucial role in development and stability of fens. It was hypothesized that the mid- and late-Holocene acceleration of fens' development in Europe could have been induced by changes in land cover: decreasing areas of forests resulting from the expanding agriculture have enhanced groundwater recharge by decreasing evapotranspiration and interception and promoting infiltration. However, regardless human-related changes of the landscape, recorded climatic fluctuations could also be considered as drivers of changing groundwater recharge that affects fen stability and development. Nowadays, when up to 90% of European wetlands is considered degraded, assessing vulnerability of groundwater recharge to changing landscape and climate is of the crucial importance for setting fen restoration and management strategies. Main goal of our study was to assess the magnitude of changes in groundwater recharge estimation resulting from modelled changes of the landscape and climatic features in >300 fens located in Poland, Germany, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and Norway. In our approach we (1) delineated the most probable extents of catchments of particular fens analysed, (2) assumed hypothetical and the most probable changes of land cover within these catchments, (3) assumed the most probable ranges of climatic changes in each of the catchments including historical reconstructions (Holocene) and future projections (A1B scenario, CSIRO:MK3 and UKMO:HADCM3 GCM-RCM ensembles), (4) developed, tested and calibrated automatic, GIS-based groundwater recharge calculation algorithm to be applied in the study, (5) calculated groundwater recharge in multiple probable combinations of landscape and climatic conditions and (6) performed statistical analysis in order to reveal whether the climate or landscape changes were the dominant factors that could have probably influenced groundwater recharge in catchments of fens analysed. We revealed that in the case of 80% of

  1. Infilitration tests at the Sant Vicenç dels Horts artificial recharge experimental site

    OpenAIRE

    Barahona-Palomo, Marco; Pedretti, Daniele; Sánchez Vila, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Infiltration capacity is the key parameter in an artificial recharge operation site. Infiltration capacity is spatially variable, and during operation it is also temporally variable due to surface clogging processes. Double-ring infiltrometer tests were performed at an experimental site close to Barcelona city (Spain). The site is located on alluvial deposits from the Llobregat River and comprises two half hectare ponds. River water collected upstream traveled through a two km pipe before ent...

  2. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every catchment of NHDPlus for the conterminous United States....

  3. Long-term spatio-temporal precipitation variability in arid-zone Australia and implications for groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Jensen, Evan; Leggett, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying dryland groundwater recharge as a function of climate variability is becoming increasingly important in the face of a globally depleted resource, yet this remains a major challenge due to lack of adequate monitoring and the complexity of processes involved. A previously unpublished and unique dataset of high density and frequency rainfall measurements is presented, from the Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station in western New South Wales (Australia). The dataset confirms extreme spatial and temporal variability in rainfall distribution which has been observed in other dryland areas and is generally explained by the dominance of individual storm cells. Contrary to previous observations, however, this dataset contains only a few localised storm cells despite the variability. The implications of spatiotemporal rainfall variability on the estimation of groundwater recharge is assessed and show that the most likely recharge mechanism is through indirect and localised, rather than direct, recharge. Examples of rainfall and stream gauge height illustrate runoff generation when a spatially averaged threshold of 15-25 mm (depending on the antecedent moisture conditions) is exceeded. Preliminary assessment of groundwater levels illustrates that the regional water table is much deeper than anticipated, especially considering the expected magnitude of indirect and localised recharge. A possible explanation is that pathways for indirect and localised recharge are inhibited by the large quantities of Aeolian dust observed at the site. Runoff readily occurs with water collecting in surface lakes which slowly dry and disappear. Assuming direct groundwater recharge under these conditions will significantly overestimate actual recharge.

  4. Multi-isotope (B, Li, O, H) tracing of reverse osmosis treated waste water recharged artificially into a coastal aquifer (Torreele/Wulpen, Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificially enhanced aquifer recharge is gaining importance in the active management of groundwater resources, in particular in coastal areas endangered by marine intrusion. Within the FP6 project Reclaim Water, the site of Torreele/Wulpen, at the Belgium North Sea Coast, was investigated, where secondary treated municipal wastewater is further purified through ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis (RO) before being infiltrated into the coastal dunes in order to reduce the extraction of natural groundwater for potable water production and hold back saline intrusion. B and Li isotopes as well as stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were analysed to evaluate the extension of the injected water in the aquifer body. The infiltration and mixing of RO-treated wastewater with natural groundwaters could be intimately monitored. B isotopes performed particularly well due to a characteristic waste water signature and high contrasts of natural end-members (total range > 25 per mille vs. NBS951) (author)

  5. Organic micropollutant removal from wastewater effluent-impacted drinking water sources during bank filtration and artificial recharge

    KAUST Repository

    Maeng, Sungkyu

    2010-07-01

    Natural treatment systems such as bank filtration (BF) and artificial recharge (via an infiltration basin) are a robust barrier for many organic micropollutants (OMPs) and may represent a low-cost alternative compared to advanced drinking water treatment systems. This study analyzes a comprehensive database of OMPs at BF and artificial recharge (AR) sites located near Lake Tegel in Berlin (Germany). The focus of the study was on the derivation of correlations between the removal efficiencies of OMPs and key factors influencing the performance of BF and AR. At the BF site, shallow monitoring wells located close to the Lake Tegel source exhibited oxic conditions followed by prolonged anoxic conditions in deep monitoring wells and a production well. At the AR site, oxic conditions prevailed from the recharge pond along monitoring wells to the production well. Long residence times of up to 4.5 months at the BF site reduced the temperature variation during soil passage between summer and winter. The temperature variations were greater at the AR site as a consequence of shorter residence times. Deep monitoring wells and the production well located at the BF site were under the influence of ambient groundwater and old bank filtrate (up to several years of age). Thus, it is important to account for mixing with native groundwater and other sources (e.g., old bank filtrate) when estimating the performance of BF with respect to removal of OMPs. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate correlations between OMP removals and hydrogeochemical conditions with spatial and temporal parameters (e.g., well distance, residence time and depth) from both sites. Principal component-1 (PC1) embodied redox conditions (oxidation-reduction potential and dissolved oxygen), and principal component-2 (PC2) embodied degradation potential (e.g., total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon) with the calcium carbonate dissolution potential (Ca2+ and HCO3 -) for the BF site

  6. Organic micropollutant removal from wastewater effluent-impacted drinking water sources during bank filtration and artificial recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Sung Kyu; Ameda, Emmanuel; Sharma, Saroj K; Grützmacher, Gesche; Amy, Gary L

    2010-07-01

    Natural treatment systems such as bank filtration (BF) and artificial recharge (via an infiltration basin) are a robust barrier for many organic micropollutants (OMPs) and may represent a low-cost alternative compared to advanced drinking water treatment systems. This study analyzes a comprehensive database of OMPs at BF and artificial recharge (AR) sites located near Lake Tegel in Berlin (Germany). The focus of the study was on the derivation of correlations between the removal efficiencies of OMPs and key factors influencing the performance of BF and AR. At the BF site, shallow monitoring wells located close to the Lake Tegel source exhibited oxic conditions followed by prolonged anoxic conditions in deep monitoring wells and a production well. At the AR site, oxic conditions prevailed from the recharge pond along monitoring wells to the production well. Long residence times of up to 4.5 months at the BF site reduced the temperature variation during soil passage between summer and winter. The temperature variations were greater at the AR site as a consequence of shorter residence times. Deep monitoring wells and the production well located at the BF site were under the influence of ambient groundwater and old bank filtrate (up to several years of age). Thus, it is important to account for mixing with native groundwater and other sources (e.g., old bank filtrate) when estimating the performance of BF with respect to removal of OMPs. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate correlations between OMP removals and hydrogeochemical conditions with spatial and temporal parameters (e.g., well distance, residence time and depth) from both sites. Principal component-1 (PC1) embodied redox conditions (oxidation-reduction potential and dissolved oxygen), and principal component-2 (PC2) embodied degradation potential (e.g., total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon) with the calcium carbonate dissolution potential (Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-)) for the BF

  7. Isotope Method for Confined Groundwater Recharge of the Lower Reaches of the Heihe River, Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Environmental isotopes have been applied to analyze confined groundwater recharge in the lower reaches of the Heihe River, Inner Mongolia. CFC is regarded as a tracer that determines the date of groundwater, the date being less than 45 a. The confined groundwater within the Gurinai area and Ejin Basin other than the surface water of Heihe River might have originated from precipitation from Qilian Mountain or/and the Tibetan Plateau. The deep confined groundwater overflows into an upper aquifer and emerges into the ground, forming springs and lakes within the low-lying area. The recharge volume is estimated to be around 400 million-cubic meters.

  8. Comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods for the semi-arid Nyamandhlovu area, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Sibanda, T.; Nonner, J.C.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Nyamandhlovu aquifer is the main water resource in the semi-arid Umguza district in Matebeleland North Province in Zimbabwe. The rapid increase in water demand in the city of Bulawayo has prompted the need to quantify the available groundwater resources for sustainable utilization. Groundwater recharge estimation methods and results were compared: chloride mass balance method (19–62 mm/year); water-table fluctuation method (2–50 mm/year); Darcian flownet computations (16–28 mm/year); 14C ...

  9. Intermediate tree cover can maximize groundwater recharge in the seasonally dry tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Ilstedt, U.; Bargués Tobella, A; Bazié, H. R.; Bayala, J.; E. Verbeeten; Nyberg, G; Sanou, J.; Benegas, L.; Murdiyarso, D.; Laudon, H.; D. Sheil; Malmer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity contributes to the poverty of around one-third of the world’s people. Despite many benefits, tree planting in dry regions is often discouraged by concerns that trees reduce water availability. Yet relevant studies from the tropics are scarce, and the impacts of intermediate tree cover remain unexplored. We developed and tested an optimum tree cover theory in which groundwater recharge is maximized at an intermediate tree density. Below this optimal tree density the benefits fro...

  10. Modification of the isotopic composition of rainwater by processes which occur before groundwater recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of groundwaters differs from that of the average rain composition due to selection (seasonal or otherwise) from among different rainfalls during the replenishment of groundwaters, as well as to isotope fractionation which accompanies some of the steps in the recharge process. An assessment of the resulting concentration changes is required before one can use the characteristic variations of the isotopic composition of atmospheric waters as hydrological tracers to mark the origin of groundwaters. An over-all measure of the encountered effect is obtained by comparison of the isotopic composition of rain and groundwaters in regions in Israel of known hydrological pattern and recharge areas. Correlation of the effects with the environmental factors of the different areas gives preliminary clues concerning the causes of fractionation which operate in the natural process. Of these the formation of puddles after rain seems particularly effective. The following water-transport processes, all of which are steps in the rain-to-groundwater transition, are then evaluated regarding their potential contribution to the modification of the isotopic composition: interception by vegetation, open-water evaporation and exchange with ambient vapour from overland flow and surface run-off, evaporation of soil moisture, transpiration and water transport by unsaturated flow in the zone or aeration. The discussion is based partly on theoretical analysis and partly on case studies of isotope separations in open water-bodies and in lysimeter fields. (author)

  11. Effects of Hysteresis on Groundwater Recharge From Ephemeral Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parissopoulos, G. A.; Wheater, H. S.

    1992-11-01

    The effects of hysteresis on the movement of the saturated and unsaturated soil water phase due to infiltration from ephemeral surface water flows are investigated for different scenarios of flood events in homogeneous and heterogeneous media with the use of a two-dimensional model based on Richards' equation and the dependent domain hysteresis model of Mualem (1984). Hysteresis effects were found in general to be small, but sensitive to water ponding depth, hydraulic contact between surface and groundwater and initial moisture distribution. In all cases tested, hysteresis resulted in higher rise of the toe of the water mound formed beneath the wadi despite a decrease of cumulative infiltration.

  12. Potential Groundwater Recharge from the Infiltration of Surface Runoff in Cold and Dry Creeks, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runoff from Cold and Dry Creeks may provide an important source of groundwater recharge on the Hanford Site. This report presents estimates of total volume and distribution of such recharge from extreme precipitation events. Estimates were derived using a simple approach that combined the Soil Conservation Service curve number runoff method and an exponential-decay channel infiltration model. Fifteen-minute streamflow data from four gaging stations, and hourly precipitation data from one climate station, were used to compute curve numbers and calibrate the infiltration model. All data were from several storms occurring during January 1995. Design storm precipitation depths ranging from 1.6 to 2.7 inches were applied with computed curve numbers to produce total runoff/recharge of 7,700 to 15,900 ac-ft, or approximately 10 times the average annual rate from this recharge source as determined in a previous study. Approximately two-thirds of the simulated recharge occurred in the lower stream reaches contained in the broad alluvial valley that parallels State Highway 240 near the Hanford 200 Area

  13. The influence of model structure on groundwater recharge rates in climate-change impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Christian; Brunner, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Numerous modeling approaches are available to provide insight into the relationship between climate change and groundwater recharge. However, several aspects of how hydrological model choice and structure affect recharge predictions have not been fully explored, unlike the well-established variability of climate model chains—combination of global climate models (GCM) and regional climate models (RCM). Furthermore, the influence on predictions related to subsoil parameterization and the variability of observation data employed during calibration remain unclear. This paper compares and quantifies these different sources of uncertainty in a systematic way. The described numerical experiment is based on a heterogeneous two-dimensional reference model. Four simpler models were calibrated against the output of the reference model, and recharge predictions of both reference and simpler models were compared to evaluate the effect of model structure on climate-change impact studies. The results highlight that model simplification leads to different recharge rates under climate change, especially under extreme conditions, although the different models performed similarly under historical climate conditions. Extreme weather conditions lead to model bias in the predictions and therefore must be considered. Consequently, the chosen calibration strategy is important and, if possible, the calibration data set should include climatic extremes in order to minimise model bias introduced by the calibration. The results strongly suggest that ensembles of climate projections should be coupled with ensembles of hydrogeological models to produce credible predictions of future recharge and with the associated uncertainties.

  14. Modeling the effects of unsaturated, stratified sediments on groundwater recharge from intermittent streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark E.; Dreiss, Shirley J.

    1990-03-01

    Unsaturated, stratified sediments beneath intermittent stream channels affect groundwater recharge from these streams. Using four different cases of sediment stratification, we simulate transient, variably saturated flow in a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical cross-section between the stream and the underlying water table. These cases include: homogeneous sediments; low permeability streambed sediments; narrow, low permeability lenses; and extensive, low permeability layers. The permeability of the sediments in these cases greatly affects the timing and rate of channel loss and groundwater recharge. Flow patterns and the style of stream/water table connection are controlled by the location and geometry of low permeability sediments. In cases with homogeneous sediments and narrow, low permeability lenses, stream/water table connection occurs by a saturated column advancing from above. In cases with low permeability streambed sediments and extensive, low permeability layers, connection occurs by a water table mound building from below. The style of stream/water table connection suggests simplified physically based interaction models that may be appropriate for these settings. We compared channel loss and groundwater recharge computed using two simplified models, a Darcian seepage equation and the Green-Ampt infiltration equation, with the results from our 2-D simulations. Simplified models using parameters from the 2-D simulations appear to perform well in cases with homogeneous and low permeability streambed sediments. In cases with low permeability lenses or layers, the simplified models require calibrated parameters to perform well.

  15. Conceptual model of recharge to southeastern Badain Jaran Desert groundwater and lakes from environmental tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of groundwater recharge to the Badain Jaran Desert in China have been investigated using geochemical and isotopic techniques. Stable isotope compositions (δ18O and δ2H) of shallow groundwater and surface water from oasis lakes evolve from a starting composition considerably depleted compared to local unsaturated zone moisture, confirming inferences from chloride mass balance that direct infiltration of precipitation is not a volumetrically important source of recharge to the shallow aquifer in the study area. Shallow phreatic and deeper confined groundwater bodies appear unconnected based on chemical composition and radiocarbon activities. Hydrogeologic evidence points toward a bordering mountain range (Yabulai) as a likely recharge zone, which is consistent with tracer results. A mean residence time in the range of 1-2 ka for the desert's southeastern margin is inferred from radiocarbon. These results reveal that some replenishment to the desert aquifer is occurring but at a rate much lower than previously suggested, which is relevant for water resources planning in this ecologically sensitive area

  16. Comparison of optimal irrigation scheduling and groundwater recharge at representative sites in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is an important food production area in China, facing an increasing water shortage and overexploitation of groundwater. It is critical to optimize the irrigation scheduling and accurately estimate groundwater recharge for saving water and increasing crop water use efficiency. However, the water cycle and crop responses to irrigation are quite various in different areas, because of the spatial variation of climatic, soil, water table and other management practices in the NCP. In this study, three representative sites (LC site in the piedmont plain, TZ site in the northern alluvial and lacustrine plain, YC site in the southern alluvial and lacustrine plain) were selected to compare the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge under different hydrological years for winter wheat-summer maize double cropping system. At each site, a physically based agro-hydrological model (SWAP) was calibrated using field data of soil moisture. Then, scenarios under different irrigation time and amount were simulated. Results showed that the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge were significant different between the three representative sites. The mean water table depth at the LC (33.0 m), YC (10.3 m), and TZ site (2.5 m) caused great different time lags of infiltrated water and groundwater contribution to evapotranspiration. Then, the most irrigation amount was required for the TZ site but the least requirement for the YC site at each hydrologic year. As most clay contents in the deep soils at the LC site increased tortuosity and limited water movement, which resulted in lower rates of recharge compared to more sandy soils at the other two sites. Averagely, using the optimal irrigation scheduling could save 2.04×109 m3 irrigation water and reduce about 84.3% groundwater over-exploitation in winter wheat growth period in the NCP. Therefore, comparison of the simulation results among the three

  17. Estimating annual effective infiltration coefficient and groundwater recharge for karst aquifers of the southern Apennines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Allocca

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the mean annual groundwater recharge of the karst aquifers in southern Apennines (Italy, the estimation of the mean annual effective infiltration coefficient (AEIC was conducted by means of an integrated approach based on hydrogeological, hydrological, geomorphological, land use and soil cover analyses. We studied a large part of the southern Apennines that is covered by a meteorological network and containing 40 principal karst aquifers. Using precipitation and air temperature time series gathered through monitoring stations operating in the period 1926–2012, the annual effective precipitation (AEP was estimated, and its distribution was modelled, by considering the orographic barrier and rain shadow effects of the Apennines chain, as well as the altitudinal control. Four sample karst aquifers with available long spring discharge time series were identified for estimating the AEIC by means of the hydrological budget equation. The resulting AEIC values were correlated with other parameters that control groundwater recharge, such as the extension of outcropping karst-rock, morphological settings, land use and covering soil type. A simple correlation relationship between AEIC, lithology and the summit flat and endorheic areas was found. This empirical model has been used to estimate AEIC and mean annual groundwater recharge in other regional karst aquifers. The estimated AEIC values ranged between 48% and 78%, thus matching intervals estimated for other karst aquifers in European and Mediterranean countries. These results represent a deeper understanding of an aspect of groundwater hydrology in karst aquifers which is fundamental for the formulation of appropriate management models of groundwater resources, also taking into account mitigation strategies for climate change impacts. Finally, the proposed hydrological characterisations are also perceived as useful for the assessment of mean annual runoff over carbonate mountains, which is

  18. Estimating annual effective infiltration coefficient and groundwater recharge for karst aquifers of the southern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, V.; Manna, F.; De Vita, P.

    2013-08-01

    To assess the mean annual groundwater recharge of the karst aquifers in southern Apennines (Italy), the estimation of the mean annual effective infiltration coefficient (AEIC) was conducted by means of an integrated approach based on hydrogeological, hydrological, geomorphological, land use and soil cover analyses. We studied a large part of the southern Apennines that is covered by a meteorological network and containing 40 principal karst aquifers. Using precipitation and air temperature time series gathered through monitoring stations operating in the period 1926-2012, the annual effective precipitation (AEP) was estimated, and its distribution was modelled, by considering the orographic barrier and rain shadow effects of the Apennines chain, as well as the altitudinal control. Four sample karst aquifers with available long spring discharge time series were identified for estimating the AEIC by means of the hydrological budget equation. The resulting AEIC values were correlated with other parameters that control groundwater recharge, such as the extension of outcropping karst-rock, morphological settings, land use and covering soil type. A simple correlation relationship between AEIC, lithology and the summit flat and endorheic areas was found. This empirical model has been used to estimate AEIC and mean annual groundwater recharge in other regional karst aquifers. The estimated AEIC values ranged between 48% and 78%, thus matching intervals estimated for other karst aquifers in European and Mediterranean countries. These results represent a deeper understanding of an aspect of groundwater hydrology in karst aquifers which is fundamental for the formulation of appropriate management models of groundwater resources, also taking into account mitigation strategies for climate change impacts. Finally, the proposed hydrological characterisations are also perceived as useful for the assessment of mean annual runoff over carbonate mountains, which is another important

  19. Impacts of Future Climate Change and Baltic Sea Level Rise on Groundwater Recharge, Groundwater Levels, and Surface Leakage in the Hanko Aquifer in Southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrit Luoma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate change and Baltic Sea level rise on groundwater resources in a shallow, unconfined, low-lying coastal aquifer in Hanko, southern Finland, was assessed using the UZF1 model package coupled with the three-dimensional groundwater flow model MODFLOW to simulate flow from the unsaturated zone through the aquifer. The snow and PET models were used to calculate the surface water availability for infiltration from the precipitation data used in UZF1. Infiltration rate, flow in the unsaturated zone and groundwater recharge were then simulated using UZF1. The simulation data from climate and sea level rise scenarios were compared with present data. The results indicated changes in recharge pattern during 2071–2100, with recharge occurring earlier in winter and early spring. The seasonal impacts of climate change on groundwater recharge were more significant, with surface overflow resulting in flooding during winter and early spring and drought during summer. Rising sea level would cause some parts of the aquifer to be under sea level, compromising groundwater quality due to intrusion of sea water. This, together with increased groundwater recharge, would raise groundwater levels and consequently contribute more surface leakage and potential flooding in the low-lying aquifer.

