WorldWideScience

Sample records for articular prosthetic device

  1. Effects of a contoured articular prosthetic device on tibiofemoral peak contact pressure: a biomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Roland; Thermann, Hajo; Paessler, Hans H.; Skrbensky, Gobert

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged patients are affected by localized cartilage defects that are neither appropriate for primary, nor repeat biological repair methods, nor for conventional arthroplasty. This in vitro study aims to determine the peak contact pressure in the tibiofemoral joint with a partial femoral resurfacing device (HemiCAP®, Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, MA, USA). Peak contact pressure was determined in eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens using a Tekscan sensor placed in the medial compartment above the menisci. A closed loop robotic knee simulator was used to test each knee in static stance positions (5°/15°/30°/45°) with body weight ground reaction force (GRF), 30° flexion with twice the body weight (2tBW) GRF and dynamic knee-bending cycles with body weight GRF. The ground reaction force was adjusted to the living body weight of the cadaver donor and maintained throughout all cycles. Each specimen was tested under four different conditions: Untreated, flush HemiCAP® implantation, 1-mm proud implantation and 20-mm defect. A paired sampled t test to compare means (significance, P ≤ 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. On average, no statistically significant differences were found in any testing condition comparing the normal knee with flush device implantation. With the 1-mm proud implant, statistically significant increase of peak contact pressures of 217% (5° stance), 99% (dynamic knee bending) and 90% (30° stance with 2tBW) compared to the untreated condition was seen. No significant increase of peak contact pressure was evaluated with the 20-mm defect. The data suggests that resurfacing with the HemiCAP® does not lead to increased peak contact pressure with flush implantation. However, elevated implantation results in increased peak contact pressure and might be biomechanically disadvantageous in an in vivo application. PMID:17934718

  2. Control method for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  3. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  4. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  5. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic devices subject to...

  6. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  7. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Design And Development Of Adjustable Prosthetic Device For A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a six bar link knee mechanism an artificial adjustable leg is produced for an amputee. The prosthetic device when fitted to an amputee provided easy movement for the left leg amputee. It is produced using readily available materials involving aluminum, steel, polyethylene, leader, glue etc. the device has a special ...

  9. Prosthetic vision: devices, patient outcomes and retinal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Meffin, Hamish; Maturana, Matias I; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ibbotson, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Retinal disease and its associated retinal degeneration can lead to the loss of photoreceptors and therefore, profound blindness. While retinal degeneration destroys the photoreceptors, the neural circuits that convey information from the eye to the brain are sufficiently preserved to make it possible to restore sight using prosthetic devices. Typically, these devices consist of a digital camera and an implantable neurostimulator. The image sensor in a digital camera has the same spatiotopic arrangement as the photoreceptors of the retina. Therefore, it is possible to extract meaningful spatial information from an image and deliver it via an array of stimulating electrodes directly to the surviving retinal circuits. Here, we review the structure and function of normal and degenerate retina. The different approaches to prosthetic implant design are described in the context of human and preclinical trials. In the last section, we review studies of electrical properties of the retina and its response to electrical stimulation. These types of investigation are currently assessing a number of key challenges identified in human trials, including stimulation efficacy, spatial localisation, desensitisation to repetitive stimulation and selective activation of retinal cell populations. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  10. Evaluation of articular disc loading in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment in model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, Małgorzata E; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Kijak, Edward; Wiśniewska, Grażyna

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often related to excessive load in the stomatognathic system. The objective of the model tests, using numeric calculations, was to assess the articular disc loads in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment of functional disorders of the masticatory organ. The study involved 10 patients, aged 21-48 years, of both sexes, randomly selected from a group of 120 patients treated with relaxation occlusal splints (60 patients, group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (60 patients, group II), suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction with the dominant muscle component. In all subjects, a specialized functional examination was carried out. Treatment groups: occlusal splint therapy (group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (group II). An assessment of the loads of 4 disc zones of the temporomandibular joints was carried out based on the results of clinical studies (phase I of the study), and numeric model tests (phase II). In the representatives of the study groups (5 patients in each group), measurements of occlusal forces and an evaluation of tension of the masseter and temporalis muscle were performed. The results of the average load values for all evaluated zones of the right and left articular disc differ in a statistically significant way in favor of group II, with the exception of the external mid part of the discs. In the case of the anterior of the right disc, the load was lower in patients belonging to group I than in those obtained in group II. Botulinum toxin type A significantly reduces the loads within the temporomandibular joints, generated by masseter muscle hypertonia.

  11. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  12. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  13. Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Conducting Polymer Coatings on Neural Prosthetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyan; Martin, David

    2003-03-01

    Micromachined neural prosthetic devices facilitate the functional stimulation of and recording from the central nervous system (CNS). These devices have been fabricated to consist of silicon shanks that have gold or iridium sites along their surface. Our goal is to improve the biocompatibility and long-term performance of the neural prosthetic probes when they are implanted chronically in the brain. In our most recent efforts we have established that electrochemical polymerization can be used to deposit fuzzy coatings of conducting polymers specifically on the electrode sites. For neural prosthetic devices that are intended for long term implantation, we need to develop surfaces that provide intimate contact and promote efficient signal transport at the interface of the microelectrode array and brain tissue. We have developed methods to rapidly and reliably fabricate nanostructured conducting polymer coatings on the electrode probes using templated and surfactant-mediated techniques. Conducting polymer nanomushrooms and nanohairs of polypyrrole (PPy) were electrochemically polymerized onto the functional sites of neural probes by using either nanoporous block copolymers thin films, "track-etched" polycarbonate films or anodic aluminium oxide membranes as templates. Nanofibers of conducting polymers have also been successfully obtained by polymerizations in the presence of surfactants. The influence of current density, monomer concentration, surfactant concentration, and deposition charge on the thickness and morphology of the nanostructured conducting polymer coatings has been studied by optical, scanned probe, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. As compared with the normal nodular morphology of polypyrrole, the nanostructured morphologies grown from the neural electrode result in fuzzy coatings with extremely high surface area. The electrical properties of the polymer coatings were studied by Impedance Spectroscopy (IS) and Cyclic Voltammetry

  14. A new prosthetic alignment device to read and record prosthesis alignment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouzi, Gholamhossein; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Ali, Sadeeq; Davoodi Makinejad, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Prosthetic alignment is an essential process to rehabilitate patients with amputations. This study presents, for the first time, an invented device to read and record prosthesis alignment data. The digital device consists of seven main parts: the trigger, internal shaft, shell, sensor adjustment button, digital display, sliding shell, and tip. The alignment data were read and recorded by the user or a computer to replicate prosthesis adjustment for future use or examine the sequence of changes in alignment and its effect on the posture of the patient. Alignment data were recorded at the anterior/posterior and medial/lateral positions for five patients. Results show the high level of confidence to record alignment data and replicate adjustments. Therefore, the device helps patients readjust their prosthesis by themselves, or prosthetists to perform adjustment for patients and analyze the effects of malalignment.

  15. Shape-memory alloy overload protection device for osseointegrated transfemoral implant prosthetic limb attachment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Fei; Hughes, Steven

    2002-11-01

    The osseointegrated trans-femoral implant system provides a direct anchoring technique to attach prosthetic limb. This technique was first introduced PI Brenmark in Sweden. The UK had the first clinical trial in 1997 and currently has 6 active limb wearers. The success of this procedure has the potential for improved gait function and mobility, increased employability and significant long-term improvements in the quality of life for above knee amputees. However, the significant load involved in the trans-femoral implant system has caused permanent deformation and/or fractures of the implant abutment in several occasions. To protect the implant system, the implant abutment in particularly, an overloading protection device was introduced. The device uses mechanical mechanism to release torsion overload on the abutment. However, the bending overload protection remains unsolved. To solve the problem, a new overload protection device was developed. This device uses SMA component for bending overload protection. In this paper, the results of non-linear finite element modelling of the SMA and steel (AISI 1040) components were presented. Experiments were also carried out using steel components to assess the design which is based on the non-linear property of the materials.

  16. Pilot Study for OCT Guided Design and Fit of a Prosthetic Device for Treatment of Corneal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Gam T. Le

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess optical coherence tomography (OCT for guiding design and fit of a prosthetic device for corneal disease. Methods. A prototype time domain OCT scanner was used to image the anterior segment of patients fitted with large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices for corneal disease. OCT images were processed and analyzed to characterize corneal diameter, corneal sagittal height, scleral sagittal height, scleral toricity, and alignment of device. Within-subject variance of OCT-measured parameters was evaluated. OCT-measured parameters were compared with device parameters for each eye fitted. OCT image correspondence with ocular alignment and clinical fit was assessed. Results. Six eyes in 5 patients were studied. OCT measurement of corneal diameter (coefficient of variation, %, cornea sagittal height (%, and scleral sagittal height (% is highly repeatable within each subject. OCT image-derived measurements reveal strong correlation between corneal sagittal height and device corneal height ( and modest correlation between scleral and on-eye device toricity (. Qualitative assessment of a fitted device on OCT montages reveals correspondence with slit lamp images and clinical assessment of fit. Conclusions. OCT imaging of the anterior segment is suitable for custom design and fit of large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices used in the treatment of corneal disease.

  17. Prosthetic Jamming Terminal Device: A Case Study of Untethered Soft Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nadia; Amend, John; Farrell, Todd; Latour, Debra; Martinez, Carlos; Johansson, Jen; McNicoll, Anthony; Wartenberg, Marek; Naseef, Samuel; Hanson, William; Culley, William

    2016-12-01

    This article illuminates the major and often overlooked challenge of untethering soft robotic systems through the context of recent work, in which soft robotic gripper technology enabled by jamming of granular media was applied to a prosthetic jamming terminal device (PJTD). The PJTD's technical and market feasibility was evaluated in a pilot study with two upper-limb amputees. A PJTD prototype was tested against a commercial device (Motion Control electric terminal service with a one degree-of-freedom pinching mechanism) using two existing hand function tests: the first quantified the device's speed in picking and placing small blocks and the second evaluated a person's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). The PJTD prototype performed slightly slower than its commercial counterpart in the first test. While both participants successfully completed all the ADLs with both devices in the second test, the commercial device scored marginally higher. Results suggested that PJTD can have potential benefits over existing terminal devices, such as providing the capability to firmly grasp tools due to the ability of PJTD to conform to arbitrary surfaces and reducing compensatory shoulder movements due to its axisymmetric design. Some downsides were that users reported fatigue while operating the PJTD, as most operations require pushing the PJTD against target objects to adequately conform to them. The greatest drawback for the PJTD is also a major roadblock preventing a number of soft robotic research projects from making an impact in real-world applications: pneumatic technology required for operating the PJTD is currently too large and heavy to enable compact untethered operation.

  18. Towards Optimization of a Novel Trileaflet Polymeric Prosthetic Heart Valve Via Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Thomas E.; Xenos, Michalis; Sheriff, Jawaad; Chiu, Wei-Che; Soares, Joao; Alemu, Yared; Gupta, Shikha; Judex, Stefan; Slepian, Marvin J.; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis the is most prevalent and life threatening form of valvular heart disease. It is primarily treated via open-heart surgical valve replacement with either a tissue or mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV), each prone to degradation and thrombosis, respectively. Polymeric PHVs may be optimized to eliminate these complications, and they may be more suitable for the new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure and in devices like the Total Artificial Heart. However, the development of polymer PHVs has been hampered by persistent in vivo calcification, degradation, and thrombosis. To address these issues, we have developed a novel surgically implantable polymer PHV comprised of a new thermoset polyolefin called xSIBS, in which key parameters were optimized for superior functionality via our Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE) methodology. In this parametric study, we compared our homogeneous optimized polymer PHV to a prior composite polymer PHV and to a benchmark tissue valve. Our results show significantly improved hemodynamics and reduced thrombogenicity in the optimized polymer PHV compared to the other valves. These results indicate that our new design may not require anticoagulants and may be more durable than its predecessor, and validates the improvement, towards optimization, of this novel polymeric PHV design. PMID:23644615

  19. Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Serruya, Mijail D.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Mukand, Jon A.; Saleh, Maryam; Caplan, Abraham H.; Branner, Almut; Chen, David; Penn, Richard D.; Donoghue, John P.

    2006-07-01

    Neuromotor prostheses (NMPs) aim to replace or restore lost motor functions in paralysed humans by routeing movement-related signals from the brain, around damaged parts of the nervous system, to external effectors. To translate preclinical results from intact animals to a clinically useful NMP, movement signals must persist in cortex after spinal cord injury and be engaged by movement intent when sensory inputs and limb movement are long absent. Furthermore, NMPs would require that intention-driven neuronal activity be converted into a control signal that enables useful tasks. Here we show initial results for a tetraplegic human (MN) using a pilot NMP. Neuronal ensemble activity recorded through a 96-microelectrode array implanted in primary motor cortex demonstrated that intended hand motion modulates cortical spiking patterns three years after spinal cord injury. Decoders were created, providing a `neural cursor' with which MN opened simulated e-mail and operated devices such as a television, even while conversing. Furthermore, MN used neural control to open and close a prosthetic hand, and perform rudimentary actions with a multi-jointed robotic arm. These early results suggest that NMPs based upon intracortical neuronal ensemble spiking activity could provide a valuable new neurotechnology to restore independence for humans with paralysis.

  20. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: research designs for usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in prosthetic research.

  1. Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheter Insertion Additional Content Medical News Overview of Limb Prosthetics By James Baird, CPO, Director of Education, Hanger ... DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Limb Prosthetics Overview of Limb Prosthetics Prosthetic Parts Options for Limb Prostheses Preparing ...

  2. Functional in situ assessment of human articular cartilage using MRI: a whole-knee joint loading device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Post, Manuel; Raith, Stefan; Fischer, Horst; Knobe, Matthias; Braun, Benedikt; Prescher, Andreas; Tingart, Markus; Thüring, Johannes; Bruners, Philipp; Jahr, Holger; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    The response to loading of human articular cartilage as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains to be defined in relation to histology and biomechanics. Therefore, an MRI-compatible whole-knee joint loading device for the functional in situ assessment of cartilage was developed and validated in this study. A formalin-fixed human knee was scanned by computed tomography in its native configuration and digitally processed to create femoral and tibial bone models. The bone models were covered by artificial femoral and tibial articular cartilage layers in their native configuration using cartilage-mimicking polyvinyl siloxane. A standardized defect of 8 mm diameter was created within the artificial cartilage layer at the central medial femoral condyle, into which native cartilage samples of similar dimensions were placed. After describing its design and specifications, the comprehensive validation of the device was performed using a hydraulic force gauge and digital electronic pressure-sensitive sensors. Displacement-controlled quasi-static uniaxial loading to 2.5 mm [Formula: see text] and 5.0 mm [Formula: see text] of the mobile tibia versus the immobile femur resulted in forces of [Formula: see text] N [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] N [Formula: see text] (on the entire joint) and local pressures of [Formula: see text] MPa [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] MPa [Formula: see text] (at the site of the cartilage sample). Upon confirming the MRI compatibility of the set-up, the response to loading of macroscopically intact human articular cartilage samples ([Formula: see text]) was assessed on a clinical 3.0-T MR imaging system using clinical standard proton-density turbo-spin echo sequences and T2-weighted multi-spin echo sequences. Serial imaging was performed at the unloaded state [Formula: see text] and at consecutive loading positions (i.e. at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Biomechanical unconfined compression testing

  3. Unilateral lower-limb loss: prosthetic device use and functional outcomes in servicemembers from Vietnam war and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailey, Robert; McFarland, Lynne V; Cooper, Rory A; Czerniecki, Joseph; Gambel, Jeffrey M; Hubbard, Sharon; Maynard, Charles; Smith, Douglas G; Raya, Michele; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation goals following major combat-associated limb loss in World War II and the Vietnam war focused on treatment of the injury and a return to civilian life. The goal for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) servicemembers is to restore function to the greatest possible degree and, if they desire, return them to Active Duty, by providing them with extensive rehabilitation services and a variety of prosthetic devices. Our study determines the usefulness of these diverse types of prosthetic devices for restoring functional capability and documents prosthesis use and satisfaction. We compare servicemembers and veterans with major combat-associated unilateral lower-limb loss: 178 from the Vietnam war and 172 from OIF/OEF conflicts. Of survey participants with unilateral lower-limb loss, 84% of the Vietnam group and 94% of the OIF/OEF group currently use at least one prosthetic device. Reasons for rejection varied by type of device, but common reasons were pain, prosthesis too heavy, and poor fit. Abandonment is infrequent (11% Vietnam group, 4% OIF/OEF group). Future efforts should aim to improve prosthetic-device design, decrease pain, and improve quality of life for these veterans and servicemembers.

  4. Case Study on Human Walking during Wearing a Powered Prosthetic Device: Effectiveness of the System “Human-Robot”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Grosu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that force exchanges between a robotic assistive device and the end-user have a direct impact on the quality and performance of a particular movement task. This knowledge finds a special reflective importance in prosthetic industry due to the close human-robot collaboration. Although lower-extremity prostheses are currently better able to provide assistance as their upper-extremity counterparts, specific locomotion problems still remain. In a framework of this contribution the authors introduce the multibody dynamic modelling approach of the transtibial prosthesis wearing on a human body model. The obtained results are based on multibody dynamic simulations against the real experimental data using AMP-Foot 2.0, an energy efficient powered transtibial prosthesis for actively assisted walking of amputees.

  5. Patients' Satisfaction with Lower-limb Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices and Service delivery in Sierra Leone and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lina; Ahlström, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    People with disabilities have the right to personal mobility and available and affordable assistive technology, according to the Convention of Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The aims were to investigate similarities and differences between Sierra Leone and Malawi concerning participants' mobility and satisfaction with their lower-limb prosthetic or orthotic device and related service delivery, and to identify variables associated with patients' satisfaction with assistive devices and associated services in the entire study group from these two low-income countries. Questionnaires, including QUEST, were answered by 222 patients in Sierra Leone and Malawi. Eighty-six per cent of assistive devices were in use, but half needed repair. One third of participants reported pain when using their assistive device. A higher percentage (66%) of participants in Sierra Leone had difficulties or could not walk at all on uneven ground compared with 42% in Malawi. The majority in both countries had difficulties or could not walk at all up and down hills, or on stairs. Participants in both countries were quite satisfied (mean 3.7-3.9 of 5) with their assistive device. Participants were most dissatisfied with: comfort (46%), dimensions (39%), and safety (38%) of their assistive device. In Sierra Leone participants were less satisfied than in Malawi with service delivery (mean 3.7; 4.4, p < .001). Access to repairs and servicing of their assistive device was considered the most important item. In Sierra Leone patients were less satisfied with follow-up services (41%) than patients in Malawi were (22%). The strongest association with satisfaction with assistive device was pain, and for satisfaction with service, country. The general condition of devices and the ability to walk on uneven ground were associated with both satisfaction with assistive devices and service received. Participants reported high levels of use and mobility with their assistive device, in spite of pain

  6. Comparative evaluation of MicroDTTect device and flocked swabs in the diagnosis of prosthetic and orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calori, Giorgio Maria; Colombo, Massimiliano; Navone, Paola; Nobile, Marta; Auxilia, Francesco; Toscano, Marco; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of new prosthetic and osteosynthetic devices has led to more surgical indications, and this is accompanied by an increased incidence of septic complications in orthopaedic and trauma surgery in the general population. The strategy for choosing surgical or therapeutic (conservative) treatment is based on the identification of the pathogen: knowledge of the aetiological agents is an essential element in the decision-making process to ensure the most effective treatment is administered. The pathogen also needs to be considered in the challenging case of doubtful infection, where perhaps the only sign is inflammation, for a more accurate prediction of progression to either sepsis or healing. Biofilm-related infections and low-grade infections may fall into this category. Biofilm slows the metabolism of microorganisms and prolongs their survival, which renders them resistant to antibiotics. Moreover, when microorganisms are embedded in the biofilm they are poorly recognised by the immune system and the infection becomes chronic. As recently demonstrated, isolation and identification of bacteria in biofilm is difficult as the bacteria are concealed. The development of an effective means of sample collection and laboratory methods that can dislodge bacteria from prosthetic surfaces has therefore become necessary. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the reliability of an innovative technology (MicroDTTect), specifically applied to collect and transport explanted samples (prostheses, osteosynthetic devices, biological tissues), and compare with flocked swabs. The MicroDTTect system is quick and simple to use and, most importantly, is a closed system that is totally sterile and safe for the patient being treated. It contains a specific concentration of dithiotreitol (DTT) that can dislodge bacteria from the biofilm adhering to prosthetic surfaces. The numbers of positive and negative samples were measured to compare the MicroDTTect methodology with

  7. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Ashok [Royal London Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mankad, Kshitij [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H. [Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  8. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3935 Prosthetic heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3025 Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. (a) Identification. A prosthetic and orthotic accessory is a device...

  11. Validation of the Arabic version of the client satisfaction with device module of the orthotics and prosthetics users survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, Hadeel; Franchignoni, Franco; Bravini, Elisabetta; Ferriero, Giorgio; Giordano, Andrea; Foti, Calogero

    2014-01-01

    Assessing patient satisfaction with orthosis (PSwO) is a key point for clinical practice to increase a patient's adherence to therapeutic programs and reduce orthotic-related costs. The Client Satisfaction with Device (CSD) module of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS) is one of the most widely-used questionnaires for assessing PSwO, but its validated version in the Arabic language is lacking. The objective of this study is to generate and psychometrically validate an Arabic version of the CSD (CSD-Ar). This is a cross-sectional study, conducted during February to June 2013 at 2 inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation departments in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Translation of CSD-Ar was carried out according to the guideline recommendations of Linacre. A convenience sample of 100 orthotic-user patients with various conditions (59% men, mean age 36 years) completed the CSD-Ar. Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis followed by Rasch analysis. Factor analysis confirmed the unidimensionality of the CSD-Ar. Rasch criteria for the functioning of rating scale categories were fulfilled. All items showed an adequate fit to the Rasch model. The person separation reliability was .75 and Cronbach alpha .83. There was a borderline local dependency between items 1 ("My device fits well") and 3 ("My device is comfortable throughout the day"). The internal construct validity of the CSD-Ar in Arab patients with various types of orthotics has been confirmed. This study provides a useful starting point for the use of this outcome measure in Arabic-speaking countries.

  12. Validation of the Italian version of the Client Satisfaction with Device module of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravini, Elisabetta; Franchignoni, Franco; Ferriero, Giorgio; Giordano, Andrea; Bakhsh, Hadeel; Sartorio, Francesco; Vercelli, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Information on patient satisfaction with orthosis (PSwO) is crucial for verifying and enhancing orthotic quality, for clinical decision making, and for improving patient's quality of life. To perform the translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Italian of the recently revised version of the Client Satisfaction with Device (CSD) module of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey, and then analyze its psychometric properties using factor and Rasch analyses. We translated and cross-culturally adapted the revised CSD into Italian (CDS-It) and assessed it in a convenience sample of orthotic-user patients with orthopedic, neurological and rheumatic conditions (N = 178; 56% men; median age, 62 years). Exploratory factor analysis and Rasch analysis (rating scale model) were used to investigate, respectively, dimensionality and metric properties of the scale. Factor analysis confirmed the substantial unidimensionality of the CSD-It. The rating scale fulfilled the category functioning criteria. All items fitted the Rasch model except #2 ("The weight of my device is manageable") that overfitted the model, and #4 ("It is easy to put on my device") that was underfitting in six stroke patients (i.e. not systematically). The targeting of item difficulty to person ability was out of range. The person separation reliability was 0.70 and Cronbach's alpha 0.73. The residual correlation between items #7 and #8 showed a borderline local dependency. This study confirms the validity of the CSD-It, and provides a useful starting point for further refinement of this outcome measure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem (PROSE) scleral device compared to keratoplasty for the treatment of corneal ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoss, Karen S; Fatteh, Nadeem H; Hood, Christopher T

    2014-11-01

    To compare the ocular characteristics and visual outcomes of eyes with corneal ectasia that were fitted with the Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem (PROSE) scleral device to those that underwent keratoplasty. Retrospective, comparative case series. We reviewed the charts of consecutive patients with corneal ectasia that were evaluated for PROSE or underwent keratoplasty at our institution. Clinical data, topographic indices, and corneal thickness were reviewed, and eyes were stratified according to the Amsler-Krumeich classification for severity of ectasia. Only the more severe eye of each patient was included in the study. We compared visual acuity before and after PROSE fitting or keratoplasty. For PROSE evaluations, achievement of satisfactory fit and continued wear at 1 year of follow-up were recorded. From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients underwent PROSE evaluation for corneal ectasia while 37 patients underwent keratoplasty for the same indication. All eyes were successfully fitted with the PROSE device. Eyes in the keratoplasty group had more severe ectasia than eyes in the PROSE group (P = .038). Visual acuity was achieved more rapidly in the PROSE cohort compared to keratoplasty, and mean visual acuity was significantly better for all eyes (P ectasia (P ectasia achieved 20/25 visual acuity after PROSE than after keratoplasty (P = .003). At 1 year follow-up in the PROSE cohort, Snellen acuity was 20/28 (P = .108 vs keratoplasty), improving to 20/25 with over-refraction (P = .006 vs keratoplasty). Eyes with advanced corneal ectasia can be successfully fitted with the PROSE device, and the visual acuity outcome for stage 4 ectasia was better and more rapid compared to keratoplasty. The acuity remained excellent with 1 year of follow-up. PROSE evaluation should be considered in patients with advanced corneal ectasia before proceeding to keratoplasty, especially if the ectasia is deemed stable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety and effectiveness considerations for clinical studies of visual prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-03-01

    With the advent of new designs of visual prostheses for the blind, FDA is faced with developing guidance for evaluating their engineering, safety and patient performance. Visual prostheses are considered significant risk medical devices, and their use in human clinical trials must be approved by FDA under an investigation device exemption (IDE). This paper contains a series of test topics and design issues that sponsors should consider in order to assess the safety and efficacy of their device. The IDE application includes a series of pre-clinical and clinical data sections. The pre-clinical section documents laboratory, animal and bench top performance tests of visual prostheses safety and reliability to support a human clinical trial. The materials used in constructing the implant should be biocompatible, sterile, corrosion resistant, and able to withstand any forces exerted on it during normal patient use. The clinical data section is composed of items related to patient-related evaluation of device performance. This section documents the implantation procedure, trial design, statistical analysis and how visual performance is assessed. Similar to cochlear implants, a visual prosthesis is expected to last in the body for many years, and good pre-clinical and clinical testing will help ensure its safety, durability and effectiveness.

  15. A case study of technology transfer: Rehabilitative engineering at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital. [prosthetic devices engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildred, W.

    1973-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technolgy to rehabilitative applications of artificial limbs is studied. Human factors engineering activities range from orthotic manipulators to tiny dc motors and transducers to detect and transmit voluntary control signals. It is found that bicarbon implant devices are suitable for medical equipment and artificial limbs because of their biological compatibility with human body fluids and tissues.

  16. Reliability and validity of the Lower Limb Function Questionnaire when completed by young adult orthotic and prosthetic device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke; Thiessen, Danielle; Wright, Virginia; Andrysek, Jan; Rispin, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The Lower Limb Function Questionnaire (LLFQ) was developed as a self-report assessment of lower-limb functional ability for orthotic and prosthetic (O&P) device users to be suitable for a wide range of conditions, cultures, and ages. The measure aims to address an existing gap in tools for the assessment of functional ability in this population. The purpose of this study is to evaluate LLFQ reliability and validity in a sample of young adult O&P users. Methods Adolescents from a secondary school in Kenya completed the LLFQ twice, 6 d apart, and test-retest reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients. Validity evaluations involved Timed Up-and-Go, 6-min walk, 6-min obstacle course, and/or spatiotemporal gait assessments. Oxygen consumption was measured during walk tests. Associations between the LLFQ and each measure were evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients for construct validity. Results LLFQ reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.79, 95% CIs 0.64-0.89). Construct validity was demonstrated via moderate correlation (r  >  0.60) with obstacle course distance, gait velocity, stride length, and stance/single support/double support percent of gait cycle. Conclusions Both LLFQ reliability and validity were acceptable in the sample of youth in Kenya. Further testing is required to determine applicability in other cultural contexts. Implications for Rehabilitation The LLFQ may be clinically useful across a variety of cultures and conditions to provide feedback on the effectiveness of rehabilitative treatment or assistive devices for youth with lower limb impairments. The LLFQ may enable specific strengths and challenges to lower limb function to be identified to enable planning of well-targeted rehabilitation.

  17. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  18. [Experience with prosthetic disc nucleus device in Mexico. Final report of a 4-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Pérez-Víquez, Ariel; Miramontes-Martínez, Víctor; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Discal hernia is generally treated by discectomies that are mutilating and cause instability and low back pain in 50% of the patients. Partial arthroplasty is used in an attempt to avoid degeneration after a discectomy. Nineteen patients from the INR (National Institute of Rehabilitation) were selected with extruded discal hernia. All inclusion criteria were met, with a minimal follow-up of 4 years. Evolution was evaluated with the Oswestry scale (OS) and x-ray studies. Statistical analysis was done with Student's t-test. Sixteen men and three women were included in the study, with an average age of 35.4 years. OS before surgery was 57.37% and improved to 22% (p < 0.001). The results obtained in the Prolo scale 4 years later were for the economy scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = 3.87) and for the functional scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = -3.94). The intervertebral space height (IS) before surgery was 6 and 8 mm, and 4 years later, in 12 patients it remained between 8 and 10 mm. The prosthesis had variations according to its initial placement in seven patients, and in all there was subsidence. In two cases migration surpassed the limits of the vertebral body without clinical repercussion. None of the patients required re-operation. Prosthetic disc nucleus device improved clinical conditions and x-rays of the patients using Oswestry, Prolo and intersomatic space height enhancement after 4 years of follow-up in 12/19 patients.

  19. Unilateral upper-limb loss: satisfaction and prosthetic-device use in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Lynne V; Hubbard Winkler, Sandra L; Heinemann, Allen W; Jones, Melissa; Esquenazi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic use and satisfaction in wounded servicemembers and veterans with unilateral upper-limb loss has not been thoroughly explored. Through a national survey, we enrolled 47 participants from the Vietnam conflict and 50 from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) with combat-associated major unilateral upper-limb loss. Upper-limb prosthetic devices were used by 70% of the Vietnam group and 76% of the OIF/OEF group. Mechanical/body-powered upper-limb devices were favored by the Vietnam group, while a combination of myoelectric/hybrid and mechanical/body-powered devices were favored by the OIF/OEF group. Upper-limb devices were completely abandoned in 30% of the Vietnam and 22% of the OIF/OEF groups. Abandonment was more frequent for transhumeral and more proximal levels (42% of Vietnam and 40% of OIF/OEF) than more distal limb-loss levels. Upper-limb prostheses were rejected because of dissatisfaction with the device by significantly fewer (23%) members of the Vietnam group than the OIF/OEF group (45%) (p limb prostheses than the Vietnam group.

  20. Which prosthetic foot to prescribe?

    OpenAIRE

    De Asha, AR; Barnett, CT; Struchkov, V; Buckley, JG

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: \\ud Clinicians typically use findings from cohort studies to objectively inform judgements regarding the potential (dis)advantages of prescribing a new prosthetic device. However, before finalising prescription a clinician will typically ask a patient to 'try out' a change of prosthetic device while the patient is at the clinic. Observed differences in gait when using the new device should be the result of the device’s mechanical function, but could also conceivably be due to pa...

  1. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair...

  2. 77 FR 14989 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... section 1861(s)(8) of the Act. Prosthetic devices are defined as devices (other than dental) which replace... examples of prosthetic devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, electrical continence aids...

  3. Investigation of the medical applications of the unique biocarbons developed by NASA. [compatibility of percutaneous prosthetic carbon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, V.

    1973-01-01

    The biocompatibility of percutaneous endoskeletal fixation devices made from carbon compounds, and their applications are considered. The clinical application of these carbons to solve human problems is demonstrated and the nature of myoelectric simulation by carbon implants is studied.

  4. State of the Art: Amputation and Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, David E

    2017-09-01

    Amputation is not a defeat or failure of treatment, but an effective management strategy for certain conditions in the pediatric population. The principles of management, especially in the pediatric population, have not changed. Current surgical strategies focus on providing an optimal residual limb for prosthetic fitting. New technology provides improvement in the design and fabrication of prosthetic devices.

  5. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  6. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  7. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L.; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C.; Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen; Ferrer, Manuel E.F.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. 18 F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs and CIEDs is highly

  8. AI and Prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriazi, Nefeli Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetics are very important to an amputee.The introduction of technology to prosthetics has allowed bionic limbs to emerge and change the way we were thinking about prosthetic limbs.More and more companies create new innovative models,but not affordable for anyone.3D Printing gives more options.

  9. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  10. Intra-articular use of a medical device composed of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate (Structovial CS: effects on clinical, ultrasonographic and biological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrotin Yves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This pilot open noncontrolled study was designed to assess the efficacy of intra-articular injections of a solution combining hyaluronic acid (HA and chondroitin sulphate (CS in the treatment of outpatients affected by knee osteoarthrosis. Findings Thirty patients with knee OA have been included. The primary objective was to assess clinical efficacy as measured by pain and Lequesne’s index. Secondary objectives were to assess potential effect of the treatment on ultrasound parameters, safety and biomarkers of cartilage metabolism and joint inflammation. After a selection visit (V1, the study treatment was administered 3 times on a weekly basis (V2, V3, V4. Follow-up was planned 6 (V5 and 12 weeks (V6 after the first intra-articular injection. Efficacy results showed a reduction in mean pain at V3 and V6 and in functional impairment, the most marked changes being measured at the two follow-up visits (V5 and V6. Although statistical significance was not achieved due to small sample size, a clear tendency towards improvement was detectable for ultrasound assessments as well as biomarkers. Except for a mild injection site hematoma for which the drug causal relationship could not be excluded, no adverse effect of clinical relevance was recorded during the study. Conclusion Although this pilot study was performed according to an open design only, the ultrasound as well as biomarkers changes strongly suggest a non-placebo effect. These preliminary results call now for a randomized controlled study to confirm the clinical relevance of the observed results. Trial registration #ISRCTN91883031

  11. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  12. Threshold concepts in prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie

    2017-12-01

    Curriculum documents identify key concepts within learning prosthetics. Threshold concepts provide an alternative way of viewing the curriculum, focussing on the ways of thinking and practicing within prosthetics. Threshold concepts can be described as an opening to a different way of viewing a concept. This article forms part of a larger study exploring what students and staff experience as difficult in learning about prosthetics. To explore possible threshold concepts within prosthetics. Qualitative, interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data from 18 students and 8 staff at two universities with undergraduate prosthetics and orthotics programmes were generated through interviews and questionnaires. The data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Three possible threshold concepts arose from the data: 'how we walk', 'learning to talk' and 'considering the person'. Three potential threshold concepts in prosthetics are suggested with possible implications for prosthetics education. These possible threshold concepts involve changes in both conceptual and ontological knowledge, integrating into the persona of the individual. This integration occurs through the development of memories associated with procedural concepts that combine with disciplinary concepts. Considering the prosthetics curriculum through the lens of threshold concepts enables a focus on how students learn to become prosthetists. Clinical relevance This study provides new insights into how prosthetists learn. This has implications for curriculum design in prosthetics education.

  13. Principles of obstacle avoidance with a transfemoral prosthetic limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-01-01

    In this study, conditions that enable a prosthetic knee flexion strategy in transfemoral amputee subjects during obstacle avoidance were investigated. This study explored the hip torque principle and the static ground principle as object avoidance strategies. A prosthetic limb simulator device was

  14. Prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  15. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  16. 76 FR 18472 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... dental) which replace all or part of an internal body organ (including colostomy bags and supplies... intraocular lens.'' Other examples of prosthetic devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants...

  17. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  18. Prosthetic training: upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shawn Swanson; Mansfield, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    Ideally, a collaborative team approach is already in place between the certified prosthetist (CP) and the occupational therapist (OT) before patients are casted for a prosthesis. Once an individual has completed their preprosthetic rehabilitation program and received an operational prosthesis from a CP, it is imperative that an OT provides prosthetic training. Prosthetic training is necessary so that the individual can learn how to use and incorporate the prosthesis into their daily life. Prosthetic training consists of 3 main phases: controls training, repetitive drills, and bimanual functional skill training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prosthetic Care FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are healthcare professionals that have demonstrated knowledge and competence in the field of prosthetics. Their qualifications include a ... issues. Prosthetists are allied health professionals and experts in designing and ... information, resources and advice to patients and their healthcare ...

  1. [Ocular prosthetics. Fitting, daily use and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K R; Trester, W; Müller-Uri, N; Trester, M; Cursiefen, C; Heindl, L M

    2016-02-01

    Ocular prosthetics make a decisive contribution to the functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation of patients after ocular extirpation. This article provides an overview of the fitting, daily care and complications of ocular prosthetics. The study comprised a PubMed literature review and own clinical results. Ocular prosthetics made from cryolite glass or perspex can be manufactured and fitted 5-8 weeks after removal of the eye. During this period a conformer is placed within the conjunctival sac in order to prevent scar formation and shrinking of the socket. Artificial eyes can be worn continuously, only interrupted by a short but regular cleaning procedure. Artificial tears and lid hygiene improve the comfort of wearing. Glass prostheses have to be renewed every 1-2 years, while perspex prostheses need to be polished once a year. Complications, such as giant papillary conjunctivitis or blepharoconjunctivitis sicca are facilitated by poor fit, increased age and inappropriate care of the prosthetic device. In the case of socket shrinkage or anophthalmic socket syndrome, surgical interventions are needed to re-enable the use of an artificial eye. Adequate fitting, daily care of ocular prosthetics and therapeutic management of associated complications are mandatory for a durable functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation after ocular extirpation.

  2. Upper limb neurorehabilitation in patients with stroke using haptic device system: reciprocal bi-articular muscle activities reflect as a result of improved circle-drawing smoothness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Hokyoo; Suzuki, Tadashi; Komeda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Muscular co-contraction resulted in corrected elbow and shoulder joint stiffness; however, this correction neither ameliorated endpoint oscillation nor assisted in the execution of smooth two-joint arm movements. We hypothesised that the reacquisition of smooth arm movements became synonymous with the restoration of time-domain reciprocal electromyographic (EMG) activities in biarticular arm muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not the restored reciprocal EMG activities in biarticular arm muscles reflected improved smooth motor performance in patients with stroke after 10 days of two-joint arm-movement training. Three male patients with sub-acute stroke with left-arm paralysis performed circle-drawing tasks using a haptic device system for upper limb neuromuscular rehabilitation. After the training, the movement velocities and achievement periods increased with the enhancement of the reciprocal EMG activities in biarticular arm muscles, and there was less jerkness in movement after training for the same duration. Patients with stroke could achieve smooth motor performance with the restoration of the reciprocal EMG activities in biarticular arm muscles. Therefore, the reciprocal EMG activities in biarticular arm muscles in response to circle drawing would be an index for the progressive improvements of smooth motor functions in the upper limbs.

