WorldWideScience

Sample records for artificial food colour

  1. Artificial selection for food colour preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Gemma L.; Endler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two differ...

  2. Artificial selection for food colour preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Gemma L; Endler, John A

    2015-04-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  3. Estimates of dietary exposure of children to artificial food colours in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, A; Sawaya, W; Al-Omair, A; Al-Zenki, S; Al-Amiri, H; Ahmed, N; Al-Sinan, M

    2006-03-01

    To assess the intake of artificial food colour additives by 5-14-year-old children in the State of Kuwait, a 24-h dietary recall was conducted twice on 3141 male and female Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti children from 58 schools. The determination of colour additives in 344 foods items consumed was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector. A comparison with the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) was undertaken to evaluate the potential risk associated with the consumption of artificial colour additives by children in Kuwait. The results indicated that out of nine permitted colours, four exceeded their ADIs by factors of 2-8: tartrazine, sunset yellow, carmoisine and allura red. Further, follow-up studies to provide insight into potential adverse health effects associated with the high intakes of these artificial colour additives on the test population are warranted.

  4. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health.

  5. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health. PMID:27295128

  6. Colour gamuts in polychromatic dielectric elastomer artificial chromatophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Cerruto, Antonio; Winters, Amy; Roke, Calum

    2014-03-01

    Chromatophores are the colour changing organelles in the skins of animals including fish and cephalopods. The ability of cephalopods in particular to rapidly change their colouration in response to environmental changes, for example to camouflage against a new background, and in social situations, for example to attract a mate or repel a rival, is extremely attractive for engineering, medical, active clothing and biomimetic robotic applications. The rapid response of these chromatophores is possible by the direct coupling of fast acting muscle and pigmented saccules. In artificial chromatophores we are able to mimic this structure using electroactive polymer artificial muscles. In contrast to prior research which has demonstrated monochromatic artificial chromatophores, here we consider a novel multi-colour, multi-layer, artificial chromatophore structure inspired by the complex dermal chromatophore unit in nature and which exploits dielectric elastomer artificial muscles as the electroactive actuation mechanism. We investigate the optical properties of this chromatophore unit and explore the range of colours and effects that a single unit and a matrix of chromatophores can produce. The colour gamut of the multi-colour chromatophore is analysed and shows its suitability for practical display and camouflage applications. It is demonstrated how, by varying actuator strain and chromatophore base colour, the gamut can be shifted through colour space, thereby tuning the artificial chromatophore to a specific environment or application.

  7. The chemistry and analysis of annatto food colouring: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Scotter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Annatto food colouring (E160b) has a long history of use in the food industry for the colouring of a wide range of food commodities. The principle colouring components of annatto is the oil-soluble diapo carotenoid bixin, which is the methyl ester of the dicarboxylic acid norbixin, which is soluble in aqueous alkali. Bixin and norbixin therefore exhibit not only physicochemical properties normally associated with carotenoids but also certain anomalous properties that have ...

  8. Food analysis using artificial senses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar

    2014-02-19

    Nowadays, consumers are paying great attention to the characteristics of food such as smell, taste, and appearance. This motivates scientists to imitate human senses using devices known as electronic senses. These include electronic noses, electronic tongues, and computer vision. Thanks to the utilization of various sensors and methods of signal analysis, artificial senses are widely applied in food analysis for process monitoring and determining the quality and authenticity of foods. This paper summarizes achievements in the field of artificial senses. It includes a brief history of these systems, descriptions of most commonly used sensors (conductometric, potentiometric, amperometic/voltammetric, impedimetric, colorimetric, piezoelectric), data analysis methods (for example, artificial neural network (ANN), principal component analysis (PCA), model CIE L*a*b*), and application of artificial senses to food analysis, in particular quality control, authenticity and falsification assessment, and monitoring of production processes.

  9. Effects of the ionizing radiation in natural food colours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world's fast growing population and its consequent increase in demand for food has driven mankind into improving technologies which ensure a safer supply of such commodities. Both food radiation processing and its constituents are highlighted as a feasible alternative technique capable of meeting food safety standards. Natural dyes are extensively employed in the food industry thanks to their colour enhancing properties on food products. This paper has aimed at studying the effects of ionizing radiation on three natural dyes: carminic acid and its derivatives (cochineal dyes), bixine and its salts (annatto dyes) and curcumin (turmeric dyes), used in the food and cosmetic industries within dilutions and doses those goods might eventually be processed in. It also envisages clarifying the compatibility of the irradiation technique with the keeping of such relevant sensorial attribute which is the product colour. Spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis were the analytic methods employed. All in all, a colour decrease proportional to the increase on the applied gamma radiation (1 to 32 kGy) has been observed. The annatto dyes have proven moderately stable whereas turmeric has shown to be highly sensitive to radiation. Those results shall be taken into account as far as the need to alter the formulae additive amount in the product is concerned whenever undergoing radiation processing. (author)

  10. Artificial senses for characterization of food quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-bo; LAN Yu-bin; R.E. Lacey

    2004-01-01

    Food quality is of primary concern in the food industry and to the consumer. Systems that mimic human senses have been developed and applied to the characterization of food quality. The five primary senses are: vision, hearing, smell, taste and touch.In the characterization of food quality, people assess the samples sensorially and differentiate "good" from "bad" on a continuum.However, the human sensory system is subjective, with mental and physical inconsistencies, and needs time to work. Artificial senses such as machine vision, the electronic ear, electronic nose, electronic tongue, artificial mouth and even artificial the head have been developed that mimic the human senses. These artificial senses are coordinated individually or collectively by a pattern recognition technique, typically artificial neural networks, which have been developed based on studies of the mechanism of the human brain. Such a structure has been used to formulate methods for rapid characterization of food quality. This research presents and discusses individual artificial sensing systems. With the concept of multi-sensor data fusion these sensor systems can work collectively in some way. Two such fused systems, artificial mouth and artificial head, are described and discussed. It indicates that each of the individual systems has their own artificially sensing ability to differentiate food samples. It further indicates that with a more complete mimic of human intelligence the fused systems are more powerful than the individual systems in differentiation of food samples.

  11. Artificial radioisotopes in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of uranium for nuclear fission involves the risk of environmental contamination by radiation during the processes of mining, concentration, peaceful and military application and storage, reprocessing and waste disposal. Three of the most dangerous radioisotopes have been followed here as they move through four different food chains. The main bottlenecks for fast and massive transfer are for 131I its rather short half life, for 137Cs the defective plant uptake from soil (and much less so also the pathway through the animal body), and for 90Sr its discrimination relative to calcium in several transport processes in the animal body, and its preference for the bone mass. Hence it is often of advantage for man to use animals as an additional food chain. Known exceptions are discussed: the reindeer and karibou living entirely on lichens during the winter and thereby acquiring for 137Cs nearly identical specific activity as plant food, and cow's milk for iodine during a short period after contamination. 15 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  12. Synthetic food colours in saffron solutions, saffron rice and saffron chicken from restaurants in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Khatoonabadi, Zhila; Amirpour, Mansooreh; AkbariAzam, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Saffron solutions, saffron rice and saffron chicken samples were considered for synthetic colours as additives, which are forbidden according to Iranian national standards. Samples were taken from restaurants of three locations and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Of the total 573 samples, 52% were positive for at least one colour. The most prevalent colours were Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow and Sunset Yellow, with 44%, 9.1% and 8.4% of the samples testing positive for these colours, respectively. Carmoisine and Ponceau were both detected only in 0.5% of the positive samples and found only in saffron solution. In conclusion, synthetic food colours, especially Tartrazine should be regarded as a potential risk in saffron and its related food. Therefore, new attempts for food safety and quality should be undertaken to eliminate the use of these colours in restaurants. PMID:25116149

  13. Synthetic food colours in saffron solutions, saffron rice and saffron chicken from restaurants in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Khatoonabadi, Zhila; Amirpour, Mansooreh; AkbariAzam, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Saffron solutions, saffron rice and saffron chicken samples were considered for synthetic colours as additives, which are forbidden according to Iranian national standards. Samples were taken from restaurants of three locations and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Of the total 573 samples, 52% were positive for at least one colour. The most prevalent colours were Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow and Sunset Yellow, with 44%, 9.1% and 8.4% of the samples testing positive for these colours, respectively. Carmoisine and Ponceau were both detected only in 0.5% of the positive samples and found only in saffron solution. In conclusion, synthetic food colours, especially Tartrazine should be regarded as a potential risk in saffron and its related food. Therefore, new attempts for food safety and quality should be undertaken to eliminate the use of these colours in restaurants.

  14. Demonstration of a foraging advantage for trichromatic marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi) dependent on food colour.

    OpenAIRE

    Caine, N G; Mundy, N. I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that the major advantage of trichromatic over dichromatic colour vision in primates is enhanced detection of red/yellow food items such as fruit against the dappled foliage of the forest. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the foraging ability of dichromatic and trichromatic Geoffroy's marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi) for orange- and green-coloured cereal balls (Kix) in a naturalized captive setting. Trichromatic marmosets found a significantly greater number of ora...

  15. Assessment of the suitability of food colouring materials as indicators of bacterial contamination of enteral feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, A

    1988-04-01

    The suitability of using food colouring materials in enteral feeds as indicators of bacterial contamination was examined. Experiments using Triosorbon, Clinifeed ISO or Vivonex Standard plus amaranth, carmoisine, ponceau 4R, sunset yellow FCF, tartrazine or erythrosine demonstrated that although the change in appearance of coloured feed could be linked with the presence of high numbers of bacteria in the feed, the converse was not always true. PMID:2899111

  16. Methods for the determination of European Union-permitted added natural colours in foods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotter, M J

    2011-05-01

    Coupled to increasing consumer demand, food manufacturers have moved towards increased usage of approved natural colours. There is a legal requirement for governments to monitor the consumption of all food additives in the European Union to ensure the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) are not exceeded, especially by young children. Validated analytical methods are needed to fulfil this requirement. The aim of this paper is to review the available literature on methods of extraction for approved natural colours in food and drink. Available analytical methods for the determination of European Union-permitted natural food colour additives in foods and beverages have been assessed for their fitness for purpose in terms of their key extraction and analysis procedures, selectivity and sensitivity, especially with regard to maximum permitted levels, and their applicability for use in surveillance and in an enforcement role. The advantages and disadvantages of available analytical methods for each of nine designated chemical classes (groups) of natural colours in different food and beverage matrices are given. Other important factors such as technical requirements, cost, transferability and applicability are given due consideration. Gaps in the knowledge and levels of validation are identified and recommendations made on further research to develop suitable methods. The nine designated natural colour classes covered are: 1. Curcumin (E100), 2. Riboflavins (E101i-ii), 3. Cochineal (E120), 4. Chlorophylls--including chlorophyllins and copper analogues (E140-141), 5. Caramel Classes I-IV (E150a-d), 6. Carotenoids (E160a-f, E161b, E161g), 7. Beetroot red (E162), 8. Anthocyanins (E163), and 9. Other colours--Vegetable carbon (E153), Calcium carbonate (E170), Titanium dioxide (E171) and Iron oxides and hydroxides (E172).

  17. CONSUMPTION OF ARTIFICIAL COLOURS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN OF A BAIXADA FLUMINENSE, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Teixeira Polônio

    2012-01-01

    colorantes; riesgos a la salud                    CONSUMO DE CORANTES ARTIFICIAIS POR PRÉ-ESCOLARES DE UM MUNICÍPIO DA BAIXADA FLUMINENSE, RJ. CONSUMPTION OF ARTIFICIAL COLOURS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN OF A BAIXADA FLUMINENSE, RJ. CONSUMO DE COLORANTES ARTIFICIALES POR PREESCOLARES DE UN MUNICIPIO DE LA BAJADA FLUMINENSE, RJ.                                                    RESUMO: OBJETIVOS: Analisar o consumo de alimentos industrializados com corantes por pré-escolares de um município da Baixada Fluminense.MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída por 148 mães de pré-escolares de 3 a 5 anos matriculados na rede pública do município de Mesquita, RJ. Foi aplicado um questionário estruturado constituído por variáveis sócio-demográficas e de saúde. Para análise do consumo de alimentos utilizaram-se o Recordatório 24 horas e Questionário de Frequência Alimentar (QFA. Em seguida analisaram-se produtos e marcas mais consumidos, verificando-se informações sobre corantes nos rótulos. RESULTADOS: Os produtos mais consumidos foram o biscoito recheado com consumo diário ou de 3 a 5 vezes por semana (55,1%, seguido de balas (51,4% e biscoito salgado tipo gritz de milho (48,4%. Nos biscoitos recheados (sabores morango e chocolate destacaram-se tanto corantes naturais (carmin e urucum quanto sintéticos (caramelo amoniacal, β-caroteno sintético, tartrazina e azul brilhante. Nas balas destacaram-se vermelho 40 (81,8%, tartrazina (54,5% e azul brilhante (54,5%. Nos cinco sabores de biscoitos salgados constataram-se, também, corantes naturais (69% urucum, 31% caramelo e sintéticos (amarelo crepúsculo, tartrazina, vermelho 40 na freqüência de 8% cada. Nesse estudo a IDA foi ultrapassada para os corantes artificiais, bordeaux S (56% e amarelo crepúsculo (25%. DISCUSSÃO: Evidenciam-se dois problemas relacionados ao uso de corantes no país: o primeiro, a facilidade de se ultrapassar a IDA de

  18. Artificial Sweeteners as Food Additives (Turkish with English Abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    In this review some artificial sweeteners (saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame) as food additives are looked over for their usage purposes and the effects on health. The problems of public health caused by some artificial sweeteners are assessed according the recent scientific publication on the subject.   

  19. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0 lx, 1 lx, 10 lx, 100 lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1 lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities. PMID:26584071

  20. Applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yiqun; Kangas, Lars J; Rasco, Barbara A

    2007-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied in almost every aspect of food science over the past two decades, although most applications are in the development stage. ANNs are useful tools for food safety and quality analyses, which include modeling of microbial growth and from this predicting food safety, interpreting spectroscopic data, and predicting physical, chemical, functional and sensory properties of various food products during processing and distribution. ANNs hold a great deal of promise for modeling complex tasks in process control and simulation and in applications of machine perception including machine vision and electronic nose for food safety and quality control. This review discusses the basic theory of the ANN technology and its applications in food science, providing food scientists and the research community an overview of the current research and future trend of the applications of ANN technology in the field.

  1. Case Studies of Effects of Artificial Food Colors on Hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Carl; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A double blind, double crossover study with six hyperactive boys (8 to 13 years old) tested B. Feingold's hypothesis that synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity in some children. All Ss were on the Feingold diet, eliminating artificial colors and flavors. The authors conclude that evidence for Feingold's hypothesis is weak. (Author)

  2. The meaning of colours in nutrition labelling in the context of expert and consumer criteria of evaluating food product healthfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wąsowicz, Grażyna; Styśko-Kunkowska, Małgorzata; Grunert, Klaus G

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted to explore the effect of front-of-pack nutrition labels on the perceived healthfulness of food products. Consumers were found to hold beliefs about colours and their fit to product categories that influence the assessment process. Consumers...... show the complexity of psychological processes in the perception of food healthfulness....

  3. Reciprocal preening and food sharing in colour-polymorphic nestling barn owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, A; Des Monstiers, B; Ifrid, E; Da Silva, A; Genzoni, E; Dreiss, A N

    2016-02-01

    Barn owl (Tyto alba) siblings preen and offer food items to one another, behaviours that can be considered prosocial because they benefit a conspecific by relieving distress or need. In experimental broods, we analysed whether such behaviours were reciprocated, preferentially exchanged between specific phenotypes, performed to avoid harassment and food theft or signals of hierarchy status. Three of the results are consistent with the hypothesis of direct reciprocity. First, food sharing was reciprocated in three-chick broods but not in pairs of siblings, that is when nestlings could choose a partner with whom to develop a reciprocating interaction. Second, a nestling was more likely to give a prey item to its sibling if the latter individual had preened the former. Third, siblings matched their investment in preening each other. Manipulation of age hierarchy showed that food stealing was directed towards older siblings but was not performed to compensate for a low level of cooperation received. Social behaviours were related to melanin-based coloration, suggesting that animals may signal their propensity to interact socially. The most prosocial phenotype (darker reddish) was also the phenotype that stole more food, and the effect of coloration on prosocial behaviour depended upon rank and sex, suggesting that colour-related prosociality is state dependent. PMID:26563617

  4. Immunological studies on Amaranth, Sunset Yellow and Curcumin as food colouring agents in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mohamed M; Atta, Attia H; Arbid, Mahmoud S; Nada, Somaia A; Asaad, Gihan Farag

    2010-06-01

    The use of food dyes is at least controversial because they are only of essential role. Moreover many of them have been related to health problems mainly in children that are considered a very vulnerable group. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of Amaranth, Sunset Yellow and Curcumin for 4 weeks at doses of 47, 315 and 157.5 mg/kg b. wt. and after 2 weeks all animals were immunostimulated by intra peritoneal injection of sheep RBCs 10% (1 ml/rat). Body weight, relative body weight, total and differential leukocytes count, mononuclear cell count, delayed hypersensitivity, total protein and serum fractions were determined. Results revealed that oral administration of Amaranth, Sunset Yellow and Curcumin did not affect the body weight gain or the spleen weight. On the other hand Sunset Yellow and Curcumin significantly decreased the weight of thymus gland of the rats. Total leukocyte count were not affected while Amaranth and Curcumin-treated rats revealed a significant decrease in neutrophiles and monocytes and a compensatory increase in lymphocytes. Moreover, oral administration of Sunset Yellow revealed a significant decrease in monocyte percent. Amaranth, Sunset Yellow and Curcumin significantly decreased the delayed hyper sensitivity. Total serum protein, albumin, total globulin and albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio were not affected by administration of the colouring agents. Oral administration of Amaranth increases the density of albumin band. On the other hand oral administration of Curcumin decreases the density of the albumin band. Oral administration of any of the tested colouring agents did not change the density of globulin region as compared to control group. In conclusion we found that both synthetic (Amaranth and Sunset Yellow) and natural (Curcumin) colouring agents used at doses up to 10 times the acceptable daily intake exerted a depressing effect on the cellular but not humoral immune response.

  5. Tracing artificial trans fat in popular foods in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To minimise the intake of industrial artificial trans fat (I-TF), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of this strategy on I-TF content in prepackaged biscuits...... in foods is expected to be an effective strategy to achieve this goal......./cakes/wafers in 2012-2013 in 20 European countries. DESIGN: The I-TF content was assessed in a market basket investigation. Three large supermarkets were visited in each capital, and in some countries, three additional ethnic shops were included. RESULTS: A total of 598 samples of biscuits/cakes/wafers with 'partially...

  6. Effects of the ionizing radiation in natural food colours; Efeitos da radiacao ionizante em corantes naturais de uso alimenticio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosentino, Helio Morrone

    2005-07-01

    The world's fast growing population and its consequent increase in demand for food has driven mankind into improving technologies which ensure a safer supply of such commodities. Both food radiation processing and its constituents are highlighted as a feasible alternative technique capable of meeting food safety standards. Natural dyes are extensively employed in the food industry thanks to their colour enhancing properties on food products. This paper has aimed at studying the effects of ionizing radiation on three natural dyes: carminic acid and its derivatives (cochineal dyes), bixine and its salts (annatto dyes) and curcumin (turmeric dyes), used in the food and cosmetic industries within dilutions and doses those goods might eventually be processed in. It also envisages clarifying the compatibility of the irradiation technique with the keeping of such relevant sensorial attribute which is the product colour. Spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis were the analytic methods employed. All in all, a colour decrease proportional to the increase on the applied gamma radiation (1 to 32 kGy) has been observed. The annatto dyes have proven moderately stable whereas turmeric has shown to be highly sensitive to radiation. Those results shall be taken into account as far as the need to alter the formulae additive amount in the product is concerned whenever undergoing radiation processing. (author)

  7. Making food labels social: The impact of colour of nutritional labels and injunctive norms on perceptions and choice of snack foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Milica; Pechey, Rachel; Marteau, Theresa M

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies report that using green labels to denote healthier foods, and red to denote less healthy foods increases consumption of green- and decreases consumption of red-labelled foods. Other symbols (e.g. emoticons conveying normative approval and disapproval) could also be used to signal the healthiness and/or acceptability of consuming such products. The present study tested the combined effects of using emoticons and colours on labels amongst a nationally representative sample of the UK population (n = 955). In a 3 (emoticon expression: smiling vs. frowning vs. no emoticon) × 3 (colour label: green vs. red vs. white) ×2 (food option: chocolate bar vs. cereal bar) between-subjects experiment, participants rated the level of desirability, healthiness, tastiness, and calorific content of a snack bar they had been randomised to view. At the end they were further randomised to view one of nine possible combinations of colour and emoticon labels and asked to choose between a chocolate and a cereal bar. Regardless of label, participants rated the chocolate as tastier and more desirable when compared to the cereal bar, and the cereal bar as healthier than the chocolate bar. A series of interactions revealed that a frowning emoticon on a white background decreased perceptions of healthiness and tastiness of the cereal bar, but not the chocolate bar. In the explicit choice task selection was unaffected by label. Overall nutritional labels had limited effects on perceptions and no effects on choice of snack foods. Emoticon labels yielded stronger effects on perceptions of taste and healthiness of snacks than colour labels. Frowning emoticons may be more potent than smiling emoticons at influencing the perceived healthiness and tastiness of foods carrying health halos.

  8. A review of the genotoxicity of food, drug and cosmetic colours and other azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, R D; Haveland-Smith, R B

    1982-03-01

    The genetic toxicology of the major dyestuffs used in foods, drugs and cosmetics has been reviewed. Published data for azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes from short-term assays for muta-carcinogenicity have been summarized and discussed according to usage, current and previous worldwide legislative status. Certain other synthetic food dyes, commercial mixtures, natural and polymeric colourants as well as a section on aminoazobenzene and its derivatives have been included. Genotoxicity has been discussed with reference to structural chemistry, levels of exposure, absorption and metabolism and to epidemiological information. The extent of agreement between data from different tests and correlations with animal cancer assays have been considered. Synthetic dyes from the 3 major structural classes exhibit genotoxicity, whilst only 2 natural colours have proved active. Activity may be due to the presence of certain functional groups, notably nitro- and amino-substituents which are metabolized to ultimate electrophiles that may be stabilized by electronic interaction with aryl rings. Metabolic processes such as azo-reduction may be activating or detoxifying. the low but significant correlation between animal carcinogenicity and short-term test data may be increased with further screening, especially involving chromosome assays. It is suggested that a human cancer hazard may exist where significant quantities of finished benzidine dye samples are handled. Such risks from exposures to other colours and the possibility of human germ-line mutation induction by dyestuffs cannot be meaningfully assessed.

  9. Highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platforms for food colourants based on the property-tuning of porous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Qin [Key Laboratory for Large-Format Battery Materials and System, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Xia, Shanhong; Tong, Jianhua [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wu, Kangbing, E-mail: kbwu@hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Large-Format Battery Materials and System, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2015-08-05

    It is very challenging to develop highly-sensitive analytical platforms for toxic synthetic colourants that widely added in food samples. Herein, a series of porous carbon (PC) was prepared using CaCO{sub 3} nanoparticles (nano-CaCO{sub 3}) as the hard template and starch as the carbon precursor. Characterizations of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the morphology and porous structure were controlled by the weight ratio of starch and nano-CaCO{sub 3}. The electrochemical behaviours of four kinds of widely-used food colourants, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red, were studied. On the surface of PC samples, the oxidation signals of colourants enhanced obviously, and more importantly, the signal enhancement abilities of PC were also dependent on the starch/nano-CaCO{sub 3} weight ratio. The greatly-increased electron transfer ability and accumulation efficiency were the main reason for the enhanced signals of colourants, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronocoulometry. The prepared PC-2 sample by 1:1 starch/nano-CaCO{sub 3} weight ratio was more active for the oxidation of food colourtants, and increased the signals by 89.4-fold, 79.3-fold, 47.3-fold and 50.7-fold for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. As a result, a highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platform was developed, and the detection limits were 1.4, 3.5, 2.1 and 1.7 μg L{sup −1} for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. The practical application of this new sensing platform was demonstrated using drink samples, and the detected results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. - Highlights: • PC samples with different morphology and electrochemical activities were prepared. • Highly sensitive electrochemical sensing platform was developed for food colourants. • The accuracy and practicability was testified to be good by HPLC.

  10. Highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platforms for food colourants based on the property-tuning of porous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very challenging to develop highly-sensitive analytical platforms for toxic synthetic colourants that widely added in food samples. Herein, a series of porous carbon (PC) was prepared using CaCO3 nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) as the hard template and starch as the carbon precursor. Characterizations of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the morphology and porous structure were controlled by the weight ratio of starch and nano-CaCO3. The electrochemical behaviours of four kinds of widely-used food colourants, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red, were studied. On the surface of PC samples, the oxidation signals of colourants enhanced obviously, and more importantly, the signal enhancement abilities of PC were also dependent on the starch/nano-CaCO3 weight ratio. The greatly-increased electron transfer ability and accumulation efficiency were the main reason for the enhanced signals of colourants, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronocoulometry. The prepared PC-2 sample by 1:1 starch/nano-CaCO3 weight ratio was more active for the oxidation of food colourtants, and increased the signals by 89.4-fold, 79.3-fold, 47.3-fold and 50.7-fold for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. As a result, a highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platform was developed, and the detection limits were 1.4, 3.5, 2.1 and 1.7 μg L−1 for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. The practical application of this new sensing platform was demonstrated using drink samples, and the detected results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. - Highlights: • PC samples with different morphology and electrochemical activities were prepared. • Highly sensitive electrochemical sensing platform was developed for food colourants. • The accuracy and practicability was testified to be good by HPLC

  11. Assessment of dietary exposure in the French population to 13 selected food colours, preservatives, antioxidants, stabilizers, emulsifiers and sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemrah, Nawel; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Volatier, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    The results of French intake estimates for 13 food additives prioritized by the methods proposed in the 2001 Report from the European Commission on Dietary Food Additive Intake in the European Union are reported. These 13 additives were selected using the first and second tiers of the three-tier approach. The first tier was based on theoretical food consumption data and the maximum permitted level of additives. The second tier used real individual food consumption data and the maximum permitted level of additives for the substances which exceeded the acceptable daily intakes (ADI) in the first tier. In the third tier reported in this study, intake estimates were calculated for the 13 additives (colours, preservatives, antioxidants, stabilizers, emulsifiers and sweeteners) according to two modelling assumptions corresponding to two different food habit scenarios (assumption 1: consumers consume foods that may or may not contain food additives, and assumption 2: consumers always consume foods that contain additives) when possible. In this approach, real individual food consumption data and the occurrence/use-level of food additives reported by the food industry were used. Overall, the results of the intake estimates are reassuring for the majority of additives studied since the risk of exceeding the ADI was low, except for nitrites, sulfites and annatto, whose ADIs were exceeded by either children or adult consumers or by both populations under one and/or two modelling assumptions. Under the first assumption, the ADI is exceeded for high consumers among adults for nitrites and sulfites (155 and 118.4%, respectively) and among children for nitrites (275%). Under the second assumption, the average nitrites dietary exposure in children exceeds the ADI (146.7%). For high consumers, adults exceed the nitrite and sulfite ADIs (223 and 156.4%, respectively) and children exceed the nitrite, annatto and sulfite ADIs (416.7, 124.6 and 130.6%, respectively).

  12. Colourful English Colour Words

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    English colour words, though very small in number, reflect to a great extent the different cultural connotations of different languages. This paper gives quite a few idiomatic usages,and ranslation examples of some colour words and illustrates the mportance of a clear understanding of cultural - loaded words in translation practice.

  13. Onion, a natural alternative to artificial food preservatives. Review

    OpenAIRE

    Santas, Jonathan; Almajano Pablos, María Pilar; Carbó Moliner, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Consumer demand of minimally processed foods without synthetic preservatives has led to a growing interest in their replacement for more natural alternatives. Onion is widely used as a food ingredient and it is known as a good source of bioactive compounds, such as sulphur-containing compounds and flavonoids with well known health beneficial effects, antioxidant and antimicrobial capacities. Consequently, onion has been proposed as a promising and safer source of food preservatives. The overa...

  14. Rheological characterization of coloured oil-in-water food emulsions with lutein and phycocyanin added to the oil and aqueous phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Isabel; Batista, Ana Paula; Raymundo, Anabela; Empis, José

    2006-01-01

    The use of natural colourings in food products presents nutritional advantages, and certain pigments are associated with functional properties, e.g. antioxidant effects. This can be very advantageous in food products with high fat contents like mayonnaises. The aim of this work was to study the effect of adding natural pigments, lutein and phycocyanin, to the water and oil phases, respectively, of oil-in-water pea protein-stabilized emulsions, beyond the desirable and expected develo...

  15. Inorganic nutrients in natural and artificial food of Dacus oleae larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain inorganic nutrients contained in the natural and artificial food of Dacus oleae larvae were determined by neutron activation analysis and spectrophotometry. The content of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron, zinc, copper and phosporus was reported for the olive fruit mesocarp at three stages of maturity, brewer's yeast, soybean hydrolysate and roasted peanuts. Several differences were found between the inorganic nutrient content of the natural food (olive fruit) and artificial diet of D. oleae larvae. The differences which may be important in the nutrition and metabolism of this insect were estimated and discussed

  16. Study on the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of a natural food colour (annatto) in mouse bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Lima, R O; Azevedo, L; Ribeiro, L R; Salvadori, D M F

    2003-02-01

    Most manufactured foods contain chemicals added as a deliberate part of the manufacturing process. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of annatto, a natural pigment extracted from the Bixa orellana L. and widely used as a colorant in foods. The micronucleus test was performed in bone marrow cells from Swiss male mice treated with one of the three concentrations of annatto (1330, 5330 and 10,670 ppm), incorporated into the diet. The animals were fed with the diets for 7 days and sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment. For the evaluation of the antimutagenic potential of annatto, at day 7, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg body weight). Under the concentrations tested annatto did not present mutagenic or antimutagenic activities on the mice bone marrow cells. However, an increased frequency of micronucleated cells was observed when the highest concentration (10,670 ppm) was administered simultaneously with cyclophosphamide. In conclusion, the data indicate that annatto colour, for the conditions used, is neither mutagenic nor an inhibitor of induced mutations, although it should be used carefully since high doses may increase the effect of a mutagen. PMID:12480296

  17. Sweeteners (natural and artificial) used in the food industry

    OpenAIRE

    PIHLÍK, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to introduce the sweeteners which are used in the food industry in the Czech Republic but also in the world. The basic sweetener which is a measure of the other sweeteners is regarded as sugar (sucrose). In this bachelor´s work, I described the history of the production of beet sugar in the Czech Republic, the products which are made of it and also its usage in food industry. Furthermore, I introduce the basic types of sweeteners by which we try to replace the beet sug...

  18. Coloured plastinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hanno; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2006-03-01

    To obtain coloured plastinates by colouring anatomical structures in e.g. red, blue and yellow we used different types of chemical reagents. The colours remained stable during dehydration, degreasing and impregnation of specimen with silicone resin. The colours, which penetrated into the specimen, appeared to be included in the plastination process. To prove their stability, the coloured plastinates were exposed to light and heat for more than 5 years. A permanent colouration remained. The coloured plastinates are dry and flexible, odourless and robust. They are instructive and can be used in tutorials, examinations and seminars. PMID:16551016

  19. Willingness to purchase Genetically Modified food: an analysis applying artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Ordóñez, M.; Rodríguez-Entrena, M.; Becerra-Alonso, D.

    2014-01-01

    Findings about consumer decision-making process regarding GM food purchase remain mixed and are inconclusive. This paper offers a model which classifies willingness to purchase GM food, using data from 399 surveys in Southern Spain. Willingness to purchase has been measured using three dichotomous questions and classification, based on attitudinal, cognitive and socio-demographic factors, has been made by an artificial neural network model. The results show 74% accuracy to forecast the willin...

  20. Colour calibration for colour reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Emmel, P.; R. D. Hersch

    2000-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of low-cost colour devices (digital colour cameras, scanners, printers etc.) during the last few years, colour calibration has become an important issue. Such devices should faithfully reproduce colour images, but experience shows they don't. Among the main reasons, we note the diversity of acquisition, display and printing technologies which makes standardization difficult. Each device has a different gamut, i.e. a different set of colours that it can acquire or repr...

  1. Effects of artificial sweeteners on body weight, food and drink intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyák, Eva; Gombos, K; Hajnal, B; Bonyár-Müller, K; Szabó, Sz; Gubicskó-Kisbenedek, A; Marton, K; Ember, I

    2010-12-01

    Artificial sweeteners are widely used all over the world. They may assist in weight management, prevention of dental caries, control of blood glucose of diabetics, and also can be used to replace sugar in foods. In the animal experimentation mice were given oral doses of water solutions of table top artificial sweeteners (saccharin, cyclamate based, acesulfame-K based, and aspartame) the amount of maximum Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) ad libitum. The controls received only tap water with the same drinking conditions as the treated groups. The mice were fed chow ad libitum.We measured food intake and body weight once a week, water and solutions of artificial sweeteners intake twice a week. The data were analysed by statistical methods (T-probe, regression analysis).Consumption of sweeteners resulted in significantly increased body weight; however, the food intake did not change.These results question the effect of non-caloric artificial sweeteners on weight-maintenance or body weight decrease. PMID:21138816

  2. Measurement of food colour in L*a*b* units from RGB digital image using least squares support vector machine regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Romaniello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the potential of least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM regression to develop an efficient method to measure the colour of food materials in L*a*b* units by means of a computer vision systems (CVS. A laboratory CVS, based on colour digital camera (CDC, was implemented and three LS-SVM models were trained and validated, one for each output variables (L*, a*, and b* required by this problem, using the RGB signals generated by the CDC as input variables to these models. The colour target-based approach was used to camera characterization and a standard reference target of 242 colour samples was acquired using the CVS and a colorimeter. This data set was split in two sets of equal sizes, for training and validating the LS-SVM models. An effective two-stage grid search process on the parameters space was performed in MATLAB to tune the regularization parameters γ and the kernel parameters σ2 of the three LS-SVM models. A 3-8-3 multilayer feed-forward neural network (MFNN, according to the research conducted by León et al. (2006, was also trained in order to compare its performance with those of LS-SVM models. The LS-SVM models developed in this research have been shown better generalization capability then the MFNN, allowed to obtain high correlations between L*a*b* data acquired using the colorimeter and the corresponding data obtained by transformation of the RGB data acquired by the CVS. In particular, for the validation set, R2 values equal to 0.9989, 0.9987, and 0.9994 for L*, a* and b* parameters were obtained. The root mean square error values were 0.6443, 0.3226, and 0.2702 for L*, a*, and b* respectively, and the average of colour differences ΔEab was 0.8232±0.5033 units. Thus, LS-SVM regression seems to be a useful tool to measurement of food colour using a low cost CVS.

  3. Measuring Colour

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, R W G

    2011-01-01

    The classic authority on colour measurement now fully revised and updated with the latest CIE recommendations The measurement of colour is of major importance in many commercial applications, such as the textile, paint, and foodstuff industries; as well as having a significant role in the lighting, paper, printing, cosmetic, plastics, glass, chemical, photographic, television, transport, and communication industries. Building upon the success of earlier editions, the 4th edition of Measuring Colour has been updated throughout with new chapters on colour rendering by light sources; colorimetry

  4. 国内外食品接触材料中着色剂的法规%Briefly Expound of International Standard and Regulations on Colourants of Food Contact Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇海娟; 商贵芹; 王文烨

    2011-01-01

    Types and the influence of colourants on food contact materials were described. The international standard and regulations on colourants were mainly introduced.%简述了着色剂的种类及其对食品接触材料安全性的影响,重点介绍了欧盟、美国、日本和我国关于着色剂的一些法规和要求.

  5. Prevalence of Artificial Food Colors in Grocery Store Products Marketed to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batada, Ameena; Jacobson, Michael F

    2016-10-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) in foods and beverages may be harmful to children. This study assesses the percentage of grocery store products marketed to children that contain AFCs, by category and company. The research team collected product and food-color information about 810 products in one grocery store in North Carolina in 2014. Overall, 350 products (43.2%) contained AFCs. The most common AFCs were Red 40 (29.8% of products), Blue 1 (24.2%), Yellow 5 (20.5%), and Yellow 6 (19.5%). Produce was the only category that did not have any AFCs. The highest percentage of products with AFCs was found in candies (96.3%), fruit-flavored snacks (94%), and drink mixes/powders (89.7%). Forty-one of the 66 companies marketed products containing AFCs. Given concerns about health effects of AFCs and high proportions of high-AFC categories, clinicians, parents, food companies, and the government can take steps to support children's healthy eating and development by reducing AFCs in children's diets. PMID:27270961

  6. Colour schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for analysing colour schemes based on a parametric approach that includes not only hue, value and saturation, but also purity, transparency, luminosity, luminescence, lustre, modulation and differentiation.......This chapter presents a framework for analysing colour schemes based on a parametric approach that includes not only hue, value and saturation, but also purity, transparency, luminosity, luminescence, lustre, modulation and differentiation....

  7. Feeding habits and food partitioning between three commercial fish associated with artificial reefs in a tropical coastal environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mablouke, C.; Kolasinski, J.; Potier, Michel; Cuvillier, A.; Potin, G.; Bigot, L.; Frouin, P.; Jaquemet, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    At Reunion Island (south-western Indian Ocean), artificial reefs were submerged in 2003 in a bay and were soon colonised by fish, among which were the highly abundant commercial species Lutjanus kasmira, Priacanthus hamrur and Selar crumenophthalmus. The high concentration and diversity of fish around the artificial reefs is surprising, considering the low abundance of potential benthic prey. We investigated the diet and food partitioning between the aforementioned species using stomach conte...

  8. Artificial Food Support for Lutra lutra in a River in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Olmo J.

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Food Support for Lutra lutra in a River in SpainPages 34 - 36 (ReportJordi Ruiz-OlmoIn the Spanish Pyrenees, otters are only present in six rivers, and populations are fragmented by hydrological schemes, and high, dry mountains. Because of the great water level fluctuations caused by hydroelectricity generation, fish levels often drop very low, endangering the otters. It was decided to restock one of the rivers, the Noguera Ribagorçana, with two species found below the dams and thus native to the river, which are better able to cope with high fluctuations in water level. An ongoing monitoring program shows otters are using this new resource.

  9. An Urban Colour Space in the Context of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Zheleznyak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A colour space is seen as an actual discourse when discussing problems of formation and inhabitation of the modern city environment. The key aspect of such understanding is an activity-cultural interpretation of the urban environment colouristics proposed by the author, which allows building of an integral sphere of colour existence. This model of working with colour includes basic components and structures a colour space, while matching up all the elements (basic paradigms that provide proper functioning and development of the colour space; mechanisms of formation of colour paradigms; processes of formation and transformation of cultural norms and stereotypes; the culture of colour as a holistic unit that penetrates the variety of colour space forms, as well as the reality of colour establishment in the framework of human culture; the urban colouristics as a material and virtual, artificial and natural, organized and spontaneously appearing colour reality together with professional and conventional visions of it, etc..

  10. Evidence for inbreeding depression in the food-deceptive colour-dimorphic orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina (L.) Soò.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet, N; Dunand-Martin, S; Gigord, L D B

    2007-01-01

    About one third of all orchid species are deceptive, i.e., not providing any reward to their pollinator. Such species often have lower visitation rates compared to rewarding relatives. This could result in lower levels of geitonogamous selfing and thus would provide an advantage in term of progeny fitness through inbreeding avoidance. This hypothesis could be tested by comparing the level of inbreeding depression between deceptive and rewarding orchids. However, due to the difficulty to raise orchids from seeds, few studies of inbreeding depression are available, and most are focused on very early life stages, such as seed mass or embryo viability. Here, we present the results from an experimental investigation of inbreeding depression in the deceptive flower-colour dimorphic Dactylorhiza sambucina, from in vitro cultivation to greenhouse soil transplantation. We found strong inbreeding depression at all recorded stages (i.e., germination and survival), with estimates ranging from 0.47 to 0.75. Our study finally proposes a simple and suitable experimental protocol to raise orchids from seeds with high germination rates.