  20. Simulated effects of an artificial-recharge experiment near Proctor, Logan County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    An artificial-recharge experiment was conducted near Proctor, Colorado in which a computed 620 acre-feet were pumped from a well during a 4-month period. A computed 420 acre-feet were delivered at the potential reservoir site, and the remaining 200 acre-feet leaked from the pipeline. No pond was created due to the high rates of infiltration. Water levels in the nearest well (about 0.1 mile from the recharge site) rose almost 25 feet. Computer simulations indicate that this 4-month pumping-recharge experiment would cause stream depletions from the nearby South Platte River for the first 16 months, thereafter, stream accretions due to the recharge would exceed stream depletions due to pumpage. If the experiment was conducted annually, the simulations indicate that stream depletions would occur for 6 months of each year and stream acretions for the remaining 6 months once the system reached an equilibrium condition. To reach the cyclic equilibrium condition would take at least 7 years. (USGS)

  1. Estimation of groundwater recharge of shallow aquifer on humid environment in Yaounde, Cameroon using hybrid water-fluctuation and hydrochemistry methods

    OpenAIRE

    Takounjou, A. F.; Ngoupayou, J. R. N.; Riotte, Jean; Takem, G. E.; Mafany, G.; Maréchal, J. C.; Ekodeck, G. E.

    2011-01-01

    A study of environmental chloride and groundwater balance has been carried out in order to estimate their relative value for measuring average groundwater recharge under a humid climatic environment with a relatively shallow water table. The hybrid water fluctuation method allowed the split of the hydrologic year into two seasons of recharge (wet season) and no recharge (dry season) to appraise specific yield during the dry season and, second, to estimate recharge from the water table rise du...

  2. Hydrochemistry of urban groundwater in Seoul, South Korea: effects of land-use and pollutant recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Yu, Soon-Young; Lee, Pyeong-Koo; Park, Seong-Sook; Chae, Gi-Tak; Mayer, Bernhard

    2005-10-01

    The ionic and isotopic compositions (δD, δ18O, and 3H) of urban groundwaters have been monitored in Seoul to examine the water quality in relation to land-use. High tritium contents (6.1-12.0 TU) and the absence of spatial/seasonal change of O-H isotope data indicate that groundwaters are well mixed within aquifers with recently recharged waters of high contamination susceptibility. Statistical analyses show a spatial variation of major ions in relation to land-use type. The major ion concentrations tend to increase with anthropogenic contamination, due to the local pollutants recharge. The TDS concentration appears to be a useful contamination indicator, as it generally increases by the order of forested green zone (average 151 mg/l), agricultural area, residential area, traffic area, and industrialized area (average 585 mg/l). With the increased anthropogenic contamination, the groundwater chemistry changes from a Ca-HCO3 type toward a Ca-Cl(+NO3) type. The source and behavior of major ions are discussed and the hydrochemical backgrounds are proposed as the basis of a groundwater management plan.

  3. The investigation of fault-controlled groundwater recharge within a suburban area of Damascus, Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannous, M.; Siebert, C.; Tröger, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Al-Mazraa is a heavily populated suburb of Damascus (Syria) with agricultural activity. It is adjacent to the Cretaceous Qassioun Mountain Range, from which it is structurally separated by the Damascus fault. Al-Mazraa waterworks abstracts from a shallow Quaternary aquifer, whose recharge processes are unidentified. The functions of Qassioun Mountain, the Damascus fault, the agricultural activities, the ascending deeper groundwater, and the through-flowing Tora River are not well understood and they are, hence, subject to study. The application of hydrochemical parameters and ratios in combination with signatures of δD and δ18O revealed that recharge predominantly occurs in the outcropping Cretaceous rocks through subsurface passages rather than through influent conditions of the Tora River or through direct rainfall. Interestingly, high Na/Cl ratios indicate contact with volcanic rocks which exist within the Cretaceous anticline and also in the subsurface of the studied Quaternary aquifer. Evidence for deeper circulating groundwater is given, since replenishing waters are up to 4 °C warmer and have much lower nitrate concentrations than the groundwater in the study area. From these points, it is indicated that the Damascus fault is conductive in respect to groundwater, rather than being impermeable, as it is elsewhere.

  4. Potential groundwater recharge for the State of Minnesota using the Soil-Water-Balance model, 1996-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erik A.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater recharge is one of the most difficult components of a water budget to ascertain, yet is an important boundary condition necessary for the quantification of water resources. In Minnesota, improved estimates of recharge are necessary because approximately 75 percent of drinking water and 90 percent of agricultural irrigation water in Minnesota are supplied from groundwater. The water that is withdrawn must be supplied by some combination of (1) increased recharge, (2) decreased discharge to streams, lakes, and other surface-water bodies, and (3) removal of water that was stored in the system. Recent pressure on groundwater resources has highlighted the need to provide more accurate recharge estimates for various tools that can assess the sustainability of long-term water use. As part of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, used the Soil-Water-Balance model to calculate gridded estimates of potential groundwater recharge across Minnesota for 1996‒2010 at a 1-kilometer (0.621-mile) resolution. The potential groundwater recharge estimates calculated for Minnesota from the Soil-Water Balance model included gridded values (1-kilometer resolution) of annual mean estimates (that is, the means for individual years from 1996 through 2010) and mean annual estimates (that is, the mean for the 15-year period 1996−2010).

  5. Evaluation of Groundwater Recharge Estimates in a Partially Metamorphosed Sedimentary Basin in a Tropical Environment: Application of Natural Tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Oteng Mensah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tests the representativeness of groundwater recharge estimates through the chloride mass balance (CMB method in a tropical environment. The representativeness of recharge estimates using this methodology is tested using evaporation estimates from isotope data, the general spatial distribution of the potential field, and the topographical variations in the area. This study suggests that annual groundwater recharge rates in the area ranges between 0.9% and 21% of annual precipitation. These estimates are consistent with evaporation rates computed from stable isotope data of groundwater and surface water in the Voltaian Basin. Moreover, estimates of groundwater recharge through numerical model calibration in other parts of the terrain appear to be consistent with the current data in this study. A spatial distribution of groundwater recharge in the area based on the estimated data takes a pattern akin to the spatial pattern of distribution of the hydraulic head, the local topography, and geology of the terrain. This suggests that the estimates at least qualitatively predicts the local recharge and discharge locations in the terrain.

  6. Comparative study of irrigation water use and groundwater recharge under various irrigation schemes in an agricultural region, central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Kai; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Tsai, Cheng-Bin

    2016-04-01

    The risk of rice production has increased notably due to climate change in Taiwan. To respond to growing agricultural water shortage without affecting normal food production in the future, the application of water-saving irrigation will be a substantial resolution. However, the adoption of water-saving irrigation may result in the reducing of groundwater recharge because continuous flooding in the paddy fields could be regarded as an important source for groundwater recharge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the irrigation water-saving benefit and groundwater recharge deficit when adopting the System of Rice Intensification, known as SRI methodology, in the Choushui River alluvial fan (the largest groundwater pumping and the most important rice-cropping region in central Taiwan). The three-dimensional finite element groundwater model, FEMWATER, was applied to simulate the infiltration process and groundwater recharge under SRI methodology and traditional irrigation schemes including continuous irrigation, and rotational irrigation in two rice-crop periods with hydro-climatic data of 2013. The irrigation water use was then calculated by water balance. The results showed that groundwater recharge amount of SRI methodology was slightly lower than those of traditional irrigation schemes, reduced 3.6% and 1.6% in the first crop period, and reduced 3.2% and 1.6% in the second crop period, compared with continuous irrigation and rotational irrigation, respectively. However, the SRI methodology achieved notably water-saving benefit compared to the disadvantage of reducing the groundwater recharge amount. The field irrigation requirement amount of SRI methodology was significantly lower than those of traditional irrigation schemes, saving 37% and 20% of irrigation water in the first crop period, and saving 53% and 35% in the second crop period, compared with continuous irrigation and rotational irrigation, respectively. Therefore, the amount of groundwater pumping for

  7. Use of environmental isotopes to study the recharge mechanisms and arsenic pollution of Bangladesh groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental isotopes like 2H, 18O, 13C, 3H and 14C are the suitable tools for investigating a series of problems linked with the management of water resources in the alluvial and deltaic sediments of Bangladesh. Isotope Hydrology of Groundwater in Bangladesh: Implications for Characterisation and Mitigation of Arsenic in Groundwater (BGD/8/016), a Technical Cooperation Project sponsored by IAEA, carried out in 1999-2000. Total 56 nos. water samples from shallow and deep tubewells, ranging in depth 10 to 335 meters, located mostly in south-west, north-west and partly in south-east of the country were collected. Results of isotope techniques have provided adequate information on recharge conditions and age of groundwater in the basin, that is very important and open up prospects for further investigations using isotope techniques

  8. Application of environmental tracers to delineate recharge patterns and nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater around a river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaown, Dugin; Koh, Eunhee; Park, Byeong-Hak; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical data, stable isotopes, chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs) and 3H-3He in groundwater were applied to characterize residence time, recharge patterns and nitrate contamination of groundwater in a small agricultural area, Yangpyung, Korea. The study area is located around a river and the measured groundwater table ranges from 1.5 to 2.65 m during the year. Most residents in the study area practice agriculture and potato, strawberry, and cabbage are the typical vegetables grown. Vegetable fields are mostly located in the upgradient area of the study area while forest and residence areas are located in the downgradient area. A lot of chemical and organic fertilizers are applied in the upgradient area. The concentration of NO3-N in groundwater showed 9.8-83.7 mg/L in the upgradient area and 0.1-22.6 mg/L in the downgradient area in 2014. It is necessary to monitor groundwater recharge patterns and transport processes of nitrate to protect surface water around the study area. The values of δ18O and δD showed that groundwater is recharged mainly from summer precipitation. The apparent groundwater ages using 3H-3He and CFCs ranged from 13 to 27 years in the upgradient area and from 25 to 35 years in the downgradient area. The NO3-N in more recently recharged groundwater showed higher concentrations while the NO3-N in older groundwater showed low concentrations. Some shallow wells in the downgradient area showed similar apparent groundwater age with that of the river water indicating groundwater-surface water interactions. A conceptual model of groundwater-surface water interactions using stable isotopes, apparent 3H-3He and CFCs age in groundwater will be useful to understand the hydrological processes and nitrate contamination of the study area.

  9. Application limits of the interpretation of near-surface temperature time series to assess groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, J. S.; Rivard, C.; Martel, R.; Lefebvre, R.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to test the application limits of a groundwater recharge assessment technique based on the inversion of a vertical one-dimensional numerical model of advective-conductive heat transport, using temperature time series at three different depths (1, 3, 5 m) in the unsaturated zone. For this purpose, several synthetic hourly datasets of subsurface temperatures, representing various weather, ground cover, and soil texture conditions, thus covering a wide range of groundwater recharge values, were produced with the vertical one-dimensional coupled heat and moisture transport simulator SHAW (Simultaneous Heat and Water model). Estimates of the vertical flux of water in the soil were then retrieved from these realistic temperature profiles using a simple one-dimensional numerical simulator of advective and conductive heat transport in the unsaturated zone that was developed as part of this study. The water flux was assumed constant on a weekly, monthly, semiannual, and annual basis. From these vertical water flux estimates, annual (potential) groundwater recharge rates were then computed and results were compared to those calculated previously with SHAW to assess the accuracy of the method. Results showed that, under ideal conditions, it would be possible to estimate annual recharge rates that are above 200 mm/y, with an acceptable error of less than 20%. These "ideal" conditions include the resolution of the water flux on a weekly basis, error-free temperature measurements below the soil freezing zone, and model parameter values (thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the soil) known a priori with no uncertainty. However, this work demonstrates that the accuracy of the method is highly sensitive to the uncertainty of the input model parameters of the numerical model used to carry out the inversion and to measurement errors of temperature time series. For the conditions represented in this study, these findings suggest that, despite

  10. Interpretation of GRACE data of the Nile Basin using a groundwater recharge model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Bonsor

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing and quantifying natural water storage is becoming increasingly important as nations develop strategies for economic growth and adaptations measures for climate change. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE data provide a new opportunity to gain a direct and independent measure of water mass variations on a regional scale. Hydrological models are required to interpret these mass variations and partition them between different parts of the hydrological cycle, but groundwater storage has generally been poorly constrained by such models. This study focused on the Nile basin, and used a groundwater recharge model ZOODRM (Zoomable Object Oriented Distributed Recharge Model to help interpret the seasonal variation in terrestrial water storage indicated by GRACE. The recharge model was constructed using almost entirely remotely sensed input data and calibrated to observed hydrological data from the Nile. GRACE data for the Nile Basin indicates an annual terrestrial water storage of approximately 200 km3: water input is from rainfall, and much of this water is evaporated within the basin since average annual outflow of the Nile is less than 30 km3. Total annual recharge simulated by ZOODRM is 400 km3/yr; 0–50 mm/yr within the semi arid lower catchments, and a mean of 250 mm/yr in the sub-tropical upper catchments. These results are comparable to the few site specific studies of recharge in the basin. Accounting for year-round discharge of groundwater, the seasonal groundwater storage is 100–150 km3/yr and seasonal change in soil moisture, 30 km3/yr. Together, they account for between 50 and 90% of the annual water storage in the catchment. The annual water mass variation (200 km3/yr is an order of magnitude smaller than the rainfall input into the catchment (2000 km3/yr, which could be consistent with a high degree of moisture recycling within the

  11. Analysis of groundwater-level response to rainfall and estimation of annual recharge in fractured hard rock aquifers, NW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zuansi; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Despite fractured hard rock aquifers underlying over 65% of Ireland, knowledge of key processes controlling groundwater recharge in these bedrock systems is inadequately constrained. In this study, we examined 19 groundwater-level hydrographs from two Irish hillslope sites underlain by hard rock aquifers. Water-level time-series in clustered monitoring wells completed at the subsoil, soil/bedrock interface, shallow and deep bedrocks were continuously monitored hourly over two hydrological years. Correlation methods were applied to investigate groundwater-level response to rainfall, as well as its seasonal variations. The results reveal that the direct groundwater recharge to the shallow and deep bedrocks on hillslope is very limited. Water-level variations within these geological units are likely dominated by slow flow rock matrix storage. The rapid responses to rainfall (⩽2 h) with little seasonal variations were observed to the monitoring wells installed at the subsoil and soil/bedrock interface, as well as those in the shallow or deep bedrocks at the base of the hillslope. This suggests that the direct recharge takes place within these units. An automated time-series procedure using the water-table fluctuation method was developed to estimate groundwater recharge from the water-level and rainfall data. Results show the annual recharge rates of 42-197 mm/yr in the subsoil and soil/bedrock interface, which represent 4-19% of the annual rainfall. Statistical analysis of the relationship between the rainfall intensity and water-table rise reveal that the low rainfall intensity group (⩽1 mm/h) has greater impact on the groundwater recharge rate than other groups (>1 mm/h). This study shows that the combination of the time-series analysis and the water-table fluctuation method could be an useful approach to investigate groundwater recharge in fractured hard rock aquifers in Ireland.

  12. Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques to map Groundwater Recharge and Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, S.; Leblanc, M.; Webb, J.; Lubczynski, M.; Stagnitti, F.

    2006-12-01

    In salinity prone catchments, effective management of water resources involves balancing the requirements of sustainable resource allocation with salinity mitigation programs and ecosystem protection. Understanding groundwater recharge and discharge processes is a key component to achieving this balance. In this study, surface and sub-surface features are linked with recharge and discharge processes by incorporating GIS and remote sensing mapping techniques for an unconfined basalt aquifer, in a salinity and drought prone region of southeast Australia. The basalt aquifer covers ~11,500 km2 in an agriculturally intensive region. The approach requires (a) knowledge of local hydrogeological processes, to choose appropriate surface/sub-surface indicators, (b) adequate remote sensing and GIS techniques as well as necessary datasets to map these indicators, and (c) validation of the results at test sites and at the catchment-scale. This approach, applied systematically across a catchment, provides a framework for mapping recharge and discharge areas. A key component in assigning surface and sub-surface indicators is the relevance to the dominant recharge and discharge processes occurring, and using appropriate remote sensing and GIS techniques with the capacity to identify these.

  13. Isotope studies on mechanisms of groundwater recharge to an alluvial aquifer in Gatton, Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatton is an important agricultural area for Queensland where about 40% of its vegetables needs are produced using groundwater as the main source. An alluvial Aquifer is located about 30m beneath the layers of alluvial sediments ranging from black soils of volcanic origin on top, layers of alluvial sands, clays and beds of sand and gravel. The leakage of creek flows has been considered to be the main source of recharge to this aquifer. A number of weirs have been built across the Lockyer and Laidley creeks to allow surface water to infiltrate through the beds when the creeks flow. Water levels in bores in a section located in the middle of the alluvial plain (Crowley Vale) have been declining for the last 20 years with little or no success in recharging from the creeks. Acute water shortages have been experienced in the Gatton area during the droughts of 1980-81, 1986-87 and 1994-97. Naturally occurring stable isotopes, 2H, 180 and 13C as well as radioisotopes 3H and 14C have been used to delineate sources of recharge and active recharge areas. Tritium tracing of soil moisture in the unsaturated soil was also used to determine direct infiltration rates

  14. Investigation of Groundwater Flow Variations near a Recharge Pond with Repeat Deliberate Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan F Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining hydraulic connections and travel times between recharge facilities and production wells has become increasingly important for permitting and operating managed aquifer recharge (MAR sites, a water supply strategy that transfers surface water into aquifers for storage and later extraction. This knowledge is critical for examining water quality changes and assessing the potential for future contamination. Deliberate tracer experiments are the best method for determining travel times and identifying preferential flow paths between recharge sites over the time scales of weeks to a few years. This paper compares the results of two deliberate tracer experiments at Kraemer Basin, Orange County, CA, USA. Results from the first experiment, which was conducted in October 1998, showed that a region of highly transmissive sedimentary material extends down gradient from the basin for more than 3 km [1]. Mean groundwater velocities were determined to be approximately 2 km/year in this region based on the arrival time of the tracer center of mass. A second experiment was initiated in January 2008 to determine if travel times from this basin to monitoring and production wells changed during the past decade in response to new recharge conditions. Results indicate that flow near Kraemer Basin was stable, and travel times to most wells determined during both experiments agree within the experimental uncertainty.

  15. Increasing a freshwater lens below a creek ridge using a controlled artificial recharge and drainage system: a case study in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauw, Pieter S.; van Baaren, Esther S.; Visser, Martijn; de Louw, Perry G. B.; Essink, Gualbert H. P. Oude

    2015-11-01

    A controlled artificial recharge and drainage (CARD) system was used to increase freshwater lenses below creek ridges to increase freshwater supply. Creek ridges are typical geomorphological features that lie up to 2 m higher than the surroundings in the reclaimed tidal flat landscape of the southwestern Netherlands. The 5-30-m thick freshwater lenses below the creek ridges are a vital source for irrigation, as the groundwater and surface waters are predominantly saline. However, freshwater supply from these lenses is commonly not sufficient to meet the irrigation demand, which leads to crop damage. The CARD system was tested in the field and the development of the freshwater lens was monitored during the period May 2013 to May 2014. Numerical models, which were used to investigate a long-term effect of the CARD system, predicted that below the center of the creek ridge, the 13-15-m thick freshwater lens increased 6-8 m within 10 years. The total volumetric increase of the freshwater lens was about 190,000 m3 after 10 years, which was about 40 % of the total recharge (natural and artificial recharge). From this increased freshwater lens, up to three times more water can be extracted using horizontal wells, compared to the initial size of the freshwater lens. A higher water table in the CARD system leads to a thicker freshwater lens but a lower storage efficiency. A lower water table has the opposite effect.

  16. Estimation of temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge in unconfined sand aquifers using Scots pine inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-aho, P.; Rossi, P. M.; Kløve, B.

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and land use are rapidly changing the amount and temporal distribution of recharge in northern aquifers. This paper presents a novel method for distributing Monte Carlo simulations of 1-D sandy sediment profile spatially to estimate transient recharge in an unconfined esker aquifer. The modelling approach uses data-based estimates for the most important parameters controlling the total amount (canopy cover) and timing (thickness of the unsaturated zone) of groundwater recharge. Scots pine canopy was parameterized to leaf area index (LAI) using forestry inventory data. Uncertainty in the parameters controlling sediment hydraulic properties and evapotranspiration (ET) was carried over from the Monte Carlo runs to the final recharge estimates. Different mechanisms for lake, soil, and snow evaporation and transpiration were used in the model set-up. Finally, the model output was validated with independent recharge estimates using the water table fluctuation (WTF) method and baseflow estimation. The results indicated that LAI is important in controlling total recharge amount. Soil evaporation (SE) compensated for transpiration for areas with low LAI values, which may be significant in optimal management of forestry and recharge. Different forest management scenarios tested with the model showed differences in annual recharge of up to 100 mm. The uncertainty in recharge estimates arising from the simulation parameters was lower than the interannual variation caused by climate conditions. It proved important to take unsaturated thickness and vegetation cover into account when estimating spatially and temporally distributed recharge in sandy unconfined aquifers.