  3. Mechanical testing of pericardium for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiari, Paola; Fiorese, Michele; Iop, Laura; Gerosa, Gino; Bagno, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian pericardia are currently used for the production of percutaneous prosthetic heart valves. The characteristics of biological tissues largely influence the durability of prosthetic devices used in the percutaneous approach and in traditional surgery, too. This paper reviews methodologies employed to assess and compare mechanical properties of pericardial patches from different mammalian species in order to identify the biomaterials adequate for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Tactile sensing means for prosthetic limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved prosthetic device characterized by a frame and a socket for mounting on the stump of a truncated human appendage is described. Flexible digits extend from the distal end and transducers located within the digits act as sensing devices for detecting tactile stimuli. The transducers are connected through a power circuit with a slave unit supported by a strap and fixed to the stump. The tactile stimuli detected at the sensing devices are reproduced and applied to the skin of the appendage in order to stimulate the sensory organs located therein.

  5. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of ...

  6. DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    reaching, pointing, grasping, and coordinated finger movements to the design of this prosthetic.  Understand and address the amputees ’ needs to promote and...filled bladders 3. Vacuum attachment methods 4. Electro-active Polymers 5. Shape changing material structures Cosmesis  Exploring alternative materials

  7. Designing prosthetic knee joints with bio-inspired bearing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingfeng; Chyr, Anthony; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known that articular cartilage exhibits a surface microtexture with shallow indentations. By contrast, prosthetic joints consist of ultra-smooth bearing surfaces, the longevity of which does not reach that of natural cartilage. We show that adding a microtexture to the smooth femoral component of a prosthetic knee joint reduces friction by increasing the lubricant film thickness between the bearing surfaces of the knee. We have implemented an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model to optimize the geometry of the microtexture, while taking into account the deformation of the polyethylene tibial insert. We have manufactured several microtexture designs on a surrogate femoral component, and experimentally demonstrate that the microtexture reduces friction between the surrogate femoral component and tibial insert.

  8. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  9. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  10. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  11. Prosthetics in Facial Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Jaclyn; Helman, Samuel; Kadakia, Sameep; Sawhney, Raja; Abraham, Manoj; Vest, Allison K; Ducic, Yadranko

    2018-03-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck can be a challenging undertaking owing to numerous considerations for successful rehabilitation. Although head and neck defects were once considered irretrievably morbid and associated with a poor quality of life, advances in surgical technique has immensely contributed to the well-being of these patients. However, all patients are not suitable surgical candidates and many have sought nonsurgical options for functional and cosmetic restoration. As such, the advent of prostheses has ameliorated those concerns and provided a viable alternative for select patient populations. Prosthetic reconstruction has evolved significantly over the past decade. Advances in biocompatible materials and imaging adjuncts have spurred further discovery and forward progress. A multidisciplinary approach to head and neck reconstruction focused on appropriate expectations and patient-centered goals is most successfully coordinated by a team of head and neck surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons, and prosthetic specialists. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the current trends for prosthetic rehabilitation of head and neck defects, and further elaborate on the limitations and advancements in the field.

  12. Prescription and repair rates of prosthetic limbs in the VA healthcare system: implications for national prosthetic parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Katherine; Borgia, Matthew; Resnik, Linda

    2014-05-22

    Abstract Purpose: To quantify prescription and repair rates of prosthetic limbs in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and explore differences by level, type, and age. Methods: Veterans (N = 32 440) with an initial prosthetic prescription between 2000 and 2010 were classified by amputation level and type. Annual rates of prescription and repair were calculated using person-time and compared by group. Results: Veterans with upper limb amputation had lower annual prescription and repair rates (0.28 and 0.21) compared with those with lower limb amputation (0.40 and 0.56). Myoelectric devices users had higher prescription rates. However, body-powered users had higher repair rates. Prescription and repair rates for microprocessor knee joints were higher than for fluid and friction devices. Veterans under 65 had 0.07 and 0.16 higher rates of prescription and repair than those over 65 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Because the VA is unconstrained by co-pays or caps, data on prosthetic prescription and repair can be used to estimate rates that might occur if national prosthetic parity laws were adopted. Given the rates found, it is likely that annual costs would exceed the typical annual and/or lifetime caps in most insurance plans. In states without prosthetic parity laws, such costs likely limit access to needed devices. Implications for Rehabilitation For the almost 2 million people in the United States living with an amputation or congenital limb loss, purchasing and maintaining a prosthetic limb can be costly, with insurances often imposing annual or lifetime caps. Data on prosthetic purchasing and repair is limited and reliant on self-reported information. Because the VA is unconstrained by co-pays or caps, claims data on prosthetic prescription and repair can be used to estimate rates that might occur if national prosthetic parity laws were adopted. Given the rates found, it is likely that annual costs would exceed the typical annual and/or lifetime caps

  13. Prosthetic elbow joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  14. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  15. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, La Rioja (Spain); Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Manuel E.F. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Research Unit, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs

  16. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  17. Evaluation of the Thompson articular index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, H. R.; van der Heide, A.; Jacobs, J. W.; van der Veen, M. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Three articular indices for measuring disease activity are compared. In a cross sectional study the Thompson articular index (a modified Lansbury index) correlated better with laboratory variables than the Ritchie articular index or a swollen joint score (Thompson 0.74-0.77; Ritchie 0.57-0.58;

  18. Differences in trochlear parameters between native and prosthetic kinematically or mechanically aligned knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, C; Iranpour, F; Harris, S; Auvinet, E; Aframian, A; Parratte, S; Cobb, J

    2017-12-06

    Kinematic (KA) and mechanical (MA) alignment techniques are two different philosophies of implant positioning that use the same TKA implants. This might generate differences in the resulting prosthetic trochleae parameters between the two techniques of alignment. Our study aim was to test the following hypotheses : (1) mechanically or kinematically aligned femoral implant understuffs the native trochlear articular surface and poorly restores the native groove orientation, and (2) the orientation of the prosthetic trochlear groove and trochlear fill are different between MA and KA. Three-dimensional models of the femur were made from segmentation of preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans (MRIs) of ten subjects with isolated medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In-house planning and analysis software kinematically and mechanically aligned a modern cruciate retaining femoral component and determined differences in parameters of the trochlear fit between native and prosthetic trochleae, and between KA and MA prosthetic trochleae. The MA prosthetic trochleae did not fill (understuffed) the entire length of the native medial facet and the proximal 70% of the native groove and lateral facet, and oriented the trochleae groove 8° more valgus than native. The KA prosthetic trochleae understuffed the proximal 70% of the native trochleae, and had a groove 6° more valgus than native. The KA trochleae understuffed the medial facet distally and oriented the groove 2° less valgus and 3° more internally rotated than the MA trochleae. MA and KA prosthetic trochleae substantially understuff and create a prosthetic groove more valgus compared to native trochlear anatomy, and they also differed between each other regarding trochleae stuffing and groove alignment. Although randomized trials have not shown differences in patellofemoral complications between KA and MA, a femoral component designed specifically for KA that more closely restores the native trochlear anatomy might

  19. Prosthetic limbs on display: from maker to user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Goggins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic devices have been used in museums to tell clinical, technical and personal stories. Here we reflect on the ways artificial limbs and their users were represented in recent museum projects at the Royal College of Surgeons of England and at National Museums Scotland. We consider how these meaningful artefacts illuminate three overlapping themes in museum scholarship and practice: the representation of disabled people and disability in museums; reflections on conflict-acquired limb loss; and the presence or otherwise of user or patient voice in interpretation. In working with and representing people who design and wear prosthetics we advocate a balance between narratives of technique and of use.

  20. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  1. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on ...

  2. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  3. Development of a 3D-Printed Robotic Prosthetic Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Martinez, M.; Garcia-Miquel, A.; Vidal Martinez, N.

    2016-07-01

    Current prostheses are not affordable to the general public. 3D printing technology may allow low-cost production of such devices, making them more readily accessible to people in need. This contribution presents the set-up and the considerations that have to be taken into account to develop a functional artificial upper limb prototype. The robotic prosthetic arm reported herein was produced entirely using 3D printing technology to demonstrate its feasibility on a limited budget. The project was developed to integrate two different functional modes: a prosthetic application and a remote application. The prosthetic application is intended to emulate existing prosthetic devices using myoelectric sensors. The remote application is conceived as a tool for prevention, by providing the general public with a device that could carry out activities that entail a risk of severe physical injury. This is achieved using a hand-tracking system that allows the robotic arm to copy the user’s movements remotely and in real time. The outcome of the validation tests has been considerably successful for both applications and the total costs are on target. (Author)

  4. Rehabilitation regimes based upon psychophysical studies of prosthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. C.; Suaning, G. J.; Morley, J. W.; Lovell, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    Human trials of prototype visual prostheses have successfully elicited visual percepts (phosphenes) in the visual field of implant recipients blinded through retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Researchers are progressing rapidly towards a device that utilizes individual phosphenes as the elementary building blocks to compose a visual scene. This form of prosthetic vision is expected, in the near term, to have low resolution, large inter-phosphene gaps, distorted spatial distribution of phosphenes, restricted field of view, an eccentrically located phosphene field and limited number of expressible luminance levels. In order to fully realize the potential of these devices, there needs to be a training and rehabilitation program which aims to assist the prosthesis recipients to understand what they are seeing, and also to adapt their viewing habits to optimize the performance of the device. Based on the literature of psychophysical studies in simulated and real prosthetic vision, this paper proposes a comprehensive, theoretical training regime for a prosthesis recipient: visual search, visual acuity, reading, face/object recognition, hand-eye coordination and navigation. The aim of these tasks is to train the recipients to conduct visual scanning, eccentric viewing and reading, discerning low-contrast visual information, and coordinating bodily actions for visual-guided tasks under prosthetic vision. These skills have been identified as playing an important role in making prosthetic vision functional for the daily activities of their recipients.

  5. The use of underactuation in prosthetic grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Kyberd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Underactuation as a method of driving prosthetic hands has a long history. The pragmatic requirements of such a device to be light enough to be worn and used regularly have meant that any multi degree of freedom prosthetic hand must have fewer actuators than the usable degrees of freedom. Aesthetics ensures that while the hand needs five fingers, five actuators have considerable mass, and only in recent years has it even been possible to construct a practical anthropomorphic hand with five motors. Thus there is an important trade off as to which fingers are driven, and which joints on which fingers are actuated, and how the forces are distributed to create a functional device. This paper outlines some of the historical solutions created for this problem and includes those designs of recent years that are now beginning to be used in the commercial environment.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  6. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Oluseeni; Wood, Sean; Caldwell, Ryan; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians' choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio]) and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock]) prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm(3) (2 in.(3)) to 197 cm(3) (12 in.(3)) were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg). The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  7. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Williams

    Full Text Available The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  8. Investigating the uncanny valley for prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Ellen; O'Kane, Sophie; Carefoot, Olivia; Kyberd, Peter; Gowen, Emma

    2018-02-01

    In 1970, Mori hypothesised the existence of an 'uncanny valley', whereby stimuli falling short of being fully human are found to be creepy or eerie. To investigate how eerie people find different prosthetic hands and whether perceptions of eeriness can be accounted for by categorical ambiguity. Students participated in computerised experiments during which photographic images of hands were presented. We compared photographs of prosthetic hands pre-selected as more (H+) or less human-like (H-), as well as mechanical and real hands. Participants rated the hands for eeriness and human-likeness, as well as performing a speeded classification (human/non-human) and location judgment (control) task. The H- prosthetic hands were rated as more eerie than the H+ prosthetic, mechanical and real hands, and this was unaffected by hand orientation. Participants were significantly slower to categorise the H+ prosthetic hands compared to the H- prosthetic and real hands, which was not due to generally slower responses to the H+ prosthetic hands (control task). People find prosthetic hands to be eerie, most consistently for less human-like prosthetic hands. This effect is not driven by ambiguity about whether to categorise the prosthetic hand as human or artificial. Clinical relevance More obviously artificial, less-realistic, prosthetic hands consistently generate a sense of eeriness, while more realistic prosthetic hands avoid the uncanny valley, at least on initial viewing. Thus, greater realism in prosthetic design may not always incur a cost, although the role of movement and cutaneous input requires further investigation.

  9. Evaluation of Cognitive Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sävenstedt, Stefan; Meiland, Franka; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Moelaert, Ferial

    An important aspect when developing assistive technical services for persons with dementia is the assessment of usability and usefulness from the perspective of the user. The COGKNOW project aims at developing an assistive device for persons with mild dementia and the evaluation of the first pilot device was based on a multiple case study design using mainly a qualitative approach in data collection. The design of the evaluation used a mix method approach using semi-structured interviews, combining structured and open questions, and semi-structured observations. Persons with dementia provide special challenges in assessing usefulness and user friendliness due to their cognitive impairments. The experiences from the first test of the COGKNOW device showed that the use of a mix method approach provides a comprehensive understanding of the usefulness and user friendliness that overcome some of the challenges.

  10. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  11. Is the prosthetic homologue necessary for embodiment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Dornfeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of 5 hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures. Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  12. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  13. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  15. Validation of the prosthetic esthetic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özhayat, Esben B; Dannemand, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In order to diagnose impaired esthetics and evaluate treatments for these, it is crucial to evaluate all aspects of oral and prosthetic esthetics. No professionally administered index currently exists that sufficiently encompasses comprehensive prosthetic esthetics. This study aimed...

  16. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  17. Prosthetic management of deciduous teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Bassil, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária Introduction: Situations of single or multiple edentulous are not an exception during childhood. Prosthetic management is necessary in case of absence of replacing tooth or when its eruption is planned too far in time. Indications of prosthetic rehabilitation for children are multiple and rise from the etiologic factors caus...

  18. Myoelectric control of prosthetic hands: state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geethanjali P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purushothaman Geethanjali School of Electrical Engineering Department of Control and Automation VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: Myoelectric signals (MES have been used in various applications, in particular, for identification of user intention to potentially control assistive devices for amputees, orthotic devices, and exoskeleton in order to augment capability of the user. MES are also used to estimate force and, hence, torque to actuate the assistive device. The application of MES is not limited to assistive devices, and they also find potential applications in teleoperation of robots, haptic devices, virtual reality, and so on. The myoelectric control-based prosthetic hand aids to restore activities of daily living of amputees in order to improve the self-esteem of the user. All myoelectric control-based prosthetic hands may not have similar operations and exhibit variation in sensing input, deciphering the signals, and actuating prosthetic hand. Researchers are focusing on improving the functionality of prosthetic hand in order to suit the user requirement with the different operating features. The myoelectric control differs in operation to accommodate various external factors. This article reviews the state of the art of myoelectric prosthetic hand, giving description of each control strategy. Keywords: EMG, assistive device, amputee, myoelectric control, electric powered, body ­powered, bioelectric signal control

  19. Consumer design priorities for upper limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiss, Elaine; Beaton, Dorcas; Chau, Tom

    2007-11-01

    To measure consumer satisfaction with upper limb prosthetics and provide an enumerated list of design priorities for future developments. A self-administered, anonymous survey collected information on participant demographics, history of and goals for prosthesis use, satisfaction, and design priorities. The questionnaire was available online and in paper format and was distributed through healthcare providers, community support groups, and one prosthesis manufacturer; 242 participants of all ages and levels of upper limb absence completed the survey. Rates of rejection for myoelectric hands, passive hands, and body-powered hooks were 39%, 53%, and 50%, respectively. Prosthesis wearers were generally satisfied with their devices while prosthesis rejecters were dissatisfied. Reduced prosthesis weight emerged as the highest priority design concern of consumers. Lower cost ranked within the top five design priorities for adult wearers of all device types. Life-like appearance is a priority for passive/cosmetic prostheses, while improved harness comfort, wrist movement, grip control and strength are required for body-powered devices. Glove durability, lack of sensory feedback, and poor dexterity were also identified as design priorities for electric devices. Design priorities reflect consumer goals for prosthesis use and vary depending on the type of prosthesis used and age. Future design efforts should focus on the development of more light-weight, comfortable prostheses.

  20. Prosthetic Rehabilitation After Hip Disarticulation or Hemipelvectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovec, Michael E; Houdek, Matthew T; Andrews, Karen L; Shives, Thomas C; Rose, Peter S; Sim, Franklin H

    2015-12-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation after pelvic-level amputation (hemipelvectomy/hip disarticulation) is difficult, and because of this, many patients are never fit with a prosthetic limb. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the characteristics of successful prosthetic users and to determine what factors are associated with successful prosthetic fitting and use. The authors identified 43 patients who underwent hip disarticulation/hemipelvectomy between 2000 and 2010 and were candidates for prosthetic fitting at the authors' institution. The medical records of these patients were then reviewed for pertinent demographic and medical characteristics to identify the profile of successful prosthetic users. Of 43 patients, 18 (43%) successfully used a prosthetic limb. The only preoperative factor associated with unsuccessful prosthetic fitting was coronary artery disease. Specifically, age, body mass index, other medical comorbidities, and demographic characteristics were not associated with successful or unsuccessful prosthetic fitting. Successful users wore their prosthesis an average of 5.8 hrs/day, and most ambulated with one or both hands free. Successful prosthetic rehabilitation after hemipelvectomy and hip disarticulation is possible. Increased body mass index, advanced age, depression, and other comorbidities should not discourage prosthetic rehabilitation. Most patients that undergo prosthetic rehabilitation enjoy long periods of survival and wear their prosthesis for most of the day.

  1. Intraoral Scanning for Single-Tooth Implant Prosthetics: Rationale for a Digital Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duello, George V

    2018-01-01

    Conventional and implant prosthetics have benefited from recent advances in digital dentistry. Intraoral scanning devices can generate files that can be used for the design and milling of implant prosthetics both in the office and out of the office in the dental laboratory. This article will discuss the rationale for clinicians to consider the benefits of using intraoral scanners in their offices to provide patients with a unique experience in contrast to conventional elastomeric impression techniques.

  2. Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN; Shibata, Jason [Manhattan Beach, CA

    2012-03-27

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  3. Sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Christian; D'Alonzo, Marco; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran; Sebelius, Fredrik; Cipriani, Christian

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges facing prosthetic designers and engineers is to restore the missing sensory function inherit to hand amputation. Several different techniques can be employed to provide amputees with sensory feedback: sensory substitution methods where the recorded stimulus is not only transferred to the amputee, but also translated to a different modality (modality-matched feedback), which transfers the stimulus without translation and direct neural stimulation, which interacts directly with peripheral afferent nerves. This paper presents an overview of the principal works and devices employed to provide upper limb amputees with sensory feedback. The focus is on sensory substitution and modality matched feedback; the principal features, advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are presented.

  4. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  5. Principles of obstacle avoidance with a transfemoral prosthetic limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keeken, Helco G; Vrieling, Aline H; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-10-01

    In this study, conditions that enable a prosthetic knee flexion strategy in transfemoral amputee subjects during obstacle avoidance were investigated. This study explored the hip torque principle and the static ground principle as object avoidance strategies. A prosthetic limb simulator device was used to study the influence of applied hip torques and static ground friction on the prosthetic foot trajectory. Inverse dynamics were used to calculate the energy produced by the hip joint. A two-dimensional forward dynamics model was used to investigate the relation between obstacle-foot distance and the necessary hip torques utilized during obstacle avoidance. The study showed that a prosthetic knee flexion strategy was facilitated by the use of ground friction and by larger active hip torques. This strategy required more energy produced by the hip compared to a knee extension strategy. We conclude that when an amputee maintains enough distance between the distal tip of the foot and the obstacle during stance, he or she produces sufficiently high, yet feasible, hip torques and uses static ground friction, the amputee satisfies the conditions for enable stepping over an obstacle using a knee flexion strategy. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in Retinal Prosthetic Research: A Systematic Review of Engineering and Clinical Characteristics of Current Prosthetic Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Derrick L; Greenberg, Paul B; Borton, David A

    2017-03-01

    To date, reviews of retinal prostheses have focused primarily on devices undergoing human trials in the Western Hemisphere and fail to capture significant advances in materials and engineering research in countries such as Japan and Korea, as well as projects in early stages of development. To address these gaps, this systematic review examines worldwide advances in retinal prosthetic research, evaluates engineering characteristics and clinical progress of contemporary device initiatives, and identifies potential directions for future research in the field of retinal prosthetics. A literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, and IEEExplore was conducted following the PRISMA Guidelines for Systematic Review. Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed papers demonstrating progress in human or animal trials and papers discussing the prosthetic engineering design. For each initiative, a description of the device, its engineering considerations, and recent clinical results were provided. Ten prosthetic initiatives met our inclusion criteria and were organized by stimulation location. Of these initiatives, four have recently completed human trials, three are undergoing multi- or single-center human trials, and three are undergoing preclinical animal testing. Only the Argus II (FDA 2013, CE 2011) has obtained FDA approval for use in the United States; the Alpha-IMS (CE 2013) has achieved the highest visual acuity using a Landolt-C test to date and is the only device presently undergoing a multicenter clinical trial. Several distinct approaches to retinal stimulation have been successful in eliciting visual precepts in animals and/or humans. However, many clinical needs are still not met and engineering challenges must be addressed before a retinal prosthesis with the capability to fully and safely restore functional vision can be realized.

  7. User surveys support designing a prosthetic wrist that incorporates the Dart Thrower's Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew; Bodine, Cathy; Weir, Richard F Ff

    2018-03-07

    Prosthetic devices are not meeting the needs of people with upper limb amputations. Due to controlsidelimitations, prosthetic wrists cannot yet be fully articulated. This study sought to determine which wrist motions users felt were most important for completing activities of daily living. We specifically invstigated whether adding a combinationof flexion and deviation known as the Dart Thrower's Motion to a prosthetic wrist would help improve functionality. Fifteen participants with a trans-radial amputation, aged 25-64 years, who use a prosthesis completed an online survey and answered interview questions to determine which types of tasks pose particular challenges. Participants were asked what kinds of improvements they would like to see in a new prosthesis. A subset of five participants were interviewed in-depth to provide further information about difficulties they face using their device. The survey showed that participants had difficulty performing activities of daily living that involve a combination of wrist flexion and deviation known as the "Dart Throwers Motion". Interview responses confirmed that users have difficulty performing these tasks, especially those that require tools. Additionally, users said that they were more interested in having flexion and deviation than rotation in a prosthetic wrist. This research indicates that including the Dart Thrower's Motion in future designs of prosthetic wrists would improve these devices and people with upper limb amputations would be excited to see this improvement in their devices. Implications for Rehabilitation • Over one third of people with upper limb amputations do not use a prosthesis because prosthetic devices do not meet their needs.• The number of motions possible in state of the art prosthetic devices is limited by the small number of control sites available.• The Dart Thrower?s Motion is a wrist motion used for many activities of daily living but unavailable in commercial prosthetics

  8. ServoSEA concept: Cheap, miniature series-elastic actuators for orthotic, prosthetic and robotic hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, Sedar; Sluiter, Victor IJzebrand; Lammertse, P.; Stienen, Arno

    2014-01-01

    For interactive humanoids, rehabilitation robots, and orthotic and prosthetic devices, the human-robot interaction is an essential but challenging element. Compliant Series-Elastic Actuators (SEAs) are ideal to power such devices due to their low impedance and smoothness of generated forces. In this

  9. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutwell, Erin; Stine, Rebecca; Gard, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects the total limb stiffness and influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1) a reduced total limb stiffness, and (2) reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping) of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb.

  10. [Preventive strategies in prosthetic dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, M; Böning, K W; Stark, H; Wolowski, A; Wöstmann, B; Walter, M H

    2011-09-01

    Despite the success in preventing oral diseases, the prevalence of tooth loss in the German population remains high and increases with age. Today, the advances in prosthetic dentistry allow necessary tooth replacement following preventive strategies-after considering benefits and risks. Modern treatment options improve the overall prognosis of the stomatognathic system and the quality of life of the affected patients significantly. Hereby, adverse iatrogenic effects can be minimized or even completely avoided by extending the traditional treatment spectrum, e.g., using adhesively fixed restorations and implant-supported restorations, and refraining from placing restorations that are unnecessary from the medical point of view. Generally, patients benefit greatly from prosthetic treatment and the achieved health gain is remarkably high. It encompasses not only the recovery of the impaired oral functions but also extends to the whole human organism, including nutrition, digestion, musculoskeletal system, as well as mental and social well-being.

  11. Kytococcus schroeteri prosthetic valve endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Yousri, Taher; Hawari, Mohammad; Saad, Rasheed; Langley, Steve

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a prosthetic aortic valve who presented with clinical features of endocarditis confirmed by transoesophageal echocardiography. His blood cultures were positive for a very rare and newly described organism—Kytococcus schroeteri. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. This is the fifth reported case of endocarditis associated with this organism.

  12. Kytococcus schroeteri prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousri, Taher; Hawari, Mohammad; Saad, Rasheed; Langley, Steve

    2010-09-29

    We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a prosthetic aortic valve who presented with clinical features of endocarditis confirmed by transoesophageal echocardiography. His blood cultures were positive for a very rare and newly described organism-Kytococcus schroeteri. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. This is the fifth reported case of endocarditis associated with this organism.

  13. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists...

  14. Test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarl, Gustav; Holmefur, Marie; Hermansson, Liselotte M N

    2014-02-01

    The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey consists of five modules to assess outcomes of orthotic and prosthetic interventions: lower extremity functional status, upper extremity functional status, client satisfaction with device, client satisfaction with services and health-related quality of life. To investigate the test-retest reliability and calculate the smallest detectable difference for all modules of the Swedish Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey. Test-retest reliability study design. A total of 69 patients at a Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics completed Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey on two occasions separated by a 2-week interval, giving 18 answers on lower extremity functional status, 41 on upper extremity functional status, 53 on client satisfaction with device, 12 on client satisfaction with services and 67 answers on health-related quality of life. Raw scores were converted into Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey units on a 0-100 scale. Intra-class correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots, common person linking plots and t-tests of person mean measures were used to investigate the reliability. The 95% confidence level smallest detectable differences were calculated. The intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from 0.77 to 0.96 for the modules, and no systematic differences were detected between the response occasions. The smallest detectable differences ranged from 7.4 to 16.6 units. The test-retest reliability was satisfactory for all Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey modules. The smallest detectable difference was large on all modules except the health-related quality of life module. The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey modules are reliable and, thus, can be recommended for repeated measurements of patients over time. Relatively large changes are needed to achieve statistical significance when assessing individual patients.

  15. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  16. Current strategies for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Redman S. N.; Oldfield S. F.; Archer C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Defects of articular cartilage that do not penetrate to the subchondral bone fail to heal spontaneously. Defects that penetrate to the subchondral bone elicit an intrinsic repair response that yields a fibrocartilaginous repair tissue which is a poor substitute for hyaline articular cartilage. Many arthroscopic repair strategies employed utilise this intrinsic repair response to induce the formation of a repair tissue within the defect. The goal, however, is to produce a repair tissue that ha...

  17. Growth factor transgenes interactively regulate articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2013-04-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes lack an effective repair response to correct damage from injury or osteoarthritis. Polypeptide growth factors that stimulate articular chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix synthesis may augment this response. Gene transfer is a promising approach to delivering such factors. Multiple growth factor genes regulate these cell functions, but multiple growth factor gene transfer remains unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that multiple growth factor gene transfer selectively modulates articular chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We tested the hypothesis by delivering combinations of the transgenes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and bone morphogenetic protien-7 (BMP-7) to articular chondrocytes and measured changes in the production of DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. The transgenes differentially regulated all these chondrocyte activities. In concert, the transgenes interacted to generate widely divergent responses from the cells. These interactions ranged from inhibitory to synergistic. The transgene pair encoding IGF-I and FGF-2 maximized cell proliferation. The three-transgene group encoding IGF-I, BMP-2, and BMP-7 maximized matrix production and also optimized the balance between cell proliferation and matrix production. These data demonstrate an approach to articular chondrocyte regulation that may be tailored to stimulate specific cell functions, and suggest that certain growth factor gene combinations have potential value for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis and management of implant-prosthetic complications: Description of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm with a clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Gennaro; Di Francesco, Fabrizio; Lanza, Alessandro

    2017-08-24

    A 65-year-old non-smoker man with stabilized chronic periodontitis and in good general health conditions presented to our observation. The patient reported crown mobility, gingival inflammation and localized pain, corresponding to the mandibular right first molar rehabilitated with a cement-retained implant crown. This clinical situation suspected a fracture of an implant-prosthetic component. Through the described diagnostic algorithm, an abutment hexagon fracture was revealed. Thus, a minimally invasive treatment was carried out in order to use the residual implant-prosthetic components for a new implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Fractures of implant-prosthetic components are clinical occurrences that may result in irreversible failures. The main causes of a possible fracture are dependent on biomechanical considerations and production processes of implant-prosthetic components. The respect of the rigorous planning and the employment of the implant-prosthetic devices of the same manufacturer are recommended. Specific employments and protocols have to be offered in order to manage the fractures of implant-prosthetic components. This work showed that through the described diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm, the clinician can be guided towards a proper diagnosis and a correct management of the cases where a fracture of implant-prosthetic components may occur. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consumer satisfaction with the services of prosthetics and orthotics facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Joline; Geertzen, Jan; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2009-03-01

    Consumer satisfaction with the services provided in a prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facility has seldom been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze consumer satisfaction regarding the services provided by 15 P&O facilities in The Netherlands. Consumers (n = 1,364) of these P&O facilities who were fitted with a prosthesis, orthopaedic shoes, an orthosis, or another device, were asked to rate the overall services provided and whether they were satisfied with the device provided and its delivery time. Additionally, they filled in a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire (see Appendix). Consumers gave the service provided by P&O facilities a mean overall rating of 8.1. The highest ratings were given by consumers fitted with a prosthesis (mean overall rating of services: 8.4). In total, 78% of the consumers were satisfied with the device provided and 93% with the delivery time. The results of our study showed that, on the SERVQUAL, 50% of the statements fulfilled the criteria for a satisfactory quality of the services. The overall consumer rating of the service provided by P&O facilities is high and depends on the device provided. The outcomes on the SERVQUAL were moderate. In future, it is important to study consumer satisfaction more extensively in order to improve the quality of P&O services in daily practice. Additionally, specific questionnaires need to be developed to measure all aspects of prosthetic and orthotic care, with the aim to improve the services.

  1. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  2. 77 FR 72924 - Taxable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    .... The factors are (i) whether the device generally must be implanted, inserted, operated, or otherwise... with respect to an orthotic or prosthetic device that is not implanted. The final regulations provide a... circumstances test. 6. Dental Devices Several commenters suggested that dental devices that are customized for...

  3. [Facial prosthetics: grounds and techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirven, R; Lieben, G; Bouwman, S; Wolterink, R; van den Brekel, M W M; Lohuis, P J F M

    2017-09-01

    Surgical treatment of advanced facial tumours is often physically, functionally and emotionally debilitating. The resulting defects often give grounds for surgical reconstruction, prosthetic reconstruction or a combination of both. During the past two decades, huge advances have been achieved in the development of prostheses. This has led to improved rehabilitation of facial defects. In the clinic of the Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, both adhesive- and implant-retained facial prostheses are used. In recent decades, implant-retained prostheses have been used increasingly often. Patient satisfaction rates are very high for both types of prostheses.

  4. [Osteo-articular manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Fatima-Zohra; Talaoui, Maha; Benamour, Saida

    2005-01-15

    Osteo-articular sarcoidosis may be evoked in the presence of peripheral articular manifestations or bone lesions that are sometimes asymptomatic. The aim of this work is to describe clinical and progressive features of sarcoidosis with osteo-articular involvement. Our retrospective study concerned 18 patients presenting with osteo-articular sarcoidosis from 1985 to 1999. We included patients with clinical diagnosis suggestive of sarcoidosis and with at least one positive biopsy. Among 35 cases of sarcoidosis, 18 patients had an osteo-articular manifestation (51.42%), which revealed the disease in 2 patients. The female sex was predominant (sex ratio M/F of 0.12), the mean age was 47 years and the time before diagnosis was 3.6 years. Articular involvement was the most frequent. Inflammatory joint pains were present in 11 cases, a Lofgren syndrome in 2 cases, a chronic arthritis in 4 cases and acute monoarthritis of the elbow in 1 case. A female patient exhibited a probable association with a spondylarthropathy. The bone involvement, revealing the disease in 1 case, was also noted in 5 cases, located exclusively on hands; this sarcoidosal dactyly was represented in 2 cases in the form of phalangeal geodes, in wired form (2 cases) and in large bulla form (1 case). The bone biopsy when it was performed was positive in all 3 cases. The patients responded well to corticosteroids. The osteo-articular involvement of sarcoidosis is polymorphic and can reveal the disease or may appear during the course of its progression.

  5. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  6. Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokpong Amornvit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can be caused by road traffic accidents, falls, assaults, or work-related accidents. Enucleation is often indicated after ocular injury or for the treatment of intraocular tumors, severe ocular infections, and painful blind eyes. Rehabilitation of an enucleated socket without an intraocular implant or with an inappropriately sized implant can result in superior sulcus deepening, enophthalmos, ptosis, ectropion, and lower lid laxity, which are collectively known as post-enucleation socket syndrome. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of post-enucleation socket syndrome with a modified ocular prosthesis. Modifications to the ocular prosthesis were performed to correct the ptosis, superior sulcus deepening, and enophthalmos. The rehabilitation procedure produced satisfactory results.

  7. Imaging of the cervical articular pillar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeomans, E. [Orange Base Hospital, Orange, NSW (Australia)

    1998-12-01

    The cervical articular pillar, due to the complex anatomical structure of the cervical spine, is not well demonstrated in routine plain radiographic views. Dedicated views have been devised to demonstrate the pillar, yet their performance has abated considerably since the inception of Computed Tomography (CT) in the 1970`s. It is the consideration that CT does not image the articular pillar with a 10 per cent accuracy that poses the question: Is there still a need for plain radiography of the cervical articular pillar? This paper studies the anatomy, plain radiography, and incidence of injury to the cervical articular pillar. It discusses (with reference to current and historic literature) the efficacy of current imaging protocols in depicting this injury. It deals with plain radiography, CT, complex tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine to conclude there may still be a position in current imaging protocols for plain radiography of the cervical articular pillar. Copyright (1998) Australian Institute of Radiography 43 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  9. Development and marketing of a prosthetic urinary control valve system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, J. B., Jr.; Rabinowitz, R.; Rogers, D. W.; Harrison, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    An implantable prosthetic for the control of urinary incontinence was developed and marketed. Three phases are presented: bench development studies, animal trials, and human clinical trials. This work was performed under the direction of a Research Team at Rochester General Hospital (RGH). Bench trials were completed on prototype hardware and provided early verification of the device's ability to withstand repeated cyclic testing. Configurational variants were evaluated and a preferred design concept was established. Silicone rubber (medical grade) was selected as the preferred material for the prosthesis.

  10. Is intra-articular magnesium effective for postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic shoulder surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Okesli, Selmin; Yel, Mustafa; Otelcioglu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    Various medications are used intra-articularly for postoperative pain reduction after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Magnesium, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, may be effective for reduction of both postoperative pain scores and analgesic requirements. A total of 67 patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery were divided randomly into two groups to receive intra-articular injections of either 10 mL magnesium sulphate (100 mg⁄mL; group M, n=34) or 10 mL of normal saline (group C, n=33). The analgesic effect was estimated using a visual analogue scale 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 8 h, 12 h, 18 h and 24 h after operation. Postoperative analgesia was maintained by intra-articular morphine (0.01%, 10 mg) + bupivacaine (0.5%, 100 mL) patient-controlled analgesia device as a 1 mL infusion with a 1 mL bolus dose and 15 min lock-out time; for visual analogue scale scores >5, intramuscular diclofenac sodium 75 mg was administered as needed during the study period (maximum two times). Intra-articular magnesium resulted in a significant reduction in pain scores in group M compared with group C 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 8 h and 12 h after the end of surgery, respectively, at rest and with passive motion. Total diclofenac consumption and intra-articular morphine + bupivacaine consumption were significantly lower in group M. Postoperative serum magnesium levels were significantly higher in group M, but were within the normal range. Magnesium causes a reduction in postoperative pain in comparison to saline when administered intra-articularly after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, and has no serious side effects.

  11. Tissue engineering techniques to regenerate articular cartilage using polymeric scaffolds.

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ OLMEDILLA, MARCOS

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Articular cartilage is a tissue that consists of chondrocytes surrounded by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is mainly composed of type II collagen and proteoglycans. The main function of articular cartilage is to provide a lubricated surface for articulation. Articular cartilage damage is common and may lead to osteoarthritis. Articular cartilage does not have blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic vessels and therefore has limited capacity for intrinsic healing and repair. ...

  12. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) ...

  13. Prevalence and characteristics of articular manifestations in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Main outcome measure: Presence of articular manifestations that included HIV associated arthritis, HIV associated spondyloarthropathies, HIV associated arthralgia, painful articular syndrome and avascular necrosis. Results: Thirty three of these 193 patients had articular manifestation with a prevalence of 17.1 %. The type ...