  11. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of nature identical and artificial synthetic food additives of aroma and flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, R D M; Sales, I M S; Silva, S I O; Sousa, J M C; Peron, A P

    2016-07-25

    This study aimed to analyze the antiproliferative and genotoxic potential of synthetic food flavorings, nature identical passion fruit and artificial vanilla. This assessment used root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., in exposure times of 24 and 48 hours and using doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL. Roots were fixed in Carnoy's solution, hydrolyzed in hydrochloric acid, stained with acetic orcein and analyzed with optical microscope at 400× magnification, 5,000 cells for each treatment. For data analysis, it was used Chi-square test at 5%. Doses of 0.2 mL at ET 48 h; 0.4 and 0.6 mL at ET 24 and 48 h of passion fruit flavor, and the three doses of the vanilla flavor at ET 24 and 48 h significantly reduced the cell division rate in the meristems of roots, proving to be cytotoxic. Doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL of the passion fruit additive, and the three doses of vanilla tested, in the two exposure times, induced mitotic spindle changes and micronuclei formation in the cells of the test organism used, proving to be genotoxic. Therefore, under the studied conditions, flavoring solutions of vanilla and passion fruit, marketed nationally and internationally, significantly altered the functioning of the cell cycle in root meristem cells of A. cepa. PMID:27463833

  12. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen–consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power. PMID:26052427

  13. Inadequate awareness among chronic kidney disease patients regarding food and drinks containing artificially added phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Shutto

    Full Text Available Hyperphosphatemia is an important determinant of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Patients with CKD are advised to consume a low phosphate diet and are often prescribed phosphate-lowering drug therapy. However, commercially processed food and drinks often contain phosphate compounds, but the phosphate level is not usually provided in the ingredient list, which makes it difficult for CKD patients to choose a correct diet. We conducted a survey of the awareness of food/beverages containing artificially added phosphate among CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. The subjects were 153 patients (77 males and 76 females; average age 56±11 years who were randomly selected from the Dialysis Center of Hirosaki City, Japan. The subjects were provided with a list of questions. The survey results showed that 93% of the subjects were aware of the presence of high sugar content in soda, whereas only 25% were aware of the presence of phosphate (phosphoric acid in such drinks. Despite 78% of the subjects being aware of the detrimental effects of consumption of a high phosphate diet, 43% drank at least 1 to 5 cans of soda per week and about 17% consumed "fast food" once each week. We also assessed the immediate effects of high-phosphate containing carbonated soda consumption by determining urinary calcium, phosphate, protein and sugar contents in overnight fasted healthy volunteers (n = 55; average age 20.7±0.3 years old, 20 males and 35 females. Significantly higher urinary calcium (adjusted using urinary creatinine excretion was found 2 h after consuming 350 ml of carbonated soda compared to the fasting baseline level (0.15±0.01 vs. 0.09±0.01, p = 0.001. Our survey results suggest that CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis are not adequately aware of the hidden source of phosphate in their diet, and emphasize the need for educational initiatives to raise awareness of this issue among CKD patients.

  14. Influence of drying method on the colour of dried pears.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrilha, Fátima; Guiné, Raquel; Lima, Maria João; Ferreira, Dulcienia

    2010-01-01

    Colour is considered a fundamental property of foods, since it has been widely demonstrated that it correlates well with other physical, chemical and sensorial indicators of product quality [1]. In fact, colour plays a major role in the assessment of external quality in food industries and food engineering research. The measure of the standard colour of fruits and vegetables can be done by a wide range of colour spaces. However, the L*a*b* system is suggested as the best colour space for quan...

  15. Lifespan psychomotor behaviour profiles of multigenerational prenatal stress and artificial food dye effects in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T Erickson

    Full Text Available The consumption of artificial food dye (AFD during childhood and adolescence has been linked to behavioural changes, such as hyperactivity. It is possible that the vulnerability to AFDs is modified by prenatal stress. Common consequences of prenatal stress include hyperactivity, thus potentially leading to synergistic actions with AFDs. Here, we investigated the compounding effect of multigenerational prenatal stress (MPS and AFD consumption on the development of hyperactivity and anxiety-related behaviours across the lifespan in male rats. MPS treatment involved a family history of four consecutive generations of prenatal stress (F4 generation. AFD treatment included a 4%-concentration of FD&C Red 40, FD&C Yellow 5, FD&C Yellow 6, and FD&C Blue 1 in the drinking water from postnatal days 22 to 50 to resemble juvenile and adolescent dietary exposure. Using several exploration tasks, animals were tested in motor activity and anxiety-like behaviours from adolescence to 13 months of age. MPS resulted in hyperactivity both early (50 days and later in life (13 months, with normalized activity patterns at reproductive age. AFD consumption resulted in hyperactivity during consumption, which subsided following termination of treatment. Notably, both MPS and AFD promoted risk-taking behaviour in young adults (3 months. There were few synergistic effects between MPS and AFD in this study. The findings suggest that AFDs exert the most noticeable effects at the time of exposure. MPS, however, results in a characteristic lifespan profile of behavioural changes, indicating that development and aging represent particularly vulnerable periods in life during which a family history of prenatal stress may precipitate.

  16. Colour Guided Colour Image Steganography

    CERN Document Server

    Amirtharajan, R; Swarup, Motamarri Abhilash; K, Mohamed Ashfaaq; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2010-01-01

    Information security has become a cause of concern because of the electronic eavesdropping. Capacity, robustness and invisibility are important parameters in information hiding and are quite difficult to achieve in a single algorithm. This paper proposes a novel steganography technique for digital color image which achieves the purported targets. The professed methodology employs a complete random scheme for pixel selection and embedding of data. Of the three colour channels (Red, Green, Blue) in a given colour image, the least two significant bits of any one of the channels of the color image is used to channelize the embedding capacity of the remaining two channels. We have devised three approaches to achieve various levels of our desired targets. In the first approach, Red is the default guide but it results in localization of MSE in the remaining two channels, which makes it slightly vulnerable. In the second approach, user gets the liberty to select the guiding channel (Red, Green or Blue) to guide the r...

  17. A comprehensive study of the presence of some food additives in non-alcoholic beverages in Republic of Macedonia from the period 2008- 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Kostik, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavour or enhance its taste and appearance. The most abundant additives used in production of refreshing-non alcoholic beverages (soft drinks) are: potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate caffeine, some artificial food colourings, artificial sweeteners etc. Different medical studies have shown that the usage of additives have various impact on human’s health. In the current study, the presence of: preservatives (potassium sorbate and sodium ...

  18. The role of fruit colour in avian fruit selection: an objective approach

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Veronika

    2002-01-01

    To explain the prevalence of red and black fruits in fruit colour patterns, the following hypotheses were addressed, using reflectance spectra of fruits as colour assessment: 1. Birds prefer red and black fruits, or these hues are cues for food recognition in migrants or fledglings. 2. Fruit colours correlate with chemical compounds. 3. Fruit colours serve as advertisement for ripe fruits. Reflectance spectra are the most objective colour assessment currently possible. Birds show no colour pr...

  19. Synaesthesia and colour constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Holly; Mattingley, Jason B; Arnold, Derek H

    2013-04-01

    Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by the perception of colours when reading achromatic text. We investigated the level of colour processing responsible for these experiences. To do so, we tapped a central characteristic of colour perception. In different lighting conditions the same wavelength of light can prompt the perception of different colours. This helps humans recognize distinctive coloured objects despite changes in illumination. We wanted to see if synaesthetic colours were generated at a neural locus that was susceptible to colour constancy analyses. We used colour matching and naming tasks to examine interactions between simulated coloured illuminants and synaesthetic colours. Neither synaesthetic colour matching or naming was impacted. This contrasted with non-synaesthetic control participants, who performed the colour-matching task with graphemes physically coloured to mimic synaesthesia. Our data suggest that synaesthetic colour signals are not generated at lower-levels of colour processing, but are introduced at higher levels of analysis and are therefore not impacted by the processes responsible for perceptual constancy. PMID:22487049

  20. Can colour be measured?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.

    Colour is a sensation. While wavelength can be measured with a spectrometer consisting of dispersive elements and colour insensitive detectors, detection of colour is accomplished by the eye, equipped with a lens, colour sensitive detectors, and a powerful processor in the form of brain. Sometimes...

  1. Colour constancy of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Arikawa, Kentaro; 充代, 木下

    2000-01-01

    We have recently shown that the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus uses colour vision when searching for food. In the field, these butterflies feed on nectar provided by flowers of various colours not only in direct sunlight but also in shaded places and on cloudy days, suggesting that they have colour constancy. Here, we tested this hypothesis. We trained newly emerged Papilio xuthus to feed on sucrose solution on a paper patch of a certain colour under white illumination. ...

  2. Mouth colour is a reliable signal of need in begging canary nestlings

    OpenAIRE

    R., initials Kilner

    1997-01-01

    Begging passerine chicks display brightly coloured mouths as they solicit food from their parents. Despite a range of hypotheses, the function of vivid nestling mouth colour remains unknown. Here I report that mouth colour functions as a signal of need in canary nestlings, in the days immediately following hatching. Changes in mouth colour accurately reflect a nestling's state of need: the more food deprived the chick, the more intensely coloured its mouth. In controlled experiments with two ...

  3. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Logvinenko

    Full Text Available Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object.

  4. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object. PMID:26356217

  5. Re-evaluation of azo dyes as food additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratt, Iona; Larsen, John Christian; Mortensen, Alicja;

    2013-01-01

    additives to be assessed by the Scientific Committee on Food, many years ago, (ii) because of concern regarding possible health effects of artificial colours arising since the original evaluations.Concerns includedbehavioural effects in children, allergic reactions, genotoxicity and possible carcinogenicity......Aryl azo compounds are widely used as colorants (azo dyes) in a wide range of products including textiles, leather, paper, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and food.As part of its systematic re-evaluation of food additives, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has carried out new risk assessments...... of allazo dyes permitted in food. EFSA has also evaluated a number of azo dyes found illegally in food in recent years, including Sudan dyes, Para Red and Orange II. The re-evaluation of all food colours, including the azo dyes,was considered high priority (i) because colorants were among the first...

  6. Recolouring-resistant colourings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Rautenbach, D.

    2011-01-01

    We study colourings of graphs with the property that the number of used colours cannot be reduced by applying some recolouring operation. A well-studied example of such colourings are b-colourings, which were introduced by Irving and Manlove [R.W. Irving, D.F. Manlove, The la-chromatic number...... of a graph, Discrete Appl. Math. 91 (1999) 127-141]. Given a graph and a colouring, a recolouring operation specifies a set of vertices of the graph on which the colouring can be changed. We consider two such operations: One which allows the recolouring of all vertices within some given distance of some...

  7. Effects of memory colour on colour constancy for unknown coloured objects

    OpenAIRE

    Granzier, Jeroen J. M.; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.

    2012-01-01

    The perception of an object's colour remains constant despite large variations in the chromaticity of the illumination—colour constancy. Hering suggested that memory colours, the typical colours of objects, could help in estimating the illuminant's colour and therefore be an important factor in establishing colour constancy. Here we test whether the presence of objects with diagnostical colours (fruits, vegetables, etc) within a scene influence colour constancy for unknown coloured objects in...

  8. Artificial food lump from porous neoprene and the method of its use for the evaluation of adaptation patients to the dental constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, A.; Urakov, A.; Kasatkin, A.; Soiher, M. G.; Kopylov, M.

    2016-04-01

    New dental product called artificial food lump is offered for dental practices. In its size and shape it is similar to the natural food bolus, which is formed in adult's mouth when chewing white bread. This innovative product resembles an inedible and non-swallowable chewing gum. Artificial lump is made of porous neoprene; it is elastic and has food flavor. It is not destroyed by chewing and has stable elasticity during chewing. Besides, artificial lump is manufactured in a way that it can be attached to the patient's clothes with a braid line. New medical device is intended to create the masticatory loading in patients' mouth in order to evaluate the quality of mounted dental restorations as well as patient's adaptation to it during the chewing process.

  9. Study on influences of 8 food additives on capsanthin colour%八种食品添加剂对辣椒红色素颜色影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉宝

    2012-01-01

    The research was aimed to study the chicken gravy with capsanthin, adding antioxygen additives such as BHA, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and so on, and condiment such as sodium glutamate, sugar and so on, so as to investigate the influences of these additives on the colour change of capsanthin in gravy and explore the food additives which can prevent capsanthin from fading in meat products. Influences of various additives on capsanthin colour were studied through single-factor experiment. The results show that BHA and Vitamin C play remarkable roles in extending the colour preserving period of capsanthin in gravy. And adding Vitamin E, potassium sorbate, sodium diacetate at various times, the effect of colour preserving is different.%以加有辣椒红色素的鸡肉汁为研究对象,添加BHA、维生素C、维生素E、山梨酸钾、双乙酸钠等抗氧化剂以及谷氨酸钠、砂糖等调味剂,考察这几种添加剂对内汁中辣椒红色素颜色变化利影响,以探寻出可防止肉制品中辣椒红色素褪色的食品添加荆。通过单因素试验研究各种添加剂对辣椒红色素颜色的影响。结果表明:BHA和维生素C在延长肉汁中辣椒红色素的保色期方面有极显著效果;在不同保存期间添加维生素E、山梨酸钾、双乙酸钠,护色效果不同。

  10. Rethinking Colour Constancy

    OpenAIRE

    Logvinenko, Alexander D.; Brian Funt; Hamidreza Mirzaei; Rumi Tokunaga

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colou...

  11. Immediate colour constancy

    OpenAIRE

    Foster DH, Craven BJ, Sale ERH

    1992-01-01

    Colour constancy is traditionally interpreted as the stable appearance of the colour of a surface despite changes in the spectral composition of the illumination. When colour constancy has been assessed quantitatively, however, by observers making matches between surfaces illuminated by different sources, its completeness has been found to be poor. An alternative operational approach to colour constancy may be taken which concentrates instead on detecting the underlying chromatic relationship...

  12. Separation and simultaneous determination of four artificial sweeteners in food and beverages by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Yingying; Ye, Mingli; James, Frits S

    2005-08-26

    In this paper, the separation and determination of four artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K and sodium saccharin) by ion chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detector is reported. The four artificial sweeteners were separated using KOH eluent generator. Due to the use of eluent generator, very low conductance background conductivity can be obtained and sensitivity of sweeteners has been greatly improved. Under the experimental condition, several inorganic anions, such as F-, Cl-, NO3-, NO2-, Br-, SO4(2)-, PO4(3)- and some organic acid such as formate, acetate, benzoate, and citrate did not interfere with the determination. With this method, good linear relationship, sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained. Detection limits of aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin were 0.87, 0.032, 0.019, 0.045 mg/L, respectively. Rate of recovery were between 98.23 and 105.42%, 99.48 and 103.57%, 97.96 and 103.23%, 98.46 and 102.40%, respectively. The method has successfully applied to the determination of the four sweeteners in drinks and preserved fruits. PMID:16106861

  13. Practical colour management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan

    2006-06-01

    Spectrophotometers have been successfully used for colour measurement. This paper addresses digital imaging as a complementary and alternative method of colour measurement and appearance and an effective communication tool as part of a practical colour management programme within the supply chain of a textile retailer. The specific needs—to measure and communicate textured dyed material and printed fabric—are discussed, as well as the colour specification and quality control (QC) of currently un-measurable fabrics and accessories. A unique method of using digital imaging for the assessment of colour fastness will also be discussed.

  14. Red trap colour of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, G.; RICE S.p.; Millett, J.

    2014-01-01

    The traps of many carnivorous plants are red in colour. This has been widely hypothesized to serve a prey attraction function; colour has also been hypothesized to function as camouflage, preventing prey avoidance. We tested these two hypotheses in situ for the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia. We conducted three separate studies: (i) prey attraction to artificial traps to isolate the influence of colour; (ii) prey attraction to artificial traps on artificial backgrounds to control the ...

  15. Artificial trans fat in popular foods in 2012 and in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To minimise the intake of industrially produced trans fat (I-TF) and thereby decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to monitor the change...... if the products contained more than 15 g of total fat per 100 g of product and if partially hydrogenated oil or a similar term was disclosed at the beginning of the ingredients list. These same supermarkets were revisited in 2014 and the same collection procedure was followed. All foods were subsequently analysed...... for total fat and trans fat in the same laboratory. RESULTS: The number of packages bought in the six countries taken together was 266 in 2012 and 643 in 2014. Some were identical, and therefore only 226 were analysed in 2012 and 434 in 2014. Packages with less than 2% of fat from I-TF went up from 69...

  16. Colour constancy in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittka, Lars; Faruq, Samia; Skorupski, Peter; Werner, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Colour constancy is the perceptual phenomenon that the colour of an object appears largely unchanged, even if the spectral composition of the illuminating light changes. Colour constancy has been found in all insect species so far tested. Especially the pollinating insects offer a remarkable opportunity to study the ecological significance of colour constancy since they spend much of their adult lives identifying and choosing between colour targets (flowers) under continuously changing ambient lighting conditions. In bees, whose colour vision is best studied among the insects, the compensation provided by colour constancy is only partial and its efficiency depends on the area of colour space. There is no evidence for complete 'discounting' of the illuminant in bees, and the spectral composition of the light can itself be used as adaptive information. In patchy illumination, bees adjust their spatial foraging to minimise transitions between variously illuminated zones. Modelling allows the quantification of the adaptive benefits of various colour constancy mechanisms in the economy of nature. We also discuss the neural mechanisms and cognitive operations that might underpin colour constancy in insects. PMID:24647930

  17. Colour harmony of two colour combinations in clothes matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Sungging Haryo; Fu, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Liang-Ya; Hou, Chien-Yu; Ou, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    There are many definitions and theories about colour harmony. But no consistent rules and definitions can be determined. Some previous researches show that there are many factors that influence the colour harmony. Colour harmony is highly depends on the external factors, including the context of colour besides their colour combinations. In the current research an experiment conducted by observing two colour combinations which applied in shirt and trousers. Twenty observers involved in the experiment, consist of ten male and ten female. Each observer predict colour harmony score in 58 samples of shirt and trouser pairs, the colour combination then applied upside down. Based on the experimental results, male and female group has similar tendency in colour harmony score prediction in the same colour samples (correlation coefficient, r=0.84). Upside down colour combinations will change the impression of observer about colour harmony and yields a different value of colour harmony prediction score which indicated from correlation coefficient results of 0.53.

  18. Topographical coloured plasmonic coins

    CERN Document Server

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal nanostructures for colourization has attracted a great deal of interest with the recent developments in plasmonics. However, the current top-down colourization methods based on plasmonic concepts are tedious and time consuming, and thus unviable for large-scale industrial applications. Here we show a bottom-up approach where, upon picosecond laser exposure, a full colour palette independent of viewing angle can be created on noble metals. We show that colours are related to a single laser processing parameter, the total accumulated fluence, which makes this process suitable for high throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of the laser irradiated surfaces reveal various distributions of nanoparticle sizes which control colour. Quantitative comparisons between experiments and large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations, demonstrate that colours are produced by selective absorption phenomena in heterogeneous nanoclusters. Plasmonic cluster resonances are thus fo...

  19. Four issues concerning colour constancy and relational colour constancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, DH; Nascimento, SMC; Craven, BJ; Linnell, KJ; Cornelissen, FW; Brenner, E

    1997-01-01

    Four issues concerning colour constance and relational colour constancy are briefly considered: (I) the equivalence of colour constancy and relational colour constancy; (2) the dependence of relational colour constancy on ratios of cone excitations due to light from different reflecting surfaces, an

  20. Colour Texture analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Paul F.; Ghita, O.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents a novel and generic framework for image segmentation using a compound image descriptor that encompasses both colour and texture information in an adaptive fashion. The developed image segmentation method extracts the texture information using low-level image descriptors (such as the Local Binary Patterns (LBP)) and colour information by using colour space partitioning. The main advantage of this approach is the analysis of the textured images at a micro-level using the l...

  1. Robert Grosseteste's colours

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Here I am proposing a translation and discussion of the De Colore, one of the short scientific treatises written by Robert Grosseteste. In this very short treatise of the mid-1220s, Grosseteste continued the discussion on light and colours he started in the De Iride. He describes two manners of counting colours: one gives an infinity of tones, the other counts seven colours. In both cases, colours are created by the purity or impurity of the transparent medium when light is passing through it. This medieval framework survived until Newton's experiments with prisms.

  2. Colourful FKS subtraction

    CERN Document Server

    Frixione, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    I formulate in a colour-friendly way the FKS method for the computation of QCD cross sections at the next-to-leading order accuracy. This is achieved through the definition of subtraction terms for squared matrix elements, constructed with single colour-dressed or pairs of colour-ordered amplitudes. The latter approach relies on the use of colour flows, is exact to all orders in $N$, and is thus particularly suited to being organized as a systematic expansion in 1/N.

  3. There's more to taste in a coloured bowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrar, Vanessa; Piqueras-Fiszman, Betina; Spence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The flavour and pleasantness of food and drinks are affected by their colour, their texture or crunch, and even by the shape and weight of the plate or glass. But, can the colour of the bowl also affect the taste of the food it contains? To answer this question we served popcorn in four different coloured bowls, and participants rated sweetness, saltiness, and overall liking. The sweet popcorn, in addition to being sweet, was perceived as saltier when eaten out of a coloured (as compared to a white) bowl, and vice versa for the salty popcorn. These results demonstrate that colour in bowl design can be used to elicit perceptions of sweetness and saltiness in real foods.

  4. Colour matters: colour evaluation of textile and clothing

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Tetsuya; Kitaguchi, Saori; Kajiwara, Kanji; Koo, Kang; Kim, Samsoo; Park, Soonjee; Valldeperas Morell, José; Lis Arias, Manuel José; Xin, John; Hansuebsai, Aran; Nobbs, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The colours of textiles and clothing induce our emotions. The emotions induced from the colour are made in our brains. The colour emotions affect our interests and actions. It is very difficult to know why the colour emotions affect them. However, it is important to know how the colour emotions affect them, because we can know what textile products should be produced. As related on this matter, some numerical expression of the colour impressions has been tried. This paper was summarized the n...

  5. Colour: code, mode, modality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2014-01-01

    This article uses a social semiotic approach to discuss the influence of film, video and digital technologies on the way colour is used in audiovisual media......This article uses a social semiotic approach to discuss the influence of film, video and digital technologies on the way colour is used in audiovisual media...

  6. Graph Colouring Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to graph colouring algorithms. The focus is on vertex-colouring algorithms that work for general classes of graphs with worst-case performance guarantees in a sequential model of computation. The presentation aims to demonstrate the breadth of available...... techniques and is organized by algorithmic paradigm....

  7. The colours of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Would you move into an office painted in a colour you hate? As we all know, taste in colour is individual. Thanks to the establishment of a new Painting Charter, conflicting opinions will be unified.   The four new paint colours established in the Painting Charter. There were many reasons behind the creation of the Painting Charter by the GS SEM Department. Unlike many companies, CERN has not until now regulated which colours can be used inside buildings. With many nationalities passing through CERN, tastes tend to differ: northern countries usually prefer colder colours, while southern countries seem to prefer warm colours. It’s not hard to imagine how quickly we could make a rainbow! In addition, whenever an office needs to be repainted, it can be difficult to find exactly the same colour. This results in entire walls being repainted, which increases the cost. If – by chance – the original colour is found, it could be out of stock. While ...

  8. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue ...

  9. Simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners, preservatives, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in food and pharmaceutical preparations by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q C; Wang, J

    2001-12-01

    A novel ion chromatographic method was proposed for the simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners (sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K), preservatives (benzoic acid, sorbic acid), caffeine, theobromine and theophylline. The separation was performed on an anion-exchange analytical column operated at 40 degrees C within 45 min by an isocratic elution with 5 mM aqueous NaH2PO4 (pH 8.20) solution containing 4% (v/v) acetonitrile as eluent, and the determination by wavelength-switching ultraviolet absorbance detection. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio 3:1) for all analytes were below the sub-microg/ml level. Under the experimental conditions, several organic acids, including citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid and ascorbic acid, did not interfere with the determination. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of various food and pharmaceutical preparations, and the average recoveries for real samples ranged from 85 to 104%. The levels of all analytes determined by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by the high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure. The results also indicated that ion chromatography would be possibly a beneficial alternative to conventional high-performance liquid chromatography for the separation and determination of these compounds.

  10. Simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners, preservatives, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in food and pharmaceutical preparations by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q C; Wang, J

    2001-12-01

    A novel ion chromatographic method was proposed for the simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners (sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K), preservatives (benzoic acid, sorbic acid), caffeine, theobromine and theophylline. The separation was performed on an anion-exchange analytical column operated at 40 degrees C within 45 min by an isocratic elution with 5 mM aqueous NaH2PO4 (pH 8.20) solution containing 4% (v/v) acetonitrile as eluent, and the determination by wavelength-switching ultraviolet absorbance detection. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio 3:1) for all analytes were below the sub-microg/ml level. Under the experimental conditions, several organic acids, including citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid and ascorbic acid, did not interfere with the determination. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of various food and pharmaceutical preparations, and the average recoveries for real samples ranged from 85 to 104%. The levels of all analytes determined by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by the high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure. The results also indicated that ion chromatography would be possibly a beneficial alternative to conventional high-performance liquid chromatography for the separation and determination of these compounds. PMID:11765085

  11. Colours and their technical interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    KRIŠTÓF, David

    2008-01-01

    My bachelor work is focussed on an outline of colour perception both in man, and in information technology. The whole paper deals with colour management including an instruction how to ensure the truest colour reproduction between input and output device.

  12. Computational colour science using MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Westland, Stephen; Cheung, Vien

    2012-01-01

    Computational Colour Science Using MATLAB 2nd Edition offers a practical, problem-based approach to colour physics. The book focuses on the key issues encountered in modern colour engineering, including efficient representation of colour information, Fourier analysis of reflectance spectra and advanced colorimetric computation. Emphasis is placed on the practical applications rather than the techniques themselves, with material structured around key topics. These topics include colour calibration of visual displays, computer recipe prediction and models for colour-appearance prediction. Each t

  13. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians.

  14. Red trap colour of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, G; Rice, S P; Millett, J

    2014-01-01

    The traps of many carnivorous plants are red in colour. This has been widely hypothesized to serve a prey attraction function; colour has also been hypothesized to function as camouflage, preventing prey avoidance. We tested these two hypotheses in situ for the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia. We conducted three separate studies: (i) prey attraction to artificial traps to isolate the influence of colour; (ii) prey attraction to artificial traps on artificial backgrounds to control the degree of contrast and (iii) observation of prey capture by D. rotundifolia to determine the effects of colour on prey capture. Prey were not attracted to green traps and were deterred from red traps. There was no evidence that camouflaged traps caught more prey. For D. rotundifolia, there was a relationship between trap colour and prey capture. However, trap colour may be confounded with other leaf traits. Thus, we conclude that for D. rotundifolia, red trap colour does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function. PMID:24740904

  15. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  16. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil;

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  17. Colour Appearance Modelling for Self-luminous Colours

    OpenAIRE

    Withouck, Martijn; Ryckaert, Wouter; Smet, Kevin; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    An experimental setup and procedure for the evaluation of self- luminous colours viewed against both dark and luminous backgrounds is presented. Physical and visual data of self-luminous colours is gathered in order to develop a Colour Appearance Model for self-luminous colours under different viewing conditions. This model is needed for the evaluation of light sources.

  18. Operation of a two-stage continuous fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from artificial food wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Kohki; Mizuno, Shiho; Umeda, Yoshito; Sakka, Makiko [Toho Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Osaka, Noriko [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Sakka, Kazuo [Mie Univ. (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    An anaerobic two-stage continuous fermentation process with combined thermophilic hydrogenogenic and methanogenic stages (two-stage fermentation process) was applied to artificial food wastes on a laboratory scale. In this report, organic loading rate (OLR) conditions for hydrogen fermentation were optimized before operating the two-stage fermentation process. The OLR was set at 11.2, 24.3, 35.2, 45.6, 56.1, and 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with a temperature of 60 C, pH5.5 and 5.0% total solids. As a result, approximately 1.8-2.0 mol-H{sub 2} mol-hexose{sup -1} was obtained at the OLR of 11.2-56.1 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}. In contrast, it was inferred that the hydrogen yield at the OLR of 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} decreased because of an increase in lactate concentration in the culture medium. The performance of the two-stage fermentation process was also evaluated over three months. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of methane fermentation was able to be shortened 5.0 days (under OLR 12.4 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} conditions) when the OLR of hydrogen fermentation was 44.0 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the average gasification efficiency of the two-stage fermentation process was 81% at the time. (orig.)

  19. The relativity of Colour

    CERN Document Server

    Stack, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    By attaching three anticommuting Lorentz scalar (colour) property coordinates to space-time, with an appropriate extended metric, we unify gravity with chromodynamics: gauge transformations then just correspond to coordinate transformations in the enlarged spacetime-property space.

  20. Shape from shading, colour constancy, and deutan colour vision deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Torbjörn

    1996-01-01

    Four studies including ten experiments adresses interrelations between some major and classical issues in visual perception: 3-D perception, colour constancy, colour perception and colour vision deficiencies. The main experimental paradigm to investigate the issues is within that of simulated shape from shading. 3-D impressions are induced by projecting space-modulated illuminations onto flat surfaces (displays), varying the colours and layout of the displays and the colour and modulation of ...

  1. Colour Rendering Index and colour rendering of LEDs

    OpenAIRE

    Dangol, Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand CIE (Commission Internationale del Eclairage) Colour Rendering Index (CRI) and its deficiencies. Another aim was to find out limitation of CIE CRI for LEDs. Finally, current works on colour rendering of LEDs was examined in the study. CIE (Commission Internationale del Eclairage) Colour Rendering Index (CRI) is the only internationally recognized colour rendering metric. This metric expresses the colour rendering properties of light sources bas...

  2. Eat by Colour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Heber; 谢琼

    2004-01-01

    <正> COLOUR is the key to good nutrition. Yet what colour is an increasing number of people’s diet? Beige.As a physician who has studied nutrition and cancer prevention for more than 20 years, I believe that bland diets actually account for the most common diseases, including heart disease, cancer and what I call diabesity-a booming epidemic of obesity and diabetes.

  3. Colour correction for panoramic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Gui Yun; Gledhill, Duke; Taylor, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the problem of colour distortion in panoramic imaging. Particularly when image mosaicing is used for panoramic imaging, the images are captured under different lighting conditions and viewpoints. The paper analyses several linear approaches for their colour transform and mapping. A new approach of colour histogram based colour correction is provided, which is robust to image capturing conditions such as viewpoints and scaling. The procedure for the colour correction is intr...

  4. Neural correlates of colour categories

    OpenAIRE

    Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Davidoff, Jules B.

    2007-01-01

    This study used an electrophysiological marker of visual detection to investigate adults' processing of colour difference. Event-related potentials were collected from the identical colour (green: G0) presented as the frequent or infrequent stimulus within different colour contexts. Critically, we compared differences within the same colour category (G0 vs. green: G1) to differences between colour categories (G0 vs. blue and G0 vs. red). All differences showed a change-related positivity with...

  5. Measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides in food samples and water for human consumption in Austria for the calculation of the ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new report on food habits of the Austrian population in the year 2006/2007 was released in 2008. Mixed diets and foodstuffs are measured within a monitoring program according to the Austrian radiation protection law, food law, and the Commission Recommendation 2000/473/Euratom on the application of Article 36 of the Euratom Treaty concerning the monitoring of the levels of radioactivity in the environment for the purpose of assessing the exposure of the population as a whole. In addition, drinking and mineral water samples are measured for natural and artificial radionuclides. The ingestion dose for the Austrian population is recalculated based on the results of these measurements, literature data, and the data of the new report on food habits. In general, the major part of the ingestion dose is caused by natural radionuclides, especially 40K. (author)

  6. Background complexity affects colour preference in bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Jessica; Thomson, James D.

    2009-08-01

    Flowers adapted for hummingbird pollination are typically red. This correlation is usually explained by the assertion that nectar- or pollen-stealing bees are “blind” to red flowers. However, laboratory studies have shown that bees are capable of locating artificial red flowers and often show no innate preference for blue over red. We hypothesised that these findings might be artefacts of the simplified laboratory environment. Using bumblebees ( Bombus impatiens) that had been trained to visit red and blue artificial flowers, we tested whether colour preference was influenced by complexity of the background on which they were foraging. Many bees were indifferent to flower colour when tested using a uniform green background like those commonly used in laboratory studies, but all bees showed strong colour preferences (usually for blue) when flowers were presented against a photograph of real foliage. Overall, preference for blue flowers was significantly greater on the more realistic, complex background. These results support the notion that the red of “hummingbird syndrome” flowers can function to reduce bee visits despite the ability of bees to detect red and highlight the need to consider context when drawing inferences about pollinator preferences from laboratory data.

  7. Activity patterns during food provisioning are affected by artificial light in free living great tits (Parus major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Titulaer

    Full Text Available Artificial light may have severe ecological consequences but there is limited experimental work to assess these consequences. We carried out an experimental study on a wild population of great tits (Parus major to assess the impact of light pollution on daily activity patterns during the chick provisioning period. Pairs that were provided with a small light outside their nest box did not alter the onset, cessation or duration of their working day. There was however a clear effect of artificial light on the feeding rate in the second half of the nestling period: when provided with artificial light females increased their feeding rate when the nestlings were between 9 and 16 days old. Artificial light is hypothesised to have affected the perceived photoperiod of either the parents or the offspring which in turn led to increased parental care. This may have negative fitness consequences for the parents, and light pollution may thus create an ecological trap for breeding birds.

  8. Food safety concerns of fast food consumers in urban Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Rose; Frempong, Godfred

    2016-03-01

    In Ghana, out-of-home ready-to-eat foods including fast food generally have been associated with food safety problems. Notwithstanding, fast food production and consumption are increasing in Ghana and therefore this study sought to determine the food safety issues of importance to consumers and the extent to which they worry about them. First, through three focus group discussions on consumers' personal opinions about food safety issues, some emergent themes were obtained, which were used to construct an open-ended questionnaire administered face-to-face to 425 respondents systematically sampled from 20 fast food restaurants in Accra. Findings showed that most fast food consumers were concerned about food hazards such as pesticide residue in vegetables, excessive use of artificial flavour enhancers and colouring substances, bacterial contamination, migrated harmful substances from plastic packages, and general unhygienic conditions under which food is prepared and sold. Consumers also raised concerns about foodborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid, food poisoning, diarrhoea, bird flu and swine flu. The logistic regression model showed that being male increased the likelihood of worrying about general food safety issues and excessive use of flavour enhancers than in females while being youthful increased the likelihood of being worried about typhoid fever than in older consumers. These findings imply that consumers in urban Ghana are aware and concerned about current trends of food safety and foodborne disease challenges in the country. Therefore, efforts targeted at improving food safety and reducing incidences of foodborne diseases should not only focus on public awareness creation but should also design more comprehensive programmes to ensure the making of food safety rules and guidelines and enforcing compliance to facilitate availability and consumers' choice of safe foods. PMID:26686975

  9. Food safety concerns of fast food consumers in urban Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Rose; Frempong, Godfred

    2016-03-01

    In Ghana, out-of-home ready-to-eat foods including fast food generally have been associated with food safety problems. Notwithstanding, fast food production and consumption are increasing in Ghana and therefore this study sought to determine the food safety issues of importance to consumers and the extent to which they worry about them. First, through three focus group discussions on consumers' personal opinions about food safety issues, some emergent themes were obtained, which were used to construct an open-ended questionnaire administered face-to-face to 425 respondents systematically sampled from 20 fast food restaurants in Accra. Findings showed that most fast food consumers were concerned about food hazards such as pesticide residue in vegetables, excessive use of artificial flavour enhancers and colouring substances, bacterial contamination, migrated harmful substances from plastic packages, and general unhygienic conditions under which food is prepared and sold. Consumers also raised concerns about foodborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid, food poisoning, diarrhoea, bird flu and swine flu. The logistic regression model showed that being male increased the likelihood of worrying about general food safety issues and excessive use of flavour enhancers than in females while being youthful increased the likelihood of being worried about typhoid fever than in older consumers. These findings imply that consumers in urban Ghana are aware and concerned about current trends of food safety and foodborne disease challenges in the country. Therefore, efforts targeted at improving food safety and reducing incidences of foodborne diseases should not only focus on public awareness creation but should also design more comprehensive programmes to ensure the making of food safety rules and guidelines and enforcing compliance to facilitate availability and consumers' choice of safe foods.

  10. Colour in flux: describing and printing colour in art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2008-01-01

    This presentation will describe artists, practitioners and scientists, who were interested in developing a deeper psychological, emotional and practical understanding of the human visual system who were working with wavelength, paint and other materials. From a selection of prints at The Prints and Drawings Department at Tate London, the presentation will refer to artists who were motivated by issues relating to how colour pigment was mixed and printed, to interrogate and explain colour perception and colour science, and in art, how artists have used colour to challenge the viewer and how a viewer might describe their experience of colour. The title Colour in Flux refers, not only to the perceptual effect of the juxtaposition of one colour pigment with another, but also to the changes and challenges for the print industry. In the light of screenprinted examples from the 60s and 70s, the presentation will discuss 21 st century ideas on colour and how these notions have informed the Centre for Fine Print Research's (CFPR) practical research in colour printing. The latter part of this presentation will discuss the implications for the need to change methods in mixing inks that moves away from existing colour spaces, from non intuitive colour mixing to bespoke ink sets, colour mixing approaches and colour mixing methods that are not reliant on RGB or CMYK.

  11. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    Coloured Petri nets (CP-nets) can be used for several fundamentally different purposes like functional analysis, performance analysis, and visualisation. To be able to use the corresponding tool extensions and libraries it is sometimes necessary to include extra auxiliary information in the CP......-net. An example of such auxiliary information is a counter which is associated with a token to be able to do performance analysis. Modifying colour sets and arc inscriptions in a CP-net to support a specific use may lead to creation of several slightly different CP-nets – only to support the different...... uses of the same basic CP-net. One solution to this problem is that the auxiliary information is not integrated into colour sets and arc inscriptions of a CP-net, but is kept separately. This makes it easy to disable this auxiliary information if a CP-net is to be used for another purpose. This paper...

  12. Accurate Colour Reproduction in Prepress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Borbély

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment of colour to achieve an acceptable match between the displayed(soft copy and printed (hard copy document is an important task in prepress. In order toachieve such match colour management systems are used, these systems implementstandards established by the International Colour Consortium (ICC.A key step of the colour management process is the calibration of display and outputdevices, the definition of the relationship between the native colour space of the device anda standard device-independent colour space. In this work the usability of the ICC colourmanagement standard was investigated in case of flat panel LCD display calibration.

  13. The Colour of Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Lavelle, Martin; McMullan, David

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that colour can only be defined on gauge invariant states. Since the ability to associate colour with constituent quarks is an integral part of the constituent quark model, this means that, if we want to extract constituent quarks from QCD, we need to dress Lagrangian quarks with gluons so that the result is gauge invariant. We further prove that gauge fixings can be used to construct such dressings. Gauge invariant dressed quark states are presented and a direct approach to the i...

  14. Novel colour constancy algorithms for digital colour imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lilong

    2009-01-01

    Colour constancy algorithms differ in their derivation, implementation, performance and assumptions. The focus of the research presented in this thesis is to discover colour constancy solutions to recover surface colours, or equivalently, to estimate the illumination, of single light source in a given scene. Several colour constancy models will be proposed. These methods have different methodologies and constraints. For example, a method can be constrained on a particular model surface materi...

  15. Fun with Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum: Science for Year 5 includes "recognising that the colour of an object depends on the properties of the object and the color of the light source". This article shows how much more can be done with color in the science laboratory. Activities include using a prism to explore white light, using a hand lens to…

  16. Colour, vision and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Cristina; da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project - Visual Communication and Inclusive Design-Colour, Legibility and Aged Vision, developed at the Faculty of Architecture of Lisbon. The research has the aim of determining specific design principles to be applied to visual communication design (printed) objects, in order to be easily read and perceived by all. This study target group was composed by a selection of socially active individuals, between 55 and 80 years, and we used cultural events posters as objects of study and observation. The main objective is to overlap the study of areas such as colour, vision, older people's colour vision, ergonomics, chromatic contrasts, typography and legibility. In the end we will produce a manual with guidelines and information to apply scientific knowledge into the communication design projectual practice. Within the normal aging process, visual functions gradually decline; the quality of vision worsens, colour vision and contrast sensitivity are also affected. As people's needs change along with age, design should help people and communities, and improve life quality in the present. Applying principles of visually accessible design and ergonomics, the printed design objects, (or interior spaces, urban environments, products, signage and all kinds of visually information) will be effective, easier on everyone's eyes not only for visually impaired people but also for all of us as we age.

  17. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  18. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1987-01-01

    The author describes a Petri net model, called coloured Petri nets (CP-nets), by means of which it is possible to describe large systems without having to cope with unnecessary details. The author introduces CP-nets and provide a first impression of their modeling power and the suitability...

  19. Coloured Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. This book introduces the constructs of the CPN modelling language and presents the related analysis methods. It provides a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN.

  20. Colour Reconnection at LEPII

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P

    2001-01-01

    The preliminary results on the search of colour reconnection effects (CR) from the four experiments at LEP, Aleph, Delphi, L3 and Opal, are reviewed. Extreme models are excluded by studies of standard variables, and on going studies of a method first suggested by L3, the particle flow method, are yet inconclusive.