  17. Estimates of ground-water recharge rates for two small basins in central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of ground-water recharge rates developed from hydrologic modeling studies are presented for 3-Springs and East Stewart basins, two small basins (analog sites) located in central Nevada. The analog-site studies were conducted to aid in the estimation of recharge to the paleohydrologic regime associated with ground water in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain under wetter climatic conditions. The two analog sites are located to the north and at higher elevations than Yucca Mountain, and the prevailing (current) climatic conditions at these sites is thought to be representative of the possible range of paleoclimatic conditions in the general area of Yucca Mountain during the Quaternary. Two independent modeling approaches were conducted at each of the analog sites using observed hydrologic data on precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, stream discharge, and chloride-ion water chemistry for a 6-year study period (October 1986 through September 1992). Both models quantify the hydrologic water-balance equation and yield estimates of ground-water recharge, given appropriate input data. Results of the modeling approaches support the conclusion that reasonable estimates of average-annual recharge to ground water range from about 1 to 3 centimeters per year for 3-Springs basin (the drier site), and from about 30 to 32 centimeters per year for East Stewart basin (the wetter site). The most reliable results are those derived from a reduced form of the chloride-ion model because they reflect integrated, basinwide processes in terms of only three measured variables: precipitation amount, precipitation chemistry, and streamflow chemistry

  18. Integrated Assessment Of Groundwater Recharge In The North Kelantan River Basin Using Environmental Water Stable Isotopes, Tritium And Chloride Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation and understanding of groundwater recharge mechanism and capacity of aquifer are essential issues in water resources investigation. An integrated study of environmental chloride content in the unsaturated zone using chloride mass balance method (CMB) and isotopic analyses of deuterium, oxygen-18, and tritium values range in the alluvial channel aquifer profiles (quaternary sediments) of the North Kelantan River basin has been carried out in order to estimate and understand groundwater recharge processes. However, the rate of aquifer recharge is one of the most difficult factors to measure in the evaluation of ground water resources. Estimation of recharge, by whatever method, is normally subject to large uncertainties and errors. In this paper, changes in stable isotopic signatures in different seasons and tritium analysis of the sampled groundwater observed at different depth in the aquifer system were evaluated. Stable isotope data are slightly below the local meteoric water line (LMWL) indicating that there is some isotopic enrichment due to direct evaporation through the soil surface which is exposed prior or during the recharging process. The overall data on water isotopic signatures from boreholes and production wells (shallow and relatively deep aquifer system) are spread over a fairly small range but somewhat distinct compared to river water isotopic compositions. Such a narrow variation in isotopic signatures of the sampled groundwaters may suggest that all groundwater samples originated from the same area of direct recharge predominantly from rainfall and nearby rivers. Environmental tritium data measured in groundwater at different depths and locations together with a medium-term of limited monthly rainfall collections were used to investigate the groundwater age distributions (residence times). The existence of groundwater in the aquifer system (sampled wells) is predominantly designated as modern (young) water that has undergone recharged

  19. Modeling hydrology, groundwater recharge and non-point nitrate loadings in the Himalayan Upper Yamuna basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Kapil K., E-mail: kkn2104@columbia.edu [Columbia Water Center (India Office), Columbia University, New Delhi 110 016 (India); Gosain, A.K. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The mountainous Himalayan watersheds are important hydrologic systems responsible for much of the water supply in the Indian sub-continent. These watersheds are increasingly facing anthropogenic and climate-related pressures that impact spatial and temporal distribution of water availability. This study evaluates temporal and spatial distribution of water availability including groundwater recharge and quality (non-point nitrate loadings) for a Himalayan watershed, namely, the Upper Yamuna watershed (part of the Ganga River basin). The watershed has an area of 11 600 km{sup 2} with elevation ranging from 6300 to 600 m above mean sea level. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a physically-based, time-continuous model, has been used to simulate the land phase of the hydrological cycle, to obtain streamflows, groundwater recharge, and nitrate (NO{sub 3}) load distributions in various components of runoff. The hydrological SWAT model is integrated with the MODular finite difference groundwater FLOW model (MODFLOW), and Modular 3-Dimensional Multi-Species Transport model (MT3DMS), to obtain groundwater flow and NO{sub 3} transport. Validation of various modules of this integrated model has been done for sub-basins of the Upper Yamuna watershed. Results on surface runoff and groundwater levels obtained as outputs from simulation show a good comparison with the observed streamflows and groundwater levels (Nash–Sutcliffe and R{sup 2} correlations greater than + 0.7). Nitrate loading obtained after nitrification, denitrification, and NO{sub 3} removal from unsaturated and shallow aquifer zones is combined with groundwater recharge. Results for nitrate modeling in groundwater aquifers are compared with observed NO{sub 3} concentration and are found to be in good agreement. The study further evaluates the sensitivity of water availability to climate change. Simulations have been made with the weather inputs of climate change scenarios of A2, B2, and A1B for end of the

  20. Assessing the effectiveness of drywells as tools for stormwater management and aquifer recharge and their groundwater contamination potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Emily C.; Harter, Thomas; Fogg, Graham E.; Washburn, Barbara; Hamad, Hamad

    2016-08-01

    Drywells are gravity-fed, excavated pits with perforated casings used to facilitate stormwater infiltration and groundwater recharge in areas where drainage and diversion of storm flows is problematic. Historically, drywells have predominantly been used as a form of stormwater management in locations that receive high volumes of precipitation; however the use of drywells is increasingly being evaluated as a method to supplement groundwater recharge, especially in areas facing severe drought. Studies have shown that drywells can be an effective means to increase recharge to aquifers; however, the potential for groundwater contamination caused by polluted stormwater runoff bypassing transport through surface soil and near surface sediment has prevented more widespread use of drywells as a recharge mechanism. Numerous studies have shown that groundwater and drinking water contamination from drywells can be avoided if drywells are used in appropriate locations and properly maintained. The effectiveness of drywells for aquifer recharge depends on the hydrogeologic setting and land use surrounding a site, as well as influent stormwater quantity and quality. These parameters may be informed for a specific drywell site through geologic and hydrologic characterization and adequate monitoring of stormwater and groundwater quality.

  1. Integrating lysimeter drainage and eddy covariance flux measurements in a groundwater recharge model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Vicente; Thomsen, Anton; Iversen, Bo V.;

    2015-01-01

    Field scale water balance is difficult to characterize because controls exerted by soils and vegetation are mostly inferred from local scale measurements with relatively small support volumes. Eddy covariance flux and lysimeters have been used to infer and evaluate field scale water balances...... estimate groundwater recharge. Variation in measured D was attributed to redirection of snowmelt infiltration and differences in lysimeter hydraulic properties caused by surface soil treatment. During the growing seasons of 2010, 2011, and 2012, ETwbLys (278, 289, 269 mm) was in good agreement with ETEC...

  2. Modeling a thick unsaturated zone at San Gorgonio Pass, California: lessons learned after five years of artificial recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Alan L.; Ellett, Kevin M.; Christensen, Allen H.; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The information flow among the tasks of framework assessment, numerical modeling, model forecasting and hind casting, and system-performance monitoring is illustrated. Results provide an understanding of artificial recharge in high-altitude desert settings where large vertical distances may separate application ponds from their target aquifers. Approximately 3.8 million cubic meters of surface water was applied to spreading ponds from 2003–2007 to artificially recharge the underlying aquifer through a 200-meter thick unsaturated zone in the San Gorgonio Pass area in southern California. A study was conducted between 1997 and 2003, and a numerical model was developed to help determine the suitability of the site for artificial recharge. Ongoing monitoring results indicated that the existing model needed to be modified and recalibrated to more accurately predict artificial recharge at the site. The objective of this work was to recalibrate the model by using observation of the application rates, the rise and fall of the water level above a perching layer, and the approximate arrival time to the water table during the 5-yr monitoring period following initiation of long-term artificial recharge. Continuous monitoring of soil-matric potential, temperature, and water levels beneath the site indicated that artificial recharge reached the underlying water table between 3.75 and 4.5 yr after the initial application of the recharge water. The model was modified to allow the simulation to more adequately match the perching layer dynamics and the time of arrival at the water table. The instrumentation also showed that the lag time between changes in application of water at the surface and the response at the perching layer decreased from about 4 mo to less than 1 mo due to the wet-up of the unsaturated zone and the increase in relative permeability. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of iteratively monitoring and modeling the unsaturated zone in layered

  3. Oxygen isotope composition as late glacial palaeoclimate indicators of groundwater recharge in the Baltic Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several hypotheses were established to explain low δ18O values of groundwater which have been found in the Estonian Homocline. Traces of depleted groundwater were found also in other parts of the Baltic Basin near the shoreline. From data collected in this and previous studies, the δ18O values of groundwater in most aquifers are known to range from -7.7 to -13.9 per mille. However, the groundwater in Estonia in the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer system has significantly lower δ18O values, which vary mainly from -18 to -22.5 per mille. The overlying Ordovician-Cambrian aquifer is also depleted in 18O, but, as a rule, the degree of depletion is several per mille less than in case of the Cambrian- Vendian aquifer. The thickness of the depleted water in Estonia reaches 450 m. At similar depths beneath Gotland Island (Sweden Homocline), groundwater has significantly higher δ18O values (from -5.7 to -6.1 per mille). A hydrogeologic model, depicting conditions during the pre Late Glacial, and accounting for hydraulic connections between the lake and river systems through taliks in permafrost, was developed to explain the observed groundwater isotope data. According to the adopted model, penetration of isotopically depleted surface waters could have reached depths of up to 500 m, with subsequent mixing between subglacial meltwater and old groundwater of Huneborg-Denekamp time. Traces of this penetration were discovered only near the shoreline, where δ18O values vary from -12 to -13.9 per mille and 14C is below 4%. In the territory of the Estonian Homocline, the hydraulically close connection via the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer between talik systems of the Gulf of Riga and the Gulf of Finland existed through permafrost before the Late Glacial. This was due to subglacial recharge during the recessional Pandivere (12 ka BP) and Palivere (11.2 ka BP) phases, which is also associated with recharge of isotopically depleted groundwater. (author)

  4. Contribution of cloud water to the groundwater recharge in Madeira Island: preliminary isotopic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, S.; Cruz, J. V.; Silva, M. O.; Figueira, C.

    2010-07-01

    Situated about 900 km southwest of mainland Portugal, in the North Atlantic, Madeira is the bigger and more populated island of the archipelago with the same name. It has a total area of 747 km2 and its northern slope forms a barrier that opposes the prevailing north-easterly trade winds, thus resulting in a very frequent windward fog belt, between 800-1600 a.s.l. Madeira has a 125 km2 area of indigenous altitude forests inside the windward fog belt, between 800-1600 a.s.l. (Prada et al., 2008). This area is characterized by very steep slopes, mainly exposed to the prevailing winds. When combined, factors like steep slopes, great exposure to the humid trade winds and presence of forest vegetation facilitate fog precipitation. This is why we assume that fog precipitation is a generalized phenomenon throughout Madeira’s northern slope area. To ascertain whether or not fog water contributes to groundwater recharge, a study on the stable isotopic composition was made. For that purpose, assuming a difference between isotopic composition in rain and fog (fog being enriched in heavier isotopes 2H and 18O relative to rain at the same altitude and region) (Ingraham and Mathews 1988, 1990; Clark and Fritz, 1997), several samples of fog water, rain water and groundwater were collected for stable isotopic analysis. Groundwater was collected, according to Clark and Fritz, (1997), from springs and tunnels representing perched and basal aquifers, respectively; fog water was collected on trees by hand by placing a funnel in a collection bottle and dabbing droplets which collected on the foliage, in rainless days of intense fog, under 98-100% relative humidity conditions, thus preventing sample evaporation enrichment; rain water was collected in containers with a 1 cm thick layer of mineral oil to prevent evaporation according to Clark and Fritz (1997) and School et al., (2002), representing a sample of several rain events. The preliminary stable isotopic compositions of fog

  5. Coupling of Groundwater Recharge and Biodegradation of Subsurface Crude-Oil Contamination (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B. A.; Hostettler, F. D.; Delin, G. N.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Warren, E.; Campbell, P.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Cozzarelli, I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface hydrologic properties controlling groundwater recharge can have a large effect on biodegradation rates in the subsurface. Two studies of crude oil contamination show that degradation rates are dramatically increased where recharge rates are enhanced. The first site, located near Bemidji, Minnesota, was contaminated in August, 1979 when oil from a pipeline rupture infiltrated into a surficial glacial outwash aquifer. Discrete oil phases form three separate pools at the water table, the largest of which is 25x75 m at a depth of 6-8 m. Gas and water concentrations and microbial community data show that methanogenic conditions prevail in this oil pool. There is extreme spatial dependence in the degradation rates such that most of the n-alkanes have been degraded in the upgradient end, but in the downgradient end n-alkane concentrations are nearly unaltered from the original spill. Recharge rates through the two ends of the oil body were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. In 2002, the more degraded end received 15.2 cm of recharge contrasted to 10.7 cm at the less degraded end. The enhanced recharge is caused by topographic focusing of runoff toward a local depression. Microbial data using the Most Probable Number method show that the methanogen concentrations are 10-100 times greater in the more degraded end of the oil body suggesting that a growth nutrient is supplied by recharge. A decrease in partial pressure of N2 compared to Ar in the soil gas indicates nitrogen fixation probably meets N requirements (Amos et al., 2005, WRR, doi:10.1029/2004WR003433). Organic phosphorus is the main form of P in infiltrating pore water and concentration decreases with depth. The second site is located 40 km southeast of the Bemidji site at an oil pipeline pumping station near Cass Lake, Minnesota. This site was contaminated by oil leaking from a pipe coupling for an unknown duration of time between 1971 and 2002. The oil body at this site lies under a fenced

  6. Technical Note: Three-dimensional transient groundwater flow due to localized recharge with an arbitrary transient rate in unconfined aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    C.-H. Chang; C.-S. Huang; H.-D. Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Most previous solutions for groundwater flow induced by localized recharge assumed either aquifer incompressibility or two-dimensional flow in the absence of the vertical flow. This paper develops a new three-dimensional flow model for hydraulic head variation due to localized recharge in a rectangular unconfined aquifer with four boundaries under the Robin condition. A governing equation for describing the head distribution is employed. The first-order free surface equation...

  7. Recharge and discharge of near-surface groundwater in Forsmark. Comparison of classification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and compares data and models for identification of near-surface groundwater recharge and discharge (RD) areas in Forsmark. The general principles of groundwater recharge and discharge are demonstrated and applied to interpret hydrological and hydrogeological observations made in the Forsmark area. 'Continuous' RD classification methods considered in the study include topographical modelling, map overlays, and hydrological-hydrogeological flow modelling. 'Discrete' (point) methods include field-based and hydrochemistry-based RD classifications of groundwater monitoring well locations. The topographical RD modelling uses the digital elevation model as the only input. The map overlays use background maps of Quaternary deposits, soils, and ground- and field layers of the vegetation/land use map. Further, the hydrological-hydrogeological modelling is performed using the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 software packages, taking into account e.g. topography, meteorology, hydrogeology, and geometry of watercourses and lakes. The best between-model agreement is found for the topography-based model and the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 model. The agreement between the topographical model and the map overlays is less good. The agreement between the map overlays on the one hand, and the MIKE SHE and field-based RD classifications on the other, is thought to be less good, as inferred from the comparison made with the topography-based model. However, much improvement of the map overlays can likely be obtained, e.g. by using 'weights' and calibration (such exercises were outside the scope of the present study). For field-classified 'recharge wells', there is a good agreement to the hydrochemistry-based (Piper plot) well classification, but less good for the field-classified 'discharge wells'. In addition, the concentration of the age-dating parameter tritium shows low variability among recharge wells, but a large spread among discharge wells. The usefulness of hydrochemistry-based RD

  8. Recharge and discharge of near-surface groundwater in Forsmark. Comparison of classification methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Per-Olof [Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden); Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa University, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    This report presents and compares data and models for identification of near-surface groundwater recharge and discharge (RD) areas in Forsmark. The general principles of groundwater recharge and discharge are demonstrated and applied to interpret hydrological and hydrogeological observations made in the Forsmark area. 'Continuous' RD classification methods considered in the study include topographical modelling, map overlays, and hydrological-hydrogeological flow modelling. 'Discrete' (point) methods include field-based and hydrochemistry-based RD classifications of groundwater monitoring well locations. The topographical RD modelling uses the digital elevation model as the only input. The map overlays use background maps of Quaternary deposits, soils, and ground- and field layers of the vegetation/land use map. Further, the hydrological-hydrogeological modelling is performed using the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 software packages, taking into account e.g. topography, meteorology, hydrogeology, and geometry of watercourses and lakes. The best between-model agreement is found for the topography-based model and the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 model. The agreement between the topographical model and the map overlays is less good. The agreement between the map overlays on the one hand, and the MIKE SHE and field-based RD classifications on the other, is thought to be less good, as inferred from the comparison made with the topography-based model. However, much improvement of the map overlays can likely be obtained, e.g. by using 'weights' and calibration (such exercises were outside the scope of the present study). For field-classified 'recharge wells', there is a good agreement to the hydrochemistry-based (Piper plot) well classification, but less good for the field-classified 'discharge wells'. In addition, the concentration of the age-dating parameter tritium shows low variability among recharge wells, but a large spread among discharge

  9. Groundwater recharge assessment at local and episodic scale in a soil mantled perched karst aquifer in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, V.; De Vita, P.; Manna, F.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Groundwater recharge assessment of karst aquifers, at various spatial and temporal scales, is a major scientific topic of current importance, since these aquifers play an essential role for both socio-economic development and fluvial ecosystems. In this study, groundwater recharge was estimated at local and episodic scales in a representative perched karst aquifer in a region of southern Italy with a Mediterranean climate. The research utilized measurements of precipitation, air temperature, soil water content, and water-table depth, obtained in 2008 at the Acqua della Madonna test area (Terminio Mount karst aquifer, Campania region). At this location the aquifer is overlain by ash-fall pyroclastic soils. The Episodic Master Recession (EMR) method, an improved version of the Water Table Fluctuation (WTF) method, was applied to estimate the amount of recharge generated episodically by individual rainfall events. The method also quantifies the amount of precipitation generating each recharge episode, thus permitting calculation of the Recharge to the Precipitation Ratio (RPR) on a storm-by-storm basis. Depending on the seasonally varying air temperature, evapotranspiration, and precipitation patterns, calculated values of RPR varied between 35% and 97% among the individual episodes. A multiple linear correlation of the RPR with both the average intensity of recharging rainfall events and the antecedent soil water content was calculated. Given the relatively easy measurability of precipitation and soil water content, such an empirical model would have great hydrogeological and practical utility. It would facilitate short-term forecasting of recharge in karst aquifers of the Mediterranean region and other aquifers with similar hydrogeological characteristics. By establishing relationships between the RPR and climate-dependent variables such as average storm intensity, it would facilitate prediction of climate-change effects on groundwater recharge. The EMR methodology

  10. Groundwater recharge history and hydrogeochemical evolution in the Minqin Basin, North West China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Minqin Basin is a type area for examining stress on groundwater resources in the Gobi Desert, and has been investigated here using a combination of isotopic, noble gas and chemical indicators. The basin is composed of clastic sediments of widely differing grain size and during the past half century over 10 000 boreholes have been drilled with a groundwater decline of around 1 m a-1. Modern diffuse recharge is unlikely to exceed 3 mm a-1, as determined using unsaturated zone profiles and Cl- mass balance. A small component of modern (3H-3He data, probably from irrigation returns. A clear distinction is found between modern waters with median δ 18O values of 6.5 ± 0.5 per mille and most groundwaters in the basin with more depleted isotopic signatures. Radiocarbon values as pmc range from 0.6% to 85% modern, but it is difficult to assign absolute ages to these, although a value of 20% modern C probably represents the late Pleistocene to Holocene transition. The δ 13C compositions remain near-constant throughout the basin (median value of -8.1 per mille δ 13C) and indicate that carbonate reactions are unimportant and also that little reaction takes place. There is a smooth decrease in 14C activity accompanied by a parallel increase in 4He accumulations from S-N across the basin, which define the occurrence of a regional flow system. Noble gas temperatures indicate recharge temperatures of about 5.6 deg. C for late Pleistocene samples, which is some 2-3 deg. C cooler than the modern mean annual air temperature and the recharge temperature obtained from several Holocene samples. Groundwaters in the Minqin Basin have salinities generally below 1 g/L and are aerobic, containing low Fe but elevated concentrations of U, Cr and Se (mean values of 27.5, 5.8 and 5.3 μg L-1, respectively). Nitrate is present at baseline concentrations of around 2 mg L-1 but there is little evidence of impact of high NO3 from irrigation returns. Strontium isotope and major ion ratios

  11. Joint inference of groundwater-recharge and hydraulic-conductivity fields from head data using the ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, D.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    Regional groundwater flow strongly depends on groundwater recharge and hydraulic conductivity. Both are spatially variable fields, and their estimation is an ongoing topic in groundwater research and practice. In this study, we use the ensemble Kalman filter as an inversion method to jointly estimate spatially variable recharge and conductivity fields from head observations. The success of the approach strongly depends on the assumed prior knowledge. If the structural assumptions underlying the initial ensemble of the parameter fields are correct, both estimated fields resemble the true ones. However, erroneous prior knowledge may not be corrected by the head data. In the worst case, the estimated recharge field resembles the true conductivity field, resulting in a model that meets the observations but has very poor predictive power. The study exemplifies the importance of prior knowledge in the joint estimation of parameters from ambiguous measurements.