  14. Can We Achieve Intuitive Prosthetic Elbow Control Based on Healthy Upper Limb Motor Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merad, Manelle; de Montalivet, Étienne; Touillet, Amélie; Martinet, Noël; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Jarrassé, Nathanaël

    2018-01-01

    Most transhumeral amputees report that their prosthetic device lacks functionality, citing the control strategy as a major limitation. Indeed, they are required to control several degrees of freedom with muscle groups primarily used for elbow actuation. As a result, most of them choose to have a one-degree-of-freedom myoelectric hand for grasping objects, a myoelectric wrist for pronation/supination, and a body-powered elbow. Unlike healthy upper limb movements, the prosthetic elbow joint angle, adjusted prior to the motion, is not involved in the overall upper limb movements, causing the rest of the body to compensate for the lack of mobility of the prosthesis. A promising solution to improve upper limb prosthesis control exploits the residual limb mobility: like in healthy movements, shoulder and prosthetic elbow motions are coupled using inter-joint coordination models. The present study aims to test this approach. A transhumeral amputated individual used a prosthesis with a residual limb motion-driven elbow to point at targets. The prosthetic elbow motion was derived from IMU-based shoulder measurements and a generic model of inter-joint coordinations built from healthy individuals data. For comparison, the participant also performed the task while the prosthetic elbow was implemented with his own myoelectric control strategy. The results show that although the transhumeral amputated participant achieved the pointing task with a better precision when the elbow was myoelectrically-controlled, he had to develop large compensatory trunk movements. Automatic elbow control reduced trunk displacements, and enabled a more natural body behavior with synchronous shoulder and elbow motions. However, due to socket impairments, the residual limb amplitudes were not as large as those of healthy shoulder movements. Therefore, this work also investigates if a control strategy whereby prosthetic joints are automatized according to healthy individuals' coordination models can

  15. Dynamic balance changes within three weeks of fitting a new prosthetic foot component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jenny A; Stergiou, Nicholas; Wurdeman, Shane R

    2017-10-01

    Balance during walking is of high importance to prosthesis users and may affect walking during baseline observation and evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in walking balance occurred during an adaptation period following the fitting of a new prosthetic component. Margin of stability in the medial-lateral direction (MOS ML ) and an anterior instability margin (AIM) were used to quantify the dynamic balance of 21 unilateral transtibial amputees during overground walking. Participants trialled two prosthetic feet presenting contrasting movement/balance constraints; a Higher Activity foot similar to that of their own prosthesis, and a Lower Activity foot. Participants were assessed before (Visit 1) and after (Visit 2) a 3-week adaptation period on each foot. With the Higher Activity component, MOS ML decreased on the prosthetic side, and increased on the sound side from Visit 1 to Visit 2, eliminating a significant inter-limb difference apparent at Visit 1 (Visit 1-sound=0.062m, prosthetic=0.075m, p=0.018; Visit 2-sound=0.066m, prosthetic=0.074m, p=0.084). No such change was seen with the Lower Activity foot (Visit 1-sound=0.064m, prosthetic=0.077m, p=0.007; Visit 2-sound=0.063m, prosthetic=0.080m, p<0.001). Significant changes in AIM were observed at Visit 2 (Visit 1: -0.16 (0.08) m, Visit 2: -0.17 (0.08) m; F=23.396, p<0.01). These findings suggest that changes in balance during walking can occur following the initial receipt of a device regardless of whether the component is of the same functional category as the one an individual is accustomed to using. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Can We Achieve Intuitive Prosthetic Elbow Control Based on Healthy Upper Limb Motor Strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manelle Merad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most transhumeral amputees report that their prosthetic device lacks functionality, citing the control strategy as a major limitation. Indeed, they are required to control several degrees of freedom with muscle groups primarily used for elbow actuation. As a result, most of them choose to have a one-degree-of-freedom myoelectric hand for grasping objects, a myoelectric wrist for pronation/supination, and a body-powered elbow. Unlike healthy upper limb movements, the prosthetic elbow joint angle, adjusted prior to the motion, is not involved in the overall upper limb movements, causing the rest of the body to compensate for the lack of mobility of the prosthesis. A promising solution to improve upper limb prosthesis control exploits the residual limb mobility: like in healthy movements, shoulder and prosthetic elbow motions are coupled using inter-joint coordination models. The present study aims to test this approach. A transhumeral amputated individual used a prosthesis with a residual limb motion-driven elbow to point at targets. The prosthetic elbow motion was derived from IMU-based shoulder measurements and a generic model of inter-joint coordinations built from healthy individuals data. For comparison, the participant also performed the task while the prosthetic elbow was implemented with his own myoelectric control strategy. The results show that although the transhumeral amputated participant achieved the pointing task with a better precision when the elbow was myoelectrically-controlled, he had to develop large compensatory trunk movements. Automatic elbow control reduced trunk displacements, and enabled a more natural body behavior with synchronous shoulder and elbow motions. However, due to socket impairments, the residual limb amplitudes were not as large as those of healthy shoulder movements. Therefore, this work also investigates if a control strategy whereby prosthetic joints are automatized according to healthy individuals

  17. DME Prosthetics Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics-Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule. The list contains the fee schedule amounts, floors, and ceilings for all procedure codes...

  18. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we report a case of an antenatal female in first trimester with aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT), who was successfully ...

  19. Computed Tomography of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients with PHV dysfunction clinically can present with symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, fatigue, edema), fever, angina pectoris, dizziness

  20. Intra-articular therapies for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional medical therapies for osteoarthritis are mainly palliative in nature, aiming to control pain and symptoms. Traditional intra-articular therapies are not recommended in guidelines as first line therapy, but are potential alternatives, when conventional therapies have failed. Current and future intra-articular drug therapies for osteoarthritis are highlighted, including corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and more controversial treatments marketed commercially, namely platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal cell therapy. Intraarticular disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs are the future of osteoarthritis treatments, aiming at structural modification and altering the disease progression. Interleukin-1β inhibitor, bone morphogenic protein-7, fibroblast growth factor 18, bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, human serum albumin, and gene therapy are discussed in this review. The evolution of drug development in osteoarthritis is limited by the ability to demonstrate effect. High quality trials are required to justify the use of existing intra-articular therapies and to advocate for newer, promising therapies. Challenges in osteoarthritis therapy research are fundamentally related to the complexity of the pathological mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Novel drugs offer hope in a disease with limited medical therapy options. Whether these future intra-articular therapies will provide clinically meaningful benefits, remains unknown.

  1. Juxta-articular myxoma of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, Matthijs P.; de Vries, Jasper S.; Dingemans, Willemijn; de Jonge, Milco; Maas, Mario; Schaap, Gerard R.; Bramer, Jos A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Juxta-articular myxoma is a benign lesion usually presenting as a slow-growing, well-circumscribed mass. Occasionally, however, the lesion grows rapidly and is poorly circumscribed, and it is this clinical presentation that arouses suspicion of malignancy. Furthermore, on histology a myxoma can also

  2. [Ibuprofen in osteo-articular (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigne, R; Le Corre, F; Juvin, P; Deletang, M

    The authors point out the good results which are obtained in osteo-articular pathology, in particular vertebral, with ibuprofen (Brufen 400). Providing that a sufficient dosage is given (1 600 mg - 2 400 mg per day), an obvious and fast favourable effect is noticed in 75% cases. According to these results, tolerance is quite satisfactory.

  3. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  4. Prosthetic management of hemimandibulectomy patient with guiding plane and twin occlusion prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar R.; Shamnur, Sunitha N.; Iynalli, Rudraprasad V.; Shivmurthy, Shadakshari

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular deviation is multifactorial defect and its severity is based on the extent of osseous and soft tissue involvement, degree of tongue impaired, the loss of sensory and motor innervations, the type of wound closure, the presence of remaining natural teeth and finally the first initiation of prosthetic treatment. We describe a case of prosthetic management of a maxillary partially edentulous patient with hemimandibulectomy who reported after 4 years of postsurgical cancer therapy. A simple maxillary guided hollow inclined plane with twin occlusion acrylic prosthesis was fabricated as a functional training device to correct mandibular deviation, restore maxillomandibular relation and occlusal approximation. The patient was able to functionally achieve good maxillomandibular occlusal approximation with guidance therapy combined with physiotherapy in 2 weeks. A 6 months follow-up revealed patient satisfactory appreciation by understanding the limitations of overall prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:26283850

  5. Prosthetic management of hemimandibulectomy patient with guiding plane and twin occlusion prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar R; Shamnur, Sunitha N; Iynalli, Rudraprasad V; Shivmurthy, Shadakshari

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular deviation is multifactorial defect and its severity is based on the extent of osseous and soft tissue involvement, degree of tongue impaired, the loss of sensory and motor innervations, the type of wound closure, the presence of remaining natural teeth and finally the first initiation of prosthetic treatment. We describe a case of prosthetic management of a maxillary partially edentulous patient with hemimandibulectomy who reported after 4 years of postsurgical cancer therapy. A simple maxillary guided hollow inclined plane with twin occlusion acrylic prosthesis was fabricated as a functional training device to correct mandibular deviation, restore maxillomandibular relation and occlusal approximation. The patient was able to functionally achieve good maxillomandibular occlusal approximation with guidance therapy combined with physiotherapy in 2 weeks. A 6 months follow-up revealed patient satisfactory appreciation by understanding the limitations of overall prosthetic rehabilitation.

  6. Stump ulcers and continued prosthetic limb use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawu, A; Middleton, C; Gilbertson, A; Kodavali, K; Neumann, V

    2006-12-01

    Stump ulcers are common problems in amputees. Temporary discontinuation of prosthetic limb use is frequently employed to facilitate healing. Inevitably, this limits activity and may, for instance, prevent an amputee from going to work. A survey of clinical practice was carried out based on the premise that controlled continued prosthetic limb use in patients with stump ulcers will not adversely affect the ulcer nor prevent healing. The survey would also form a basis for developing future guidelines in the management of stump ulcers. All consecutive patients attending the Chapel Allerton Hospital prosthetic clinic between January 2003 and May 2004 with stump ulcers were recruited into the study. Primary outcome measures were changes in the surface area of the ulcers and in clinical photographs taken on 2 occasions 6 weeks apart. Some 102 patients with a mean age 60 years (range 18 - 88 years) were recruited. Eight patients who were established prosthetic limb users did not complete the study and were excluded from the analysis. Of the patients 52 were newly referred patients with delayed surgical wound healing while 42 were established prosthetic limb users for at least 1 year. Continued prosthetic limb was associated with a significant reduction in ulcer size (p prosthetic limb wearing despite the presence of stump ulceration. This observational study found that, despite prosthetic use, 60 (64%) cases healed completely within the six-week study period and 23 (25%) ulcers reduced in size. The ulcers were unchanged in 2% of the cases. Deterioration was observed in nine (9%) cases. This survey suggests that the current practice of allowing patients to use their prostheses is safe. A clinical trial is now needed to establish whether this practice alters healing rate or has any other disadvantages for new or established amputees.

  7. Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Combination Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Carlino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical symptoms, ethologic factors, and prosthetic rehabilitation in a case of Combination Syndrome (CS. The treatment of CS can be conventional or surgical, with or without the bone reconstruction of maxilla. The correct prosthetic treatment helps this kind of patients to restore the physiologic occlusion plane to allow a correct masticatory and aesthetic function. Management of this kind of patients can be a challenge for a dental practitioner.

  8. Exploring virtual reality and prosthetic training.

    OpenAIRE

    Phelan, Ivan; Arden, Madelynne; Garcia, Carol; Roast, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Working together with health care professionals and a world\\ud leading bionic prosthetic maker we created a prototype that aims to decrease the time it takes for a transradial amputee to train how to use a Myoelectric prosthetic arm. Our research indicates that the Oculus Rift, Microsoft’s Kinect and the Thalmic Labs Myo gesture control armband will allow us to create a unique, cost effective training tool that could be beneficial to amputee patients.

  9. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma as a differential diagnosis of diffuse mono-articular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvien, Tim; Zustin, Jozef; Mussawy, Haider; Schmidt, Tobias; Pogoda, Pia; Ueblacker, Peter

    2016-11-04

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the frequency of intra-articular osteoid osteoma (iaOO) in a large study cohort and to demonstrate its clinical relevance as an important differential diagnosis of non-specific mono-articular joint pain. We searched the registry for bone tumours of the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf for osteoid osteomas in the last 42 years. Herein, we present three selected iaOO which were detected in the three major weight-bearing joints. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed for initial diagnosis. Out of a total of 367 osteoid osteomas, 19 (5.2 %) tumours were localized intra-articularly. In all three presented tumours, a history of severe mono-articular pain was reported; however, the mean time to correct diagnosis was delayed to 20.7 months. Clearly, the nidus seen in CT and MRI images in combination with inconsistent salicylate-responsive nocturnal pain led to the diagnosis of iaOO. Rarely, osteoid osteoma can occur in an intra-articular location. In cases of diffuse mono-articular pain, iaOO should be considered both in large and smaller joints to avoid delays in diagnosis and therapy of this benign bone tumour.

  10. [Microbiological characteristics and patterns of resistance in prosthetic joint infections in a referral hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Peña, Silvestre; Colín-Castro, Claudia; Hernández-Duran, Melissa; López-Jácome, Esaú; Franco-Cendejas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The prosthetic joint infection is the most feared and catastrophic complication for cause severe physical damage to patients and, generates high economic costs. To describe the microbiological characteristics and to determine the resistance pattern in prosthetic joint infections in a reference hospital in Mexico. Patients whose prosthetic devices were withdrawn due to suspicion of septic and aseptic loosening were included. Cultures were performed to identify microorganisms and susceptibility analysis. Of the 111 patients included, 55% were diagnosed with prosthetic joint infection, with the most frequent prosthesis being of the hip (43%). Positive cultures were obtained in 97% of the infected cases, of which 75% were monomicrobial infections. The most frequent bacterial species isolated were: Staphylococcus epidermidis (31%), Enterococcus faecalis (16%), Staphylococcus aureus (13%), and Escherichia coli (8%). The resistance patterns for the Staphylococcus genus were: oxacillin (79%), erythromycin (45%) and ciprofloxacin (37%). Enterococcus faecalis showed a high percentage of resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin (86%), and fluoroquinolones (43%). The large majority (86%) of Escherichia coli were extended spectrum beta-lactamases positive, in addition to having high resistance to fluoroquinolones (86%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (86%) and gentamicin (72%). The microbiological characteristics found in prosthetic joint infections vary according to the hospitals. In this series, a high proportion of coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Enterococcus spp. were found, as well as a high bacterial resistance. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  12. Utilization of penile prosthesis and male incontinence prosthetics in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwaal, Amjad; Al-Sayyad, Ahmad J

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent disease affecting over 50% of men between the ages of 40 and 70 years. Penile prosthesis represents the end of the line treatment when other less invasive therapies fail or are contraindicated. Male stress urinary incontinence can significantly diminish quality of life and lead to embarrassment and social withdrawal. Surgical therapies, such as male urethral slings and artificial urinary sphincters (AUS), are considered effective and safe treatments for male stress incontinence. No data exist on the utilization of penile prosthesis or male incontinence surgical treatment in Saudi Arabia. Generally, urological prosthetic surgery is performed either in private hospitals or in government hospitals. Our aim was to assess the trend of penile prosthesis and male incontinence device utilization in Saudi Arabia. We utilized sales' data of penile prosthetics, male slings, and AUS from the only two companies selling these devices in Saudi Arabia (AMS ® and Coloplast ® ), from January 2013 to December 2016. There were 2599 penile prosthesis implantation procedures done in the study period, with 67% of them performed in private institutions. There was a progressively increased use of penile prosthetics which nearly doubled from 2013 to 2016. The main type of prosthesis utilized was the semirigid type 70% versus 11% of the 2-piece inflatable and 17% of the 3-piece inflatable device. Only 10 slings and 31 AUS were inserted during the same study period. There is an increased utilization of penile prosthetics in Saudi Arabia. The private sector performs the majority of penile prosthesis procedures, and most of them are of the semirigid type. The governmental sector is more likely to perform inflatable penile prosthesis and male incontinence device procedures. Male incontinence prosthetics' use is very limited in Saudi Arabia.

  13. The efficacy of the Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot prototype 4.0 during walking: Physiological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Kevin; Cherelle, Pierre; Roelands, Bart; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2018-04-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness of a novel prosthetic device during walking is an important step in product development. To investigate the efficacy of a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthetic device, Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot 4.0, during walking at different speeds, using physiological determinants in transtibial and transfemoral amputees. Nonrandomized crossover design for amputees. Six able-bodied subjects, six unilateral transtibial amputees, and six unilateral transfemoral amputees underwent a 6-min walk test at normal speed, followed by series of 2-min walking at slow, normal, and fast speeds. The intensity of effort and subjective measures were determined. Amputees performed all walking tests on a treadmill with current and novel prostheses. Shapiro-Wilk normality tests and parametric and nonparametric tests were conducted (p < 0.05). Compared to able-bodied individuals, the rating of perceived exertion levels were significantly elevated in transtibial and transfemoral amputees for both prostheses (p ≤ 0.016). Compared to able-bodied individuals transfemoral amputees also showed significantly elevated heart rate for both prostheses at normal speed (p ≤ 0.043). Within-group comparisons demonstrated that walking with Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot significantly increased the heart rate in transfemoral amputees and transtibial compared to current prosthesis (p = 0.002). Furthermore, transfemoral amputees reached a significantly higher rating of perceived exertion levels. Intensity of effort during walking with Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot is higher compared to current prostheses. Clinical relevance Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot 4.0 is a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthesis with state-of-the-art technological parts. Subjective measures show the importance of this technology, but the intensity of effort during walking still remains higher compared to current passive prostheses, especially in transfemoral amputees.

  14. Porous composite prosthetic pylon for integration with skin and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pilling, John; Galibin, Oleg V; Protasov, Mikhail V; Chihovskaya, Julie V; Belyaeva, Irina G; Blinova, Miralda I; Yudintseva, Natalia M; Potokin, Igor L; Pinaev, George P; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodimir

    2007-01-01

    This article presents results of the further development and testing of the "skin and bone integrated pylon" (SBIP-1) for percutaneous (through skin) connection of the residual bone with an external limb prosthesis. We investigated a composite structure (called the SBIP-2) made of titanium particles and fine wires using mathematical modeling and mechanical testing. Results showed that the strength of the pylon was comparable with that of anatomical bone. In vitro and in vivo animal studies on 30 rats showed that the reinforcement of the composite pylon did not compromise its previously shown capacity for inviting skin and bone cell ingrowth through the device. These findings provide evidence for the safe and reliable long-term percutaneous transfer of vital and therapeutic substances, signals, and necessary forces and moments from a prosthetic device to the body.

  15. First-in-man demonstration of a fully implanted myoelectric sensors system to control an advanced electromechanical prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Paul F; Evangelista, Melissa; Carvalho, A J; Lockhart, Joseph; Griffin, Sarah; Nanos, George; McKay, Patricia; Hansen, Morten; Ipsen, Derek; Vandersea, James; Butkus, Josef; Miller, Matthew; Murphy, Ian; Hankin, David

    2015-04-15

    Advanced motorized prosthetic devices are currently controlled by EMG signals generated by residual muscles and recorded by surface electrodes on the skin. These surface recordings are often inconsistent and unreliable, leading to high prosthetic abandonment rates for individuals with upper limb amputation. Surface electrodes are limited because of poor skin contact, socket rotation, residual limb sweating, and their ability to only record signals from superficial muscles, whose function frequently does not relate to the intended prosthetic function. More sophisticated prosthetic devices require a stable and reliable interface between the user and robotic hand to improve upper limb prosthetic function. Implantable Myoelectric Sensors (IMES(®)) are small electrodes intended to detect and wirelessly transmit EMG signals to an electromechanical prosthetic hand via an electro-magnetic coil built into the prosthetic socket. This system is designed to simultaneously capture EMG signals from multiple residual limb muscles, allowing the natural control of multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously. We report the status of the first FDA-approved clinical trial of the IMES(®) System. This study is currently in progress, limiting reporting to only preliminary results. Our first subject has reported the ability to accomplish a greater variety and complexity of tasks in his everyday life compared to what could be achieved with his previous myoelectric prosthesis. The interim results of this study indicate the feasibility of utilizing IMES(®) technology to reliably sense and wirelessly transmit EMG signals from residual muscles to intuitively control a three degree-of-freedom prosthetic arm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  17. Simulation of a sensor array for multiparameter measurements at the prosthetic limb interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Gabriel I.; Mamishev, Alexander V.

    2004-07-01

    Sensitive skin is a highly desired device for biomechanical devices, wearable computing, human-computer interfaces, exoskeletons, and, most pertinent to this paper, for lower limb prosthetics. The measurement of shear stress is very important because shear effects are key factors in developing surface abrasions and pressure sores in paraplegics and users of prosthetic/orthotic devices. A single element of a sensitive skin is simulated and characterized in this paper. Conventional tactile sensors are designed for measurement of the normal stress only, which is inadequate for comprehensive assessment of surface contact conditions. The sensitive skin discussed here is a flexible array capable of sensing shear and normal forces, as well as humidity and temperature on each element.

  18. Percutaneous management of prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis of a prosthetic valve is a serious complication in patients with prosthetic heart valves. Thrombolysis is the initial choice of treatment. Patients who do not respond to thrombolysis are subjected to surgery which carries a high risk. We report a case series of 5 patients with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis who did not respond to thrombolysis and were subjected to percutaneous manipulation of the prosthetic valves successfully and improved. Five patients who were diagnosed to have prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and failed to respond to a minimum of 36 h of thrombolysis (persistent symptoms with increased gradients, abnormal findings on fluoroscopy),were subjected to percutaneous treatment after receiving proper consent. None of them had a visible thrombus on transthoracic echocardiogram. All patients underwent transseptal puncture following which a 6F JR4 guiding catheter was passed into the left atrium. The valve leaflets were repeatedly hit gently under fluoroscopic guidance till they regained their normal mobility. Mean age was 38.8 years. Average peak and mean gradients prior to the procedure were 38 and 25 and after the procedure were 12 and 6 mm of Hg respectively. All patients had successful recovery of valve motion on fluoroscopy with normalization of gradients and complete resolution of symptoms. None of the patients had any focal neurological deficits, embolic manifestations or bleeding complications. Percutaneous manipulation of prosthetic valves in selected patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis who do not respond to thrombolytic therapy is feasible and can be used as an alternative to surgery. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of environmental and personal factors on participation of lower-limb prosthetic users in low-income countries: prosthetists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Season; Kent, Mallory; Khodaverdian, Alin; Daiter, Liane; Njelesani, Janet; Cameron, Debra; Andrysek, Jan

    2015-05-01

    To examine the environmental and personal factors in low-income countries (LICs) that influence prosthetic rehabilitation of adults with lower-limb (LL) amputations and their ability to participate in daily activities. In this qualitative descriptive study, 11 prosthetists participated in semi-structured interviews by telephone or Skype. Qualitative thematic analysis was guided by the International Classification of Function. Facilitating continuity of care, consideration of physical environments and usage, prosthetic quality including durability and socket fit, and minimizing the visibility of disability, were found to be important factors affecting the provision of prosthetic services in LICs. Environmental and personal factors must be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation for adults with LL amputations in LICs in order to optimize participation in activities. Results from this study provide new insights about some of the factors that influence the ability of individuals with LL amputations to rehabilitate to a level where they are able to participate in meaningful activities within their communities. There are unique environmental and personal components that can influence activity and participation of lower-limb (LL) prosthetic users in low-income countries (LICs). These components are often overlooked in the design of prosthetic devices and provision of prosthetic services. Continuity of care, condition of the post-surgical residuum, outdoor environments of common occupations, aesthetics and durability of prostheses, and user comfort should all be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation to adults with LL amputations in LICs to promote activity and participation. Results of our study can inform the practice of prosthetists in LICs by highlighting their contributions in enabling participation for LL prosthetic users. Our results can also inform the design of durable and comfortable prostheses and the provision of more appropriate

  20. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  1. Magnetic Oculomotor Prosthetics for Acquired Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rose, Geoff E; Verity, David H; Manohar, Sanjay G; MacKenzie, Kelly; Adams, Gill; Theodorou, Maria; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Kennard, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Acquired nystagmus, a highly symptomatic consequence of damage to the substrates of oculomotor control, often is resistant to pharmacotherapy. Although heterogeneous in its neural cause, its expression is unified at the effector-the eye muscles themselves-where physical damping of the oscillation offers an alternative approach. Because direct surgical fixation would immobilize the globe, action at a distance is required to damp the oscillation at the point of fixation, allowing unhindered gaze shifts at other times. Implementing this idea magnetically, herein we describe the successful implantation of a novel magnetic oculomotor prosthesis in a patient. Case report of a pilot, experimental intervention. A 49-year-old man with longstanding, medication-resistant, upbeat nystagmus resulting from a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by stage 2A, grade I, nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma. We designed a 2-part, titanium-encased, rare-earth magnet oculomotor prosthesis, powered to damp nystagmus without interfering with the larger forces involved in saccades. Its damping effects were confirmed when applied externally. We proceeded to implant the device in the patient, comparing visual functions and high-resolution oculography before and after implantation and monitoring the patient for more than 4 years after surgery. We recorded Snellen visual acuity before and after intervention, as well as the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus in each eye. The patient reported a clinically significant improvement of 1 line of Snellen acuity (from 6/9 bilaterally to 6/6 on the left and 6/5-2 on the right), reflecting an objectively measured reduction in the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus. These improvements were maintained throughout a follow-up of 4 years and enabled him to return to paid employment. This work opens a new field of implantable therapeutic devices-oculomotor prosthetics-designed to modify eye

  2. A geometrical optimization of a magneto-rheological rotary brake in a prosthetic knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudmundsson, K H; Jonsdottir, F; Thorsteinsson, F

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been successfully introduced to prosthetic devices. One such device is a biomechanical prosthetic knee that uses MR fluids to actively control its rotary stiffness. The brake is rotational, utilizing the MR fluid in shear mode. In this study, the geometrical design of the MR brake is addressed. This includes the design of the magnetic circuit and the geometry of the fluid chamber. Mathematical models are presented that describe the rotary torque of the brake. A novel perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based MR fluid is introduced, whose properties are tailored for the prosthetic knee. On-state and off-state rheological measurements of the MR fluid are presented. The finite element method is used to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the MR fluid. The design is formulated as an optimization problem, aiming to maximize the braking torque. A parametric study is carried out for several design parameters. Subsequently, a multi-objective optimization problem is defined that considers three design objectives: the field-induced braking torque, the off-state rotary stiffness and the weight of the brake. Trade-offs between the three design objectives are investigated which provides a basis for informed design decisions on furthering the success of the MR prosthetic knee

  3. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  4. [New technologies in the prosthetic management after amputations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M; Gawron, O

    2015-06-01

    In Germany around 70,000 amputations are carried out on extremities each year. Modern prosthetic functional components have become more and more sophisticated and must be understood and applied by their users to be of beneficial use in everyday life. The prosthetic socket is the most important component of modern extremity prosthetics. Which demands have to be met by a modern prosthetic socket so that innovative function-improving components in prosthetics can be successfully applied? Complex prosthetic technologies are rarely compatible with a lower overall weight of the prosthesis. The increase in functionality also produces differentiated force effects on the human body. Modern socket technologies, therefore, have to compensate for the increased strain and counteract the increasing dynamics between the stump and the prosthesis. This can be achieved through the application of adhesive socket materials and through new adhesive mechanisms. Form variants can also improve the connection between stump and prosthetic socket. The improvements in prosthetic socket technology presented here have a lasting positive effect on the daily routine of many amputees. Not only do they improve the control and application of modern prosthetic components, but also clearly enhance the wearing comfort. The prosthetic socket is crucial for the success of exoskeletal prosthetic management. The better we succeed in making the human body and the prosthetic socket an entity, the more usefully and comfortably innovative prosthetic methods can be applied.

  5. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  6. Current concepts of articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2011-12-01

    Articular cartilage provides a vital function in the homeostasis of the joint environment. It possesses unique mechanical properties, allowing for the maintenance of almost frictionless motion over a lifetime. However, cartilage is vulnerable to traumatic injury and due to its poor vascularity and inability to access mesenchymal stem cells, unable to facilitate a satisfactory healing response. Untreated chondral defects are thus likely to predispose patients to the development of osteoarthritis. Reconstitution and repair of articular cartilage is dependent on the neosynthesis or implantation of cartilage matrix elements, a goal which can be achieved through a variety of surgical means. Commonly used repair techniques include marrow stimulation, structural osteo-articular autografts or chondrocyte implantation. Despite substantial differences in the complexity and technical application of each method, all are united in the endeavour to restore joint function and prevent joint degeneration. Anyone attempting to treat cartilage defects must possess a basic understanding of the physiology of cartilage growth, and relevant factors affecting cartilage healing and repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the biomechanics and kinematics of the knee are essential in order to appreciate the forces acting on joint surfaces and repair tissues. Although clinical success is dependent on appropriate patient selection, accurate clinical assessment, definition of root causes and application of the right choice of treatment modality, the ultimate outcome of any intervention remains heavily reliant on the surgeon's proficiency in the technical aspects of the chosen surgical procedure.

  7. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  8. Illusory movement perception improves motor control for prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Paul D; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Sensinger, Jon W; Shell, Courtney E; Schofield, Jonathon S; Thumser, Zachary C; Nataraj, Raviraj; Beckler, Dylan T; Dawson, Michael R; Blustein, Dan H; Gill, Satinder; Mensh, Brett D; Granja-Vazquez, Rafael; Newcomb, Madeline D; Carey, Jason P; Orzell, Beth M

    2018-03-14

    To effortlessly complete an intentional movement, the brain needs feedback from the body regarding the movement's progress. This largely nonconscious kinesthetic sense helps the brain to learn relationships between motor commands and outcomes to correct movement errors. Prosthetic systems for restoring function have predominantly focused on controlling motorized joint movement. Without the kinesthetic sense, however, these devices do not become intuitively controllable. We report a method for endowing human amputees with a kinesthetic perception of dexterous robotic hands. Vibrating the muscles used for prosthetic control via a neural-machine interface produced the illusory perception of complex grip movements. Within minutes, three amputees integrated this kinesthetic feedback and improved movement control. Combining intent, kinesthesia, and vision instilled participants with a sense of agency over the robotic movements. This feedback approach for closed-loop control opens a pathway to seamless integration of minds and machines. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Comparison of satisfaction with current prosthetic care in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts with major traumatic limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Gary M; Fergason, John; Milani, John R; Hattingh, John; McDowell, Martin; Nguyen, Viet; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic care is a vital aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss. Our survey queried 581 veterans and servicemembers with limb loss from the Vietnam and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)/Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) conflicts. Among survey participants, 78.2% from the Vietnam conflict and 90.5% from the OIF/OEF conflict currently use prosthetic devices. In Vietnam respondents, 78% received prosthetic care from private sources, 16% from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prosthetic laboratories, 0.9% from Department of Defense (DOD), and 5% from multiple sources. In OIF/OEF respondents, 42% received prosthetic care from private sources, 9% percent from VA, 39% from DOD, and 10% from multiple sources. Participants identified their satisfaction with current prosthetic devices and prosthetic services. Reports of pain, sweating, skin irritation, and problems with socket fit continue to be significant issues for participants from both conflicts regardless of level of amputation or site of service. In those with upper-limb loss who used myoelectric prostheses, minimal effect on prosthesis use and satisfaction was noted. Among lower-limb loss participants from both conflicts, notable differences existed in prosthesis satisfaction by source of care.

  10. Prosthetic status and prosthetic needs amongst geriatric fishermen population of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dola Rama Venkata; Raju, Datla Srinivasa; Naidu, Lakshmu; Deshpande, Sumit; Chadha, Manish; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Literature among fishermen of India is scanty. The external factors like diet, quality of dental hygiene and environmental factors have an effect on oral health. Moreover elderly age group offer very little importance towards their oral health. To assess the prosthetic status and prosthetic treatment needs among the geriatric fishermen population of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among 1200 elderly people (above 60 years) of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. They were interviewed and examined using a proforma designed with the help of WHO Oral Health Survey 1997. Chi square test was used for comparisons. Confidence level and p-value were set at 95% and 5% respectively. Out of 1200 elderly people, 836 were males and 364 were females. Considering the prosthetic status, majority (76.7%) had no prosthesis followed by full removable dentures (12.3%). An insight into the prosthetic needs showed that majority (27.3%) had a need for multiunit prosthesis. In this study, it was seen that overall prosthetic status was low and prosthetic need was high. Therefore new avenues have to be discovered to make the prosthetic treatment readily available to the elderly.

  11. [Localized purpura revealing vascular prosthetic graft infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Lescalie, F; Cassagnau, E; Clairand, R; Connault, J

    2013-07-01

    Prosthetic graft infection after vascular reconstruction is a rare but serious complication. We report a case of infection occurring late after implantation of an iliofemoral prosthetic vascular graft. The Staphylococcus aureus infection was revealed by vascular purpura localized on the right leg 7 years after implantation of a vascular prosthesis. This case illustrates an uncommonly late clinical manifestation presenting as an acute infection 7 years after the primary operation. In this situation, the presentation differs from early infection, which generally occurs within the first four postoperative months. Diagnosis and treatment remain a difficult challenge because prosthetic graft infection is a potentially life-threatening complication. Morbidity and mortality rates are high. Here we detail specific aspects of the clinical and radiological presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Bruxism and prosthetic treatment: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2011-07-01

    Based on the findings from available research on bruxism and prosthetic treatment published in the dental literature, an attempt was made to draw conclusions about the existence of a possible relationship between the two, and its clinical relevance. MEDLINE/PubMed searches were conducted using the terms 'bruxism' and 'prosthetic treatment', as well as combinations of these and related terms. The few studies judged to be relevant were critically reviewed, in addition to papers found during an additional manual search of reference lists within selected articles. Bruxism is a common parafunctional habit, occurring both during sleep and wakefulness. Usually it causes few serious effects, but can do so in some patients. The etiology is multifactorial. There is no known treatment to stop bruxism, including prosthetic treatment. The role of bruxism in the process of tooth wear is unclear, but it is not considered a major cause. As informed by the present critical review, the relationship between bruxism and prosthetic treatment is one that relates mainly to the effect of the former on the latter. Bruxism may be included among the risk factors, and is associated with increased mechanical and/or technical complications in prosthodontic rehabilitation, although it seems not to affect implant survival. When prosthetic intervention is indicated in a patient with bruxism, efforts should be made to reduce the effects of likely heavy occlusal loading on all the components that contribute to prosthetic structural integrity. Failure to do so may indicate earlier failure than is the norm. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Multiple agenesis and prosthetic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, P

    1990-03-01

    Cases of multiple agenesia present some difficulties in the treatment planing. Three situations may be encountered: limited agenesia, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia without remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis or the partial adjacent prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia with remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by means of a supra-dental prosthesis. The first two situations have been described in dental literature and are relatively easy to treat. The same is not true for the third situation, where the decision to keep the temporary teeth considerably increases the difficulty of prosthetic restoration. This subject will be illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of multiple bi-maxillary agenesia. The patient has: on the maxilla: an absence of 9 permanent teeth (18, 15, 14, 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28) and the presence of 4 deciduous teeth (62, 63, 64, 65), on the mandible: an absence of all permanent teeth, with the exception of 36 and 46, and the remaining of 4 deciduous teeth (75, 73, 83, 84). The remaining of deciduous teeth and the presence of a very high inter-arch space led to opting for dental coverage so as to keep the deciduous teeth and a proper vertical dimension. The patient wished to solve his "problem" in the maxilla first, and is not wanting to undergo the extraction of his deciduous teeth. The following therapeutic proposal was adapted: On the maxilla, a three-step procedure: first step: building of metal copings on 13, 16 and 26 and metal-ceramic crowns on 11 and 21, second step: building of telescop crowns on 16 and 26 and clasps on 13, 11 and 21, third step: casting of the removable partial denture framework and soldering to the telescop crowns and clasps. On the mandible, a provisional restoration using a supra-dental resin removable partial denture with ceramic occlusal surfaces was adopted. The aesthetic and functional

  14. Optimising the prescription of prosthetic technologies (opptec): Outcome measures for evidence based prosthetic practice and use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryall, Dr Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This study provided a forum for patients and service providers to voice their opinions in what they believe to be the important predictors and outcomes involved in successful rehabilitation following limb loss. To develop a consensus on the most important outcomes and factors to address for both the lower limb and upper limb prosthetic prescription process, the above data relating to lower limb and upper prosthetics were subsequently used in the next phase of the research involving two Delphi surveys of 23 and 53 experts within the lower limb and upper limb amputation and prosthetic field respectively, including users, service providers and researchers.\\r\

  15. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  16. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p dental offices.

  17. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a

  18. Electrical Stimulation of Visual Cortex: Relevance for the Development of Visual Cortical Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosking, William H; Beauchamp, Michael S; Yoshor, Daniel

    2017-09-15

    Electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex is a powerful tool for exploring cortical function. Stimulation of early visual cortical areas is easily detected by subjects and produces simple visual percepts known as phosphenes. A device implanted in visual cortex that generates patterns of phosphenes could be used as a substitute for natural vision in blind patients. We review the possibilities and limitations of such a device, termed a visual cortical prosthetic. Currently, we can predict the location and size of phosphenes produced by stimulation of single electrodes. A functional prosthetic, however, must produce spatial temporal patterns of activity that will result in the perception of complex visual objects. Although stimulation of later visual cortical areas alone usually does not lead to a visual percept, it can alter visual perception and the performance of visual behaviors, and training subjects to use signals injected into these areas may be possible.

  19. Method of making self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2017-06-06

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  20. The agenetic body: prosthetics or the new Promethean ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmeyer, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    In our rapidly changing world, we are often encouraged to treat our bodies as objects of constant improvement by means of various facilities and innovations. As part of this "Promethean tendency," the present-day alliance between medicine and technology has opened up a new perspective on the ill and disabled body, by providing access to sophisticated prosthetics that are increasingly seen as ideal remedies. These devices allow patients to benefit from previously unimaginable treatments and inestimable scientific advances, yet they also create new forms of dependency that go beyond simply forming a habit. They are part of a complex process which results in the construction of a body full of paradoxes and whose effects go beyond the subject's image construction. Based on the case of Mathilde, a little girl with a partial arm agenesis, the author traces some elements of the psychic process of constructing a body: from a congenital malformation towards a body "supplemented" by a prosthesis.

  1. Physiologically Relevant Prosthetic Limb Movement Feedback for Upper and Lower Extremity Amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Extremity Amputees 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0575 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Paul Marasco*, Jacqueline Hebert, Alex...most effectively influence motor control. We are developing novel socket designs (EMG and Suspension Focused Design, and Vibration Tactor Focused...the context of optimal foraging theory. 4) Gait perturbation analysis. In order to develop devices that have clinical applicability prosthetic socket

  2. Psychometric evaluation of self-report outcome measures for prosthetic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Brian J.; Morgan, Sara J.; Askew, Robert L.; Salem, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Documentation of clinical outcomes is increasingly expected in delivery of prosthetic services and devices. However, many outcome measures suitable for use in clinical care and research have not been psychometrically tested with prosthesis users. The aim of this study was to determine test-retest reliability, mode-of-administration (MoA) equivalence, standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC) of standardized, self-report instruments that assess constructs of impo...

  3. Utilization of penile prosthesis and male incontinence prosthetics in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwaal, Amjad; Al-Sayyad, Ahmad J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent disease affecting over 50% of men between the ages of 40 and 70 years. Penile prosthesis represents the end of the line treatment when other less invasive therapies fail or are contraindicated. Male stress urinary incontinence can significantly diminish quality of life and lead to embarrassment and social withdrawal. Surgical therapies, such as male urethral slings and artificial urinary sphincters (AUS), are considered effective and safe treatments for male stress incontinence. No data exist on the utilization of penile prosthesis or male incontinence surgical treatment in Saudi Arabia. Generally, urological prosthetic surgery is performed either in private hospitals or in government hospitals. Our aim was to assess the trend of penile prosthesis and male incontinence device utilization in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: We utilized sales’ data of penile prosthetics, male slings, and AUS from the only two companies selling these devices in Saudi Arabia (AMS® and Coloplast®), from January 2013 to December 2016. Results: There were 2599 penile prosthesis implantation procedures done in the study period, with 67% of them performed in private institutions. There was a progressively increased use of penile prosthetics which nearly doubled from 2013 to 2016. The main type of prosthesis utilized was the semirigid type 70% versus 11% of the 2-piece inflatable and 17% of the 3-piece inflatable device. Only 10 slings and 31 AUS were inserted during the same study period. Conclusions: There is an increased utilization of penile prosthetics in Saudi Arabia. The private sector performs the majority of penile prosthesis procedures, and most of them are of the semirigid type. The governmental sector is more likely to perform inflatable penile prosthesis and male incontinence device procedures. Male incontinence prosthetics’ use is very limited in Saudi Arabia. PMID:29118538

  4. Prosthetic soft contact lenses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, Masumi; Toshida, Hiroshi; Takahiro, Itagaki; Murakami, Akira

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the use of the prosthetic iris-tinted soft contact lens, the SEED Opaque, during the past 5 years. The records of 42 outpatients (48 eyes) for whom the prosthetic soft contact lens was prescribed in the contact lens clinic of Juntendo University Hospital from July 2001 to June 2005 were investigated. An investigation was conducted in regard to the tint patterns of the prosthetic soft contact lens and the presence or absence of a transparent part in the middle, as a brown iris with a clear pupil or a solid pupil. The diagnosis, purpose of prescription, age when that lens was prescribed, complications, and changes in corrected visual acuities were analyzed retrospectively from the medical records. The mean age at the first prescription, total number of years of wearing prosthetic contact lenses, total number of prescriptions, and mean period to use each SEED Opaque lens were compared. The mean age at the first prescription of solid-pupil lens wearers was significantly younger than that for clear-pupil lens wearers (Ppossible to adjust the color and size of the cosmetic part and the pupil diameter. Further, corrected visual acuities could improve with the clear-pupil type for patients who had prescribed for improvement of visual function.