  1. Legal and Illegal Colours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian

    2008-01-01

    Food additives are evaluated by the European Food Safety Authority's (EFSA) Scientific Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (the AFC Panel). The AFC Panel is supported by its standing working group on food additives (WG ADD), which prepares draf...

  2. Minimalist surface-colour matching

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Kinjiro; Foster, David H.; Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.

    2005-01-01

    Some theories of surface-colour perception assume that observers estimate the illuminant on a scene so that its effects can be discounted. A critical test of this interpretation of colour constancy is whether surface-colour matching is worse when the number of surfaces in a scene is so small that any illuminant estimate is unreliable. In the experiment reported here, observers made asymmetric colour matches between pairs of simultaneously presented Mondrian-like patterns under different dayli...

  3. Marine Communities of North Sea Offshore Platforms, and the Use of Stable Isotopes to Explore Artificial Reef Food Webs

    OpenAIRE

    Guerin, Andrew James

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope methods offer a powerful means of investigating trophic interactions, allowing assessment of the relative importance of multiple nutrient sources to biological assemblages, as well as estimation of the trophic positions of consumers. Differences in the isotope ratios of consumers between habitats can thus indicate differences in the structures of food webs, or the contributions of different food sources to those food webs. Isotope methods were used to compare ...

  4. Hedgehogs are not colour blind

    OpenAIRE

    Conlon, David; Fox, Jacob; Rödl, Vojtěch

    2015-01-01

    We exhibit a family of $3$-uniform hypergraphs with the property that their $2$-colour Ramsey numbers grow polynomially in the number of vertices, while their $4$-colour Ramsey numbers grow exponentially. This is the first example of a class of hypergraphs whose Ramsey numbers show a strong dependence on the number of colours.

  5. Colour displays for categorical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasbey, C.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Toh, V.F.K.; Gray, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method for identifying a set of colours for displaying 2D and 3D categorical images when the categories are unordered labels. The principle is to find maximally distinct sets of colours. We either generate colours sequentially, to maximize the dissimilarity or distance between a new col

  6. A generic framework for colour texture segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Nammalwar, Padmapriya

    2004-01-01

    This thesis proposes a novel method to combine the colour and the texture for colour texture segmentation. The objective of this research work is to derive a framework for colour texture segmentation and to determine the contribution of colour in colour texture analysis. The colour texture processing is based on the feature extraction from colour-textured images. The texture features were obtained from the luminance plane along with the colour features from the chrominance planes. Based on th...

  7. Light and colours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Often a dichotomy between daylight and artificial light is observed, often artificial lighting replaces daylight. In Denmark daylight is characterized partly by being "borrowed" half of the year, partly by having long transitions periods between the light and the dark (nautical and civil twilight......). For these reasons artificial lighting does not complement daylight but provides, coupled with the daylight, the total lighting in the indoor environment. Electric lighting is therefore ‐ in a complex interaction with the daylight ‐ of great importance for both our lighting and our wellbeing. Studying artificial...... lighting without studying daylight seem to be a common procedure of the practice of today in Denmark and other parts of the industrialized world. As a consequence of this artificial lighting suffers from a quantifying tyranny, a tyranny where the quality of light is measured in quantities. This procedure...

  8. Colour vision in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Justin; Carleton, Karen L; Cronin, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Colour vision in the marine environment is on average simpler than in terrestrial environments with simple or no colour vision through monochromacy or dichromacy. Monochromacy is found in marine mammals and elasmobranchs, including whales and sharks, but not some rays. Conversely, there is also a greater diversity of colour vision in the ocean than on land, examples being the polyspectral stomatopods and the many colour vision solutions found among reef fish. Recent advances in sequencing reveal more opsin (visual pigment) types than functionally useful at any one time. This diversity arises through opsin duplication and conversion. Such mechanisms allow pick-and-mix adaptation that tunes colour vision on a variety of very short non-evolutionary timescales. At least some of the diversity in marine colour vision is best explained as unconventional colour vision or as neutral drift. PMID:25725325

  9. Colour, form in music

    OpenAIRE

    Trobec, Neža

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of expert literature the following B.A. thesis presents various aspects of the relation between the musical and visual language. In the theoretical part I discussed colours and sound, as well as how they influence our sensory perception. I analysed light values, presented music as an inspiration for creativity in the field of fine arts, explored the relations between these two fields of expression, looked at synesthesia and, as a curiosity, described the bouba/kiki effect. ...

  10. Colouring the Sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Godsil, C. D.; Zaks, J.

    2012-01-01

    Let $G$ be the graph with the points of the unit sphere in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ as its vertices, by defining two unit vectors to be adjacent if they are orthogonal as vectors. We present a proof, based on work of Hales and Straus chromatic number of this graph is four. We also prove that the subgraph of G induced by the unit vectors with rational coordinates is 3-colourable.

  11. New model for colour kinetics of plum under infrared vacuum condition and microwave drying

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Amiri Chayjan; Behnam Alaei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quality of dried foods is affected by the drying method and physiochemical changes in tissue. The drying method affects properties such as colour. The colour of processed food is one of the most impor- tant quality indices and plays a determinant role in consumer acceptability of food materials and the process- ing method. The colour of food materials can be used as an indirect factor to determine changes in quality, since it is simpler and faster than chemical methods...

  12. Daylight Influence on Colour Design : Empirical Study on Perceived Colour and Colour Experience Indoors

    OpenAIRE

    Hårleman, Maud

    2007-01-01

    It is known that one and the same interior colouring will appear different in rooms with windows facing north or facing south, but it is not known how natural daylight from these two compass points affects perceived colour and the ways in which colour is experienced. The objective is to describe the perceived colours to be expected in rooms with sunlight and diffused light, and thus develop a tool for colour design. Two empirical investigations provide the basis for six attached papers. The m...

  13. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d') and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object's stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain. PMID:27023274

  14. Colour Reproduction on Tablet Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zorić

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of Internet and mobile devices client services and other print production are migrating more and more to online platforms. In a recent technology changeover it is obvious that there is growing number of printers as well need from the customers for the print service providers to expand their business to online and mobile platforms. With this technological transition there are some open questions regarding the possibilities of using the tablet devices for colour soft proofing and other colour related operations. As a display devices on a hardware level there are large similarities with the desktop display devices but the operating systems which are driving them are not yet colour smart. There have been some initial attempts to characterize the colour reproduction on this type of devices and find a possibility of using them not just for information content but also for colour managed content. In this study we have tested several tablets (Apple iPad2,Asus Transformer TF101, Samsung Galaxy Tab 1 with different display and OS technology and tested a software which is intended for colour managed viewing of the reproduction. We have measured the colour reproduction of the tablets with the digital version of the GretagMacbeth ColorChecker card and have calculated the colour differences between the colour chart data and the displayed data. We have calibrated the Ipad2 with the only existing colour management tool the Spyder Gallery and we have also tested the chart display with and without the colour correction of the software. We have found that there are differences in the colour reproduction of the display technologies and that the possibilities of a real colour managed workflow has yet to be resolved on the OS level of tablet and mobile devices

  15. Colour detection thresholds in faces and colour patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Wei; Stephen, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Human facial skin colour reflects individuals' underlying health (Stephen et al 2011 Evolution & Human Behavior 32 216-227); and enhanced facial skin CIELab b* (yellowness), a* (redness), and L* (lightness) are perceived as healthy (also Stephen et al 2009a International Journal of Primatology 30 845-857). Here, we examine Malaysian Chinese participants' detection thresholds for CIELab L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) colour changes in Asian, African, and Caucasian faces and skin coloured patches. Twelve face photos and three skin coloured patches were transformed to produce four pairs of images of each individual face and colour patch with different amounts of red, yellow, or lightness, from very subtle (deltaE = 1.2) to quite large differences (deltaE = 9.6). Participants were asked to decide which of sequentially displayed, paired same-face images or colour patches were lighter, redder, or yellower. Changes in facial redness, followed by changes in yellowness, were more easily discriminated than changes in luminance. However, visual sensitivity was not greater for redness and yellowness in nonface stimuli, suggesting red facial skin colour special salience. Participants were also significantly better at recognizing colour differences in own-race (Asian) and Caucasian faces than in African faces, suggesting the existence of cross-race effect in discriminating facial colours. Humans' colour vision may have been selected for skin colour signalling (Changizi et al 2006 Biology Letters 2 217-221), enabling individuals to perceive subtle changes in skin colour, reflecting health and emotional status. PMID:24344549

  16. The use of a PCR-generated invA probe for the detection of Salmonella spp. in artificially and naturally contaminated foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülte, M; Jakob, P

    1995-08-01

    Part of the invasion A gene (invA) of slamonellae (Rahn et al., 1992) was amplified and labelled simultaneously with digoxigenin by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This was used as gene probe for a colony hybridization assay which included nitrocellulose filter incubation on modified Rambach agar. 312 Salmonella and 268 non-Salmonella strains were hybridized with the invA probe. No false-negative or false-positive results were obtained. In 11 beef samples, which had been contaminated artificially with Salmonella, the test strain was recovered quantitatively with the invA probe. Salmonellae could be detected in 29 samples of 104 further foods of animal origin by means of the gene probe assay in contrast to 27 samples which were positive by the standard method. The invA probe assay allows for the quantitative estimation of Salmonella in fresh meat samples within 48 h. However, with frozen samples a pre-enrichment step is necessary.

  17. Bees' subtle colour preferences: how bees respond to small changes in pigment concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiorek, Sarah; Rohde, Katja; Lunau, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    Variability in flower colour of animal-pollinated plants is common and caused, inter alia, by inter-individual differences in pigment concentrations. If and how pollinators, especially bees, respond to these small differences in pigment concentration is not known, but it is likely that flower colour variability impacts the choice behaviour of all flower visitors that exhibit innate and learned colour preferences. In behavioural experiments, we simulated varying pigment concentrations and studied its impact on the colour choices of bumblebees and honeybees. Individual bees were trained to artificial flowers having a specific concentration of a pigment, i.e. Acridine Orange or Aniline Blue, and then given the simultaneous choice between three test colours including the training colour, one colour of lower and one colour of higher pigment concentration. For each pigment, two set-ups were provided, covering the range of low to middle and the range of middle to high pigment concentrations. Despite the small bee-subjective perceptual contrasts between the tested stimuli and regardless of training towards medium concentrations, bees preferred neither the training stimuli nor the stimuli offering the highest pigment concentration but more often chose those stimuli offering the highest spectral purity and the highest chromatic contrast against the background. Overall, this study suggests that bees choose an intermediate pigment concentration due to its optimal conspicuousness. It is concluded that the spontaneous preferences of bees for flower colours of high spectral purity might exert selective pressure on the evolution of floral colours and of flower pigmentation.

  18. The Metric of Colour Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The space of colours is a fascinating space. It is a real vector space, but no matter what inner product you put on the space the resulting Euclidean distance does not correspond to human perception of difference between colours. In 1942 MacAdam performed the first experiments on colour matching...... and found the MacAdam ellipses which are often interpreted as defining the metric tensor at their centres. An important question is whether it is possible to define colour coordinates such that the Euclidean distance in these coordinates correspond to human perception. Using cubic splines to represent...... the colour coordinates and an optimisation approach we find new colour coordinates that make the MacAdam ellipses closer to uniform circles than the existing standards....

  19. English Colour Terms in Context

    OpenAIRE

    Steinvall, Anders

    2002-01-01

    This thesis examines usage of English colour terms in context, based on an extensive computerised text corpus, the Bank of English. It describes the ways in which English colour terms may be used to refer to nuances outside their normal area of designation and to attributes outside the colour domain. Usage patterns are analysed on three different levels: with regard to the overall frequency of occurrences, nominal domains and individual tokens, respectively. Cognitive linguistics supplies the...

  20. Theory of colours

    CERN Document Server

    Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von

    2006-01-01

    The wavelength theory of light and color had been firmly established by the time the great German poet published his Theory of Colours in 1810. Nevertheless, Goethe believed that the theory derived from a fundamental error, in which an incidental result was mistaken for a elemental principle. Far from affecting a knowledge of physics, he maintained that such a background would inhibit understanding. The conclusions Goethe draws here rest entirely upon his personal observations.This volume does not have to be studied to be appreciated. The author's subjective theory of colors permits him to spe

  1. Registered Designation of Origin Areas of Fermented Food Products Defined by Microbial Phenotypes and Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, M. F. S.; Pereira, C. I.; Rodrigues, F. M. S.; Martins, M. P.; Mimoso, M. C.; Barros, T. C.; Figueiredo Marques, J. J.; Tenreiro, R. P.; Almeida, J. S.; Barreto Crespo, M. T.

    1999-01-01

    Cheese produced from raw ewes’ milk and chouriço, a Portuguese dry fermented sausage, are still produced in a traditional way in certain regions of Portugal by relying on colonization by microbial populations associated with the raw materials, equipment, and local environments. For the purpose of describing the product origins and types of these fermented foods, metabolic phenotypes can be used as descriptors of the product as well as to determine the presence of compounds with organoleptic v...

  2. Children preferences of coloured fresh cheese prepared during an educational laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Tesini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Choices among young consumers are mainly driven by food preferences; in particular, a connection between appearance and acceptance of food has been highlighted, together with a general lack of knowledge of food processing. For these reasons, educational activities are important to increase scientific knowledge and awareness. The cheese-making educational laboratory described herein involved children, adolescents, and their parents/teachers in the preparation of fresh and naturally-coloured cheeses. At the end of the activity, both the colour preference and possible relation between preference and colour of cheese prepared were investigated administering a short questionnaire.

  3. An experimental design approach employing artificial neural networks for the determination of potential endocrine disruptors in food using matrix solid-phase dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boti, Vasiliki I; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2009-02-27

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) as a sample preparation method for the determination of two potential endocrine disruptors, linuron and diuron and their common metabolites, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU), 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea (DCPU) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) in food commodities has been developed. The influence of the main factors on the extraction process yield was thoroughly evaluated. For that purpose, a 3 fractional factorial design in further combination with artificial neural networks (ANNs) was employed. The optimal networks found were afterwards used to identify the optimum region corresponding to the highest average recovery displaying at the same time the lowest standard deviation for all analytes. Under final optimal conditions, potato samples (0.5 g) were mixed and dispersed on the same amount of Florisil. The blend was transferred on a polypropylene cartridge and analytes were eluted using 10 ml of methanol. The extract was concentrated to 50 microl of acetonitrile/water (50:50) and injected in a high performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV-diode array detector system (HPLC/UV-DAD). Recoveries ranging from 55 to 96% and quantification limits between 5.3 and 15.2 ng/g were achieved. The method was also applied to other selected food commodities such as apple, carrot, cereals/wheat flour and orange juice demonstrating very good overall performance.

  4. Supervised Object Class Colour Normalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riabchenko, Ekatarina; Lankinen, Jukka; Buch, Anders Glent;

    2013-01-01

    Colour is an important cue in many applications of computer vision and image processing, but robust usage often requires estimation of the unknown illuminant colour. Usually, to obtain images invariant to the illumination conditions under which they were taken, color normalisation is used...

  5. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  6. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  7. Skin Colour Analysis of Iraqi Kurdish Population

    OpenAIRE

    Zardawi, Faraedon M; Xiao, Kaida; Yates, Julian M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Skin colour measurement and analysis was performed for Iraqi Kurdish population in sulaimani city. The purpose of this study was to produce a dedicated skin shade guide for precise colour reproduction and colour matching of maxillofacial prostheses with the patient’s original skin colour. Methodology: A skin colour measurement was undertaken for 140 subjects (73 female and 67 male). A method of capturing their (L* a* b*) colour values from nine body parts was pe...

  8. Chromagen lenses and abnormal colour perception

    OpenAIRE

    O. Matthew Oriowo; Abdullah Z. Alotaibi

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Chromagen lens system comprises of tinted spectacle or contact lenses, each with a specific colour wavelength filter which controls the spectra of the light entering the eye. This study investigated whether spectacle-mounted Chromagen lenses would enhance colour perception in individuals with abnormal colour vision.Methods: The Ishihara colour test was used to test for colour vision deficiency (CVD) and also to evaluate the effect of the Chromagen spectacle lens on colour perc...

  9. An automatic colour-based computer vision algorithm for tracking the position of piglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Jover, J. M.; Alcaniz-Raya, M.; Gomez, V.; Balasch, S.; Moreno, J. R.; Grau-Colomer, V.; Torres, A.

    2009-07-01

    Artificial vision is a powerful observation tool for research in the field of livestock production. So, based on the search and recognition of colour spots in images, a digital image processing system which permits the detection of the position of piglets in a farrowing pen, was developed. To this end, 24,000 images were captured over five takes (days), with a five-second interval between every other image. The nine piglets in a litter were marked on their backs and sides with different coloured spray paints each one, placed at a considerable distance on the RGB space. The programme requires the user to introduce the colour patterns to be found, and the output is an ASCII file with the positions (column X, lineY) for each of these marks within the image analysed. This information may be extremely useful for further applications in the study of animal behaviour and welfare parameters (huddling, activity, suckling, etc.). The software programme initially segments the image in the RGB colour space to separate the colour marks from the rest of the image, and then recognises the colour patterns, using another colour space [B/(R+G+B), (G-R), (B-G)] more suitable for this purpose. This additional colour space was obtained testing different colour combinations derived from R, G and B. The statistical evaluation of the programmes performance revealed an overall 72.5% in piglet detection, 89.1% of this total being correctly detected. (Author) 33 refs.

  10. Multi-coloured stereograms unveil two binocular colour mechanisms in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelens, Casper J; van Ee, Raymond

    2002-04-01

    Two different colours, one presented to one eye and the other presented to the other eye, often create the impression of a third colour. This percept is known as binocular colour mixture. Here we use coloured stereograms to study binocular colour appearance. Vivid pastel colours are induced in monocular, achromatic patches, if these are placed in stereograms whose left and right images differ in colour. The build-up of the colours is slow and takes tens of seconds or even minutes in certain individuals. The induced colours remain visible during monocular viewing of the patch and decay gradually. The same colours are induced irrespective of whether the patches are placed in fusible or rivalrous stereograms. We show that these colour effects cannot be induced by monocular colour mechanisms, either alone or in combination with binocular colour mixing. We suggest that the colours are induced by a binocular feedback mechanism, which reduces colour differences between the colour appearances of two monocular images. Induced colours are not observed if the achromatic patches are binocular. However, induced colours are apparent if one switches to monocular viewing after prolonged binocular viewing of the binocular patches. This aftereffect suggests that binocular colour induction acts on the monocular representations of binocular images. We suggest that during binocular viewing the fast process of binocular colour mixing masks the changes in colour appearance produced by the much slower process of binocular colour induction.

  11. Carotenoid-based nestling colouration and parental favouritism in the great tit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirren, Barbara; Fitze, Patrick S; Richner, Heinz

    2005-04-01

    While elaborate carotenoid-based traits in adult birds may have evolved as honest signals of individual quality in the context of sexual selection or other social interactions, the function of carotenoid-based colours in juveniles is less well understood. We investigated the hypothesis that carotenoid-based nestling colouration has evolved in response to parental preference of intensely coloured offspring during food provisioning. In a field experiment, we manipulated nestling plumage colouration by a carotenoid-supplementation and analysed the parental food provisioning behaviour before feather appearance and at the end of the nestling stage. Carotenoids per se did not influence the nestling's begging behaviour or parental feeding decisions and we found no evidence that carotenoid-based colouration in nestling great tits has a signalling function in parent-offspring interactions. Parents did not discriminate between intensely coloured and control offspring in their food provisioning and in accordance with this finding intensely coloured nestlings were not heavier or larger at the end of the nestling stage. Alternative explanations for the evolution of carotenoid-based colours in nestling birds are discussed. PMID:15678330

  12. Producing colour pictures from SCAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code SCAN.TSK has been written for use on the Interdata 7/32 minicomputer which will convert the pictures produced by the SCAN program into colour pictures on a colour graphics VDU. These colour pictures are a more powerful aid to detecting errors in the MONK input data than the normal lineprinter pictures. This report is intended as a user manual for using the program on the Interdata 7/32, and describes the method used to produce the pictures and gives examples of JCL, input data and of the pictures that can be produced. (U.K.)

  13. Colour reconnection in WW events

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hondt, J

    2003-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for a measurement of the kappa parameter used in the JETSET SK-I model of colour reconnection in W /sup +/W/sup -/ to qq'qq' events at LEP2. An update on the investigation of colour reconnection effects in hadronic decays of W pairs, using the particle flow in DELPHI is presented. A second method is based on the observation that two different m/sub W/ estimators have different sensitivity to the parametrised colour reconnection effect. Hence the difference between them is an observable with information content about kappa. (6 refs).

  14. The importance of colour models for teaching about colour in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Lesar, Urša

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we explored the importance that colour models have for teaching colour systematics in primary school. In the theoretical part history and theoretical nature of colour models are explored. We analyzed which colour models clearly illustrate significant colour problems such as colour mixing, contrasts, harmony and colour chords and dimensions, and in particular, how these problematics are illustrated. Based on the analysis of the curriculum and textbooks for art education in Slove...

  15. Colour anomia resulting from weakened short-term colour memory. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, J B; Ostergaard, A L

    1984-06-01

    A patient exhibited marked colour anomia without object anomia, but was able to point to named colours. Five experiments were conducted to investigate his immediate colour memory. It was concluded that his colour anomia was the result of an impaired short-term memory deficit specific to colour. Temporary activation of specific entries in the colour lexicon enabled pointing and even naming to take place. A general model incorporating all forms of colour anomia is presented.

  16. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  17. What Colour Is a Shadow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    What colour is a shadow? Black, grey, or some other colour? This article describes how to use a digital camera to test the hypothesis that a shadow under a clear blue sky has a blue tint. A white sheet of A4 paper was photographed in full sunlight and in shadow under a clear blue sky. The images were analysed using a shareware program called…

  18. Dynamic colour of chromogenic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Klanjšek Gunde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Chromogenic materials change colour due to some stimulus. They are increasingly applied in the so-called smart applications where the change of colour is used. Two examples of such applications are presented, electrochromic windows and thermochromic printing inks. Active component in many switchable smart windows is a thin layer of electrochromic material. Most frequently WO3 is applied, which changes reversibly from colourless to deep blue state, when a constant current is provided in one or...

  19. A new universal colour image fidelity metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Lucassen, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    We extend a recently introduced universal grayscale image quality index to a newly developed perceptually decorrelated colour space. The resulting colour image fidelity metric quantifies the distortion of a processed colour image relative to its original version. We evaluated the new colour image fi

  20. Colour Day: an innovative project

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    This year, the Children’s Day-Care Centre (EVE) and School works on the theme of colours. Every class has their own project revolving around this common theme. The class of Claire, Sandrine and Nadia, introduced a monthly “Colour Day”. The objective of this day is to offer children different activities (arts and crafts, baking, etc.) designed around a specific colour. The children get a chance to decorate their classroom and learn in many different ways inspired by the colours blue, red, and many others. The parents are also called to contribute and invited to dress their children in the colour of the day. In September, we discovered the colour blue, in October it was time for red, and in mid-November yellow will brighten up our structure. Everyone plays along, making this a very festive day for us all. On Tuesday, 20 September, we saw the whole School turn blue! We were all dressed in blue and we made blue paintings, too! We made beautiful artwork inspired by artists like Ma...

  1. An operational approach to colour constancy

    OpenAIRE

    Craven, BJ; Foster, DH

    1992-01-01

    Colour constancy is traditionally defined as the invariance of perceived surface colours under changes in the spectral composition of the illuminant. Existing quantitative studies show that, by this definition, human subjects show poor colour constancy. A different and complementary aspect of colour constancy is considered which is concerned with the ability of a subject to attribute correctly changes in the colour appearance of a scene either to changes in reflecting properties of the surfac...

  2. Separating illumination from reflectance in colour imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Weihua

    2007-01-01

    Since more people choose the convenience of colour imaging over traditional grayscale imaging, colour is a very important and useful feature in the computer vision community. However, the changing colour of the object may lead to some problems if the illuminant colour changes, since any colour imaging device’s response to light from imaged scenes depends on three factors: the nature of the illumination incident on the objects, the underlying physical property of the objects, and the sensor se...

  3. Influence of colour in working environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrovšek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Anton Trstenjak wrote: »Our life is practically sinking in the sea of light and colours.« Different colours create different psycho-physiological responses. That is why colours have various impacts on human experiences and arrangements of our attention. When we know how control the colours in our environment, we can influence human psychological and physiological well-being and attention in the space. In my thesis, I explore how colours affect our feelings, our body and attention. Knowing all...

  4. Artificial Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as ...

  5. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  6. Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lone Brinkmann; Vasilaras, Tatjana H; Astrup, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of appetite studies in free-living subjects supplying the habitual diet with either sucrose or artificially sweetened beverages and foods. Furthermore, the focus of artificial sweeteners has only been on the energy intake (EI) side of the energy-balance equation. The data are from...

  7. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  8. Colour, Luminance and Crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BJ Jennings

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were performed to assess the effect backgrounds have on object discrimination. Experiment 1 investigated the discrimination of foveally presented Gaborised objects and non-objects with and without a surrounding background. Thresholds were obtained by modulating the Gabor patches in 7 different directions, either isolating the L-M, S-(L+M and L+M geniculate mechanisms, or stimulating these mechanisms in combination. The spacing between background Gabor elements and the object contour was chosen so as to not cause crowding, on the basis of previously published work with luminance stimuli. No differences were found between the Michelson contrasts required for threshold with or without a background, except when signals in the S-(L+M and L+M were combined. The signals were combined at an elevation of 30° in DKL colour space, which resulted in a mixture with a proportionally strong chromatic signal. Experiment 2 investigated this finding further using three background conditions: no background, a sparse background and a densely populated background. Object vs. non-object discrimination thresholds were obtained for the L+M and S-(L+M isolating directions, along with two conditions that combined them at DKL luminance elevations of 30° and 60°. In the 60° combination, the proportion of the chromatic signal was lower than in the 30° combination. Thresholds were found to be largely stable across chromatic and luminance conditions and background class, again with the exception of the combination at 30° elevation. The final experiment examined Gabor orientation discrimination over the same conditions as experiment 2 using a classical crowding paradigm, with a peripheral target and a set of three target-flanker separations. Crowding was most pronounced in the 30° combination. We conclude that when S-(L+M signals above a certain level are combined with luminance signals, an increase in crowding results. This is likely to underlie the

  9. Exposure estimate for FD&C colour additives for the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Diana L; Folmer, Daniel E; Lee, Hyoung S; Butts, Kyla M; Carberry, Susan E

    2016-05-01

    Dietary exposures to the seven food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colour additives that are approved for general use in food in the United States were estimated for the US population (aged 2 years and older), children (aged 2-5 years) and teenage boys (aged 13-18 years) based on analytical levels of the FD&C colour additives in foods. Approximately 600 foods were chosen for analysis, based on a survey of product labels, for the levels of FD&C colour additives. Dietary exposure was estimated using both 2-day food consumption data from the combined 2007-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and 10-14-day food consumption data from the 2007-10 NPD Group, Inc. National Eating Trends - Nutrient Intake Database (NPD NET-NID). Dietary exposure was estimated at the mean and 90th percentile using three different exposure scenarios: low exposure, average exposure and high exposure, to account for the range in the amount of each FD&C colour additive for a given food. For all populations and all exposure scenarios, the highest cumulative eaters-only exposures in food were determined for FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5 and FD&C Yellow No. 6. In addition, the eaters-only exposure was estimated for individual food categories in order to determine which food categories contributed the most to the exposure for each FD&C colour additive. Breakfast Cereal, Juice Drinks, Soft Drinks, and Frozen Dairy Desserts/Sherbet (also referred to as Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, Sherbet (including Bars, Sticks, Sandwiches)) were the major contributing food categories to exposure for multiple FD&C colour additives for all three populations. PMID:27092991

  10. Meio- and Macrofaunal Communities in Artificial Water-Filled Tree Holes: Effects of Seasonality, Physical and Chemical Parameters, and Availability of Food Resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Ptatscheck

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the dynamics of meiofaunal and macrofaunal communities in artificial water-filled tree holes. The abundances and, for the first time, biomasses and secondary production rates of these communities were examined. The experimental set-up consisted of 300 brown plastic cups placed in temperate mixed forests and sampled five times over a period of 16 months to determine the impact of (i seasonal events, (ii physicochemical parameters, and (iii food resources on the tree hole metazoans.Metazoan organisms, especially the meiofauna (rotifers and nematodes occupied nearly all of the cups (> 99% throughout the year. Between 55% and 99% of the metazoan community was represented by rotifers (max. 557,000 individuals 100 cm-2 and nematodes (max. 58,000 individuals 100 cm-2. Diptera taxa, particularly Dasyhelea sp. (max. 256 individuals 100 cm-2 dominated the macrofaunal community. Macrofauna accounted for the majority of the metazoan biomass, with a mean dry weight of 5,800 μg 100 cm-2 and an annual production rate of 20,400 μg C 100 cm-2, whereas for meiofauna mean biomass and annual production were 100 μg 100 cm-2 and 5,300 μg C 100 cm-2, respectively. The macrofaunal taxa tended to show more fluctuating population dynamic while the meiofaunal dynamic was rather low with partly asynchronous development. Seasonality (average temperature and rain intervals had a significant impact on both meiofauna and macrofauna. Furthermore, bottom-up control (chlorophyll-a and organic carbon, mainly attributable to algae, was a significant factor that shaped the metazoan communities. In contrast, physicochemical water parameters had no evident influence. 23.7% of organism density distribution was explained by redundancy analysis (RDA indicating a high dynamic and asynchrony of the systems.

  11. Colour Symbols in Mari Songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Glukhova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a system of colour symbols in Mari folk songs based on the results of a multifold investigation. The research was carried out with the help of a complex technique applied to 2100 songs from different song collections. Mari colour symbols have never before been the object of research. The process of investigation included several steps. The most important of these was the semantic analysis that helped to discern 2000 mentions of four main spectre colours as well as white, black, silver, and golden. Quantitative data evaluation singled out a dominant group by a dichotomous method, applying the principle of simple majority employed in mathematical statistics. The same technique divided the other colour symbols into complementary, auxiliary, and insignificant groups. The results of an investigation into ethnic symbology are also shown graphically. The main reconstructed meanings of colour in the analysed songs denote such emotions as joy, wonder, astonishment, grief, melancholy, some aesthetic ideals, ethical vices, as well as people’s character and appearance.

  12. Contrast normalization in colour vision: the effect of luminance contrast on colour contrast detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Kathy T.; Kim, Yeon Jin; Gheiratmand, Mina

    2014-01-01

    While contrast normalization is well known to occur in luminance vision between overlaid achromatic contrasts, and in colour vision between overlaid colour contrasts, it is unknown whether it transfers between colour and luminance contrast. Here we investigate whether contrast detection in colour vision can be normalized by achromatic contrast, or whether this is a selective process driven only by colour contrast. We use a method of cross-orientation masking, in which colour detection is mask...

  13. 神经网络法在食品安全预警中的应用%Application of artificial neural networks in food safety pre-warning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金剑; 齐思源; 彭亚拉

    2011-01-01

    神经网络法是一种反应快、成本低并且能解决非线性复杂问题的处理方法,在食品安全预警中有着重要的作用。综述了国内外神经网络法在食品安全预警风险评估、信息源系统和预警分析系统构建中的应用情况,具体介绍了神经网络法在环境危害评估、生物化学危害评估、粮食安全风险评估,以及微生物污染、食品添加剂、食品有毒有害物质、假冒伪劣产品信息源检测中的应用进展状况。%Artificial neural networks as a method of quick response, low cost and solving complicated nonlinear problem that plays an important role in the food safety pre-warning system. This paper reviews the artificial neural networks in the food safety pre-warning system construction of risk assessment, information source and warning analysis. Also, it specifically introduces the application progress status of artificial neural networks on environmental hazards assessment, biological chemical hazards assessment, food security risk assessment, and microbial pollution, food additives, food poisonous and harmful substances, fake products information source inspection.

  14. The colour of an avifauna: A quantitative analysis of the colour of Australian birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Animal coloration is a poorly-understood aspect of phenotypic variability. Here I expand initial studies of the colour gamut of birds by providing the first quantitative description of the colour variation of an entire avifauna: Australian landbirds (555 species). The colour of Australian birds occupies a small fraction (19%) of the entire possible colour space and colour variation is extremely uneven. Most colours are unsaturated, concentrated in the centre of colour space and based on the deposition of melanins. Other mechanisms of colour production are less common but account for larger portions of colour space and for most saturated colours. Male colours occupy 45-25% more colour space than female colours, indicating that sexual dichromatism translates into a broader range of male colours. Male-exclusive colours are often saturated, at the edge of chromatic space, and have most likely evolved for signalling. While most clades of birds occupy expected or lower-than-expected colour volumes, parrots and cockatoos (Order Psittaciformes) occupy a much larger volume than expected. This uneven distribution of colour variation across mechanisms of colour production, sexes and clades is probably shared by avifaunas in other parts of the world, but this remains to be tested with comparable data. PMID:26679370

  15. Edge colouring by total labellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Rautenbach, D.; Stiebitz, M.;

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of an edge-colouring total k-labelling. This is a labelling of the vertices and the edges of a graph G with labels 1, 2, ..., k such that the weights of the edges define a proper edge colouring of G. Here the weight of an edge is the sum of its label and the labels of its...... two endvertices. We define χ (G) to be the smallest integer k for which G has an edge-colouring total k-labelling. This parameter has natural upper and lower bounds in terms of the maximum degree Δ of G : ⌈ (Δ + 1) / 2 ⌉ ≤ χ (G) ≤ Δ + 1. We improve the upper bound by 1 for every graph and prove χ (G...

  16. The colours of HII galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Telles, E; Telles, Eduardo; Terlevich, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution CCD surface photometry study in the optical V, R and I filters of 15 HII galaxies from the Nordic Optical Telescope and the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope at Canary Islands. The colours of the starburst continuum and of the underlying galaxy are measured. The distribution of colours of the underlying galaxy in HII galaxies is similar to the colours of other late type low surface brightness galaxies which suggests a close kinship of these with the quiescent phases of HII galaxies. However, comparison with recent evolutionary population synthesis models show that the observational errors and the uncertainties in the models are still too large to put strict constraints on their past star formation history.

  17. New model for colour kinetics of plum under infrared vacuum condition and microwave drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Amiri Chayjan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Quality of dried foods is affected by the drying method and physiochemical changes in tissue. The drying method affects properties such as colour. The colour of processed food is one of the most impor- tant quality indices and plays a determinant role in consumer acceptability of food materials and the process- ing method. The colour of food materials can be used as an indirect factor to determine changes in quality, since it is simpler and faster than chemical methods. Material and methods. The study focused on the kinetics of colour changes of plum slices, under infrared vacuum and microwave conditions. Drying the samples was implemented at the absolute pressures of 20 and 60 kPa, drying temperatures of 50 and 60°C and microwave power of 90, 270, 450 and 630 W. Colour changes were quantified by the tri-stimulus L* (whiteness/darkness, a* (redness/greenness and b* (yellow- ness/blueness model, which is an international standard for color measurement developed by the Commis- sion Internationale d’Eclairage (CIE. These values were also used to calculate total colour change (∆E, chroma, hue angle, and browning index (BI. A new model was used for mathematical modelling of colour change kinetics. Results. The drying process changed the colour parameters of L*, a*, and b*, causing a colour shift toward the darker region. The values of L* and hue angle decreased, whereas the values of a*, b*, ∆E, chroma and browning index increased during exposure to infrared vacuum conditions and microwave drying. Comparing the results obtained using the new model with two conventional models of zero-order and first-order kinet- ics indicated that the new model presented more compatibility with the data of colour kinetics for all colour parameters and drying conditions. Conclusion. All kinetic changes in colour parameters can be explained by the new model presented in this study. The hybrid drying system included infrared vacuum conditions and

  18. Estimating varying illuminant colours in images

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Stuart Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Colour Constancy is the ability to perceive colours independently of varying illumi-nation colour. A human could tell that a white t-shirt was indeed white, even under the presence of blue or red illumination. These illuminant colours would actually make the reflectance colour of the t-shirt bluish or reddish. Humans can, to a good extent, see colours constantly. Getting a computer to achieve the same goal, with a high level of accuracy has proven problematic. Particularly if we wanted to ...

  19. A chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin with interactive colour changing controlled by tactile sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Nguyen, Amanda; Chortos, Alex; To, John W.F.; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Bae, Won-Gyu; Tok, Jeffrey B.-H.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    Some animals, such as the chameleon and cephalopod, have the remarkable capability to change their skin colour. This unique characteristic has long inspired scientists to develop materials and devices to mimic such a function. However, it requires the complex integration of stretchability, colour-changing and tactile sensing. Here we show an all-solution processed chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin (e-skin), in which the e-skin colour can easily be controlled through varying the applied pressure along with the applied pressure duration. As such, the e-skin's colour change can also be in turn utilized to distinguish the pressure applied. The integration of the stretchable, highly tunable resistive pressure sensor and the fully stretchable organic electrochromic device enables the demonstration of a stretchable electrochromically active e-skin with tactile-sensing control. This system will have wide range applications such as interactive wearable devices, artificial prosthetics and smart robots. PMID:26300307

  20. A chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin with interactive colour changing controlled by tactile sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Nguyen, Amanda; Chortos, Alex; To, John W. F.; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Bae, Won-Gyu; Tok, Jeffrey B.-H.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-01

    Some animals, such as the chameleon and cephalopod, have the remarkable capability to change their skin colour. This unique characteristic has long inspired scientists to develop materials and devices to mimic such a function. However, it requires the complex integration of stretchability, colour-changing and tactile sensing. Here we show an all-solution processed chameleon-inspired stretchable electronic skin (e-skin), in which the e-skin colour can easily be controlled through varying the applied pressure along with the applied pressure duration. As such, the e-skin's colour change can also be in turn utilized to distinguish the pressure applied. The integration of the stretchable, highly tunable resistive pressure sensor and the fully stretchable organic electrochromic device enables the demonstration of a stretchable electrochromically active e-skin with tactile-sensing control. This system will have wide range applications such as interactive wearable devices, artificial prosthetics and smart robots.

  1. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants.

  2. PENENTUAN KUANTITATIF ZAT WARNA KARMOSIN,PONCEAU 4R DAN MERAH ALURA YANG DITAMBAHKAN DALAM MINUMAN AGREM (Hibiscus sabdariffa, Linn) [Quantitative Determination of Carmoisine, Ponceau 4R and Allura Red Colouring Agents Added Into Softdrink Containing the Aqueous Extract of (Hibiscus sabdariffa, Linn

    OpenAIRE

    Embit Kartadarma2); As’ari Nawawi; Halida

    2007-01-01

    The synthetic food-colouring agent is stiil commonly used in soft drink to enhance the colour of the food and to make foods more attractive, particularly for the drink containing natural colour. Addition of colour is legally permitted by the govermment, however, the product sometime contain the substance more than the permissible maximum dosage, and it may possibly cause iillhealth to the consumer. Preparation of soft drink containing the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa fruits gave l...

  3. Digieye Application In Cotton Colour Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colour is one of the most important properties of cotton raw materials. It helps in determining and classifying the quality of fibres according to the Universal Cotton Standards. Organoleptic and instrumental techniques are applied to assess the color of cotton. Worldwide, the colour parameters of cotton are measured by the High Volume Instrument (HVI, which provides information on reflectance (Rd and yellowness (+b that is specific for cotton, but are not the typical and globally recognized colour characteristics. Usually, worldwide, the colour of textile products and other goods is assessed utilizing the spectrophotometer, which provides the colour data that is widely recognized and accepted by the CIE L*a*b* colour space. This paper discusses utilizing the DigiEye system to measure the colour parameters of cotton samples and compares the results with the colour parameters from the HVI.

  4. Hierarchies in Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Peter; Jensen, Kurt; Shapiro, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper shows how to extend Coloured Petri Nets with a hierarchy concept. The paper proposes five different hierarchy constructs, which allow the analyst to structure large CP-nets as a set of interrelated subnets (called pages). The paper discusses the properties of the proposed hierarchy...

  5. Chromomagnetic catalysis of colour superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovskij, V C; Klimenko, K G; Ehbert, D

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the chromomagnetic field on the phase structure of the Namby - Jona-Lasinio expanded model with two quarks aromas is studied. It is shown that certain types of the chromomagnetic fields induce spontaneous violation of the colour, chiral or both symmetries simultaneously, depending on the ratio between the quarks interaction constants in the q-barq- and qq-channels

  6. Colour reconnection at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P

    2002-01-01

    The preliminary results on the search of colour reconnection effects (CR) from the four experiments at LEP, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, are reviewed. Extreme models are excluded by studies of standard variables, and on going studies of a method first suggested by L3, the particle flow method (D. Duchesneau, (2001)), are yet inconclusive. (22 refs).