  12. Quality of surface water and ground water in the proposed artificial-recharge project area, Rillito Creek basin, Tucson, Arizona, 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Saeid

    1995-01-01

    Controlled artificial recharge of surface runoff is being considered as a water-management technique to address the problem of ground-water overdraft. The planned use of recharge facilities in urban areas has caused concern about the quality of urban runoff to be recharged and the potential for ground-water contamination. The proposed recharge facility in Rillito Creek will utilize runoff entering a 1-mile reach of the Rillito Creek between Craycroft Road and Swan Road for infiltration and recharge purposes within the channel and excavated overbank areas. Physical and chemical data were collected from two surface-water and two ground-water sites in the study area in 1994. Analyses of surface-water samples were done to determine the occurrence and concentration of potential contaminants and to determine changes in quality since samples were collected during 1987-93. Analyses of ground-water samples were done to determine the variability of ground-water quality at the monitoring wells throughout the year and to determine changes in quality since samples were collected in 1989 and 1993. Surface-water samples were collected from Tanque Verde Creek at Sabino Canyon Road (streamflow-gaging station Tanque Verde Creek at Tucson, 09484500) and from Alamo Wash at Fort Lowell Road in September and May 1994, respectively. Ground-water samples were collected from monitoring wells (D- 13-14)26cbb2 and (D-13-14)26dcb2 in January, May, July, and October 1994. In surface water, calcium was the dominant cation, and bicarbonate was the dominant anion. In ground water, calcium and sodium were the dominant cations and bicarbonate was the dominant anion. Surface water in the area is soft, and ground water is moderately hard to hard. In surface water and ground water, nitrogen was found predominantly as nitrate. Concentrations of manganese in ground-water samples ranged from 60 to 230 micrograms per liter and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant

  13. Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Deaker, Amy E.; Stonestrom, David A.; Moore, Stephanie J.

    2007-01-01

    Abo Arroyo, an ephemeral tributary to the Rio Grande, rises in the largest upland catchment on the eastern side of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB). The 30-kilometer reach of channel between the mountain front and its confluence with the Rio Grande is incised into basin-fill sediments and separated from the regional water table by an unsaturated zone that reaches 120 meters thick. The MRGB portion of the arroyo is dry except for brief flows generated by runoff from the upland catchment. Though brief, ephemeral flows provide a substantial fraction of ground-water recharge in the southeastern portion of the MRGB. Previous estimates of average annual recharge from Abo Arroyo range from 1.3 to 21 million cubic meters. The current study examined the timing, location, and amount of channel infiltration using streamflow data and environmental tracers during a four-year period (water years 1997?2000). A streamflow-gaging station (?gage?) was installed in a bedrock-controlled reach near the catchment outlet to provide high-frequency data on runoff entering the basin. Streamflow at the gage, an approximate bound on potential tributary recharge to the basin, ranged from 0.8 to 15 million cubic meters per year. Storm-generated runoff produced about 98 percent of the flow in the wettest year and 80 percent of the flow in the driest year. Nearly all flows that enter the MRGB arise from monsoonal storms in July through October. A newly developed streambed temperature method indicated the presence and duration of ephemeral flows downstream of the gage. During the monsoon season, abrupt downward shifts in streambed temperatures and suppressed diurnal ranges provided generally clear indications of flow. Streambed temperatures during winter showed that snowmelt is also effective in generating channel infiltration. Controlled infiltration experiments in dry arroyo sediments indicated that most ephemeral flow is lost to seepage before reaching the Rio Grande. Streambed temperature

  14. Effects of experimental passive artificial recharge of treated surface water on water quality in the Equus Beds Aquifer, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garinger, Linda Pickett; King, Aaron S.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Declining water levels and concerns about the migration of a known saltwater plume upgradient from public supply wells prompted the City of Wichita to investigate the feasibility of using artificial recharge to replenish the water supply in the Equus Beds aquifer. After preliminary testing, the City of Wichita began Phase I of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project in 2006. In 2009, the City of Wichita installed an experimental passive gravity recharge well and trench system to increase artificial recharge at Recharge Basin 1, one of the six Phase ? recharge sites.

  15. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers in groundwater in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Roy, James W.; Brown, Susan J.; Bickerton, Greg

    2011-04-01

    SummaryThere is little information available on the prevalence of artificial sweeteners in groundwater, though these compounds may prove to be useful tracers of human wastewater, especially in urban settings with complex hydrology. In this study, the artificial sweetener acesulfame was detected in groundwater at all eight urban sites investigated (from five different urban areas in Canada), often at high concentrations (i.e., μg/L-scale). In a municipal wastewater plume at Jasper, Alberta, acesulfame was strongly correlated with chloride and was positively correlated with other wastewater-related contaminants indicating that this sweetener has potential to be a good tracer of young wastewater (sucralose at three sites, and cyclamate at five of seven sites where it was analyzed. The occurrence of sucralose may have been affected by its detection limit, which was much higher than for the other sweeteners. These results, and those of a parallel study, are the first reported detections of saccharin and cyclamate in groundwater, and suggest that these sweeteners may be more common than previously anticipated. In general, fewer samples from each site contained these other three sweeteners compared to acesulfame. At Barrie, Ontario, adjacent to an old landfill, the concentration of saccharin was higher than acesulfame in many samples. These results suggest that analyses of multiple sweeteners, rather than just acesulfame, may provide useful information on contaminant sources and groundwater conditions in urban settings. Further work is needed to address this potential use.

  16. Risk assessment of three fluoroquinolone antibiotics in the groundwater recharge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoli; Liu, Xiang; Tartakevosky, Daniel; Li, Miao

    2016-11-01

    Three fluoroquinolone antibiotics agents (FQs) in groundwater and reclaimed water have been investigated in Changzhou and Beijing, China. The occurrence of ofloxacin (OFL), enrofloxacin (ENR) and norfloxacin (NOR) is in nanograms per liter and has 100% frequency. The concentration order of FQs in reclaimed water is NOR>OFL>ENR, whilst the order in groundwater is NOR>ENR>OFL. And then the single and mixture adsorption-desorption have been studied and showed that (i) silty clay loam has higher sorption capacity than loamy sand, (ii) competitive adsorption exists when the three selected FQs coexist, (iii) ENR has a significantly priority sorption to NOR, whilst OFL has a least sorption among the mixture, (iv) there is no significant difference between the desorption results of mixture and the indivdual compound in relatively low concentration, (v) the formed chemical bonds and the irreversible combination of adsorption point are the significant influential factors for explaining desorption hysteresis of the selected FQs. Based on the above study, transport model and risk quotient have been performed, and the calculated risk quotient reveals that: (i) the selected FQs risk order in reclaimed water is OFL>ENR>NOR, (ii) in groundwater, OFL and ENR pose a higher risk than NOR no matter whether considering the long time groundwater recharge. This study will help policy makers to decide which FQs need to be covered in the priority substance lists defined in legislative frameworks. PMID:27400060

  17. A Participatory Water Management Tool for the Determination of Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, M. M.; Edmunds, W.; Sharma, O.; Davis, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture currently accounts for 70% of global water consumption, resulting in excessive groundwater pumping that surpasses the rate of groundwater renewal in many places. There is a pressing need for farmers to have a way to monitor water resources, so that they can manage and utilize water more sustainably to mitigate hardship and sustain water-related livelihoods. One of the most promising methods for quantifying groundwater supplies is the Chloride Mass Balance (CMB) approach. Although chloride can be easily quantified with ion chromatography in a laboratory, its application in developing countries remains a logistical challenge. The high costs and complexity associated with the current methodology limits its application in practice, since it requires highly specialized personnel to make advanced measurements and interpretations. In an effort to mitigate these caveats and simplify the CMB methodology such that spatial and temporal resolution can increase, this study exemplifies the use of Total Dissolved Solutes (TDS) and Electrical Conductivity (EC) meters as surrogates for ion chromatography as an extension of an on-going participatory watershed monitoring program in the Jaisamand Lake Basin, a UNESCO G-WADI pilot basin located in Rajasthan, India. Weekly EC measurements collected from 20 farmers within the Gangeshwar Watershed and Household data collection were collected in 2012 to elucidate well-well scale differences in groundwater recharge.

  18. Evaluation of the potential impact of climate changes on groundwater recharge in Karkheh river basin (Khuzestan, Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrishamchi, A.; Beigi, E.; Tajrishy, M.; Abrishamchi, A.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater is an important natural resource for human beings and ecosystems, especially in arid semi arid regions with scarce water resources and high climate variability. This vital resource is under stress in terms of both quantity and quality due to increased demands as well as the drought. Wise groundwater management requires vulnerability and susceptibility assessment of groundwater resources to natural and anthropogenic phenomena such as drought, over-abstraction and quality deterioration both in the current climatic situation and in the context of climate change. There is enough evidence that climate change is expected to affect all elements of hydrologic cycle and have negative effects on water resources due to increased variability in extreme hydrologic events of droughts and floods. .In this study impact of climate change on groundwater recharge in Karkheh river basin in province of Khuzestan, Iran, has been investigated using a physically-based methodology that can be used for predicting both temporal and spatial varying groundwater recharge. To ensure the sustainability of the land and water resources developments, assessment of the possible impacts of climate change on hydrology and water resources in the basin is necessary. Quantifying groundwater recharge is essential for management of groundwater resources. Recharge was estimated by using the hydrological evaluation of landfill performance (HELP3) water budget model. Model’s parameters were calibrated and validated using observational data in 1990-1998. The impact of climate change was modeled using downscaled precipitation and temperature from runs of CGCM2 model. These data were derived from two scenarios, A2 and B2 for three periods: 2010-2039, 2040-2069, and 2070-2099. Results of the study indicate that due to global warming evapotranspiration rates will increase and winter-precipitation will fall, spring-snowmelt will shift toward winter and consequently it will cause recharge to increase

  19. Experimental and numerical investigations of soil water balance at the hinterland of the Badain Jaran Desert for groundwater recharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhu; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Hu, Bill X.; Shang, Jie; Wan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Quantification of groundwater recharge from precipitation in the huge sand dunes is an issue in accounting for regional water balance in the Badain Jaran Desert (BJD) where about 100 lakes exist between dunes. In this study, field observations were conducted on a sand dune near a large saline lake in the BJD to investigate soil water movement through a thick vadose zone for groundwater estimation. The hydraulic properties of the soils at the site were determined using in situ experiments and laboratory measurements. A HYDRUS-1D model was built up for simulating the coupling processes of vertical water-vapor movement and heat transport in the desert soil. The model was well calibrated and validated using the site measurements of the soil water and temperature at various depths. Then, the model was applied to simulate the vertical flow across a 3-m-depth soil during a 53-year period under variable climate conditions. The simulated flow rate at the depth is an approximate estimation of groundwater recharge from the precipitation in the desert. It was found that the annual groundwater recharge would be 11-30 mm during 1983-2012, while the annual precipitation varied from 68 to 172 mm in the same period. The recharge rates are significantly higher than those estimated from the previous studies using chemical information. The modeling results highlight the role of the local precipitation as an essential source of groundwater in the BJD.

  20. Comparison of surface and groundwater balance approaches in the evaluation of managed aquifer recharge structures: Case of a percolation tank in a crystalline aquifer in India

    OpenAIRE

    Boisson, Alexandre; Baisset, M.; Alazard, M.; Perrin, Jérôme; Villeseche, D.; Dewandel, Benoit; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Chandra, S.; Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine; Sarah, S.

    2014-01-01

    To face the problem of groundwater depletion, the Indian Government relies on large projects of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Numerous recharge structures such as percolation tanks exist but the impact of these structures on groundwater resources remains poorly understood. Although the evaporation/infiltration ratio of percolation tanks was determined in several studies in semi-arid contexts using surface water balance methods, few studies evaluated the impact on the aquifer recharge. Howev...

  1. Fens as whole-ecosystem gauges of groundwater recharge under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Knifong, Donna L.; JayLee Tuil; Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, little is known about the impact of climate change on groundwater recharge in the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Range of California or other mountainous regions of the world. The purpose of this study was to determine whether small alpine peat lands called fens can be used as whole-ecosystem gauges of groundwater recharge through time. Fens are sustained by groundwater discharge and are highly sensitive to changes in groundwater flow due to hydrologic disturbance including climate change. Seven fens in the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Range were studied over a 50-80 year period using historic aerial photography. In each aerial photograph, fen areas were identified as open lawn and partially treed areas that exhibited (1) dark brownish-green coloring or various shades of gray and black in black and white imagery and (2) mottling of colors and clustering of vegetation, which signified a distinct moss canopy with overlying clumped sedge vegetation. In addition to the aerial photography study, a climate analysis for the study sites was carried out using both measured data (U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service SNOwpack TELemetry system) and modeled data (a downscaled version of the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) for the period from 1951 to 2010. Over the study period, the five fens in the Sierra Nevada were found to be decreasing between 10% and 16% in delineated area. The climate analysis revealed significant increases through time in annual mean minimum temperature (Tmin) between 1951-1980 and 1981-2010. In addition, April 1 snow water equivalent and snowpack longevity also decreased between 1951-1980 and 1981-2010. For the fens in the Cascade Range, there were no discernible changes in delineated area. At these sites, increases in Tmin occurred only within the past 20-25 years and decreases in snowpack longevity were more subtle. A conceptual model is presented, which illustrates

  2. Identifying the role of human-induced land-use change while assessing drought effects on groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeiren, Boud; Weerasinghe, Imeshi; Vanderhaegen, Sven; Canters, Frank; Uljee, Inge; Engelen, Guy; Jacquemin, Ingrid; Tychon, Bernard; Vangelis, Harris; Tsakiris, George; Batelaan, Okke; Huysmans, Marijke

    2015-04-01

    Drought is mainly regarded as a purely natural phenomenon, driven by the natural variation in precipitation or rather the lack of precipitation. Nowadays many river catchments are, however, altered by human activities having direct effects on the catchment landscape and hydrological response. In case of the occurrence of drought events in those catchments it becomes more complex to determine the effects of drought. To what extent is the hydrological response a direct result of the natural phenomenon and what is the role of the human factor? In this study we focus on the effects of droughts on groundwater recharge. Reliable estimation of groundwater recharge in space and time is of utmost importance for sustainable management of groundwater resources. Groundwater recharge forms the main source for replenishing aquifers. The main factors influencing groundwater recharge are the soil and topographic characteristics, land use and climate. While the first two influencing factors are relatively static, the latter two are (highly) dynamic. Differentiating between the contributions of each of these influencing factors to groundwater recharge is a challenging but important task. On the one hand, the occurrence of meteorological drought events is likely to cause direct, potentially deteriorating, effects on groundwater recharge. On the other hand, this is also the case for on-going land-use dynamics such as extensive urbanisation. The presented methodology aims at distinguishing in space and time between climate (drought-related) and land-use (human-induced) effects, enabling to assess the effects of drought on groundwater recharge. The physically-based water balance model WetSpass is used to calculate groundwater recharge in a distributed way (space and time) for the Dijle-Demer catchments in Belgium. The key issue is to determine land-use dynamics in a consistent way. A land-use timeseries is build based on four base maps. Via a change trajectory analysis the consistency

  3. Estimation of groundwater recharge using the chloride mass-balance method, Pingtung Plain, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Cheh-Shyh; Kerh, Tienfuan; Liao, Chiu-Jung

    Due to rapid economic growth in the Pingtung Plain of Taiwan, the use of groundwater resources has changed dramatically. Over-pumping of the groundwater reservoir, which lowers hydraulic heads in the aquifers, is not only affecting the coastal area negatively but has serious consequences for agriculture throughout the plain. In order to determine the safe yield of the aquifer underlying the plain, a reliable estimate of groundwater recharge is desirable. In the present study, for the first time, the chloride mass-balance method is adopted to estimate groundwater recharge in the plain. Four sites in the central part were chosen to facilitate the estimations using the ion-chromatograph and Thiessen polygon-weighting methods. Based on the measured and calculated results, in all sites, including the mountain and river boundaries, recharge to the groundwater is probably 15% of the annual rainfall, excluding recharge from additional irrigation water. This information can improve the accuracy of future groundwater-simulation and management models in the plain. Résumé Du fait de la croissance économique rapide de la plaine de Pingtung à Taiwan, l'utilisation des ressources en eau souterraine s'est considérablement modifié. La surexploitation des aquifères, qui a abaissé le niveau des nappes, n'affecte pas seulement la région côtière, mais a de sérieuses répercutions sur l'agriculture dans toute la plaine. Afin de déterminer les ressources renouvelables de l'aquifère sous la plaine, une estimation précise de la recharge de la nappe est nécessaire. Dans cette étude, le taux de recharge de la nappe a d'abord été estimé au moyen d'un bilan de matière de chlorure. Quatre sites de la partie centrale ont été sélectionnés pour réaliser ces estimations, à l'aide d'un chromatographe ionique et de la méthode des polygones de Thiessen. A partir des résultats mesurés et calculés, à chaque site, et en prenant comme limites les montagnes et les rivi

  4. Investigation of groundwater recharge in arid environments through continuous monitoring of water fluxes within the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioras, A.; Reshid, M.; Dietrich, P.; Rausch, R.; Al-Saud, M.; Schuth, C.

    2012-04-01

    For groundwater resources management in arid environments the rate of aquifer replenishment due to groundwater recharge is one of the most important factors and unfortunately also one of the most difficult to derive with sufficient accuracy. In general, the potential evaporation by far exceeds the precipitation limiting groundwater recharge. Unsaturated zone processes play a key role in groundwater recharge as the thickness of the unsaturated zone in arid areas may reach several thenth of meters, compared to millimeters or centimeters of assumed groundwater recharge per year. This indicates the complexity of the problem. Overcoming the field capacity along the infiltration path to initiate downward movement on such a long distance to the groundwater table would require the recharge of tenths or even hundreds of years. Also, precipitation is highly variable in space, time, and intensity and may be followed by hot and dry conditions leading to an alternation of downward and upward movement of water. For this study, field sites in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (located app. 200km SW of Riyadh) were selected that represent typical settings for potential groundwater recharge in arid regions, i.e. sand dune areas and wadi beds. In the field campaign vibro-coring techniques applying direct-push technologies (Geoprobe 7720DT) were used to retrieve undisturbed soil sampling down to depths of about 15 m in the unsaturated zone. The drilled boreholes were consequently used for the installation of specially designed flat cable TDR sensors that provide continuous monitoring of the soil moisture content in high vertical resolution. In addition, temperature sensors were installed to monitor temperature fluctuations in the unsaturated zone. We present data on the analyses of soil samples as well as on the measured water content evolution over time as determined by the TDR flat band cables. Results show, that significant changes in water content occurred within the observation time

  5. A groundwater recharge perspective on locating tree plantations within low-rainfall catchments to limit water resource losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J. F.; Webb, J. A.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Chisari, R.; Dresel, P. E.

    2015-02-01

    Despite the many studies that consider the impacts of plantation forestry on groundwater recharge, and others that explore the spatial heterogeneity of recharge in low-rainfall regions, there is little marriage of the two subjects in forestry management guidelines and legislation. Here we carry out an in-depth analysis of the impact of reforestation on groundwater recharge in a low-rainfall ( BP 200 years). The tree plantation has caused a progressive drawdown in groundwater levels due to tree water use; the decline is less in the upland areas. The results of this study show that spatial variations in recharge are important considerations for locating tree plantations. To conserve water resources for downstream users in low-rainfall, high-evapotranspiration regions, tree planting should be avoided in the dominant zone of recharge, i.e. the topographically low areas and along the drainage lines, and should be concentrated on the upper slopes, although this may negatively impact the economic viability of the plantation.