  5. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling for an exper...

  6. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  7. Consumer satisfaction in prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Gankema, H.G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    The aim of this study was to assess consumer/patient satisfaction with the services of the prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facilities in the north of the Netherlands, using a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire. In this questionnaire, consumer interests and experiences are assessed on a 5-point Likert

  8. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling...

  9. Prosthetic Management of Patients Presenting with Juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighteen were referred for prosthetic replacement. Their age ranged between 18 and 36 years. A total of 24 removable partial dentures were fabricated, 17[70.8%] were kennedy class III type, of which 11[64.7%] had the bounded saddle located in the anterior segment. Majority 8[44.4%] of the patients had 2-4 teeth replaced ...

  10. Mechanical behavior of provisional implant prosthetic abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Roig-Vanaclocha, Ana; Román-Rodriguez, Juan-Luis; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implant-supported prostheses have to overcome a major difficulty presented by the morphology and esthetics of peri-implant tissues in the anterior sector. Diverse therapeutic techniques are used for managing the mucosa adjacent to the implant and the most noteworthy is immediate/deferred fixed provisionalization. Objectives: In vitro testing of strength and deformation of implant prosthetic abutments made from different materials (Titanium/PEEK/methacrylate). Material and Methods: Forty Sweden&Martina® implant prosthetic abutments (n=40) were divided into five groups: Group MP: methacrylate provisional abutments with machined titanium base; Group PP: Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) provisional abutments; Group TP: titanium provisional abutments; Group TAD: titanium anti-rotational definitive abutments; Group TRD: titanium rotational definitive abutments. Their mechanical behavior under static loading was analyzed. Samples were examined under a microscope to determine the type of fracture produced. Results and Conclusions: Definitive anti-rotational titanium abutments and definitive rotational titanium abutments achieved the best mean compression strength, while PEEK resin provisional abutments obtained the lowest. The group that showed the greatest elastic deformation was the group of titanium provisional abutments. Key words:Immediate loading, immediate provisionalization, implant prosthetic abutment, definitive implant prosthetic abutment. PMID:25129253

  11. Nonconventional mesocaval prosthetic shunt interposition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 Burch PT, Kaza AK, Lambert LM, Holubkov R, Shaddy RE, Hawkins JA. Clinical performance of decellularized cryopreserved valved allografts compared with standard allografts in the right ventricular outflow tract. The Annals of thoracic surgery 2010; 90:1301–1306. Nonconventional mesocaval prosthetic shunt Salman ...

  12. Fundamental study on articular disc with magnetic resonance imagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Toyokazu

    1993-01-01

    In order to establish criteria of reading MRI of the temporomandibular joint, a morphological comparison between MRI and the section, and an observation of the articular disc associated with the opening were made. Five temporomandibular joints isolated from 3 human cadavers were subjected to MRI, and sections were prepared to examine criteria of reading MRI. In 20 male adults, 40 temporomandibular joints underwent MRI in three conditions of the intercuspal position, 10 and 20 mm opening positions, and the kinetics of the articular disc were examined. External feature of the head of mandible and that of the articular fossa, the articular tubercule and the postglenoid process were outlined in a row of blacks. The articular disc was outlined in a row of dark ashen areas of the anterior band, the intermediate region, and the posterior band. In the intercuspal position, the head of mandible was rarely covered with the articular disc, and being situated postero-inferiorly, at the most rear point of the posterior band of the articular disc. In the 10 mm-opening position, the head of mandible was practically covered with the articular disc. In the 20 mm-opening position, the intermediate region of the articular disc, and the head of mandible were situated in an approximate position. Quantitative movement of the articular disc was slower than that of the head of mandible. Comparison of various points of the articular disc revealed that movements of the anterior and posterior band varied almost proportionally to the opening distance, but with lesser movement of the intermediate region. (author)

  13. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  14. Linezolid penetration into osteo-articular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, B; Butcher, I; Grigoris, P; Murnaghan, C; Seaton, R A; Tobin, C M

    2002-11-01

    Penetration of linezolid into osteo-articular tissue and fluid was studied in 10 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement. Linezolid 600 mg 12 hourly was given orally over the 48 h before operation and intravenously 1 h before induction of anaesthesia. Mean concentrations of linezolid at 90 min after the final dose, in serum, synovial fluid, synovium, muscle and cancellous bone, assayed by HPLC, were at least twice the MIC(90) for staphylococci and streptococci. The concentrations obtained indicate good penetration of this antibiotic and support its use in the management of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bone, joint and deep-seated soft-tissue infections.

  15. Clinicosocial aspect of osteo-articular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R P; Mohan, N; Garg, R K; Bajpai, S K; Verma, S K; Mohindra, Y

    1990-11-01

    The study constituted clinicosocial analysis of 194 cases of osteo-articular tuberculosis. The disease was common in 1st and 2nd decades of life but not rare in old age with male preponderance. Majority of the patients were from rural area belonging to lower economic classes. Lesions were usually solitary (96.4%) situated in the weight bearing bones and joints (88.66%). Spinal tuberculosis was commonest (48.97%). The onset of disease was insidious in 94.8% cases. Chronic pain, swelling, impaired movements, deformities, sinus and cold abscess were found to be salient features of disease. Negligence and secondary infection were common.

  16. Pregnancy after Prosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: How Do We Monitor Prosthetic Valvular Function during Pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Sahasrabudhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With modern medicine, many women after structural heart repair are deciding to experience pregnancy. There is a need for further study to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to better assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. In addition, a multidisciplinary approach is essential in managing pregnant patients with complex cardiac conditions. Case. A 22-year-old nulliparous woman with an aortic valve replacement 18 months prior to her pregnancy presented to prenatal care at 20-week gestation. During her prenatal care, serial echocardiography showed a significant increase in the mean gradient across the prosthetic aortic valve. Multidisciplinary management and a serial echocardiography played an integral role in her care that resulted in a successful spontaneous vaginal delivery without complications. Conclusion. Further characterization of the normal echocardiographic parameters in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves is critical to optimize prenatal care for this patient population. This case report is novel in that serial echocardiograms were obtained throughout prenatal care, which showed significant changes across the prosthetic aortic valve. Teaching Points. (1 Further study is needed to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to best assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. (2 Multidisciplinary management is encouraged to optimize prenatal care for women with prosthetic aortic valve replacements.

  17. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  18. Face recognition in simulated prosthetic vision: face detection-based image processing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Xiaobei; Lu, Yanyu; Wu, Hao; Kan, Han; Chai, Xinyu

    2014-08-01

    Given the limited visual percepts elicited by current prosthetic devices, it is essential to optimize image content in order to assist implant wearers to achieve better performance of visual tasks. This study focuses on recognition of familiar faces using simulated prosthetic vision. Combined with region-of-interest (ROI) magnification, three face extraction strategies based on a face detection technique were used: the Viola-Jones face region, the statistical face region (SFR) and the matting face region. These strategies significantly enhanced recognition performance compared to directly lowering resolution (DLR) with Gaussian dots. The inclusion of certain external features, such as hairstyle, was beneficial for face recognition. Given the high recognition accuracy achieved and applicable processing speed, SFR-ROI was the preferred strategy. DLR processing resulted in significant face gender recognition differences (i.e. females were more easily recognized than males), but these differences were not apparent with other strategies. Face detection-based image processing strategies improved visual perception by highlighting useful information. Their use is advisable for face recognition when using low-resolution prosthetic vision. These results provide information for the continued design of image processing modules for use in visual prosthetics, thus maximizing the benefits for future prosthesis wearers.

  19. Clinical and Laboratory Predictors of Articular Disorders Among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV infection may be associated with different arthropathies that are often underdiagnosed. There is also paucity of reported studies of relationship between clinical and laboratory features of HIV‑infected patients and articular disorders. Aims: To determine the predictors of articular disorders among ...

  20. Juxta-articular erosions in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J.; Virtama, P.

    Thirty-one patients with documented reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) were reviewed for their radiographic changes. Juxta-articular and metaphyseal bone loss was found in the majority of the patients. Juxta-articular bone loss closely resembling erosions seen in rheumatoid arthritis was found in all the patients. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  1. prevalence and characteristics of articular manifestations in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-10

    Oct 10, 2010 ... articular syndrome and avascular necrosis. Results:Thirty three of these 193 patients had articular manifestation with a prevalence of 17.1 %. The type prevalence was; HIV associated arthralgia, 15.6%; undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, 1 % and HIV associated arthritis; 0.5%. Their mean age was 36±.

  2. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  3. Intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M L

    1995-10-01

    Intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus should be treated like any other fractures of major weight-bearing joints. Technology has advanced significantly in the evaluation of such complex pathology. Surgical instrumentation is now available to address any fracture classification. In the past, this had been a problem, as maintenance of the anatomic reduction, rigid internal/dynamic external fixation, and early mobilization may not have been attainable. The two remaining major variables are the mechanism of injury and its force that creates the fracture in combination with a very complex intra-articular anatomical structure. There will always be some morbidity in complex and serious fractures, but at least a more favorable outcome may be attainable with application of the current concepts discussed in this text. Finally, the most crucial factor when dealing with this trauma is the skill of the surgeon, which includes his or her decision-making, preoperative planning, surgical acumen, atraumatic technique, experience, and training and postoperative management of possible complications.

  4. Cyborg beast: a low-cost 3d-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge; Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Peck, Jean; Stollberg, John; Petrykowski, Marc; Carson, Adam; Fernandez, Cristina

    2015-01-20

    There is an increasing number of children with traumatic and congenital hand amputations or reductions. Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development. Families' financial resources play a crucial role in the prescription of prostheses for their children, especially when private insurance and public funding are insufficient. Electric-powered (i.e., myoelectric) and body-powered (i.e., mechanical) devices have been developed to accommodate children's needs, but the cost of maintenance and replacement represents an obstacle for many families. Due to the complexity and high cost of these prosthetic hands, they are not accessible to children from low-income, uninsured families or to children from developing countries. Advancements in computer-aided design (CAD) programs, additive manufacturing, and image editing software offer the possibility of designing, printing, and fitting prosthetic hands devices at a distance and at very low cost. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to describe a low-cost three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb reductions and to propose a prosthesis fitting methodology that can be performed at a distance. No significant mean differences were found between the anthropometric and range of motion measurements taken directly from the upper limbs of subjects versus those extracted from photographs. The Bland and Altman plots show no major bias and narrow limits of agreements for lengths and widths and small bias and wider limits of agreements for the range of motion measurements. The main finding of the survey was that our prosthetic device may have a significant potential to positively impact quality of life and daily usage, and can be incorporated in several activities at home and in school. This investigation describes a low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand for children and proposes a distance fitting procedure. The Cyborg Beast

  5. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid for treatment of osteoarthritis knee: comparative study to intra-articular corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soad A Elsawy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion Both HA and corticosteroid groups showed improvement in pain and knee function, but the intra-articular HA was superior to corticosteroid on long-term follow-up. This supports the potential rate of intra-articular HA as an effective long-term therapeutic option for patients with OA of the knee.

  6. Factors influencing intra-articular fluid temperature profiles with radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoric, Bojan B; Horn, Nils; Braun, Sepp; Millett, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    Radiofrequency ablation devices are being used increasingly in arthroscopic surgery. However, there are concerns that excessive temperatures may damage the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temperature profiles that occur within the glenohumeral space with the use of one commercially available radiofrequency ablation probe. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaver shoulder specimens were used. Intra-articular temperatures were measured at different time intervals over a two-minute period at a distance of 1, 3, 5, and 10 mm away from the probe. The radiofrequency probe was activated throughout the range of machine power settings, and irrigation fluid flow was varied (no flow, a flow at 60 mm Hg without suction, and a flow at 60 mm Hg with suction). Temperatures deleterious to articular cartilage chondrocytes (i.e., those in excess of 50 degrees C) were seen with an increased duration of application, a decreased distance between the thermometer and the probe, and a decreased irrigation fluid flow rate. The highest recorded irrigation fluid temperature reached >80 degrees C after two minutes in a no-flow setting. The flow rate was found to be the most significant predictor of intra-articular temperature profiles. The various machine power settings had no apparent influence on temperature, meaning that higher probe settings are not necessarily associated with higher temperature profiles. These results demonstrate the importance of the management of the irrigation fluid flow rate across the joint during arthroscopic procedures that involve radiofrequency ablation. Even short intervals of limited flow could lead to supraphysiological temperature profiles and potentially to cartilage damage.

  7. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of finger causes devastating physical, psychosocial, and economic damage to an individual. The concealment of an amputated part with the help of prosthesis can shield an amputee from social stigma. Prosthesis for such patient must be comfortable to wear lightweight, durable, cosmetically pleasing easy to put on and remove. The restoration of finger amputations depends on the amount of tissue involved, the involvement of bone, the angles and levels of amputation, and the involvement of other fingers. The microsurgical reimplantation helps to save many severely injured and traumatically amputed finger. The prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger is considered when microvascular reconstruction is not possible, unavailable, unsuccessful, or unaffordable. Most accepted material is silicones because of their better esthetics, ease of manipulation, and availability. This paper presents prosthetic rehabilitation of index finger of the right hand with custom made silicon prosthesis.

  8. Targeted muscle reinnervation and advanced prosthetic arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E; Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with either transhumeral or shoulder disarticulation amputations. They also discuss how TMR may act synergistically with recent advances in prosthetic arm technologies to improve prosthesis controllability. Discussion of TMR and prosthesis control is presented in the context of a 41-year-old man with a left-side shoulder disarticulation and a right-side transhumeral amputation. This patient underwent bilateral TMR surgery and was fit with advanced pattern-recognition myoelectric prostheses.

  9. The radiology of prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.M.; Flicker, S.

    1985-01-01

    The development of prosthetic heart valves in the late 1950s ushered in a new era in the treatment of heart disease. The radiologist has an important role to play preoperatively in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Radiology is valuable in identification of the implanted prosthetic valve and recognition of complications associated with valve implantation. Radiologists must be familiar with the imaging techniques best suited to evaluate the function of the valve prosthesis in question. In this chapter the authors discuss the radiographic approach to the evaluation of the status of patients for valve replacement and the imaging problems peculiar to the types of valves in current use. The relative value of plain-film radiography, fluoroscopy, videorecording and cinerecording, and aortography is addressed, as well as the potential value of magnetic resonance imaging and subsecond dynamic computed tomography

  10. Osteo-articular manifestations of amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'bappé, Pauline; Grateau, Gilles

    2012-08-01

    Whether it is overload disease or mispleated proteins, amyloid is a great pretender. This is especially true for all of the osteo-articular manifestations of amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis, which may mimic rheumatoid arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, a myeloma or a bone tumour. To improve the prognosis, AL amyloidosis must be considered in front of atypical osteo-articular manifestations. Amyloidosis Ab2M of chronic haemodialysis (members' arthropathy and destructive spondylitis) is a specific entity that needs to be differentiated from other osteoarthropathies of chronic renal failure. It has become exceptional since the progress of haemodialysis. Finally transthyretin amyloidosis(ATTR) can be responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) in its genetic and senile form. Although amyloidosis is rare, it represents one of the aetiologies of CSC, regardless of its type. In the specific context of haemodialysis, this poses no difficulty for the clinician. Yet AL amyloidosis must be considered more often, as must senile amyloidosis ATTR in the elderly. It seems obvious that the anatomo-pathologic analysis with specific staining with Congo red - see typing - should be systematically performed in the case of surgical neurolysis. Amyloidosis is defined by the extracellular deposit of proteins which share common tinctorial affinities, a fibril aspect under electron microscopy and spatial conformation called beta pleated. Once regarded as a mere overload disease, it is currently considered as a disease of misfolded proteins. Indeed, it is certain that abnormalities of spatial pattern play an essential role in the responsibility for the pathology of many proteins whose amyloid fibre is the final common way. They involve both changes in the conformation of proteins and other major in vivo interactions between amyloid protein and the extracellular matrix. In most cases, amyloidosis represents the bulk of histopathological lesions and its pathogenic role is certain. In

  11. Prosthetic vascular graft infection and prosthetic joint infection caused byPseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonares, Michael J; Vaisman, Alon; Sharkawy, Abdu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is infrequently isolated from clinical specimens, and if isolated, more likely represents colonization or contamination rather than infection. Despite this, there are dozens of case reports which describe clinically significant P. stutzeri infections at variable sites. A 69-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic vascular graft infection, which he received in Panama City. He was successfully treated with a single antipseudomonal agent for 6 weeks and the removal of the infected vascular graft. A 70-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic joint, which was successfully treated with a single anti-pseudomonal agent for 6 weeks. There is only one other documented case of a prosthetic vascular graft infection secondary to P. stutzeri . There are 5 documented cases of P. stutzeri prosthetic joint infections. The previous cases were treated with antibiotics and variably, source control with the removal of prosthetic material. Most cases of P. stutzeri infection are due to exposure in health care settings. Immunocompromised states such as HIV or hematological and solid tumor malignancies are risk factors for P. stutzeri infection. Infections caused by P. stutzeri are far less frequent and less fatal than those caused by P. aeruginosa. The etiology of a P. stutzeri infection could be exposure to soil and water, but also contaminated material in the health care setting or an immunocompromised state. Iatrogenic infections that are secondary to health care tourism are a potential cause of fever in the returned traveler.

  12. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  13. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation and Advanced Prosthetic Arms

    OpenAIRE

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.; Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with eith...

  14. Interposition vein cuff in infrainguinal prosthetic bypasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Biancari, F; Catania, A; Di Matteo, F M; Sorrenti, S; Spyrou, M; Dibra, A; Foti, N; Ortensi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Authors describe the interposition vein cuff technique as an adjuvant method to infrainguinal prosthetic bypass grafts. The haemodynamic, mechanical and humoral factors thought to be involved in the beneficial effects of the vein cuff are herein discussed. The results of the main series suggest the use of this method particularly in patients without any available autologous vein conduit requiring a below-knee popliteal or crural reconstruction.

  15. Wettability of silicone rubber maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M G; Jagger, R G; Polyzois, G L

    1999-04-01

    Maxillofacial prosthetic materials that contact skin or mucosa should have good wettability. A material that is easily wetted will form a superior lubricating layer between the supporting tissues and, thus, reduce friction and patient discomfort. The surface energy of a maxillofacial prosthetic material will give an indication of the amount of energy available for adhesion and of the susceptibility of the material to bacterial adhesion. This study evaluated the wettability and surface energies of a range of commercially available silicone rubber maxillofacial prosthetic materials. Contact angles and surface energies were measured by using a dynamic contact angle measuring technique. Four commonly used silicone maxillofacial materials were tested and their properties compared with those of an acrylic resin denture base material and a widely used denture soft lining material. There were no significant differences in the wettability of the silicone rubber materials. All materials were significantly less wetted than the denture acrylic resin material. There were no significant differences in the surface energies of the silicone rubber materials, but all were significantly lower than denture acrylic resin material. The Cahn dynamic contact angle analyzer was a quick and reproducible method for determining the contact angles and surface energies of maxillofacial materials. Further work is needed to improve the wettability of silicone rubber materials used for maxillofacial prostheses, thus, reducing their potential to produce friction with tissues.

  16. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prosthetic reconstruction to restore function in transcarpal amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminger, S; Roche, A D; Hruby, L A; Sturma, A; Riedl, O; Bergmeister, K D; Aszmann, O C

    2016-03-01

    Mutilated hands at the distal level may pose a challenge for reconstruction. Biological treatment options may require multiple surgical interventions and a long rehabilitation course with little hope of good functional outcome. Standard hand prostheses are also not an ideal solution, as they are too long and cumbersome for partial hand injuries. This paper outlines the functional outcomes of prosthetic reconstruction with devices customized for the transcarpal amputation levels. The functional outcome was evaluated with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH). Functional evaluation was performed at least 12 months after final fitting. Psychological assessment was performed with the Short Form-36. The three patients achieved a mean ARAT score of 35.67 ± 0.58. The average SHAP score was 74 ± 7.81. The average DASH score was found to be 16.11 ± 12.03. The reconstructed hand achieved a score of 75.27 ± 8.16% in SHAP and 62.57 ± 1.02% in ARAT in relation to the healthy hand. All patients exhibited average physical and mental component summary scales in the Short Form-36. The majority of transcarpal amputations are seen in manual laborers due to work-related trauma. Returning to work is the main goal in such young and otherwise-healthy patients. As shown with this study, prosthetic fitting results in quick and reliable functional reconstruction. Therefore, this treatment should be considered as an option during the initial decision-making process of reconstructing difficult traumatic injuries of the hand. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance of Optimized Prosthetic Ankle Designs That Are Based on a Hydraulic Variable Displacement Actuator (VDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, James; Bari, Abu Zeeshan; Kenney, Laurence; Twiste, Martin; Moser, David; Zahedi, Saeed; Howard, David

    2017-12-01

    Current energy storage and return prosthetic feet only marginally reduce the cost of amputee locomotion compared with basic solid ankle cushioned heel feet, possibly due to their lack of push-off at the end of stance. To the best of our knowledge, a prosthetic ankle that utilizes a hydraulic variable displacement actuator (VDA) to improve push-off performance has not previously been proposed. Therefore, here we report a design optimization and simulation feasibility study for a VDA-based prosthetic ankle. The proposed device stores the eccentric ankle work done from heel strike to maximum dorsiflexion in a hydraulic accumulator and then returns the stored energy to power push-off. Optimization was used to establish the best spring characteristic and gear ratio between ankle and VDA. The corresponding simulations show that, in level walking, normal push-off is achieved and, per gait cycle, the energy stored in the accumulator increases by 22% of the requirements for normal push-off. Although the results are promising, there are many unanswered questions and, for this approach to be a success, a new miniature, low-losses, and lightweight VDA would be required that is half the size of the smallest commercially available device.

  19. Intra-articular morphine in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Casper

    to a multimodal analgesia protocol. Despite that no research has investigated this issue in horses so far, IA injection of morphine after arthroscopic surgery has become common practice in several veterinary university teaching hospitals in Europe and USA. The aims of this thesis were to investigate the analgesic...... for pharmacological analysis were obtained repeatedly. Pain was evaluated by degree of lameness as well as using a visual analogue scale of pain intensity (VAS) and a composite measure pain scale (CMPS), developed for this purpose. Intra-articular injection of LPS elicited a marked synovitis resulting in lameness...... compared to the same dose administered IV, was demonstrated. In combination with the results of the pharmacologic analysis, this is highly suggestive of a peripherally mediated effect of IA morphine....

  20. [Osteo-articular ultrasonography of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, J; Montagnon, D; Hacquard, B; Tardieu, M

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this course is to present the normal and pathological aspects of the various periarticular structures of the shoulder, and the practical modalities of their analysis. The anatomy and pitfalls of tendon imaging is recalled, as well as the interest to detect intra and peri articular effusions. The semiological aspects of complete and partial tears of the rotator cuff and the various impingement syndromes, well demonstrated with dynamic sonography, are then studied. The examination requires time and knowledge but the diagnostic and therapeutic impact is very important regarding the low cost of this technique. The standardisation of the procedure and the production of normal reference images seems to guarantee a global increase in quality of the sonographic examinations.

  1. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    , especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... these minor collagens. The generation and release of fragmented molecules could generate novel biochemical markers with the capacity to monitor disease progression, facilitate drug development and add to the existing toolbox for in vitro studies, preclinical research and clinical trials....... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  2. [Application of "cold" laser (I.R. with semiconductors) as antalgic and anti-inflammatory therapy in osteo-articular and musculotendinous pathologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrachi, F; Matzuzzi, G

    1990-05-31

    The therapeutic efficacy of an I.R. laser appliance with semiconductors (GaAs) and a cooling device (cold laser) has been tried for osteo-articular ad muscle-tendinous painful pathologies. The result in almost all types of disorder has been satisfactory with diminution or disappearance of painful symptomatology and functional recovery.

  3. Radiocapitellar contact characteristics during prosthetic radial head subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Dipit; Fitzsimmons, James S; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2017-01-01

    Metallic radial head prostheses are often used in the management of comminuted radial head fractures and elbow instability. We hypothesized that during radiocapitellar subluxation, the contact pressure characteristics of an anatomic radial head prosthesis will more closely mimic those of the native radial head compared with a monopolar circular or a bipolar circular radial head design. With use of 6 fresh frozen cadaver elbows, mean radiocapitellar contact pressures, contact areas, and peak pressures of the native radial head were assessed at 0, 2, 4, and 6 mm of posterior subluxation. These assessments were repeated after the native radial head was replaced with anatomic, monopolar circular and bipolar circular prostheses. The joint contact pressures increased with the native and the prosthetic radial head subluxation. The mean contact pressures for the native radial head and anatomic prosthesis increased progressively and significantly from 0 to 6 mm of subluxation (native, 0.6 ± 0.0 MPa to 1.9 ± 0.2 MPa; anatomic, 0.7 ± 0.0 MPa to 2.1 ± 0.3 MPa; P < .0001). The contact pressures with the monopolar and bipolar prostheses were significantly higher at baseline and did not change significantly further with subluxation (monopolar, 2.0 ± 0.1 MPa to 2.2 ± 0.2 MPa [P = .31]; bipolar, 1.7 ± 0.1 MPa to 1.9 ± 0.1 MPa [P = .12]). The pattern of increase in contact pressures with the anatomic prosthesis mimicked that of the native radial head. Conversely, the circular prostheses started out with higher contact pressures that stayed elevated. The articular surface design of a radial head prosthesis is an important determinant of joint contact pressures. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Committing to Memory: Memory Prosthetics Show Promise in Helping Those with Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger-these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what's being called memory prosthetics. Once considered to be on the fringes of neuroscience, the idea of adding hardware to the brain to help with memory has gathered steam. In 2014, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made a US$30 million investment in memory prosthetic research as part of the Obama administration's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative. In August 2016, Kernel, a startup based in Los Angeles, California, announced its goal to develop a clinical memory device for those debilitated by neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a look at prosthetics - past, present and possible future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Randy; MacDonald, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Biological tissue autograft reconstruction using the patellar tendon or quadrupled semitendinosus/gracilis tendons has become the most popular procedure in surgical treatment of a ruptured ACL. This article provides a review of the history of the use of prosthetics with respect to ACL reconstruction grafts including Carbon Fibre, Gore-Tex and Dacron prosthetics as well as the Leeds-Keio Artificial Ligament and the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD). Emphasis is placed on the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) as preliminary investigations of its use have been encouraging. Significant progress has been made recently with respect to the understanding of ACL anatomy, composition, biomechanics, and healing processes, leading to innovative techniques using approaches based in tissue engineering principles and computer – assisted surgery. While research into improved ACL treatment options continues, the synthesis of recent advancements provides a new optimism towards the regeneration of an ACL mirroring its original stability, function, and longevity. PMID:18523530

  6. Prosthetic mesh repair of abdominal wall hernias in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Ferenc; Schumacher, Jim

    2018-02-05

    Repair of hernias of the abdominal wall of horses is often augmented by inserting a prosthetic mesh. In this review, we describe the various characteristics of prosthetic meshes used for hernia repair and present 2 systems that are used by surgeons in the human medical field to classify techniques of prosthetic mesh herniorrhaphy. Both of these classification systems distinguish between onlay, inlay, sublay, and underlay placements of mesh, based on the location within the abdominal wall in which the prosthetic mesh is inserted. We separate the published techniques of prosthetic mesh herniorrhaphy of horses using this classification system, ascribing names to the techniques of herniorrhaphy where none existed, and report the success rates and complications associated with each technique. By introducing a classification system widely used in the human medical field and illustrating each technique in a figure, we hope to clarify inconsistent nomenclature associated with prosthetic mesh herniorrhaphy performed by veterinary surgeons. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Evaluation of pain regression in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction treated by intra-articular platelet-rich plasma injections: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, M; Szuta, M; Ferendiuk, E; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5 mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

  8. Fused Filament Fabrication of Prosthetic Components for Trans-Humeral Upper Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Steven M.

    Presented below is the design and fabrication of prosthetic components consisting of an attachment, tactile sensing, and actuator systems with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technique. The attachment system is a thermoplastic osseointegrated upper limb prosthesis for average adult trans-humeral amputation with mechanical properties greater than upper limb skeletal bone. The prosthetic designed has: a one-step surgical process, large cavities for bone tissue ingrowth, uses a material that has an elastic modulus less than skeletal bone, and can be fabricated on one system. FFF osseointegration screw is an improvement upon the current two-part osseointegrated prosthetics that are composed of a fixture and abutment. The current prosthetic design requires two invasive surgeries for implantation and are made of titanium, which has an elastic modulus greater than bone. An elastic modulus greater than bone causes stress shielding and overtime can cause loosening of the prosthetic. The tactile sensor is a thermoplastic piezo-resistive sensor for daily activities for a prosthetic's feedback system. The tactile sensor is manufactured from a low elastic modulus composite comprising of a compressible thermoplastic elastomer and conductive carbon. Carbon is in graphite form and added in high filler ratios. The printed sensors were compared to sensors that were fabricated in a gravity mold to highlight the difference in FFF sensors to molded sensors. The 3D printed tactile sensor has a thickness and feel similar to human skin, has a simple fabrication technique, can detect forces needed for daily activities, and can be manufactured in to user specific geometries. Lastly, a biomimicking skeletal muscle actuator for prosthetics was developed. The actuator developed is manufactured with Fuse Filament Fabrication using a shape memory polymer composite that has non-linear contractile and passive forces, contractile forces and strains comparable to mammalian skeletal muscle, reaction

  9. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    OpenAIRE

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hysteresis, which are the topics of this paper, are not properly prescribed, but could be adapted to improve the prosthetic walking performance. The shape is strongly related to the cosmetic appearance a...

  10. Mechanical and biological properties of the GORE-TEX expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthetic ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, W; Bruchman, B

    1983-01-01

    Data from these studies have resulted in a modified implant technique which has taken into consideration the salient points from this and previous studies. Ongoing animal studies will provide a better understanding of the long-term performance of the material in the anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament positions. Additional studies will be implemented as new techniques and applications evolve. The key conclusions of this study are as follows: 1. This prosthetic ligament system is not intended to match the mechanical properties of the normal anterior cruciate ligament in dogs. However, in the dog at one to four months the GORE-TEX Prosthetic Ligament system is at least comparable in tensile strength to the repaired anterior cruciate ligament utilizing autogenous tissue at eight months. 2. One square knot with wire augmentation, appears to be an adequate method of fixation; however, since proximal placement of the knot will result in a mild bursitis formation, the implant technique has been modified so that the knot is placed more distally under the cranial tibial muscle. 3. The porosity of the material is adequate to allow for the tissue ingrowth, which is essential for fixation augmentation. 4. The recommended method of implantation appears to be crucial to satisfactory long-term performance of the device. Of particular importance, all edges of drill holes must be thoroughly radiused in order to minimize stress concentrations. 5. The GORE-TEX Prosthetic Ligament implanted in the anterior cruciate ligament position was effective in maintaining joint stability in the dog for up to four months. Ongoing studies have demonstrated maintenance of joint stability for up to ten months. 6. The limb need not be immobilized in order to assure healing and adequate fixation of the device. The immediate relative stability produced by the GORE-TEX Prosthetic Ligament system is adequate to encourage early mobilization. The only protection required is to allow

  11. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  12. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, S C

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  13. Factors Associated with Prosthetic Looseness in Lower Limb Amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonghanyudh, Thong; Sutpasanon, Taweesak; Hathaiareerug, Chanasak; Devakula, M L Buddhibongsa; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2015-12-01

    To determine the factors associated with prosthetic looseness in lower limb amputees in Sisaket province. The present was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Subjects were lower limb amputees who previously obtained prostheses and required prosthetic replacements at the mobile prosthetic laboratory unit under the Prostheses Foundation of H.R.H. the Princess Mother at Khun Han Hospital, Sisaket province, in February 2013. Data including participant characteristics, prosthetic looseness data, and various variables were collected by direct semi-structured interview. Energy expenditures in physical activities were measured using the Thai version of the short format international physical activity questionnaire. Data between participants with and without prosthetic looseness were compared to determine prosthetic loosening associated factors. Among 101 participants enrolled, 33 (32.7%) had prosthetic looseness with average onset of 1.76 ± 1.67 years. Diabetes mellitus was the only significant factor associated with prosthetic looseness from both univariate and multivariate analyses (HR = 7.05, p = 0.002 and HR = 5.93, p = 0.007 respectively). Among the lower limb amputees in Sisaket province, diabetes mellitus was the only factor associated with prosthetic looseness. Therefore, diabetic screening should be supplemented in lower limb amputee assessment protocol. In addition, we recommend that amputees with diabetes mellitus should receive prosthesis check out at approximately

  14. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valves: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Maragiannis, MD, FASE, FACC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the diagnostic value of novel echocardiographic techniques and the clinical application of recently described algorithms to assess tricuspid prosthetic valve function.

  15. Successful Management of Prosthetic Valve Brucella Endocarditis with Antibiotherapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Fonseca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report a case of mechanical aortic prosthesis Brucella endocarditis successfully treated with antibiotics alone. Materials and methods: We describe a clinical case and present a review of the literature. Results: A 60-year-old female farmer with a mechanical aortic prosthetic valve presented with low back pain and fever. She was diagnosed with prosthetic valve Brucella mellitensis endocarditis and was cured with antibiotic therapy alone. Few cases of successfully treated prosthetic valve Brucella endocarditis without surgery have been reported. Conclusion: Prosthetic valve Brucella endocarditis usually requires surgical valve replacement. However, selected patients may be successfully treated with antibiotic therapy alone.

  16. A personalized 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint: From implant design to implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David C; Robinson, Dale; Redhead, Michael; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Moskaljuk, Adrian; Dimitroulis, George

    2017-05-01

    Personalized prosthetic joint replacements have important applications in cases of complex bone and joint conditions where the shape and size of off-the-shelf components may not be adequate. The objective of this study was to design, test and fabricate a personalized 3D-printed prosthesis for a patient requiring total joint replacement surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The new 'Melbourne' prosthetic TMJ design featured a condylar component sized specifically to the patient and fixation screw positions that avoid potential intra-operative damage to the mandibular nerve. The Melbourne prosthetic TMJ was developed for a 58-year-old female recipient with end-stage osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The load response of the prosthesis during chewing and a maximum-force bite was quantified using a personalized musculoskeletal model of the patient's masticatory system developed using medical images. The simulations were then repeated after implantation of the Biomet Microfixation prosthetic TMJ, an established stock device. The maximum condylar stresses, screw stress and mandibular stress at the screw-bone interface were lower in the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ (259.6MPa, 312.9MPa and 198.4MPa, respectively) than those in the Biomet Microfixation device (284.0MPa, 416.0MPa and 262.2MPa, respectively) during the maximum-force bite, with similar trends also observed during the chewing bite. After trialing surgical placement and evaluating prosthetic TMJ stability using cadaveric specimens, the prosthesis was fabricated using 3D printing, sterilized, and implanted into the female recipient. Six months post-operatively, the prosthesis recipient had a normal jaw opening distance (40.0 mm), with no complications identified. The new design features and immediate load response of the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ suggests that it may provide improved clinical and biomechanical joint function compared to a commonly used stock device, and reduce risk of intra-operative nerve damage

  17. Predicting successful prosthetic rehabilitation in major lower-limb amputation patients: a 15-year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Martos, Inés; Roda, Olga; Zambudio-Periago, Ramón; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio

    2017-11-07

    To determine and compare specific factors that could be associated and predictive with successful prosthetic rehabilitation in major lower-limb amputations. A 15-year long (2000-2014) retrospective observational cohort study was conducted. Two different criteria were used to define successful prosthetic rehabilitation: (1) the ability to walk at least 45m, regardless of assistive devices; and (2) walking >45m without other ambulatory aids than one cane (if required). Age, gender, comorbidities, cause and level of amputation, stump characteristics, ulcers in the preserved limb, and time between surgery and physical therapy were examined as predictors of successful prosthetic rehabilitation. A total of 169 patients (61.60±15.9 years) were included. Regarding walking ability with or without walking aids, the presence of ulcers in the preserved limb was individually associated with failed prosthetic rehabilitation (pprosthetic rehabilitation when assistive walking devices are considered. Future prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes

  19. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  20. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  1. Management of Posterior Articular Depression in Tibial Plateau Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John David; Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Fractures involving the posterior aspect of the tibial plateau are challenging fractures to treat. Articular depression in tibial plateau fractures is usually addressed by elevation of the fragment(s), filling the residual defect with bone graft or bone substitute, and "raft" support of the articular fracture reduction with screws through a medially and/or laterally based plate. Posterior tibial plateau articular depression presents unique challenges for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction. To obtain the goals of anatomic reduction and stable fixation, a thorough understanding of the fracture, specific approaches, reduction techniques, and stabilization strategies is needed. This article reviews the most current strategies for treating tibial plateau fracture patients with posterior articular depression. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Reconsidering evidence-based practice in prosthetic rehabilitation : a shared enterprise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Twillert, S.; Geertzen, J.; Hemminga, T.; Postema, K.; Lettinga, A.

    Background: A divide is experienced between producers and users of evidence in prosthetic rehabilitation. Objective: To discuss the complexity inherent in establishing evidence-based practice in a prosthetic rehabilitation team illustrated by the case of prosthetic prescription for elderly

  3. Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    loading and disease progression timeframe in a large animal model in order to outline a pathway to human clinical trials of the treatment method . Our...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0188 TITLE: Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert...Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0188 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Imaging diagnosis of the juxta-articular bone cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zekun; Ren Jinjun; Wang Dongmei; Zhang Wei; Ding Jianping; Ding Yang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging features of the juxta-articular bone cyst(intra- osseous ganglia). Methods: The imaging findings of 54 cases histopathologically confirmed were studied retrospectively. X-ray, CT, and MRI were performed in 46 eases, 30 cases, and 14 cases, respectively. Results: Of the 54 cases, 27 arised from the ankle (including multiple lesions), 16 from the knee joint, 7 from the hip joint, 1 from the proximate end of the humerus, ulna, trapezium bone, the first phalange in each, and 1 from the talus and the distal end of the tibia. There were 43 cases (44 lesions) in the ankle and knee joints, with 29 (65.9%) lesions located in the medial articular surface. Fifty-four cases had thinning sclerotic rim, showing a unilocular round osteolytic appearance in 44 cases and a multiloculated-cystic appearance with septa in 10 cases. Discontinuous articular surface were seen in 15 cases, reticular surface collapse in 1, gas density in 3 and fluid-fluid plane in 1. (1) On x-ray films, 46 cases (47 lesions) with well-defined sclerotic rim revealed round, arch or irregular lyric areas at the adjacent articular surface. The fissures were found at the adjacent articular surface in 6 lesions. No joint spaces were abnormal. (2)On CT, 30 cases with sclerotic rim showed round in 19 lesions, arch in 3, and irregular in 8. The fissures were seen at the adjacent articular surface in 14 lesions. The density showed homogeneous in 27 lesions, and gas existed in 3. (3) Fourteen cases (15 lesions)showed hypointense to isointense signal on MR T 1 WI and hyperintense signal on T 2 WI. Fluid-fluid plane was found in 1 case. The fissures were observed at the adjacent articular surface in 8 lesions. 7 cases showed swelling soft tissue. Conclusion: The characteristic locations combined with the typical imaging features may suggest the diagnosis of jaxta-articular bone cyst. (authors)

  5. Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis and Prosthetic Graft Infection in an Immune Competent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Berger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis is an emerging dematiaceous fungus associated with high mortality rates and is a rare cause of endocarditis. We describe the first case of E. dermatitidis endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve and aortic graft in an immune competent patient with no clear risk factors of hematological acquisition.