  7. Estimation of the real colour gamut

    OpenAIRE

    Perales Romero, Esther; Chorro Calderón, Elísabet; Viqueira Pérez, Valentín; Martínez Verdú, Francisco Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en AIC 2009, 11th Congress of the International Colour Association (AIC), 27 September-2 October 2009, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. In the present work, we have assessed the gamut of colour surfaces currently available for different colour technologies. Their colour reproduction capability have been analyzed by plotting CIELAB data under the illuminant D65 into constant lightness and hue-angle planes to be compared with MacAdam limits which defi...

  8. Colour-emotion associations in interior spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Helvacıoğlu, Elif

    2011-01-01

    Colour as an effective design tool influences people’s emotions in interior spaces. Depending on the assumption that colour has an impact on human psychology, this study stresses the need for further studies that comprise colour and emotion association in interior space in order to provide healthier spaces for inhabitants. Emotional reactions to colour in a living room were investigated by using self report measure. Pure red, green and blue were chosen to be investigated as ...

  9. Comportamento de Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone (Crustacea, Decapoda, Penaeidae em função da oferta do alimento artificial nas fases clara e escura do período de 24 horas Behavior of Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone (Crustacea, Decapoda, Penaeidae in relation to artificial food offer along light and dark phases in a 24 h period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele S. Pontes

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A escassez de dados acerca do comportamento do camarão marinho Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 relacionado ao alimento artificial ofertado em comedouros poderá induzir a uma alimentação inadequada, aumentando a relação custo/benefício e os impactos ambientais potenciais do seu cultivo. Objetivando fornecer subsídios para a melhoria do manejo alimentar praticado nas fazendas, foram desenvolvidos estudos comportamentais utilizando 64 juvenis de L. vannamei (7,57 ± 1,01 g, submetidos a fotoperíodo artificial, metade deles em ciclo invertido, para observação das suas atividades durante as fases clara e escura. A ração foi oferecida em intervalos pré-estabelecidos, registrando-se antes e depois da oferta: exploração, natação, alimentação e inatividade (focal instantâneo. A natação ocorreu preferencialmente durante a fase escura. A alimentação foi mais elevada na primeira meia hora posterior à oferta, com ênfase nos horários da fase clara. O alimento artificial atuou, em ambas as fases, como um indutor da exploração do substrato, tornando os camarões mais ativos em todos os horários posteriores à sua oferta.The few data on the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 behavior related to artificial food offer in feeding trays may result an inadequate feeding by the animal, increasing the cost/benefit relation in shrimp culture and its potential environmental impact. In order to provide tools for optimizing feeding management in shrimp farms, a behavioral study was developed, using 64 L. vannamei juveniles (7,57 ± 1,01 g. They were submitted to artificial photoperiods, half of them in reversed cycle, in order to register their behavior during light and dark phases. In established intervals, the following activities were registered before and after food exposition: exploration, swimming, feeding and inactivity (instantaneous sampling. Swimming occurred mostly during the dark phase. Feeding time was higher in

  10. Colour development in the apple orchard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Unuk, T.; Stanislav Tojnko, S.; Hribar, J.; Simcic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Colour is traditionally one of the important appearance features of all fruit for consumers in deciding to buy them. Colour is therefore important in the postharvest supply chain. But where does that colour of fruit come from? Clearly the period of growing and the circumstances during growth are imp

  11. -Colour even Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu-hong Guo

    2010-02-01

    An -colour even self-inverse composition is defined as an -colour self-inverse composition with even parts. In this paper, we get generating functions, explicit formulas and recurrence formulas for -colour even self-inverse compositions. One new binomial identity is also obtained.

  12. Colour Vision Deficiency and Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of "colourblindness" most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision…

  13. The importance of colour naming for online fashion retail

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Helen Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Online fashion retailers use a wide array of colour names to describe the colours of their products; ranging from simple colour names such as the primary colours to more ambiguous colour names such as cloud and blush. Although many online retailers devote resources to the selection of colour names, no such research exists on the impact this has on online fashion consumers’ behaviours.The impact of colour naming on online fashion consumers is important as fashion and colour have a symbiotic re...

  14. Synaesthetic Colours Can Behave More like Recalled Colours, as Opposed to Physical Colours that Can Be Seen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek H. Arnold

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Grapheme-color synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by coloured sensations when reading achromatic text. Different forms have been characterized, but this is somewhat controversial. In associative grapheme-colour synaesthesia, written graphemes can automatically trigger a sensation of colour in the ‘mind's eye’, but hearing the name of a grapheme does not. This allowed us explore the precision with which synaesthetes match triggered synaesthetic colours across separate presentations, versus the precision for recalled experiences cued by spoken graphemes. We recorded CIE coordinates, and found that matches for triggered sensations were equally variable relative to recalled experiences. To ensure this was not due to insensitivity of our apparatus, we next had synaesthetes and age-matched controls either match the colour of a circular patch while they could see it, or from memory after it had disappeared. Both synaesthetes and controls were more variable when matching from memory, and synaesthetes were more precise when matching colour hue, but not brightness. Interestingly, the variance of synaesthetes' recalled matches in this experiment matched that associated with synaesthetic colours in the first experiment. Overall, our data suggests that, for associative grapheme-colour synaesthetes, synaesthetic colours behave more like recalled colours, as opposed to physical colours that can be seen.

  15. Research on the Properties of the Naturally Coloured Cottons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Gu

    2004-01-01

    Structures and characteristics of naturally coloured cottons grown in China were analyzed. Breaking strength of yarns made of pure coloured cotton and coloured cotton fibres blended with other fibres were investigated. Colour fastness of the coloured cotton goods was tested. Suggestions for using the coloured cotton practically and effectively were also included.

  16. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  17. A STANDARDIZED LANTERN FOR TESTING COLOUR VISION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L C

    1939-01-01

    A Lantern for lesting Colour-Vision is arranged to show test colours in pairs as in the Board of Trade Lantern. It is adapted to use electric light, and is standardized by stringent testing. The paper discusses the experiments and considerations which led to the formulation of the allowable tolerances in the transmission and colour co-ordinate specifications of the filters, the colour temperature of the lamps and so on. The results of tests on normal and colour-defective subjects are described.

  18. Assessing the colour quality of LED sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jost-Boissard, S.; Avouac, P.; Fontoynont, Marc

    2015-01-01

    sources and especially some LEDs. In this paper, several aspects of perceived colour quality are investigated using a side-by-side paired comparison method, and the following criteria: naturalness of fruits and vegetables, colourfulness of the Macbeth Color Checker chart, visual appreciation...... (attractiveness/ preference) and colour difference estimations for both visual scenes. Forty-five observers with normal colour vision evaluated nine light sources at 3000 K, and 36 observers evaluated eight light sources at 4000 K. Our results indicate that perceived colour differences are better dealt...

  19. Colour vision in diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, Almut; Balkenius, Anna; Warrant, Eric J

    2003-08-01

    Diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera) have three spectral types of receptor sensitive to ultraviolet, blue and green light. As avid flower visitors and pollinators, they use olfactory and visual cues to find and recognise flowers. Moths of the diurnal species Macroglossum stellatarum and the nocturnal species Deilephila elpenor, Hyles lineata and Hyles gallii use and learn the colour of flowers. Nocturnal species can discriminate flowers at starlight intensities when humans and honeybees are colour-blind. M. stellatarum can use achromatic, intensity-related cues if colour cues are absent, and this is probably also true for D. elpenor. Both species can recognise colours even under a changed illumination colour. PMID:21680465

  20. Characterisation of the n-colour printing process using the spot colour overprint model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Kiran; Green, Phil; Pointer, Michael R

    2014-12-29

    This paper is aimed at reproducing the solid spot colours using the n-colour separation. A simplified numerical method, called as the spot colour overprint (SCOP) model, was used for characterising the n-colour printing process. This model was originally developed for estimating the spot colour overprints. It was extended to be used as a generic forward characterisation model for the n-colour printing process. The inverse printer model based on the look-up table was implemented to obtain the colour separation for n-colour printing process. Finally the real-world spot colours were reproduced using 7-colour separation on lithographic offset printing process. The colours printed with 7 inks were compared against the original spot colours to evaluate the accuracy. The results show good accuracy with the mean CIEDE2000 value between the target colours and the printed colours of 2.06. The proposed method can be used successfully to reproduce the spot colours, which can potentially save significant time and cost in the printing and packaging industry.

  1. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  2. Colour Reproduction on Tablet Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Zorić; Igor Karlović

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of Internet and mobile devices client services and other print production are migrating more and more to online platforms. In a recent technology changeover it is obvious that there is growing number of printers as well need from the customers for the print service providers to expand their business to online and mobile platforms. With this technological transition there are some open questions regarding the possibilities of using the tablet devices for colour soft proofing an...

  3. -Colour Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geetika Narang; A K Agarwal

    2006-08-01

    MacMahon’s definition of self-inverse composition is extended to -colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations, generating functions and a summation formula are obtained. Two new binomial identities with combinatorial meaning are also given.

  4. Colour Reconnection - Models and Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Jesper R

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress on colour reconnection within the Pythia framework is presented. A new model is introduced, based on the SU(3) structure of QCD and a minimization of the potential string energy. The inclusion of the epsilon structure of SU(3) gives a new baryon production mechanism and makes it possible simultaneously to describe hyperon production at both $e^+e^-$ and pp colliders. Finally, predictions for $e^+e^-$ colliders, both past and potential future ones, are presented.

  5. Artificial organisms that sleep.

    OpenAIRE

    Mirolli, Marco; Parisi, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Populations of artificial organisms live in an environment in which light is cyclically present (day) or absent (night). Since being active during night is non-adaptive (activity consumes energy which is not compensated by the food found at night) the organisms evolve a sleep/wake behavioral pattern of being active during daytime and sleeping during nighttime. When the population moves to a different environment that contains "caves", they have to get out of a cave although the dark ...

  6. Artificial urushi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity. PMID:11763444

  7. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  8. Colorimetry and prime colours--a theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornaes, Hans Petter; Wold, Jan Henrik; Farup, Ivar

    2005-08-01

    Human colour vision is the result of a complex process involving topics ranging from physics of light to perception. Whereas the diversity of light entering the eye in principle span an infinite-dimensional vector space in terms of the spectral power distributions, the space of human colour perceptions is three dimensional. One important consequence of this is that a variety of colours can be visually matched by a mixture of only three adequately chosen reference lights. It has been observed that there exists one particular set of monochromatic reference lights that, according to a certain definition, is optimal for producing colour matches. These reference lights are commonly denoted prime colours. In the present paper, we intend to rigorously show that the existence of prime colours is not particular to the human visual system as sometimes stated, but rather an algebraic consequence of the manner in which a kind of colorimetric functions called colour-matching functions are defined and transformed. The solution is based on maximisation of a determinant determining the gamut size of the colour space spanned by the prime colours. Cramer's rule for solving a set of linear equations is an essential part of the proof. By means of examples, it is shown that mathematically the optimal set of reference lights is not unique in general, and that the existence of a maximum determinant is not a necessary condition for the existence of prime colours.

  9. Measurement and prediction of pork colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oeckel, M J; Warnants, N; Boucqué, C V

    1999-08-01

    The extent to which instrumental colour determinations by FOPu (light scattering), Göfo (reflectance) and Labscan II (CIE L*, CIE a* and CIE b*, hue and chroma) are related to the Japanese colour grades was studied. Additionally, four on-line methods: pH1, FOP1, PQM1 (conductivity) and DDLT (Double Density Light Transmission, analogous to Capteur Gras/Maigre), were evaluated for their ability to predict subjectively and objectively colour. One hundred and twenty samples of m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, from animals of different genotypes, were analysed. Of the instrumental colour determinations, CIE L* (r=-0.82), FOPu (r=-0.70) and Göfo (r=0.70) were best correlated with the Japanese colour scores. The Japanese colour grades could be predicted by the on-line instruments, pH1, FOP1, PQM1 and DDLT, with determination coefficients between 15 and 28%. Ultimate meat colour, determined by Japanese colour standards, FOPu, Göfo and CIE L*, was better predicted by DDLT than by the classic on-line instruments: FOP1, pH1 and PQM1, although the standard error of the estimate was similar for all instruments. This means that DDLT, although originally designed for estimating lean meat percentage, can additionally give information about meat quality, in particular colour. However, it must be stressed that the colour estimate by DDLT refers to a population of animals, rather than to individual pigs, because of the number of erroneously assigned samples.

  10. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  11. Relation between polyphenols content and skin colour in sour cherry fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljevac Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit skin colour plays a major role in quality assessment of food, significantly determining consumer`s choice. Colour of sour cherries depends on anthocyanins which are phenolic compounds (flavonoids present in high amounts in fruits. The aim of this study was to determine a possible relation between polyphenols (total phenolics and anthocyanins and colour parameters of fruit skin of sour cherries. The plant material used in this study was twenty two sour cherry genotypes from an orchard of Agricultural Institute Osijek. Total phenolics and anthocyanins contents as well as colour parameters (L*, a*, b*, h and C of fruit skin were determined. Variability between sour cherry genotypes in total phenolics and anthocyanins as well as in colour parameters was revealed. Total polyphenols content varied from 462.7 to 1049.0 mg GAE/100 g of fresh weight, while total anthocyanins ranged from 160.1 to 495.6 mg CGE/100 g of fresh weight. A significant positive correlation was found between polyphenols and anthocyanins content. Total phenolics content had a significant negative correlation with colour parameters b* and h, while anthocyanins content negatively correlated with colour parameters L*, b* and h. According to the obtained results, genotypes Maraska, Heimanns Konservenweichsel and Rexelle are the richest genotypes in polyphenols and anthocyanins content.

  12. Mechanisms, functions and ecology of colour vision in the honeybee

    OpenAIRE

    Hempel de Ibarra, N.; Vorobyev, M.; Menzel, R

    2014-01-01

    Research in the honeybee has laid the foundations for our understanding of insect colour vision. The trichromatic colour vision of honeybees shares fundamental properties with primate and human colour perception, such as colour constancy, colour opponency, segregation of colour and brightness coding. Laborious efforts to reconstruct the colour vision pathway in the honeybee have provided detailed descriptions of neural connectivity and the properties of photoreceptors and interneurons in the ...

  13. Colour-grapheme synaesthesia affects binocular vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L.E. Paffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In colour-grapheme synaesthesia, non-coloured graphemes are perceived as being inherently coloured. In recent years, it has become evident that synaesthesia-inducing graphemes can affect visual processing in a manner comparable to real, physical colours. Here, we exploit the phenomenon of binocular rivalry in which incompatible images presented dichoptically compete for conscious expression. Importantly, the competition only arises if the two images are sufficiently different; if the difference between the images is small, the images will fuse into a single mixed percept. We show that achromatic graphemes that induce synaesthetic colour percepts evoke binocular rivalry, while without the synaesthetic percept, they do not. That is, compared to achromatically perceived graphemes, synaesthesia-inducing graphemes increase the predominance of binocular rivalry over binocular fusion. This finding shows that the synaesthetic colour experience can provide the conditions for evoking binocular rivalry, much like stimulus features that induce rivalry in normal vision.

  14. Please pass me the skin coloured crayon!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Martina; Levisen, Carsten; Beck, Thorhalla Gudmundsdottir;

    2015-01-01

    -based colour concept to language socialisation. Our study suggests that children’s use of crayons in pre-schools, homes, and kindergartens have a formative impact on the acquisition of colour concepts in general, and in particular, in acquiring a skin-based colour concept. Apart from ‘crayon socialisation......’ and children’s drawing practices, our study points to one other salient aspect of meaning associated with the skin-based colour concept, namely socio-political discourses of multiculturalism, political correctness and racism. Some speakers find it ‘natural’ to use a skin-based colour concept while others find......This study explores the cultural semantics of colour words in the four urban, European communities of Munich, Berne, Aarhus, and Reykjavik, focussing on hautfarben (German), hutfarb (Bernese Swiss German), hudfarvet (Danish), and húðlitur (Icelandic), all of which can be translated as ‘skin...

  15. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O., E-mail: omar.foda@unimelb.edu.au [Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wheeler, M., E-mail: mwheeler@lpthe.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS UMR 7589 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2013-06-11

    We study lattice configurations related to S{sub n}, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A{sub n} integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A{sub n} models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S{sub 2} (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S{sub 2}, which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b_1} and {b_2}, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b_1}→∞, and/or {b_2}→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A{sub 1} vertex-model partition function.

  16. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2013-01-01

    We study lattice configurations related to S_n, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A_n integrable vertex models, n = {1, 2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A_n models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S_2 [1, 2]. Namely, 1. S_2 which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, b_1 and b_2, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit b_1 -> infinity, and/or b_2 -> infinity, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the la...

  17. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study lattice configurations related to Sn, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational An integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric An models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S2 (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S2, which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b1} and {b2}, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b1}→∞, and/or {b2}→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A1 vertex-model partition function

  18. The intensity threshold of colour vision in a passerine bird, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Doris; Grégoire, Arnaud; Del Rey Granado, Maria; Bassoul, Marine; Degueldre, David; Perret, Philippe; Doutrelant, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Many vertebrates use colour vision for vital behaviour but their visual performance in dim light is largely unknown. The light intensity threshold of colour vision is known only for humans, horses and two parrot species. Here, we first explore this threshold in a passerine bird, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). Using classic conditioning of colour cues to food rewards in three individuals, we find a threshold ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 cd m(-2). Results are comparable to the two previously tested bird species. For tits, nest light conditions probably exceed that threshold, at least after sunrise. These results shed new light on the lively debate questioning the visual performance of cavity nesters and the evolutionary significance of egg and chick coloration. Although this needs further investigation, it is possible that blue tits exploit both colour and brightness cues when viewing their eggs, chicks or conspecifics in their nests.

  19. Performance of a five category front-of-pack labelling system – the 5-colour nutrition label – to differentiate nutritional quality of breakfast cereals in France

    OpenAIRE

    Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Ducrot, Pauline; Péneau, Sandrine; Touvier, Mathilde; Méjean, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background Breakfast cereals exhibit a wide variability in nutritional quality, and differences are not easily grasped by consumers. A simplified nutritional information system might contribute to help consumers make healthier food choices. A five-category colour label based on the Food Standards Agency Nutrient profiling system (FSA score) has been proposed in France to be implemented on the front-of-pack of foods (the five-colour nutrition label - 5-CNL). Objectives were to evaluate the abi...

  20. Colour Vision Impairment in Young Alcohol Consumers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alódia Brasil

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption among young adults is widely accepted in modern society and may be the starting point for abusive use of alcohol at later stages of life. Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to visual function impairment. In the present study, we investigated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity, colour arrangement ability, and colour discrimination thresholds on young adults that weekly consume alcoholic beverages without clinical concerns. Twenty-four young adults were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and performed three psychophysical tests to evaluate their vision functions. We estimated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function at 11 spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 cycles/degree. No difference in contrast sensitivity was observed comparing alcohol consumers and control subjects. For the evaluation of colour vision, we used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100 test to test subject's ability to perform a colour arrangement task and the Mollon-Reffin test (MR test to measure subject's colour discrimination thresholds. Alcohol consumers made more mistakes than controls in the FM100 test, and their mistakes were diffusely distributed in the FM colour space without any colour axis preference. Alcohol consumers also performed worse than controls in the MR test and had higher colour discrimination thresholds compared to controls around three different reference points of a perceptually homogeneous colour space, the CIE 1976 chromaticity diagram. There was no colour axis preference in the threshold elevation observed among alcoholic subjects. Young adult weekly alcohol consumers showed subclinical colour vision losses with preservation of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity. Adolescence and young adult age are periods of important neurological development and alcohol exposure during this period of life might be responsible for deficits in visual functions, especially colour vision that is very sensitive to

  1. Flower colour adaptation in a mimetic orchid

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Ethan; Anderson, Bruce; JOHNSON, STEVEN D.

    2012-01-01

    Although the tremendous variability in floral colour among angiosperms is often attributed to divergent selection by pollinators, it is usually difficult to preclude the possibility that floral colour shifts were driven by non-pollinator processes. Here, we examine the adaptive significance of flower colour in Disa ferruginea, a non-rewarding orchid that is thought to attract its butterfly pollinator by mimicking the flowers of sympatric nectar-producing species. Disa ferruginea has red flowe...

  2. How temporal cues can aid colour constancy

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, David H.; Amano, Kinjiro; Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Colour constancy assessed by asymmetric simultaneous colour matching usually reveals limited levels of performance in the unadapted eye. Yet observers can readily discriminate illuminant changes on a scene from changes in the spectral reflectances of the surfaces making up the scene. This ability is probably based on judgements of relational colour constancy, in turn based on the physical stability of spatial ratios of cone excitations under illuminant changes. Evidence is presented suggestin...

  3. Colour constancy: human mechanisms and machine algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, C B

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a quantitative experimental investigation into instantaneous colour constancy in humans. Colour constancy may be defined as the ability of the visual system to maintain a constant colour percept of a surface despite varying conditions of illumination. Instantaneous, in this context, refers to effects which happen very rapidly with the change of illumination, rather than those which may be due to long term adaptation of the photoreceptors. The results of experiments are d...

  4. Colour model analysis for microscopic image processing

    OpenAIRE

    García-Rojo Marcial; González Jesús; Déniz Oscar; González Roberto; Bueno Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This article presents a comparative study between different colour models (RGB, HSI and CIEL*a*b*) applied to a very large microscopic image analysis. Such analysis of different colour models is needed in order to carry out a successful detection and therefore a classification of different regions of interest (ROIs) within the image. This, in turn, allows both distinguishing possible ROIs and retrieving their proper colour for further ROI analysis. This analysis is not commonly done ...

  5. Language strategies for the domain of colour

    OpenAIRE

    Bleys, Joris

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a major leap forward in the understanding of colour by showing how richer descriptions of colour samples can be operationalized in agent-based models. Four different language strategies are explored: the basic colour strategy, the graded membership strategy, the category combination strategy and the basic modification strategy. These strategies are firmly rooted in empirical observations in natural languages, with a focus on compositionality at both the syntactic and semant...

  6. Identification of Colour Reconnection using Factorial Correlator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jing-Hua; LIU Lian-Shou

    2000-01-01

    A new signal is proposed for the colour reconnection in the hadronic decay of W+ W- in e+e- collisions. Using Pythia Monte Carlo it is shown that factorial correlators for W+ and W- without colour reconnection are almost identical to unity, while those for the cases with colour reconnection fall down approximately linearly in the log log plot. This signal, being based on the factorial correlator, is more sensitive than the ones using only averaged quantities.

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  8. Hadronisation Models and Colour Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Bierlich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced production of hadrons with $s$-quark content has been observed in $pp$ collisions at LHC, and earlier in collisions of heavy nuclei. We review the string hadronisation formalism and correc- tions from rope hadronisation and colour reconnection, corrections that takes place in such dense environments, and are able to correctly describe data. Since such corrections are very sensitive to the modelling of transverse proton structure, we investigate two such models, and compare to final states. Finally we describe how such corrections can also give a possible explanation to collective phenomena observed in small systems.

  9. Colour assortative pairing in a colour polymorphic lizard is independent of population morph diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez i de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique; Carretero, Miguel Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Previous work with a colour polymorphic population of Podarcis muralis (Lacertidae) revealed that lizards pair by ventral colour, favouring the same colour (i.e. homomorphic) pairs. Such assortative pairing, which probably results in colour assortative mating, can have consequences for the genetic structure of the population and potentially promote speciation. The population previously studied, located in the Pyrenees, encompasses white, yellow and orange animals, as well as intermediate white-orange and yellow-orange morphs. However, other Pyrenean populations of P. muralis have less ventral colour morphs. Our aim in this study is to test the generality of the assortative colour pairing system, extending our previous analyses to populations with different morph compositions and frequencies. The results show that the assortative pattern of pairing is similar in all the populations analysed and, hence, independent of morph composition and not restricted to pentamorphic populations. This suggests that assortative pairing by colour is a general phenomenon for colour polymorphic populations of P. muralis.

  10. Shell Colour Polymorphism in Bulla ampulla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Colour patterns of Bulla ampulla shells collected from Africa eastward to Pacific Islands were studied. 1\\vo common colour morphs were found. The typical morph is commonest. It is closely and finely mottled or all over with pinkish-gray on a creamy or flesh~tinted ground, with darker clouds......, irregular, V-shaped, or as longitudinal bands. The colouration of the other common morph is more uniform. It is lacking the darker clouds or bands and the colour is more greyish. The entire shell surface is densely mottled all over with small brown spots on a grey or beige background. Both morphs seem...

  11. Colour thresholds in a coral reef fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, M.; Marshall, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reef fishes are among the most colourful animals in the world. Given the diversity of lifestyles and habitats on the reef, it is probable that in many instances coloration is a compromise between crypsis and communication. However, human observation of this coloration is biased by our primate visual system. Most animals have visual systems that are ‘tuned’ differently to humans; optimized for different parts of the visible spectrum. To understand reef fish colours, we need to reconstruct the appearance of colourful patterns and backgrounds as they are seen through the eyes of fish. Here, the coral reef associated triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus, was tested behaviourally to determine the limits of its colour vision. This is the first demonstration of behavioural colour discrimination thresholds in a coral reef species and is a critical step in our understanding of communication and speciation in this vibrant colourful habitat. Fish were trained to discriminate between a reward colour stimulus and series of non-reward colour stimuli and the discrimination thresholds were found to correspond well with predictions based on the receptor noise limited visual model and anatomy of the eye. Colour discrimination abilities of both reef fish and a variety of animals can therefore now be predicted using the parameters described here. PMID:27703704

  12. Chromagen lenses and abnormal colour perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Matthew Oriowo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chromagen lens system comprises of tinted spectacle or contact lenses, each with a specific colour wavelength filter which controls the spectra of the light entering the eye. This study investigated whether spectacle-mounted Chromagen lenses would enhance colour perception in individuals with abnormal colour vision.Methods: The Ishihara colour test was used to test for colour vision deficiency (CVD and also to evaluate the effect of the Chromagen spectacle lens on colour perception in 13 subjects. An Oculus Anomaloscope was used to confirm and sub-classify the types of CVD. Subjects comprised of school age children from the Riyadh area in Saudi Arabia.Results: The distribution amongst the male participants comprised two subjects with protanomaly, two with protanopia, five with deuteranomaly, and two with deuteranopia. Amongst the two female participants, one subject showed deuteranomaly, and one showed protanomaly. Different types of Chromagen spectacle lenses displayed some levels of colour vision enhancement depending on type of CVD.Conclusion: The findings support the notion that chromagen lenses could enhance colour vision perception in some cases of red-green colour vision defects. Clients with CVD should be managed on an individual case basis. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(2 69-74 

  13. Distant set distinguishing total colourings of graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Przybyło, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The Total Colouring Conjecture suggests that $\\Delta+3$ colours ought to suffice in order to provide a proper total colouring of every graph $G$ with maximum degree $\\Delta$. Thus far this has been confirmed up to an additive constant factor, and the same holds even if one additionally requires every pair of neighbours in $G$ to differ with respect to the sets of their incident colours, so called pallets. Within this paper we conjecture that an upper bound of the form $\\Delta+const.$ still re...

  14. Colour vision and computer-generated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colour vision deficiencies affect approximately 8% of the male and approximately 0.4% of the female population. In this work, it is demonstrated that computer generated images oftentimes pose unnecessary problems for colour deficient viewers. Three examples, the visualization of molecular structures, graphs of mathematical functions, and colour coded images from numerical data are used to identify problematic colour combinations: red/black, green/black, red/yellow, yellow/white, fuchsia/white, and aqua/white. Alternatives for these combinations are discussed.

  15. Electrophysiological evidence for colour effects on the naming of colour diagnostic and noncolour diagnostic objects

    OpenAIRE

    Bramão, Inês; Francisco, Ana; Inácio, Filomena; Faísca, Luís; Reis, Alexandra; Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the level of visual processing at which surface colour information improves the naming of colour diagnostic and noncolour diagnostic objects. Continuous electroencephalograms were recorded while participants performed a visual object naming task in which coloured and black-and-white versions of both types of objects were presented. The black-and-white and the colour presentations were compared in two groups of event-related potentials (ERPs): (1) The P1 and N1 c...

  16. GENERALIZATION OF THE COOCCURRENCE MATRIX FOR COLOUR IMAGES: APPLICATION TO COLOUR TEXTURE CLASSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Arvis; Christophe Debain; Michel Berducat; Albert Benassi

    2011-01-01

    Three different approaches to colour texture analysis are tested on the classification of images from the VisTex and Outex databases. All the methods tested are based on extensions of the cooccurrence matrix method. The first method is a multispectral extension since cooccurrence matrices are computed both between and within the colour bands. The second uses joint colour-texture features: colour features are added to grey scale texture features in the entry of the classifier. The last uses gr...

  17. The uses of colour vision: behavioural and physiological distinctiveness of colour stimuli.

    OpenAIRE

    Derrington, Andrew M; Parker, Amanda; Barraclough, Nick E.; Easton, Alexander; Goodson, G R; Parker, Kris S; Tinsley, Chris J.; Webb, Ben S.

    2002-01-01

    Colour and greyscale (black and white) pictures look different to us, but it is not clear whether the difference in appearance is a consequence of the way our visual system uses colour signals or a by-product of our experience. In principle, colour images are qualitatively different from greyscale images because they make it possible to use different processing strategies. Colour signals provide important cues for segmenting the image into areas that represent different objects and for linkin...

  18. What colour is the red house? Perceived colour of painted facades.

    OpenAIRE

    Fridell Anter, Karin

    2000-01-01

    Architects and others choosingfacade colours using colour samples face difficulties whichprevious research has not addressed. This work aims to aid suchcolour design by exploring three main questions: 1. Is itpossible to survey and map out what colours people perceive onfacades observed under different conditions? If so, whatmethods can be used and it is possible to obtain results ofwider application? 2. How does the perceived colour of a facadevary with changing observation conditions? What ...

  19. Colouring COMPARA: contrastive and monolingual colour studies in English and Portuguese

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Rosário; Inácio, Susana; Santos, Diana

    2008-01-01

    We will describe the English and Portuguese colour studies carried out using COMPARA (www.linguateca.pt/COMPARA/) as a result of the semantic annotation process of the corpus regarding colour. The aim of these studies is to analyse the use of colour by English- and Portuguese-speaking authors by quantifying data, identifying patterns and tendencies -- including colour variation analysis throughout time -- and contrasting findings. Taking advantage of the fact that COMPARA is syntactically ana...

  20. Hummingbirds at artificial flowers made to resemble ornithophiles versus melittophiles

    OpenAIRE

    Wyndee A. Guzman; Paul Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Certain floral characteristics are associated with specific pollinators. Hummingbird-pollinated flowers are usually red, lack a landing platform, lack nectar guides, and contain a high amount of dilute sucrose-rich nectar. Here we test hypotheses concerning the reasons for these characters to the extent that they involve hummingbird responses. An array was set up of 16 artificial plants, each with five artificial flowers. (1) Flowers made to differ only in colour elicited a slight preference ...

  1. What do colour-blind people really see?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: colour perception of dichromats (colour-blind persons) Background: Various models have been proposed (e. g. Walraven & Alferdinck, 1997; Brettel et al. , 1997) to model reduced colour vision of colour-blind people. It is clear that colour-blind people cannot distinguish certain object colou

  2. An example of applied colour vision research: the conspicuity of airplane colour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the combined knowledge on colorimetry, colour imaging (visualization) and colour perception in an aviation related research project. It involves the optimisation of the conspicuity of the colour scheme of an airplane, with the purpose of minimizing the changes

  3. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities. PMID:24741154

  4. Artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  5. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  6. Occupational colour vision requirements for police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Jennifer; Chisholm, Catharine M

    2008-11-01

    Inclusion of public service professions in the UK Disability Discrimination Act in 2004 prompted a review of occupational colour vision requirements for police officers. Changes in the regulations which existed prior to 2003 were proposed. The aim of this study was to obtain the views of serving police officers in Northern Ireland on the importance of good colour discrimination in everyday police work and on the recruitment regulations for patrol constables introduced in 2003 in mainland UK. These views were obtained by means of a questionnaire and informal discussions. More than 65% of police officers who responded to the questionnaire considered that good colour vision was very important for effective policing. Fewer than 2% considered that colour vision was unimportant. Experienced police officers agreed that the employment of colour-deficient patrol constables, as permitted in the new regulations, would lead to reduced efficiency and organisational difficulties at the local level. A number of everyday activities were described which showed the need for accurate colour discrimination. The change in recruitment policy and the lack of clarity in the new regulations show inadequate appreciation of the needs of the occupation, of different types of colour vision anomalies and of the diagnostic function of colour vision tests. Failure to provide guidance on appropriate colour vision tests, examination procedures and counselling services is likely to result in inconsistent employment policies in different police forces. It is recommended that the colour vision standard in place prior to 2003 is reinstated at the recruitment stage. The Ishihara test should be used for screening, and colour-deficient applicants further examined with the Farnsworth D15 test as a replacement for the City University Test 2nd edition. PMID:19076554

  7. ABOUT FOOD ADDITIVES AS IMPORTANT PART OF FUNCTIONAL FOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Umida Khodjaeva; Tatiana Bojňanská; Vladimír Vietoris; Oksana Sytar

    2013-01-01

    The main characteristics and classification of food additives, which are common in the food production, have been described in the present review. The ways of food additives classification, source of nature, main antioxidants, food colouring, flavours, flavor enhancers, bulking agents, stabilizers, sweeteners which were collected from literature based on structural and biochemical characteristics with description of source and possible effects on human, organisms and environment have been pre...

  8. Evaluation and Improvement of the CIE Metameric and Colour Rendering Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Slavuj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All artificial light sources are intended to simulate daylight and its properties of color rendering or ability of colour discrimination. Two indices, defined by the CIE, are used to quantify quality of the artificial light sources. First is Color Rendering Index which quantifies ability of light sources to render colours and other is the Metemerism Index which describes metamerism potential of given light source. Calculation of both indices are defined by CIE and has been a subject of discussion and change in past. In this work particularly, the problem of sample number and type used in calculation is addressed here and evaluated. It is noticed that both indices depends on the choice and sample number and that they should be determined based on application.

  9. Colour Perception Between Psychology and Art

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaruzza, Serena

    2014-01-01

    The poster refers to important contributions of psychological research on colours. Special emphasis is given to the fundamental classification proposed by David Katz, who strongly influenced subsequent studies; e.g., those by Karl Bühler and Gaetano Kanizsa. In particular, the opposition between diaphanic and epiphanic colours is discussed and applied to two recent paintings of a contemporary experimental artist.

  10. Finite mutation classes of coloured quivers

    CERN Document Server

    Torkildsen, Hermund André

    2010-01-01

    We consider the general notion of coloured quiver mutation and show that the mutation class of a coloured quiver $Q$, arising from an $m$-cluster tilting object associated with $H$, is finite if and only if $H$ is of finite or tame representation type, or it has at most 2 simples. This generalizes a result known for 1-cluster categories.

  11. Application of graph colouring to biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, S

    2010-05-01

    The author explores the application of graph colouring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, the author finds that given similar conditions (i.e. graph size, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colours are needed to colour disassortative than assortative networks. Fewer colours create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, the author suggests that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science, 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, because graph colouring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node colouring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes (dense subgraphs in PPI networks), is investigated. The author finds that for PPI networks where 1-11% of nodes participate in at least one identified protein complex, such as H. sapien, DSATUR (a well-known complete graph colouring algorithm) node colouring information can improve the quality (homogeneity and separation) of initial candidate complexes. This finding may help improve existing protein complex detection methods, and/or suggest new methods. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:20499999

  12. Colour measurement and white blood cell recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gelsema, E S

    1972-01-01

    As a part of a collaboration with NEMCH aimed at the automation of the differential white blood cell count, studies have been made of the different possibilities for using colour to help in the recognition process. Results are presented comparing data obtained with a microspectrophotometer and with a simulated three-colour scanner.

  13. Colour Mathematics: With Graphs and Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just…

  14. Bivariate colour maps for visualizing climate data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Stöckli, R.; Seneviratne, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing availability of gridded, high-resolution, multivariate climatological data sets calls for innovative approaches to visualize inter-variable relations. In this study, we present a methodology, based on properties of common colour schemes, to plot two variables in a single colour map by

  15. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  16. Collective modes in colour superconducting matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of plasmons, Nambu-Goldstone bosons and gapless Carlson-Goldman collective modes in colour-flavour locked phase of colour superconducting dense quark matter at finite temperature are reviewed. A possibility of a kaon condensation with an abnormal number of NG bosons is also discussed. (author)

  17. Performance Analysis Using Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of improved facilities for performance analysis using coloured Petri nets. Coloured Petri nets is a formal method that is well suited for modeling and analyzing large and complex systems. The paper describes steps that have been taken to make a distinction between ...

  18. Quantum theory of colour discrimination of dichromats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.A.; Walraven, P.L.

    1962-01-01

    The hypothesis of de Vries and Rose has been applied to colour discrimination of dichromates. The hypothesis states that a brightness difference ΔB is just beyond threshold, when ΔB just exceeds the statistical fluctuations in background brightness B, which are proportional to B 1 2. The colour diff

  19. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containin...

  20. Worldwide patterns of bird colouration on islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutrelant, Claire; Paquet, Matthieu; Renoult, Julien P; Grégoire, Arnaud; Crochet, Pierre-André; Covas, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Island environments share distinctive characteristics that offer unique opportunities to investigate parallel evolution. Previous research has produced evidence of an island syndrome for morphological traits, life-history strategies and ecological niches, but little is known about the response to insularity of other important traits such as animal signals. Here, we tested whether birds' plumage colouration is part of the island syndrome. We analysed with spectrophotometry the colouration of 116 species endemic to islands and their 116 closest mainland relatives. We found a pattern of reduced brightness and colour intensity for both sexes on islands. In addition, we found a decrease in the number of colour patches on islands that, in males, was associated with a decrease in the number of same-family sympatric species. These results demonstrate a worldwide pattern of parallel colour changes on islands and suggest that a relaxation of selection on species recognition may be one of the mechanisms involved.

  1. 21 CFR 868.5375 - Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose). 868.5375 Section 868.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... moisture condenser (artificial nose). (a) Identification. A heat and moisture condenser (artificial...

  2. A quick TL authenticity testing for the Tang Dynasty Tri-coloured Pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to complete a quick authenticity testing for the Tang Dynasty Tri-coloured Pottery, a method for preparation of disc samples is developed. About 50 mg fine grain of scraps taken from some obscure position of the tested pottery was divided into 15 parts, some of them was exposed to artificial β-radiation and the natural glow curve was compared with the artificial one, the sample could be dated both rapidly and accurately. Five pieces of the pottery were dated with this method, and one of them was found to be a sham

  3. Measurement and prediction of pork colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oeckel, M J; Warnants, N; Boucqué, C V

    1999-08-01

    The extent to which instrumental colour determinations by FOPu (light scattering), Göfo (reflectance) and Labscan II (CIE L*, CIE a* and CIE b*, hue and chroma) are related to the Japanese colour grades was studied. Additionally, four on-line methods: pH1, FOP1, PQM1 (conductivity) and DDLT (Double Density Light Transmission, analogous to Capteur Gras/Maigre), were evaluated for their ability to predict subjectively and objectively colour. One hundred and twenty samples of m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, from animals of different genotypes, were analysed. Of the instrumental colour determinations, CIE L* (r=-0.82), FOPu (r=-0.70) and Göfo (r=0.70) were best correlated with the Japanese colour scores. The Japanese colour grades could be predicted by the on-line instruments, pH1, FOP1, PQM1 and DDLT, with determination coefficients between 15 and 28%. Ultimate meat colour, determined by Japanese colour standards, FOPu, Göfo and CIE L*, was better predicted by DDLT than by the classic on-line instruments: FOP1, pH1 and PQM1, although the standard error of the estimate was similar for all instruments. This means that DDLT, although originally designed for estimating lean meat percentage, can additionally give information about meat quality, in particular colour. However, it must be stressed that the colour estimate by DDLT refers to a population of animals, rather than to individual pigs, because of the number of erroneously assigned samples. PMID:22062695

  4. Information Limits on Identification of Natural Surfaces by Apparent Colour

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, David H.; Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.; Amano, Kinjiro

    2005-01-01

    By adaptational and other mechanisms, the visual system can compensate for moderate changes in the colour of the illumination on a scene. Although the colours of most surfaces are perceived to be constant (“colour constancy”), some are not. The effect of these residual colour changes on the ability of observers to identify surfaces by their apparent colour was determined theoretically from high-resolution hyperspectral images of natural scenes under different daylights with correlated colour ...