  6. Estimation of groundwater recharge and vulnerability by tritium data in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Tritium is an excellent tool for proving of the protected groundwater (containing no component younger than 50 years) and for estimation of infiltration and recharge rate. Annual mean tritium record of precipitation revealing for Hungary shows that the present tritium content of the precipitation fallen before 1952, is not detectable (z), infiltration rate (I) and the vertical hydraulic conductivity (kz) were estimated by the present depth of tritium peak (h63) and of zero tritium content (h52). According to our field studies in a recharge area of the regional groundwater flow regime of the Great Hungarian Plain the vertical flow velocity was calculated as vz 200-250 mm/a. The infiltration rate was estimated as I = 40 to 50 mm/a, assuming n0 = 0.2 porosity. Vertical hydraulic conductivity looks be very low as kz = (5 to 13) * 10-8 m/s. Same method was used for estimation of the vertical flow velocity and infiltration rate through the unsaturated zone in loess soil at the prospective nuclear waste disposal. Tritium samples were extracted from the soil samples taken from dug-wells at the construction. Infiltration rates of 5 to 10 mm/a (1 to 2% of the total precipitation) and n0 0,07 effective porosity were estimated by the method of tritium peak combined with tritium balance calculations. Horizontal groundwater flow originating from the Danube with velocity arriving 500 m/a, was detected by the tritium peak method in 1992 in NW Hungary (Szigetkoez area) in the more hundred meters thick gravel aquifer. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient of the gravel aquifer was estimated as 300 m by tritium and 3He data. Repeating the tritium sampling five and ten years later the shift of the tritium peak provided useful information about the changes of the groundwater regime. Groundwater flow velocities, infiltration rates and hydraulic conductivities can be estimated directly from tritium data but the main consume is the verification of hydraulic modeling. (author)

  7. Use Of Stable Isotope To Determine Time of Red River Water Recharging To Production Groundwater Wells In Hanoi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope O-18 and lump parameter models has been used to determine time of Red River water recharging to some production groundwater wells at Yen Phu station in Ha noi. Composition of stable isotope O-18 in Red River water changed on time in a year has been used as a tracer with lump parameter models to study flow of groundwater. Composition of stable isotope O-18 in production groundwater wells was measured on months in a year and the fitting of measured data and calculation data with selected flow models was carried out by lumped parameter models. The results of fitting shows resident time or time of Red River water recharging to production groundwater wells. At 4 production groundwater wells of Yen Phu station selected in this study, the time of Red River water recharging to wells H26 and H29 is following 3.5 months and 11 months. Composition of stable isotope O-18 at wells H12 and H27 do not change on time, but proportions of Red River water in production groundwater at these wells were calculated of following 99% and 97%. (author)

  8. Groundwater conceptualization and modeling using distributed SWAT-based recharge for the semi-arid agricultural Neishaboor plain, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izady, A.; Davary, K.; Alizadeh, A.; Ziaei, A. N.; Akhavan, S.; Alipoor, A.; Joodavi, A.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-02-01

    Increased irrigation in the Neishaboor watershed, Iran, during the last few decades has caused serious groundwater depletion, making the development of comprehensive mitigation strategies and tools increasingly important. In this study, SWAT and MODFLOW were employed to integratively simulate surface-water and groundwater flows. SWAT and MODFLOW were iteratively executed to compute spatial and temporal distributions of hydrologic components. The combined SWAT-MODFLOW model was calibrated (2000-2010) and validated (2010-2012) based on streamflow, wheat yield, groundwater extraction, and groundwater-level data. This multi-criteria calibration procedure provided greater confidence for the partitioning of water between soil storage, actual evapotranspiration, and aquifer recharge. The SWAT model provided satisfactory predictions of the hydrologic budget for the watershed outlet. It also provided good predictions of irrigated wheat yield and groundwater extraction. The 10-year mean annual recharge rate estimated using the combined model varied greatly, ranging from 0 to 960 mm, with an average of 176 mm. This result showed good agreement with the independently estimated annual recharge rate from an earlier study. The combined model provides a robust tool for the sustainable planning and management of water resources for areas with stressed aquifers where interaction between groundwater and surface water cannot be easily assessed.

  9. Preliminary data from a series of artificial recharge experiments at Stanton, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, R.L.; Weeks, E.P.; Ceazan, M.L.; Perkins, S.G.; Signor, D.C.; Redinger, D.L.; Malcolm, R.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Thurman, E.M.; Avery, P.A.; Wood, W.W.; Thompson, G.M.; Stiles, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    A series of artificial recharge experiments was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey at an experimental site located in Stanton, Texas. Five tests were performed from March 1977 through December 1978 to: (1) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of the aquifer; (2) test sampling and monitoring equipment; (3) compare tracers for future use in hydrologic investigations; and (4) determine the radial and vertical distribution of hydraulic properties at the site. Suites of inorganic, and both volatile and nonvolatile organic tracers were used in the tests, and comparative data were obtained from sampling points at several radial distances and depths from the injection well. Hydraulic data from aquifer tests and geologic data from core material also were obtained during the investigation. (USGS)

  10. Stable isotope ratios in meteoric recharge and groundwater at Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, M.; Liotta, M.; Favara, R.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA rain gauge network consisting of five sites located at different altitudes, ranging from 320 to 1285 m.a.s.l., was installed at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy). Rain water samples were collected monthly over a two-year period and their isotopic composition (δ 18O and δD) was analyzed. During the same period, circulating groundwater was sampled from 24 springs and wells distributed throughout the study area. Monthly isotopic composition values were used to determine the local meteoric water line (LMWL). Its slope is slightly lower than the relationship defined by Longinelli and Selmo (Longinelli, A., Selmo, E., 2003. Isotopic composition of precipitation in Italy: a first overall map. J. Hydrol. 270, 75-88) for southern Italy. The groundwater samples analyzed were distributed essentially along the LMWL. The weighted local meteoric water line (WLMWL), defined through the mean values weighted by the rainfall amount, however, may define in a short range the meteoric end-member in the local hydrological cycle more precisely. Since most of the groundwater sampling locations do not show seasonal variations in their stable isotope values, the flow system appears to be relatively homogeneous. The mean altitude of the recharge by rainfall infiltration was estimated on the basis of the local vertical isotopic gradient δ 18O. A few springs, which show anomalous isotopic values, reveal more regional circulation systems, associated with tectonic structures responsible for the ascent of deeper water.

  11. Groundwater recharge areas of a volcanic aquifer system inferred from hydraulic, hydrogeochemical and stable isotope data: Mount Vulture, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Serena; Paternoster, Michele; Kohfahl, Claus; Pekdeger, Asaf; Meyer, Hanno; Hubberten, Hans Wolfgang; Spilotro, Giuseppe; Mongelli, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Environmental isotope techniques, hydrogeochemical analysis and hydraulic data are employed to identify the main recharge areas of the Mt. Vulture hydrogeological basin, one of the most important aquifers of southern Italy. The groundwaters are derived from seepage of rainwater, flowing from the highest to the lowest elevations through the shallow volcanic weathered host-rock fracture zones. Samples of shallow and deep groundwater were collected at 48 locations with elevations ranging from 352 to 1,100 m above sea level (a.s.l.), for stable isotope (δ18O, δD) and major ion analyses. A complete dataset of available hydraulic information has been integrated with measurements carried out in the present study. Inferred recharge elevations, estimated on the basis of the local vertical isotopic gradient of δ18O, range between 550 and 1,200 m a.s.l. The isotope pattern of the Quaternary aquifer reflects the spatial separation of different recharge sources. Knowledge of the local hydrogeological setting was the starting point for a detailed hydrogeochemical and isotopic study to define the recharge and discharge patterns identifying the groundwater flow pathways of the Mt. Vulture basin. The integration of all the data allowed for the tracing of the groundwater flows of the Mt. Vulture basin.

  12. Estimation of temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge in unconfined sand aquifers using Scots pine inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ala-aho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and land use are rapidly changing the amount and temporal distribution of recharge in northern aquifers. This paper presents a novel method for distributing Monte Carlo simulations of 1-D soil profile spatially to estimate transient recharge in an unconfined esker aquifer. The modeling approach uses data-based estimates for the most important parameters controlling the total amount (canopy cover and timing (depth of the unsaturated zone of groundwater recharge. Scots pine canopy was parameterized to leaf area index (LAI using forestry inventory data. Uncertainty in the parameters controlling soil hydraulic properties and evapotranspiration was carried over from the Monte Carlo runs to the final recharge estimates. Different mechanisms for lake, soil, and snow evaporation and transpiration were used in the model set-up. Finally, the model output was validated with independent recharge estimates using the water table fluctuation method and baseflow estimation. The results indicated that LAI is important in controlling total recharge amount, and the modeling approach successfully reduced model uncertainty by allocating the LAI parameter spatially in the model. Soil evaporation compensated for transpiration for areas with low LAI values, which may be significant in optimal management of forestry and recharge. Different forest management scenarios tested with the model showed differences in annual recharge of up to 100 mm. The uncertainty in recharge estimates arising from the simulation parameters was lower than the interannual variation caused by climate conditions. It proved important to take unsaturated depth and vegetation cover into account when estimating spatially and temporally distributed recharge in sandy unconfined aquifers.

  13. Numerical simulation of groundwater movement and managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir, Hurricane Bench area, Washington County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Thomas M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Bench area of Washington County, Utah, is a 70 square-mile area extending south from the Virgin River and encompassing Sand Hollow basin. Sand Hollow Reservoir, located on Hurricane Bench, was completed in March 2002 and is operated primarily as a managed aquifer recharge project by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. The reservoir is situated on a thick sequence of the Navajo Sandstone and Kayenta Formation. Total recharge to the underlying Navajo aquifer from the reservoir was about 86,000 acre-feet from 2002 to 2009. Natural recharge as infiltration of precipitation was approximately 2,100 acre-feet per year for the same period. Discharge occurs as seepage to the Virgin River, municipal and irrigation well withdrawals, and seepage to drains at the base of reservoir dams. Within the Hurricane Bench area, unconfined groundwater-flow conditions generally exist throughout the Navajo Sandstone. Navajo Sandstone hydraulic-conductivity values from regional aquifer testing range from 0.8 to 32 feet per day. The large variability in hydraulic conductivity is attributed to bedrock fractures that trend north-northeast across the study area. A numerical groundwater-flow model was developed to simulate groundwater movement in the Hurricane Bench area and to simulate the movement of managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir through the groundwater system. The model was calibrated to combined steady- and transient-state conditions. The steady-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data that represented average conditions for 1975. The transient-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data collected from 1976 to 2009. Areally, the model grid was 98 rows by 76 columns with a variable cell size ranging from about 1.5 to 25 acres. Smaller cells were used to represent the reservoir to accurately simulate the reservoir bathymetry and nearby monitoring wells

  14. Water Budget and the Effects of Land-Use Changes on Ground-Water Recharge, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Patricia J.; Nichols, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed water budgets calculated for southern and southeastern Oahu are used with a geographic information system to develop simplified methods for estimating areal water budgets for predevelopment and mid-1980's land use. The methods were applied to estimate water budgets for the Waianae area of western Oahu, and for north-central, southern, and southeastern Oahu. A water budget was calculated for windward Oahu by developing a separate geographic information system model of the area. The water budgets for these areas were combined into a single water budget for the entire island. The geographic information system model was used to calculate mid-1980's ground-water recharge to small areas of specific interest and the distribution of recharge by geologic formation. The most significant changes in the water budget and ground-water recharge have occurred in north-central and southern Oahu as a result of large-scale agricultural development and urbanization by the mid-1980's. Runoff increased by 23 million gallons per day in southern Oahu where extensive urban areas have been developed. Evapotranspiration increased by 8 million gallons per day in southern Oahu and 28 million gallons per day in north-central Oahu as result of the 146 million gallons per day of agricultural irrigation. Ground-water recharge increased in both areas: by about 56 million gallons per day in southern Oahu and by about 32 million gallons per day in north-central Oahu. Predevelopment ground-water recharge to Oahu was an estimated 792 million gallons per day. Changes in land-use practices in the mid-1980's resulted in an estimated island-wide recharge of 880 million gallons per day.

  15. Performance evaluation of a dual-flow recharge filter for improving groundwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Manoj P; Senthilvel, S; Mathew, Abraham C

    2014-07-01

    A dual-flow multimedia stormwater filter integrated with a groundwater recharge system was developed and tested for hydraulic efficiency and pollutant removal efficiency. The influent stormwater first flows horizontally through the circular layers of planted grass and biofibers. Subsequently, the flow direction changes to a vertical direction so that water moves through layers of pebbles and sand and finally gets recharged to the deep aquifers. The media in the sequence of vegetative medium:biofiber to pebble:sand were filled in nine proportions and tested for the best performing combination. Three grass species, viz., Typha (Typha angustifolia), Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), and St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum), were tested as the best performing vegetative medium. The adsorption behavior of Coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber, which was filled in the middle layer, was determined by a series of column and batch studies.The dual-flow filter showed an increasing trend in hydraulic efficiency with an increase in flowrate. The chemical removal efficiency of the recharge dual-flow filter was found to be very high in case of K+ (81.6%) and Na+ (77.55%). The pH normalizing efficiency and electrical conductivity reduction efficiency were also recorded as high. The average removal percentage of Ca2+ was moderate, while that of Mg2+ was very low. The filter proportions of 1:1 to 1:2 (plant:fiber to pebble:sand) showed a superior performance compared to all other proportions. Based on the estimated annual costs and returns, all the financial viability criteria (internal rate of return, net present value, and benefit-cost ratio) were found to be favorable and affordable to farmers in terms of investing in the developed filtration system. PMID:25112029

  16. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive preferential flow models for estimating groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Mackay, R.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a fieldsite in Shropshire, UK. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via macropore flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. However, recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in the macropore system due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil, and a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Thus, although the wetting process in the topsoil is highly complex, a soil moisture balance model (SMBM) is shown to be skilful in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table suggests that Stokes type film flow rather than Richards type capillarity dominated flow is occurring and this conjecture is tested using a range of numerical models. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well, when linked to a SMBM as the source of recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils. If the conceptual and numerical models can be shown to be transferable to other ploughed soils, it promises to be a very useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation. Nimmo, J. R. (2010). Theory for Source-Responsive and Free-Surface Film Modeling of Unsaturated Flow. Vadose Zone Journal, 9, 295-306.

  17. Groundwater recharge and capillary rise in a clayey catchment: modulation by topography and the Arctic Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Schrøder

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The signature left by capillary rise in the water balance is investigated for a 16 km2 clayey till catchment in Denmark. Integrated modelling for 1981–99 substantiates a 30% uphill increase in average net recharge, caused by the reduction in capillary rise when the water table declines. Calibration of the groundwater module is constrained by stream flow separation and water table wells. Net recharge and a priori parameterisation has been estimated from those same data, an automatic rain gauge and electrical sounding. Evaluation of snow storage and compensation for a simplified formulation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity contribute to a modelling of the precipitation-runoff relation that compares well with measurements in other underdrained clayey catchments. The capillary rise is assumed to be responsible for a 30% correlation between annual evapotranspiration and the North Atlantic Oscillation. The observed correlation, and the hypothesis of a hemispherical Arctic Oscillation linking atmospheric pressure with surface temperature, suggests that modelled evapotranspiration from clayey areas is better than precipitation records for identifying the region influenced by oscillation. Keywords: catchment modelling, MIKE SHE, capillary rise, degree-day model, climate

  18. Ground-water recharge in Fortymile Wash near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, 1992-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-water recharge occurred after five separate streamflow event periods in the Pah Canyon area of Fortymile Wash approximately 10 kilometers from Yucca Mountain, Nevada during 1992-93. Ground-water levels rose in two wells, UE-29 a No.1 and UE-29 a No.2, and one neutron-access borehole, UE-29 UZN-91, after each streamflow event period. A maximum rise of 2.9 meters occurred at UE-29 a No.1 thirteen days after the largest streamflow event where depth to water changed from 27.3 to 24.4 meters. Water levels fluctuated 3.89 meters in UE-29 a No.1, 2.92 meters in UE-29 a No.2, and 2.10 meters in UE-29 UZN-91 during the period January, 1992 to September, 1993. During two of the streamflow event periods, one in 1992 and one in 1993, there was flow around the neutron-access borehole located in the Fortymile Wash channel. Three other streamflow event periods were documented in Pah Canyon Wash but the streamflow infiltrated prior to reaching the neutron-access borehole location. Volumetric-water-content profiles were measured periodically in the neutron-access borehole. After the 1992 streamflow event period, water content increased in the upper six meters of the unsaturated zone. After the 1993 streamflow event period, water content increased in the entire unsaturated section, approximately 16 meters thick at the neutron-access borehole. Water levels in the neutron-access borehole rose even when there was no apparent water movement through the unsaturated zone as inferred by changes in the volumetric-water contents. This rise is attributed to ground-water recharge from nearby infiltration of Pah Canyon Wash streamflow. A groundwater mound probably formed beneath Pah Canyon Wash and spread laterally as evidence by larger rises in water levels in UE-29 a No.1 and UE-29 a No.2, which are closer to Pah Canyon Wash than UE-29 UZN-91

  19. Recharge source and hydrogeochemical evolution of shallow groundwater in a complex alluvial fan system, southwest of North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fadong; Pan, Guoying; Tang, Changyuan; Zhang, Qiuying; Yu, Jingjie

    2008-09-01

    Many cities around the world are developed at alluvial fans. With economic and industrial development and increase in population, quality and quantity of groundwater are often damaged by over-exploitation in these areas. In order to realistically assess these groundwater resources and their sustainability, it is vital to understand the recharge sources and hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in alluvial fans. In March 2006, groundwater and surface water were sampled for major element analysis and stable isotope (oxygen-18 and deuterium) compositions in Xinxiang, which is located at a complex alluvial fan system composed of a mountainous area, Taihang Mt. alluvial fan and Yellow River alluvial fan. In the Taihang mountainous area, the groundwater was recharged by precipitation and was characterized by Ca-HCO3 type water with depleted δ18O and δD (mean value of -8.8‰ δ18O). Along the flow path from the mountainous area to Taihang Mt. alluvial fan, the groundwater became geochemically complex (Ca-Na-Mg-HCO3-Cl-SO4 type), and heavier δ18O and δD were observed (around -8‰ δ18O). Before the surface water with mean δ18O of -8.7‰ recharged to groundwater, it underwent isotopic enrichment in Taihang Mt. alluvial fan. Chemical mixture and ion exchange are expected to be responsible for the chemical evolution of groundwater in Yellow River alluvial fan. Transferred water from the Yellow River is the main source of the groundwater in the Yellow River alluvial fan in the south of the study area, and stable isotopic compositions of the groundwater (mean value of -8.8‰ δ18O) were similar to those of transferred water (-8.9‰), increasing from the southern boundary of the study area to the distal end of the fan. The groundwater underwent chemical evolution from Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, to Na-SO4. A conceptual model, integrating stiff diagrams, is used to describe the spatial variation of recharge sources, chemical evolution, and groundwater flow paths in the

  20. The evolution of redox conditions and groundwater geochemistry in recharge-discharge environments on the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater composition evolves along flow paths from recharge to discharge in response to interactions with bedrock and fracture-filling minerals, and dissolution of soluble (Cl-rich) salts in the rock matrix. The groundwater redox potential changes from oxidizing to reducing conditions due, initially, to rapid consumption of dissolved oxygen by organics in the upper ∼100 m of bedrock and, subsequently, interaction with Fe (II)-containing minerals. Measured Eh values of groundwaters at depth in the granitic Lac du Bonnet batholith indicate that biotite and chlorite control groundwater redox potential. This is supported by other geochemical characteristics such as absence of CH4, H2S, H2, NO3, low concentrations of Fe (II), and abundance of SO4. Further evidence of evolution of redox conditions is given by variations in U concentration ranging from up to 1000 μg/L in dilute near-surface waters to <1 μg/L in some deep, saline groundwaters. Groundwaters at about 400 m depth in a recharge area on the Lac du Bonnet batholith contain significantly more U than groundwaters further along the flow path or near surface in discharge areas. Uranium concentration is found to be a useful and sensitive indicator of redox conditions. (author)

  1. Estimating groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, China under varying land use practices using tritium and bromide tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Jin, M.; Nimmo, J.R.; Yang, L.; Wang, W.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium and bromide were used as applied tracers to determine groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, North China, to evaluate the impacts of different soil types, land use, irrigation, and crop cultivation practice on recharge. Additional objectives were to evaluate temporal variability of recharge and the effect on results of the particular tracer used. Thirty-nine profiles at representative locations were chosen for investigation. Average recharge rates and recharge coefficient determined by tritium and bromide tracing for different sites were 0.00-1.05 mm/d and 0.0-42.5%, respectively. The results showed relative recharge rates for the following paired influences (items within each pair are listed with the influence producing greater recharge first): flood-irrigated cropland and non-irrigated non-cultivation land, flood irrigation (0.42-0.58 mm/d) and sprinkling irrigation (0.17-0.23 mm/d), no stalk mulch (0.56-0.80 mm/d) and stalk mulch (0.44-0.60 mm/d), vegetable (e.g. Chinese cabbage and garlic, 0.70 mm/d) and wheat-maize (0.38 mm/d), peanut (0.51 mm/d) and peach (0.43 mm/d). The results also showed greater recharge for the first year of tracer travel than for the second. Because total precipitation and irrigation were greater in the first year than in the second, this may reflect temporal variability of recharge. The method may not be applicable where the water table is shallow (less than 3 m). A comparison of the near-ideal tritium tracer with the more common but less ideal bromide showed that bromide moved approximately 23% faster than tritiated water, perhaps because of anion exclusion. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale model domains, both as recharge (infiltration) at the upper boundary (water table), and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. Specifically, this work compiles information on the recharge boundary conditions supplied to the base-case and alternate SZ site-scale flow models taken from (1) distributed recharge from the 1997 (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131]) or 2001 (D'Agnese et al. 2002 [DIRS 158876]) SZ regional-scale (Death Valley Regional Flow System [DVRFS]) model; (2) recharge below the area of the 1997 (Wu et al. 1997 [DIRS 156453]) or 2003 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]) unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model; and (3) focused recharge along Fortymile Wash. In addition, this analysis includes extraction of the groundwater flow rates simulated by the 1997 and 2001 DVRFS models coincident with the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow models. The fluxes from the 1997 DVRFS were used to calibrate the base-case SZ site-scale flow model. The 2001 DVRFS fluxes are used in the alternate SZ site-scale flow model

  3. Groundwater flow, recharge rates and mean ages in the Roswell basin, Southeastern New Mexico, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-four water samples were collected from sites throughout the Roswell groundwater basin in southeastern New Mexico that were previously sampled in the 1970's. These data sets were used to evaluate the transience of δ18O values in the basin in hopes of simulating transient conditions with a numerical model. No long term transient trend in the data was established. A compartmental (mixing cell) model was developed and calibrated with the spatial distribution of δ18O. The model was run as a steady-state simulation and produced estimates of groundwater flow paths, volumetric flow rates, recharge rates and residence times. The results estimate the total annual recharge to the carbonate aquifer as 284 million cubic meters (MCM), slightly lower than previous estimates. Furthermore, the model predicts that 114 MCM of the annual recharge to the carbonate aquifer is provided by underflow from deeper units whose source waters originate in the Sacramento Mountains. Mean groundwater ages in the basin ranged from about 230 to 920 years and were strongly influenced by the fraction of recharge derived from the underflow component. (author)

  4. Geospatial technology applied to the identification of groundwater recharge areas in northeastern São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater resource information is crucial for the establishment of protective measures by police makers and local managers. This article presents the findings of a research based on the application of remote sensing technology and auxiliary data for the identification of groundwater recharge areas in the Paraíba do Sul river basin, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The objective of this study was to develop a series of georreferenced geologic information and a sequence of hydrogeologic analysis to determine the location and distribution of recharge areas for future conservation purposes. The results indicate the distribution of five categories of potential recharge areas based on lineament characteristics, fracture bundles, and fracture density analysis. The top three categories should be considered as having the higher percolation quality and infiltration capacity, therefore higher potential for groundwater recharge. Significantly different results were obtained for the two major portions of the study area, crystalline rocks and unconsolidated sedimentary material, this fact hampered the development of hydrogeologic correlations for the entire basin. Results may help policy makers and managers in the development and implementation of an aquifer protection zoning program and local community activities in environmental education and conservationist interventions.