  6. The Myosuit: Bi-articular Anti-gravity Exosuit That Reduces Hip Extensor Activity in Sitting Transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness—which can result from neurological injuries, genetic disorders, or typical aging—can affect a person's mobility and quality of life. For many people with muscle weakness, assistive devices provide the means to regain mobility and independence. These devices range from well-established technology, such as wheelchairs, to newer technologies, such as exoskeletons and exosuits. For assistive devices to be used in everyday life, they must provide assistance across activities of daily living (ADLs in an unobtrusive manner. This article introduces the Myosuit, a soft, wearable device designed to provide continuous assistance at the hip and knee joint when working with and against gravity in ADLs. This robotic device combines active and passive elements with a closed-loop force controller designed to behave like an external muscle (exomuscle and deliver gravity compensation to the user. At 4.1 kg (4.6 kg with batteries, the Myosuit is one of the lightest untethered devices capable of delivering gravity support to the user's knee and hip joints. This article presents the design and control principles of the Myosuit. It describes the textile interface, tendon actuators, and a bi-articular, synergy-based approach for continuous assistance. The assistive controller, based on bi-articular force assistance, was tested with a single subject who performed sitting transfers, one of the most gravity-intensive ADLs. The results show that the control concept can successfully identify changes in the posture and assist hip and knee extension with up to 26% of the natural knee moment and up to 35% of the knee power. We conclude that the Myosuit's novel approach to assistance using a bi-articular architecture, in combination with the posture-based force controller, can effectively assist its users in gravity-intensive ADLs, such as sitting transfers.

  7. The Myosuit: Bi-articular Anti-gravity Exosuit That Reduces Hip Extensor Activity in Sitting Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kai; Duarte, Jaime E; Grimmer, Martin; Sancho-Puchades, Alejandro; Wei, Haiqi; Easthope, Chris S; Riener, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Muscle weakness-which can result from neurological injuries, genetic disorders, or typical aging-can affect a person's mobility and quality of life. For many people with muscle weakness, assistive devices provide the means to regain mobility and independence. These devices range from well-established technology, such as wheelchairs, to newer technologies, such as exoskeletons and exosuits. For assistive devices to be used in everyday life, they must provide assistance across activities of daily living (ADLs) in an unobtrusive manner. This article introduces the Myosuit, a soft, wearable device designed to provide continuous assistance at the hip and knee joint when working with and against gravity in ADLs. This robotic device combines active and passive elements with a closed-loop force controller designed to behave like an external muscle (exomuscle) and deliver gravity compensation to the user. At 4.1 kg (4.6 kg with batteries), the Myosuit is one of the lightest untethered devices capable of delivering gravity support to the user's knee and hip joints. This article presents the design and control principles of the Myosuit. It describes the textile interface, tendon actuators, and a bi-articular, synergy-based approach for continuous assistance. The assistive controller, based on bi-articular force assistance, was tested with a single subject who performed sitting transfers, one of the most gravity-intensive ADLs. The results show that the control concept can successfully identify changes in the posture and assist hip and knee extension with up to 26% of the natural knee moment and up to 35% of the knee power. We conclude that the Myosuit's novel approach to assistance using a bi-articular architecture, in combination with the posture-based force controller, can effectively assist its users in gravity-intensive ADLs, such as sitting transfers.

  8. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Articular Cartilage Defects and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-yi; Lu, Shi-bi; Peng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis are the most common joint diseases. Joints are prone to damage caused by sports injuries or aging, and such damage regularly progresses to more serious joint disorders, including osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative disease characterized by the thinning and eventual wearing out of articular cartilage, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide. Current approaches to repair of articular cartilage damage include mosaicplasty, microfracture, and injection of autologous chondrocytes. These treatments relieve pain and improve joint function, but the long-term results are unsatisfactory. The long-term success of cartilage repair depends on development of regenerative methodologies that restore articular cartilage to a near-native state. Two promising approaches are (i) implantation of engineered constructs of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded scaffolds, and (ii) delivery of an appropriate population of MSCs by direct intra-articular injection. MSCs may be used as trophic producers of bioactive factors initiating regenerative activities in a defective joint. Current challenges in MSC therapy are the need to overcome current limitations in cartilage cell purity and to in vitro engineer tissue structures exhibiting the required biomechanical properties. This review outlines the current status of MSCs used in cartilage tissue engineering and in cell therapy seeking to repair articular cartilage defects and related problems. MSC-based technologies show promise when used to repair cartilage defects in joints.

  10. Appropriateness of clinical and organizational criteria for intra-articular injection therapies in osteoarthritis: A Delphi method consensus initiative among experts in Italy

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    Marco Paoloni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify the main aspects involved in patient selection, the choice of therapeutic agents and the safety profile, as well as the medico-legal and organizational aspects of intra-articular injection therapies for osteoarthritis. METHODS: A committee of 10 experts from Italian universities, public hospitals, territorial services, research institutes and patient associations was set up. Fifty-two clinicians from a large number of Italian medical centers specialized in intra-articular injection therapy took part in a Delphi process aimed at obtaining consensus statements among the participants. RESULTS: Large consensus was obtained for statements grouped under the following main themes: treatment indications; drug/medical device choice; treatment efficacy; and appropriate setting. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statements developed by a large number of experts may be used as a practical reference tool to help physicians treat osteoarthritis patients by means of intra-articular injection therapies.

  11. The kinetics of normal and prosthetic wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, J R; Blair, W F; Andrews, J G; Crowninshield, R D

    1985-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to describe normal wrist kinetics, and (2) to investigate the in-vitro kinetics of four currently available wrist prostheses (Swanson, Meuli, Volz, Hamas). The effective tendon moment arms of the six major wrist muscles were determined through the use of load cells and applied weights. Testing was conducted in a neutral wrist configuration with hand pronation-supination both constrained and unconstrained. The results indicate that each of the muscles studied has a unique set of effective tendon moment arms about the normal wrist as well as about wrists with the implanted prostheses, and that none of the prosthetic wrists studied duplicated normal wrist kinetics.

  12. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  13. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

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    Ge Shuzhi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a little, (b ring, and (c middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to

  14. Arthoscopy La artroscopia y las lesiones articulares

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    Raúl J. Naranjo

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available

    A general view is presented on arthroscopy; its history, indications and limitations are described and analyzed; its advantages in comparison with open surgery are emphasized.

    La artroscopia es un procedimiento que permite, mediante un instrumento óptico, evaluar el Interior de las cavidades articulares. Comenzó a desarrollarse como un procedimiento diagnóstico y pronto sus grandes ventajas frente a las exploraciones abiertas aceleraron el desarrollo de las técnicas y del instrumental. La minimización del trauma a los tejidos y la menor morbilidad posoperatoria permiten que la deambulación y la recuperación funcional sean precoces lo cual, sumado a un mejor resultado estético, ha colocado a la artroscopia como procedimiento de elección para el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de múltiples estados patológicos intraarticulares.

  15. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the

  16. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Carolina Teixeira Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  17. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Lima, Marta Cunha; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Soares, Simone; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique. PMID:24175103

  18. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Orthotic and Prosthetic Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet sets forth the National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for the one-year apprenticeship program for orthotic and/or prosthetic technicians, as developed and recommended by the American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association. Standards in various areas--such as qualifications for apprenticeship, hours of work, salaries, records,…

  19. Prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands: An interview with clinical experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Linde, H.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Hofstad, C.J.; Van Limbeek, Jacques; Postema, K.

    2004-01-01

    In the process of guideline development for prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands the authors made a study of the daily clinical practice of lower limb prosthetics. Besides the evidence-based knowledge from literature the more implicit knowledge from clinical experts is of importance for

  20. EFFICIENCY OF PROSTHETIC TREATMENT WITH POST RESECTION PROSTHESES WITH SOLID SUBSTITUTE PART

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    Ivan Gerdzhikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to track the effectiveness of prosthetic treatment with post resection dentures with solid substitute part and their role in the restoration of damaged functions. Materials and methods: The study included 14 patients (9 men and 5 women with different size and location of defects in the upper jaw treated in the period 2010-2016 with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part. The impressions were taken with irreversible hydrocolloid impression material. The prostheses were completed by heat-curing acrylic with low quantity residual monomer. The effectiveness of prosthetics was evaluated by the method of Mihaylov for both oral-nasal examination of the pressure with the device "Oronasopneumotest." For objectifying and assess the occlusal-articulation ratios was held computerized occlusal analysis with the system T-SCAN 8. Results: The results showed successful obturation and sealing of defects in all patients. It was found satisfactory recovery of the speaking function and normalization of occlusal-articulation ratios. Conclusion: The prosthetic treatment with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part allows successful recovery of the lost speech and chewing functions, helping to restore self esteem and social rehabilitation of patients.

  1. Biologically inspired multi-layered synthetic skin for tactile feedback in prosthetic limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Luke; Nguyen, Harrison; Betthauser, Joseph; Kaliki, Rahul; Thakor, Nitish

    2016-08-01

    The human body offers a template for many state-of-the-art prosthetic devices and sensors. In this work, we present a novel, sensorized synthetic skin that mimics the natural multi-layered nature of mechanoreceptors found in healthy glabrous skin to provide tactile information. The multi-layered sensor is made up of flexible piezoresistive textiles that act as force sensitive resistors (FSRs) to convey tactile information, which are embedded within a silicone rubber to resemble the compliant nature of human skin. The top layer of the synthetic skin is capable of detecting small loads less than 5 N whereas the bottom sensing layer responds reliably to loads over 7 N. Finite element analysis (FEA) of a simplified human fingertip and the synthetic skin was performed. Results suggest similarities in behavior during loading. A natural tactile event is simulated by loading the synthetic skin on a prosthetic limb. Results show the sensors' ability to detect applied loads as well as the ability to simulate neural spiking activity based on the derivative and temporal differences of the sensor response. During the tactile loading, the top sensing layer responded 0.24 s faster than the bottom sensing layer. A synthetic biologically-inspired skin such as this will be useful for enhancing the functionality of prosthetic limbs through tactile feedback.

  2. Resource-efficient proces chains to manufacture patient-specific prosthetic fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn-Hansen, D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The high cost of quality prostheses, together with the lack of trained prosthetists, makes it challenging to obtain prosthetic devices in developing communities. Modern 3D digitising techniques and additive manufacturing (AM technologies are gaining popularity in the bio-medical industry and, in the case of prosthesis production, reduce the need for a trained prosthetist. The objective of this research was to develop a new resource-efficient process chain for the manufacturing of prosthetic fingers using additive manufacturing technologies, and to compare it with the traditional (Sculptor process chain. Fused deposition modelling (FDM, open-source FDM, 3-dimensional printing (3DP, and stereolithography (SLA were evaluated in terms of their costs, time, material usage, and aesthetic quality. The surface qualities produced with the different additive manufacturing technologies were also compared. The results showed that 3DP was the preferred technology and was the best candidate for the production of prosthesis in terms of cost, quality, and time for developing communities. SLA produced the highest aesthetic quality prosthesis, but was the most expensive. It was concluded that using the additive manufacturing technology process chain to produce prosthetic fingers is faster and more cost effective than the traditional method.

  3. Stretchable Heater Using Ligand-Exchanged Silver Nanowire Nanocomposite for Wearable Articular Thermotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suji; Park, Jinkyung; Hyun, Wonji; Kim, Jangwon; Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Young Bum; Song, Changyeong; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-06-23

    Thermal therapy is one of the most popular physiotherapies and it is particularly useful for treating joint injuries. Conventional devices adapted for thermal therapy including heat packs and wraps have often caused discomfort to their wearers because of their rigidity and heavy weight. In our study, we developed a soft, thin, and stretchable heater by using a nanocomposite of silver nanowires and a thermoplastic elastomer. A ligand exchange reaction enabled the formation of a highly conductive and homogeneous nanocomposite. By patterning the nanocomposite with serpentine-mesh structures, conformal lamination of devices on curvilinear joints and effective heat transfer even during motion were achieved. The combination of homogeneous conductive elastomer, stretchable design, and a custom-designed electronic band created a novel wearable system for long-term, continuous articular thermotherapy.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulen, R L; Budinger, T F; Higgins, C B

    1985-03-01

    To evaluate the safety of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prosthetic heart valves, nine different synthetic and tissue valves were studied ex vivo. Deflection was measured in 0.35-tesla (T) and 1.5-T superconducting magnets and at the edge of the bore of a 2.35-T electromagnet in field gradients of 5, 1.1, and 6.3 mT/cm, respectively. No valve deflected in the 0.35-T magnet; six synthetic valves deflected 0.25 degrees-3 degrees in the 1.5-T magnet; all valves deflected 1 degree-27 degrees at the edge of the 2.35-T magnet. Each valve was then submerged in a vial of water and the temperature was measured immediately before and after each of two spin-echo imaging sequences in the two superconducting magnets. No significant temperature rise followed exposure in either magnet. Image distortion varied from negligible to severe in both imagers; magnitude of distortion paralleled magnitude of deflection. These data suggest that patients with present-day prosthetic heart valves can be safely imaged in present-day MR imagers and that prosthesis-induced artifacts will not interfere with interpretation in most instances.

  5. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Tordiglione

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010 software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient.

  6. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  7. Performance of conventional and X2® prosthetic knees during slope descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Elizabeth M; Pruziner, Alison L; Wilken, Jason M; Wolf, Erik J

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with transfemoral amputation often have difficulty descending sloped surfaces due to increased lower extremity range of motion and torque requirements. The X2®, a new microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee, claims to improve gait over sloped terrain. The aim of this study was to evaluate how experienced prosthesis users descended a sloped surface using the X2®, compared to a conventional knee, either mechanical (MECH) or microprocessor (MP). Descent technique and biomechanics were assessed in 21 service members with unilateral transfemoral amputation as they descended an instrumented 10° slope at a self-selected walking velocity. Use of the X2® in the MECH group resulted in greater hill assessment scores (8.5 to 11.0, P=0.026), due primarily to decreased reliance on handrail use. The use of the X2® in the MP group increased prosthetic knee flexion to a median of 6.4° at initial contact (P=0.002) and 73.7° in swing (P=0.005), contributing to longer prosthetic limb steps (P=0.024) and increased self-selected velocity (P=0.041). Additionally, the use of the X2® in the MP group increased prosthetic limb impact peaks (11.6N/kg, P=0.004), improving impact peak symmetry to -1.3% (P=0.004). Decreased reliance on handrail use as MECH users descended in the X2® indicate improved function and perhaps greater confidence in the device. Additional biomechanical improvements for existing MP users suggest potential longer-term benefits with regard to intact limb health and overuse injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T; McCall, Maureen A

    2014-08-01

    In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within the retina and is likely to produce higher

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage on mechanical properties of the articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ekrem

    2017-12-01

    Articular cartilage has unique mechanical and physicochemical properties which are responsible for its load carrying capabilities. This work investigates the effects of hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage on mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was exposed to hydrogen peroxide for a week. Dynamic and static mechanical tests applied to calculate articular cartilage compressive modulus. We observed higher control curve slopes than that of hydrogen peroxide curves which account for lesser stiffness values in the exposed articular cartilage. For the instantaneous experiments, results were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage causes reduction in the stiffness of the articular cartilage.

  10. Design for a three-fingered hand. [robotic and prosthetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, F. R. E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a prototype mechanical hand or 'end effector' for use on a remotely controlled robot, but with possible application as a prosthetic device. An analysis of hand motions is reported, from which it is concluded that the two most important manipulations (apart from grasps) are to be able to pick up a tool and draw it into a nested grip against the palm, and to be able to hold a pistol-grip tool such as an electric drill and pull the trigger. One of our models was tested and found capable of both these operations.

  11. Endogenous versus exogenous growth factor regulation of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-β1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-β1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-β1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-β1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Galle, Samuel; Derave, Wim; De Clercq, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition. Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions. Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments. PMID:29551959

  13. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Malcolm

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition. Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions. Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments.

  14. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Galle, Samuel; Derave, Wim; De Clercq, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition . Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions . Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments.

  15. Pre-prosthetic and prosthetic treatment of patients with injuries and orofacial anomalies: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ajduković, Zorica R.; Krasić, Dragan Đ.; Filipović, Gordana Lj.; Kenić-Marinković, Dragana M.; Petrović, Nenad D.; Đorđević, Nadica S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dentistry is the science that deals with the prevention, recognition and elimination of pathological changes in the orofacial system. Injuries in the orofacial region have become more frequent in recent years, and if these injuries are not properly treated, they may lead to permanent deformity and inability for adequate stomatoprosthetic treatment. Case Report This paper presents a surgical-prosthetic treatment and rehabilitation of a 49-year-old patient with traumatic injuries o...

  16. Prosthetic rehabilitation of oral submucous fibrosis patients: A systematic review of published case reports and case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Sarode, Gargi S.; Bhandi, Shilpa; Awan, Kamran Habib; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is an insidious chronic condition characterized by restricted mouth opening. Prosthetic rehabilitation is challenging for OSF patients as obtaining a good impression requires adequate mouth opening. The aim of the present review is to systematically present the data from case reports published in the English-language literature. Method A comprehensive search of the literature databases (PubMed, Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Google Scholar) along with the references of published articles on prosthetic rehabilitation in OSF patients published to date was conducted. Keywords included a combination of ‘Oral submucous fibrosis’, ‘prosthesis’, ‘dentures’ and/or ‘restricted mouth opening’. Citations from selected references and bibliographic linkages taken from similar cases were included in this review. The inclusion criteria selected for case reports on prosthetic rehabilitation in OSF patients, and cases of restricted mouth opening due to causes other than OSF were excluded from the study. Results A total of 21 cases were identified and analysed from 17 papers published in the English-language literature. Of these, 9 cases employed the sectional denture technique, 4 cases emphasized the need-based treatment approach in which conventional methods were modified, and 4 cases used mouth exercising devices. Finally, 1 case each involved, flexible denture, oral screen prosthesis, oral stents, surgery in conjunction with dentures. Conclusion Prosthetic rehabilitation in OSF patients is a multifaceted approach and should be patient specific, although sectional dentures have achieved the best results. PMID:28877246

  17. Passive prosthetic hands and tools: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Bartjan; Smit, Gerwin; Plettenburg, Dick; Breedveld, Paul

    2018-02-01

    The group of passive prostheses consists of prosthetic hands and prosthetic tools. These can either be static or adjustable. Limited research and development on passive prostheses has been performed although many people use these prosthesis types. Although some publications describe passive prostheses, no recent review of the peer-reviewed literature on passive prostheses is available. Review the peer-reviewed literature on passive prostheses for replacement of the hand. Literature review. Four electronic databases were searched using a Boolean combination of relevant keywords. English-language articles relevant to the objective were selected. In all, 38 papers were included in the review. Publications on passive prosthetic hands describe their users, usage, functionality, and problems in activities of daily living. Publications on prosthetic tools mostly focus on sport, recreation, and vehicle driving. Passive hand prostheses receive little attention in prosthetic research and literature. Yet one out of three people with a limb deficiency uses this type of prosthesis. Literature indicates that passive prostheses can be improved on pulling and grasping functions. In the literature, ambiguous names are used for different types of passive prostheses. This causes confusion. We present a new and clear classification of passive prostheses. Clinical relevance This review provides information on the users of passive prosthetic hands and tools, their usage and the functionality. Passive prostheses receive very little attention and low appreciation in literature. Passive prosthetic hands and tools show to be useful to many unilateral amputees and should receive more attention and higher acceptance.

  18. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  19. The use of a direct manufacturing prosthetic socket system in a rural community in South Africa: A pilot study and lessons for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennion, Liezel; Johannesson, Anton; Rhoda, Anthea

    2017-10-01

    Challenges exist with the provision of appropriate mobility assistive devices in rural areas. The use of the direct manufacturing prosthetic socket system is a possible solution to these challenges. The objective of this study was to test and explore the clients' perspectives with the application of this device. Within a mixed-methods approach, a longitudinal sequential explanatory design was applied. The Orthotic and Prosthetic User's Survey was administered to explore the use of the direct manufacturing prosthetic socket system in terms of function, health-related quality of life and client satisfaction. A conveniently selected sample of 21 individuals who suffered a unilateral trans-tibial amputation was included. Data were collected at 1, 3 and 6 months post fitting, and two focus group discussions were also administered. Of the 21 participants recruited, 11 returned for follow up. Although participants reported favourably about the prosthesis, their scores were generally worse than the norms with regard to function and quality of life. Participants highlighted the need for improvement in the cosmetic appearance of the prosthesis. The direct manufacturing prosthetic socket system could be considered as an alternative technique of socket manufacturing for individuals living in rural areas due to the shorter manufacture time and promising initial results, but further research on this topic with a bigger sample is recommended. Clinical relevance The direct manufacturing prosthetic socket system may be considered as an alternative to the traditional prosthetic socket manufacturing technique used in South Africa. As this device requires only one visit and therefore decreased travel by the patients to the hospitals, it could be applicable to more amputees who cannot return to hospital post discharge.

  20. 78 FR 69176 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and the...

  1. 77 FR 65609 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and the...

  2. 78 FR 48941 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and the...

  3. 75 FR 24775 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The...) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special Disabilities Programs (the... Secretary of Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetic programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics...

  4. 76 FR 21107 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The...) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will be held... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the art prosthetics and the...

  5. All-Extra-articular Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschen, Malte; Witt, Kai-Axel; Steinbeck, Jörn

    2018-02-01

    Anterosuperior rotator cuff tears involve the subscapularis tendon, supraspinatus tendon, and rotator interval. The long head of the biceps is usually affected and unstable in these complex lesions. Arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears often consists of 2 different procedures. Whereas the subscapularis tendon is reconstructed under intra-articular visualization, the supraspinatus tendon is reconstructed under extra-articular visualization. The rotator interval is often sacrificed to improve visualization and instrumentation. The presented technique uses an all-extra-articular approach, which helps to reconstruct these complex rotator cuff lesions in their whole extent without switching from the inside to the outside of the shoulder joint. The preservation of the rotator interval leads to a more stable and anatomic reconstruction.

  6. Prosthetic options available for the diabetic lower limb amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitragari, Gautham; Mahler, David B; Sumpio, Brandon J; Blume, Peter A; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2014-01-01

    Although the rate of lower limb amputation in patients with diabetes is decreasing, amputation still remains a major complication of diabetes. Prosthetics have been long used to help amputees ambulate. The last decade has seen many advances in prostheses with the enhanced understanding of the mechanics of ambulation and improved use of technology. This review describes the different types of prosthetic options available for below knee, ankle, and foot amputees, emphasizing the latest advances in prosthetic design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gait analysis in lower-limb amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Gait analysis combined with sound clinical judgment plays an important role in elucidating the factors involved in the pathologic prosthetic gait and the selection and effects of available interventions to optimize it. Detailed clinical evaluation of walking contributes to the analysis of the prosthetic gait, but evaluation in the gait laboratory using kinetic and kinematic data is often necessary to quantify and identify the particular contributions of the variables impacting the gait with confidence and assess the results of such intervention. The same approach can be considered when selecting prosthetic components and assessing leg length in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thrombolytic therapy in prosthetic valve thrombosis during early pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the improvements in the design of prosthetic heart valves and the use of anticoagulation, systemic embolism and valve thrombosis remains the most dreaded complications of mechanical heart valve replacement. A course of thrombolytic therapy may be considered as a first-line therapy for prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. The safety of thrombolysis in early pregnancy is not known. We describe a primigravida with mitral valve replacement status presenting with acute prosthetic valve thrombosis and treated successfully with intravenous streptokinase.

  9. Multi-physics computational models of articular cartilage for estimation of its mechanical and physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbabi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the realm of computational modeling of complex multiphysics phenomena in articular cartilage enabled efficient and precise determination of articular cartilage properties. However, still accurate quantification of complicated indentation and diffusion processes tying closely with

  10. Prosthetic status and prosthetic need among the patients attending various dental institutes of ahmedabad and gandhinagar district, gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vrinda R; Shah, Darshana N; Parmar, Chaitanya H

    2012-09-01

    The oral health being an integral part for the healthy living, necessity of disability limitation and rehabilitation in oral health has taken a paramount role. To assess the prosthetic status and to evaluate the prosthetic needs of the patients attending various institutes of Ahmedabad and Gandhinagar district. A total of 510 (264 males and 246 females) subjects at various dental institutes were examined in the study. A survey proforma was prepared with the help of WHO oral health assessment form (1997). Prosthetic status and prosthetic treatment need was recorded. Out of 510, any type of Edentulousness was 322 (63 %). Among them, 254 (49.8 %) were partially edentulous while 68 (13.3 %) were completely edentulous. Only 69 (13 %) were having any prosthesis in upper arch while only 80 (16 %) were having any prosthesis in lower arch. Need for any type of prosthesis in upper and lower arch was 55 and 60 % in males and females, respectively. In lower social class group need of prosthesis in upper and lower arch was 62 and 63 %, respectively. It was found that prosthetic status and prosthetic treatment need increased with increase in age. Steps should be taken to overcome this disparity and more emphasis should be given to meet the felt need of the people through government and non government organizations to improve the oral health. The unmet prosthetic treatment need should be met to rehabilitate needy people so that their disability may be limited.

  11. Fifteen years of follow-up of a removable prosthetic design to maintain two remaining molars in a patient with mandibular reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lun Hsu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes a long-term prosthetic solution for a patient who had undergone mandibular reconstruction with a fibular graft, leaving only two right molars. The only retention device for the removable prosthesis design included a telescoping system with an O-ring application, but without fibula graft involvement. This prosthesis design was motivated by the altered bony and muscular architecture resulting in an increased maxillomandibular space and thick soft tissue in the denture-bearing area. This case demonstrates that appropriate denture design, consistent recall maintenance, and oral hygiene motivation minimized periodontal destruction and maximized prosthetic use for the patient despite the unfavorable loading conditions.

  12. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with extra-articular deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Hazratwala, MBBS, FRACS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple acceptable options are available for the correction of distal femoral deformity associated with knee arthritis. The treatment modality should be chosen based on the extent of deformity and attention to preservation of the collateral ligaments. Surgical options range from osteotomy alone, arthroplasty with intra-articular correction, or arthroplasty with extra-articular correction. Different implant choices and fixation methods for the osteotomy possess advantages and disadvantages which need to be considered carefully. In addition to discussing principles of management based on current literature, this article includes a case report using a previously undescribed technique using corrective osteotomy, intramedullary nail fixation, and total knee arthroplasty with computer navigation.

  13. Rare Extra-articular Manifestation of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Scleromalacia Perforans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ching Wu

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease with manifestations in many organs. In most cases, involvement of the locomotor system dominates the clinical picture. However, extra-articular manifestations can be detected in almost any organ system with varied incidence in different series. Ophthalmic presentations include Sjogren's syndrome, episcleritis, and scleritis. The most severe form of scleritis, scleromalacia perforans, is a very rare ophthalmic manifestation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man who had had rheumatoid arthritis for more than 10 years. He had scleromalacia perforans but no other extra-articular manifestations.

  14. Intra-Articular Osteotomy for Distal Humerus Malunion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René K. Marti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-articular osteotomy is considered in the rare case of malunion after a fracture of the distal humerus to restore humeral alignment and gain a functional arc of elbow motion. Traumatic and iatrogenic disruption of the limited blood flow to the distal end of the humerus resulting in avascular necrosis of capitellum or trochlea is a major pitfall of the this technically challenging procedure. Two cases are presented which illustrate the potential problems of intra-articular osteotomy for malunion of the distal humerus.

  15. [Osteo-articular ultrasonography of the hip and the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, P; Wybier, M

    2000-03-01

    Experience in the field of musculoskeletal diseases and advanced technology of medical sonographers allow increasing accuracy in US investigations of most lesions of both hip and knee superficial tendons. In this field, US is more and more widely replacing other imaging modalities, including MR imaging. Ultrasonography may now be used also for articular diseases purpose, including joint effusion, synovitis, intraarticular loose bodies, ligamentous injuries, articular cysts, as well as for certain osseous lesions like stress or insufficiency fractures of superficial bones. However, ultrasonography has still to be evaluated for these latter indications.

  16. Experiences of attitudes in Sierra Leone from the perspective of people with poliomyelitis and amputations using orthotics and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andregård, Emmelie; Magnusson, Lina

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe experiences of attitudes in the society of Sierra Leone from the perspective of individuals with poliomyelitis and people with amputations using orthotic or prosthetic devices. Individual interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Twelve participants with amputations or polio were included. Content analysis was applied to the data. The following six themes emerged during data analysis: Experience of negative attitudes; Neglected and respected by family; Traditional beliefs; The importance of assistive devices; People with disability struggle with poverty; and The need for governmental and international support. In Sierra Leone, people with disabilities face severe discrimination. They need to be included, recognized, and supported to a greater extent by the society, the community, and the family, as well as by the government and international organizations. Traditional beliefs have a negative impact on people with physical disabilities and are an important cause of discrimination in Sierra Leone. Prosthetic and orthotic devices are vital for people with physical disability and offer increased dignity. Prosthetic and orthotic services need to be accessible and affordable. Poverty affects access to education, employment, and health care for Sierra Leoneans with physical disabilities, forcing them to resort to begging to cover basic living needs. Implications for Rehabilitation In Sierra Leone, traditional beliefs related to disability and public attitudes need to change in order to protect the human rights of people with disabilities. Increased public awareness of disability and implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) at different levels in society is needed. To increase access to prosthetic and orthotic services in Sierra Leone, these services need to be affordable and related costs, such as transport, need to be covered by support. Increased access to

  17. The Persian version of satisfaction assessment module of Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Fardipour, Shima; Kashani, Reza Vahab; Asadi, Farnoosh; Asghari, Azizeh

    2016-01-01

    Orthotics and Prosthetics User's Survey (OPUS) was developed to measure patient satisfaction in Prosthetic and Orthotic (P&O) field. To translate the satisfaction assessment module of OPUS (OPUS-SM) into Persian language (Persian OPUS-SM) and investigate its psychometric properties. For cross-cultural adaptation of the OPUS-SM, the guideline suggested by the World Health Organization was recruited. A sample of 116 Persian-speaking people who received P&O devices and services, participated in this study. During the first session, participants filled out the Persian OPUS-SM and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) regarding their satisfaction from delivered devices and services. Drawing from the above sample of 116 participants, 41 participants retook the Persian OPUS-SM 5-7 days after their first time. The results of the first and second administration sessions were analyzed to assess internal consistency, test-retest reliability, item-subscale correlation, minimal detectable change, floor and ceiling effects, criterion validity, and dimensionality of the Persian OPUS-SM. The Cronbach's alphas of the Persian OPUS-SM were 0.71 and 0.89 for device and service satisfaction subscales, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.90 for device and service satisfaction subscales, respectively. The SEM and MDC for device satisfaction were 6.21 and ±17.21, respectively. The SEM and MDC for service satisfaction were 2.25 and ±6.22, respectively. There was a strong correlation between VAS and satisfaction subscales of the Persian OPUS-SM. Dimensionality assessment revealed that Persian OPUS-SM is a unidimensional measure. The adapted and translated Persian OPUS-SM is a reliable and validated measure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fixed prosthetic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajevska Jagoda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prosthetic treatment of patients with cleft palate includes various treatment options such as fixed partial dentures, removable partial prosthesis, etc. The type of prosthetic appliance is determined by the oral health of each individual and the circumstances. We presented three adult patients with the cleft lip and palate subjected to prosthetic treatment. Case report. From the possible prosthetic solutions according to the conditions in the oral cavity and the circumstances, fixed partial dentures veneered with composite or ceramic were chosen. A proper relationship between the teeth was reached with the fixed partial dentures, and function established, the phonetics improved and satisfying aesthetics effect accomplished improving the profile appearance of the patient’s face. Plastic surgery of the nose was performed after that. Conclusion. Multidisclipinary treatment is necessary for favourable long-term outcome in cleft lip and palate patients.

  19. Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed HA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with mechanical valve prostheses require a lifelong anticoagulant treatment. The combined use of Warfarin and low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of valve thrombosis and systemic embolism at a low risk of bleeding. The management of women with prosthetic heart valves during pregnancy poses a particular challenge, as there are no available controlled clinical trials to provide guidelines for effective antithrombotic therapy. Oral anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, cause foetal embryopathy; unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin have been reported to be ineffective in preventing thromboembolic complications.This article discusses the available data and the most recent guidelines in the antithrombotic management of patients with prosthetic valves, and antithrombotic therapy in various clinical situations such as pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves, and patients with prosthetic heart valves undergoing noncardiac surgery.

  20. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Amputated Thumb: A Simplified Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Aggarawal, Himanshi; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2014-12-01

    This case report presents a case of prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated thumb. It emphasizes that prosthetic replacement is a better option for aesthetic and psychological improvement, particularly in cases where the victim is unwilling to undergo complicated surgical procedures for reconstruction of thumb or where functioning of thumb cannot be restored even by multiple surgeries. In the present case, a 20 years old female patient, with missing thumb of her right hand was rehabilitated aesthetically by a non-invasive and cost effective prosthetic procedure by using heat temperature vulcanizing silicone material. The prosthesis (the thumb) was attached using medical adhesives. On 3 months recall appointment, no complications were observed. The prosthesis was in good shape and required no further intervention. The prosthetic thumb lacks the sensation of a normal or reconstructed thumb, although it does not require the multiple procedures of surgical reconstruction and the accompanying loss of time for rehabilitation and healing.

  1. Analysis of voluntary opening Ottobock Hook and Hosmer Hook for upper limb prosthetics: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nur Afiqah; Abd Razak, Nasrul Anuar Bin; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2017-08-28

    There are a number of prosthetic terminal devices which offer functional restoration to individuals with upper limb deficiencies. Hosmer and Ottobock are major commercial hook providers for prosthetic terminal devices. The concern of this paper is to analyse the voluntary opening (VO) Ottobock model 10A18 and Hosmer model 99P hooks (one band) during opening operation and to find out favourable features in the design. Two tests were conducted to analyse the performance of both hooks. The first test used a simple bench tool to investigate cable excursion and hook opening angle and the second test used force sensor to find out the force supplied at a different hook opening angle. The study found that the average cable excursion for both hooks is approximately 30% less than the hook's opening span with the force at the hook's tip section being inversely proportional to the force at the lateral section. Ottobock 10A18 has a better control for grasping larger objects, while Hosmer 99P has the highest average force at the tip section but yet less efficient in generating adequate force for activities of daily living. Favourable features identified are low cable excursion per hook opening span and balance lateral to hook tip pinch force.

  2. Long-term stability of neural prosthetic control signals from silicon cortical arrays in rhesus macaque motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Foster, Justin D.; Fan, Joline M.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Churchland, Mark M.; Rivera-Alvidrez, Zuley; Cunningham, John P.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2011-08-01

    Cortically-controlled prosthetic systems aim to help disabled patients by translating neural signals from the brain into control signals for guiding prosthetic devices. Recent reports have demonstrated reasonably high levels of performance and control of computer cursors and prosthetic limbs, but to achieve true clinical viability, the long-term operation of these systems must be better understood. In particular, the quality and stability of the electrically-recorded neural signals require further characterization. Here, we quantify action potential changes and offline neural decoder performance over 382 days of recording from four intracortical arrays in three animals. Action potential amplitude decreased by 2.4% per month on average over the course of 9.4, 10.4, and 31.7 months in three animals. During most time periods, decoder performance was not well correlated with action potential amplitude (p > 0.05 for three of four arrays). In two arrays from one animal, action potential amplitude declined by an average of 37% over the first 2 months after implant. However, when using simple threshold-crossing events rather than well-isolated action potentials, no corresponding performance loss was observed during this time using an offline decoder. One of these arrays was effectively used for online prosthetic experiments over the following year. Substantial short-term variations in waveforms were quantified using a wireless system for contiguous recording in one animal, and compared within and between days for all three animals. Overall, this study suggests that action potential amplitude declines more slowly than previously supposed, and performance can be maintained over the course of multiple years when decoding from threshold-crossing events rather than isolated action potentials. This suggests that neural prosthetic systems may provide high performance over multiple years in human clinical trials.

  3. Skin and bone integrated prosthetic pylon: A pilot animal study

    OpenAIRE

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Galibin, Oleg V.; Protasov, Mikhail V.; Chihovskaya, Julie V.; Belyaeva, Irina G.

    2006-01-01

    Direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses is a viable alternative to traditional techniques that are based on a socket-residuum interface. Direct skeletal attachment may be a better or even the only method for patients with a very short residuum and high soft-tissue volume. The problem of integrating the prosthetic pylon with residual skin during direct skeletal attachment of a limb prosthesis has not been solved, and the use of a completely porous prosthetic pylon has not been the subjec...

  4. Possibilities of prosthetic upper limb fitting in cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Doležalová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis give an overview of possible solutions in upper limbs prosthetic fitting which is suitable for cycling. And provide enough information on modifications that should be performed on a bicycle so that it can be used by humans with upper extremity prostheses. It can be an essential guide for anyone looking for a solution that would allow a person with an amputated upper limb again sit on the bike. Keywords: amputation, upper limb prosthesis, prosthetic fitting, cycling

  5. [Prevention of complications fixed restorations in prosthetic patients with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The author on the basis of clinical and laboratory methods justified, that the use of locally cream "Solcoseryl-Denta" persons suffering from arterial hypertension, increase the speed of recovery of normal epithelial layer of the cells of the mucous membranes of the oral cavity, and, consequently, prevents the development of complications in prosthetics. On the basis of research identified the need in developing a method of prevention of inflammatory complications in prosthetic patients with arterial hypertension.

  6. Case Study and Review: Treatment of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Zhang, David; Lozier, Jay; Chang, Richard; Sachdev, Vandana; Chen, Marcus Y.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Horvath, Keith A.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a severe and life-threatening complication of heart valve replacement. Conventional therapy is surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. Medical thrombolysis is another emerging option. We report the case of a 57 year old woman with a history of Ebstein anomaly who underwent successful treatment of a tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with intra-atrial infusion of very low dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We review the presentation...