  5. Integration of feature distributions for colour texture segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Nammalwar, Padmapriya; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for colour texture segmentation and determines the contribution of colour and texture. The distributions of colour and texture features provides the discrimination between different colour textured regions in an image. The proposed method was tested using different mosaic and natural images. From the results, it is evident that the incorporation of colour information enhanced the colour texture segmentation and the developed framework is e...

  6. Dimensionality of the Consumer Perceived Value of Product Colour

    OpenAIRE

    KiehelÀ, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Consumers’ product assessments are largely based on colour, and a product’s colour can increase consumer satisfaction, awareness and loyalty. However, existing colour research is fragmented and calls for theoretically-enhanced understandings of the role of colour in consumer product perception. The existing colour research mainly focuses on consumers’ immediate reactions when exposed to colours although studies show that consumers evaluate products differently in purchase and in use....

  7. Colour-rendition properties of solid-state lamps

    OpenAIRE

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R; Shur, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The applicability of colour quality metrics to solid-state light sources is validated and the results of the assessment of colour rendition characteristics of various lamps are presented. The standard colour rendering index metric (CRI) or a refined colour quality scale metric (CQS) fail to distinguish between two principle colour rendition properties of illumination: the ability to render object colours with high fidelity and the ability to increase chromatic contrast, especially...

  8. Measuring grinding surface roughness based on the sharpness evaluation of colour images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaian, Y. I.; Jian, L. I. U.; Enhui, L. U.; Peng, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    Current machine vision-based detection methods for metal surface roughness mainly use the grey values of images for statistical analysis but do not make full use of the colour information and ignore the subjective judgment of the human vision system. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure surface roughness through the sharpness evaluation of colour images. Based on the difference in sharpness of virtual images of colour blocks that are formed on grinding surfaces with different roughness, an algorithm for evaluating the sharpness of colour images that is based on the difference of the RGB colour space was used to develop a correlation model between the sharpness and the surface roughness. The correlation model was analysed under two conditions: constant illumination and varying illumination. The effect of the surface textures of the grinding samples on the image sharpness was also considered, demonstrating the feasibility of the detection method. The results show that the sharpness is strongly correlated with the surface roughness; when the illumination and the surface texture have the same orientation, the sharpness clearly decreases with increasing surface roughness. Under varying illumination, this correlation between the sharpness and surface roughness was highly robust, and the sharpness of each virtual image increased linearly with the illumination. Relative to the detection method for surface roughness using gray level co-occurrence matrix or artificial neural network, the proposed method is convenient, highly accurate and has a wide measurement range.

  9. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  10. Artificial intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract : Issue of this work is to acquaint the reader with the history of artificial inteligence, esspecialy branch of chess computing. Main attention is given to progress from fifties to the present. The work also deals with fighting chess programs against each other, and against human opponents. The greatest attention is focused on 1997 and duel Garry Kasparov against chess program Deep Blue. The work is divided into chapters according to chronological order.

  11. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Samo; Kreft, Marko

    2007-11-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thickness of a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil or an aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some regions of Central Europe, salad dressing is made preferably with the pumpkin seed oil, which has a strong characteristic nut-like taste and remarkable properties of the colour: it appears red in a bottle, but green when served as a salad dressing. The colour of the pumpkin seed oil was previously described as brownish yellow, dark green, dark green to red ochre or dark reddish brown to light yellow green. We elucidated the physicochemical and physiological basis of such dichromatism by Beer-Lambert law and by the characteristics of human colour perception. Our concept was corroborated by the outcome of calculations of colour from spectral properties using colour matching functions. We found that dichromatism is observed if the absorption spectrum of any substance has at least two local minima: one wide but shallow and one narrow but deep local minimum.

  12. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  13. Using students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights to design a hands-on coloured light mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak

    2009-06-01

    A surface mount typed multi-coloured Light-Emitting Diode (LED) is used as a light source for the hands-on coloured light mixer. The LED consists of red, green and blue tiny sources but the mixer is designed to have four switches corresponding to red, green, blue and yellow light. These colours correspond to students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights; they realize that the primary colours and the rules for lights mixing are the same as those of paints. To generate a yellow light, a microcontroller placed between four input switches and the LED operates both a red and green tiny sources. In addition, the microcontroller is employed to eliminate some combinations of coloured light mixing to simplify the experiment (basic mode) for non advanced students. If the mixer is used with more advanced students, a number of combinations will increase and students need more analytical skills to find out the primary coloured lights (the coloured lights that can not be produced by the mixing of any other coloured lights). Therefore, the mixer is able to use with more advanced and non advanced students depending on the program in the microcontroller and some modifications of the circuit. Furthermore, to introduce students an idea that other hues or shades can be generated by mixing of these three primary coloured lights of different intensities, a tuning circuit is integrated to vary an intensity of the green light source.

  14. The colour wheels of art, perception, science and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Nick

    2006-06-01

    Colour is not the domain of any one discipline be it art, philosophy, psychology or science. Each discipline has its own colour wheel and this presentation examines the origins and philosophies behind the colour circles of Art, Perception, Science and Physiology (after image) with reference to Aristotle, Robert Boyle, Leonardo da Vinci, Goethe, Ewald Hering and Albert Munsell. The paper analyses and discusses the differences between the four colour wheels using the Natural Colour System® notation as the reference for hue (the position of colours within each of the colour wheels). Examination of the colour wheels shows the dominance of blue in the wheels of art, science and physiology particularly at the expense of green. This paper does not consider the three-dimensionality of colour space its goal was to review the hue of a colour with regard to its position on the respective colour wheels.

  15. Natural ingredients for colouring and styling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweck, A C

    2002-10-01

    This paper examines some of the existing methods for colouring the hair and skin using natural material (such as henna) and proposes a parallel technology that exists in the dyeing of wool and fabrics to extend the colour range. Many of the listed plants and their derivatives are not found in Annex IV of the Cosmetic Directive and may not be used as colours; however, they do have other properties which may justify their inclusion into a product, for example, as astringent or anti-inflammatory agents. The paper concludes with some reported antigreying and hair styling preparations cited in the literature.

  16. Artificial sweetener; Jinko kanmiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The patents related to the artificial sweetener that it is introduced to the public in 3 years from 1996 until 1998 are 115 cases. The sugar quality which makes an oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol the subject is greatly over 28 cases of the non-sugar quality in the one by the kind as a general tendency of these patents at 73 cases in such cases as the Aspartame. The method of manufacture patent, which included new material around other peptides, the oligosaccharide and sugar alcohol isn`t inferior to 56 cases of the formation thing patent at 43 cases, and pays attention to the thing, which is many by the method of manufacture, formation. There is most improvement of the quality of sweetness with 31 cases in badness of the aftertaste which is characteristic of the artificial sweetener and so on, and much stability including the improvement in the flavor of food by the artificial sweetener, a long time and dissolution, fluid nature and productivity and improvement of the economy such as a cost are seen with effect on a purpose. (NEDO)

  17. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3375 Battery-powered artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied...

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multiwavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall S\\'{e}rsic index ($n$) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-$n$ galaxies in all wavebands, which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-$n$ galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-$n$ galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population, with properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure, and luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multi-wavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall Sérsic index (n) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-n galaxies in all wavebands which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-n galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-n galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population which has properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  20. SATISFIABILITY METHODS FOR COLOURING GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Dey

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The graph colouring problem can be solved using methods based on Satisfiability (SAT. An instance of the problem is defined by a Boolean expression written using Boolean variables and the logical connectives AND, OR and NOT. It has to be determined whether there is an assignment of TRUE and FALSE values to the variables that makes the entire expression true.A SAT problem is syntactically and semantically quite simple. Many Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPsin AI and OR can be formulated in SAT. These make use of two kinds of searchalgorithms: Deterministic and Randomized.It has been found that deterministic methods when run on hard CSP instances are frequently very slow in execution.A deterministic method always outputs a solution in the end, but it can take an enormous amount of time to do so.This has led to the development of randomized search algorithms like GSAT, which are typically based on local (i.e., neighbourhood search. Such methodshave been applied very successfully to find good solutions to hard decision problems

  1. STEGANALYSIS USING COLOUR MODEL CONVERSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Thiyagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The major threat in cyber crime for digital forensic examiner is to identify, analyze and interpret theconcealed information inside digital medium such as image, audio and video. There are strong indicationsthat hiding information inside digital medium has been used for planning criminal activities. In this way, itis important to develop a steganalysis technique which detects the existence of hidden messages insidedigital medium. This paper focuses on universal image steganalysis method which uses RGB to HSI colourmodel conversion. Any Universal Steganalysis algorithm developed should be tested with various stegoimagesto prove its efficiency. The developed Universal Steganalysis algorithm is tested in stego-imagedatabase which is obtained by implementing various RGB Least Significant Bit Steganographic algorithms.Though there are many stego-image sources available on the internet it lacks in the information such ashow many rows has been infected by the steganography algorithms, how many bits have been modified andwhich channel has been affected. These parameters are important for Steganalysis algorithms and it helpsto rate its efficiency. Proposed Steganalysis using Colour Model has been tested with our Image Databaseand the results were affirmative.

  2. Steganalysis Using Colour Model Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Thiyagarajan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major threat in cyber crime for digital forensic examiner is to identify, analyze and interpret theconcealed information inside digital medium such as image, audio and video. There are strong indicationsthat hiding information inside digital medium has been used for planning criminal activities. In this way, itis important to develop a steganalysis technique which detects the existence of hidden messages insidedigital medium. This paper focuses on universal image steganalysis method which uses RGB to HSI colourmodel conversion. Any Universal Steganalysis algorithm developed should be tested with various stegoimagesto prove its efficiency. The developed Universal Steganalysis algorithm is tested in stego-imagedatabase which is obtained by implementing various RGB Least Significant Bit Steganographic algorithms.Though there are many stego-image sources available on the internet it lacks in the information such ashow many rows has been infected by the steganography algorithms, how many bits have been modified andwhich channel has been affected. These parameters are important for Steganalysis algorithms and it helpsto rate its efficiency. Proposed Steganalysis using Colour Model has been tested with our Image Databaseand the results were affirmative.

  3. Effect of Superheated Steam Treatment on Changes in Moisture Content and Colour Properties of Coconut Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Mah Sook Yun; Wahidu Zzaman; Tajul A. Yang

    2015-01-01

    Drying is one of the methods to preserve the quality and prolong the shelf life of food. Coconut meat was sliced and dried using superheated steam oven at 140°C, 160°C and 180°C. Drying was carried out at different drying time (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes). The effect of drying temperature and time on the moisture content and colour properties (L, a, b and BI) of the coconut slices were studied. The temperature and time significantly (p < 0.05) affected the moisture loss and colour va...

  4. Effects of environmental colour on mood: a wearable LifeColour capture device

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Aiden R.; Kelly, Philip; O'flynn, Brendan; Curran, Padraig; Smeaton, Alan F.; Ó Mathúna, S. Cian; O'connor, Noel E.

    2010-01-01

    Colour is everywhere in our daily lives and impacts things like our mood, yet we rarely take notice of it. One method of capturing and analysing the predominant colours that we encounter is through visual lifelogging devices such as the SenseCam. However an issue related to these devices is the privacy concerns of capturing image level detail. Therefore in this work we demonstrate a hardware prototype wearable camera that captures only one pixel - of the dominant colour prevelant in front of ...

  5. Optimization of colour quality of LED lighting with reference to memory colours

    OpenAIRE

    Smet, Kevin; Ryckaert, Wouter; Pointer, Michael R.; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Simulated and real tri- and tetrachromatic light-emitting-diode (LED) clusters were optimized for luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) and the memory colour quality metric developed by the authors. The simulated clusters showed no significant differences in achievable colour quality and LER between the different cluster types investigated. The real clusters (composed of commercially available LEDs) showed substantial differences in achievable colour quality and LER between the different clus...

  6. How to pass higher English colour

    CERN Document Server

    Bridges, Ann

    2009-01-01

    How to Pass is the Number 1 revision series for Scottish qualifications across the three examination levels of Standard Grade, Intermediate and Higher! Second editions of the books present all of the material in full colour for the first time.

  7. Colour Management as a Precondition of Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Brues

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Colour management technology has reached a high level of maturity. Only ten years after it first appeared on the market, ICC colour profiles have become indispensable in modern premedia. It can be said without exaggeration that colour management has revolutionised digital proof printing. A whole range of newcomers in the print industry supplier community offer an intelligent combination of a PostScript RIP with integral colour management functions. The quality of these low-priced proofing systems has now reached such a high level that even discerning customers accept such digital proofs as contract proofs. Modular proofing solutions are regularly to be found among the leaders in the digital proofer tests.Working with colour profiles and profiled workflows is still a major problem area. It is no mere chance that notably digital proofing is the field in which users work with colour profiles in virtually all systems, since applications here are locally limited.An important step for the widespread use of colour management technology is the now very extensive implementation of ICC mechanisms in application programs such as Adobe Photoshop. Version 7 is regarded as a model of well thought-out ICC-based colour management implementation. As Microsoft has neglected the ICC standard in recent years, Adobe has created its own colour management interface, called ACE. Based on the ICC standard, it is regarded by many experts as a reference implementation. Adobe products, which are so important for the graphic arts industry, now contain a standard colour management platform across all supported operating systems. Incompatibilities at system level can now be virtually ruled out, at least across the Adobe product line, including the important interfaces with PostScript and PDF.Modern prepress technology is set to move ever further away from exclusive print production for standardised offset print. Multiple use of production data is still at an early stage

  8. Colour preferences of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Chi, Liang; Tian, Huiqin; Meng, Lingjie; Zheng, Jimeng; Gao, Xiaolong; Liu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    The background colour of aquaculture tanks is normally chosen based on practical experience and/or observations of fish behaviour and the growth rates achieved. However, some farmed species, including turbot, are sentient and can show a preference for a particular environment. In the current study, a self-referent colour preference device was developed and the self-referent colour preference of farmed fish investigated. In experiment 1, the background colour preference of juvenile turbot cultured under a grey background for >3months post-incubation was evaluated. Based on these results, in experiment 2, juvenile turbot were adapted to blue, pink, white, or black backgrounds for 50days and their preferences established. Meanwhile, the growth rates, feed intake, and metabolic rates (including oxygen consumption rate, and ammonia excretion rate) of the turbot were evaluated. The results showed that turbot farmed under a grey background, or after long-term white, blue, pink and black colour adaptation, always displayed a preference for a white background and a dislike for black, red, or brown backgrounds, although their body colour was greyish. Long-term adaptation influenced the frequency of juveniles selecting white, black, pink or blue backgrounds. They showed the highest growth rate, feed intake, and metabolic rates under blue and white backgrounds, and the lowest under a black background in accordance with their preferences shown in experiment 1. Although it is unclear how turbot determine their self-referent colour preferences over such a short period of time, these results indicate that dark colours are unsuitable for the aquaculture of turbot culture in terms of the welfare of the fish. PMID:26792527

  9. Rockpool gobies change colour for camouflage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stevens

    Full Text Available Camouflage is found in a wide range of species living in numerous habitat types, offering protection from visually guided predators. This includes many species from the intertidal zone, which must cope with background types diverse in appearance and with multiple predator groups foraging at high and low tide. Many animals are capable of either relatively slow (hours, days, weeks or rapid (seconds and minutes colour change in order to better resemble the background against which they are found, but most work has been restricted to a few species or taxa. It is often suggested that many small intertidal fish are capable of colour change for camouflage, yet little experimental work has addressed this. Here, we test rock gobies (Gobius paganellus for colour change abilities, and whether they can tune their appearance to match the background. In two experiments, we place gobies on backgrounds of different brightness (black or white, and of different colours (red and blue and use digital image analysis and modelling of predator (avian vision to quantify colour and luminance (perceived lightness changes and camouflage. We find that gobies are capable of rapid colour change (occurring within one minute, and that they can change their luminance on lighter or darker backgrounds. When presented on backgrounds of different colours, gobies also change their colour (hue and saturation while keeping luminance the same. These changes lead to predicted improvements in camouflage match to the background. Our study shows that small rockpool fish are capable of rapid visual change for concealment, and that this may be an important mechanism in many species to avoid predation, especially in complex heterogeneous environments.

  10. Digieye Application In Cotton Colour Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Matusiak Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Colour is one of the most important properties of cotton raw materials. It helps in determining and classifying the quality of fibres according to the Universal Cotton Standards. Organoleptic and instrumental techniques are applied to assess the color of cotton. Worldwide, the colour parameters of cotton are measured by the High Volume Instrument (HVI), which provides information on reflectance (Rd) and yellowness (+b) that is specific for cotton, but are not the typical and globally recogniz...

  11. Plants and colour: Flowers and pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renee; Owens, Simon J.; Rørslett, Bjørn

    2011-03-01

    While there is a range of colours found in plants the predominant colour is green. Pigments in plants have several roles e.g. photosynthesis and signalling. If colour is to be used as a signal then it must stand out from green. However, one should be aware that there are also coloured compounds where we have not yet fully investigated the role of colour in their functions—they may have roles in, for example, defence or heat exchange. In this paper, we will describe the basic chemistry of the major pigments found in plants and especially floral pigments. We will then discuss their locations in parts of the flower (such as sepals, petals, pollen and nectar), the cells in which they are found and their sub-cellular locations. Floral pigments have a large role to play in pollination of flowers by animals. They can and are modified in many ways during the development of flowers in nature, for example, at emergence and post-pollination. There are a range of biochemical mechanisms of colour change both within flowers and in isolated pigments. Some of the factors influencing colour are temperature, co-pigments, pH, metals, sugars, anthocyanin stacking and cell shape. There is a renewed interest in analysing floral pigments and how they are modified partly because of advances in recombinant DNA technologies, but also because of pollinators and their significance to biodiversity and for evolutionary studies. There is continued strong interest from the horticultural industry for the introduction of new colours e.g. the blue rose and for the exploitation of natural dyes. Funding in this area may impact future research in a potentially beneficial way but it must not deflect us from science-based conservation.

  12. The Norwegian Sphagna: a field colour guide

    OpenAIRE

    Flatberg, Kjell I.

    2002-01-01

    Colour plates illustrate fifty-four Sphagnum taxa, 50 species and 4 subspecies. This constitues all the known peat mosses from Norway including arctic Svalbard. Macroscopic keys to sections and species within the different sections are presented. These keys used in combination with the colour plates and a hand lens should in most cases enable the correct determination of the Norwegian peat mosses in the field.

  13. THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory

  14. THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-06

    In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

  15. Salience of Primary and Secondary Colours in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Anna; Pitchford, Nicola; Hart, Lynsey; Davies, Ian R. L.; Clausse, Samantha; Jennings, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    Primary colour terms ("black", "white", "red", "green", "yellow", and "blue") are more fundamental in colour language than secondary colour terms ("pink", "purple", "orange", "brown", and "grey"). Here, we assess whether this distinction exists in the absence of language, by investigating whether primary colours attract and sustain preverbal…

  16. Mechanisms, functions and ecology of colour vision in the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel de Ibarra, N; Vorobyev, M; Menzel, R

    2014-06-01

    Research in the honeybee has laid the foundations for our understanding of insect colour vision. The trichromatic colour vision of honeybees shares fundamental properties with primate and human colour perception, such as colour constancy, colour opponency, segregation of colour and brightness coding. Laborious efforts to reconstruct the colour vision pathway in the honeybee have provided detailed descriptions of neural connectivity and the properties of photoreceptors and interneurons in the optic lobes of the bee brain. The modelling of colour perception advanced with the establishment of colour discrimination models that were based on experimental data, the Colour-Opponent Coding and Receptor Noise-Limited models, which are important tools for the quantitative assessment of bee colour vision and colour-guided behaviours. Major insights into the visual ecology of bees have been gained combining behavioural experiments and quantitative modelling, and asking how bee vision has influenced the evolution of flower colours and patterns. Recently research has focussed on the discrimination and categorisation of coloured patterns, colourful scenes and various other groupings of coloured stimuli, highlighting the bees' behavioural flexibility. The identification of perceptual mechanisms remains of fundamental importance for the interpretation of their learning strategies and performance in diverse experimental tasks. PMID:24828676

  17. Evolution of Colour Superposition in the Stochastic QCD Vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Kuvshinov, V. I.; Bagashov, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that confinement of spinless heavy quarks can be treated as decoherence of an arbitrary colour superposition into a mixture quantum state with equal probabilities for different colours with the use of stochastic QCD vacuum model. Decoherence rate is found to be proportional to the distance between colour charges. Purity, fidelity, and Von Neumann entropy of colour states are evaluated.

  18. The Application of Happening Colour in Modern Fabric Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chun-yu

    2006-01-01

    To expand the past and present colour concept and reinvent fabric design methods, happening colour is used as a kind of new colour concept and form to design and analyse the resource of colour. With the aid of sophisticated computer software and advanced digital printing machines, happening colour allows images of considerable complication and intricacy to be designed and produced in modern fabric design by various arrangement of printing colours, which also allows further shifts of colour emphasis of the different visual and psychogenic recept.

  19. How drone flies (Eristalis tenax L., Syrphidae, Diptera) use floral guides to locate food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, T; Lunau, K

    2001-09-01

    In this study we show how inexperienced syrphid flies, Eristalis tenax, orient on artificial flowers by means of floral guides. To test the effect of floral guides such as line and ring markings on the probability and speed of the location of a potential food source, we exploited the spontaneous proboscis reaction triggered by yellow colour stimuli. We tested whether and how fast the flies, when placed on the edge of a circular dummy flower, found a small central yellow spot and touched it with the proboscis extended. The flies found the central yellow spot more often and faster if guide lines from the margin to the yellow spot were present. The effect of guide lines was dependent on the colour of the dummy flower, and independent of the colour of the guide lines, except for yellow guide lines releasing the proboscis reaction. The effect of guide lines was stronger if the yellow spot was hidden in a 2 mm deep depression and thus not as easily visible to the flies. Ring guides had a significant effect on performance only when the intensity of the central yellow spot was low. PMID:12770188

  20. A Handheld LED Coloured-Light Mixer for Students to Learn Collaboratively the Primary Colours of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny…

  1. Environmental colour affects aspects of single-species population dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Petchey, O L

    2000-01-01

    Single-species populations of ciliates (Colpidium and Paramecium) experienced constant temperature or white or reddened temperature fluctuations in aquatic microcosms in order to test three hypotheses about how environmental colour influences population dynamics. (i) Models predict that the colour of population dynamics is tinged by the colour of the environmental variability. However, environmental colour had no effect on the colour of population dynamics. All population dynamics in this exp...

  2. Face colour under varying illumination - analysis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Martinkauppi, B. (Birgitta)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The colours of objects perceived by a colour camera are dependent on the illumination conditions. For example, when the prevailing illumination condition does not correspond to the one used in the white balancing of the camera, the object colours can change their appearance due to the lack of colour constancy capabilities. Many methods for colour constancy have been suggested but so far their performance has been inadequate. Faces are common and important objects encountered in ma...

  3. Alginic acid and hyaluronic acid, effective stabilizers of carthamin red colour in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Saito

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts and free forms of two heterosaccharides, alginic and hyaluronic acids were mixed with carthamin in a buffer at pH 5.5 and their preservation effects of carthamin red colour were screened after incubation for 24 h at 3-5oC in the dark. The effects observed were (alginic acid/hyaluronic acid, % on average: 69.3/60.3, for which the values are higher by 40.9 and 29.1%, respectively, compared with those of the control which was conducted with no addition of heterosaccharides. Alginic acid is a more promising stabilizer than haluronic acid, indicating that active groups such as hydroxyls, carboxyls and amino groups on the building units of the macromolecules are associated closely with the carthamin red colour preservation. The empirical outcomes are referred to the practical application of carthamin as a colourant of food products.

  4. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian

    2012-01-01

    intake (ADI) for humans. The ADI is the amount of the food additive, expressed on a milligram per kilogram of body weight (bw) basis, that can be ingested daily over a lifetime without any appreciable health risk. The following low-calorie sweeteners have been allocated an ADI by either the SCF or EFSA...

  5. ADDITIVES USED TO OBTAIN FOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Dorina Ardelean; Daniela Popa

    2012-01-01

    Use of food additives in food is determined by the growth of contemporary food needs of the world population. Additives used in food, both natural and artificial ones, contribute to: improving the organoleptic characteristics and to preserve the food longer, but we must not forget that all these additives should not be found naturally in food products. Some of these additives are not harmful and human pests in small quantities, but others may have harmful effects on health.

  6. ADDITIVES USED TO OBTAIN FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Ardelean

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of food additives in food is determined by the growth of contemporary food needs of the world population. Additives used in food, both natural and artificial ones, contribute to: improving the organoleptic characteristics and to preserve the food longer, but we must not forget that all these additives should not be found naturally in food products. Some of these additives are not harmful and human pests in small quantities, but others may have harmful effects on health.

  7. Going global Management of colour-measuring instrumentation is the key to successful colour management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Rachel.

    2007-01-01

    @@ It is no secret in the industry that even the best spectrophotometers exhibit colour drift with time. Software solutions are now available that can eliminate this drift and also use different manufacturers'drivers to calibrate literally all of the instruments involved in the colour process.

  8. Genetic analyses of the human eye colours using a novel objective method for eye colour classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe D.; Johansen, Peter; Harder, Stine;

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a new objective method for measuring the eye colour on a continuous scale that allows researchers to associate genetic markers with different shades of eye colour. With the use of the custom designed software Digital Iris Analysis Tool (DIAT), the iris was automatically ...

  9. Antioxidant activity, some nutritional and colour properties of vacuum dried strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L. fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hülya Orak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background.Thestrawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L. fruit contains a higher amount of nutrients and bioactive compounds than many other cultivated species, however, the edible use of this fruit is currently not widespread. In this study, the influences of vacuum drying have been investigated in terms of changing of some nutritional characteristics, antioxidant properties, and colour. Material and methods. Fruits were collected from Çanakkale province in Turkey and next vacuum dried. Ethyl oleate and water blanching pre-treatments were applied to fruits before drying. Ascorbic acid, reducing sugar, minerals, colour, total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching activity and HMF formation were determined. Results. The EO pretreatment shortened the drying time more than WB and gives a higher β-carotene bleaching activity, lower HMF and higher yellowness and brightness of external colour characteristics. Conclusions. In this research, the effects of vacuum drying process on the colour, antioxidant activity and nutritional characteristics of fruit have been determined and it has been concluded that the strawberry tree fruit is assessable in food industry by drying due to rich nutritional components, antioxidant activity and attractive colour of the fruit.  

  10. Artificial sweeteners: safe or unsafe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurrat-ul-Ain; Khan, Sohaib Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Artificial sweeteners or intense sweeteners are sugar substitutes that are used as an alternative to table sugar. They are many times sweeter than natural sugar and as they contain no calories, they may be used to control weight and obesity. Extensive scientific research has demonstrated the safety of the six low-calorie sweeteners currently approved for use in foods in the U.S. and Europe (stevia, acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose), if taken in acceptable quantities daily. There is some ongoing debate over whether artificial sweetener usage poses a health threat .This review article aims to cover thehealth benefits, and risks, of consuming artificial sweeteners, and discusses natural sweeteners which can be used as alternatives. PMID:25842566

  11. Perbandingan Efektivitas Ishihara Colour Blind Test dan Farnsworth Munsell Colour Blind Test di Fakuktas di Fakultas Kedokteran Gigi Universitas Sumatera Utara Tahun 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Indriati, Dwi Meutia

    2015-01-01

    Colour blindness is a disease caused by the inability of cone cells to capture a certain colour spectrum. Colour blindness is generally more contained on the male than the females with a 20:1 ratio. Colour blindness can be diagnosed with several test which Ishihar Colour Blind Test and Farnworth Munsell Colour Blind Test. The purpose of this research was to see a comparison the effectiveness between Ishihara Colour Blind Test with Farmsworth Munsell Colour Blind Test at the Faculty Dentist...

  12. Sensory evaluation of meat colour using photographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Destefanis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Five m. longissimus thoracis steaks from different breeds, purchased at retail, were cut into samples and simultaneously photographed under standard shooting conditions. The first photo was taken on samples just arrived at the laboratory, the second one on a freshly cut surface after blooming. Two consumer panels evaluated beef colour using respectively photo 1 and photo 2. Each consumer was asked to rank samples in order of preference. Rank sums were evaluated with Fridman’s test. Immediately after taking the photos, colour was measured with a colorimeter. Regarding photo 1, consumers were able to discriminate one sample, the worst, from all the others. Concerning photo 2, consumers discriminated the worst sample, as in photo 1, but also the best one. Therefore a more accurate colour evaluation can be obtained if the assessment is carried out on a fresh cut surface after blooming. In general consumers preferred samples with high lightness and a relatively high yellowness. The sensory evaluation of meat colour using photographs is a promising tool to overcome the difficulties when the meat is directly evaluated. But it is very important to standardize the shooting conditions to obtain a true reproduction of the meat. For this purpose the use of a colour target is useful to check the validity of the adopted parameters.

  13. Highly polymorphic colour vision in a New World monkey with red facial skin, the bald uakari (Cacajao calvus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Josmael; Bowler, Mark; Heymann, Eckhard W; Roos, Christian; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2016-04-13

    Colour vision is highly variable in New World monkeys (NWMs). Evidence for the adaptive basis of colour vision in this group has largely centred on environmental features such as foraging benefits for differently coloured foods or predator detection, whereas selection on colour vision for sociosexual communication is an alternative hypothesis that has received little attention. The colour vision of uakaris (Cacajao) is of particular interest because these monkeys have the most dramatic red facial skin of any primate, as well as a unique fission/fusion social system and a specialist diet of seeds. Here, we investigate colour vision in a wild population of the bald uakari,C. calvus, by genotyping the X-linked opsin locus. We document the presence of a polymorphic colour vision system with an unprecedented number of functional alleles (six), including a novel allele with a predicted maximum spectral sensitivity of 555 nm. This supports the presence of strong balancing selection on different alleles at this locus. We consider different hypotheses to explain this selection. One possibility is that trichromacy functions in sexual selection, enabling females to choose high-quality males on the basis of red facial coloration. In support of this, there is some evidence that health affects facial coloration in uakaris, as well as a high prevalence of blood-borne parasitism in wild uakari populations. Alternatively, the low proportion of heterozygous female trichromats in the population may indicate selection on different dichromatic phenotypes, which might be related to cryptic food coloration. We have uncovered unexpected diversity in the last major lineage of NWMs to be assayed for colour vision, which will provide an interesting system to dissect adaptation of polymorphic trichromacy. PMID:27053753

  14. Simultaneous determination of Mn2+ and Fe3+ as 4,4'[(4-cholorophenyl)methylene] bis(3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-ol) complexes in some foods, vegetable and water samples by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Tarighat, Maryam; Shahbazi, Elahe; Niknam, Khodabakhsh

    2013-06-01

    A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method to the simultaneous determination of Mn(2+) and Fe(3+) in foods, vegetable and water sample with the aid of artificial neural networks (ANNs) is described. It relies on the complexation of analytes with recently synthesised bis pyrazol base ligand as 4,4'[(4-cholorophenyl)methylene] bis(3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-ol)(CMBPP). The analytical data show that the ratio of ligand to metal in metal complexes is 1:1 and 1:2 for Fe(3+) and Mn(2+), respectively. It was found that the complexation reactions are completed at pH 6.7 and 5 min after mixing. The results showed that Mn(2+) and Fe(3+) could be determined simultaneously in the range of 0.20-7.5 and 0.30-9.0 mgl(-1), respectively. The analytical characteristics of the method such as the detection limit and the relative standard error predictions were calculated. The data obtained from synthetic mixtures of the metal ions were processed by radial basis function networks (RBFNs) and feed forward neural networks (FFNNs). The optimal conditions of the neural networks were obtained by adjusting various parameters by trial-and-error. Under the working conditions, the proposed methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of elements in different water, tablet, rice, tea leaves, tomato, cabbage and lettuce samples.

  15. Developing an effective means to reduce 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from caramel colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yongguang; Chen, Mingshun; Yu, Shujuan; Tang, Qiang; Yan, He

    2014-01-15

    Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction was used to extract 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from caramel colour (solid content was about 75%). The procedure was carried out by response surface methodology using a quadratic polynomial model. Extraction pressure, time, temperature and ethanol content were selected as the independent variables. Conditions to obtain the highest extraction ratio of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural were determined to be an extraction pressure of 21.65MPa, time of 46.7min, temperature of 35°C and 70% ethanol content of caramel colour. The predicted 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural extraction ratio was 87.42%. Under the conditions stated above, the experimental value of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural extraction ratio was 86.98%, which was similar to the predicted value by the model. This study indicated that supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction can effectively reduce 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from caramel colour, which can help food industry to improve the safety of the food material, as well as provide more healthy caramel colour for human beings.

  16. PENENTUAN KUANTITATIF ZAT WARNA KARMOSIN,PONCEAU 4R DAN MERAH ALURA YANG DITAMBAHKAN DALAM MINUMAN AGREM (Hibiscus sabdariffa, Linn [Quantitative Determination of Carmoisine, Ponceau 4R and Allura Red Colouring Agents Added Into Softdrink Containing the Aqueous Extract of (Hibiscus sabdariffa, Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embit Kartadarma

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic food-colouring agent is stiil commonly used in soft drink to enhance the colour of the food and to make foods more attractive, particularly for the drink containing natural colour. Addition of colour is legally permitted by the govermment, however, the product sometime contain the substance more than the permissible maximum dosage, and it may possibly cause iillhealth to the consumer. Preparation of soft drink containing the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa fruits gave less intense colour due to the colour. The quantity of the synthetic food colour in soft drink must be determined quantitatively for food safety and the presence of natural colour in the products may affect the results. Determination of three synthetic colouring agents, carmoisine, ponceau 4R and allura red added into soft drink containing the aqueous extract of hisbicus sabdariffa was carried out. Result showed that the determination of such colouring agents can only be achivied after adjusting the pH up to 4.5 and the recovery of carmoisine, ponceau 4R and allura red were 99.8: 100.2 and 100.0%, with the accuracy of 0.1;0.3 and 0.1% and the precission of 0.1; 0.3 and 0.1% respectively.

  17. Recent Progress of Flower Colour Modification by Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Chandler

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetically-modified, colour-altered varieties of the important cut-flower crop carnation have now been commercially available for nearly ten years. In this review we describe the manipulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway that has lead to the development of these varieties and how similar manipulations have been successfully applied to both pot plants and another cut-flower species, the rose. From this experience it is clear that down- and up-regulation of the flavonoid and anthocyanin pathway is both possible and predictable. The major commercial benefit of the application of this technology has so far been the development of novel flower colours through the development of transgenic varieties that produce, uniquely for the target species, anthocyanins derived from delphinidin. These anthocyanins are ubiquitous in nature, and occur in both ornamental plants and common food plants. Through the extensive regulatory approval processes that must occur for the commercialization of genetically modified organisms, we have accumulated considerable experimental and trial data to show the accumulation of delphinidin based anthocyanins in the transgenic plants poses no environmental or health risk.

  18. A comparison of colour micrographs obtained with a charged couple devise (CCD) camera and a 35-mm camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Smedegaard, Jesper; Jensen, Peter Koch;

    2005-01-01

    ophthalmology, colour CCD camera, colour film, digital imaging, resolution, micrographs, histopathology, light microscopy......ophthalmology, colour CCD camera, colour film, digital imaging, resolution, micrographs, histopathology, light microscopy...

  19. Artificial Sweeteners versus Natural Sweeteners

    OpenAIRE

    Neacsu, N.A.; Madar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates are an important dietary nutrient which is mostly used to supply energy to the body, as well as a carbon source for synthesis of other needed chemicals. In addition, mono- and disaccharides are craved because of their sweetness. We present different types of sweeteners, which are the basic contents of foods which we consume every day and are demonstrated the positive and negative effects of natural and artificial sweeteners.

  20. Artificial Sweeteners versus Natural Sweeteners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu, N.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are an important dietary nutrient which is mostly used to supply energy to the body, as well as a carbon source for synthesis of other needed chemicals. In addition, mono- and disaccharides are craved because of their sweetness. We present different types of sweeteners, which are the basic contents of foods which we consume every day and are demonstrated the positive and negative effects of natural and artificial sweeteners.

  1. Colour vision screening among Saudi Arabian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Matthew Oriowo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the prevalence of congenital red-green colour vision defects among Saudi Arabian male and female children.Methods: The study involved 1638 elementary and high school participants (838 males, and 800 females, who were randomly selected and screened for red-green colour vision defects using the Ishihara (pseudo-isochromatic plates test. Inclusion criteria were Snellen VA 20/20 or better and absence of known ocular pathologies.Among the females, 0.75% of the 800 participants showed CVD, with 0.25% and 0.5% demonstratingprotan and deutan defects, respectively.Conclusion: The results show that the prevalence of red-green colour deficiency among the female children from central Saudi Arabia is not significantly different from that of female populations inwestern countries.  The current prevalence among the males is higher than previously reported for central Saudi Arabia, but less than for Caucasian populations. 

  2. Artificial Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru JIVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to eliminate, a routine in the economic thinking, claimed to be responsible for the negative essence of economic developments, from the point of view, of the ecological implications (employment in the planetary ecosystem. The methodological foundations start from the natural origins of the functionality of the human economic society according to the originary physiocrat liberalism, and from specific natural characteristics of the humankind. This paper begins with a comment-analysis of the difference between natural and artificial within the economy, and then explains some of the most serious diversions from the natural essence of economic liberalism. It shall be explained the original (heterodox interpretation of the Classical political economy (economics, by making calls to the Romanian economic thinking from aggravating past century. Highlighting the destructive impact of the economy - which, under the invoked doctrines, we call unnatural - allows an intuitive presentation of a logical extension of Marshall's market price, based on previous research. Besides the doctrinal arguments presented, the economic realities inventoried along the way (major deficiencies and effects, determined demonstrate the validity of the hypothesis of the unnatural character and therefore necessarily to be corrected, of the concept and of the mechanisms of the current economy.The results of this paper consist of original heterodox methodspresented, intuitive or developed that can be found conclusively within the key proposals for education and regulation.

  3. OCoc- from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, B.; Overduin, P. P.; Schirrmeister, L.; Lantuit, H.; Doerffer, R.

    2009-12-01

    Enhanced permafrost warming and increased arctic river discharges have heightened concern about the input of terrigenous matter into Arctic coastal waters. The ‘OCoc-from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon’ project (IPY-project 1176), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), is an Ocean Colour study joined with the Arctic Coastal Dynamics ACD network and Arctic Circum-polar Coastal Observatory Network ACCO-Net (IPY-project 90). OCoc uses Ocean Colour satellite data for synoptical monitoring of organic matter fluxes from fluvial and coastal sources. Initial results from German-Russian expeditions at the southeastern Laptev Sea Coast (Arctic Siberia, Russia) in August 2008 and August 2009 are presented. Large parts of this coastal zone are characterized by highly erosive organic-rich material. Ocean Colour MERIS Reduced Resolution (RR)-LIB data of the have been processed towards optical aquatic parameters using Beam-Visat4.2 and the MERIS case2 regional processor for coastal application (C2R). Calculated aquatic parameters are absorption and backscattering coefficients, apparent optical properties such as the first attenuation depth (‘Z90’) and calculated concentrations of chlorophyll, total suspended matter and coloured dissolved organic matter absorption from the water leaving reflectances. Initial comparisons with expedition data (Secchi depths, cDOM) show that the MERIS-C2R optical parameters ’total absorption’ and the first attenuation depth, ’Z90’, seem adequately to represent true conditions. High attenuation values in the spectral blue wavelength range may serve as tracer for the organic-rich terrigenous input. The synoptic information of Ocean Colour products will provide valuable spatial and dynamical information on the Organic Carbon and sediment fluxes from the Siberian permafrost coast.

  4. Multi-colour detection of gravitational arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturi, Matteo; Mizera, Sebastian; Seidel, Gregor

    2014-07-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides fundamental insights into the understanding of the dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the background cosmology. Despite their importance, few gravitational arcs have been discovered so far. The urge for more complete, large samples and unbiased methods of selecting candidates increases. Several methods for the automatic detection of arcs have been proposed in the literature, but large amounts of spurious detections retrieved by these methods force observers to visually inspect thousands of candidates per square degree to clean the samples. This approach is largely subjective and requires a huge amount of checking by eye, especially considering the actual and upcoming wide-field surveys, which will cover thousands of square degrees. In this paper we study the statistical properties of the colours of gravitational arcs detected in the 37 deg2 of the CFHTLS-Archive-Research Survey (CARS). Most of them lie in a relatively small region of the (g' - r', r' - i') colour-colour diagram. To explain this property, we provide a model that includes the lensing optical depth expected in a ΛCDM cosmology that, in combination with the sources' redshift distribution of a given survey, in our case CARS, peaks for sources at redshift z ~ 1. By furthermore modelling the colours derived from the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies that dominate the population at that redshift, the model reproduces the observed colours well. By taking advantage of the colour selection suggested by both data and model, we automatically detected 24 objects out of 90 detected by eye checking. Compared with the single-band arcfinder, this multi-band filtering returns a sample complete to 83% and a contamination reduced by a factor of ~6.5. New gravitational arc candidates are also proposed.