  5. Simulation of future groundwater recharge using a climate model ensemble and SAR-image based soil parameter distributions - A case study in an intensively-used Mediterranean catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Frank; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Blaschek, Michael; Deidda, Roberto; Duttmann, Rainer; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Vereecken, Harry; Wendland, Frank

    2016-02-01

    We used observed climate data, an ensemble of four GCM-RCM combinations (global and regional climate models) and the water balance model mGROWA to estimate present and future groundwater recharge for the intensively-used Thau lagoon catchment in southern France. In addition to a highly resolved soil map, soil moisture distributions obtained from SAR-images (Synthetic Aperture Radar) were used to derive the spatial distribution of soil parameters covering the full simulation domain. Doing so helped us to assess the impact of different soil parameter sources on the modelled groundwater recharge levels. Groundwater recharge was simulated in monthly time steps using the ensemble approach and analysed in its spatial and temporal variability. The soil parameters originating from both sources led to very similar groundwater recharge rates, proving that soil parameters derived from SAR images may replace traditionally used soil maps in regions where soil maps are sparse or missing. Additionally, we showed that the variance in different GCM-RCMs influences the projected magnitude of future groundwater recharge change significantly more than the variance in the soil parameter distributions derived from the two different sources. For the period between 1950 and 2100, climate change impacts based on the climate model ensemble indicated that overall groundwater recharge will possibly show a low to moderate decrease in the Thau catchment. However, as no clear trend resulted from the ensemble simulations, reliable recommendations for adapting the regional groundwater management to changed available groundwater volumes could not be derived. PMID:26190446

  6. Identifying groundwater recharge connections in the Moscow (USA) sub-basin using isotopic tracers and a soil moisture routing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, Jasper; Brooks, Erin; Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Grader, George; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-06-01

    Globally, aquifers are suffering from large abstractions resulting in groundwater level declines. These declines can be caused by excessive abstraction for drinking water, irrigation purposes or industrial use. Basaltic aquifers also face these conflicts. A large flood basalt area (1.1 × 105 km2) can be found in the Northwest of the USA. This Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick series of basalt flows of Miocene age. The two major hydrogeological units (Wanapum and Grand Ronde formations) are widely used for water abstraction. The mean decline over recent decades has been 0.6 m year-1. At present day, abstraction wells are drying up, and base flow of rivers is reduced. At the eastern part of CRBG, the Moscow sub-basin on the Idaho/Washington State border can be found. Although a thick poorly permeable clay layer exists on top of the basalt aquifer, groundwater level dynamics suggest that groundwater recharge occurs at certain locations. A set of wells and springs has been monitored bi-weekly for 9 months for δ18O and δ2H. Large isotopic fluctuations and d-excess values close to the meteoric water line in some wells are indicating that recharge occurs at the granite/basalt interface through lateral flow paths in and below the clay. A soil moisture routing (SMR) model showed that most recharge occurs on the granitic mountains. The basaltic aquifer receives recharge from these sedimentary zones around the granite/basalt interface. The identification of these types of areas is of major importance for future managed-aquifer recharge solutions to solve problems of groundwater depletion.

  7. Water balance and interactions between Schwarzl artificial groundwater lake and the surrounding shallow groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chains of the dredging lakes including Schwarzl, Stuag and Samitz Lakes found in the western part of Grazer Feld are hydraulically interconnected flowthrough lakes which have an overlapping underground catchment area. They recharge each other from north to south and most of the water flows through Schwarzl Lake. One of the main objectives of the present study was to determine the subsurface inflow and outflow rate in Schwarzl Lake using the stable isotopes, 2H and 18O. The concentration of most chemical constituents increase as the groundwater moves from the western boundary of Grazer Feld inward. The chemical evolution of the shallow groundwater in the investigation area is determined mainly by water-carbonate mineral reaction. The concentration of most major ions decreases significantly as the groundwater discharges into the dredging lakes due to precipitation of the carbonate minerals, biological uptake (e.g. NO3 and SiO2) and less significantly due to dilution. The chemical changes observed in Schwarzl Lake also include the effect of the geochemical and biochemical reactions taking place in the upstream lying lakes (Stuag and Samitz Lake)

  8. Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The City of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Contributing recharge areas (CRA) were last determined for the well field in 1996. Since that time, eight supply wells have been installed in the area north of the Missouri River and well pumpage has changed for the older supply wells. The change in pumping has altered groundwater flow and substantially changed the character of the CRA and groundwater travel times to the supply wells. The U.S Geological Survey, in a cooperative study with the City of Independence, Missouri, simulated steady-state groundwater flow for 2007 well pumpage, average annual river stage, and average annual recharge. Particle-tracking analysis was used to determine the CRA for supply wells and monitoring wells, and the travel time from recharge areas to supply wells, recharge areas to monitoring wells, and monitoring wells to supply wells. The simulated CRA for the well field is elongated in the upstream direction and extends to both sides of the Missouri River. Groundwater flow paths and recharge areas estimated for monitoring wells indicate the origin of water to each monitoring well, the travel time of that water from the recharge area, the flow path from the vicinity of each monitoring well to a supply well, and the travel time from the monitoring well to the supply well. Monitoring wells 14a and 14b have the shortest groundwater travel time from their contributing recharge area of 0.30 years and monitoring well 29a has the longest maximum groundwater travel time from its contributing recharge area of 1,701 years. Monitoring well 22a has the shortest groundwater travel time of 0.5 day to supply well 44 and monitoring well 3b has the longest maximum travel time of 31.91 years to supply well 10. Water-quality samples from the Independence groundwater monitoring well network were collected from 1997 to 2008 by USGS personnel during ongoing annual sampling within the 10-year contributing

  9. Estimation of groundwater recharge in oil producing areas of the niger delta basin of nigeria: using soil moisture deficit technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was undertaken to predict natural and incidental groundwater recharge using the moisture deficit technique. It evaluates the rate of contaminants inflow into the phreatic aquifers of the Niger Delta Basin. The computer model used basic hydrological and agro-meteorological input parameters such as rainfall, potential evapo-transpiration, runoff coefficient, weighted root constant and oil and gas exploration/production spill data of 3 years to estimate the incidents of recharge on daily bases. The model was applied to selected four non-overlapping potential spill sites within the onshore area based on available data and geology/soil types. The study indicated that the daily natural recharge ranged from zero to 120 mm. Average monthly and annual natural recharge varied from zero to 585mm, and from 1416 to 2044 nim, respectively. The study established recharge coefficients of 0.143 to 0.365 for the area, with 95% confidence limit. Extensive tests determined that the model results are the most sensitive to variations in rainfall, evaporation and spill data. The estimated recharge coefficients were in agreement with the earlier reported range of 0.08 to 0.30. (author)

  10. Groundwater recharge - climatic and vegetation induced variations. Simulations in the Emaan and Aespoe areas in southern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and man-made interference will cause an impact on runoff and groundwater recharge in the future. With the aim to give a conception of seasonal variations and the magnitude of the differences, the HBV model has been used as a tool for simulating five climate alternatives in two areas of south-east Sweden. The climate alternatives include both increased and decreased temperature and precipitation. These are not predictions of a future climate change, and should only be regarded as examples. The purpose has been to exemplify a conceivable magnitude of change during temperate/boreal conditions. It has not been within the scope of this report to evaluate the most probable climate change scenarios. The impacts of different climate scenarios on the total groundwater recharge and the deep groundwater recharge have been calculated as long-term mean values and are presented in comparison with model-simulated values with an actual (recorded) climate sequence. The results show great differences between the climate alternatives. An increase in temperature will decrease snow accumulation and increase the evapotranspiration and can totally extinguish the spring snowmelt peak in runoff and groundwater recharge. A decreased temperature, on the contrary, will imply decreased winter runoff and recharge values and an increase in spring and summer values. Evapotranspiration and soil water content play a key role in the runoff and recharge processes. This report makes a review of some literature about work done within the areas of investigation and calculation of evapotranspiration. Research is in progress, not only on formulating future climate scenarios, but also on distinguishing evapotranspiration from different kinds of vegetation. These are complex questions, but vital ones, as a climate change will also affect the vegetation. Until new research results are presented, well-known methods can be used for simulating the effects of logging on runoff and groundwater

  11. Groundwater recharge estimation in semi-arid zone: a study case from the region of Djelfa (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Rahmani, S. E.; Chibane, Brahim; Boucefiène, Abdelkader

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency of surface water resources in semi-arid area makes the groundwater the most preferred resource to assure population increased needs. In this research we are going to quantify the rate of groundwater recharge using new hybrid model tack in interest the annual rainfall and the average annual temperature and the geological characteristics of the area. This hybrid model was tested and calibrated using a chemical tracer method called Chloride mass balance method (CMB). This hybrid model is a combination between general hydrogeological model and a hydrological model. We have tested this model in an aquifer complex in the region of Djelfa (Algeria). Performance of this model was verified by five criteria [Nash, mean absolute error (MAE), Root mean square error (RMSE), the coefficient of determination and the arithmetic mean error (AME)]. These new approximations facilitate the groundwater management in semi-arid areas; this model is a perfection and amelioration of the model developed by Chibane et al. This model gives a very interesting result, with low uncertainty. A new recharge class diagram was established by our model to get rapidly and quickly the groundwater recharge value for any area in semi-arid region, using temperature and rainfall.

  12. Radiotracer technique to quantify change in filtration velocity as a measure of dilution effect by artificial recharge in an arsenic infested aquifer at Ashoknagar, Habra - II block, 24 Paragana district, West Bengal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are frequently employed as tracers for various applications in industry, agricultural, medicine and hydrology. In hydrology, radiotracers are commonly applied to investigate several hydrological parameters of aquifers such as hydraulic conductivity, groundwater velocity and direction of flow etc. They impart valuable insight into the understanding of the hydrological systems. Application of radioisotopes in determination of groundwater flow velocity is now a well established technique. In this paper, groundwater filtration velocity was determined in an arsenic infested alluvium aquifer at Ashoknagar, Habra, West Bengal for determining the dilution effect due to arsenic free water. In some parts of West Bengal, generally shallow aquifers up to 80 m deep are contaminated due to geogenic arsenic. Researchers have different views about origin and mobility of arsenic in the groundwaters of West Bengal. For the removal of Arsenic from the groundwater various methods have been suggested and implemented such as ion-exchange, co-precipitation, adsorption, membrane separation and dilution etc. Dilution of the Arsenic concentration by artificial recharge of arsenic free water from the constructed pits in the contaminated aquifer is one such simple method. Efficacy of this method was studied by measuring filtration velocity in the contaminated aquifer at the Ashoknagar, Habra - II Block, North 24 Paragana district, West Bengal. Radioactive 82Br in the form of aqueous ammonium bromide was used as a tracer to measure filtration velocity of the groundwater. Point dilution technique in a single well was applied. Filtration velocity provided relevant information about the arsenic dilution in the groundwater by the artificial recharge and its value will be used as a model parameter. (author)

  13. Hydrological processes and water resources management in a dryland environment III: Groundwater recharge and recession in a shallow weathered aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Butterworth

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In crystalline basement regions of Africa, shallow weathered aquifers provide vital water resources for rural communities. To quantify evidence of the behaviour of these shallow aquifers, groundwater levels were observed at a network of 65 boreholes within the Romwe Catchment in southern Zimbabwe. Soil moisture was monitored at selected sites. Groundwater hydrographs showed considerable spatial and temporal variation. Where the soil profile was freely draining, groundwater levels typically responded within a few days of major rainstorms and large annual fluctuations in the water table of up to 7 m were recorded. In areas where a thick clay layer exists, annual fluctuations were smaller and groundwater levels rose more gradually in response to rainfall. In cultivated areas, vertical drainage was an important recharge mechanism. Groundwater hydrographs typically have an exponential recession and, by the end of the dry season in the years studied, levels were close to the base of the weathered aquifer. Variations in hydrograph response between years illustrate the importance of rainfall amount, intensity and distribution on groundwater recharge.

  14. Restoration of wadi aquifers by artificial recharge with treated waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missimer, Thomas M; Drewes, Jörg E; Amy, Gary; Maliva, Robert G; Keller, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fresh water resources within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are a rare and precious commodity that must be managed within a context of integrated water management. Wadi aquifers contain a high percentage of the naturally occurring fresh groundwater in the Kingdom. This resource is currently overused and has become depleted or contaminated at many locations. One resource that could be used to restore or enhance the fresh water resources within wadi aquifers is treated municipal waste water (reclaimed water). Each year about 80 percent of the country's treated municipal waste water is discharged to waste without any beneficial use. These discharges not only represent a lost water resource, but also create a number of adverse environmental impacts, such as damage to sensitive nearshore marine environments and creation of high-salinity interior surface water areas. An investigation of the hydrogeology of wadi aquifers in Saudi Arabia revealed that these aquifers can be used to develop aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) systems that will be able to treat the impaired-quality water, store it until needed, and allow recovery of the water for transmittal to areas in demand. Full-engineered ARR systems can be designed at high capacities within wadi aquifer systems that can operate in concert with the natural role of wadis, while providing the required functions of additional treatment, storage and recovery of reclaimed water, while reducing the need to develop additional, energy-intensive desalination to meet new water supply demands. PMID:22536878

  15. Use of environmental isotopes to study the recharge mechanisms and arsenic pollution of Bangladesh groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater is the main source of drinking water supply for over one hundred million inhabitants in Bangladesh. It is severely contaminated with arsenic, resulting in a major public health crisis for millions of people. It is now widely believed that the source of arsenic is geological in origin, not anthropogenic. But the actual release mechanisms are yet to be known. The young (Holocene) alluvial and deltaic deposits are most affected, whereas the older alluvial sediments in the north-west and the Pleistocene sediments of the uplifted Madhupur and Barind Tracts normally provide low arsenic water. Environmental isotopes like 2H, 18O, 13C, 3H and 14C are the most suitable tools for investigating a series of problems linked with the management of water resources in the alluvial and deltaic sediments of Bangladesh. Isotope Hydrology of Groundwater in Bangladesh: Implications for Characterisation and Mitigation of Arsenic in Groundwater (BGD/8/016), a Technical Cooperation Project sponsored by IAEA, carried out in 1999-2000. Total 56 nos. water samples from shallow and deep tubewells, ranging in depth 10 to 335 meters, located mostly in south-east, southwest and north-west of the country were collected for hydro-chemical and isotopic analyses. Results of isotope techniques have provided adequate information on recharge conditions and age of groundwater in the basin, that is very important and open up prospects for further investigations using isotope techniques. Shallow groundwaters (13C of As-bearing shallow waters range mostly from -3.0 per mille to -15.0 per mille. Higher arsenic concentrations are associated with higher carbon isotopic values, indicating that organic matter oxidation is not likely to play a role in arsenic mobilization in the aquifer. The carbon isotopic data indicate that the most likely process of arsenic mobilization may involve desorption from the sediments as a result of the relatively rapid and continuing (natural) renewal of shallow

  16. Long-term prediction of groundwater recharge by climate changes in the Gosan agricultural area, Jeju Island of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, E. H.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of long-term changes in groundwater recharge due to the climate changes is needed to secure the sustainable use of grounwater. In Jeju Island, which is composed of various formations of porous volcanic rocks, groundwater is a sole resource for water supply because of its hydrogeological characteristics. Therefore, preservation of the groundwater resource is an essential issue in the island. Prior to establishing a management plan for maintaining the groundwater resources in Jeju Island, long-term estimation of influencing factors are necessary. The Gosan study area is located in the western part of the island, where extensive agricultural activity has been performed and groundwater is a main source of supply for watering crops. In this study, we estimated the recharge changes for 100 years (2000~2099) in the Gosan agricultural area based on two climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) by using the HELP3 (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) program. The estimated component of water budget in this study are as follows (averaged in 2000~2014), precipitation: 1.28x108 m3/yr; ET: 6.49x107 m3/yr; runoff: 5.84x106 m3/yr; and recharge: 5.27x107 m3/yr. Over the 100 years of the estimated period, precipitation will have a highest increase among other meteorological parameters to be 6.16x109 m3 (RCP4.5) and 6.34 x109 m3 (RCP8.5). Increase in recharge by RCP8.5 scenario (2.75 x109 m3) will be less than that by RCP4.5 (2.77x109 m3) because ET by RCP 8.5 (ET: 3.34x109 m3; runoff: 2.27x108 m3) is estimated to be higher than ET by RCP4.5 (ET: 3.15x109 m3; runoff: 2.35x108 m3). Jeju volcanic island is known to have higher recharge proportions to the precipitation due to the distributed highly porous volcanic rocks. Therefore, variations in precipitation by climate changes would greatly affect the groundwater resource of the island. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the research project of "Advanced Technology for Groundwater Development and

  17. Preliminary studies for the design of an artificial recharge plant in the eastern part of the El Carracillo region, Segovia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 90s, the General Directorate for Rural Development of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment, in coordination with the Department of Agriculture of the Regional Government of Castile and Leon, has carried out various activities with the aim of defining and understanding the behaviour of the Carracillo aquifer compared to artificial recharge trials on the surface. In 2006, with the collaboration of the Tragsa Group, artificial recharge with winter surplus of the Cega River in the western paleo-landform area was initiated. This sector has insufficient capacity to respond to all the water demand of the region. Driven by this situation, the work required to ascertain the possibilities of the aquifer in the western storage area sector were started. Among the activities carried out, the drilling of 27 boreholes to obtain continuous samples should be highlighted, plus 6 hydrogeological investigation boreholes, in which pumping tests were made, both individually and jointly. The vertical infiltration rate was estimated and the surface area for recharging was quantified. The water chemistry of the recharges from the Cega River and of the native aquifer was also studied in order to foresee what might be the compositional changes in the aquifer water. Based on this data a mathematical model, which had been developed in 2001, was updated by carrying out various simulations of possible scenarios. (Author)

  18. Combining unsaturated and saturated hydraulic observations to understand and estimate groundwater recharge through glacial till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Mackay, R.; Tellam, J. H.; Thatcher, K. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryAlthough there has been much previous research into various aspects of the flow mechanisms through glacial till, an integrated analysis of the flow system from the ground surface to the aquifer is lacking. This paper describes such an approach with reference to a detailed field study of the hydraulic processes controlling groundwater recharge through lodgement till in Shropshire, UK. A fieldsite was instrumented with tensiometers and piezometers at a range of depths through the profile, and the geology investigated in detail through field and laboratory testing. The median matrix hydraulic conductivity of the 6 m thick till is found to be around 2 × 10 -10 m/s on the basis of laboratory measurements. Using the barometric efficiency of the till derived from on-site pressure responses, the specific storage for the till is found to be in the range 2 × 10 -6-6 × 10 -6 m -1 and approximately 3 × 10 -6 m -1 for the underlying Permo-Triassic sandstone, the regional aquifer. The hydraulic data indicate that till water table responses to rainfall occur during the summer period even when large tensions are present higher in the profile. This is thought to be due to preferential flow through hydraulically active fractures in the till, which were observed in a test pit dug on-site. The field evidence indicates that the fractures are usually infilled with a variety of materials derived and transported from clasts within the till. The bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till seems to be greatly enhanced by these features and it is shown on the basis of hydraulic testing and numerical modelling that the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till is orders of magnitude greater than that of the till matrix and reduces with depth below ground surface. The paper furthers understanding of the hydraulic processes contributing to recharge through till and makes the link between the detail of these processes and simplified models of recharge estimation, which may be needed for

  19. A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in a semi-arid, coastal avocado and citrus orchard (Ventura County, California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, Mark E.; Bachman, S.; Powers, T.

    2000-10-01

    by progressive wetting during the winter rainy season was observed in both irrigated and non-irrigated soil profiles, confirming that groundwater recharge was rainfall driven and that micro-irrigation did not predispose the soil profile to excess rainfall recharge. The ability to make this recharge assessment, however, depended on making multiple field measurements associated with all three methods, suggesting that any one should not be used alone.