  7. Prosthetic Tricuspid Valve Thrombosis: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Yaminisharif; MohammadJavad Alemzadeh-Ansari; SeyedHossein Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication of prosthetic heart valves is thrombosis. Although the incidence of prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) in the tricuspid position is high, there are not enough data on the management of it, in contrast to left-sided PVT. Here, we describe three cases of tricuspid PVT with three different management approaches: thrombolytic therapy; close observation with oral anticoagulants; and surgery. The first case was a woman who suffered from recurrent PVT, for which we successfully ...

  8. ORAL HYGIENE OF PROSTHETIC DENTURE USER IN KODINGARENG ISLAND

    OpenAIRE

    NUR, NURUL KUSUMADEWI S.KG

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:to determine the level of oral hygiene for prosthetic denture user, especially for full-denture in Kodingareng Island. This researchincluded the distribution level of prosthetic denture user based on age and education.Methods: the method that used in this research is observational descriptive withcross sectional-studyas the research design. Variable result of the research determined in to 3, those are bad, middle, and good. Result:the highest percentage o...

  9. A review of available prosthetics for ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Vidya; Weber, Daniel J; Reed, R Lawrence; Luchette, Fred A

    2011-01-01

    To review mesh products currently available for ventral hernia repair and to evaluate their efficacy in complex repair, including contaminated and reoperative fields. Although commonly referenced, the concept of the ideal prosthetic has never been fully realized. With the development of newer prosthetics and approaches to the ventral hernia repair, many surgeons do not fully understand the properties of the available prosthetics or the circumstances that warrant the use of a specific mesh. A systematic review of published literature from 1951 to June of 2009 was conducted to identify articles relating to ventral hernia repairs and the use of prosthetics in herniorrhaphy. Important differences exist between the synthetics, composites, and biologic prosthetics used for ventral hernia repair in terms of mechanics, cost, and the ideal situation in which each should be used. The use of synthetic mesh remains an appropriate solution for most ventral hernia repairs. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has created a niche for both expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and composite mesh, as they are suited to intraperitoneal placement. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that the newer biologic prosthetics are reasonable options for hernia repair in contaminated fields and for large abdominal wall defects; however, more studies need to be done before advocating the use of these biologics in other settings.

  10. Rotationplasty with Vascular Reconstruction for Prosthetic Knee Joint Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Fujiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotationplasty is used most often as a function-preserving salvage procedure after resection of sarcomas of the lower extremity; however, it is also used after infection of prosthetic knee joints. Conventional vascular management during rotationplasty is to preserve and coil major vessels, but recently, transection and reanastomosis of the major vessels has been widely performed. However, there has been little discussion regarding the optimal vascular management of rotationplasty after infection of prosthetic knee joints because rotationplasty is rarely performed for this indication. We reviewed four patients who had undergone resection of osteosarcomas of the femur, placement of a prosthetic knee joint, and rotationplasty with vascular reconstruction from 2010 to 2013. The mean interval between prosthetic joint replacement and rotationplasty was 10.4 years and the mean interval between the diagnosis of prosthesis infection and rotationplasty was 7.9 years. Rotationplasty was successful in all patients; however, in one patient, arterial thrombosis developed and necessitated urgent surgical removal and arterial reconstruction. All patients were able to walk independently with a prosthetic limb after rehabilitation. Although there is no consensus regarding the most appropriate method of vascular management during rotationplasty for revision of infected prosthetic joints, vascular transection and reanastomosis is a useful option.

  11. Instantaneous stiffness and hysteresis of dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Christina M; Kaufman, Kenton

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet are designed to mimic the functional characteristics of the native foot/ankle joint. Numerous designs of dynamic elastic response feet exist which make the prescription process difficult, especially because of the lack of empirical evidence describing the objective performance characteristics of the feet. To quantify the mechanical properties of available dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet, specifically the stiffness and hysteresis. Mechanical testing of dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet. Static Proof Testing in accordance with ISO 10328 was conducted on seven dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet. Load-displacement data were used to calculate the instantaneous stiffness in both the heel and forefoot regions, as well as hysteresis associated with each foot. Heel stiffness was greater than forefoot stiffness for all feet. The heel of the glass composite prosthetic foot was stiffer than the carbon fiber feet and it exhibited less hysteresis. Two different carbon fiber feet had the stiffest forefoot regions. Mechanical testing is a reproducible method that can be used to provide objective evidence about dynamic elastic response prosthetic foot performance and aid in the prescription process. Clinical relevance The quantitative stiffness and hysteresis data from this study can be used by prosthetists to aid the prescription process and make it more objective.

  12. [Surgical management of limb prosthetic vascular graft exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wu, Wei-wei; Bai, Ming; Zeng, Rong; Song, Xiao-jun; Chen, Yu; Liu, Chang-wei

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the risk factors and surgical management of limb prosthetic vascular graft exposure. The clinical data of 17 patients suffering from limb prosthetic vascular graft exposure in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from August 2006 to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Among 17 cases, 5 suffered from prosthetic vascular graft exposure after vascular bypass for the lower limb ischemia, whereas 12 were affected after the artificial graft arteriovenous fistula construction in the upper limbs for hemodialysis. The surgical procedures mainly included the local debridement as well as the local flap and transferred muscle-cutaneous flap reconstruction to preserve the prosthetic vascular graft. All 17 patients underwent local flap or muscle-cutaneous flap coverage procedure. After the surgery, the prosthetic vascular graft was successfully salvaged in 14 cases. The total successful rate was 82.4%. The surgery failed in three patients, in whom the prosthetic vascular grafts were finally removed. Local flap and transferred muscle-cutaneous flap reconstruction is an effective surgical management to salvage the exposed grafts.

  13. Surgery for extra-articular trismus : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M. A.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Reintsema, H.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Werkera, P. M. N.

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify operations that are used to improve mouth opening in patients with extra-articular trismus (caused by cancer and its treatment, oral submucous fibrosis, or noma) and to find out if they work. We searched the electronic databases PubMed, Embase,

  14. Intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wambeek, N.; Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Meek, R.N. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver (Canada)

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of lntra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee in a 53-year-old man. The case demonstrates an unusual pattern of migration of the marrow edema within the knee joint. This phenomenon has received scant attention in the radiological literature. (orig.)

  15. Segmenting articular cartilage automatically using a voxel classification approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2007-01-01

    We present a fully automatic method for articular cartilage segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which we use as the foundation of a quantitative cartilage assessment. We evaluate our method by comparisons to manual segmentations by a radiologist and by examining the interscan repro...

  16. Segmentation of articular cartilage using active contours and prior knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Cristian; Hall, Laurance; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    A diffusion snake segmentation algorithm was evaluated on synthetic and real MR images of articular cartilage. The algorithm proved to be robust to missing boundaries and the initial contour converges over large distances. Compared with a standard B-spline snake, more accurate and reproducible segmentations were obtained, with less effort during initialization of the algorithm.

  17. Subtalar versus triple arthrodesis after intra-articular calcaneal fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); B.C.T. Kieboom (Brenda); J.H.J.M. Bessems (Gert); L.M.M. Vogels (Lucas); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); P. Patka (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDepending upon initial treatment, between 2 and 30% of patients with a displaced intra-articular calcaneal fracture require a secondary arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subtalar versus triple arthrodesis on functional outcome. A total of 33 patients

  18. Early micromovement of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) femoral component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, J O; Ding, M; Varmarken, J E

    2012-01-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) can detect early micromovement in unstable implant designs which are likely subsequently to have a high failure rate. In 2010, the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) was withdrawn because of a high failure rate. In 19 ASR femoral components, the mean micromovement...

  19. Clinical and Laboratory Predictors of Articular Disorders Among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    radiologist for features of avascular necrosis (AVN) and sacroiliitis, respectively. Synovial fluid was obtained, for analysis and microscopy, culture/sensitivity testing and acid fast bacilli detection in those with demonstrable joint effusion. The clinically evident articular features, laboratory, and radiographic findings were used ...

  20. Subtalar versus triple arthrodesis after intra-articular calcaneal fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; Kieboom, Brenda C. T.; Bessems, Gert H. J. M.; Vogels, Lucas M. M.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Patka, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Depending upon initial treatment, between 2 and 30% of patients with a displaced intra-articular calcaneal fracture require a secondary arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subtalar versus triple arthrodesis on functional outcome. A total of 33 patients with 37

  1. Reduction of intra-articular adhesion by topical application of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of daidzein on intra articular adhesion was estimated by visual score through macroscopic examination, histopathology study, hydroxyproline content, fibroblast and collage density. Results: Data obtained in the study suggest that topical application of daidzein (5 and 10 mg/ml) loose the collagen and significantly ...

  2. [Surgical treatment of calcaneus fracture involving posterior subtalar articular facet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-Wu; Qiao, Lin; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Liu, Chun-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Qing-Lei

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the methods of reduction and stable fixation for the treatment of calcaneus fracture involving posterior subtalar articular facet. From September 2004 to September 2008, 31 cases(38 feet) of calcaneus fracture involving posterior subtalar articular facet were treated with open reduction and plate fixation through L incision. There were 24 males and 7 females, with an average age of 39.6 years ranging from 20 to 65 years. All patients underwent systematic CT-scan with coronal and horizontal images and sagittal reconstruction. The classification of the fractures by the Sanders scale showed that there were 22 of type II,14 of type III, 2 of type IV. All cases were followed up for from 12 to 36 months with an average of 25 months, and all the fractures healed without skin flap necrosis. According to the Maryland foot scoring, the total score was (96.2 +/- 8.8) on average, the results were excellent in 32 feet, good in 4 feet, fair in 2 feet. The replacement of the posterior articular facet by X-ray control of Broden and open reduction and internal fixation with calcaneus plate and Schanz-Screw during the operation can keep stable of articular facet, and promote early rehabilitation of calcaneus fracture affected with subtalar joint.

  3. Insight into osteo-articular digital tomosynthesis: a pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacout, Alexis; Thariat, Juliette; El Hajjam, Mostafa; Marcy, Pierre-Yves

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this pictorial essay are to describe osteo-articular imaging using digital tomosynthesis. We provide characteristic examples in eight patients. Digital tomosynthesis allows easy, fast and low-dose imaging, with excellent spatial resolution. © 2012 The Authors; Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Oncogene expression in the peri-articular osteophytes | Alonge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to ascertain the proliferative and probably reparative potentials of the peri-articular osteophytes by evaluating the sites of expression of c-myc, c-jun and c-fos oncogenes in this neoplastic repair tissue. Materials and Methods: Sections of osteophytes were obtained from knees of patients ...

  5. Automatic quantification of local and global articular cartilage surface curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the surface curvature of the articular cartilage from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and to investigate its role in populations with varying radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA), cross-sectionally and longitudinally. ...... curvature estimates from low-field MRI at different scales could potentially become biomarkers targeted at different stages of OA....

  6. A STUDY OF EXTRA-ARTICULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha N. S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diseases of musculoskeletal system are among the most common human afflictions. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology characterised by symmetric erosive arthritis and in some cases extra-articular involvement. Characteristic feature of RA is persistent inflammatory synovitis usually involving peripheral joints in a symmetric distribution. The aim of the study is to study the extra-articular manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 cases who satisfied the criteria for diagnosis of RA laid down by the American Rheumatism Association Criteria were selected. They were studied for evidence of extra-articular manifestations by clinical, biochemical, radiological, echocardiographic and pulmonary function tests. Data was collected and analysis was made using various statistical parameters. RESULTS Among the 50 cases of RA studied, the disease was common in females and maximum incidence was seen between 30-39 years of age (30%. Morning stiffness, pain and swelling in the joints were the commonest presenting symptoms. The joints of the hand (70% were the most commonly involved followed by wrist, knee, ankle and foot joints. In the present study, 28 (56% had extra-articular manifestations with more incidence in males than females. The commonest one was anaemia (20% followed by cardiac involvement (12%. Next, in the order of involvement were pulmonary, lymphadenopathy, vasculitis and rheumatoid nodule. Pericardial effusion was the most common cardiac finding followed by mitral regurgitation and aortic regurgitation. RA factor was positive in 33 (66% cases. All the patients who had extra-articular manifestation had RA factor positive. CONCLUSION Although, the rheumatoid arthritis was common among females, the extra-articular manifestations were common among males. Longer duration of disease and positive RA factor were associated with higher incidence of extra-articular

  7. Prosthetic considerations for orthodontic implant site development in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Alexandra I; Nkenke, Emeka; Blatz, Markus B; Geiselhöringer, Hans; Holst, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Proper site development is a key factor for long-term clinical success of dental implants. Whereas surgical and restorative techniques have been refined to ensure predictable functional and esthetic outcome, individual clinical prerequisites do not always allow proper placement of implants when prosthetic and material properties are considered. Orthodontic tooth movement may be a viable and nonsurgical site development treatment option. With the introduction and advancements of minimal invasive and less visible orthodontic appliances, a growing number of adult patients are willing to obtain orthodontic treatment. The spectrum of modern appliances is broad and ranges from clear aligners to lingual brackets. Skeletal anchorage devices such as orthodontic mini-implants often eliminate unpopular external anchorage devices (ie, headgear) in adult patients, This article discusses the selection of an appropriate pretreatment approach by taking patient-specific criteria into account.

  8. [Prosthetics and Orthotics: Prosthetic Fitting in Lower Extremity in Transfemoral Amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    Modern prosthetic equipment often enables reintegration of patients with the amputation of a lower limb into their private life, their professional and social environment to a large extent. Provisioning of the lower extremity with artificial limbs aims at a life as normal as possible for the involved individual. The modules are selected in an interdisciplinary team. An optimal fitting of the socket, the correct static set-up, the appropriate fitting as well as cosmetic aspects are the essential basis for a sufficient provisioning. Knee and foot components should be chosen according to the individual patient's situation including their prognostic mobility classification. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Prosthetic Status and Prosthetic Need Among the Patients Attending Various Dental Institutes of Ahmedabad and Gandhinagar District, Gujarat

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Vrinda R.; Shah, Darshana N.; Parmar, Chaitanya H.

    2012-01-01

    The oral health being an integral part for the healthy living, necessity of disability limitation and rehabilitation in oral health has taken a paramount role. To assess the prosthetic status and to evaluate the prosthetic needs of the patients attending various institutes of Ahmedabad and Gandhinagar district. A total of 510 (264 males and 246 females) subjects at various dental institutes were examined in the study. A survey proforma was prepared with the help of WHO oral health assessment ...

  10. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPARDICS

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  12. Analytical Study of Active Prosthetic Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kyosuke; Katsumata, Mie

    Walking with prosthesis has not been well analyzed mathematically and it seems that the design of powered prosthesis has been done empirically so far. This paper presents a dynamic simulation of a normal human walking and walking with an active prosthesis. We also studied the two controlling methods of a powered thigh prosthesis based on multi-body simulation of human walking. First we measured the normal human walking gait, then, we showed that a 3-DOF human walking model can walk on level ground by applying tracking control to the measured walking gait within a certain range of tuned walking period. Next, we applied the tracking control and self-excited control to the powered thigh prosthesis and compared the robustness and efficiency of the two control methods by numerical simulation. As a result, we found that the self-excited control can significantly decrease the hip joint torque and specific cost to 1/3 compared with the tracking control. Moreover, the self-excited control is superior to the tracking control because tuning for the walking period is not needed for the active prosthetic leg.

  13. Surface EMG in advanced hand prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Claudio; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    One of the major problems when dealing with highly dexterous, active hand prostheses is their control by the patient wearing them. With the advances in mechatronics, building prosthetic hands with multiple active degrees of freedom is realisable, but actively controlling the position and especially the exerted force of each finger cannot yet be done naturally. This paper deals with advanced robotic hand control via surface electromyography. Building upon recent results, we show that machine learning, together with a simple downsampling algorithm, can be effectively used to control on-line, in real time, finger position as well as finger force of a highly dexterous robotic hand. The system determines the type of grasp a human subject is willing to use, and the required amount of force involved, with a high degree of accuracy. This represents a remarkable improvement with respect to the state-of-the-art of feed-forward control of dexterous mechanical hands, and opens up a scenario in which amputees will be able to control hand prostheses in a much finer way than it has so far been possible.

  14. 100 top-cited scientific papers in limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq; Shadgan, Babak

    2013-11-17

    Research has tremendously contributed to the developments in both practical and fundamental aspects of limb prosthetics. These advancements are reflected in scientific articles, particularly in the most cited papers. This article aimed to identify the 100 top-cited articles in the field of limb prosthetics and to investigate their main characteristics. Articles related to the field of limb prosthetics and published in the Web of Knowledge database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) from the period of 1980 to 2012. The 100 most cited articles in limb prosthetics were selected based on the citation index report. All types of articles except for proceedings and letters were included in the study. The study design and level of evidence were determined using Sackett's initial rules of evidence. The level of evidence was categorized either as a systematic review or meta-analysis, randomized controlled trial, cohort study, case-control study, case series, expert opinion, or design and development. The top cited articles in prosthetics were published from 1980 to 2012 with a citation range of 11 to 90 times since publication. The mean citation rate was 24.43 (SD 16.7) times. Eighty-four percent of the articles were original publications and were most commonly prospective (76%) and case series studies (67%) that used human subjects (96%) providing level 4 evidence. Among the various fields, rehabilitation (47%), orthopedics (29%), and sport sciences (28%) were the most common fields of study. The study established that studies conducted in North America and were written in English had the highest citations. Top cited articles primarily dealt with lower limb prosthetics, specifically, on transtibial and transradial prosthetic limbs. Majority of the articles were experimental studies.

  15. Prosthetic aortic valve selection: current patient experience, preferences and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Bras, Frans J; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Kluin, Jolanda; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current clinical practice guidelines advocate shared decision-making (SDM) in prosthetic valve selection. This study assesses among adult patients accepted for aortic valve replacement (AVR): (1) experience with current clinical decision-making regarding prosthetic valve selection, (2) preferences for SDM and risk presentation and (3) prosthetic valve knowledge and numeracy. Methods In a prospective multicentre cohort study, AVR patients were surveyed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results 132 patients (89 males/43 females; mean age 67 years (range 23–86)) responded preoperatively. Decisional conflict was observed in 56% of patients, and in 25% to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. 68% wanted to be involved in decision-making, whereas 53% agreed that they actually were. 69% were able to answer three basic knowledge questions concerning prosthetic valves correctly. 56% were able to answer three basic numeracy questions correctly. Three months postsurgery, 90% (n=110) were satisfied with their aortic valve prosthesis, with no difference between mechanical and bioprosthetic valve recipients. Conclusions In current clinical practice, many AVR patients experience decisional conflict and suboptimal involvement in prosthetic valve selection, and exhibit impaired knowledge concerning prosthetic valves and numeracy. Given the broad support for SDM among AVR patients and the obvious need for understandable information, to-be-developed tools to support SDM in the setting of prosthetic valve selection will help to improve quality of decision-making, better inform and actively involve patients, and reduce decisional conflict. Trial registration number NTR3618. PMID:25893105

  16. Integrated Electrode Arrays for Neuro-Prosthetic Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik; Mojarradi, Mohammede

    2003-01-01

    Arrays of electrodes integrated with chip-scale packages and silicon-based integrated circuits have been proposed for use as medical electronic implants, including neuro-prosthetic devices that might be implanted in brains of patients who suffer from strokes, spinal-cord injuries, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The electrodes of such a device would pick up signals from neurons in the cerebral cortex, and the integrated circuit would perform acquisition and preprocessing of signal data. The output of the integrated circuit could be used to generate, for example, commands for a robotic arm. Electrode arrays capable of acquiring electrical signals from neurons already exist, but heretofore, there has been no convenient means to integrate these arrays with integrated-circuit chips. Such integration is needed in order to eliminate the need for the extensive cabling now used to pass neural signals to data-acquisition and -processing equipment outside the body. The proposed integration would enable progress toward neuro-prostheses that would be less restrictive of patients mobility. An array of electrodes would comprise a set of thin wires of suitable length and composition protruding from and supported by a fine-pitch micro-ball grid array or chip-scale package (see figure). The associated integrated circuit would be mounted on the package face opposite the probe face, using the solder bumps (the balls of the ball grid array) to make the electrical connections between the probes and the input terminals of the integrated circuit. The key innovation is the insertion of probe wires of the appropriate length and material into the solder bumps through a reflow process, thereby fixing the probes in place and electrically connecting them with the integrated circuit. The probes could be tailored to any distribution of lengths and made of any suitable metal that could be drawn into fine wires. Furthermore, the wires could be coated with an insulating layer using anodization or

  17. Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevell, S; Hellmark, B; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å; Söderquist, B

    2017-01-01

    Further knowledge about the clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by different coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) may facilitate interpretation of microbiological findings and improve treatment algorithms. Staphylococcus capitis is a CoNS with documented potential for both human disease and nosocomial spread. As data on orthopaedic infections are scarce, our aim was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of PJIs caused by S. capitis. This retrospective cohort study included three centres and 21 patients with significant growth of S. capitis during revision surgery for PJI between 2005 and 2014. Clinical data were extracted and further microbiological characterisation of the S. capitis isolates was performed. Multidrug-resistant (≥3 antibiotic groups) S. capitis was detected in 28.6 % of isolates, methicillin resistance in 38.1 % and fluoroquinolone resistance in 14.3 %; no isolates were rifampin-resistant. Heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate resistance was detected in 38.1 %. Biofilm-forming ability was common. All episodes were either early post-interventional or chronic, and there were no haematogenous infections. Ten patients experienced monomicrobial infections. Among patients available for evaluation, 86 % of chronic infections and 70 % of early post-interventional infections achieved clinical cure; 90 % of monomicrobial infections remained infection-free. Genetic fingerprinting with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR; DiversiLab®) displayed clustering of isolates, suggesting that nosocomial spread might be present. Staphylococcus capitis has the potential to cause PJIs, with infection most likely being contracted during surgery or in the early postoperative period. As S. capitis might be an emerging nosocomial pathogen, surveillance of the prevalence of PJIs caused by S. capitis could be recommended.

  18. New horizons for orthotic and prosthetic technology: artificial muscle for ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Kornbluh, Roy D.

    2004-07-01

    The rehabilitation community is at the threshold of a new age in which orthotic and prosthetic devices will no longer be separate, lifeless mechanisms, but intimate extensions of the human body-structurally, neurologically, and dynamically. In this paper we discuss scientific and technological advances that promise to accelerate the merging of body and machine, including the development of actuator technologies that behave like muscle and control methodologies that exploit principles of biological movement. We present a state-of-the-art device for leg rehabilitation: a powered ankle-foot orthosis for stroke, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis patients. The device employs a forcecontrollable actuator and a biomimetic control scheme that automatically modulates ankle impedance and motive torque to satisfy patient-specific gait requirements. Although the device has some clinical benefits, problems still remain. The force-controllable actuator comprises an electric motor and a mechanical transmission, resulting in a heavy, bulky, and noisy mechanism. As a resolution of this difficulty, we argue that electroactive polymer-based artificial muscle technologies may offer considerable advantages to the physically challenged, allowing for joint impedance and motive force controllability, noise-free operation, and anthropomorphic device morphologies.

  19. Assessment of Myoelectric Controller Performance and Kinematic Behavior of a Novel Soft Synergy-Inspired Robotic Hand for Prosthetic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Simone; Bianchi, Matteo; Jain, Sonal; Pimenta Neto, José Simões; Boege, Scott; Grioli, Giorgio; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Myoelectric artificial limbs can significantly advance the state of the art in prosthetics, since they can be used to control mechatronic devices through muscular activity in a way that mimics how the subjects used to activate their muscles before limb loss. However, surveys indicate that dissatisfaction with the functionality of terminal devices underlies the widespread abandonment of prostheses. We believe that one key factor to improve acceptability of prosthetic devices is to attain human likeness of prosthesis movements, a goal which is being pursued by research on social and human-robot interactions. Therefore, to reduce early abandonment of terminal devices, we propose that controllers should be designed so as to ensure effective task accomplishment in a natural fashion. In this work, we have analyzed and compared the performance of three types of myoelectric controller algorithms based on surface electromyography to control an underactuated and multi-degrees of freedom prosthetic hand, the SoftHand Pro. The goal of the present study was to identify the myoelectric algorithm that best mimics the native hand movements. As a preliminary step, we first quantified the repeatability of the SoftHand Pro finger movements and identified the electromyographic recording sites for able-bodied individuals with the highest signal-to-noise ratio from two pairs of muscles, i.e., flexor digitorum superficialis/extensor digitorum communis, and flexor carpi radialis/extensor carpi ulnaris. Able-bodied volunteers were then asked to execute reach-to-grasp movements, while electromyography signals were recorded from flexor digitorum superficialis/extensor digitorum communis as this was identified as the muscle pair characterized by high signal-to-noise ratio and intuitive control. Subsequently, we tested three myoelectric controllers that mapped electromyography signals to position of the SoftHand Pro. We found that a differential electromyography-to-position mapping ensured the

  20. Hand Transplantation Versus Hand Prosthetics: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminger, S; Roche, A D; Sturma, A; Mayer, J A; Aszmann, O C

    Composite tissue transplantation and new developments in the field of prosthetics have opened new frontiers in the restoration of function among upper limb amputees. It is now possible to restore hand function in affected patients; however, the indications, advantages, and limitations for either hand transplantation or prosthetic fitting must be carefully considered depending on the level and extent of the limb loss. Hand transplantation allows comprehensive hand function to be restored, yet composite tissue transplantation comes with disadvantages, making this method a controversial topic in the hand surgical community. Alternatively, prosthetic limb replacement represents the standard of care for upper limb amputees, but results in the known limitations of function, sensation, and usage. The indication for hand transplantation or prosthetic fitting strongly depends on the level of amputation, as well as on the extent (unilateral/bilateral) of the amputation. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of hand transplantation and prosthetic replacement for upper limb amputees in general, as well as in regard to the different levels of amputation.

  1. Heel-region properties of prosthetic feet and shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klute, Glenn K; Berge, Jocelyn S; Segal, Ava D

    2004-07-01

    The properties of the prosthetic components prescribed to amputees have the potential to ameliorate or exacerbate their comfort, mobility, and health. To measure the difference in heel-region structural properties of currently available prosthetic feet and shoes, we simulated the period of initial heel-ground contact with a pendulum apparatus. The energy dissipation capacity of the various prosthetic feet ranged from 33.6% to 52.6% of the input energy. Donning a shoe had a large effect. Energy dissipation of a Seattle Lightfoot 2 prosthetic foot was 45.3%, while addition of a walking, running, and orthopedic shoe increased energy dissipation to 63.0%, 73.0%, and 82.4%, respectively. The force versus deformation response to impact was modeled as a hardening spring in parallel with a position-dependent damping element. A nonlinear least-squares curve fit produced model coefficients useful for predicting the heel-region impact response of both prosthetic feet and shoes.

  2. Provision of Prosthetic Services Following Lower Limb Amputation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Nooranida; Hasbollah, Hasif Rafidee; Hanafi, Muhammad Hafiz; Ibrahim, Al Hafiz; Rahman, Wan Afezah Wan Abdul; Aziz, Roslizawati Che

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of lower limb amputation is high across the globe and continues to be a major threat to morbidity and mortality. Consequently, the provision of high quality and effective prosthetics services have been known as an essential component for a successful rehabilitation outcome. In Malaysia, amputation prevalence has been increasing in which several main components of service delivering aspects (such as service intervention, prosthetic personnel) should be anticipated to accommodate for the increasing demand. This article highlights the hurdles experienced in providing prosthetic services in Malaysia from multiple aspects such as financial burden to acquire the prosthesis and lack of expertise to produce quality prosthesis. This paramount issues consequently justify for the urgency to carry out national level survey on the current statistics of lower limb amputation and to ascertain the available workforce to provide a quality prosthetics services. Only with accurate and current information from the national survey, strategies and policies aimed at enhancing the outcome from prosthetics services can be achieved. PMID:29386978

  3. Biomechanical design considerations for transradial prosthetic interface: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Traditional function and comfort assessment of transradial prostheses pay scant attention to prosthetic interface. With better understanding of the biomechanics of prosthetic interface comes better efficiency and safety for interface design; in this way, amputees are more likely to accept prosthetic usage. This review attempts to provide design and selection criteria of transradial interface for prosthetists and clinicians. Various transradial socket types in the literature were chronologically reviewed. Biomechanical discussion of transradial prosthetic interface design from an engineering point of view was also done. Suspension control, range of motion, stability, as well as comfort and safety of socket designs have been considered in varying degrees in the literature. The human-machine interface design should change from traditional "socket design" to new "interface design." From anatomy and physiology to biomechanics of the transradial residual limb, the force and motion transfer, together with comfort and safety, are the two main aspects in prosthetic interface design. Load distribution and transmission should mainly rely on achieving additional skeletal control through targeted soft tissue relief. Biomechanics of the residual limb soft tissues should be studied to find the relationship between mechanical properties and the comfort and safety of soft tissues. © IMechE 2016.

  4. Provision of Prosthetic Services Following Lower Limb Amputation in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Nooranida; Hasbollah, Hasif Rafidee; Hanafi, Muhammad Hafiz; Ibrahim, Al Hafiz; Rahman, Wan Afezah Wan Abdul; Aziz, Roslizawati Che

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of lower limb amputation is high across the globe and continues to be a major threat to morbidity and mortality. Consequently, the provision of high quality and effective prosthetics services have been known as an essential component for a successful rehabilitation outcome. In Malaysia, amputation prevalence has been increasing in which several main components of service delivering aspects (such as service intervention, prosthetic personnel) should be anticipated to accommodate for the increasing demand. This article highlights the hurdles experienced in providing prosthetic services in Malaysia from multiple aspects such as financial burden to acquire the prosthesis and lack of expertise to produce quality prosthesis. This paramount issues consequently justify for the urgency to carry out national level survey on the current statistics of lower limb amputation and to ascertain the available workforce to provide a quality prosthetics services. Only with accurate and current information from the national survey, strategies and policies aimed at enhancing the outcome from prosthetics services can be achieved.

  5. The FDA's role in medical device clinical studies of human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, James

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the United States Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) role as a regulatory agency in medical device clinical studies involving human subjects. The FDA's regulations and responsibilities are explained and the device application process discussed. The specific medical device regulatory authorities are described as they apply to the development and clinical study of retinal visual prosthetic devices. The FDA medical device regulations regarding clinical studies of human subjects are intended to safeguard the rights and safety of subjects. The data gathered in pre-approval clinical studies provide a basis of valid scientific evidence in order to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a medical device. The importance of a working understanding of applicable medical device regulations from the beginning of the device development project is emphasized particularly for novel, complex products such as implantable visual prosthetic devices.

  6. Extra-articular hip impingement: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo Galeano, N; Santamaría Guinea, N; Gredilla Molinero, J; Grande Bárez, M

    Hip and groin pain is a common clinical problem. Multiple causes can generate hip or groin pain, often sharing clinical and demographic characteristics. Diagnostic imaging tests play an important role in the etiological diagnosis. New forms of extra-articular hip impingement have recently been recognized as a cause of hip pain and limited function especially in young active patients. These conditions include ischiofemoral impingement, anterior inferior iliac spine and subspine impingement, iliopsoas impingement and greater trochanteric-pelvic impingement. In general, they are caused by a mechanical conflict with an abnormal or excessive contact between the proximal femur and pelvis and/or soft tissue between them. In this manuscript we review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, the most common radiologic findings and treatment of these forms of extra-articular hip impingement. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Osteo-articular tuberculosis and postpartum: a casual association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvet, F; Imbert, I; Magnin, J; Souviat, C; Ponties, J E; Lechevalier, D

    2005-09-01

    Most cases of active tuberculosis in France are due to a recurrence of latent tuberculosis. It seems that immunorestitution during the postpartum can contribute to the return of latent tuberculosis. We report three observations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis osteo-articular infections (two Pott's diseases and one sterno-clavicular arthritis) occurring during the postpartum of women non infected by HIV. Two patients need a surgical treatment. The response to standard tuberculous treatment was favourable and all patients were cured. One must consider osteo-articular tuberculosis when a patient is suffering from osseous pains not proving reliable during the postpartum. We must remind ourselves of the relationships between tuberculosis and postpartum as well as the necessity to the threat both mother and child. Additional epidemiological studies should be realised. It appears necessary to increase in France measures for tracking tuberculosis in particularly about the latent forms.

  8. Robotic hand with locking mechanism using TCP muscles for applications in prosthetic hand and humanoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Lokesh; Tadesse, Yonas

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a biomimetic, lightweight, 3D printed and customizable robotic hand with locking mechanism consisting of Twisted and Coiled Polymer (TCP) muscles based on nylon precursor fibers as artificial muscles. Previously, we have presented a small-sized biomimetic hand using nylon based artificial muscles and fishing line muscles as actuators. The current study focuses on an adult-sized prosthetic hand with improved design and a position/force locking system. Energy efficiency is always a matter of concern to make compact, lightweight, durable and cost effective devices. In natural human hand, if we keep holding objects for long time, we get tired because of continuous use of energy for keeping the fingers in certain positions. Similarly, in prosthetic hands we also need to provide energy continuously to artificial muscles to hold the object for a certain period of time, which is certainly not energy efficient. In this work we, describe the design of the robotic hand and locking mechanism along with the experimental results on the performance of the locking mechanism.

  9. Development of nylon-based artificial muscles for the usage in robotic prosthetic limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atikah, Nurul Anis; Weng, Leong Yeng; Anuar, Adzly; Fat, Chau Chien; Abidin, Izham Zainal; Sahari, Khairul Salleh Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the development of nylon-based artificial muscles that is intended to be used in prosthetic limb for young amputees. Prosthetic limbs are very expensive and this situation is further compounded for young amputees who are very quickly out-grow their prosthesis. The proposed artificial muscles are made of nylon fishing strings from various size such as 0.45mm, 0.55mm, 0.65mm and 1.00mm. These fishing strings were twisted into coils to create Super Coiled Polymers (SCP) and tested using hot air blower. These artificial muscles react counterintuitively, where when it is exposed to heat, contracts, and when cooled, expands. Peltier devices, when switched-on acts as heat pump, where one side is hot and the other is cold. This phenomenon, when affixed in between 2 SCP's, creates tandem motion similar to triceps and biceps. As initial study, the hot side of the Peltier module was tested using these artificial muscles. The string was measured for both its force production, length contraction, the initial results were promising.

  10. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  11. Prosthetic EMG control enhancement through the application of man-machine principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    An area in medicine that appears suitable to man-machine principles is rehabilitation research, particularly when the motor aspects of the body are involved. If one considers the limb, whether functional or not, as the machine, the brain as the controller and the neuromuscular system as the man-machine interface, the human body is reduced to a man-machine system that can benefit from the principles behind such systems. The area of rehabilitation that this paper deals with is that of an arm amputee and his prosthetic device. Reducing this area to its man-machine basics, the problem becomes one of attaining natural multiaxis prosthetic control using Electromyographic activity (EMG) as the means of communication between man and prothesis. In order to use EMG as the communication channel it must be amplified and processed to yield a high information signal suitable for control. The most common processing scheme employed is termed Mean Value Processing. This technique for extracting the useful EMG signal consists of a differential to single ended conversion to the surface activity followed by a rectification and smoothing.

  12. Psychometric evaluation of self-report outcome measures for prosthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Askew, Robert L; Salem, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Documentation of clinical outcomes is increasingly expected in delivery of prosthetic services and devices. However, many outcome measures suitable for use in clinical care and research have not been psychometrically tested with prosthesis users. The aim of this study was to determine test-retest reliability, mode-of-administration (MoA) equivalence, standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC) of standardized, self-report instruments that assess constructs of importance to people with lower limb loss. Prosthesis users (n = 201) were randomly assigned to groups based on MoA (i.e., paper, electronic, or mixed-mode). Participants completed two surveys 2 to 3 d apart. Instruments included the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility, Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Subscale, Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale, Quality of Life in Neurological Conditions-Applied Cognition/General Concerns, Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile, and Socket Comfort Score. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated all instruments are appropriate for group-level comparisons and select instruments are suitable for individual-level applications. Several instruments showed evidence of possible floor and ceiling effects. All were equivalent across MoAs. SEM and MDC were quantified to facilitate interpretation of outcomes and change scores. These results can enhance clinicians' and researchers' ability to select, apply, and interpret scores from instruments administered to prosthesis users.

  13. Prosthetic memory and post-memory: cultural encounters with the past in designing a museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mălina Ciocea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper1 investigates the sources of representations on the communist period and the type of engagement with the past in an experiential museum, in the context of the National Network of Romanian Museums’ project for a laboratory-museum of Romanian Communism. Our analysis of focus-groups in October-November 2012 explores the public’s expectations in terms of museum experience and engagement with objects and the potential of an experiential museum to facilitate deliberation about the past. We use the conceptual framework of recent studies on postmemory (Hirsch, 2008 and prosthetic memory (Landsberg, 2004, 2009 to focus on ways of building the experiential archive needed to produce prosthetic memory. We consider that such an analysis is relevant for two interconnected problems: the bidirectional relationship between a projected museum of communism and a prospective public, and the methodological insights available for investigating this relation. With regard to the first problem, this paper makes a case for treating museums as a memory device rather than a lieu de memoire and analyses the role of the museum in relation to cultural memory. With regard to the second problem, it offers an example of conducting research on prospective publics which departs from traditional marketing approaches, adopting theoretical insights and analytical categories from specific conceptualizations in the field of memory studies.

  14. Effect of biophysical therapy on articular pain in a primary care setting compared to ibuprofen and placebo: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, A; Egan, C G; Baron, P

    2018-01-01

    Articular pain is one of the most frequent complaints practitioners face in their daily work. With an aging population, many patients have multiple comorbidities that are associated with the presence of chronic diseases, while others experience allergies, side effects or do not respond to standard medications or procedures. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new effective and safe strategies to manage articular pain, especially in its chronic manifestations. This randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the efficacy of a single therapy session using a biophysical procedure matched with a common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ibuprofen) and placebo. Biophysical therapy was performed using a Med Select 729 device. One hundred fifty patients (mean age 56±15.6 years) diagnosed with acute or chronic articular pain at different locations were randomized into 3 groups and the Numeric Pain Rating Score (NPRS) was used to measure pain at baseline, after one week, one month, and three months. While no difference in NPRS was observed at baseline among the 3 groups, a statistically significant difference was observed at all subsequent time points, respectively, after one week (p less than 0.05), one month (p less than 0.001), and three months (p less than 0.01), for both ibuprofen and biophysical groups vs placebo. Biophysical treatment of articular pain was shown to be as effective as a conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment over a period of 3 months compared to placebo and could, therefore, represent an integrative, safe and long-lasting therapy to be considered for the management of acute and particularly chronic articular pain in current medical practice.