  5. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  6. Colour and stellar population gradients in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, C; Cardone, V F; Capaccioli, M; Jetzer, P; Molinaro, R

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the colour, age and metallicity gradients in a wide sample of local SDSS early- and late-type galaxies. From the fitting of stellar population models we find that metallicity is the main driver of colour gradients and the age in the central regions is a dominant parameter which rules the scatter in both metallicity and age gradients. We find a consistency with independent observations and a set of simulations. From the comparison with simulations and theoretical considerations we are able to depict a general picture of a formation scenario.

  7. Complexity of greedy edge-colouring

    OpenAIRE

    Havet, Frédéric; Maia, Ana Karolinna; Yu, Min-Li

    2015-01-01

    International audience The Grundy index of a graph G = (V, E) is the greatest number of colours that the greedy edge-colouring algorithm can use on G. We prove that the problem of determining the Grundy index of a graph G = (V, E) is NP-hard for general graphs. We also show that this problem is polynomial-time solvable for caterpillars. More specifically, we prove that the Grundy index of a caterpillar is (G) or (G) + 1 and present a polynomial-time algorithm to determine it exactly.

  8. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour

    OpenAIRE

    Kreft, Marko; KREFT, SAMO

    2015-01-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thicknessof a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil oran aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some...

  9. Colour dosemeters for high level radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönbacher, H.; Coninckx, F.; Miller, A.;

    1990-01-01

    Development work was undertaken in order to produce a visual dosemeter system for measurement of radiation levels around the present and future high energy particle accelerators. This dosemeter should exhibit radiation induced colours in the visible part of the spectrum leading to a visual dose...... radiation; and (2) a paint containing a base substance with a pigment. The paint dosemeter remained unaffected by irradiation up to 3 x 10(4) Gy while the film dosemeter showed a measurable colour change from 10(4) Gy to 5 x 10(5) Gy. Above 10(6) Gy the film dosemeter is destroyed by radiation. Samples...

  10. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  11. Colour vision screening among Saudi Arabian children

    OpenAIRE

    O. Matthew Oriowo; Abdullah Z. Alotaibi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of congenital red-green colour vision defects among Saudi Arabian male and female children.Methods: The study involved 1638 elementary and high school participants (838 males, and 800 females), who were randomly selected and screened for red-green colour vision defects using the Ishihara (pseudo-isochromatic plates) test. Inclusion criteria were Snellen VA 20/20 or better and absence of known ocular pathologies.Among the females, 0.75% of the 800 participa...

  12. The well-tuned blues: the role of structural colours as optical signals in the species recognition of a local butterfly fauna (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Zsolt; Kertész, Krisztián; Piszter, Gábor; Vértesy, Zofia; Biró, László P

    2012-08-01

    The photonic nanoarchitectures responsible for the blue colour of the males of nine polyommatine butterfly species living in the same site were investigated structurally by electron microscopy and spectrally by reflectance spectroscopy. Optical characterization was carried out on 110 exemplars. The structural data extracted by dedicated software and the spectral data extracted by standard software were inputted into an artificial neural network software to test the specificity of the structural and optical characteristics. It was found that both the structural and the spectral data allow species identification with an accuracy better than 90 per cent. The reflectance data were further analysed using a colour representation diagram built in a manner analogous to that of the human Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage diagram, but the additional blue visual pigment of lycaenid butterflies was taken into account. It was found that this butterfly-specific colour representation diagram yielded a much clearer distinction of the position of the investigated species compared with previous calculations using the human colour space. The specific colours of the investigated species were correlated with the 285 flight-period data points extracted from museum collections. The species with somewhat similar colours fly in distinct periods of the year such that the blue colours are well tuned for safe mate/competitor recognition. This allows for the creation of an effective pre-zygotic isolation mechanism for closely related synchronic and syntopic species.

  13. 77 FR 71746 - Artificially Sweetened Fruit Jelly and Artificially Sweetened Fruit Preserves and Jams; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... fruit preserves and jams (artificially sweetened preserves and jams) (21 CFR 150.161) (24 FR 8896... for their use in food labeling (58 FR 2302; January 6, 1993). FDA also prescribed at the same time in... a traditional standardized food term (58 FR 2431; January 6, 1993). A nutrient content claim...

  14. Camouflage Effects of Various Colour-Marking Morphs against Different Microhabitat Backgrounds in a Polymorphic Pygmy Grasshopper Tetrix japonica

    OpenAIRE

    Kaori Tsurui; Atsushi Honma; Takayoshi Nishida

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colour-marking polymorphism is widely distributed among cryptic species. To account for the adaptive significance of such polymorphisms, several hypotheses have been proposed to date. Although these hypotheses argue over the degree of camouflage effects of marking morphs (and the interactions between morphs and their microhabitat backgrounds), as far as we know, most empirical evidence has been provided under unnatural conditions (i.e., using artificial prey). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPA...

  15. Exclusion of candidate genes for coat colour phenotypes of the American mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Markakis, M. N.; Vissenberg, K.;

    2012-01-01

    In a previous project, we screened the American mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library, CHORI-231, for genes potentially involved in various coat colour phenotypes in the American mink. Subsequently, we 454 sequenced the inserts containing these genes and developed microsatellite markers fo...... of similar phenotypes in other mammals, including horses, pigs, cows, dogs, cats, mice and humans, they do not appear to be responsible for comparable phenotypes found in American mink....

  16. Application of Modern Colour Measurement Dervices in Coloration Industries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUNG Y.S.; XIN John H.; SIN K.M.

    2002-01-01

    In colour measurement ralated industry, reflectance spectrophotometer is the one of the popular measuring machine for measutring colour and quality control. Colour communications is frequently confusing. This is because the colour appearance is subject to the influence of at least three different phenomena: the light source, the object and the visual system. The variation in either the radiant quantity or the spectral distribution of the source can alter the observed colour. Because of this reason,the objective quantitative tool, colour measurement equipment and communication method; become more important in evaluating of the colour. In fact, based on the advanced in computer system and electronic device,the colour measurement becomes more and more accuracy, especiany in spectrophotometer measurement.In this paper, we will focus on the review of modern spectrophotometers in coloration industries.

  17. Testing the AUDI2000 colour-difference formula for solid colours using some visual datasets with usefulness to automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Juan; Melgosa, Manuel; Gómez-Robledo, Luis; Li, Changjun; Huang, Min; Liu, Haoxue; Cui, Guihua; Luo, M. Ronnier; Dauser, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Colour-difference formulas are tools employed in colour industries for objective pass/fail decisions of manufactured products. These objective decisions are based on instrumental colour measurements which must reliably predict the subjective colour-difference evaluations performed by observers' panels. In a previous paper we have tested the performance of different colour-difference formulas using the datasets employed at the development of the last CIErecommended colour-difference formula CIEDE2000, and we found that the AUDI2000 colour-difference formula for solid (homogeneous) colours performed reasonably well, despite the colour pairs in these datasets were not similar to those typically employed in the automotive industry (CIE Publication x038:2013, 465-469). Here we have tested again AUDI2000 together with 11 advanced colour-difference formulas (CIELUV, CIELAB, CMC, BFD, CIE94, CIEDE2000, CAM02-UCS, CAM02-SCD, DIN99d, DIN99b, OSA-GP-Euclidean) for three visual datasets we may consider particularly useful to the automotive industry because of different reasons: 1) 828 metallic colour pairs used to develop the highly reliable RIT-DuPont dataset (Color Res. Appl. 35, 274-283, 2010); 2) printed samples conforming 893 colour pairs with threshold colour differences (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, 883-891, 2012); 3) 150 colour pairs in a tolerance dataset proposed by AUDI. To measure the relative merits of the different tested colour-difference formulas, we employed the STRESS index (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 1823-1829, 2007), assuming a 95% confidence level. For datasets 1) and 2), AUDI2000 was in the group of the best colour-difference formulas with no significant differences with respect to CIE94, CIEDE2000, CAM02-UCS, DIN99b and DIN99d formulas. For dataset 3) AUDI2000 provided the best results, being statistically significantly better than all other tested colour-difference formulas.

  18. Jottings on protective colour in animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort, de L.F.

    1964-01-01

    I have often been puzzled about the remarkable change of colour in the roedeer, a species that I can watch almost daily from my house. In the winter the greyish brown coat can hardly be distinguished against the dull, brownish shrubby wood, at the border of which they come to feed. The only visible

  19. A Brief Introduction to Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets or CPN) is a graphical oriented language for design, specification, simulation and verification of systems. It is in particular well- suited for systems in which communication, synchronisation and resource sharing are important. Typical examples of application areas a...

  20. An analogy between colour and spatial coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R; Moorhead, I

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of colour coding are well established in that the trichromatic receptor stage is followed by a set of opponent colour channels. One interpretation of the sequence is that opponent channels carry unrelated aspects of the colour stimulus, unlike the cone channels. The overlap of the cone channels can be removed by decorrelating their spectral-sensitivity functions, and this procedure has been found to give opponent colour channels which match those found psychophysically. Since the known spatial-frequency channels also show considerable overlap, the question arises which aspects of the spatial stimulus are captured by decorrelating the spatial-frequency channels. The results of decorrelating the spatial-frequency channels are that the first decorrelated spatial filter acts as a broad bandpass filter which has a peak sensitivity at 7.9 cycles deg-1, and that the second decorrelated spatial filter acts as an opponent spatial-frequency channel, with a minimum output at a low (4.1 cycles deg-1) spatial frequency and a maximum output at a high (15.1 cycles deg-1) spatial frequency. The characteristics of the first decorrelated filter closely resemble the properties of the foveal perceptive field which have been used to explain the Hermann grid illusion. Thus, the decorrelation analysis produces a model for the functional organisation of the channel implementation at the neural and psychophysical levels, but which directly relates to the subjective appearance of the visual stimuli.

  1. Demonstration of the Colour Range of Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a box that is filled with indicator of a particular concentration. A little acid is added to one side and a little alkali to the other so that the complete colour range of the indicator is observable. (GS)

  2. Basic mechanisms of defective colour vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Normal colour vision is presently described in the framework of one or other trichromatic opponent model. The trichromacy finds its origin in three different pigments, these pigments having maximal absorption in different parts of the spectrum. The absorption spectra determine the spectral sensitivi

  3. New Evidence for Infant Colour Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Anna; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2004-01-01

    Bornstein, Kessen, and Weiskopf (1976) reported that pre-linguistic infants perceive colour categorically for primary boundaries: Following habituation, dishabituation only occurred if the test stimulus was from a different adult category to the original. Here, we replicated this important study and extended it to include secondary boundaries,…

  4. Central Limit Theorem for Coloured Hard Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Simonetta Bernabei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the central limit theorem for a class of coloured graphs. This means that we investigate the limit behavior of certain random variables whose values are combinatorial parameters associated to these graphs. The techniques used at arriving this result comprise combinatorics, generating functions, and conditional expectations.

  5. Colour is more than hue: preferences for compiled colour traits in the stingless bees Melipona mondury and M. quadrifasciata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koethe, Sebastian; Bossems, Jessica; Dyer, Adrian G; Lunau, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    The colour vision of bees has been extensively analysed in honeybees and bumblebees, but few studies consider the visual perception of stingless bees (Meliponini). In a five-stage experiment the preference for colour intensity and purity, and the preference for the dominant wavelength were tested by presenting four colour stimuli in each test to freely flying experienced workers of two stingless bee species, Melipona mondury and Melipona quadrifasciata. The results with bee-blue, bee-UV-blue and bee-green colours offered in four combinations of varying colour intensity and purity suggest a complex interaction between these colour traits for the determination of colour choice. Specifically, M. mondury preferred bee-UV-blue colours over bee-green, bee-blue and bee-blue-green colours while M. quadrifasciata preferred bee-green colour stimuli. Moreover in M. mondury the preferences were different if the background colour was changed from grey to green. There was a significant difference between species where M. mondury preferred UV-reflecting over UV-absorbing bee-blue-green colour stimuli, whereas M. quadrifasciata showed an opposite preference. The different colour preferences of the free flying bees in identical conditions may be caused by the bees' experience with natural flowers precedent to the choice tests, suggesting reward partitioning between species. PMID:27480640

  6. Dose-response effects of gamma irradiation on colour and antioxidant activity of wild Malva neglecta

    OpenAIRE

    Pinela, José; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Barros, Lillian; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation processing technology has been used to improve food security, safety and quality. However there are a few reports in the literature on the effect of irradiation on bioactivity of herbs and medicinal plants [1]. Hence, the present work was undertaken to investigate the dose-response effects of gamma irradiation on the colour and antioxidant activity of wild Malva neglecta Wallr. In the north-eastern of Portugal, this annual herbaceous plant is traditionally eaten raw as leafy vegetab...

  7. Visual targeting of components of floral colour patterns in flower-naïve bumblebees ( Bombus terrestris; Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Klaus; Fieselmann, Gabriele; Heuschen, Britta; van de Loo, Antje

    2006-07-01

    Floral colour patterns are contrasting colour patches on flowers, a part of the signalling apparatus that was considered to display shape and colour signals used by flower-visitors to detect flowers and locate the site of floral reward. Here, we show that flower-naïve bumblebees ( Bombus terrestris) spontaneously direct their approach towards the outside margin of artificial flowers, which provides contrast between these dummy flowers and the background. If no floral guides are present, the bumblebees continue to approach the margin and finally touch the marginal area of the dummy flower with the tips of their antennae. Whilst approaching dummy flowers that also have a central floral guide, the bumblebees change their direction of flight: Initially, they approach the margin, later they switch to approaching the colour guide, and finally they precisely touch the floral guide with their antennae. Variation of the shape of equally sized dummy flowers did not alter the bumblebees’ preferential orientation towards the guide. Using reciprocal combinations of guide colour and surrounding colour, we showed that the approach from a distance towards the corolla and the antennal contact with the guide are elicited by the same colour parameter: spectral purity. As a consequence, the dummy flowers eliciting the greatest frequency of antennal reactions at the guide are those that combine a floral guide of high spectral purity with a corolla of less spectral purity. Our results support the hypothesis that floral guides direct bumblebees’ approaches to the site of first contact with the flower, which is achieved by the tips of the antennae.

  8. Improvement of Objective Image Quality Evaluation Applying Colour Differences in the CIELAB Colour Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandro Lovisolo & Renata C. C. de Souza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective full-reference image quality algorithms are often designed considering the luminancecomponent of images. In this work perceived colour distance is employed in a simple andfunctional way in order to improve these full-reference image quality algorithms. The differencebetween colours in the CIELAB colour space is employed as perceived colour distance. Thisquantity is used to process images that are to be feed to full-reference image quality algorithms.This image processing stage consists of identifying the image regions or pixels that are expectedto be perceived identically by a human observer in both the reference image and the imagehaving its quality evaluated. In order to verify the validity of the proposal, objective scores arecompared with subjective ones for public available image databases. Despite being a very simplestrategy, the proposed approach was effective to improve the agreement between subjective andthe SSIM (Structural Similarity Index Metric objective score.

  9. Memory colour segmentation and classification using class-specific eigenregions

    OpenAIRE

    Fredembach, Clement; Estrada, Francisco; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Memory colours refer to the colour of specific image regions that have the essential attribute of being perceived in a consistent manner by human observers. In colour correction-or rendering-tasks, this consistency implies that they have to be faithfully reproduced; their importance, in that respect, is greater than for other regions in an image. There are various schemes and attributes to detect memory colours, but the preferred method remains to segment the images into meaningful regions, a...

  10. From spectral information to animal colour vision: experiments and concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Kelber, Almut; Osorio, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many animals use the spectral distribution of light to guide behaviour, but whether they have colour vision has been debated for over a century. Our strong subjective experience of colour and the fact that human vision is the paradigm for colour science inevitably raises the question of how we compare with other species. This article outlines four grades of ‘colour vision’ that can be related to the behavioural uses of spectral information, and perhaps to the underlying mechanisms. In the fir...

  11. Tracking categorical surface colour across illuminant changes in natural scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, K

    2010-01-01

    How well can categorical colour perception be maintained in natural environments with varying illuminants? To address this question, a colour-naming experiment was performed with colour-monitor images of natural scenes simulated under two different daylights of correlated colour temperature 6500 K and 25000 K. Images were obtained from a set of hyperspectral data to enable the accurate control of illuminant and reflectance spectra. Each scene contained a spherical test surface whose digitally...

  12. Estimating limits on colour vision performance in natural scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, D H

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate some of the basic limits on human colour vision performance over a range of natural scenes. Computational simulations of colour processing were carried out with 50 hyperspectral images of rural and urban scenes under different daylights. Three limits were estimated for each scene: the number of discriminable coloured surfaces under a single daylight, the relative frequency of metamerism across two daylights, and, as a measure of of colour constancy, the me...

  13. Higher-level cortical processing of colour (Guest editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Davidoff, J; Walsh, V; Wagemans, Johan

    1997-01-01

    Wavelength information serves both to organise shapes and to provide the appearance of surfaces. These two roles are considered within a model that outlines the role of colour in picture naming (Davidoff and de Bleser, 1993). An introduction to the papers in this issue is given within the framework of the model. The topics in this issue cover the role of colour in scene segmentation, colour constancy and the memory for the colours of objects. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Colour Design for Carton-Packed Fruit Juice Packages

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuo-Ting; Ou, Li-Chen; Luo, M. Ronnier

    2009-01-01

    The present research studies the relationships between observers’ expectations for 7 fruit juice packages and the colour design of the package. To do this, a two-stage experiment was conducted. At the first stage, we studied perceived colours for the fruit images shown on each package. At the second stage, fruit juice packages with 20 package colours were rated using 5 bipolar scales: colour harmony, preference, freshness, naturalness and product quality. The experimental results show that th...

  15. Inheritance of flower colour in Desmodium gangeticum (L.) DC.

    OpenAIRE

    Harshwardhan R. Nandanwar* and P. Manivel

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted with the aim to study the inheritance pattern of flower colour in Desmodium gangeticum. Populations of two parental lines having two different flower colours, white (DDG 18) and pink (DDG 8) were used for study. The results indicated that flower colour was under monogenic control of dominant gene with pink colour indicating the mendelian inheritance pattern exhibiting the monohybrid ratio of 3:1. The data was confirmed by χ2 test which showed non-significa...

  16. Dynamic Colour Possibilities and Functional Properties of Thermochromic Printing Inks

    OpenAIRE

    Rahela Kulcar; Marta Klanjsek Gunde; Nina Knesaurek

    2012-01-01

    Thermochromic printing inks change their colour regarding the change in temperature and they are one of the major groups of colour-changing inks. One of the most frequently used thermochromic material in printing inks are leuco dyes. The colour of thermochromic prints is dynamic, it is not just temperature-dependent, but it also depends on thermal history. The effect is described by colour hysteresis. This paper aims at discussing general aspects of thermochromic inks, dynamic colorimetric pr...

  17. Colour vision of the foraging swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Shimada, Naoko; Arikawa, Kentaro; 充代, 木下

    1995-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that foraging summer-form females of the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus have colour vision. The butterflies were trained to feed on sucrose solution placed on a disk of a particular colour in a cage set in the laboratory. After a few such training runs, a butterfly was presented with the training colour randomly positioned within an array of disks of other colours, but with no sucrose solution. The results indicate that the butterflies learn rapid...

  18. New method for comparing colour gamuts among printing technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Perales Romero, Esther; Chorro Calderón, Elísabet; Viqueira Pérez, Valentín; Martínez Verdú, Francisco Miguel; Otero Belmar, Susana; Gracia Bonache, Vicente de

    2007-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method to compare the colour gamuts of different industries (printing, textiles, plastics, etc.) based on representing the reproduced colours in constant lightness L* and hue hab* planes. This method allows the analysis of those aspects related to the comparison between the colour gamuts of different industries and the MacAdam and Pointer limits and also of those aspects related to how the colour solid is filled, whether homogeneously or leav...

  19. Mary Gartside: A female colour theorist in Georgian England

    OpenAIRE

    Loske, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the work of Mary Gartside, a British female flower painter, art teacher and colour theorist, active in London between 1781 and 1809. Gartside's colour theory was published privately in the guise of a traditional water colouring manual. Until well into the twentieth century, she remained the only woman known to have published a theory of colour. In chronological and intellectual terms Gartside can cautiously be regarded an exemplary link between Moses Harr...

  20. Colour constancy in natural images through colour naming and sensor sharpening

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Corral, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Advisors: Maria Vanrell, Graham Finlayson. Date and location of PhD thesis defense: 28 February 2011, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Colour is derived from three physical properties: incident light, object reflectance and sensor sensitivities. Incident light varies under natural conditions; hence, recovering scene illuminant is an important issue in computational colour. One way to deal with this problem under calibrated conditions is by following three steps, 1) building a narrow-band ...

  1. Floral colour diversity in plant communities, bee colour space and a null model

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbert, A; Kunze, J.; Chittka, L.

    1999-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists have long hypothesized that the diversity of flower colours we see is in part a strategy to promote memorization by pollinators, pollinator constancy, and therefore, a directed and efficient pollen transfer between plants. However, this hypothesis has never been tested against a biologically realistic null model, nor were colours assessed in the way pollinators see them. Our intent here is to fill these gaps. Throughout one year, we sampled floral species compositions ...

  2. Certification of the Cu and Cd amount contents in artificial food digest using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for Pilot Study 13 of the Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere (CCQM) launched the Pilot Study 13, an interlaboratory comparison between the metrological organizations worldwide on the determination of Ca, Cu and Cd in artificial food digests. These samples (available in 7% HNO3 and with a salinity evaluated around 370 mg kg-1, including approx. 30 mg Na kg-1) were prepared by gravimetrical mixing, and thus reference values traceable to the Kg for the three elements were available eventually. This paper describes the contribution of IRMM for the certification of the Cu and the Cd amount contents. The analytical protocol developed was based on isotope dilution associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The Cu measurements required 125-fold dilution of the initial sample solution. An interference of 23Na40Ar+ on 63Cu+ was identified but, since the ratio between both species was over 1000, it was successfully overcome by the calculation of a correction factor for its effect on the Cu amount content directly. Dilution of the sample was not possible for Cd only present at the low ng g-1 level. Up to 1% difference was observed on Cd isotope ratio results between measurements performed directly or after matrix separation. This is rarely shown. As similar results could be obtained either way after the necessary corrections, the direct measurements approach associated to a correction for mass discrimination effects using the CCQM-P13 sample itself (and the IUPAC table values as reference for the natural Cd isotopic composition) was preferred as it was the easiest. SI traceable values were obtained for Cu and Cd with less than 1 and 1.5% combined uncertainty, respectively (6 995±55 (k=2) nmol kg-1 and 45.53±0.64 (k=2) nmol kg-1). The excellent agreement between these results and the reference values (less than 0.6 and 0.08% difference) further validated the analytical protocols developed

  3. Colour picking: the pecking order of form and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nack, F.-M.; Manniesing, A.S.K.; Hardman, L.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia presentation generation has to be able to balance the functional aspects of a presentation that address the information needs of the user, and its aesthetic form. We demonstrate our approach using automatic colour design for which we integrate relevant aspects of colour theory. Colour sel

  4. A period-colour relation for dwarf novae at minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of available UBVRI photometry of dwarf novae at minimum shows that the colour indices (B-V) and (U-B) correlate strongly with orbital period. In the colour-colour diagram they define a characteristic quiescent branch. Two models to explain the correlation are discussed. (author)

  5. Period-colour relation for dwarf novae at minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria, J. (Sussex Univ., Brighton, Great Britain); Jones, D.H.P. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Hailsham, Great Britain)

    1984-02-15

    An analysis of available UBVRI photometry of dwarf novae at minimum shows that the colour indices (B-V) and (U-B) correlate strongly with orbital period. In the colour-colour diagram they define a characteristic quiescent branch. Two models to explain the correlation are discussed.

  6. Is colour modulation an independent factor in human visual photosensitivity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Parra; F.H. Lopes da Silva; H. Stroink; S. Kalitzin

    2007-01-01

    Considering that the role of colour in photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) remains unclear, we designed a study to determine the potential of different colours, colour combinations and white light to trigger photoparoxysmal responses (PPRs) under stringent controlled conditions. After assessing their phot

  7. An Interaction of Screen Colour and Lesson Task in CAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.

    2004-01-01

    Colour is a common feature in computer-aided learning (CAL), though the instructional effects of screen colour are not well understood. This investigation considers the effects of different CAL study tasks with feedback on posttest performance and on posttest memory of the lesson colour scheme. Graduate students (n=68) completed a computer-based…

  8. Mediterranean Ocean Colour Chlorophyll Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Simone; Falcini, Federico; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Sammartino, Michela; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-01-01

    In being at the base of the marine food web, phytoplankton is particularly important for marine ecosystem functioning (e.g., biodiversity). Strong anthropization, over-exploitation of natural resources, and climate change affect the natural amount of phytoplankton and, therefore, represent a continuous threat to the biodiversity in marine waters. In particular, a concerning risks for coastal waters is the increase in nutrient inputs of terrestrial/anthropogenic origin that can lead to undesirable modifications of phytoplankton concentration (i.e., eutrophication). Monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) concentration, which is a proxy of phytoplankton biomass, is an efficient tool for recording and understanding the response of the marine ecosystem to human pressures and thus for detecting eutrophication. Here, we compute Chl trends over the Mediterranean Sea by using satellite data, also highlighting the fact that remote sensing may represent an efficient and reliable solution to synoptically control the “good environmental status” (i.e., the Marine Directive to achieve Good Environmental Status of EU marine waters by 2020) and to assess the application of international regulations and environmental directives. Our methodology includes the use of an ad hoc regional (i.e., Mediterranean) algorithm for Chl concentration retrieval, also accounting for the difference between offshore (i.e., Case I) and coastal (i.e., Case II) waters. We apply the Mann-Kendall test and the Sens’s method for trend estimation to the Chl concentration de-seasonalized monthly time series, as obtained from the X-11 technique. We also provide a preliminary analysis of some particular trends by evaluating their associated inter-annual variability. The high spatial resolution of our approach allows a clear identification of intense trends in those coastal waters that are affected by river outflows. We do not attempt to attribute the observed trends to specific anthropogenic events. However, the

  9. From silk to satellite: Half a century of ocean colour anomalies in the Northeast Atlantic

    KAUST Repository

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.

    2014-04-23

    Changes in phytoplankton dynamics influence marine biogeochemical cycles, climate processes, and food webs, with substantial social and economic consequences. Large-scale estimation of phytoplankton biomass was possible via ocean colour measurements from two remote sensing satellites - the Coastal Zone Colour Scanner (CZCS, 1979-1986) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, 1998-2010). Due to the large gap between the two satellite eras and differences in sensor characteristics, comparison of the absolute values retrieved from the two instruments remains challenging. Using a unique in situ ocean colour dataset that spans more than half a century, the two satellite-derived chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) eras are linked to assess concurrent changes in phytoplankton variability and bloom timing over the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and North Sea. Results from this unique re-analysis reflect a clear increasing pattern of Chl-a, a merging of the two seasonal phytoplankton blooms producing a longer growing season and higher seasonal biomass, since the mid-1980s. The broader climate plays a key role in Chl-a variability as the ocean colour anomalies parallel the oscillations of the Northern Hemisphere Temperature (NHT) since 1948. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. ON f-EDGE COVER-COLOURING OF SIMPLE GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Huimin; Liu Guizhen

    2005-01-01

    An f-edge cover-colouring of a graph G = (V, E) is an assignment of colours to the edges of G such that every colour appears at each vertex υ∈ V at least f(υ) times.The maximum number of colours needed to f-edge cover colour G is called the f-edge cover chromatic index of G, denoted by χfc(G). This paper gives that min[d(ν)-1/f(ν)] ≤χfc(G) ≤min[d(υ)/f(υ)].

  11. THE GENETICS PRINCIPLE OF COAT COLOUR ABOUT ASSORTED DOG BREEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Boumová, Renáta

    2012-01-01

    Summary The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) probably had the original colour like the wolf (Canis lupus) which blends into its surroundings and its pale colour ensured it to attack and catch a prey. Domestication has led to a breeding of many dog breeds that would not have a chance to survive in the wild because of a wide variety of colours. The colour became an important selection criterion from the viewpoint of the usage of different dog breeds. The colour of fur is often one of the ...

  12. Colour Fading of Textile Fabric by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Cheung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colour fading of a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 19 dyed textile fabric was performed by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP treatment with the use of plasma jet. Under the APP treatment condition of treatment time = 5 sec/mm; ignition power = 160 W; oxygen concentration = 1%; jet distance = 3 mm, significant colour-fading effect was achieved. For comparison purpose, the reactive dye dyed textile fabric was subjected to conventional enzymatic colour-fading process. Experimental results revealed that the APP-induced colour-fading effect was comparable with conventional enzymatic colour-fading process.

  13. The influence of colours on pupils' feelings at school

    OpenAIRE

    Bec, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The role that colours have in our lives is far greater than most of us might imagine. Environment in which we live is composed of different colours and their shades. When we are aware of the meaning of colours and their impact on mental and physical well-being, we can also better choose the right colours and shades for our clothing, home and work environment which would bring us the desired feelings. With this thesis we researched how colours in the school environment affect the well-being of...

  14. Inheritance of flower colour in Desmodium gangeticum (L. DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshwardhan R. Nandanwar* and P. Manivel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted with the aim to study the inheritance pattern of flower colour in Desmodium gangeticum. Populations of two parental lines having two different flower colours, white (DDG 18 and pink (DDG 8 were used for study. The results indicated that flower colour was under monogenic control of dominant gene with pink colour indicating the mendelian inheritance pattern exhibiting the monohybrid ratio of 3:1. The data was confirmed by χ2 test which showed non-significant chi-square value for flower colour.

  15. Uropygial gland and bib colouration in the house sparrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Birds frequently signal different qualities by plumage colouration, mainly during mating. However, plumage colouration is determined during the moult, and therefore it would indicate the quality of individual birds during the moult, not its current quality. Recent studies, however, suggest that birds could modify plumage colouration by using cosmetic preen oil produced by the uropygial gland. In this study, I show that bib colouration is related to uropygial gland size and body condition in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Moreover, I conducted an experiment in which a group of sparrows were inoculated with an antigen, mimicking an illness. In control birds, short-term changes in bib colouration were related to both body condition and change in uropygial gland size. Therefore, birds that reduced uropygial gland size showed a greater colouration change. However, bib colouration did not change with the change in uropygial gland size in experimental birds inoculated with the antigen. Given that the experiment did not affect preen oil production or consumption, this finding tentatively suggests that the immune challenge provoked a change in the composition of preen oil, affecting its cosmetic properties. In short, the results of this study suggest that (1) male house sparrows produce cosmetic preen oil that alters the colouration of their bibs; (2) the more change in uropygial gland size, the more change in bib colouration; and (3) in this way, bib colouration has the potential to signal current health status, since less healthy birds showed less capacity to change bib colouration. PMID:27280079

  16. Colour From the Perspective of Hadith: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainan Nazri Mohd Khairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colour is mentioned a few times in the Prophetic Traditions, signifying its values and symbolic representation for the people. The Prophet PBUH highlighted the significance of certain colours by describing his preferred colours for his clothing and he also approved or discouraged the usage of certain colours. Among the colours that are specifically mentioned and found in the hadith are white, red, green, black and yellow. These colours give different connotations as they were used in the Prophet’s attires during battles and other occasions; and some bring about specific understanding, as stated by the Prophet PBUH. Interestingly, the use of certain colours as found in the hadith corresponds to that mentioned in the Qur’an. Thus, this paper will observe the discussion among Muhaddithin regarding to the topic of colours in terms of its definition, function, significance and impact on the human life. The variety of meaning and understanding of colours according to different perspectives and cultures will also be discussed. The implications of using specific colours psychologically and scientifically will also be exposed in order to discover the connection between colours in the Prophetic Traditions and in our contemporary life.

  17. Colour appearance descriptors for image browsing and retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Aniza; Martinez, Kirk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the development of whole-scene colour appearance descriptors for classification to be used in browsing applications. The descriptors can classify a whole-scene image into various categories of semantically-based colour appearance. Colour appearance is an important feature and has been extensively used in image-analysis, retrieval and classification. By using pre-existing global CIELAB colour histograms, firstly, we try to develop metrics for whole-scene colour appearance: "colour strength", "high/low lightness" and "multicoloured". Secondly we propose methods using these metrics either alone or combined to classify whole-scene images into five categories of appearance: strong, pastel, dark, pale and multicoloured. Experiments show positive results and that the global colour histogram is actually useful and can be used for whole-scene colour appearance classification. We have also conducted a small-scale human evaluation test on whole-scene colour appearance. The results show, with suitable threshold settings, the proposed methods can describe the whole-scene colour appearance of images close to human classification. The descriptors were tested on thousands of images from various scenes: paintings, natural scenes, objects, photographs and documents. The colour appearance classifications are being integrated into an image browsing system which allows them to also be used to refine browsing.

  18. Synaesthetic colour in the brain: beyond colour areas. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of synaesthetes and matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa M van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In synaesthesia, sensations in a particular modality cause additional experiences in a second, unstimulated modality (e.g., letters elicit colour. Understanding how synaesthesia is mediated in the brain can help to understand normal processes of perceptual awareness and multisensory integration. In several neuroimaging studies, enhanced brain activity for grapheme-colour synaesthesia has been found in ventral-occipital areas that are also involved in real colour processing. Our question was whether the neural correlates of synaesthetically induced colour and real colour experience are truly shared. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, in a free viewing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI experiment, we located main effects of synaesthesia in left superior parietal lobule and in colour related areas. In the left superior parietal lobe, individual differences between synaesthetes (projector-associator distinction also influenced brain activity, confirming the importance of the left superior parietal lobe for synaesthesia. Next, we applied a repetition suppression paradigm in fMRI, in which a decrease in the BOLD (blood-oxygenated-level-dependent response is generally observed for repeated stimuli. We hypothesized that synaesthetically induced colours would lead to a reduction in BOLD response for subsequently presented real colours, if the neural correlates were overlapping. We did find BOLD suppression effects induced by synaesthesia, but not within the colour areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because synaesthetically induced colours were not able to suppress BOLD effects for real colour, we conclude that the neural correlates of synaesthetic colour experience and real colour experience are not fully shared. We propose that synaesthetic colour experiences are mediated by higher-order visual pathways that lie beyond the scope of classical, ventral-occipital visual areas. Feedback from these areas, in which the left parietal

  19. Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Xiao Ming; Zheng, Yihan; Tan, Shawn J.; Zhang, Lei; Kumar, Karthik; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Yang, Joel K. W.

    2014-11-01

    Metal nanostructures can be designed to scatter different colours depending on the polarization of the incident light. Such spectral control is attractive for applications such as high-density optical storage, but challenges remain in creating microprints with a single-layer architecture that simultaneously enables full-spectral and polarization control of the scattered light. Here we demonstrate independently tunable biaxial colour pixels composed of isolated nanoellipses or nanosquare dimers that can exhibit a full range of colours in reflection mode with linear polarization dependence. Effective polarization-sensitive full-colour prints are realized. With this, we encoded two colour images within the same area and further use this to achieve depth perception by realizing three-dimensional stereoscopic colour microprint. Coupled with the low cost and durability of aluminium as the functional material in our pixel design, such polarization-sensitive encoding can realize a wide spectrum of applications in colour displays, data storage and anti-counterfeiting technologies.

  20. The colour of domestication and the designer chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppy, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Colour is an important feature of most living organisms. In the wild, colour has great significance affecting the survival and reproductive success of the species. The environmental constraints which lead to the specific colours of birds and animals are very strong and individuals of novel colours tend not to survive. Under domestication, mankind has transformed all the species involved which have thus been freed from environmental pressures to a large extent. Early colour variants were mostly selected for utility reasons or religious practices. In more recent centuries colour varieties have been created purely for ornament and pleasure, fashion playing a surprisingly large part in their development. A bewildering array of colours and patterns can now be found in all our commensal species, especially the Domestic Fowl ( Gallus gallus domesticus).

  1. Colour how we see it and sow we use it

    CERN Document Server

    Woolfson, Michael Mark

    2016-01-01

    Colour makes our lives more interesting how dull it would be in a black-and-white world! It pleases us aesthetically, entertains us and is useful to us. This unique book aims to describe the scientific nature of colour and light, and how we see it, in an accessible and easily understandable style. The evolution of the eye, science of colour and technical visual systems are all broken down into readable chapters, with clear images and illustrations provided for reference. The book then goes on to discuss the innate tendency of humankind to produce artistic works as conceived, realised and augmented through the use of colour. Focussing on broad forms of artistic entertainment painting with pigments and dyes, colour and light in photography and cinematography, light displays and colour in television this book then delivers a comprehensive review of what colour means and has meant in the creative arts.

  2. QCD thermodynamics with colour-sextet quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, D K

    2009-01-01

    We study QCD with two flavours of colour-sextet quarks as a candidate walking-Technicolor theory. We simulate lattice QCD with two flavours of colour-sextet staggered quarks at finite temperatures to observe the scales of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking. These should give us some indication as to whether the massless theory has an infrared fixed point making it a conformal field theory, or whether it exhibits confinement and chiral symmetry breaking with a slowly varying coupling constant, i.e. `walks'. We find that unlike the case with fundamental quarks, the deconfinement and chiral-symmetry restoration transitions are far apart. The values of $\\beta=6/g^2$ for both transitions increase when $Ta$ is decreased from 1/4 to 1/6 as would be expected for finite temperature transitions of an asymptotically-free field theory. So far we see no suggestion of conformal behaviour.

  3. Coloured Petri Nets and the Invariant Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1981-01-01

    In many systems a number of different processes have a similar structure and behaviour. To shorten system description and system analysis it is desirable to be able to treat such similar processes in a uniform and succinct way. In this paper it is shown how Petri nets can be generalized to allow...... processes to be described by a common subnet, without losing the ability to distinguish between them. Our generalization, called coloured Petri nets, is heavily influenced by predicate transition-nets introduced by H.J. Genrich and K. Lautenbach. Moreover our paper shows how the invariant-method, introduced...... for Petri nets by K. Lautenbach, can be generalized to coloured Petri nets....

  4. Testing of Nonlinear Filters For Coloured Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Wieslaw M.; Redaelli, Stefano; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    We focus on nonlinearity and deterministic behaviour of classical model systems cor- rupted by white or coloured noise. Therefore, we use nonlinear filters to give a faith- ful representation of nonlinear behaviour of the systems. We also analyse time series of a real system, namely, we study velocities of of the solar wind plasma including Alfvénic fluctuations measured in situ by the Helios spacecraft in the inner helio- sphere. We demonstrate that the influence of white and coloured noise in the data records can be efficiently reduced by a nonlinear filter. We show that due to this non- linear noise reduction we get with much reliability estimates of the largest Lyapunov exponent and the Kolmogorov entropy.

  5. How to Calculate Colourful Cross Sections Efficiently

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoeche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank

    2008-09-03

    Different methods for the calculation of cross sections with many QCD particles are compared. To this end, CSW vertex rules, Berends-Giele recursion and Feynman-diagram based techniques are implemented as well as various methods for the treatment of colours and phase space integration. We find that typically there is only a small window of jet multiplicities, where the CSW technique has efficiencies comparable or better than both of the other two methods.

  6. Rockpool Gobies Change Colour for Camouflage

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Stevens; Alice E Lown; Alexander M Denton

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is found in a wide range of species living in numerous habitat types, offering protection from visually guided predators. This includes many species from the intertidal zone, which must cope with background types diverse in appearance and with multiple predator groups foraging at high and low tide. Many animals are capable of either relatively slow (hours, days, weeks) or rapid (seconds and minutes) colour change in order to better resemble the background against which they are fou...

  7. Colour-Charged Quark Matter in Astrophysics?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Cong-Xin; XU Ren-Xin

    2006-01-01

    Colour confinement is only a supposition, which has not yet been proven in QCD. Here we propose that macroscopic quark-gluon plasma in astrophysics could hardly maintain colourless because of causality. It is expected that the existence of chromatic strange quark stars as well as chromatic strangelets preserved from the QCD phase transition in the early Universe could be unavoidable if their colourless correspondents do exist.

  8. Constraining RRc candidates using SDSS colours

    CERN Document Server

    Bányai, E; Molnár, L; Dobos, L; Szabó, R

    2016-01-01

    The light variations of first-overtone RR Lyrae stars and contact eclipsing binaries can be difficult to distinguish. The Catalina Periodic Variable Star catalog contains several misclassified objects, despite the classification efforts by Drake et al. (2014). They used metallicity and surface gravity derived from spectroscopic data (from the SDSS database) to rule out binaries. Our aim is to further constrain the catalog using SDSS colours to estimate physical parameters for stars that did not have spectroscopic data.