  20. Computer programs for describing the recession of ground-water discharge and for estimating mean ground-water recharge and discharge from streamflow records-update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1998-01-01

    The computer programs included in this report can be used to develop a mathematical expression for recession of ground-water discharge and estimate mean ground-water recharge and discharge. The programs are intended for analysis of the daily streamflow record of a basin where one can reasonably assume that all, or nearly all, ground water discharges to the stream except for that which is lost to riparian evapotranspiration, and where regulation and diversion of flow can be considered to be negligible. The program RECESS determines the master reces-sion curve of streamflow recession during times when all flow can be considered to be ground-water discharge and when the profile of the ground-water-head distribution is nearly stable. The method uses a repetitive interactive procedure for selecting several periods of continuous recession, and it allows for nonlinearity in the relation between time and the logarithm of flow. The program RORA uses the recession-curve displacement method to estimate the recharge for each peak in the streamflow record. The method is based on the change in the total potential ground-water discharge that is caused by an event. Program RORA is applied to a long period of record to obtain an estimate of the mean rate of ground-water recharge. The program PART uses streamflow partitioning to estimate a daily record of base flow under the streamflow record. The method designates base flow to be equal to streamflow on days that fit a requirement of antecedent recession, linearly interpolates base flow for other days, and is applied to a long period of record to obtain an estimate of the mean rate of ground-water discharge. The results of programs RORA and PART correlate well with each other and compare reasonably with results of the corresponding manual method.

  1. Chemical and microbiological monitoring of a sole-source aquifer intended for artificial recharge, Nassau County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian G.; Mallard, Gail E.

    1980-01-01

    In late 1980, approximately 4 million gallons per day of highly treated wastewater will be used to recharge the groundwater reservoir in central Nassau County through a system of 10 recharge basins and 5 shallow injection wells. To evaluate the impact of large-scale recharge with reclaimed water on groundwater quality, the U.S. Geological Survey has collected hydrologic and water-quality data from a 1-square-mile area around the recharge site to provide a basis for future comparison. Extensive chemical and microbiological analyses are being made on samples from 48 wells screened in the upper glacial (water-table) aquifer and the upper part of the underlying Magothy (public-supply) aquifer. Preliminary results indicate that water from the upper glacial aquifer contains significant concentrations of nitrate and low-molecular-weight chlorinated hydrocarbons and detectable concentrations of organochlorine insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls. At present, no fecal contamination is evident in either aquifer in the area studied. In the few samples containing fecal indicator bacteria, the numbers were low. Nonpoint sources provide significant loads of organic and inorganic compounds; major sources include cesspool and septic-tank effluent, cesspool and septic-tank cleaners and other over-the-counter domestic organic solvents, fertilizers, insecticides for termite and other pest control, and stormwater runoff to recharge basins. The water-table aquifer is composed mainly of stratified, well-sorted sand and gravel and, as a result, is highly permeable. In the 1-square-mile area studied, some contaminants seem to have traveled 200 feet downward to the bottom of the water-table aquifer and into the upper part of the public-supply aquifer. (USGS)

  2. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    OpenAIRE

    M. O. Cuthbert; R. Mackay; Nimmo, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is presented and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via preferential flow and subsequent redistribution...

  3. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    OpenAIRE

    M. O. Cuthbert; R. Mackay; Nimmo, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is developed and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via macropore flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into...

  4. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    OpenAIRE

    M. O. Cuthbert; R. Mackay; Nimmo, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is presented and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via preferential flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into ...

  5. GROUNDWATER RECHARGE POTENTIAL USING SECONDARY TREATED WASTEWATER: METHODS AND CASE STUDY IN THE SOUTHERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Diganta Deb

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity in a period of climate uncertainty necessitates exploring new avenues for recharging depleted groundwater. The Western United States, including the agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley (SJV), is highly dependent on winter precipitation and accumulated snow pack to refill reservoirs for use during peak summer agricultural operations. However, severe weather patterns (such as the current drought) have drastically reduced both the amount and longevity of the snow pack resulting ...

  6. Remote-sensing based groundwater recharge estimates in the Danube-Tisza sand plateau region of Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    SZILÁGYI, József; Kovács, Ákos; Józsa, János

    2012-01-01

    Mean annual recharge in the Danube-Tisza sand plateau region of Hungary over the 2000–2008 period was estimated at a 1-km spatial resolution as the difference of mean annual precipitation (P) and evapotranspiration (ET). The ET rates were derived from linear transformations of the MODIS daytime land surface temperature (Ts) values with the help of ancillary atmospheric data (air temperature, humidity, and sunshine duration). The groundwater under the sand plateau receives about 75 ± 50 mm of ...

  7. Using environmental isotopes for estimating the relative contributions of groundwater recharge mechanisms in an Arid Basin, Central Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope compositions of water (2H and 18O) were utilized to estimate the relative contributions of diffused recharge (DR) through the soil matrix from direct precipitation and concentrated recharge (CR) through coarse-textured ephemeral streambeds to groundwater in the arid granitic basin of Alquway, central Saudi Arabia. Groundwater ranged in its stable isotope composition from -2.51% to -2.03% from delta 18O and from -12.7% to -10.1% delta square H. Local groundwater line (LGWL) is defined by: delta square H = 4.72 delta 18O-0.57.Average stable isotopic content of CR is -2.58% for delta 18O, and -12.37% for delta 2H. Local CR line (LCRL) is given by: delta square H =5.28 delta 18O + 1.24. Its slope indicates that CR experiences significant kinetic fractionation resulting in a greater relative enrichment of 18 O than 2H. DR is more enriched in the heavy isotopes with means of -0.38% for delta 18O and -9.8% for delta square H. Local DR line (LDRL) is given by : delta square H = 2.01 delta 18O -9.03. Its slope is much lower than that of LCRL, indicating that DR goes through more stable isotopic fractionation than CR, due to experiencing more evaporation form unsaturated soils. Recharge-inducing rainfalls in this basin were estimated to be relatively depleted in the heavy isotopes, suggesting that groundwater recharge in this basin originates only from heavy downpours. Using mean values of delta 18O in a mass-balance equation, the relative contributions of CR and DR, to ground water were estimated to be 84% and 16% respectively. (author)

  8. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  9. Determining the impacts of experimental forest plantation on groundwater recharge in the Nebraska Sand Hills (USA) using chloride and sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adane, Z. A.; Gates, J. B.

    2015-02-01

    Although impacts of land-use changes on groundwater recharge have been widely demonstrated across diverse environmental settings, most previous research has focused on the role of agriculture. This study investigates recharge impacts of tree plantations in a century-old experimental forest surrounded by mixed-grass prairie in the Northern High Plains (Nebraska National Forest), USA. Recharge was estimated using solute mass balance methods from unsaturated zone cores beneath 10 experimental plots with different vegetation and planting densities. Pine and cedar plantation plots had uniformly lower moisture contents and higher solute concentrations than grasslands. Cumulative solute concentrations were greatest beneath the plots with the highest planting densities (chloride concentrations 225-240 % and sulfate concentrations 175-230 % of the grassland plot). Estimated recharge rates beneath the dense plantations (4-10 mm yr-1) represent reductions of 86-94 % relative to the surrounding native grassland. Relationships between sulfate, chloride, and moisture content in the area's relatively homogenous sandy soils confirm that the unsaturated zone solute signals reflect partitioning between drainage and evapotranspiration in this setting. This study is among the first to explore afforestation impacts on recharge beneath sandy soils and sulfate as a tracer of deep drainage.

  10. Application of Artificial Neural Networks to Complex Groundwater Management Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As water quantity and quality problems become increasingly severe, accurate prediction and effective management of scarcer water resources will become critical. In this paper, the successful application of artificial neural network (ANN) technology is described for three types of groundwater prediction and management problems. In the first example, an ANN was trained with simulation data from a physically based numerical model to predict head (groundwater elevation) at locations of interest under variable pumping and climate conditions. The ANN achieved a high degree of predictive accuracy, and its derived state-transition equations were embedded into a multiobjective optimization formulation and solved to generate a trade-off curve depicting water supply in relation to contamination risk. In the second and third examples, ANNs were developed with real-world hydrologic and climate data for different hydrogeologic environments. For the second problem, an ANN was developed using data collected for a 5-year, 8-month period to predict heads in a multilayered surficial and limestone aquifer system under variable pumping, state, and climate conditions. Using weekly stress periods, the ANN substantially outperformed a well-calibrated numerical flow model for the 71-day validation period, and provided insights into the effects of climate and pumping on water levels. For the third problem, an ANN was developed with data collected automatically over a 6-week period to predict hourly heads in 11 high-capacity public supply wells tapping a semiconfined bedrock aquifer and subject to large well-interference effects. Using hourly stress periods, the ANN accurately predicted heads for 24-hour periods in all public supply wells. These test cases demonstrate that the ANN technology can solve a variety of complex groundwater management problems and overcome many of the problems and limitations associated with traditional physically based flow models

  11. A GIS based hydrogeomorphic approach for identification of site-specific artificial-recharge techniques in the Deccan Volcanic Province

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M N Ravi Shankar; G Mohan

    2005-10-01

    The Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP)of India,as a whole,faces a severe shortage of water despite receiving a high annual rainfall,this is primarily due to excess runoff and lack of water conservation practices.In this study,an attempt is made to identify zones favourable for the application and adaptation of site-specific artificial-recharge techniques for augmentation of groundwater through a Geographical Information System (GIS)based hydrogeomorphic approach in the Bhatsa and Kalu river basins of Thane district,in western DVP.The criteria adopted for the GIS analysis were based on the hydrogeomorphological characteristics of both basins extracted from the IRS- 1C LISS-III data supported by information on drainage pattern,DEM derived slope,lineament density,drainage density,and groundwater condition.The integrated study helps design a suitable groundwater management plan for a basaltic terrain.

  12. GEOCHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC CONSTRAINTS ON GROUND-WATER FLOW DIRECTIONS, MIXING AND RECHARGE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report Development Plan entitled ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). As stated in this Development Plan, the purpose of the work is to provide an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. The analysis of hydrochemical and isotopic data is intended to provide a basis for evaluating the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain independently of analyses based purely on hydraulic arguments. Where more than one conceptual model for flow is possible, based on existing hydraulic data, hydrochemical and isotopic data may be useful in eliminating some of these conceptual models. This report documents the use of geochemical and isotopic data to constrain rates and directions of groundwater flow near Yucca Mountain and the timing and magnitude of recharge in the Yucca Mountain vicinity. The geochemical and isotopic data are also examined with regard to the possible dilution of groundwater recharge from Yucca Mountain by mixing with groundwater downgradient from the potential repository site. Specifically, the primary tasks of this report, as listed in the AMR Development Plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a), consist of the following: (1) Compare geochemical and isotopic data for perched and pore water in the unsaturated zone with similar data from the saturated zone to determine if local recharge is present in the regional groundwater system; (2) Determine the timing of the recharge from stable isotopes such as deuterium (2H) and oxygen-18 (18O), which are known to vary over time as a function of climate, and from radioisotopes such as carbon-14 (14C) and chlorine-36 (36Cl); (3) Determine the magnitude of recharge from relatively conservative

  13. GEOCHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC CONSTRAINTS ON GROUND-WATER FLOW DIRECTIONS, MIXING AND RECHARGE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Meijer; E. Kwicklis

    2000-08-17

    This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report Development Plan entitled ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). As stated in this Development Plan, the purpose of the work is to provide an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. The analysis of hydrochemical and isotopic data is intended to provide a basis for evaluating the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain independently of analyses based purely on hydraulic arguments. Where more than one conceptual model for flow is possible, based on existing hydraulic data, hydrochemical and isotopic data may be useful in eliminating some of these conceptual models. This report documents the use of geochemical and isotopic data to constrain rates and directions of groundwater flow near Yucca Mountain and the timing and magnitude of recharge in the Yucca Mountain vicinity. The geochemical and isotopic data are also examined with regard to the possible dilution of groundwater recharge from Yucca Mountain by mixing with groundwater downgradient from the potential repository site. Specifically, the primary tasks of this report, as listed in the AMR Development Plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), consist of the following: (1) Compare geochemical and isotopic data for perched and pore water in the unsaturated zone with similar data from the saturated zone to determine if local recharge is present in the regional groundwater system; (2) Determine the timing of the recharge from stable isotopes such as deuterium ({sup 2}H) and oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O), which are known to vary over time as a function of climate, and from radioisotopes such as carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) and chlorine-36 ({sup 36}Cl); (3) Determine the magnitude of

  14. Restoration of Wadi Aquifers by Artificial Recharge with Treated Waste Water

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2012-04-26

    Fresh water resources within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are a rare and precious commodity that must be managed within a context of integrated water management. Wadi aquifers contain a high percentage of the naturally occurring fresh groundwater in the Kingdom. This resource is currently overused and has become depleted or contaminated at many locations. One resource that could be used to restore or enhance the fresh water resources within wadi aquifers is treated municipal waste water (reclaimed water). Each year about 80 percent of the country\\'s treated municipal waste water is discharged to waste without any beneficial use. These discharges not only represent a lost water resource, but also create a number of adverse environmental impacts, such as damage to sensitive nearshore marine environments and creation of high-salinity interior surface water areas. An investigation of the hydrogeology of wadi aquifers in Saudi Arabia revealed that these aquifers can be used to develop aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) systems that will be able to treat the impaired-quality water, store it until needed, and allow recovery of the water for transmittal to areas in demand. Full-engineered ARR systems can be designed at high capacities within wadi aquifer systems that can operate in concert with the natural role of wadis, while providing the required functions of additional treatment, storage and recovery of reclaimed water, while reducing the need to develop additional, energy-intensive desalination to meet new water supply demands. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Using stable isotopes and hydraulic head data to investigate groundwater recharge and discharge in a fractured rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praamsma, Titia; Novakowski, Kent; Kyser, Kurt; Hall, Kevin

    2009-03-01

    SummaryGroundwater recharge and discharge were studied in a gneissic terrain with minimal glacial overburden at a well-instrumented field site adjacent to a 1.2 km section of the Tay River, near Perth, Ontario, Canada. Seven 31-56 m-deep monitoring wells were constructed, characterized, and sampled for 18O and 2H. Each well was first hydraulically tested using a 1.77 m straddle packer system and then instrumented with multi-level piezometers. Detailed fracture mapping and electrical conductivity surveys were conducted in a 1.2 km section of the river to identify potential groundwater discharge points. Groundwater, surface water and precipitation (rain and snow) samples were collected to measure δ 2H and δ 18O during and following several storm events, and during baseflow conditions. Results showed that groundwater flow in the upper 30-40 m of bedrock is dominated by a few horizontal fractures which are weakly connected by sparsely-arranged vertical fractures. Values of δ 2H and δ 18O indicate that precipitation does not directly influence the isotopic signature of river water and deep groundwater during a rain event. Recharge is localized and rapid where overburden is thin, however, it does not penetrate deeply into the flow system at this site. There is no hydraulic or isotopic evidence that groundwater discharges into the river over the study section, thus most of the groundwater underflows the river at this location. Flow in this reach, and likely in the bulk of the river, is controlled by an upstream dam and by surface water runoff. The results of this study suggest that the use of traditional methods for water budgeting based on equivalent porous media are highly inappropriate for this crystalline bedrock setting.

  16. Geochemical analyses of ground-water ages, recharge rates, and hydraulic conductivity of the N aquifer, Black Mesa area, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, John P.

    1997-01-01

    The Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe of the Black Mesa area, Arizona, depend on ground water from the N aquifer to meet most tribal and industrial needs. Increasing use of this aquifer is creating concerns about possible adverse effects of increased ground-water withdrawals on the water resources of the region. A thorough understanding of the N aquifer is necessary to assess the aquifer's response to ground-water withdrawals. This study used geochemical techniques as an independent means of improving the conceptual model of ground-water flow in the N aquifer and to estimate recharge rates and hydraulic conductivity. Ground water flows in a south-southeastward direction from the recharge area around Shonto into the confined part of the N aquifer underneath Black Mesa. Ground-water flow paths diverge in the confined part of the aquifer to the northeast and south. The N aquifer thins to extinction south of Black Mesa. This discontinuity could force ground water to diverge along paths of least resistance. Ground water discharges from the confined part of the aquifer into Laguna Creek and Moenkopi Wash and from springs southwest of Kykotsmovi and southeast of Rough Rock after a residence time of about 35,000 years or more. Recent recharge along the periphery of Black Mesa mixes with older ground water that discharges from the confined part of the aquifer and flows away from Black Mesa. Dissolved-ion concentrations, ratios of dissolved ions, dissolved-gas concentrations, tritium, carbon-13, and chlorine-36 data indicate that water in the overlying D aquifer could be leaking into the confined part of the N aquifer in the southeastern part of Black Mesa. The boundary between the leaky and nonleaky zones is defined roughly by a line from Rough Rock to Second Mesa and separates ground waters that have significantly different chemistries. The Dakota Sandstone and Entrada Formation of the D aquifer could be the sources of leakage. Adjusted radiocarbon ground-water ages and data on

  17. Application of stable isotopes to evaluate groundwater recharge of a coastal aquifer in North-Central Chile and its role in vegetation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the water sources for plant growth is one of the key elements to evaluate the present and long term primary productivity in arid ecosystems. We use stable isotope tools to evaluate the recharge mechanisms in a coastal aquifer located in the arid zone of north-central Chile. The main water sources in the study area, fog, rain and groundwater, were isotopically characterized over a decade. The isotope data confirmed that fog does not play any role in groundwater recharge. The water table and isotope data showed that during low water conditions (dry periods), the aquifer is maintained primarily by water recharged in the higher part of the Romeral basin. During high water table conditions (wet periods), recharge associated with local precipitation becomes a significant source of groundwater recharge. The aquifer responded very fast to rains with amounts over the average level for precipitation (like El Nino conditions), while no recharge was detected with precipitation events lower than the average value for precipitation. The recharge pattern can also influence the behavior of plants characterized by a dimorphic root systems than can perform hydraulic redistribution. Part of the fast recharge of the aquifer could be related to this water redistribution. (author)

  18. Geohydrology and artificial-recharge potential of the Irvine area, Orange County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, John A.

    1973-01-01

    The Irvine area is in hydraulic continuity with the rest of the coastal plain in Orange County. Factors that distinguish the aquifer section of the Irvine area from that in other parts of the coastal plain are a low permeability, a high clay and silt content, and a thin alluvial sequence. Rapid facies change and the large percentage of silt and clay in the section locally result in confining conditions. The aquifer, most of which is included in the Fernando Formation, is as much as 1,300 feet thick beneath parts of the plain. The alluvium overlying the Fernando Formation averages about 200-250 feet in thickness and also contains significant amounts of silt and clay. Transmissivities range from 25,000 to 100,000 gallons per day per foot in the Irvine area, values which are much lower than those in the rest of the coastal plain in Orange County. Water levels have recovered as much as 60 feet from the low levels of the early 1950's. Water-level maps indicate that in the winter non-pumping season water tends to move toward upper Newport Bay and the rest of the coastal plain. During the summer pumping season a cone of depression develops, reversing the winter gradient. The average dissolved-solids content of the ground water is about 800 milligrams per liter. The most prevalent cations are sodium and calcium; the most prevalent anions are bicarbonate and sulfate. No long-term degradation of water quality has occurred, with the exception of a slight increase in dissolved solids. No areas in the Irvine area are suitable for the large-scale spreading of water for artificial recharge. Clay and silt predominate in the section beneath the Tustin plain, and in the foothill areas either bedrock is close to the surface or the alluvium is fine grained.

  19. Simulated response of groundwater to predicted recharge in a semi-arid region using a scenario of modelled climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater systems in arid regions will be particularly sensitive to climate change owing to the strong dependence of rates of evapotranspiration on temperature, and shifts in the precipitation regimes. In agricultural areas, such changes in climate may require increased irrigation, putting stress on existing water supplies. In this study, a regional-scale numerical groundwater model was developed for the Oliver region of the south Okanagan, British Columbia, Canada, to simulate the impacts of future predicted climate change on groundwater. In future time periods (the 2050s and 2080s), the most noticeable change in the water budget is the increased contribution of recharge to the annual water budget, estimated at 1.2% (2050s) and 1.4% (2080s) of the total annual budget relative to the current conditions. This increase is related primarily to increases to irrigation return flow resulting from higher irrigation needs under warmer temperatures and a longer growing season. Increases in recharge and irrigation return flow will result in higher water tables with future climate conditions, particularly in the irrigation districts. Median value increases in groundwater level of up to 0.7 m by the 2080s are estimated.