  15. Chondroitin sulfate reduces the friction coefficient of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalo, Ines M; Chahine, Nadeen O; Kaplun, Michael; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS)-C on the frictional response of bovine articular cartilage. The main hypothesis is that CS decreases the friction coefficient of articular cartilage. Corollary hypotheses are that viscosity and osmotic pressure are not the mechanisms that mediate the reduction in the friction coefficient by CS. In Experiment 1, bovine articular cartilage samples (n=29) were tested in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or in PBS containing 100mg/ml of CS following 48h incubation in PBS or in PBS+100mg/ml CS (control specimens were not subjected to any incubation). In Experiment 2, samples (n=23) were tested in four different solutions: PBS, PBS+100mg/ml CS, and PBS+polyethylene glycol (PEG) (133 or 170mg/ml). In Experiment 3, samples (n=18) were tested in three solutions of CS (0, 10 and 100mg/ml). Frictional tests (cartilage-on-glass) were performed under constant stress (0.5MPa) for 3600s and the time-dependent friction coefficient was measured. Samples incubated or tested in a 100mg/ml CS solution exhibited a significantly lower equilibrium friction coefficient than the respective PBS control. PEG solutions delayed the rise in the friction coefficient relative to the PBS control, but did not reduce the equilibrium value. Testing in PBS+10mg/ml of CS did not cause any significant decrease in the friction coefficient. In conclusion, CS at a concentration of 100mg/ml significantly reduces the friction coefficient of bovine articular cartilage and this mechanism is neither mediated by viscosity nor osmolarity. These results suggest that direct injection of CS into the joint may provide beneficial tribological effects.

  16. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    TaqMan probe AAC-CCT-CTT- TTC -GGA-TTA-ACC-CTG-CGA- GTT. Articular cartilage defect model and cell transplanta- tion. All animal experiments were... inhalation mask. The knee joint was exposed by medial parapa- tellar incision, and the trochlear groove was exposed by lateral dislocation of the...least significant difference test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS In vitro MDSC characterization. Flow cytometric analysis

  17. [Osteo-articular tuberculosis in African (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, R; Barnaud, P; Carayon, A

    1979-01-01

    General, clinical and therapeutic features of osteo-articular tuberculosis in African, excluding vertebral localizations, are compiled from 81 records: The are: -- a frequency lower than in expatriated Africans and this indicates their special physical resistance when they live in their natural environment; -- frequently an easy diagnosis because of infected advanced foci with associated lesions; -- a surgical indication (curettage, resection, arthrodesis) as frequent as in vertebral localizations.

  18. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity: Rehabilitation process and prosthetics. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-10-01

    A structured, multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation process after amputation is needed that includes a greater focus on the involvement of both (para)medics and prosthetists. There is considerable variation in prosthetic prescription concerning the moment of initial prosthesis fitting and the use of replacement parts. To produce an evidence-based guideline for the amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremities. This guideline provides recommendations in support of daily practice and is based on the results of scientific research and further discussions focussed on establishing good medical practice. Part 2 focuses on rehabilitation process and prosthetics. Systematic literature design. Literature search in five databases and quality assessment on the basis of evidence-based guideline development. An evidence-based multidisciplinary guideline on amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity. The best care (in general) for patients undergoing amputation of a lower extremity is presented and discussed. This part of the guideline provides recommendations for treatment and reintegration of patients undergoing amputation of a lower extremity and can be used to provide patient information. This guideline provides recommendations in support of daily practice and is based on the results of scientific research and further discussions focussed on establishing good medical practice. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  19. Obtention of a prosthetic group for labelling of radioiodinated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da S.; Colturato, Maria Tereza; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies and peptides labeled with radionuclides has been extensively used in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunodetection. The principal problem with the use of radioiodinated proteins is the in vivo dehalogenation. The use of prosthetic groups for indirect labeling of proteins with radioiodine has showed to be useful on labeling proteins with greater in vivo stability. A procedure is described for the preparation of an radioiodinated prosthetic group (N-succinimidyl 4-radioiodine-benzoate-SIB), using procedure described by Stocklin et al, with the iodination of p-bromo-benzoic acid and subsequent reaction with TSTU. Preliminary labeling results showed that the prosthetic group can be obtained in a good yield. The coupling of the SIB to the protein will be studied using human IgG as protein model. (author)

  20. Surgical-prosthetic treatment of large mandibular cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džambas Ljubiša D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a combined surgical-prosthetic procedure of reconstructing mandibular bone defect in a 53 year old patient, following enucleation of a mandibular cyst (Cystectomy Partsch II. After a thorough diagnostic evaluation, a surgical procedure was planned with the particular attention to the nature of the disease, patient’s condition, size and extension of the cyst, tissue loss, and the possibilities of prosthetic management of a mandibular bone defect with partial postresection dental prosthesis. It is of great importance to point to the significance of teamwork of a maxillofacial surgeon and a specialist in prosthodontics. This kind of cooperation provided very effective and less risky soft tissue, as well as bone tissue regeneration (osteogenesis. The patient’s recovery was fast, and he could return to his daily activities and work without significant changes regarding quality of life after surgery and prosthetic treatment.

  1. Prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis in pregnancy: from thrombolysis to anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Gonçalo; Aguiar, Carlos; Andrade, Maria João; Patrício, Lino; Freire, Isabel; Serrano, Fátima; Anjos, Rui; Mendes, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves are at increased risk for valve thrombosis. Management decisions for this life-threatening complication are complex. Open-heart surgery has a very high risk of maternal mortality and fetal loss. Bleeding and embolic risks associated with thrombolytic agents, the limited efficacy of thrombolysis in certain subgroups, and a lack of experience in the setting of pregnancy raise important concerns. We report a case of mitral prosthetic valve thrombosis in early pregnancy, which was successfully treated with streptokinase. Ten years later, the same patient had an uneventful pregnancy, throughout which acenocoumarol was maintained. With this case we review the prevention (with oral anticoagulant therapy) and treatment of prosthetic valve thrombosis during pregnancy, which is important for both obstetrician and cardiologist. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Image segmentation for enhancing symbol recognition in prosthetic vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Lachlan; Barnes, Nick; McCarthy, Chris; He, Xuming

    2012-01-01

    Current and near-term implantable prosthetic vision systems offer the potential to restore some visual function, but suffer from poor resolution and dynamic range of induced phosphenes. This can make it difficult for users of prosthetic vision systems to identify symbolic information (such as signs) except in controlled conditions. Using image segmentation techniques from computer vision, we show it is possible to improve the clarity of such symbolic information for users of prosthetic vision implants in uncontrolled conditions. We use image segmentation to automatically divide a natural image into regions, and using a fixation point controlled by the user, select a region to phosphenize. This technique improves the apparent contrast and clarity of symbolic information over traditional phosphenization approaches.

  3. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana de Villa CAMARGOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical, implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH, and occlusal loading (axial or oblique, for both immediately and delayed loaded implants. Analysis of variance at 95%CI was used to evaluate the peak maximum principal stress and strain in bone after applying a 100 N occlusal load. The results showed that the type of prosthetic abutment influences bone stress/strain in only immediately loaded implants. Attachment of conical abutments to IH implants exhibited the best biomechanical behavior, with optimal distribution and dissipation of the load in peri-implant bone.

  4. Effects of a 3D segmental prosthetic system for tricuspid valve annulus remodelling on the right coronary artery: a human cadaveric coronary angiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riki-Marishani, Mohsen; Gholoobi, Arash; Sazegar, Ghasem; Aazami, Mathias H; Hedjazi, Aria; Sajjadian, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Aghaii-Zade Torabi, Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    A prosthetic system to repair secondary tricuspid valve regurgitation was developed. The conceptual engineering of the current device is based on 3D segmental remodelling of the tricuspid valve annulus in lieu of reductive annuloplasty. This study was designed to investigate the operational safety of the current prosthetic system with regard to the anatomical integrity of the right coronary artery (RCA) in fresh cadaveric human hearts. During the study period, from January to April 2016, the current prosthetic system was implanted on the tricuspid valve annulus in fresh cadaveric human hearts that met the study's inclusion criteria. The prepared specimens were investigated via selective coronary angiography of the RCA in the catheterization laboratory. The RCA angiographic anatomies were categorized as normal, distorted, kinked or occluded. Sixteen specimens underwent implantation of the current prosthetic system. The mean age of the cadaveric human hearts was 43.24 ± 15.79 years, with vehicle accident being the primary cause of death (59%). A dominant RCA was noticed in 62.5% of the specimens. None of the specimens displayed any injury, distortion, kinking or occlusion in the RCA due to the implantation of the prostheses. In light of the results of the present study, undertaken on fresh cadaveric human heart specimens, the current segmental prosthetic system for 3D remodelling of the tricuspid valve annulus seems to be safe vis-à-vis the anatomical integrity of the RCA. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate the functional features of the current prosthetic system with a view to addressing the complex pathophysiology of secondary tricuspid valve regurgitation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of tenascin-C in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    Tenascin-C (TN-C) is a glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). TN-C consists of four distinct domains, including the tenascin assembly domain, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, fibronectin type III-like repeats, and the fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) domain. This review summarizes the role of TN-C in articular cartilage. Expression of TN-C is associated with the development of articular cartilage but markedly decreases during maturation of chondrocytes and disappears almost completely in adult articular cartilage. Increased expression of TN-C has been found at diseased cartilage and synovial sites in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TN-C is increased in the synovial fluid in patients with OA and RA. In addition, serum TN-C is elevated in RA patients. TN-C could be a useful biochemical marker for joint disease. The addition of TN-C results in different effects among TN-C domains. TN-C fragments might be endogenous inducers of cartilage matrix degradation; however, full-length TN-C could promote cartilage repair and prevent cartilage degeneration. The deficiency of TN-C enhanced cartilage degeneration in the spontaneous OA in aged joints and surgical OA model. The clinical significance of TN-C effects on cartilage is not straightforward.

  6. MRI diagnosis of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Zhou Chengtao; Mu Renqi; Zhang Guanghui; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscal articular capsule. Methods: MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule confirmed by surgery and arthroscope were analyzed retrospectively in 8 cases. Results: The 'Butterfly knot sign' disappeared and was replaced with fluid signal on the sagittal slice of meniscal body in 8 cases. Part of back angle remained in 3 cases. 'Double anterior cruciate ligament sign' was showed on one side of middle sagittal slice in 7 cases. 'Reverse meniscus sign' was revealed in intercondylar fossa on the coronary view in 8 cases. Abnormal high signal was showed in the injured meniscus in 6 cases. Abnormal high signal was detected in the opposite meniscus in 5 cases. Conclusion: The MR findings of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule include disappearance of 'butterfly knot sign', appearance of 'reverse meniscus sign' and 'double anterior cruciate ligament sign'. The diagnosis would be established if the former 2 signs were present or all the 3 signs were present simultaneously. (authors)

  7. Maxillofacial prosthetics training and practice profiles in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, James L; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Davis, Betsy K; Wee, Alvin G

    2017-10-01

    The motivation of maxillofacial prosthodontists to go into fellowship training and specific procedures in maxillofacial prosthetics practice once they have completed training has not been previously evaluated. The purpose of this study was to survey maxillofacial prosthodontists in the United States to investigate their reasons for pursuing maxillofacial prosthetic training and their practice profiles. In June 2015, a survey was sent to all US maxillofacial prosthodontists asking for descriptive demographics, their reasoning as to what prompted entrance into a maxillofacial prosthetic program, and their practice pattern. Frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations were calculated and reported. The survey response rate was 60.4%. The main reason for pursuing maxillofacial training was primarily personal satisfaction, prosthodontic residency exposure, and mentorship rather than media exposure and compensation. The time spent in prosthodontic practice varied among practitioners, with the majority of practice time spent accomplishing standard prosthodontic procedures (65.59%) versus maxillofacial (25.53%) or surgical procedures (9.67%). Of 12 clinical maxillofacial procedures inquired about, the most prevalent were obturators, dental oncology, and mandibular resections. This study reveals that personal satisfaction, mentorship, and prosthodontic residency exposure were the reasons most prosthodontists pursued an additional year of maxillofacial prosthetic fellowship. Most were very satisfied with their training and chosen career path and would recommend an additional year of training. The majority of maxillofacial prosthodontists provided maxillofacial prosthetic treatment for approximately one fourth of their practice time. The most common procedures performed were obturators, dental oncology, and mandibular resections. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihad Tatar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of noncomplicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3, and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4. Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14% of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78% had hematomas, four (3.57% had seromas, and one (0.89% had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56% of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69% had hematomas, one (2.56% had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection

  9. ALL-CERAMIC APPLIANCES FOR PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru BASNO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess a possible fixed rehabilitation in young patients, by means of CAD-CAM techniques. Materials and method. The CERCON substractive technique with zirconium oxide blanks was applied. Discussion. The obtained prosthetic structures are characterized by a better aesthetic integration, optimum marginal adaptation and suitable clinical longevity. Conclusions. All-ceramic prostheses appear as a biological solution in the prosthetic rehabilitation of young patients, as they require reduced removal of both enamel and dentin, while obeying the biological conservative principle of treatment.

  10. Case Study and Review: Treatment of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Zhang, David; Lozier, Jay; Chang, Richard; Sachdev, Vandana; Chen, Marcus Y.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Horvath, Keith A.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a severe and life-threatening complication of heart valve replacement. Conventional therapy is surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. Medical thrombolysis is another emerging option. We report the case of a 57 year old woman with a history of Ebstein anomaly who underwent successful treatment of a tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with intra-atrial infusion of very low dose recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We review the presentation, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the tricuspid PVT emphasizing a modified medical option as a safe, minimally invasive alternative to surgical intervention or conventional medical therapy for tricuspid valve thrombosis. PMID:22000268

  11. 76 FR 64429 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The...) ] that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special- Disabilities Programs will be held... advise the Secretary of Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the...

  12. 78 FR 35099 - Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items... information needed to determine eligibility and authorize funding for various prosthetic services. DATES..., VA Form 10- 1394. (d) Prosthetic Authorization for Items or Services, VA Form 10- 2421. (e...

  13. 75 FR 45206 - Proposed Information Collection (Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items and... information needed to determine eligibility and authorize funding for various prosthetic services. DATES... Adaptive Equipment Motor Vehicle, VA Form 10- 1394. c. Prosthetic Authorization for Items or Services, VA...

  14. 75 FR 62185 - Proposed Information Collection (Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items and...-0103. c. Application for Adaptive Equipment Motor Vehicle, VA Form 10- 1394. d. Prosthetic Authorization for Items or Services, VA Form 10-2421. e. Prosthetic Service Card Invoice, VA Form 10-2520. f...

  15. Pre-prosthetic surgical alterations in maxillectomy to enhance the prosthetic prognoses as part of rehabilitation of oral cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fattah, H; Zaghloul, A; Pedemonte, E; Escuin, T

    2012-03-01

    After maxillectomy, prosthetic restoration of the resulting defect is an essential step because it signals the beginning of patient's rehabilitation. The obturator used to restore the defect should be comfortable, restore adequate speech, deglutition, mastication, and be cosmetically acceptable, success will depend on the size and location of the defect and the quantity and integrity of the remaining structures, in addition to pre-prosthetic surgical preparation of defect site. Preoperative cooperation between the oncologist surgeon and the maxillofacial surgeon may allow obturation of a resultant defect by preservation of the premaxilla or the tuberosity on the defect side and maintaining the alveolar bone or teeth adjacent to the defect. This study evaluates the importance of pre-prosthetic surgical alterations at the time maxillectomy on the enhancement of the prosthetic prognoses as part of the rehabilitation of oral cancer patient. The study was carried out between 2003- 2008, on 66 cancer patients(41 male-25 female) age ranged from 33 to 72 years, at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, whom underwent maxillectomy surgery to remove malignant tumor as a part of cancer treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Group A: Resection of maxilla followed by preprosthetic surgical preparation. Twenty-four cancer patients (13 male - 11 female). Group B: Resection of maxilla without any preprosthetic surgical preparation. Forty-two cancer patients (28 male-14 female). Outcome variables measured included facial contour and aesthetic results, speech understandability, ability to eat solid foods, oronasal separation, socializing outside the home, and return-to-work status. Flap success and donor site morbidity were also studied. To improve the prosthetic restoration of maxillary defect resulting maxillary resection as part treatment of maxillofacial tumor depends on the close cooperation between prosthodontist and surgeon, by combination of pre-prosthetic

  16. A model to facilitate implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health into prosthetics and orthotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarl, Gustav; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2017-09-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is a classification of human functioning and disability and is based on a biopsychosocial model of health. As such, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health seems suitable as a basis for constructing models defining the clinical P&O process. The aim was to use International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to facilitate development of such a model. Proposed model: A model, the Prosthetic and Orthotic Process (POP) model, is proposed. The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model is based on the concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and comprises four steps in a cycle: (1) Assessment, including the medical history and physical examination of the patient. (2) Goals, specified on four levels including those related to participation, activity, body functions and structures and technical requirements of the device. (3) Intervention, in which the appropriate course of action is determined based on the specified goal and evidence-based practice. (4) Evaluation of outcomes, where the outcomes are assessed and compared to the corresponding goals. After the evaluation of goal fulfilment, the first cycle in the process is complete, and a broad evaluation is now made including overriding questions about the patient's satisfaction with the outcomes and the process. This evaluation will determine if the process should be ended or if another cycle in the process should be initiated. The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model can provide a common understanding of the P&O process. Concepts of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health have been incorporated into the model to facilitate communication with other rehabilitation professionals and encourage a holistic and patient-centred approach in clinical practice. Clinical relevance The Prosthetic and Orthotic Process model can support the implementation

  17. Gait and balance of transfemoral amputees using passive mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, K R; Levine, J A; Brey, R H; Iverson, B K; McCrady, S K; Padgett, D J; Joyner, M J

    2007-10-01

    Microprocessor-controlled knee joints appeared on the market a decade ago. These joints are more sophisticated and more expensive than mechanical ones. The literature is contradictory regarding changes in gait and balance when using these sophisticated devices. This study employed a crossover design to assess the comparative performance of a passive mechanical knee prosthesis compared to a microprocessor-controlled knee joint in 15 subjects with an above-knee amputation. Objective measurements of gait and balance were obtained. Subjects demonstrated significantly improved gait characteristics after receiving the microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (pknee to a flexed knee during loading response which resulted in a change from an internal knee flexor moment to a knee extensor moment. The participants' balance also improved (pmicroprocessor-controlled knee have significant improvements in gait and balance.

  18. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  19. The efficacy of intra-articular bupivacaine for relief of pain following arthroscopy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, F; Coakes, J; Umarji, S; Palmer, S; Venn, R; Panayiotou, S

    2006-12-01

    The intra-articular injection of local anaesthetic is frequently used for pain relief after arthroscopy. There is, however, no published evidence of the analgesic effect of bupivacaine in the ankle. In a randomised, double-blind study, 35 patients undergoing arthroscopy of the ankle were allocated to receive intra-articular saline or bupivacaine. Pain was assessed using pain scores and additional analgesic requirements. Intra-articular bupivacaine had a significant analgesic effect in the immediate post-operative period, reducing pain scores and the need for additional analgesics. We recommend the use of intra-articular bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia in ankle surgery.

  20. Intrauterine Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    S HARE W ITH W OMEN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES INTRAUTERINE DEVICES What is An Intrauterine Device? An intrauterine device (IUD) is anything that is placed inside the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. ...

  1. Fifteen years of follow-up of a removable prosthetic design to maintain two remaining molars in a patient with mandibular reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Lun Hsu; Jacqueline Chia-Hsuan Wu; Ling-Ming Yu

    2012-01-01

    This clinical report describes a long-term prosthetic solution for a patient who had undergone mandibular reconstruction with a fibular graft, leaving only two right molars. The only retention device for the removable prosthesis design included a telescoping system with an O-ring application, but without fibula graft involvement. This prosthesis design was motivated by the altered bony and muscular architecture resulting in an increased maxillomandibular space and thick soft tissue in the den...

  2. American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable scripts and reload this page. My ABC ABC Directory State Licensure Professional Ethics News & Events OandPCare.org Contact Us It looks like ... Practitioner Career Opportunities Professional & Educational Resources ... of Use Privacy Policy Contact Us News & Events American Board for Certification in Orthotics, Prosthetics & ...

  3. Predictors of Success on the Prosthetics Certification Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Rebecca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Students who graduate from a practitioner program in prosthetics & orthotics must achieve certification in order to obtain licensure and practice independently in 16 states. In states where licensure is not mandatory, graduates may choose to pursue certification in order assure patients that they are practicing at the highest level as well as…

  4. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Jürgen Benjamin; Essig, Andreas; Herrmann, Manuel; Liebold, Andreas; Quader, Mohamed Abo

    2015-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) kroppenstedtii is a rarely detected agent of bacterial infections in humans. Here, we describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by C. kroppenstedtii. Application of molecular methods using surgically excised valve tissue was a cornerstone for the establishment of the microbiological diagnosis, which is crucial for targeted antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Consumer satisfaction with the services of prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Joline; Geertzen, Jan; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Consumer satisfaction with the services provided in a prosthetics and orthotics (PO) facility has seldom been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze consumer satisfaction regarding the services provided by 15 PO facilities in The Netherlands. Consumers (n=1,364) of these PO facilities who

  6. Diagnostic flowcharts in osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis and prosthetic joint infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, P.; Lazzeri, E.; Sconfienza, L. M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.; Trampuz, A.; Petrosillo, N.; Signore, A.

    Infections of the bone, spine and prosthetic joints are serious and complex conditions to diagnose and to treat. Structured diagnostic workup may very well improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis, thereby improving the outcome since treatment may very well be more successful and less harmful if

  7. Esthetics with prosthetics in case of maxillary canine transposition: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esthetics with prosthetics in case of maxillary canine transposition: A clinical report. ... provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  8. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... total prosthesis. Examples of external limb prosthetic components include the following: Ankle, foot, hip, knee, and socket components; mechanical or powered hand, hook, wrist unit, elbow joint, and shoulder joint components; and cable and prosthesis suction valves. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  9. Effect of Modifying Prosthetic Socket Base Materials by Adding Nanodiamonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The curing process of prosthetic socket base materials requires attention owing to a series of associated problems that are yet to be addressed and solved. However, to date, few relevant studies have been reported. In this paper, nanodiamonds modified with a silane coupling agent were dispersed into a prosthetic socket base material, and the performance of the modified base materials was investigated. Adding a predetermined amount of nanodiamonds to the prosthetic socket base material increased the glass transition temperature, improved the mechanical properties of the cured base material, and reduced the influence of the volatile gas formed during the curing process on the environment. With increasing nanodiamond contents, the glass transition temperature increased and the mechanical properties improved slightly. Owing to the high thermal conductivity of the nanodiamonds, the localized heat, as a result of the curing process, could be dissipated and released. Thus, adding nanodiamonds led to a more uniform temperature field forming in the curing system. This improved the curing process and reduced the formation of volatile monomers, thereby decreasing the adverse impact of the generated volatile gases on the environment. All of these provide a potential strategy for modifying prosthetic socket base materials.

  10. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  11. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  12. Role of CT in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease accounts for a substantial part of the cardiovascular disease worldwide with an estimated prevalence of 2.5% in the Western population aged <65 years and over 13% in the population aged >75 years. Surgical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement is the indicated therapy for

  13. Prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, H; Geertzen, JHB; Hofstad, CJ; Postema, K; Van Limbeek, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Prosthetic prescription for lower limb amputees and the methodology used are primarily based on empirical knowledge. Clinical expertise plays an important role that can lead to an adequate prescription; however, a clear evidence based motivation for the choices made cannot be given. This can lead to

  14. Simulated Prosthetic Vision: The Benefits of Computer-Based Object Recognition and Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Marc J-M; Guivarch, Valérian; Denis, Grégoire; Jouffrais, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Clinical trials with blind patients implanted with a visual neuroprosthesis showed that even the simplest tasks were difficult to perform with the limited vision restored with current implants. Simulated prosthetic vision (SPV) is a powerful tool to investigate the putative functions of the upcoming generations of visual neuroprostheses. Recent studies based on SPV showed that several generations of implants will be required before usable vision is restored. However, none of these studies relied on advanced image processing. High-level image processing could significantly reduce the amount of information required to perform visual tasks and help restore visuomotor behaviors, even with current low-resolution implants. In this study, we simulated a prosthetic vision device based on object localization in the scene. We evaluated the usability of this device for object recognition, localization, and reaching. We showed that a very low number of electrodes (e.g., nine) are sufficient to restore visually guided reaching movements with fair timing (10 s) and high accuracy. In addition, performance, both in terms of accuracy and speed, was comparable with 9 and 100 electrodes. Extraction of high level information (object recognition and localization) from video images could drastically enhance the usability of current visual neuroprosthesis. We suggest that this method-that is, localization of targets of interest in the scene-may restore various visuomotor behaviors. This method could prove functional on current low-resolution implants. The main limitation resides in the reliability of the vision algorithms, which are improving rapidly. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparison of hyaluronic acid and PRP intra-articular injection with combined intra-articular and intraosseous PRP injections to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ke; Bai, Yuming; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Haisen; Liu, Hao; Ma, Shiyun

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit provided by intraosseous infiltration combined with intra-articular injection of platelet-rich plasma to treat mild and moderate stages of knee joint degeneration (Kellgren-Lawrence score II-III) compared with other treatments, specifically intra-articular injection of PRP and of HA. Eighty-six patients with grade II to grade III knee OA according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification were randomly assigned to intra-articular combined with intraosseous injection of PRP (group A), intra-articular PRP (group B), or intra-articular HA (group C). Patients in group A received intra-articular combined with intraosseous injection of PRP (administered twice, 2 weeks apart). Patients in group B received intra-articular injection of PRP every 14 days. Patients in group C received a series of five intra-articular injections of HA every 7 days. All patients were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score before the treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment. There were significant improvements at the end of the 1st month. Notably, group A patients had significantly superior VAS and WOMAC scores than were observed in groups B and C. The VAS scores were similar in groups B and group C after the 6th month. Regarding the WOMAC scores, groups B and C differed at the 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months; however, no significant difference was observed at the 18th month. The combination of intraosseous with intra-articular injections of PRP resulted in a significantly superior clinical outcome, with sustained lower VAS and WOMAC scores and improvement in quality of life within 18 months.

  16. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  17. Measuring the Impact of Cognitive Prosthetics on the Daily Life of People with Dementia and Their Carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiland, Franka; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan

    Assistive technologies to support persons with dementia and their carers are used increasingly often. However, little is known about the effectiveness of most assistive devices. Much technology is put on the market without having been properly tested with potential end-users. To increase the chance that an assistive device is well accepted and useful for the target group, it is important, especially in the case of disabled persons, to involve potential users in the development process and to evaluate the impact of using the device on them before implementing it in the daily care and support. When evaluating the impact, decisions have to be made regarding the selection of measuring instruments. Important considerations in the selection process are the underlying domains to be addressed by the assistive technology, the target group and the availability of standardized instruments with good psychometric properties. In this chapter the COGKNOW project is used as a case example to explain how the impact of cognitive prosthetics on the daily lives of people with dementia and their carers can be measured. In COGKNOW a cognitive prosthetic device is being developed to improve the quality of life and autonomy of persons with dementia and to help them to remember and remind, to have social contact, to perform daily activities and to enhance feelings of safety. For all these areas, potential measuring instruments are described. Besides (standardized) measuring instruments, other data collection methods are used as well, such as semi-structured interviews and observations, diaries and in situ measurement. Within the COGKNOW project a first uncontrolled small-scale impact measurement takes place during the development process of the assistive device. However, it is recommended to perform a larger randomized controlled study as soon as the final product is ready to evaluate the impact of the device on persons with dementia and carers before it is released on the market.

  18. [The biomechanical behaviour of the flexible acrylic partial prosthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheban, E; Forna, Norina Consuela

    2008-01-01

    The simulation methods constitute a modern method absolutely necessary at the forerunner stage of the practical unwinding of the research stages, outlining the precise directions for the practical application, the final results influencing the dental practice. Our study proposes itself to analyze through the method of the finite element the status of the tension and the deformations registered at the level of the partially extended indentured prosthetic field and at the level of the partially flexible acrylic prosthetics. The first step was constituted by the realization of CT followed by their scanning and the usage of the material constants. Following the tomographic computer exam at the patients submitted to the study, it was observed a resorption and an important atrophy at the level of the jaw indented crest, after a period of four months, with the flexible prosthetics type Valplast, this aspect having profound clinical and viability implications to the selected therapy solution. For the 3D reconstruction of the different types of partial extended indentation the Amira universal program was used for the 3D reconstructions for any type of Tomographic Computer. Following the 3D reconstructions of the information obtained on the tomographic computer on the images it can be observed an important resorption of the jaw bone in the area of the edentulous space with an acrylic flexible prosthetics. The intrusion of the silicon material Rubber type, as a viable solution for the reduction of the absorption rate and atrophy of the partially indented prosthetics field, has results proportional to the type of the force applied and the applying of this. The simulation of the real clinical situations following the contribution of the tomographic computer constitutes a highly important stage in the evaluation of the degree of resorption and atrophy at the level of the indented crests, process whose parameters are influenced by the factorial accumulation with a profound impact

  19. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity : Rehabilitation process and prosthetics. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S.; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: A structured, multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation process after amputation is needed that includes a greater focus on the involvement of both (para)medics and prosthetists. There is considerable variation in prosthetic prescription concerning the moment of initial prosthesis

  20. Shape of articular surface of crocodilian (Archosauria) elbow joints and its relevance to sauropsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Taru, Hajime; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2010-07-01

    The determination of area and shape of articular surfaces on the limb bones of extinct archosaurs is difficult because of postmortem decomposition of the fibrous tissue and articular cartilages that provide the complex three-dimensional joint surfaces in vivo. This study aims at describing the shape of the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of six crocodilian specimens; comparing its structure with that of four birds, three testudines, and five squamates; and comparing the shapes of the surfaces of the calcified and the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of an Alligator specimen. The shapes of the articular cartilages of crocodilian elbow joint are shown to resemble those of birds. The humerus possesses an olecranon fossa positioned approximately at the midportion of the distal epiphysis and bordering the margin of the extensor side of the articular surface. The ulna possesses a prominent intercotylar process at approximately the middle of its articular surface, and splits the surface into the radial and ulnar cotylae. This divides the articular cartilage into an articular surface on the flexor portion, and the olecranon on the extensor portion. The intercotylar process fits into the olecranon fossa to restrict elbow joint extension. Dinosaurs and pterosaurs, phylogenetically bracketed by Crocodylia and Aves (birds), may have possessed a similar olecranon fossa and intercotylar process on their articular cartilages. Although these shapes are rarely recognizable on the bones, their impressions on the surfaces of the calcified cartilages provide an important indication of the extensor margin of the articular surfaces. This, in turn, helps to determine the maximum angle of extension of the elbow joint in archosaurs.

  1. Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage: role of synovial fluid constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tannin A; Gastelum, Nicholas S; Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Schumacher, Barbara L; Sah, Robert L

    2007-03-01

    To determine whether the synovial fluid (SF) constituents hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL) contribute to boundary lubrication, either independently or additively, at an articular cartilage-cartilage interface. Cartilage boundary lubrication tests were performed with fresh bovine osteochondral samples. Tests were performed using graded concentrations of SF, HA, and PRG4 alone, a physiologic concentration of SAPL, and various combinations of HA, PRG4, and SAPL at physiologic concentrations. Static (mu(static, Neq)) and kinetic () friction coefficients were calculated. Normal SF functioned as an effective boundary lubricant both at a concentration of 100% ( = 0.025) and at a 3-fold dilution ( = 0.029). Both HA and PRG4 contributed independently to a low mu in a dose-dependent manner. Values of decreased from approximately 0.24 in phosphate buffered saline to 0.12 in 3,300 mug/ml HA and 0.11 in 450 mug/ml PRG4. HA and PRG4 in combination lowered mu further at the high concentrations, attaining a value of 0.066. SAPL at 200 mug/ml did not significantly lower mu, either independently or in combination with HA and PRG4. The results described here indicate that SF constituents contribute, individually and in combination, both at physiologic and pathophysiologic concentrations, to the boundary lubrication of apposing articular cartilage surfaces. These results provide insight into the nature of the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage by SF and its constituents. They therefore provide insight regarding both the homeostatic maintenance of healthy joints and pathogenic processes in arthritic disease.

  2. Survivorship After Meniscal Allograft Transplantation According to Articular Cartilage Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bum-Sik; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Won-Kyeong; Choi, Jun Weon

    2017-04-01

    Clinical outcomes after meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) in arthritic knees are unclear, and objective estimates of graft survival according to the articular cartilage status have not been performed. MAT should provide clinical benefits in knees with high-grade cartilage damage, but their graft survivorship should be inferior to that in knees with low-grade chondral degeneration after MAT. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The records of 222 consecutive patients who underwent primary MAT were reviewed to compare clinical outcomes and graft survivorship. The patients were grouped according to the degree and location of articular cartilage degeneration: low-grade chondral lesions (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] grade ≤2) on both the femoral and tibial sides (ideal indication), high-grade lesions (ICRS grade 3 or 4) on either the femoral or tibial side (relative indication), and high-grade lesions on both sides (salvage indication). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log-rank test was performed to compare the clinical survival rates and graft survival rates between the groups. A Lysholm score of meniscal tear or meniscectomy of greater than one-third of the allograft, objectively evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopic surgery. The mean (±SD) Lysholm score significantly improved from 63.1 ± 15.1 preoperatively to 85.1 ± 14.3 at the latest follow-up of a mean 44.6 ± 19.7 months ( P lesions. However, better graft survival can be expected when articular cartilage is intact or if chondral damage is limited to a unipolar lesion. MAT should be considered before the progression of chondral damage to a bipolar lesion for better graft survivorship and should be performed cautiously in arthritic knees.

  3. Pediatric and adolescent intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dudda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcaneal fractures in childhood are very rare, whereas particularly intra-articular displaced fractures are not typical in skeletally immature children. Various techniques of osteosynthesis have been described. This study aimed to determine clinical and radiological outcome after surgical treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Fourteen intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus were included in this retrospective study. Eleven children (2 girls and 9 boys aged 6-16 years (average age 11.5 years underwent surgical treatment. One child sustained a Type II open fracture of both calcanei. All injuries occurred after a high-energy trauma; 3 patients had multiple additional fractures. The clinical and radiological postoperative follow up was an average 44 months. In 4 cases, a reduction through a minimally invasive approach and fixation with K-wires or screws could be achieved. Eleven fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation with plate osteosynthesis, K-wires or screws. In one case with open fractures of both heel bones, an additional external fixator was applied. The surgical treatment approach adopted enabled the pre-operative Boehler’s angle (average 16° to be improved to an average 30°. In all cases, except for the patient with open fractures, a good functional result and outcome could be achieved. In calcaneal fractures in childhood, anatomical reduction is the determining factor, as in fractures in adults, whereas the surgical technique seems to have no influence on clinical outcome in children. The wound healing problems that have often been described were not observed in this age group.

  4. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.

  5. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy.

  7. [Symptomatic and evolutive characteristics of articular destruction noted in chondrocalcinosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiaumey, J; Larget-Piet, B; Menza, C D; Rotterdam, M

    1975-04-01

    Referring to 17 personal observations, the authors endeavour to clarify the main clinical and radiological traits of the destructive arthropathies occuring in patients suffering from diffuse, articular chondrocalcinosis. These arthropathies appear to be relatively frequent and older, obese women suffering from demineralization are more readily affected. The knees, coxo-femoral joints and the shoulders are principally concerned, and to a lesser extent the wrists, the trapezo-metacarpal joints and even the spine. The lesions can be polyarticular and symmetrical, be grouped in more or less random oligoarticular combinations or may occur in only a single joint space. Clinically, these destructive arthropathies give rise to severe pain and very marked functional impotence. The joints are swollen without any signs of inflammation. The joint movements are painful, stiff, and limited. Axial deviations are frequent. Radiologically, the lesions occur throughout the cartilage sheath, the inter-chondrial bone, and in the underlying epiphysary bone, in the form of massive geodes and massives loss of tissue substance. On the other hand, the process of reconstruction is very limited. In the patients studied, chondrocalcinosis was proved by the very characteristic pictures of calcic incrustations of the cartilage sheath and the fibro-cartilages, by the discovery of micro-crystals of calcium pyrophosphate in the articular fluid or, at biopsy, by the thickness of the synovial fluid. This chondrocalcinosis was primary in the cases. These destructive lesions were easily distinguishable from nervous or diabetic osteo-arthropathies, and from tumoral, infectious, rheumatic, or vascular changes. Thus, chondrocalcinosis is among the most common causes of osteo-articular destruction. It should be looked for systematically in all patients with lytic arthropathies of unknown etiology.

  8. Treatment of Recurrent Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis with Reteplase: A Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadnia, Neda; Sharif Kashani, Babak; Kiani, Arda; Abedini, Atefe; Seyedi, Seyed Reza; Zargham Ahmadi, Hossein; Naghash Zadeh, Farah; Fakharian, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a life threatening complications of prosthetic mitral valves and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Even in presence of systemic anticoagulation prosthetic valve thrombosis has an incidence of 0.5% to 8%. Recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis and the resulting thrombotic occlusion require re-establishment of blood flow across the valve. While surgical repair is considered the classic first line treatment option for prosthetic valve thrombosis, intravenous thrombolysis has emerged as an acceptable alternative for the first episode of prosthetic valve thrombosis. Due to the limitation of using streptokinase in recurrent thrombotic events, fibrin-specific tissue plasminogen activators have been successfully utilized to treat cases of recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis. In this case-series, we have reported four cases of recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis that were successfully treated with Reteplase at our hospital.

  9. Tratamiento farmacológico invasivo articular en la artrosis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Benítez Pareja; P. Benítez Pareja

    2016-01-01

    La degeneración de las articulaciones axiales y periféricas va unida al propio envejecimiento del ser humano. Es responsable del dolor e impotencia funcional, y su fisiopatología es compleja y no del todo conocida. El denominador común en la artrosis es la degeneración del cartílago articular, junto a otras alteraciones secundarias. Su abordaje y manejo del dolor supone todo un reto para las Unidades del Dolor. Históricamente, el tratamiento intervencionista se llevó a cabo mediante infiltrac...

  10. [Dosage of ionized calcium in osteo-articular pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, J; Schiano, A

    1978-06-01

    The dosage of calcium ionized serum using a selective electrode, was performed in a series of controls and patients with osteo-articular diseases. Normal values were 43 mg/l between 20 and 50 years of age, and 41 mg/l after 60 years. The level of ionized calcium, when given as a percentage of total blood calcium, did not decrease with age (normal value : 44%). It was increased in hyper-parathyroidism, rhumatoid polyarthritis and lytic bone metastasis. It did not vary in Paget's disease, osteoporosis, osteomalacia, condensing metastasis, Kahler's disease and spasmophilia. The ionized calcium in definitely diminished in hypoparathyroidism.

  11. [The stage of articular destruction in the rheumatoid hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Caffinière, J Y; Mazas, F; Achach, P C

    1975-01-01

    Function incapacitation of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis was studied on 33 patients (54 hands). 35 were operated on. All cases had reached the stage of articular destructions. The authors emphasize the importance of preserved proximal inter-phalangeal joint for digito-palmar pinch. Thumb unstability was not severely disabling as long as the other digits were normal. However, when it was associated with hyperextension deformities of the other fingers, the hand became useless. Surgical indications in rheumatoid hand were detailed. The importance of restoring thumb function was pointed out.