  9. Mushroom Processing Retaining Colour Without Losing Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Gormley, T. R. (Thomas Ronan); Walshe, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Processed mushrooms must be blanched so that they will retain an acceptable white colour. However,. This can lead to a weight loss of between 20 and 30 per cent, which is bad economy for the processor. Research at Kinsealy Research Centre has come up with some solution for this problem. Breading of unblanched mushrooms prior to freezing is one. Another successful technique is to treat mushrooms with xanthan gum prior to blanching in the case of frozen or canned mushrooms.

  10. Colour Dynamic Photometric Stereo for Textured Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Janko, Zsolt; Delaunoy, Amael; Prados, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    International audience In this paper we present a novel method to apply photometric stereo on textured dynamic surfaces. We aim at exploiting the high accuracy of photometric stereo and reconstruct local surface orientation from illumination changes. The main difficulty derives from the fact that photometric stereo requires varying illumination while the object remains still, which makes it quite impractical to use for dynamic surfaces. Using coloured lights gives a clear solution to this ...

  11. Proton Spin from General Colour Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-Fu; LI Ying-Chuan; WEN Xin-Min

    2001-01-01

    The quark wavefunction in a proton has been calculated by using the global colour symmetry model. We find that the property of this wavefunction is closely related to the nonperturbative vacuum configuration. Using the wavefunction we make the calculation of the matrix element of the axial vector current of the quarks in the proton ground state. Its value is found to be 0.17, which is perfectly consistent with 0.23(+6).

  12. A new method for face detection in colour images for emotional bio-robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAPESHI; Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Emotional bio-robots have become a hot research topic in last two decades. Though there have been some progress in research, design and development of various emotional bio-robots, few of them can be used in practical applications. The study of emotional bio-robots demands multi-disciplinary co-operation. It involves computer science, artificial intelligence, 3D computation, engineering system modelling, analysis and simulation, bionics engineering, automatic control, image processing and pattern recognition etc. Among them, face detection belongs to image processing and pattern recognition. An emotional robot must have the ability to recognize various objects, particularly, it is very important for a bio-robot to be able to recognize human faces from an image. In this paper, a face detection method is proposed for identifying any human faces in colour images using human skin model and eye detection method. Firstly, this method can be used to detect skin regions from the input colour image after normalizing its luminance. Then, all face candidates are identified using an eye detection method. Comparing with existing algorithms, this method only relies on the colour and geometrical data of human face rather than using training datasets. From experimental results, it is shown that this method is effective and fast and it can be applied to the development of an emotional bio-robot with further improvements of its speed and accuracy.

  13. Light colour preference of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Szendrő

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the light colour preference of growing rabbits placed in a free-choice cage. The experiment was carried out on 128 Pannon White growing rabbits weaned at the age of 5 weeks and placed into blocks (2m2 of four cages. The rabbits could move freely among the four cages (0.5m2 each through swing doors. The cages differed only in the colour of the light applied (white, yellow, green or blue. The lighting schedule was 16L: 8D. From 6 until 10 weeks of age, infrared video recording was performed once a week (24 hours. The number of rabbits in each cage was counted every 15 minutes. Feed consumption was measured weekly. Between 6 and 10 weeks of age the rabbits significantly preferred white light (28.0%. The preference order was the following: yellow (26.3%, blue (23.4% and green (22.3% (P<0.001. No significant differences were recorded in the feed consumption among the cages. In conclusion, the cage preference of the rabbits was slightly affected by the light colour.

  14. SNPs in coat colour genes in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nicoloso

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Coat colour genes are useful candidates for breeds traceability of farm animals. To identify SNPs in genes involved in pigmentation in goat, we carried out in silico studies in human, mouse and cattle.We analysed 41 genes and we found: 88 SNPs in mouse, 29 synonymous and 59 non synonymous; 279 SNPs in humans, 121 synonymous and 158 non synonymous, 78 of which validated; 147 putative SNPs in cattle, 62 synonymous and 75 non synonymous, 10 of which validated. To identify the more interesting coding regions, we collected in these species information on pigmentation traits or on pathologies associated to different mutation. In goat, molecular information were available only on 7 genes and no SNP is reported, moreover poor information exists on association between mutations and different coat colour. Starting from the information collected in mouse, human and cattle, we obtained PCR products in goat for 61 exons in 36 genes. The PCR products were sequenced and checked for homology with the target sequences. Sequences on 8 animals from 4 breeds (Alpine, Saanen, Blonde of Adamello, Orobica characterised by different coat colour phenotypes have been compared, revealing 25 SNPs (11 synonymous, 14 non synonymous in 21 genes.

  15. Trends in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the foundations of artificial intelligence as a science and the types of answers that may be given to the question, "What is intelligence?" The paradigms of artificial intelligence and general systems theory are compared. (Author/VT)

  16. NICE: A Computational Solution to Close the Gap from Colour Perception to Colour Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraga, C Alejandro; Akbarinia, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The segmentation of visible electromagnetic radiation into chromatic categories by the human visual system has been extensively studied from a perceptual point of view, resulting in several colour appearance models. However, there is currently a void when it comes to relate these results to the physiological mechanisms that are known to shape the pre-cortical and cortical visual pathway. This work intends to begin to fill this void by proposing a new physiologically plausible model of colour categorization based on Neural Isoresponsive Colour Ellipsoids (NICE) in the cone-contrast space defined by the main directions of the visual signals entering the visual cortex. The model was adjusted to fit psychophysical measures that concentrate on the categorical boundaries and are consistent with the ellipsoidal isoresponse surfaces of visual cortical neurons. By revealing the shape of such categorical colour regions, our measures allow for a more precise and parsimonious description, connecting well-known early visual processing mechanisms to the less understood phenomenon of colour categorization. To test the feasibility of our method we applied it to exemplary images and a popular ground-truth chart obtaining labelling results that are better than those of current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. A universal ultraviolet-optical colour-colour-magnitude relation of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chilingarian, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Although the optical colour-magnitude diagram of galaxies allows one to select red sequence objects, neither can it be used for galaxy classification without additional observational data such as spectra or high-resolution images, nor to identify blue galaxies at unknown redshifts. We show that adding the near ultraviolet colour to the optical CMD reveals a tight relation in the three-dimensional colour-colour-magnitude space smoothly continuing from the "blue cloud" to the "red sequence". We found that 98 per cent of 225,000 low-redshift (Z<0.27) galaxies follow a smooth surface g-r=F(M,NUV-r) with a standard deviation of 0.03-0.07 mag making it the tightest known galaxy photometric relation. There is a strong correlation between morphological types and integrated NUV-r colours. Rare galaxy classes such as E+A or tidally stripped systems become outliers that occupy distinct regions in the 3D parameter space. Using stellar population models for galaxies with different SFHs, we show that (a) the (NUV-r, g-r...

  18. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... packing medium may be thickened with pectin. (b)(1) The specified name of the food is “artificially... the packing medium is thickened with pectin, the label shall bear the statement “thickened with pectin”....

  19. The Effect of Chlorhexidine Mouth Rinse on the Colour Stability of Porcelain with Three Different Surface Treatments: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaledi AAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: The effect of mouth washes on discolouration of dental ceramics with different surface preparations is not well documented. Objectives: This in-vitro study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX mouth rinse on colour stability of overglazed (OP, autoglazed, (AP or polished porcelain (POP specimens. Materials and Methods: The restorative material investigated in this study was overglazed, autoglazed, or polished feldspathic porcelain. A total of 48 cylandrical specimens were prepared, (n=16 per each group. After baseline colour measurements, for a period of14 days 8 specimens of each group were immersed in 15 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth rinse twice daily for 2 min. After each immersion, the specimens were washed and stored in artificial saliva. Half of the specimens from each group were selected randomly as controls and stored in artificial saliva that was changed daily. The colour change (ΔE of the specimens was measured by a spectrophotometer device. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-Way ANOVA followed by Tukey test Results: All the specimens displayed colour changes after immersion in chlorhexidine mouth rinse. POP specimens exhibited more colour change compared to AP and OP specimens (P=0.001. AP and OP specimens showed relatively the same colour change which was not significant compared to the control groups (P=0.9. Conclusion: Auto-glazed and over-glazed porcelain can tolerate chlorhexidine mouth rinse better than polished porcelain. However the colour changes of the ceramic with three different surface preparations were not perceivable clinically.

  20. Artificial Inteligence and Law

    OpenAIRE

    Fuková, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Submitted diploma work Artificial Intelligence and Law deals with the rule of law and its position in the process of new advanced technologies in computer cybernetics and further scientific disciplines related with artificial intelligence and its creation. The first part of the work introduces the history of the first imagines about artificial intelligence and concerns with its birth. This chapter presents main theoretical knowledge and hypotheses defined artificial intelligence and progre...

  1. Sugar Substitutes: Artificial Sweeteners and Sugar Alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Washburn, Carolyn; Christensen, Nedra

    2012-01-01

    Most people enjoy the sweet taste of food. Artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols can provide the sweet flavor and be beneficial for people with diabetes or those choosing to avoid sugars because they contain lower calories and carbohydrates than regular sugars. These products are also beneficial in that they do not cause tooth decay.

  2. Emotional response towards food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis Xinwei; Corsi, Armando M.; Chrysochou, Polymeros;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate consumers’ emotional responses to food packaging. More specifically, we use self-report and physiological measures to jointly assess emotional responses to three typical food packaging elements: colours (lowwavelength vs. high-wavelength), images (positive vs. negative......) and typefaces (simple vs. ornate). A sample of 120 participants was exposed to mock package design concepts of chocolate blocks. The results suggest that images generate an emotional response that can be measured by both self-report and physiological measures, whereas colours and typefaces generate emotional...... response that can only be measured by self-report measures. We propose that a joint application of selfreport and physiological measures can lead to richer information and wider interpretation of consumer emotional responses to food packaging elements than using either measure alone....

  3. Minimum Perceptible Differences in the Colour Reproduction of Photographic Prints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Carol Ann

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Electronic simulations of the Macbeth Color Checker Chart were prepared such that each of the eighteen colour patches could be varied independently from the rest of the chart. The output was in the form of photographic colour prints which comprised a ring-around set of 168 prints for each of the colour patches, where each print was a colour perturbation from a standard print. Twelve observers, with normal colour vision, judged the prints in each set to be perceptibly different or not perceptibly different from the standard print, for each patch. The experimental results, in the form of hue-orientated and non hue-orientated ellipses, were compared with MacAdam type ellipses, CIELAB unit ellipses and ellipses derived from the CMC(1:c) colour difference formula: the comparisons were made in the 1976 CIELAB colour space. Colour reproduction indices were calculated for the end points of the semi-major and semi-minor axes of the CMC ellipses, for each of the eighteen colour patches. The coefficient of variation was very small for the combined hue index, the combined chroma index and the overall combined index, indicating that the mean values for these indices could be assigned to any of the ellipses as a measure of the minimum perceptible difference in terms of colour appearance.

  4. Can Grapheme-Colour Synaesthesia be Induced by Hypnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Patricia Anderson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is a perceptual experience where graphemes, letters or words evoke a specific colour, which are experienced either as spatially coincident with the grapheme inducer (projector sub-type or elsewhere, perhaps without a definite spatial location (associator sub-type. Here, we address the question of whether synaesthesia can be rapidly produced using a hypnotic colour suggestion to examine the possibility of ‘hypnotic synaesthesia’, i.e. subjectively experienced colour hallucinations similar to those experienced by projector synaesthetes. We assess the efficacy of this intervention using an embedded figures test, in which participants are required to detect a shape (e.g., a square composed of local graphemic elements. For grapheme-colour synaesthetes, better performance on the task has been linked to a higher proportion of graphemes perceived as coloured. We found no performance benefits on this test when using a hypnotic suggestion, as compared to a no-suggestion control condition. The same result was found when participants were separated according to the degree to which they were susceptible to the suggestion (number of coloured trials perceived. However, we found a relationship between accuracy and subjective reports of colour in those participants who reported a large proportion of coloured trials: trials in which the embedded figure was accurately recognised (relative to trials in which it was not were associated with reports of more intense colours occupying a greater spatial extent. Collectively, this implies that hypnotic colour was only perceived after shape detection rather than aiding in shape detection via colour-based perceptual grouping. The results suggest that hypnotically induced colours are not directly comparable to synaesthetic ones.

  5. Toxicology of Processed and Packaged Foods

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Srivatsa; Sharma, T. R.

    1987-01-01

    Modem food production, processing and preservation use a large number of additives at various stages. These include food sweetners, preservatives, colours, antioxidants and pesticides. In addition, the foods come in contact with packaging materials which by themselves contain a large number of additives. Some of these are potential sources of hazards to consumers. This paper is a review of investigations which have been carried out on some of the additives, the migration of additives from pac...

  6. Cyclic colour change in the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps under different photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Marie; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Cadena, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to change colour rapidly is widespread among ectotherms and has various functions including camouflage, communication and thermoregulation. The process of colour change can occur as an aperiodic event or be rhythmic, induced by cyclic environmental factors or regulated by internal oscillators. Despite the importance of colour change in reptile ecology, few studies have investigated the occurrence of a circadian rhythm in lizard pigmentation. Additionally, although colour change also entails changes in near-infrared reflectance, which may affect thermoregulation, little research has examined this part of the spectrum. We tested whether the bearded dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps, displays an endogenous circadian rhythm in pigmentation changes that could be entrained by light/dark (LD) cycles and how light affected the relative change in reflectance in both ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared spectra. We subjected 11 lizards to four photoperiodic regimens: LD 12:12; LD 6:18; LD 18:6 and DD; and measured their dorsal skin reflectance at 3-hour intervals for 72 hours after a habituation period. A proportion of lizards displayed a significant rhythm under constant darkness, with maximum reflectance occurring in the subjective night. This endogenous rhythm synchronised to the different artificial LD cycles, with maximum reflectance occurring during dark phases, but did not vary in amplitude. In addition, the total ultraviolet-visible reflectance in relation to the total near-infrared reflectance was significantly higher during dark phases than during light phases. We conclude that P. vitticeps exhibits a circadian pigmentation rhythm of constant amplitude, regulated by internal oscillators and that can be entrained by light/dark cycles. PMID:25354192

  7. Cyclic Colour Change in the Bearded Dragon Pogona vitticeps under Different Photoperiods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Marie; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Cadena, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to change colour rapidly is widespread among ectotherms and has various functions including camouflage, communication and thermoregulation. The process of colour change can occur as an aperiodic event or be rhythmic, induced by cyclic environmental factors or regulated by internal oscillators. Despite the importance of colour change in reptile ecology, few studies have investigated the occurrence of a circadian rhythm in lizard pigmentation. Additionally, although colour change also entails changes in near-infrared reflectance, which may affect thermoregulation, little research has examined this part of the spectrum. We tested whether the bearded dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps, displays an endogenous circadian rhythm in pigmentation changes that could be entrained by light/dark (LD) cycles and how light affected the relative change in reflectance in both ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared spectra. We subjected 11 lizards to four photoperiodic regimens: LD 12∶12; LD 6∶18; LD 18∶6 and DD; and measured their dorsal skin reflectance at 3-hour intervals for 72 hours after a habituation period. A proportion of lizards displayed a significant rhythm under constant darkness, with maximum reflectance occurring in the subjective night. This endogenous rhythm synchronised to the different artificial LD cycles, with maximum reflectance occurring during dark phases, but did not vary in amplitude. In addition, the total ultraviolet-visible reflectance in relation to the total near-infrared reflectance was significantly higher during dark phases than during light phases. We conclude that P. vitticeps exhibits a circadian pigmentation rhythm of constant amplitude, regulated by internal oscillators and that can be entrained by light/dark cycles. PMID:25354192

  8. Cyclic colour change in the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps under different photoperiods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Fan

    Full Text Available The ability to change colour rapidly is widespread among ectotherms and has various functions including camouflage, communication and thermoregulation. The process of colour change can occur as an aperiodic event or be rhythmic, induced by cyclic environmental factors or regulated by internal oscillators. Despite the importance of colour change in reptile ecology, few studies have investigated the occurrence of a circadian rhythm in lizard pigmentation. Additionally, although colour change also entails changes in near-infrared reflectance, which may affect thermoregulation, little research has examined this part of the spectrum. We tested whether the bearded dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps, displays an endogenous circadian rhythm in pigmentation changes that could be entrained by light/dark (LD cycles and how light affected the relative change in reflectance in both ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared spectra. We subjected 11 lizards to four photoperiodic regimens: LD 12:12; LD 6:18; LD 18:6 and DD; and measured their dorsal skin reflectance at 3-hour intervals for 72 hours after a habituation period. A proportion of lizards displayed a significant rhythm under constant darkness, with maximum reflectance occurring in the subjective night. This endogenous rhythm synchronised to the different artificial LD cycles, with maximum reflectance occurring during dark phases, but did not vary in amplitude. In addition, the total ultraviolet-visible reflectance in relation to the total near-infrared reflectance was significantly higher during dark phases than during light phases. We conclude that P. vitticeps exhibits a circadian pigmentation rhythm of constant amplitude, regulated by internal oscillators and that can be entrained by light/dark cycles.

  9. A simplified method for generation of pseudo natural colours from colour infrared aerial photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Olsen, Brian Pilemann

    mapping methods. The method presented is a dramatic simplification of a recently published method, going from a 7 step to a 2 step procedure. The first step is a classification of the input image into 4 domains, based on simple thresholding of a vegetation index and a saturation measure for each pixel....... In the second step the blue colour component is estimated using tailored models for each domain. Green and red colour components are taken directly fron the CIR photo. The visual impression of the results from the 2 step method is only slightly inferior to the original 7 step method. The implementation, however...

  10. Colour-rendition properties of solid-state lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukauskas, A [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9, bldg. III, Vilnius, LT-10222 (Lithuania); Vaicekauskas, R [Department of Computer Science, Vilnius University, Naugarduko g. 24, Vilnius, LT-03225 (Lithuania); Shur, M S, E-mail: arturas.zukauskas@ff.vu.l [Department of Electrical, Computer, and System Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2010-09-08

    The applicability of colour-quality metrics to solid-state light sources is validated and the results of the assessment of colour-rendition characteristics of various lamps are presented. The standard colour-rendering index metric or a refined colour-quality scale metric fails to distinguish between two principle colour-rendition properties of illumination: the ability to render object colours with high fidelity and the ability to increase chromatic contrast, especially when the spectra of light sources contain a few narrow-band electroluminescence components. Supplementing these metrics by the known figures of merit that measure the gamut area of a small number of test colour samples does not completely resolve this issue. In contrast, the statistical approach, which is based on sorting a very large number of test colour samples in respect of just-perceivable colour distortions of several kinds, offers a comprehensive assessment of colour-rendition properties of solid-state light sources. In particular, two statistical indices, colour-fidelity index (CFI) and colour-saturation index (CSI), which are the relative numbers of object colours rendered with high fidelity and increased saturation, respectively, are sufficient to reveal and assess three distinct types of solid-state light sources. These are (i) high-fidelity lamps, which cover the entire spectrum with the spectral components present in the wavelength ranges of both 530-610 nm and beyond 610 nm (e.g. trichromatic warm white phosphor-converted (pc) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), red-amber-green-blue LED clusters, complementary clusters of white and coloured LEDs); (ii) colour-saturating lamps, which lack power in the 530-610 nm wavelength range (e.g. red-green-blue or red-cyan-blue LED clusters) and (iii) colour-dulling lamps, which lack power for wavelengths longer than 610 nm (dichromatic daylight pc LEDs and amber-green-blue LED clusters). Owing to a single statistical format, CSI and CFI can be used for

  11. The Philosophical Consideration about Food Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyu Ma

    2015-01-01

    This study mainly analyzes the essential features of food additives technology from the angle of philosophy, explaining the essential characteristics of food additives technology. As for the attitude towards the application of food additives, it is influenced by the public's gender, age, educational level, occupation and monthly expenditure for buying non-staple food and other variables, thus, the attitude towards food additives and green food, as well as the attitude towards using artificial...

  12. DIFFERENCES IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF COLOUR TERMS IN COLOUR SPACE IN THE RUSSIAN, UDMURT AND KOMI LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ryabina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article compares data of Russian, Udmurt and Komi on the distribution of colour terms in Ostwald’s colour space. Data of Russian derive from an article by Davies and Corbett (1994. Data from Udmurt and Komi were originally collected by using the field method suggested for establishing basic colour terms by Davies and Corbett (1994, 1995. Sixty-five coloured tiles were used as stimuli. It was found that the distribution of colour terms differed even in closely related languages.In addition, there are differences in the distribution of the pink colour in the Southern and Northern dialects of Udmurt.It can be argued that the distribution of colour terms in colour space is language-specific and dependent on culture. The data on unrelated languages showed that colour perception by Northern Udmurt subjects, compared to that by Southern Udmurts, was more influenced by Russian. Udmurt, like Russian, possesses a term for light blue, which in the Northern dialect was located in the same part of colour space as in Russian.

  13. Responses to colour and host odour cues in three cereal pest species, in the context of ecology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S E J; Stevenson, P C; Belmain, S R

    2015-08-01

    Many insects show a greater attraction to multimodal cues, e.g. odour and colour combined, than to either cue alone. Despite the potential to apply the knowledge to improve control strategies, studies of multiple stimuli have not been undertaken for stored product pest insects. We tested orientation towards a food odour (crushed white maize) in combination with a colour cue (coloured paper with different surface spectral reflectance properties) in three storage pest beetle species, using motion tracking to monitor their behaviour. While the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch.), showed attraction to both odour and colour stimuli, particularly to both cues in combination, this was not observed in the bostrichid pests Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (lesser grain borer) or Prostephanus truncatus (Horn) (larger grain borer). The yellow stimulus was particularly attractive to S. zeamais, and control experiments showed that this was neither a result of the insects moving towards darker-coloured areas of the arena, nor their being repelled by optical brighteners in white paper. Visual stimuli may play a role in location of host material by S. zeamais, and can be used to inform trap design for the control or monitoring of maize weevils. The lack of visual responses by the two grain borers is likely to relate to their different host-seeking behaviours and ecological background, which should be taken into account when devising control methods. PMID:25916219

  14. The colour analysis method applied to homogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Amadé; Halmai, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Computer-aided colour analysis can facilitate cyclostratigraphic studies. Here we report on a case study involving the development of a digital colour analysis method for examination of the Boda Claystone Formation which is the most suitable in Hungary for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Rock type colours are reddish brown or brownish red, or any shade between brown and red. The method presented here could be used to differentiate similar colours and to identify gradual transitions between these; the latter are of great importance in a cyclostratigraphic analysis of the succession. Geophysical well-logging has demonstrated the existence of characteristic cyclic units, as detected by colour and natural gamma. Based on our research, colour, natural gamma and lithology correlate well. For core Ib-4, these features reveal the presence of orderly cycles with thicknesses of roughly 0.64 to 13 metres. Once the core has been scanned, this is a time- and cost-effective method.

  15. FIR colours and SEDs of nearby galaxies observed with Herschel

    OpenAIRE

    Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Buat, V.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, GJ; S. Bianchi; Bock, J.; Bomans, DJ; Bradford, M; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Clemens, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present infrared colours (in the 25-500 mu m spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temp...

  16. 'Flight of colours' in lesions of the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, M; Todman, L; Bender, M B

    1974-11-01

    A bright pocket flashlight was directed into one eye for 10 seconds; the subject then closed the eyelids and reported the sequence of after-image colours observed. Lesions of the visual system which compromised bilateral central colour vision also reduced or abolished the `flight of colours'. This simple bedside test of each eye independently is of value in detecting mild defects of central vision. PMID:4457619

  17. Chemical and colour quenching in liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and colour quenching for H-3 and C-14 was studied. The method includes spectral analysis of colouring agents; methyl red, (4'-dimethylamine-azobenzene 2-carboxylic acid) dimethyl yellow (4'-dimethylamine-azobenzene) and malachite green (methane, bis .(4-dimethyl aminophenyl) - (phenyl)). External standard channels ratio was applied for the liquid scintillation counting of samples. The introduction of an isolated external standard seems to be a strong tool for the correction of chemical and colour quenching curves. (Author) 12 refs

  18. Architecture, science and colour in Britain 1945-1976.

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a scientific theory of colour and of standardized colour ranges by a small group of modernist architects is a fascinating but Little-known episode of post-war British architectural history. In many articles, official publications, and conferences, and from within key organizations of the building industry, these architects promoted a theory of colour selection and application based on seemingly 'functional' and 'rational' criteria such as the 'aesthetic of...

  19. COLOUR TERMS IN MODERN LINGUISTICS: SEMANTIC AND SEMIOTIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. SAPIGA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of colour terms in modern linguistics, and in particular its semantic and semiotic aspects. The aim of the article is to identify the lexical-semantic features of colour terms in the definition of national cultural identity of linguistic and speech means. Special attention is paid to semantic diversity of colour symbolism, which is closely related to psychological perception and has numerous crosscultural differences in relation to the events in people's lives. The article analyzes the so-called colour vocabulary, namely, the colour -indication, describing shades of colour that have a narrative structure and are in direct and additional value. In particular, we take into account the metaphorical reconsiderations of the peripheral color-namings and color terms, which include, for example, borrowed and terminological adjectives, neologisms, archaisms, nonce words etc. From the point of view of belonging the colorindication to different parts of speech, a significant group is made by adjectives , suffixal formation, etc. The lexico-semantic field of colour has a high degree of organization. Modern researches of determining the nature of lexical-semantic field of colour terms confirm the presence of about ten pigment genes, which are individual for each person. A defined set of pigment genes allows a person to perceive colour and its shades in different ways. Observations of colour perception in people of different cultures discover the dependence and the relationship between concepts and words in various systems, which explain the differences in the reactions to colour and the absence of a specific hue in different cultures. The analysis revealed the close relationship of colour symbolism with a mental and psychological component that reflects the moods, the reality and situation-specific nature of the occurring phenomena.

  20. Children's colour choices for completing drawings of affectively characterised topics

    OpenAIRE

    Burkitt, Esther; Barrett, Martyn; Davis, Alyson

    2003-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to explore whether or not children systematically use particular colours when completing drawings of affectively characterised topics. Method: Three hundred and thirty 4-11-year-old children were subdivided into three conditions, colouring in a drawing of a man, a dog, or a tree, respectively. The children completed two test sessions in counterbalanced order. In one session, children rated and ranked ten colours in order of preference. In the other session,...

  1. Redesigning Studio Apartments for Sheltered Accomodation Using Colour Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Meakin, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    First year interior Design and Furniture Students study colour theory as part of a second semester module on colour and perception, and as part of this brief worked with older residents in Dublin City Council housing in Raheny and Kilbarrack to collaboratively produce colour palettes and mood boards that the older people could use at home. http://arrow.dit.ie/civpostbk/1016/thumbnail.jpg

  2. FIR colours and SEDs of nearby galaxies observed with Herschel

    OpenAIRE

    Boselli, A.; Bock, J.; Bradford, M; Fadda, D.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B.; Wright, G.

    2010-01-01

    We present infrared colours (in the 25−500 μm spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temper...

  3. Leveraging Colour Segmentation for Upper-Body Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Duffner, Stefan; Odobez, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an upper-body detection algorithm that extends classical shape-based detectors through the use of additional semantic colour segmentation cues. More precisely, candidate upper-body image patches produced by a base detector are soft-segmented using a multi-class probabilistic colour segmentation algorithm that leverages spatial as well as colour prior distributions for different semantic object regions (skin, hair, clothing, background). These multi-class soft segmentation ...

  4. Colour - important factor in preserving the local identity

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Maria Zybaczynski

    2014-01-01

    The concept of sustainable competitiveness, referring to the city, requires the analysis of the characteristic elements that confer identity to the city. Could be colour one of them? This article, based on the Doctoral Dissertation "The colour in rehabilitation" presented to the Faculty of Architecture, University of Architecture and Urbanism "Ion Mincu" Bucharest, explores the role of colour in the urbanscape in terms of local identity and perceptual connections, concluding that the transfor...

  5. Performance Analysis using Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wells, Lisa Marie

    , military, health care, and transportation, that have shown that time, money, and even lives can be saved if the performance of a system is improved. Performance analysis studies are conducted to evaluate existing or planned systems, to compare alternative configurations, or to find an optimal configuration...... in a very limited and predictable manner, and it is easy to enable and disable the auxiliary information. The fourth paper is a case study in which the performance of a web server was analysed using coloured Petri nets. This case study has shown that it is relatively easy to analyse the performance...

  6. Development of a colour scale for colour evaluation of beef carcasses at 60 min post mortem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, I.; Merkus, G.S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The pectoralis profundus muscles of 200 selected beef carcasses were measured to develop a standard colour scale for evaluating beef carcasses at the time of classification (approximately 60 min post mortem). Five lightness (L*) values were chosen ranging from 22 to 42 with intervals of five L* unit

  7. Why do colours look the way they do?

    OpenAIRE

    Unwin, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    A major part of the mind–body problem is to explain why a given set of physical processes should give rise to perceptual qualities of one sort rather than another. Colour hues are the usual example considered here, and there is a lively debate as to whether the results of colour vision science can provide convincing explanations of why colours actually look the way they do. The internal phenomenological structure of colours is considered here in some detail, and a comparison is drawn with sou...

  8. Colour contribution to children's wayfinding in school environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvacıoǧlu, Elif; Olguntürk, Nilgün

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the contribution of colour to children's wayfinding ability in school environments and to examine the differences between colours in terms of their remembrance and usability in route learning process. The experiment was conducted with three different sample groups for each of three experiment sets differentiated by their colour arrangement. The participants totalled 100 primary school children aged seven and eight years old. The study was conducted in four phases. In the first phase, the participants were tested for familiarity with the experiment site and also for colour vision deficiencies by using Ishihara's tests for colour-blindness. In the second phase, they were escorted on the experiment route by the tester one by one, from one starting point to one end point and were asked to lead the tester to the end point by the same route. In the third phase, they were asked to describe verbally the route. In the final phase, they were asked to remember the specific colours at their correct locations. It was found that colour has a significant effect on children's wayfinding performances in school environments. However, there were no differences between different colours in terms of their remembrances in route finding tasks. In addition, the correct identifications of specific colours and landmarks were dependent on their specific locations. Contrary to the literature, gender differences were not found to be significant in the accuracy of route learning performances.

  9. The use of colour in the game Journey : Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dickmark, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to find out the usage of colour in the game called Journey (2012). It is a case study which focuses on three different scenes in the game and how their colour scheme affects the game both emotionally and the storyline progress. The question that will be answered is: How does the choice of colour affect the players perception on an emotional level? This thesis talks about how different colours affect us in different ways and why this plays a major part in gameplay situations a...

  10. Colour fluctuations in grapheme-colour synaesthesia: The effect of clinical and non-clinical mood changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Collette L.; Carmichael, Duncan; Ruffell, Henry E.; Simner, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Synaesthesia is a condition that gives rise to unusual secondary sensations (e.g., colours are perceived when listening to music). These unusual sensations tend to be reported as being stable throughout adulthood (e.g., Simner & Logie, 2007, Neurocase, 13, 358) and the consistency of these experiences over time is taken as the behavioural hallmark of genuineness. Our study looked at the influence of mood states on synaesthetic colours. In Experiment 1, we recruited grapheme‐colour synaest...

  11. Estimating pollination success with novel artificial flowers: Effects of nectar concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Thomson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed novel artificial flowers that dispense and receive powdered food dyes as pollen analogues while their nectar is replenished by capillary action. Dye receipt, which can be measured colourimetrically, is a direct surrogate for pollen receipt or female reproductive success, but can also serve to compare pollen donation (male reproductive success from flowers with different colours of dye. By allowing captive bumble bee colonies to visit large arrays of such flowers, we investigated whether total dye receipt depended on the sugar concentration of a flower’s nectar. Estimating pollen transfer, rather than simply visitation rate, is appropriate for this question because flowers with more concentrated nectar might accrue more pollen not only through higher visitation rates but also through longer visits that transfer more pollen per visit. Flowers with richer nectar did receive more dye regardless of their spatial arrangement, but the effect was greatest when rich and poor flowers were segregated in large blocks, as opposed to being intermingled.

  12. The colour of galaxies in distant groups

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L; Wilman, Dave; Bower, Richard G; Hau, George; Morris, Simon L; Mulchaey, J S; Oemler, A; Parker, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We present new optical and near-infrared imaging for a sample of 98 spectroscopically-selected galaxy groups at 0.25colours for group members and the surrounding field population, statistically complete above a stellar mass limit of M=1E10 Msun. The overall colour distribution is bimodal in both the field and group samples; but at fixed luminosity the fraction of group galaxies populating the red peak is larger, by 20+/-7 per cent, than that of the field. In particular, group members with early-type morphologies, as identified in HST imaging, exhibit a tight red sequence, similar to that seen for more massive clusters. We show that approximately 20-30 per cent of galaxies on the red sequence may be dust-reddened galaxies with non-negligible star formation and early-spiral morphologies. This is true of both the field and group sample, and shows little dependence on near infrared luminosity. Thus, the fraction of bright group members with no sign of star formation o...

  13. COLOUR DOPPLER EVALUATION OF ACUTE RENAL COLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallepu Ramaiah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIMS Can Doppler index–RI be a predictor of renal colics impending obstruction in acute and emergency clinical settings. To compare the results of RI in cases of obstructive, nondilated and normal kidneys. METHODS A total of 90 patients were included in this prospective study. The patients were grouped into three categories based on the clinical settings. Group 1 with acute unilateral obstruction were 44, group 2 who were presented with flank pain without stone disease were 26 and group 3 were 20 patients with sonologically normal kidneys. Grey scale ultrasonography and colour Doppler study carried out in all the groups and index – RI value were compared. RESULTS The study showed differences in RI values among the groups (0.726±0.04, 0.63±0.039 and 0.608±0.03 respectively. CONCLUSION In acute and emergency clinical setting, grey scale ultrasonography and interrogation with colour Doppler index– RI improved the assessment and detection of impending obstructive uropathy.

  14. Hair colouring, permanent styling and hair structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S; Sinclair, R

    2003-07-01

    Hair is an important component of body image and has immense psychological importance for both men and women. Women, in particular, over the ages have modified their appearance through changing their hair colour or style. Hair can be straight, wavy or curly, blonde, black, brown or red. These natural variations are an important part of our identity that can be manipulated according to the dictates of fashion, culture or society. Different types of hair have varying affinity for the different colouring and waving methods. Damaged hair also has a different affinity for hair products than normal healthy hair. The hair shaft is remarkably strong and resistant to the extremes of nature. Hair cosmetics are widely available and manipulate the structural properties of hair. Whilst most procedures are safe, there is considerable potential for damage to the hair and hair problems of acute onset, including hair breakage, hair loss and loss of condition, are frequently blamed on the last product used on the hair. Hair problems are particularly prevalent among people who repeatedly alter the natural style of their hair.

  15. Colilert® applied to food analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Rodrigues

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colilert® (IDEXX was originally developed for the simultaneous enumeration of coliforms and E. coli in water samples and has been used for the quality control routine of drinking, swimming pools, fresh, coastal and waste waters (Grossi et al., 2013. The Colilert® culture medium contains the indicator nutrient 4-Methylumbelliferyl-β-D-Glucuronide (MUG. MUG acts as a substrate for the E. coli enzyme β-glucuronidase, from which a fluorescent compound is produced. A positive MUG result produces fluorescence when viewed under an ultraviolet lamp. If the test fluorescence is equal to or greater than that of the control, the presence of E. coli has been confirmed (Lopez-Roldan et al., 2013. The present work aimed to apply Colilert® to the enumeration of E. coli in different foods, through the comparison of results against the reference method (ISO 16649-2, 2001 for E. coli food analysis. The study was divided in two stages. During the first stage ten different types of foods were analyzed with Colilert®, these included pastry, raw meat, ready to eat meals, yogurt, raw seabream and salmon, and cooked shrimp. From these it were approved the following: pastry with custard; raw minced pork; soup "caldo-verde"; raw vegetable salad (lettuce and carrots and solid yogurt. The approved foods presented a better insertion in the tray, the colour of the wells was lighter and the UV reading was easier. In the second stage the foods were artificially contaminated with 2 log/g of E. coli (ATCC 25922 and analyzed. Colilert® proved to be an accurate method and the counts were similar to the ones obtained with the reference method. In the present study, the Colilert® method did not reveal neither false-positive or false-negative results, however sometimes the results were difficult to read due to the presence of green fluorescence in some wells. Generally Colilert® was an easy and rapid method, but less objective and more expensive than the reference method.

  16. Dynamic miniature lighting system with low correlated colour temperature and high colour rendering index for museum lighting of fragile artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Corell, Dennis Dan; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff;

    2013-01-01

    of historical artefacts in display cases at museums and other exhibitions, which can replace 3-5 Watt incandescent light bulbs with a correlated colour temperature (CCT) from 2000 K to 2400 K. The solution decreases the energy consumption by up to 80 %, while maintaining colour rendering indices (Ra) above 90......Illumination of fragile and irreplaceable historical objects exhibited to the public presents challenges with regards to: good colour rendering, low photochemical degradation of sensitive materials and general energy consumption. We present a dynamic tri-colour LED lighting system for illumination...

  17. Fusion of colour and monochromatic images with edge emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade M. Pavlović

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to fuse true colour images with monochromatic non-visible range images that seeks to encode important structural information from monochromatic images efficiently but also preserve the natural appearance of the available true chromacity information. We utilise the β colour opponency channel of the lαβ colour as the domain to fuse information from the monochromatic input into the colour input by the way of robust grayscale fusion. This is followed by an effective gradient structure visualisation step that enhances the visibility of monochromatic information in the final colour fused image. Images fused using this method preserve their natural appearance and chromacity better than conventional methods while at the same time clearly encode structural information from the monochormatic input. This is demonstrated on a number of well-known true colour fusion examples and confirmed by the results of subjective trials on the data from several colour fusion scenarios. Introduction The goal of image fusion can be broadly defined as: the representation of visual information contained in a number of input images into a single fused image without distortion or loss of information. In practice, however, a representation of all available information from multiple inputs in a single image is almost impossible and fusion is generally a data reduction task.  One of the sensors usually provides a true colour image that by definition has all of its data dimensions already populated by the spatial and chromatic information. Fusing such images with information from monochromatic inputs in a conventional manner can severely affect natural appearance of the fused image. This is a difficult problem and partly the reason why colour fusion received only a fraction of the attention than better behaved grayscale fusion even long after colour sensors became widespread. Fusion method Humans tend to see colours as contrasts between opponent

  18. Anticipatory Artificial Autopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    DuBois, Daniel; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-01-01

    In examining relationships between autopoiesis and anticipation in artificial life (Alife) systems it is demonstrated that anticipation may increase efficiency and viability in artificial autopoietic living systems. This paper, firstly, gives a review of the Varela et al [1974] automata algorithm of an autopoietic living cell. Some problems in this algorithm must be corrected. Secondly, a new and original anticipatory artificial autopoiesis algorithm for automata is presented. ...

  19. Inteligencia artificial en vehiculo

    OpenAIRE

    Amador Díaz, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Desarrollo de un robot seguidor de líneas, en el que se implementan diversas soluciones de las áreas de sistemas embebidos e inteligencia artificial. Desenvolupament d'un robot seguidor de línies, en el qual s'implementen diverses solucions de les àrees de sistemes encastats i intel·ligència artificial. Follower robot development of lines, in which various solutions are implemented in the areas of artificial intelligence embedded systems.

  20. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  1. 75 FR 62844 - Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial Pancreas (an Autonomous... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial Pancreas (an Autonomous System); Public Workshop AGENCY: Food...

  2. A feed-forward Hopfield neural network algorithm (FHNNA) with a colour satellite image for water quality mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asal Kzar, Ahmed; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Hwee San, Lim; Al-Zuky, Ali A.; Mutter, Kussay N.; Hassan Al-Saleh, Anwar

    2016-06-01

    There are many techniques that have been given for water quality problem, but the remote sensing techniques have proven their success, especially when the artificial neural networks are used as mathematical models with these techniques. Hopfield neural network is one type of artificial neural networks which is common, fast, simple, and efficient, but it when it deals with images that have more than two colours such as remote sensing images. This work has attempted to solve this problem via modifying the network that deals with colour remote sensing images for water quality mapping. A Feed-forward Hopfield Neural Network Algorithm (FHNNA) was modified and used with a satellite colour image from type of Thailand earth observation system (THEOS) for TSS mapping in the Penang strait, Malaysia, through the classification of TSS concentrations. The new algorithm is based essentially on three modifications: using HNN as feed-forward network, considering the weights of bitplanes, and non-self-architecture or zero diagonal of weight matrix, in addition, it depends on a validation data. The achieved map was colour-coded for visual interpretation. The efficiency of the new algorithm has found out by the higher correlation coefficient (R=0.979) and the lower root mean square error (RMSE=4.301) between the validation data that were divided into two groups. One used for the algorithm and the other used for validating the results. The comparison was with the minimum distance classifier. Therefore, TSS mapping of polluted water in Penang strait, Malaysia, can be performed using FHNNA with remote sensing technique (THEOS). It is a new and useful application of HNN, so it is a new model with remote sensing techniques for water quality mapping which is considered important environmental problem.