  20. Ground-water recharge to and storage in the regolith-fractured crystalline rock aquifer system, Guilford County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, C. C., III; Harned, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative information concerning recharge rates to aquifers and ground water in storage is needed to manage the development of ground- water resources. The amount of ground water available from the regolith-fractured crystalline rock aquifer system in Guilford County, North Carolina, is largely unknown. If historical patterns seen throughout the Piedmont continue into the future, the number of ground- water users in the county can be expected to increase. In order to determine the maximum population that can be supplied by ground water, planners and managers of suburban development must know the amount of ground water that can be withdrawn without exceeding recharge and(or) overdrafting water in long-term storage. Results of the study described in this report help provide this information. Estimates of seasonal and long-term recharge rates were estimated for 15 selected drainage basins and subbasins using streamflow data and an anlytical technique known as hydrograph separation. Methods for determining the quantity of ground water in storage also are described. Guilford County covers approximately 658 square miles in the central part of the Piedmont Province. The population of the county in 1990 was about 347,420; approximately 21 percent of the population depends on ground water as a source of potable supplies. Ground water is obtained from wells tapping the regolith-fractured crystalline rock aquifer system that underlies all of the county. Under natural conditions, recharge to the ground-water system in the county is derived from infiltration of precipitation. Ground-water recharge from precipitation cannot be measured directly; however, an estimate of the amount of precipitation that infiltrates into the ground and ultimately reaches the streams of the region can be determined by the technique of hydrograph separation. Data from 19 gaging stations that measure streamflow within or from Guilford County were analyzed to produce daily estimates of ground-water

  1. Fate of selected pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds during artificial aquifer recharge using surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Marina; Díaz-Cruz, Silvia; Rosell, Mònica; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2010-05-01

    The artificial recharge of aquifers has become a valuable tool to increase water resources for drinking water production in many countries. In this work a total of 41 organic pollutants belonging to the classes of pesticides, estrogens, progestogens and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been monitored in the water from two artificial recharge plants located in Sweden and Denmark. The results from two sampling campaigns performed in each plant indicate good chemical status of the source water, as the contaminants detected were present at very low levels, far from those established in the legislation as maximum admissible concentrations (when existing) and far from those considered as a risk. Thus, of the 17 pesticides investigated, BAM (2,6-dichlorobenzamide), desethylatrazine, simazine, atrazine, terbuthylazine, diuron, metolachlor, and diazinon were the only compounds detected, and total pesticides levels were below 25ng L(-1), respectively. Estrone-3-sulfate was the only estrogen detected, at concentrations lower than 0.5ng L(-1). Progestogens were not found in any sample. Detected VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and trichloroethylene) were below 0.04microg L(-1). The efficiency of elimination of these organic contaminants was poor as no significant decrease in their concentrations was observed through the recharge process. PMID:20226495

  2. Technical Note: Three-dimensional transient groundwater flow due to localized recharge with an arbitrary transient rate in unconfined aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Huang, Ching-Sheng; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-03-01

    Most previous solutions for groundwater flow induced by localized recharge assumed either aquifer incompressibility or two-dimensional flow in the absence of the vertical flow. This paper develops a new three-dimensional flow model for hydraulic head variation due to localized recharge in a rectangular unconfined aquifer with four boundaries under the Robin condition. A governing equation describing spatiotemporal head distributions is employed. The first-order free-surface equation with a source term defining a constant recharge rate over a rectangular area is used to depict water table movement. The solution to the model for the head is developed with the methods of Laplace transform and double-integral transform. Based on Duhamel's theorem, the present solution is applicable to flow problems accounting for arbitrary time-dependent recharge rates. The solution to depth-average head can then be obtained by integrating the head solution to elevation and dividing the result by the aquifer thickness. The use of a rectangular aquifer domain has two merits. One is that the integration for estimating the depth-average head can be analytically achieved. The other is that existing solutions based on aquifers of infinite extent can be considered as special cases of the present solution before the time when the aquifer boundary had an effect on head predictions. With the help of the present solution, the assumption of neglecting the vertical flow effect on the temporal head distribution at an observation point outside a recharge region can be assessed by a dimensionless parameter related to the aquifer horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, initial aquifer thickness, and the shortest distance between the observation point and the edge of the recharge region. The validity of assuming aquifer incompressibility is dominated by the ratio of the aquifer specific yield to its storage coefficient. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the head

  3. Integrating soil water and tracer balances, numerical modelling and GIS tools to estimate regional groundwater recharge: Application to the Alcadozo Aquifer System (SE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornero, Jorge; Manzano, Marisol; Ortega, Lucía; Custodio, Emilio

    2016-10-15

    Groundwater recharge is one of the key variables for aquifer management and also one of the most difficult to be evaluated with acceptable accuracy. This is especially relevant in semiarid areas, where the processes involved in recharge are widely variable. Uncertainty should be estimated to know how reliable recharge estimations are. Groundwater recharge has been calculated in the Alcadozo Aquifer System, under steady state conditions, at regional (aquifer) and sub-regional (spring catchment) scales applying different methods. The regional distribution of long-term average recharge values has been estimated with the chloride mass balance method using data from four rain stations and 40 groundwater samples covering almost the whole aquifer surface. A remarkable spatial variability has been found. Average annual recharge rates ranges from 20 to 243mmyear(-1) across the aquifer, with an estimated coefficient of variation between 0.16 and 0.38. The average recharge/precipitation ratio decreases from 34% in the NW to 6% in the SE, following the topographic slope. At spring-catchment scale, recharge has been estimated by modelling the soil water balance with the code Visual Balan 2.0. The results, calibrated with discharge data of the two main springs Liétor and Ayna, are 35.5 and 50mmyear(-1) respectively, with estimated coefficients of variation of 0.49 and 0.36. A sensitivity analysis showed that soil parameters influence the most the uncertainty of recharge estimations. Recharge values estimated with both methods and at two temporal and spatial scales are consistent, considering the regional variability obtained with the chloride method and the respective confidence intervals. Evaluating the uncertainties of each method eased to compare their relative results and to check their agreement, which provided confidence to the values obtained. Thus, the use of independent methods together with their uncertainties is strongly recommended to constrain the magnitude and to

  4. Documentation of input datasets for the soil-water balance groundwater recharge model of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred D

    2015-01-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries supply water to more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico, irrigating more than 4.5 million acres of farmland, and generating about 12 billion kilowatt hours of hydroelectric power annually. The Upper Colorado River Basin, encompassing more than 110,000 square miles (mi2), contains the headwaters of the Colorado River (also known as the River) and is an important source of snowmelt runoff to the River. Groundwater discharge also is an important source of water in the River and its tributaries, with estimates ranging from 21 to 58 percent of streamflow in the upper basin. Planning for the sustainable management of the Colorado River in future climates requires an understanding of the Upper Colorado River Basin groundwater system. This report documents input datasets for a Soil-Water Balance groundwater recharge model that was developed for the Upper Colorado River Basin.

  5. Long-term increase in diffuse groundwater recharge following expansion of rainfed cultivation in the Sahel, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Maïmouna; Favreau, Guillaume; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Seidel, Jean Luc; Le Coz, Mathieu; Demarty, Jérôme; Cappelaere, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    Rapid population growth in sub-Saharan West Africa and related cropland expansion were shown in some places to have increased focused recharge through ponds, raising the water table. To estimate changes in diffuse recharge, the water content and matric potential were monitored during 2009 and 2010, and modeling was performed using the Hydrus-1D code for two field sites in southwest Niger: (1) fallow land and (2) rainfed millet cropland. Monitoring results of the upper 10 m showed increased water content and matric potential to greater depth under rainfed cropland (>2.5 m) than under fallow land (≤1.0 m). Model simulations indicate that conversion from fallow land to rainfed cropland (1) increases vadose-zone water storage and (2) should increase drainage flux (˜25 mm year-1) at 10-m depth after a 30-60 year lag. Therefore, observed regional increases in groundwater storage may increasingly result from diffuse recharge, which could compensate, at least in part, groundwater withdrawal due to observed expansion in irrigated surfaces; and hence, contribute to mitigate food crises in the Sahel.

  6. Groundwater-surface water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses natural and modified interactions between groundwater and surface water. Theory on recharge to groundwater from rivers is introduced, and the relative importance of groundwater recharge from rivers is illustrated with an example from the Ngaruroro River, Hawke's Bay. Some of the techniques used to identify and measure recharge to groundwater from gravel-bed rivers will be outlined, with examples from the Ngaruroro River, where the recharge reach is relatively well defined, and from the Rakaia River, where it is poorly defined. Groundwater recharged from rivers can have characteristic chemical and isotopic signatures, as shown by Waimakariri River water in the Christchurch-West Melton groundwater system. The incorporation of groundwater-river interaction in a regional groundwater flow model is outlined for the Waimea Plains, and relationships between river scour and groundwater recharge are examined for the Waimakariri River. Springs are the result of natural discharge from groundwater systems and are important water sources. The interactions between groundwater systems, springs, and river flow for the Avon River in New Zealand will be outlined. The theory of depletion of stream flow by groundwater pumpage will be introduced with a case study from Canterbury, and salt-water intrusion into groundwater systems with examples from Nelson and Christchurch. The theory of artificial recharge to groundwater systems is introduced with a case study from Hawke's Bay. Wetlands are important to flora, and the relationship of the wetland environment to groundwater hydrology will be discussed, with an example from the South Taupo wetland. (author). 56 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Groundwater recharge and chemical evolution in the southern High Plains of Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryar, Alan; Mullican, William; Macko, Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The unconfined High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer is the largest aquifer in the USA and the primary water supply for the semiarid southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. Analyses of water and soils northeast of Amarillo, Texas, together with data from other regional studies, indicate that processes during recharge control the composition of unconfined groundwater in the northern half of the southern High Plains. Solute and isotopic data are consistent with a sequence of episodic precipitation, concentration of solutes in upland soils by evapotranspiration, runoff, and infiltration beneath playas and ditches (modified locally by return flow of wastewater and irrigation tailwater). Plausible reactions during recharge include oxidation of organic matter, dissolution and exsolution of CO2, dissolution of CaCO3, silicate weathering, and cation exchange. Si and 14C data suggest leakage from perched aquifers to the High Plains aquifer. Plausible mass-balance models for the High Plains aquifer include scenarios of flow with leakage but not reactions, flow with reactions but not leakage, and flow with neither reactions nor leakage. Mechanisms of recharge and chemical evolution delineated in this study agree with those noted for other aquifers in the south-central and southwestern USA. Résumé. L'aquifère libre des Hautes Plaines (Ogallala) est le plus vaste aquifère des états-Unis et la ressource de base pour l'eau potable de la région semi-aride du sud des Hautes Plaines du Texas et du Nouveau-Mexique. Des analyses de l'eau et des sols prélevés au nord-est d'Amarillo (Texas), associées à des données provenant d'autres études dans cette région, indiquent que des processus intervenant au cours de l'infiltration contrôlent la composition de l'eau de la nappe libre dans la moitié septentrionale du sud des Hautes Plaines. Les données chimiques et isotopiques sont compatibles avec une séquence de précipitation épisodique, avec la reconcentration en solut

  8. Using 14C and 3H to delineate a recharge 'window' into the Perth Basin aquifers, North Gnangara groundwater system, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Karina; Cendón, Dioni I; Pigois, Jon-Philippe; Hollins, Suzanne; Jacobsen, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    The Gnangara Mound and the underlying Perth Basin aquifers are the largest source of groundwater for the southwest of Australia, supplying between 35 and 50% of Perth's potable water (2009-2010). However, declining health of wetlands on the Mound coupled with the reduction in groundwater levels from increased irrigation demands and drier climatic conditions means this resource is experiencing increased pressures. The northern Gnangara is an area where the Yarragadee aquifer occurs at shallow depths (~50 m) and is in direct contact with the superficial aquifer, suggesting the possibility of direct recharge into a generally confined aquifer. Environmental isotopes ((14)C and (3)H) and hydrochemical modelling were used to assess the presence of a recharge 'window' as well as understand the groundwater residence time within different aquifers. Forty-nine groundwater samples were collected from depths ranging from 11 to 311 m below ground surface. The isotopic variation observed in the superficial aquifer was found to be controlled by the different lithologies present, i.e. quartz-rich Bassendean Sand and carbonate-rich sediments of the Ascot Formation. Rainfall recharge into the Bassendean Sand inherits its dissolved inorganic carbon from the soil CO(2). Organic matter throughout the soil profile is degraded by oxidation leading to anoxic/acidic groundwater, which if in contact with the Ascot Formation leads to enhanced dissolution of carbonates. Hydrochemical mass balance modelling showed that carbonate dissolution could contribute 1-2 mmol kg(-1) of carbon to groundwaters recharged through the Ascot Formation. The corrected groundwater residence times of the Yarragadee aquifer in the northern part of the study area ranged from 23 to 35 ka, while waters in the southeastern corner ranged from sub-modern to 2 ka. Groundwater ages increase with distance radiating from the recharge 'window'. This study delineates a recharge 'window' into the commonly presumed confined

  9. A preliminary analysis of the groundwater recharge to the Karoo formations, mid-Zambesi basin, Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming; Owen, R.; Dahlin, T.; Mangeya, P.; Barmen, G.

    A multi-disciplinary study is being carried out on recharge to the Karoo sandstone aquifer in the western part of Zimbabwe, where recharge is controlled by the presence of a thick, confining basalt layer. The aquifer is geographically extensive, and has been identified throughout the southern part...

  10. The effects of a dry sand layer on groundwater recharge in extremely arid areas: field study in the western Hexi Corridor of northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Ma, Jinzhu; Qi, Shi; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Gaofeng

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation capacity is an important factor that cannot be ignored when judging whether extreme precipitation events will produce groundwater recharge. The evaporation layer's role in groundwater recharge was evaluated using a lysimeter simulation experiment in the desert area of Dunhuang, in the western part of the Hexi Corridor in northwestern China's Gansu Province. The annual precipitation in the study area is extremely low, averaging 38.87 mm during the 60-year study period, and daily pan evaporation amounts to 2,486 mm. Three simulated precipitation regimes (normal, 10 mm; ordinary annual maximum, 21 mm; and extreme, 31 mm) were used in the lysimeter simulation to allow monitoring of water movement and weighing to detect evaporative losses. The differences in soil-water content to a depth of 50 cm in the soil profile significantly affected rainfall infiltration during the initial stages of rainfall events. It was found that the presence of a dry 50-cm-deep sand layer was the key factor for "potential recharge" after the three rainfall events. Daily precipitation events less than 20 mm did not produce groundwater recharge because of the barrier effect created by the dry sand. Infiltration totaled 0.68 mm and penetrated to a depth below 50 cm with 31 mm of rainfall, representing potential recharge equivalent to 1.7 % of the rainfall. This suggests that only extreme precipitation events offer the possibility of recharge of groundwater in this extremely arid area.

  11. Combining the soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation methods to estimate natural groundwater recharge: Practical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple and practical approach for calculating groundwater recharge in semiarid plain environments with a relatively shallow water table, such as the Kansas Prairies, is outlined. Major uncertainties in the Darcian, water balance, and groundwater fluctuation analysis approaches are outlined, and a combination methodology for reducing some of the uncertainties is proposed. By combining a storm-based soilwater balance (lasting several days) with the resulting water table rise, effective storativity values of the region near the water table are obtained. This combination method is termed the 'hybrid water-fluctuation method'. Using a simple average of several such estimates results in a site-calibrated effective storativity value that can be used to translate each major water-table rise tied to a specific storm period into a corresponding amount of groundwater recharge. Examples of soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation analyses based on field-measured data from Kansas show that the proposed methodology gives better and more reliable results than either of the two well-established approaches used singly. ?? 1991.

  12. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Cuthbert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is presented and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via preferential flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in preferential flow pathways due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil and to a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010 is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  13. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Cuthbert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is developed and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via macropore flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in the macropore system due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil, and a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010 is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  14. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Mackay, R.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is presented and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via preferential flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in preferential flow pathways due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil and to a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  15. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through stormwater basins designed for groundwater recharge in urban area: Assessment of retention efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; Simon, Laurent; Maazouzi, Chafik; Foulquier, Arnaud; Delolme, Cécile; Marmonier, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has been developed in many countries to limit the risk of urban flooding and compensate for reduced groundwater recharge in urban areas. The environmental performances of MAR systems like infiltration basins depend on the efficiency of soil and vadose zone to retain stormwater-derived contaminants. However, these performances need to be finely evaluated for stormwater-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) that can affect groundwater quality. Therefore, this study examined the performance of MAR systems to process DOM during its transfer from infiltration basins to an urban aquifer. DOM characteristics (fluorescent spectroscopic properties, biodegradable and refractory fractions of dissolved organic carbon -DOC-, consumption by micro-organisms during incubation in slow filtration sediment columns) were measured in stormwater during its transfer through three infiltration basins during a stormwater event. DOC concentrations sharply decreased from surface to the aquifer for the three MAR sites. This pattern was largely due to the retention of biodegradable DOC which was more than 75% for the three MAR sites, whereas the retention of refractory DOC was more variable and globally less important (from 18% to 61% depending on MAR site). Slow filtration column experiments also showed that DOC retention during stormwater infiltration through soil and vadose zone was mainly due to aerobic microbial consumption of the biodegradable fraction of DOC. In parallel, measurements of DOM characteristics from groundwaters influenced or not by MAR demonstrated that stormwater infiltration increased DOC quantity without affecting its quality (% of biodegradable DOC and relative aromatic carbon content -estimated by SUVA254-). The present study demonstrated that processes occurring in soil and vadose zone of MAR sites were enough efficient to limit DOC fluxes to the aquifer. Nevertheless, the enrichments of DOC concentrations measured in groundwater below

  16. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Timms

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr−1 rainfall, potential evapotranspiration >2000 mm yr−1 such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB. In this rare study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8–1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0–2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91–229 t ha−1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ≥ 10 m depth that was not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m−1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5, whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m−1 with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3–9.5 mm yr−1 (0.7–2.1% rainfall based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent soil water content, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total, and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge appears to be negligible due to low

  17. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, W. A.; Young, R. R.; Huth, N.

    2012-04-01

    The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (evapotranspiration >2000 mm yr-1) such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB). In this rare study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8-1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0-2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91-229 t ha-1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ≥ 10 m depth that was not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m-1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5), whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m-1) with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3-9.5 mm yr-1 (0.7-2.1% rainfall) based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent soil water content, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total), and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge appears to be negligible due to low rainfall and large potential evapotranspiration, transient hydrological conditions after changes in land use and a thick clay dominated vadose zone

  18. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Timms

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr−1 rainfall, such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB. In this unique study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8–1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0–2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91–229 t ha−1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ≥10 m depth that is not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m−1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5, whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m−1 with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3–9.5 mm yr−1 (0.7–2.1% rainfall based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total, and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge negligible due to low rainfall and large potential evapotranspiration, transient hydrological conditionsafter changes

  19. Effect of River Restoration on Ground Water Recharge: Investigation of Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, A.-M.; Schirmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Following the EU Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (1) Switzerland passed the Water Protection Act 814.20 (2), obligating the cantons to restoring their surface water bodies to a near-natural state within the next 100 years. In case of rivers and streams this comprises the provision of extensive areas to allow for meandering, sufficient discharge to prevent drying-out of the river, as might be caused by hydropower production, and adequate water quality, e.g. by limiting waste water discharge. Hereby, the main aim lies in improving the ecological status of the surface water bodies, as well as flood protection and mitigation (2). However, apart from the enhancement of the water quality, river restoration has the potential to increase groundwater recharge due to improved connectivity between the surface water bodies and the underlying aquifers. A new method for the estimation of groundwater recharge in rivers is currently developed at Eawag in Switzerland, and will be employed to investigate if river restoration enhances groundwater recharge. This method comprises the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS), as well as heatable glass-fibre optics cables. DTS is a fibre-optical method for temperature determination over long distances with high accuracy and precision (3), largely depending on the instrument settings and calibration, as well as the fibre-optics cables employed in the measurements (4). Temperature data will be used to distinguish between ground- and surface water, due to their different temperature signatures (5). By heating the glass-fibre optics cable the additional information on the cooling behaviour of the cable may be used to (i) distinguish between up- and downwelling water and to (ii) estimate the volume of water exchanged locally in the river bed. In order to separate the signal of horizontal flow from vertical flow over the cable, it will be buried 30-40 cm deep in the river bed; a control cable will be installed in 10-20 cm depth right

  20. Comparison of surface and groundwater balance approaches in the evaluation of managed aquifer recharge structures: Case of a percolation tank in a crystalline aquifer in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, A.; Baïsset, M.; Alazard, M.; Perrin, J.; Villesseche, D.; Dewandel, B.; Kloppmann, W.; Chandra, S.; Picot-Colbeaux, G.; Sarah, S.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    To face the problem of groundwater depletion, the Indian Government relies on large projects of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Numerous recharge structures such as percolation tanks exist but the impact of these structures on groundwater resources remains poorly understood. Although the evaporation/infiltration ratio of percolation tanks was determined in several studies in semi-arid contexts using surface water balance methods, few studies evaluated the impact on the aquifer recharge. However, knowledge on recharge dynamics over time and space is essential for (1) the quantitative evaluation of stored water volumes, (2) the identification of beneficiaries (farmers) and (3) the estimation of percolation tanks recharge zone to the extent that is required to define proper management regulations at basin scale. These three points are of prime importance in the case of semi-arid regions where a limited number of rain events determine the water stored over the entire year. Assessment of the stored groundwater is even more difficult in crystalline aquifers due to the heterogeneous structure of flow paths. To date no methodological guidelines exist for local assessment of percolation tanks in crystalline aquifers. In this paper, we develop a method for calculating a local groundwater budget and we compare it with a computed surface balance. The method is applied to a case study in semi-arid crystalline context. From the groundwater balance we draw conclusions on (1) the limited amount of stored water in the aquifer, (2) the delayed recharge of the aquifer highlighting temporary storage/slow groundwater movement in the unsaturated zone and (3) the limited number of beneficiaries in years of medium monsoon rainfall. These results complement the understanding of the hydrodynamic functioning of percolation tanks, and their impact on the local groundwater balance.