  3. A Multiuser Detector Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for DS-UWB Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhendong Yin; Xiaohui Liu(High Energy Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, U.S.A.); Zhilu Wu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bee...

  4. Colour mimicry and sexual deception by Tongue orchids ( Cryptostylis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskett, A. C.; Herberstein, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Typically, floral colour attracts pollinators by advertising rewards such as nectar, but how does colour function when pollinators are deceived, unrewarded, and may even suffer fitness costs? Sexually deceptive orchids are pollinated only by male insects fooled into mating with orchid flowers and inadvertently transferring orchid pollinia. Over long distances, sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators with counterfeit insect sex pheromones, but close-range deception with colour mimicry is a tantalising possibility. Here, for the first time, we analyse the colours of four sexually deceptive Cryptostylis orchid species and the female wasp they mimic ( Lissopimpla excelsa, Ichneumonidae), from the perspective of the orchids’ single, shared pollinator, male Lissopimpla excelsa. Despite appearing different to humans, the colours of the orchids and female wasps were effectively identical when mapped into a hymenopteran hexagonal colour space. The orchids and wasps reflected predominantly red-orange wavelengths, but UV was also reflected by raised bumps on two orchid species and by female wasp wings. The orchids’ bright yellow pollinia contrasted significantly with their overall red colour. Orchid deception may therefore involve accurate and species-specific mimicry of wavelengths reflected by female wasps, and potentially, exploitation of insects’ innate attraction to UV and yellow wavelengths. In general, mimicry may be facilitated by exploiting visual vulnerabilities and evolve more readily at the peripheries of sensory perception. Many sexually deceptive orchids are predominantly red, green or white: colours that are all potentially difficult for hymenoptera to detect or distinguish from the background.

  5. Colour Picking - the Pecking Order of Form and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nack, F.-M.; Manniesing, A.S.K.; Hardman, L.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia presentation generation has to be able to balance the functional aspects of a presentation that address the information needs of the user and its aesthetic form. We demonstrate our approach using automatic colour design for which we integrate relevant aspects of colour theory. We do not p

  6. The Effect of Colour on Children's Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Alice; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of red appears to hamper adults' cognitive performance relative to other colours (see Elliot & Maier, 2014, "Ann. Rev. Psychol." 65, 95). Aims and sample: Here, we investigate whether colour affects cognitive performance in 8- and 9-year-olds. Method: Children completed a battery of tasks once in the presence…

  7. Children's Models about Colours in Nahuatl-Speaking Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Cázares, Leticia; Flores-Camacho, Fernando; Calderón-Canales, Elena; Perrusquía-Máximo, Elvia; García-Rivera, Beatriz

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the development and structure of indigenous children's ideas about mixing colours as well as their ideas about each colour, derived from their traditions. The children were interviewed both at school and outside it, and an educational proposal was implemented. Ideas expressed in the school context were analysed using the partial possible model, which states that the inferences and explanations used to describe a subject consist of constricting ideas, rules of correspondence, and a set of phenomenological inferences about processes. After identifying these components in the children's ideas, we developed models to describe their conceptions about mixing colours. We employed a different approach to analyse children's ideas related to their cultural context. The results showed that children change from a conception that focuses on colours as entities that do not change and as properties of objects (model 1) to the idea that colour represents a quality of substances or objects that can be modified by mixing colours (model 2). Cultural context analysis showed that stories are independent from one another and that they are not connected to colour mixing processes, only to the actions of colour on people. We concluded that students generate independent constructions between school and cultural knowledge.

  8. The colours of quarks as new degrees of freedom

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, S; Banerjee, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the colours of quarks has been explored and the number of colours equal to three has been derived from the fractal properties suggested in the statistical model.The quark gluon coupling constant has been reproduced and the properties of the intrinsic electric charges of quarks have also been studied.

  9. Structures and colour properties of new red wine pigments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Anders Eckart; Pardon, K.; Hayasaka, Y.;

    2003-01-01

    the colour properties of the pigments were characterized; it could be demonstrated that the pyranoanthocyanins retained their red colour at pH 3.6 in model wine and were resistant to bisulfite-mediated bleaching. Finally, HPLC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of both anthocyanin-derived pigments in red...

  10. Colour vision in long-standing diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, M.S.; McCulloch, C.; Hanna, A. K.; Mortimer, C.

    1984-01-01

    In 12 long-standing insulin-dependent diabetics with background diabetic retinopathy their 100-hue colour vision scores were positively related to the degree of retinopathy and negatively to fasting blood glucose levels. However, the 100-hue colour vision scores and types were not significantly different from those of normal subjects matched for age, sex, and social class.

  11. The absolute threshold of colour vision in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina S V Roth

    Full Text Available Arrhythmic mammals are active both during day and night if they are allowed. The arrhythmic horses are in possession of one of the largest terrestrial animal eyes and the purpose of this study is to reveal whether their eye is sensitive enough to see colours at night. During the day horses are known to have dichromatic colour vision. To disclose whether they can discriminate colours in dim light a behavioural dual choice experiment was performed. We started the training and testing at daylight intensities and the horses continued to choose correctly at a high frequency down to light intensities corresponding to moonlight. One Shetland pony mare, was able to discriminate colours at 0.08 cd/m(2, while a half blood gelding, still discriminated colours at 0.02 cd/m(2. For comparison, the colour vision limit for several human subjects tested in the very same experiment was also 0.02 cd/m(2. Hence, the threshold of colour vision for the horse that performed best was similar to that of the humans. The behavioural results are in line with calculations of the sensitivity of cone vision where the horse eye and human eye again are similar. The advantage of the large eye of the horse lies not in colour vision at night, but probably instead in achromatic tasks where presumably signal summation enhances sensitivity.

  12. Luminous flux and colour maintenance investigation of integrated LED lamps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    This article will present an investigation of the luminous flux and colour maintenance of white LED based retrofit lamps. The study includes 23 different types of integrated LED lamps, covering 18 directional and 5 non-directional. Luminous flux and colour data for operation up to 20000 h has been...

  13. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  14. Implementation and characterization of a fibre-optic colour sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajić, Jovan S.; Stupar, Dragan Z.; Dakić, Bojan M.; Manojlović, Lazo M.; Slankamenac, Miloš P.; Živanov, Miloš B.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the implementation of a fibre-optic sensor for colour detection based on reflective colour sensing is proposed. The sensor consists of three plastic optical fibres emitting red, green and blue components and one optical fibre collecting light reflected from the object. Red, green and blue LEDs are excited at different frequencies. In this way detection of the reflected signal is achieved with only one photodetector and three bandpass filters. Bandpass filters are implemented as digital IIR (infinite impulse response) filters on the microcontroller. Results obtained from the proposed sensor are compared with commercial available colour sensors and the results are satisfactory. Analyses of the sensor performance both in RGB and HSV colour space are done. The proposed solution shows that in specific applications by using the HSV model the sensor can be used both as a colour and distance sensor.

  15. Human eye colour and HERC2, OCA2 and MATP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J.;

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of human eye colour by forensic genetic methods is of great value in certain crime investigations. Strong associations between blue/brown eye colour and the SNP loci rs1129038 and rs12913832 in the HERC2 gene were recently described. Weaker associations between eye colour and other...... genetic markers also exist. In 395 randomly selected Danes, we investigated the predictive values of various combinations of SNP alleles in the HERC2, OCA2 and MATP (SLC45A2) genes and compared the results to the eye colours as they were described by the individuals themselves. The highest predictive...... value of typing either the HERC2 SNPs rs1129038 and/or rs12913832 that are in strong linkage disequilibrium was observed when eye colour was divided into two groups, (1) blue, grey and green (light) and (2) brown and hazel (dark). Sequence variations in rs11636232 and rs7170852 in HERC2, rs1800407 in...

  16. 'Nonbaryonic' dark matter as baryonic colour superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss a novel cold dark matter candidate which is formed from the ordinary quarks during the QCD phase transition when the axion domain wall undergoes an unchecked collapse due to the tension in the wall. If a large number of quarks is trapped inside the bulk of a closed axion domain wall, the collapse stops due to the internal Fermi pressure. In this case the system in the bulk, may reach the critical density when it undergoes a phase transition to a colour superconducting phase with the ground state being the quark condensate, similar to BCS theory. If this happens, the new state of matter representing the diquark condensate with a large baryon number B ∼ 1032 becomes a stable soliton-like configuration. Consequently, it may serve as a novel cold dark matter candidate

  17. Quarkonium suppression: Gluonic dissociation vs. colour screening

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Binoy Krishna Patra; Dinesh Kumar Srivastava

    2003-05-01

    We evaluate the suppression of / production in an equilibrating quark gluon plasma for two competing mechanisms: Debye screening of colour interaction and dissociation due to energetic gluons. Results are obtained for S + S and Au + Au collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. At RHIC energies the gluonic dissociation of the charmonium is found to be equally important for both the systems while the screening of the interaction plays a significant role only for the larger systems. At LHC energies the Debye mechanism is found to dominate both the systems. While considering the suppression of directly produced $\\Upsilon$ at LHC energies, we find that only the gluonic dissociation mechanism comes into play for the initial conditions taken from the self screened parton cascade model in these studies.

  18. Mouse Simulation Using Two Coloured Tapes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Vikram; Mahe, Swapnil; Vyawahare, Swapnil; 10.5121/ijist.2012.2206

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) where, we control cursor movement using a real-time camera. Current methods involve changing mouse parts such as adding more buttons or changing the position of the tracking ball. Instead, our method is to use a camera and computer vision technology, such as image segmentation and gesture recognition, to control mouse tasks (left and right clicking, double-clicking, and scrolling) and we show how it can perform everything as current mouse devices can. The software will be developed in JAVA language. Recognition and pose estimation in this system are user independent and robust as we will be using colour tapes on our finger to perform actions. The software can be used as an intuitive input interface to applications that require multi-dimensional control e.g. computer games etc.

  19. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  20. Colour and pattern change against visually heterogeneous backgrounds in the tree frog Hyla japonica

    OpenAIRE

    Changku Kang; Ye Eun Kim; Yikweon Jang

    2016-01-01

    Colour change in animals can be adaptive phenotypic plasticity in heterogeneous environments. Camouflage through background colour matching has been considered a primary force that drives the evolution of colour changing ability. However, the mechanism to which animals change their colour and patterns under visually heterogeneous backgrounds (i.e. consisting of more than one colour) has only been identified in limited taxa. Here, we investigated the colour change process of the Japanese tree ...

  1. Towards slime mould colour sensor: Recognition of colours by Physarum polycephalum

    OpenAIRE

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a popular now user-friendly living substrate for designing of future and emergent sensing and computing devices. P. polycephalum exhibits regular patterns of oscillations of its surface electrical potential. The oscillation patterns are changed when the slime mould is subjected to mechanical, chemical, electrical or optical stimuli. We evaluate feasibility of slime-mould based colour sensors by illuminating Physarum with red, green, blue and whit...

  2. Beyond the colour of my skin: how skin colour affects the sense of body-ownership.

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Harry; Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Tsakiris, Manos

    2012-01-01

    Multisensory stimulation has been shown to alter the sense of body-ownership. Given that perceived similarity between one’s own body and those of others is crucial for social cognition, we investigated whether multisensory stimulation can lead participants to experience ownership over a hand of different skin colour. Results from two studies using introspective, behavioural and physiological methods show that, following synchronous visuotactile (VT) stimulation, participants can experience bo...

  3. The genetics of eye colours in an Italian population measured with an objective method for eye colour quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietroni, C.; Andersen, J.D.; Johansen, P.;

    2013-01-01

    Brown and blue eye colours are primarily explained by the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) HERC2 rs12913832. However, the genetics of eye colours that appear to be neither blue nor brown are not well understood. In this study, 230 unrelated Italian individuals were typed for 32 SNP loci in pi...

  4. How metamer mismatching decreases as the number of colour mechanisms increases with implications for colour and lightness constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Godau, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Metamer mismatching has been previously found to impose serious limitations on colour constancy. The extent of metamer mismatching is shown here to be considerably smaller for trichromats than for dichromats, and maximal for monochromats. The implications for achromatic colour perception are discussed. PMID:26054251

  5. Onion artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  6. Technical inventions that enabled artificial infant feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Artificial feeding of infants, called hand-feeding, was unsafe well into the 19th century. This paper aims to identify technical innovations which made artificial feeding less dangerous. In rapid succession from 1844 to 1886, the vulcanization of rubber, production of rubber teats, cooling machines for large-scale ice production, techniques for milk pasteurization, evaporation and condensation, and packing in closed tins were invented or initiated. Remarkably, most of these inventions preceded the discovery of pathogenic bacteria. The producers of proprietary infant formula made immediate use of these innovations, whereas in the private household artificial feeding remained highly dangerous - mostly because of ignorance about bacteria and hygiene, and partly because the equipment for safe storage, transport, preparation and application of baby food was lacking.

  7. Consumer Values of Health-Related Food Symbols and Chemical Food Additives - The Case of Breakfast Cereals

    OpenAIRE

    Thunström, Linda

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze consumers’ revealed values of food symbols indicating nutritious and organic food, as well as consumers’ revealed values for chemical food additives. We do so by estimating a hedonic price function based on a rich data set on breakfast cereal purchases. Our findings suggest that consumers positively value chemical food additives in breakfast cereals, suggesting that the positive taste effect from e.g. chemical taste enhancers, emulsifiers, colourings and preservatives...

  8. Part C notification (reference C/NL/13/01) from Suntory Holdings Limited for the import, distribution and retailing of carnation SHD-27531-4 cut flowers with modified petal colour for ornamental use

    OpenAIRE

    Birch, Andrew Nicholas; Casacuberta, Josep; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gathmann, Achim; Gralak, Mikolaj Antoni; Guerche, Philippe; Jones, Huw; Manachini, Barbara; Messéan, Antoine; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Ebbesen Nielsen, Elsa; Fabien Nogué, Fabien; Robaglia, Christophe; Rostoks, Nils; Sweet, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel) has evaluated the overall safety of genetically modified (GM) carnation SHD-27531-4 cut flowers to be imported into the European Union (EU) for ornamental use. The genetic modification results in the flowers having purple petals. The stability of the new colour trait was observed over multiple vegetative generations. The purple colour of the petals comes from the altered expression le...

  9. MEMORY IMPROVING FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning is a lifelong process of transforming information and experience into knowledge, skills, behaviorand attitudes. Memory is the ability of the brain to store, retain and subsequently to recall information received fromthe world. Cognition can be defined as organization of information. It includes acquiring information (perception,selecting (attention, representing (understanding and retaining (memory information and using it to guidebehavior (reasoning and coordination of motor outputs.There are so many conditions associated with memory and cognitive impairment which include Aging,Alzheimer’s disease, Stroke, Stress, Head injuries, Seizures, Benzodiazepines, Brain tumors, Depression, Temporallobe defects and Schizophrenia etc.Choline rich foods can enhance memory and learning and may be useful in improving cognitive abilities. Theseinclude sea foods, liver, egg yolk, soysbeans, broccoli, ash gourd. Coloured fruits and vegetables are good source ofantioxidants which improve concentration. It is advised to decrease the consumption of foods rich in transfats likehydrogenated oils, fried foods, beef, pork, mutton and ice creams and pastries. Such foods increase the deposition offats in the neurons and impair cognition. Tea, cocoa and turmeric are reported to have good nootropic activity i.e.improving memory and learning. Apart from the foods, one should keep the brain active to maintain its cognitivefunction well.

  10. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  11. A developmental study of the acquisition of Russian colour terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, I R; Corbett, G G; McGurk, H; MacDermid, C

    1998-06-01

    We report a study of the acquisition of colour terms by Russian children which had two main aims: first, to test Berlin & Kay's (1969) theory of colour universals using acquisition order as a measure of basicness; and secondly, to see if the two BLUE terms of Russian are genuinely basic. Two hundred children aged from three to six-years-old were tested on three colour-tasks--colour term listing, colour term production and colour term comprehension. To a reasonable approximation, the order of colour term acquisition was in accord with Berlin & Kay's theory, but the data are also consistent with the weaker claim that primary terms tend to be learned before derived terms. On balance the data were consistent with Russian exceptionally, having an extra term for the BLUE region. But, the two BLUE terms--goluboj 'light blue' and sinij 'dark blue'--were confused more often than other pairs of terms even by the five- to six-year-old sample.

  12. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites. PMID:23667689

  13. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites.

  14. Dynamic Colour Possibilities and Functional Properties of Thermochromic Printing Inks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahela Kulcar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermochromic printing inks change their colour regarding the change in temperature and they are one of the major groups of colour-changing inks. One of the most frequently used thermochromic material in printing inks are leuco dyes. The colour of thermochromic prints is dynamic, it is not just temperature-dependent, but it also depends on thermal history. The effect is described by colour hysteresis. This paper aims at discussing general aspects of thermochromic inks, dynamic colorimetric properties of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, their stability and principle of variable-temperature colour measurement. Thermochromic material is protected in round-shaped capsules. They are much larger than pigments in conventional inks. The polymer envelopes of pigment capsules are more stable against oxidation than the binder. If these envelopes are damaged, the dynamic colour is irreversibly lost. Our aim is to analyse the colorimetric properties of several reversible screen-printed UV-curing leuco dye thermochromic inks with different activation temperatures printed on paper. A small analysis of irreversible thermochromic inks will be presented for comparison with reversible thermochromic inks. Moreover, so as to show interesting possibilities, a combination of different inks was made, an irreversible thermochromic ink was printed on top of the red and blue reversible thermochromic inks. Special attention was given to the characterization of colour hysteresis and the meaning of activation temperature.

  15. Earth's colour unchanged since 1967: results from earthshine observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejll, Peter; Flynn, Chris; Gleisner, Hans; Schwarz, Henriette

    2014-05-01

    The colour of Earthlight is a function of atmospheric, surface and ocean conditions because each scatters light in a characteristic way. The colour of Earth can in principle be determined and monitored from satellites - but geostationary satellites do not observe in multiple visual bands, and low Earth orbit platforms do not provide instantaneous colour pictures of the terrestrial disc. Observations of the dark side of the Moon - illuminated by earthlight - can be used to determine the terrestrial colour, and was done accurately in 1967 with astronomical photometric techniques. Until now, such techniques have not been re-applied. We report on multi-band visual photometry of the earthshine in 2011/2012. Scattered light in the atmosphere and the equipment is a difficult issue to circumvent - but for a unique pair of observations in the Johnson B and V bands we have a situation where scattered light cancels closely and thus we can estimate the Johnson B-V colours of the earthshine itself. By arguing on the basis of changes in reflected sunlight we can estimate the colour of the earthlight striking the Moon - and hence the colour of the Earth at that particular time. We find good agreement with the a measurement performed 47 years previously, and broad agreement with historic measurements from the 1920s and 30s. This similarity has fundamental consequences for the climate system feedback mechanisms, discussed in this poster.

  16. Colour changes by laser irradiation of reddish building limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, C. M.; Benavente, D.

    2016-10-01

    We have used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as a novel method to investigate the causes of colour changes in a reddish limestone under irradiation by a Q-switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm laser. We irradiated clean dry and wet surfaces of Pidramuelle Roja, a building stone frequently used in the Asturian heritage, at fluences ranging from 0.12 to 1.47 J cm-2. We measured the colour coordinates and undertook XPS analysis of the state of oxidation of iron both before and after irradiation. Visible colour changes and potential aesthetic damage occurred on dry surfaces from a fluence of 0.31 J cm-2, with the stone showing a greening effect and very intense darkening. The colour change on dry surfaces was considerably higher than on wet surfaces, which at the highest fluence (1.47 J cm-2) was also above the human visual detection threshold. The use of XPS demonstrated that the change in colour (chroma and hue) is associated with a reduction in the iron oxidation state on dry surfaces during laser irradiation. This points out to a potential routinary use of XPS to analyse causes of colour changes during laser cleaning in other types of coloured building stones.

  17. Novel sensors for the Artificial Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghlaf, Lyes; Mielle, Patrick; Maratray, Jacques; Launay, Jérôme; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Salles, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Similarly to human chewing, tasty compounds are released in saliva during the food piece mastication in the `Artificial Mouth', and so, are available continuously. Glutamate is present in numerous food, as taste enhancer, has a nice and sought "umami" taste, specific receptors and different inter individual sensitivities, and is a fair marker of the release of tasty compounds. The three sensors (for pH, salt, or glutamate concentration) have the same size, so they are easily interchangeable. Up to now, only one kind of parameter may be analysed at a time by the different sensors. Nevertheless, combined electrodes may be developed in the future.

  18. Exploration of SNP variants affecting hair colour prediction in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söchtig, Jens; Phillips, Chris; Maroñas, Olalla; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Cruz, Raquel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose; de Cal, María-Ángeles Casares; Ruiz, Yarimar; Reich, Kristian; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María V

    2015-09-01

    DNA profiling is a key tool for forensic analysis; however, current methods identify a suspect either by direct comparison or from DNA database searches. In cases with unidentified suspects, prediction of visible physical traits e.g. pigmentation or hair distribution of the DNA donors can provide important probative information. This study aimed to explore single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants for their effect on hair colour prediction. A discovery panel of 63 SNPs consisting of already established hair colour markers from the HIrisPlex hair colour phenotyping assay as well as additional markers for which associations to human pigmentation traits were previously identified was used to develop multiplex assays based on SNaPshot single-base extension technology. A genotyping study was performed on a range of European populations (n = 605). Hair colour phenotyping was accomplished by matching donor's hair to a graded colour category system of reference shades and photography. Since multiple SNPs in combination contribute in varying degrees to hair colour predictability in Europeans, we aimed to compile a compact marker set that could provide a reliable hair colour inference from the fewest SNPs. The predictive approach developed uses a naïve Bayes classifier to provide hair colour assignment probabilities for the SNP profiles of the key SNPs and was embedded into the Snipper online SNP classifier ( http://mathgene.usc.es/snipper/ ). Results indicate that red, blond, brown and black hair colours are predictable with informative probabilities in a high proportion of cases. Our study resulted in the identification of 12 most strongly associated SNPs to hair pigmentation variation in six genes. PMID:26162598

  19. THE ICONOGRAPHIC COLOUR SYMBOLISM IN BIBLICAL POEMS BY SERGEI YESENIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vladimirovna Mikhalenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Biblical poems by Sergei Yesenin are full of pathos of theurgic reforms and creation of a new world. All components of these poems (images, spatial-temporal organization, colour symbolics stressed the importance of ongoing changes. The colours in small poems not only correspond to normal natural colours, but also bear a symbolic meaning, drawing the reader to the iconographic mysticism. The colourful preferences correspond to the tradition (of the Old or New Testaments, iconography or liturgy, as well as scenic tradition, which Yesenin follows in his poetry. Creating images of cosmic transformation, the poet turns to the traditional icon colour combinations and reinterprets the Old and New Testaments images. It puts the cases of prophet Sergei Yesenin in line with the acts of the biblical prophets. All poems in their colour scheme are consistent with iconographic tradition. In these poems three basic colours are used which repeat the colours of thematically close icons. So, Th e Coming is coloristically associated with the icon of the Nativity, The Transfiguration corresponds to the eponymous icon of Christ. The colours show the relationship and the parallelism of the processes occurring in earthly and heavenly worlds. It emphasizes the unity of the poetic world, the engagement of the Earth and the Heaven in the conversion process. The consideration of Yesenin’s revolutionary epic in line with biblical and iconographic symbolism allows analyzing in a more detailed and deep way originality of poetic recreation of the World and enables to reveal philosophical and esoteric content of the works.

  20. The Impact of Effective Colour Management for Textile Coloration: An Instrumental Way Towards Perfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Khatri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The colour produced by the application of either dyes or pigments on textiles must be close matched with reference (standard provided by buyer. Meeting stringent requirement from Buyer that demands right colour on right time is not a simple task to achieve. The process of colour matching is a lengthy process and needs many trials to get close match. The colour quantification through instruments helps to cut most of the lead time, however, there is a serious need to manage colour during colour approval stage and coloration process. We adopted four different routes for colour approval and compared with the conventional one. The study revealed that out of four instrumental options, the 4th option had shortest route and minimum lead time. We also concluded that by using spectrophotometer, K/S (Colour Strength and colorimetic values are very good to not only communicate colour numerically but also controlling colour during colour approval process.

  1. Brilliant Star in a Colourful Neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A spectacular new image from ESO's Wide Field Imager at the La Silla Observatory in Chile shows the brilliant and unusual star WR 22 and its colourful surroundings. WR 22 is a very hot and bright star that is shedding its atmosphere into space at a rate many millions of times faster than the Sun. It lies in the outer part of the dramatic Carina Nebula from which it formed. Very massive stars live fast and die young. Some of these stellar beacons have such intense radiation passing through their thick atmospheres late in their lives that they shed material into space many millions of times more quickly than relatively sedate stars such as the Sun. These rare, very hot and massive objects are known as Wolf-Rayet stars [1], after the two French astronomers who first identified them in the mid-nineteenth century, and one of the most massive ones yet measured is known as WR 22. It appears at the centre of this picture, which was created from images taken through red, green and blue filters with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. WR 22 is a member of a double star system and has been measured to have a mass at least 70 times that of the Sun. WR 22 lies in the southern constellation of Carina, the keel of Jason's ship Argo in Greek mythology. Although the star lies over 5000 light-years from the Earth it is so bright that it can just be faintly seen with the unaided eye under good conditions. WR 22 is one of many exceptionally brilliant stars associated with the beautiful Carina Nebula (also known as NGC 3372) and the outer part of this huge region of star formation in the southern Milky Way forms the colourful backdrop to this image. The subtle colours of the rich background tapestry are a result of the interactions between the intense ultraviolet radiation coming from hot massive stars, including WR 22, and the vast gas clouds, mostly hydrogen, from which they formed. The central part of this enormous complex

  2. Floral colour change as a potential signal to pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2016-08-01

    Colour change in flowers (with age and/or after pollination) is taxonomically widespread, has evolved repeatedly, and has a range of putative selective benefits linked to modifying pollinator behaviour; however, this phenomenon seems paradoxically uncommon. We explore this paradox by reviewing the empirical evidence and argue that the evolution and maintenance of floral colour change as a signal to modify pollinator behaviour require special ecological circumstances that will often not be met across a plant population for a sustained number of generations, which potentially explains the scarcity of this phenomenon. We discuss alternative explanations for floral colour change and potentially fruitful lines of future research. PMID:27428780

  3. Effects of drying on pumpkin and green peper colour.

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Barroca, Maria João

    2010-01-01

    The present work evaluates the effect of different drying treatments on the colour of green bell peppers and pumpkin, which were dried using two different methods: air drying and freeze-drying. The treatments in air drying were carried out at 30 ºC and 70 ºC. Overall, it was possible to conclude that air drying at 30 ºC produces small changes in colour of green pepper whereas air drying at 70 ºC and freeze drying originate more intense colour changes. The increase of temperature on air dryin...

  4. Colour Fading of Textile Fabric by Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, H. F.; C. W. Kan; Yuen, C. W. M.; Yip, J.; M. C. Law

    2013-01-01

    Colour fading of a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 19) dyed textile fabric was performed by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment with the use of plasma jet. Under the APP treatment condition of treatment time = 5 sec/mm; ignition power = 160 W; oxygen concentration = 1%; jet distance = 3 mm, significant colour-fading effect was achieved. For comparison purpose, the reactive dye dyed textile fabric was subjected to conventional enzymatic colour-fading process. Experimental results reve...

  5. Facial Identification in Observers with Colour-Grapheme Synaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

    2013-01-01

    Synaesthesia between colours and graphemes is often reported as one of the most common forms cross modal perception [Colizolo et al, 2012, PLoS ONE, 7(6), e39799]. In this particular synesthetic sub-type the perception of a letterform is followed by an additional experience of a colour quality. Both colour [McKeefry and Zeki, 1997, Brain, 120(12), 2229–2242] and visual word forms [McCandliss et al, 2003, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 7(7), 293–299] have previously been linked to the fusiform ...

  6. Visual evoked potentials to colour change of a moving bar

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina eMurd; Kairi eKreegipuu; Nele eKuldkepp; Aire eRaidvee; Maria eTamm; Jüri eAllik

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study we found that it takes less time to detect colour change in a moving object compared to colour change in a stationary one (Kreegipuu et al., 2006, Vision Research 46(11), 1848-1855). Here, we replicated the experiment, but in addition to reaction times we measured visual evoked potentials, to see whether this effect of motion is revealed at the cortical level of information processing. We asked our subjects to detect colour changes in stationary (0º/s) and moving bars (4...

  7. Studies of Fragmentation and Colour Reconnection at LEP

    OpenAIRE

    Azzurri, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hadronic events at the Z pole have been investigated in search for Colour Reconnection effects and QCD coherence. Colour Reconnection effects are searched for in three-jet events and the data results are compared to the predictions of different Monte Carlo models. QCD colour coherence effects are tested through the multiplicity distributions of hadrons with restricted momenta, and the LEP1 e+e- data is compared to HERA e+p data under the equivalence assumption of the e+e- hemisphere with the ...

  8. Instrumental objective measurement of veal calves carcass colour at slaughterhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Vandoni; Carlo Angelo Sgoifo Rossi

    2010-01-01

    A total of 6700 veal calves were used to compare the ability of chromameter CR300 in measuring the veal meat colour on-line at slaughterhouse and to develop a prediction equation of colour score based on relationship between instrumental and visual assessments. A total of 5000 carcasses were used to develop equation of prediction while 1700 were used to test it. The meat colour was assessed subjectively in 3 different slaughterhouses by the slaughterhouse’s judges 10h post mortem and ob...

  9. Pseudo natural colour aerial imagery for urban and suburban mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    , which are very useful in traditional (manual) mapping. In this paper, an algorithm is described which provides an approximation to the spectral capabilities of the four-channel imagers by using a colour-infrared aerial photo as input. The algorithm is tailored to urban/suburban surroundings, where the...... quality of the generated (pseudo) natural colour images are fully acceptable for manual mapping. This brings the combined availability of near-infrared and (pseudo) natural colours within reach for mapping projects based on traditional photogrammetry, which is valuable since traditional analytical cameras...

  10. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF SELECTED COLOURING HERBALS IN SAVARNIKARAN

    OpenAIRE

    Wadikar Sujata Surendra; Reddy Govind R.

    2013-01-01

    A Clinical study on "Clinical Evaluation of Selected Colouring Herbals in Savarnikaran" was carried out at shalya tantra dept. of M.A.Podar Hospital, Worli, Mumbai 18. The prime aim of the study is to make available an effective, alternative colouring cosmetic preparations which will be useful in post burn, post acne and post wound colour morbidity.Ayurvedic herbal drugs are abundant, easily available and cost effective but their use is not observed in all forms. The trial drug is prepared in...

  11. Anthocyanins, colour and antioxidant properties of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and violet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) peel extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadilova, Eva; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Acetone extracts from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and violet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) peels both belonging to the Solanaceae plant family were characterized with respect to their anthocyanin profiles, colour qualities and antioxidant capacities. According to HPLC-DAD-MS3 analyses the major anthocyanin in eggplant was delphinidin-3-rutinoside, while the predominant pigment in violet pepper was assigned to delphinidin-3-trans-coumaroylrutinoside-5-glucoside. Since virtually all anthocyanins were delphinidin-based, the effect of acylation and glycosylation patterns on colour stability and antioxidant capacity could be assessed. Application of two in vitro-assays for antioxidant capacity assessment revealed that eggplant generally exhibited higher values compared to violet pepper which was ascribed to 3,5-diglycosylated structures predominating in the latter. The higher extent of acylation in violet pepper was reflected by a more purplish colour shade of the extracts, but did not translate into a higher stability against fading which again was attributed to additional glycosyl substitution at C5. These findings support the relevance of structure-related activities of anthocyanins both for understanding food colour and their particular nutritional value. PMID:16989312

  12. Principles of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Nils J

    1980-01-01

    A classic introduction to artificial intelligence intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice, Principles of Artificial Intelligence describes fundamental AI ideas that underlie applications such as natural language processing, automatic programming, robotics, machine vision, automatic theorem proving, and intelligent data retrieval. Rather than focusing on the subject matter of the applications, the book is organized around general computational concepts involving the kinds of data structures used, the types of operations performed on the data structures, and the properties of th

  13. The Artificial Anal Sphincter

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, John

    2000-01-01

    The artificial anal sphincter as treatment for end stage anal incontinence was first described in 1987. Published series concern a total of 42 patients, with a success rate of approximately 80%. Infection has been the most serious complication, but a number of technical complications related to the device have also occurred and required revisional procedures in 40% to 60% of the patients. The artificial anal sphincter may be used for the same indications as dynamic graciloplasty except in pat...

  14. Colour constancy for an unseen surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, L.J.; Akins, K.; Heywood, C. A.; Kentridge, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    The illumination of a scene strongly affects our perception of objects in that scene, e.g., the pages of a book illuminated by candlelight will appear quite yellow relative to other types of artificial illuminants. Yet at the same time, the reader still judges the pages as white, their surface color unaffected by the interplay of paper and illuminant. It has been shown empirically [ 1 ] that we can indeed report two quite different interpretations of “color”: one is dependent on the constant ...

  15. Constancy and inconstancy in categorical colour perception

    OpenAIRE

    Roca Vilà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Als preliminars: The research described in this book was carried out at the Computer Vision Center El reconeixement d'objectes és potser la tasca més important que un sistema autònom, ja sigui biològic o artificial, necessita realitzar. En el context de la visió humana, això s'aconsegueix parcialment a través del reconeixement del color de les superfícies malgrat els canvis en la distribució espectral de la llum, propietat anomenada constància de color. El reconeixement correcte del color ...

  16. When Colour Matters: Policing and Hate Crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Wigerfelt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the image of Sweden as a tolerant, colour-blind and non-racial country, which is based on the narrative of a country for instance associated with solidarity with the so-called Third World; in this article we argue that racial attributes, e.g. visible differences, account for people’s different life possibilities and circumstances in Swedish society. This article explores and discusses whether, and if so why, people who belong to the group that is categorised as “non-white”, with an emphasis on Afroswedes, and depicted as racially different, experience being targets of diverse variations of bias-based policing, harassment and hate crime. Theories relating to colonial stereotypes, racism, doing difference, the geography of hate, race/ethnicity profiling and intersectionality are used to analyse our material. Based on individual and focus group interviews with “non-whites”, this article discusses how visible differences are highlighted in different kinds of social contexts. The interview results show that people with dark skin are often targets of different kinds of private and public policing based on race- and ethnicity profiling that often occurs on or near borders/boundaries. When those who are targets of racial harassment and exclusion resist such treatment, e.g. by crossing borders/boundaries, they are at risk of becoming victims of hate crime.

  17. Colouring cryo-cooled crystals: online microspectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeehan, John [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Biophysics Laboratories, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom); Ravelli, Raimond B. G., E-mail: ravelli@lumc.nl [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Section Electron Microscopy, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), PO Box 9600, 2300RC Leiden (Netherlands); Murray, James W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Owen, Robin Leslie [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Cipriani, Florent [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Weik, Martin [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, Institut de Biologie Structurale, Jean Pierre EBEL, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Garman, Elspeth F., E-mail: ravelli@lumc.nl [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-01

    A portable and readily aligned online microspectrophotometer that can be easily installed on macromolecular crystallography beamlines is described. It allows measurement of the spectral characteristics of macromolecular crystals prior, during, and after the X-ray diffraction experiment. X-rays can produce a high concentration of radicals within cryo-cooled macromolecular crystals. Some radicals have large extinction coefficients in the visible (VIS) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be observed optically and spectrally. An online microspectrophotometer with high temporal resolution has been constructed that is capable of measuring UV/VIS absorption spectra (200–1100 nm) during X-ray data collection. The typical X-ray-induced blue colour that is characteristic of a wide range of cryo-conditions has been identified as trapped solvated electrons. Disulphide-containing proteins are shown to form disulphide radicals at millimolar concentrations, with absorption maxima around 400 nm. The solvated electrons and the disulphide radicals seem to have a lifetime in the range of seconds up to minutes at 100 K. The temperature dependence of the kinetics of X-ray-induced radical formation is different for the solvated electrons compared with the disulphide radicals. The online microspectrophotometer provides a technique complementary to X-ray diffraction for analysing and characterizing intermediates and redox states of proteins and enzymes.

  18. Opening up a Colourful Cosmic Jewel Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The combination of images taken by three exceptional telescopes, the ESO Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal , the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla observatory and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, has allowed the stunning Jewel Box star cluster to be seen in a whole new light. Star clusters are among the most visually alluring and astrophysically fascinating objects in the sky. One of the most spectacular nestles deep in the southern skies near the Southern Cross in the constellation of Crux. The Kappa Crucis Cluster, also known as NGC 4755 or simply the "Jewel Box" is just bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye. It was given its nickname by the English astronomer John Herschel in the 1830s because the striking colour contrasts of its pale blue and orange stars seen through a telescope reminded Herschel of a piece of exotic jewellery. Open clusters [1] such as NGC 4755 typically contain anything from a few to thousands of stars that are loosely bound together by gravity. Because the stars all formed together from the same cloud of gas and dust their ages and chemical makeup are similar, which makes them ideal laboratories for studying how stars evolve. The position of the cluster amongst the rich star fields and dust clouds of the southern Milky Way is shown in the very wide field view generated from the Digitized Sky Survey 2 data. This image also includes one of the stars of the Southern Cross as well as part of the huge dark cloud of the Coal Sack [2]. A new image taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile shows the cluster and its rich surroundings in all their multicoloured glory. The large field of view of the WFI shows a vast number of stars. Many are located behind the dusty clouds of the Milky Way and therefore appear red [3]. The FORS1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) allows a much closer look at the cluster itself. The telescope's huge mirror

  19. The North Sea: Satellite colour atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holligan, P. M.; Aarup, T.; Groom, S. B.

    Satellite imagery of the North Sea from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) shows complex seasonal changes in the optical and biological properties of surface waters, features which have not been resolved, hitherto, through direct observations from ships. Selected scenes for the period 1979-1986, presented as single band (channel 3), colour composite (channels 1 + 2 + 3) and chlorophyll (channels 1/3 or 2/3) images, are used to demonstrate the relative surface distributions between February and October of suspended sediments, coccolithophores and plant pigments. Comparison are made also with sea surface temperature images from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Quantitative evaluation of the CZCS data is restricted by a lack of contemporary in situ optical and biological measurements. However, chlorophyll and Secchi disc distributions, determined by measurements from research ships have been compared qualitatively with images from the Southern Bight (13 May 1986) and for the east central North Sea (24 August 1984 and 24 October 1985). Mini series of CZCS images are presented to show the annual coccolithophore blooms, the development of the spring bloom in the Skagerrak, June 1983 and summer chlorophyl distributions in the German Bight.

  20. Artificial nutrition and bioethics issues: medical therapy or basic assistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Lesi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Artificial nutrition provides nutrients artificially to those patients who cannot take food by mouth because of their pathological condition. Artificial nutrition is the therapeutical approach in case of protein-energy malnutrition, which is secondary to many conditions which do not allow to take food by mouth. In the last years the use of artificial nutrition has increased, both in hospitals and in the territory, because of the improvement of techniques and of the increasing knowledge of doctors and people and an increasing number of conditions benefit from it. In a temporary or permanent way, artificial nutrition sets important bioethical issues, as it substitutes the function deficit of the gastroenteric system, which is in charge of natural food intake. It is understandable that in human conscience and culture, food and drinking are very strictly related to life more than any other vital function. This concept is stressed by the phrase: ‘‘Give drink to the thirsty and food to the starving’’, that influences the Christian western culture we live in. Materials and methods: The main documents produced by laymen, Italian Catholic Religion institutions, and scientific societies and the medical ethical code have been analyzed with particular attention to whether artificial nutrition should be considered as a medical therapy or as basic assistance, together with the different ethical consequences on its suspension. Conclusions: Even if the doctor is not a specialist of the field and he has to deal with patients subject to artificial nutrition, he must be aware of the bioethical issues that this technique involves, in order to use it in the best way and to develop his own opinion towards it. The review of the documents presented here cannot be considered to be exhaustive, as this topic continuously evolves.