  12. Conditional knockdown of hyaluronidase 2 in articular cartilage stimulates osteoarthritic progression in a mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoshitoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kozawa, Eiji; Zhuo, Lisheng; Arai, Eisuke; Hamada, Shunsuke; Morita, Daigo; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Kimata, Koji; Ushida, Takahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The catabolism of hyaluronan in articular cartilage remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of hyaluronidase 2 (Hyal2) knockdown in articular cartilage on the development of osteoarthritis (OA) using genetic manipulated mice. Destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) model of Col2a promoter specific conditional Hyal2 knockout (Hyal -/- ) mice was established and examined. Age related and DMM induced alterations of articular cartilage of knee joint were evaluated with modified Mankin score and immunohistochemical staining of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, KIAA11199, and biotinylated- hyaluronan binding protein staining in addition to histomorphometrical analyses. Effects of Hyal2 suppression were also analyzed using explant culture of an IL-1α induced articular cartilage degradation model. The amount and size of hyaluronan in articular cartilage were higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Hyal2 -/- mice exhibited aggravated cartilage degradation in age-related and DMM induced mice. MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive chondrocytes were significantly higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Articular cartilage was more degraded in explant cultures obtained from Hyal2 -/- mice. Knockdown of Hyal2 in articular cartilage induced OA development and progression possibly mediated by an imbalance of HA metabolism. This suggests that Hyal2 knockdown exhibits mucopolysaccharidosis-like OA change in articular cartilage similar to Hyal1 knockdown.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes septic arthritis following intra-articular yttrium-90 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A P; Prouse, P J; Gumpel, J M

    1984-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a rare cause of septic arthritis, which usually occurs in a host compromised by systemic illness. Intra-articular irradiation with yttrium-90 is generally free of complication. We report a case of intra-articular sepsis of the knee joint by Listeria monocytogenes acquired under unusual circumstances. PMID:6742916

  14. Osteoprotegerin deficiency leads to deformation of the articular cartilage in femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ge, Jianping; Chen, Danying; Weng, Yuteng; Du, Haiming; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) was a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of TNF receptor superfamily that was expressed in the chondrocytes of articular cartilage and adjacent locations in the physiological setting, was involved in maintaining integrity of articular cartilage. OPG could prevent subchondral bone from resorption, and also protect cartilage from degradation. In this study, we used Osteoprotegerin-knockout mice (Opg-KO mice) to find out the role of OPG in articular cartilage. We examined articular cartilage in the femoral head of Opg-KO mice began in early adulthood using modern molecular and imaging methods. We found cartilage changes starting from adulthood and progressively with age, reminiscent of pathological changes in OA. Deficiency of OPG caused thinned articular cartilage and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone in femoral head in comparison with wild-type mice (WT mice). Also, the articular cartilage of femoral head expressed significantly less of Aggrecan, Col-II and Col-X, but more Col-I and Matrix Metalloproteinases-13 (Mmp-13) than WT mice both at gene and protein level. Moreover, increased chondrocyte apoptosis and decreased chondrocyte proliferation were observed in femoral head of Opg-KO mice compared to WT mice. These data suggested that OPG played an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of articular cartilage of femoral head.

  15. Articular contact in a three-dimensional model of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Kuiper, J. H.; Huiskes, R.; Grootenboer, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    This study is aimed at the analysis of articular contact in a three-dimensional mathematical model of the human knee-joint. In particular the effect of articular contact on the passive motion characteristics is assessed in relation to experimentally obtained joint kinematics. Two basically different

  16. Indications for intra-articular steroid in osteoarthritis of the ankle and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of treatment with intra-articular steroid in an unselected group of patients with osteo-arthritis of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joint of the big toe are described. From the results of this trial it is possible to lay down indications for the use of intra-articular steroid in these conditions. In the ankle joint it is ...

  17. Effect of prosthetic restoration on implant survival and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelsberg, Peter; Lorenzo-Bermejo, Justo; Kappel, Stefanie

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of prosthetic restoration on the survival of implants and on the incidence of implant-related complications. From a prospectively documented clinical study, 1569 implants placed in 630 patients (mean age 59.56 years) were evaluated. Selection criteria were a conventional loading protocol, prosthetic restoration with at least one follow-up, and a minimum observation period of 9 months. Implants that failed before prosthetic restoration were excluded. The sample included 1345 tissue-level implants and 104 bone-level implants (Straumann), and 120 Replace implants (Nobel Biocare). The observation period ranged between 9 months and 11 years after prosthetic restoration (mean 4.0 years; SD 2.5). The implants were restored with single crowns (n = 557), fixed dental prostheses (n = 594), or removable dental prostheses (RDP) (n = 418). In the RDP group, 356 implants were restored with telescoping crowns, 22 with bar units 24 with bar joints, and 16 with locator attachments. The incidence of implant-related complications and failures was analyzed by use of Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Cox regression analysis was used to identify possible risk factors. Twenty-seven failures (1.8%; loosened or removed implants) were observed after prosthetic restoration; the incidence of failure was 3% for implants placed in males and 1% for implants placed in females. Other factors had no effect on the incidence of failure. Peri-implantitis (n = 29) and marginal bone loss >2 mm without acute inflammation (n = 6) also resulted in a 4% incidence of severe implant-related complications (62 of 1569; success 96%). Cox regression analysis revealed combined tooth-implant-supported restorations as a significant risk-reducing factor for severe implant-related complications (hazard ratio, HR = 0.34; P = 0.04). There was, furthermore, a tendency toward a greater incidence of complications for implants restored with RDPs than for

  18. Initial Clinical Evaluation of the Modular Prosthetic Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana N. Perry

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL was examined for its feasibility and usability as an advanced, dexterous upper extremity prosthesis with surface electromyography (sEMG control in with two individuals with below-elbow amputations. Compared to currently marketed prostheses, the MPL has a greater number of sequential and simultaneous degrees of motion, as well as wrist modularity, haptic feedback, and individual digit control. The MPL was successfully fit to a 33-year-old with a trans-radial amputation (TR01 and a 30-year-old with a wrist disarticulation amputation (TR02. To preserve anatomical limb length, we adjusted the powered degrees of freedom of wrist motion between users. Motor training began with practicing sEMG and pattern recognition control within the virtual integration environment (VIE. Prosthetic training sessions then allowed participants to complete a variety of activities of daily living with the MPL. Training and Motion Control Accuracy scores quantified their ability to consistently train and execute unique muscle-to-motion contraction patterns. Each user also completed one prosthetic functional metric—the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP for TR01 and the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT for TR02. Haptic feedback capabilities were integrated for TR01. TR01 achieved 95% accuracy at 84% of his VIE sessions. He demonstrated improved scores over a year of prosthetic training sessions, ultimately achieving simultaneous control of 13 of the 17 (76% attempted motions. His performance on the SHAP improved from baseline to final assessment with an increase in number of tasks achieved. TR01 also used vibrotactile sensors to successfully discriminate between hard and soft objects being grasped by the MPL hand. TR02 demonstrated 95% accuracy at 79% of his VIE sessions. He demonstrated improved scores over months of prosthetic training sessions, however there was a significant drop in scores initially following a mid

  19. Surgery for extra-articular trismus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, M A; Dijkstra, P U; Reintsema, H; Roodenburg, J L N; Werker, P M N

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify operations that are used to improve mouth opening in patients with extra-articular trismus (caused by cancer and its treatment, oral submucous fibrosis, or noma) and to find out if they work. We searched the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane collaboration, and then systematically selected papers before we assessed their quality, extracted the data, and did a meta-analysis. We analysed 32 studies that included 651 patients, the median (IQR) size of which was 11 (7-26). The quality of the methods used and of reporting were relatively low. Median (IQR) duration of follow-up was 12 (8-22) months. Operations resulted in a weighted mean (SD) increase in mouth opening of 19.3 (6.3) mm. None of the operations was better than the others for the improvement of mouth opening. We conclude that operations can improve mouth opening in extra-articular trismus, but the evidence is of moderate quality and there is a need for further research. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Articular Eminence Inclination in Medieval and Contemporary Croatian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjčić, Josip; Šlaus, Mario; Vodanović, Marin; Peršić, Sanja; Vojvodić, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Articular eminence inclination (AEI) of the temporomandibular joint leads the mandible in its movements. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine AEI values in medieval (MP) and recent (RP) Croatian population. The study was carried out on two groups of specimens: first group with 30 MP human dry skulls, while the other, serving as control group consisted of 137 dry skulls. The AEI was measured on lateral digital skull images as the angle between the best fi t line drawn along the posterior wall of the articular eminence and the Frankfurt horizontal plane. No statistically significant (p>0.05) differences between the left and right side AEI were found between MP skulls and RP skulls. The mean value of MP AEI was 45.5˚, with a range of 20.9˚-64˚. The mean RP AEI value was steeper (61.99˚), with a range of 30˚-94˚. Difference between the mean MP and RP AEI values was statistically significant (pmedieval time, and consequently different masticatory loads and forces.

  1. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction and Concomitant Articular Injury Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Tahami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage injuries are a common clinical problem at the time of ACL reconstruction with an incidence rate of 16-46%. Good results of ACL reconstruction combined with the treatment of chondral lesions have been published in some studies. Method: After statistical analysis 30 patients were selected and divided in 2 groups. TheFfirst group consisted of 15 patients wite isolated ACL tear without any other concomitant injuries and the second group consisted of 15 patients with ACL tear and concomitant high grade (grade 3 or 4 of outerbridge classification contained articular cartilage injuries during arthroscopy. Group 1 underwent ACL reconstruction and group 2 underwent ACL reconstruction combined with chondroplasty via the drilling and microfracture technique. For each patient the Lysholm knee score questionnaire was completed before surgery, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: The mean Lysholm knee score in both groups improves: 9.6 points after 6 months and 16.06 points after 1 year in group 1 and 23.26 points after 6 months and 30.66 after 1 year in group 2, whict was statistically significant (Pvalue

  2. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net 35 SO 4 -labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage

  3. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  4. Osteo-articular diseases as comorbidity in non-orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetić, Cedomir; Dulić, Borislav; Milaković, Branko; Simić, Dusica; Djurasić, Ljubomir; Vukasinović, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Osteo-articular diseases have significant presence among general population. Osteo-articular disorders can be caused by disease or by trauma. There are many osteo-articular diseases which have influence on general state of the organysm and on other present diseases in a various level. The influence appears by increasing risk of main disease complications, limited movement complicates postoperative treatment of main disease and medicament therapy of osteo-articular disease sometimes modifies perioperative therapy of main disease. Trauma as comorbidity needs urgent care and, in the same time, it is a huge complication for the injured condition. Osteoarticular trauma healing usually lasts several weeks, so it prolongs the healing of intercurrent surgical disease. Osteo-articular changes as comorbidity during the acute surgical disease healing need proper preoperative preparing, With the aim to minimise perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  5. Detailed Analysis of the Articular Domain in Patients with Primary Sjögren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerman, Rada V; Arends, Suzanne; Meiners, Petra M; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K L; Kroese, Frans G M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bootsma, Hendrika

    2017-03-01

    We used the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and the European League Against Rheumatism Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI) articular domain to assess the effect of rituximab (RTX) and abatacept (ABA) on articular involvement in primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). Patients with pSS treated with RTX (n = 18) or ABA (n = 13) and having a DAS28 erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)/C-reactive protein (CRP) level ≥ 3.2 at baseline were selected. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the DAS28 and ESSDAI articular domain over time. In the RTX group, DAS28-ESR/CRP decreased significantly up to 48 weeks. In the ABA group, DAS28-ESR/CRP decreased significantly up to 24 weeks. DAS28 correlated significantly with ESSDAI articular domain. DAS28 is useful to evaluate the effect of biologicals on articular involvement in patients with pSS.

  6. Secondary knee instability caused by fracture of the stabilizing insert in a dual-articular total knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Morten P; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard; Husted, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A case of a fractured polyethylene stabilizing insert causing secondary knee instability in a Dual-articular total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is presented. A 65-year-old woman who underwent surgery with a Dual-articular TKA 4 years earlier had a well-functioning prosthesis until a fall, after which......-articular knee....

  7. Comparison of efficacy of intra-articular morphine and steroid in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbülent Gökhan Beyaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary therapeutic aim in treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee is to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular triamcinolone with intra-articular morphine in pain relief due to osteoarthritis of the knee in the elderly population. Materials and Methods: Patients between 50 and 80 years of age were randomized into three groups. Group M received morphine plus bupivacaine intra-articularly, Group T received triamcinolone plus bupivacaine intra-articularly, and Group C received saline plus bupivacaine intra-articularly. Patients were evaluated before injection and in 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 12th weeks after injection. First-line supplementary analgesic was oral paracetamol 1500 mg/day. If analgesia was insufficient with paracetamol, oral dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg/day was recommended to patients. Results: After the intra-articular injection, there was statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale (VAS scores in Groups M and T, when compared to Group C. The decrease of VAS scores seen at the first 2 weeks continued steadily up to the end of 12th week. There was a significant decrease in Groups M and T in the WOMAC scores, when compared to Group C. There was no significant difference in the WOMAC scores between morphine and steroid groups. Significantly less supplementary analgesics was used in the morphine and steroid groups. Conclusion: Intra-articular morphine was as effective as intra-articular triamcinolone for analgesia in patients with osteoarthritis knee. Intra-articular morphine is possibly a better option than intra-articular steroid as it has lesser side effects.

  8. Classification of prosthetics used in hernia repair based on weight and biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, A; Lamberti, R; Martorana, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to classify the polymeric prosthetics used for hernia repair based on biomaterial composition and weight in an effort to clarify to surgeons what kinds of material they are dealing with and to provide a standardized system of categorization. An intensive research effort was carried out on prosthetics that are commercially available worldwide. We conducted a search of the medical literature and companies' websites to find the weights and thicknesses of commercially available prosthetics. Where these data were lacking, we contacted manufacturers directly in order to render the research more complete. A total of 166 products were considered for classification based on biomaterial properties. Among these, a homogeneous group of 80 polypropylene monofilament knitted or woven prosthetics was selected for classification based on weight. Weights were provided for 70 prosthetics (87%), and both the weight and thickness was provided for 40 prosthetics (50%). Classification based on weight: Ultra-light prosthetics made of one pure biomaterial); composite (prosthetics made of two or more different layers); combined (prosthetics made of two materials knitted or woven together); and biologic. Weight and biomaterial classifications were proposed after an extensive analysis of commercially available prosthetics. The need for a common terminology is important to avoid misunderstandings among clinicians and technicians.

  9. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  10. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Partially Edentulous Elders – A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICOS, ALINA MONICA; DONCA, VALER; PICOS, ANDREI

    2014-01-01

    Complex treatment involving removable articulated to fixed prostheses is indicated in extended edentulous areas, which represent clinical conditions more frequently encountered in elderly patients. A number of aspects must be considered in elderly patients before starting the therapy: physical and mental condition, self-care capacity, time and cost of treatment, predictability. In institutionalized elders, suffering of systemic diseases, the therapy of choice should be the least invasive and able to restore function at an acceptable level. Active healthy elders can be beneficiaries of complex prosthetic treatments involving many long sessions and difficult treatments. We present a case of a 74 year-old male with extended maxillary edentulous areas, in whom a complex prosthetic treatment was performed. PMID:26528025

  11. Can we close large prosthetic space with orthodontics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesko, Mauro Elias; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Valentini, Fernanda; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    For years, the treatment for the replacement of a missing tooth was a fixed dental prosthesis. Currently, implants are indicated to replace missing teeth due to high clinical success and with the advantage of not performing preparations in the adjacent tooth. Another option for space closure is the use of orthodontics associated to miniscrews for anchorage allowing better control of the orthodontic biomechanics and especially making possible closure of larger prosthetic spaces. Thus, this article describes two cases with indications and discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of using orthodontics for prosthetic spaces closure. The cases herein presented show that it is possible to close an space when there are available teeth in the adjacent area. It can be concluded that when a malocclusion is present there will be a strong trend to indicate space closure by orthodontic movement as it preserves natural teeth and seems a more physiological approach.

  12. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH in the first trimester (6–12 weeks or at any point throughout the pregnancy. However, LMWH, while widely-prescribed, requires close monitoring of the blood anti-factor Xa levels. Unfortunately, facilities for such monitoring are not universally available, such as within hospitals in developing countries. This review evaluates the leading international guidelines concerning anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic valves as well as proposing a simplified guideline which may be more relevant to hospitals in this region.

  13. Single implant restorations: prosthetically induced soft tissue topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichacho, N; Landsberg, C J

    1997-09-01

    An aesthetic transition from the smaller diameter of the implant to the prosthetic restoration that resembles the size of the natural tooth has presented an ongoing challenge to the implant restorative dentists. The appearance of the surrounding soft tissue is of major importance, and various techniques have been developed to guide and optimize its topography. The learning objective of this article is to present a cervical contouring concept, whereby the soft tissue topography is optimally determined already in the laboratory phase. Using a custom abutment and provisional crown as components of the transmucosal prosthetic unit (TPU), the topography is transferred to the vital intraoral tissues, which predictably adapt to the enhanced aesthetic configuration. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate the sequence of the technique in treating the anterior region of the maxilla.

  14. EEG Mind Controlled Smart Prosthetic Arm – A Comprehensive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Beyrouthy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the field of prosthetics has seen many accomplishments especially with the integration of technological advancements. In this paper, different arm types (robotic, surgical, bionic, prosthetic and static are analyzed in terms of resistance, usage, flexibility, cost and potential. Most of these techniques have some problems; they are extremely expensive, hard to install and maintain and may require surgery. Therefore, our work introduces the initial design of an EEG mind controlled smart prosthetic arm. The arm is controlled by the brain commands, obtained from an electroencephalography (EEG headset, and equipped with a network of smart sensors and actuators that give the patient intelligent feedback about the surrounding environment and the object in contact. This network provides the arm with normal hand functionality, smart reflexes and smooth movements. Various types of sensors are used including temperature, pressure, ultrasonic proximity sensors, accelerometers, potentiometers, strain gauges and gyroscopes. The arm is completely 3D printed built from various lightweight and high strength materials that can handle high impacts and fragile elements as well. Our project requires the use of nine servomotors installed at different places in the arm. Therefore, the static and dynamic modes of servomotors are analyzed. The total cost of the project is estimated to be relatively cheap compared to other previously built arms. Many scenarios are analyzed corresponding to the actions that the prosthetic arm can perform, and an algorithm is created to match these scenarios. Experimental results show that the proposed EEG Mind-controlled Arm is a promising alternative for current solutions that require invasive and expensive surgical procedures.

  15. Effect of comprehensive prosthetic rehabilitation program for Intelligent Prosthesis users

    OpenAIRE

    Nagakura, Y.; Chin, T.; Furukawa, H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research was to divide Intelligent Prosthesis users into one group which only received conventional training in prosthetic walking (referred to below as the conventional training group) and another group which received the comprehensive training devised by our center to test the functions of Intelligent Prostheses (referred to below as the comprehensive training group), in order to compare walking ability, with reference to energy consumption, in the two groups. The comprehens...

  16. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1990-01-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection

  17. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V. (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection.

  18. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Prosthetic rehabilitation for a patient with microstomia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslehifard E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nFabrication of dental prosthesis for patients with microstomia has long been a problem for dentists. Microstomia is defined as an abnormally small oral orifice. Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all stages, from the preliminary impressions to fabrication of prosthesis. This study described a method for making impressions for patients with limited opening of the oral cavity which the use of a full-size impression tray was not possible.

  20. Responsiveness of outcome measures for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    There is limited research on responsiveness of prosthetic rehabilitation outcome measures. To examine responsiveness of the Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function tests, Upper Extremity Functional Scale, University of New Brunswick skill and spontaneity tests, Activity Measure for Upper Limb Amputation, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. This was a quasi-experimental study with repeated measurements in a convenience sample of upper limb amputees. Measures were collected before, during, and after training with the DEKA Arm. Largest effect sizes were observed for Patient-Specific Functional Scale (effect size: 1.59, confidence interval: 1.00, 2.14), Activity Measure for Upper Limb Amputation (effect size: 1.33, confidence interval: 0.73, 1.90), and University of New Brunswick skill test (effect size: 1.18, confidence interval: 0.61, 1.73). Other measures that were responsive to change were Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function light and heavy can tests, and University of New Brunswick spontaneity test. Responsiveness and pattern of responsiveness varied by prosthetic level. The Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function light and heavy can tests, University of New Brunswick skill and spontaneity tests, Activities Measure for Upper Limb Amputation, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale were responsive to change during prosthetic training. These findings have implications for choice of measures for research and practice and inform clinicians about the amount of training necessary to maximize outcomes with the DEKA Arm. Findings on responsiveness of outcome measures have implications for the choice of measures for clinical trials and practice. Findings regarding the responsiveness to change over the course of training can inform clinicians about the amount of training that may be necessary to maximize specific outcomes with the DEKA Arm. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  1. Improved design and development of a functional moulded prosthetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Gnanasundaram, Saraswathy; Ranganathan, Mohan; Ranganathan, Rajaraman; Gopalakrishna, Gautham; Das, Bhabendra Nath; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2016-01-01

    In the Indian scenario, the Jaipur foot is a low-cost breakthrough that enabled the disabled person to adapt to the Indian environment. The aim of this study is to modify the present foot in terms of ankle support design and method of fabrication, foot moulds profile and the inner core material in order to improve the performance and durability. The optimized design of ankle support and flat foot profile moulds suitable for both left and right foot were developed through CAD/CAM and prosthetic feet were fabricated using ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam as an appropriate alternative core material for microcellular rubber (MCR). The developed prosthetic feet were tested for rigidity by load-deflection analysis in universal testing machine. EVA foot had shown better rigidity than conventional MCR foot, which will help in weight transfer during walking and increase the durability. The CAD modeled ankle support and single block EVA had made the manufacturing process easy and reduced the weight of foot and improved Gait to the person fitted with it due to improved flat foot profile. The new artificial foot had proven to be efficacious technically as well as functionally, which is clearly borne out from the extremely positive feedback given by the amputees. Implications of Rehabilitation Persons with below knee amputation are usually provided with transtibial prosthesis, which allows for easier ambulation and helps them to get back to their normal life. Transtibial prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces a lower limb that is amputated below the knee. In our study, a new prosthetic foot with a modified ankle support and flat foot profile using better inner-core material than the conventional Jaipur foot was developed and the process was also optimized for mass production. The developed prosthetic foot can be fitted with both above and below knee exoskeleton type of prosthesis.

  2. Prosthetic heart valve evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hasenkam, J. Michael; Ringgaard, Steffen; Houlind, Kim; Botnar, René M.; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Boesiger, Peter; Pedersen, Erik Morre

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of velocity fields downstream of prosthetic aortic valves. Furthermore, to provide comparative data from bileaflet aortic valve prostheses in vitro and in patients. Methods: A pulsatile flow loop was set up in a 7.0 Tesla MRI scanner to study fluid velocity data downstream of a 25 mm aortic bileaflet heart valve prosthesis. Three dimensional surface plots of velocity fields were displayed. In six NYHA clas...

  3. Intra-articular injection of tenoxicam in rats: assessment of the local effects on the articular cartilage and synovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyuvaci, H; Bilgic, B; Ozyuvaci, E; Altan, A; Altug, T; Karaca, C

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the possible local adverse effects of intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in the rat knee joint. A total of 50 rats were given 0.25 ml of a standard preparation of tenoxicam by injection into the right knee joint and 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline solution by injection into the left knee joint as a control. Groups of 10 rats were killed 24 h, 48 h, 7 days, 14 days and 21 days after tenoxicam administration. Two rats were sham operated; one was killed on the first day and the other on the second day after this procedure. All the joints were prepared and sectioned for histological examination. Tissue loss and oedema were observed in the specimens obtained 24 h and 48 h after treatment with tenoxicam. No pathological changes were observed in the 7-day, 14-day and 21-day specimens, or in the control joints. Caution should be exercised when using intra-articular tenoxicam for post-operative analgesia.

  4. A smartphone photogrammetry method for digitizing prosthetic socket interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Amaia; Lemaire, Edward

    2017-04-01

    Prosthetic CAD/CAM systems require accurate 3D limb models; however, difficulties arise when working from the person's socket since current 3D scanners have difficulties scanning socket interiors. While dedicated scanners exist, they are expensive and the cost may be prohibitive for a limited number of scans per year. A low-cost and accessible photogrammetry method for socket interior digitization is proposed, using a smartphone camera and cloud-based photogrammetry services. 15 two-dimensional images of the socket's interior are captured using a smartphone camera. A 3D model is generated using cloud-based software. Linear measurements were comparing between sockets and the related 3D models. 3D reconstruction accuracy averaged 2.6 ± 2.0 mm and 0.086 ± 0.078 L, which was less accurate than models obtained by high quality 3D scanners. However, this method would provide a viable 3D digital socket reproduction that is accessible and low-cost, after processing in prosthetic CAD software. Clinical relevance The described method provides a low-cost and accessible means to digitize a socket interior for use in prosthetic CAD/CAM systems, employing a smartphone camera and cloud-based photogrammetry software.

  5. Orientation and mobility assessment in retinal prosthetic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geruschat, Duane R; Bittner, Ava K; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an orientation and mobility (O&M) assessment protocol to implement in subjects who have been implanted with an artificial silicon retina (ASR), and to use this experience to propose a research agenda for O&M with prosthetic vision. A controlled and naturalistic assessment was developed that included walking a prescribed obstacle course and travel to and from a hospital cafeteria. Subjects were tested before and 3 and 6 months after being implanted with the ASR. Outcome measures were walking speed and number of contacts with obstacles. The experiences from this study led to a proposed research agenda in O&M. Eight subjects with retinitis pigmentosa participated in this study. The vision status of the subjects ranged from mobility after implantation. Three subjects self-reported enhancements of travel after implantation, but this enhancement was not observed. This study demonstrates that mobility might not be improved with prosthetic vision. The proposed research agenda emphasizes the importance of developing individualized assessments, identifying specific items of orientation rather than mobility for measuring the effect of prosthetic vision, and to develop and evaluate instructional programs that may be needed to obtain the full benefit of the technology.

  6. Development of Standardized Material Testing Protocols for Prosthetic Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, John C; Reinhall, Per G; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2017-04-01

    A set of protocols was created to characterize prosthetic liners across six clinically relevant material properties. Properties included compressive elasticity, shear elasticity, tensile elasticity, volumetric elasticity, coefficient of friction (CoF), and thermal conductivity. Eighteen prosthetic liners representing the diverse range of commercial products were evaluated to create test procedures that maximized repeatability, minimized error, and provided clinically meaningful results. Shear and tensile elasticity test designs were augmented with finite element analysis (FEA) to optimize specimen geometries. Results showed that because of the wide range of available liner products, the compressive elasticity and tensile elasticity tests required two test maxima; samples were tested until they met either a strain-based or a stress-based maximum, whichever was reached first. The shear and tensile elasticity tests required that no cyclic conditioning be conducted because of limited endurance of the mounting adhesive with some liner materials. The coefficient of friction test was based on dynamic coefficient of friction, as it proved to be a more reliable measurement than static coefficient of friction. The volumetric elasticity test required that air be released beneath samples in the test chamber before testing. The thermal conductivity test best reflected the clinical environment when thermal grease was omitted and when liner samples were placed under pressure consistent with load bearing conditions. The developed procedures provide a standardized approach for evaluating liner products in the prosthetics industry. Test results can be used to improve clinical selection of liners for individual patients and guide development of new liner products.

  7. Ergonomic workplace assessment in orthotic and prosthetic workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani Nodooshan, H; Koohi Booshehri, S; Daneshmandi, H; Choobineh, A R

    2016-10-17

    In Iranian orthotic and prosthetic workshops, the majority of activities are carried out by manpower and the tasks are labor-intensive. In these workshops, ergonomic aspects of working conditions are seldom considered. This study was conducted in orthotic and prosthetic workshops with the objectives of determination of prevalence rate of MSDs among employees and assessment of ergonomics working conditions. In this cross-sectional study, all employees (n = 42; 29 males and 13 females) in 11 active orthotic and prosthetic production centers of Shiraz city participated. Data were collected using Nordic Musculoskeletal disorders Questionnaire (NMQ) and observational technique by an ergonomics checklist for assessment of working conditions. The means (SD) of age and job tenure (years) in the study individuals were 37.26 (10.21) and 12.8 (9.39), respectively. The most prevalent MSD symptoms in the past 12 months were reported in the lower back (42.9%), shoulders (40.5%) and knees (40.5%). Working conditions assessment showed that the main ergonomic problems in the workshops studied originated from awkward working posture, improper workstation design, poorly designed hand tools and incorrect manual material handling. Any interventional program for working conditions improvement should, therefore, focus on these areas.

  8. Prosthetic design directives: Low-cost hands within reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G K; Rosendo, A; Stopforth, R

    2017-07-01

    Although three million people around the world suffer from the lack of one or both upper limbs 80% of this number is located within developing countries. While prosthetic prices soar with technology 3D printing and low cost electronics present a sensible solution for those that cannot afford expensive prosthetics. The electronic and control design of a low-cost prosthetic hand, the Touch Hand II, is discussed. This paper shows that sensorless techniques can be used to reduce design complexities, costs, and provide easier access to the electronics. A closing and opening finite state machine (COFSM) was developed to handle the actuated digit joint control state and a supervisory switching control scheme, used for speed and grip strength control. Three torque and speed settings were created to be preset for specific grasps. The hand was able to replicate ten frequently used grasps and grip some common objects. Future work is necessary to enable a user to control it with myoelectric signals (MESs) and to solve operational problems related to electromagnetic interference (EMI).

  9. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Clare [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lecuona, Karin [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, NCTeam

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  10. In vitro adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.R.; Stromberg, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    Adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting material is thought to play an important role in the ultimate development of prosthetic infections. To evaluate the role of bacterial adherence in the initiation and colonization of prosthetic materials, Proplast II, Gore-Tex, and silicone were evaluated for adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacteria were radiolabeled and incubated with the study material. Adherence was determined by scintillation. Adherence to Proplast II and Gore-Tex reached a maximum at approximately 45 minutes of incubation and demonstrated a detachment phenomenon with E. coli. Similar results were noted with S. aureus, but with a maximal attachment at approximately 30 minutes. Interestingly, bacterial attachment to silicone continued to increase throughout the time of the incubation. In addition, adherence of S. aureus was at a faster rate than E. coli. Attachment of bacteria is a multifactorial process. However, the PTFE graft demonstrates a slower rate of attachment, lower total number of attached bacteria, and faster detachment. The importance of this phenomenon may help explain the foreign body effect of increased susceptibility to infection of foreign materials

  11. Prosthetic graft infection: limitations of indium white blood cell scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, M.C.; Mitchell, R.S.; Baldwin, J.C.; James, D.R.; Olcott, C. IV; Mehigan, J.T.; McDougall, I.R.; Miller, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The lack of a rapid, noninvasive, and accurate method to confirm or rule out prosthetic graft infection continues to constitute a compelling and vexing clinical problem. A host of adjunctive diagnostic techniques has been used in the past, but early promising results subsequently have usually not yielded acceptable sensitivity (reflecting false negatives) and specificity (reflecting false positive) data. White blood cell (WBC) indium 111 scanning has recently been added to this list. The utility and accuracy of 111 In WBC scans were assessed by retrospective review of WBC scan results in 70 patients undergoing evaluation for possible prosthetic graft infection over a 7-year period. Operative and autopsy data (mean follow-up, 18 months for survivors with negative scans) were used to confirm the 22 positive, 45 negative, and three equivocal WBC scans. The false positive rate (+/- 70% confidence limits) was 36% +/- 6% (n = 8) among the 22 patients with positive scans (44% +/- 6% [11 of 25] if the three equivocal scans are included as false positive), yielding a specificity of 85% +/- 5% and an overall accuracy rate of 88% +/- 4% (80% +/- 5% and 84% +/- 5%, respectively, if the three equivocal cases are considered as false positive). All three patients with equivocal scans ultimately were judged not to have prosthetic graft infection. As implied by the high accuracy rate, the sensitivity of the test was absolute (100% [14 of 14]); there were no false negative results

  12. Novel implant for peri-prosthetic proximal tibia fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ton; Chen, Bernard K; Wu, Xinhua; Pun, Chung Lun

    2018-02-02

    Repair of peri-prosthetic proximal tibia fractures is very challenging in patients with a total knee replacement or arthroplasty. The tibial component of the knee implant severely restricts the fixation points of the tibial implant to repair peri-prosthetic fractures. A novel implant has been designed with an extended flange over the anterior of tibial condyle to provide additional points of fixation, overcoming limitations of existing generic locking plates used for proximal tibia fractures. Furthermore, the screws fixed through the extended flange provide additional support to prevent the problem of subsidence of tibial component of knee implant. The design methodology involved extraction of bone data from CT scans into a flexible CAD format, implant design and structural evaluation and optimisation using FEM as well as prototype development and manufacture by selective laser melting 3D printing technology with Ti6Al4 V powder. A prototype tibia implant was developed based on a patient-specific bone structure, which was regenerated from the CT images of patient's tibia. The design is described in detail and being applied to fit up to 80% of patients, for both left and right sides based on the average dimensions and shape of the bone structure from a wide range of CT images. A novel tibial implant has been developed to repair peri-prosthetic proximal tibia fractures which overcomes significant constraints from the tibial component of existing knee implant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressure characteristics at the stump/socket interface in transtibial amputees using an adaptive prosthetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian I; Alimusaj, Merkur; Fradet, Laetitia; Siegel, Johannes; Braatz, Frank

    2009-12-01

    The technological advances that have been made in developing highly functional prostheses are promising for very active patients but we do not yet know whether they cause an increase in biomechanical load along with possibly negative consequences for pressure conditions in the socket. Therefore, this study monitored the socket pressure at specific locations of the stump when using a microprocessor-controlled adaptive prosthetic ankle under different walking conditions. Twelve unilateral transtibial amputees between 43 and 59 years of age were provided with the Proprio-Foot (Ossur) and underwent an instrumented 3D gait analysis in level, stair, and incline walking, including synchronous data capturing of socket pressure. Peak pressures and pressure time integrals (PTI) at three different locations were compared for five walking conditions with and without using the device's ankle adaptation mode. Highest peak pressures of 2.4 k Pa/kg were found for incline ascent at the calf muscle as compared to 2.1 k Pa/kg in level walking with large inter-individual variance. In stair ascent a strong correlation was found between maximum knee moment and socket pressure. The most significant pressure changes relative to level walking were seen in ramp descent anteriorly towards the stump end, with PTI values being almost twice as high as those in level walking. Adapting the angle of the prosthesis on stairs and ramps modified the pressure data such that they were closer to those in level walking. Pressure at the stump depends on the knee moments involved in each walking condition. Adapting the prosthetic ankle angle is a valuable means of modifying joint kinetics and thereby the pressure distribution at the stump. However, large inter-individual differences in local pressures underline the importance of individual socket fitting.

  14. Clinical evaluation of a new, above-elbow, body-powered prosthetic arm: a final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupo, M E; Sheredos, S J

    1998-10-01

    The AdVAntage Arm is an above-elbow (AE) body-powered arm designed to improve upon, and overcome, some of the major limitations of conventional prostheses. It is the result of research and development (R&D) accomplished at the Center for Engineering Design (CED), University of Utah and Sarcos Research Corporation (SRC), Salt Lake City, UT. The AdVAntage Arm was developed to provide the following main features: lightweight, independent elbow and terminal device (TD) control, and a cable recovery system for full TD actuation at any elbow position. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Rehab R&D Service's Technology Transfer Section (TTS), with collaboration from the VA National Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service (PSAS), managed a multi-center clinical evaluation of the precommercial AdVAntage Arm (the Arm). The purpose was to objectively assess and affirm the Arm's functional advantages, reliability, clinical application, and commercial readiness. Eleven VA prosthetic services served as evaluation sites with a total of 16 subjects with amputation (14 unilateral and 2 bilateral). Fifteen prosthetists provided their comments. Overall, the results demonstrated that the Arm could be fit for use by persons with transhumeral, and even with forequarter, amputation. Once the learning curve was overcome, the majority of subjects reported that the Arm offered several functional advantages over their conventional prosthesis. Its overall light weight, separation of elbow and TD function, and cable recovery system allowed opening and closure of the TD at any elbow position; resulting in a more fluid manner of use and allowing subjects to perform more activities from waist level and above (especially in the outstretched and overhead positions). At the conclusion of clinical trials, 10 subjects elected to keep the Arm for continued use. The manufacturer is committed to the commercial marketing and technical support of the arm. Based upon the clinical findings, the AdVAntage Arm

  15. An implantable telemetry device to measure intra-articular tibial forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Townsend, Christopher P; Arms, Steven W; Morris, Beverly A; Colwell, Clifford W

    2005-02-01

    Tibial forces are important because they determine polyethylene wear, stress distribution in the implant, and stress transfer to underlying bone. Theoretic estimates of tibiofemoral forces have varied between three and six times the body weight depending on the mathematical models used and the type of activity analyzed. An implantable telemetry system was therefore developed to directly measure tibiofemoral compressive forces. This system was tested in a cadaver knee in a dynamic knee rig. A total knee tibial arthroplasty prosthesis was instrumented with four force transducers located at the four corners of the tibial tray. These transducers measured the total compressive forces on the tibial tray and the location of the center of pressure. A microprocessor performed analog-to-digital signal conversion and performed pulse code modulation of a surface acoustic wave radio frequency oscillator. This signal was then transmitted through a single pin hermetic feed-through tantalum wire antenna located at the tip of the stem. The radio frequency signal was received by an external antenna connected to a receiver and to a computer for data acquisition. The prosthesis was powered by external coil induction. The tibial transducer accurately measured both the magnitude and the location of precisely applied external loads. Successful transmission of the radio frequency signal up to a range of 3m was achieved through cadaveric bone, bone cement, and soft tissue. Reasonable accuracy was obtained in measuring loads applied through a polyethylene insert. The implant was also able to detect unicondylar loading with liftoff.

  16. Role of Surgery in Management of Osteo-Articular Tuberculosis of the Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Agashe, Vikas; Patil, Sampat Dumbre

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the foot and ankle still remains to be a significant problem, especially in the developing countries, and with an increase in incidence in immunosuppressed patients. Treatment is mainly medical using multidrug chemotherapy; surgical interventions range from biopsy, synovectomy and debridement, to joint preserving procedures like distraction in early cases, and arthrodesis of hindfoot joints and the ankle in advanced disease with joint destruction. Surgical Options: All procedures should be done after initiating appropriate medical management. The ankle is the commonest joint needing intervention, followed by the subtalar and talo-navicular joint. Forefoot TB limited to the bone rarely needs surgical intervention except when the infective focus is threatening to invade a joint. Articular disease can spread rapidly, so early diagnosis and treatment can influence the outcome. Surgical interventions may need to be modified in the presence of sinuses and active disease; fusions need compression, and implants have to be chosen wisely. External fixators are the commonest devices used for compression in active disease, but intramedullary nails better stabilize pantalar arthrodesis. Arthroscopy has become a valuable tool for visualizing the ankle and hindfoot joints, and is an excellent adjunct for arthrodesis by minimally invasive methods. Although Osteoarticular Tb involving the foot and ankle is largely managed with chemotherapy, specific indications for surgical intervention exist. Timely done procedures could limit joint destruction, or prevent spread to adjacent joints. Fusions are the commonest procedure for sequelae of disease or for correcting residual deformity.

  17. [Pre-prosthetics: role of the physiotherapist in the treatment of the residual limb and prosthetic preparation of the person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffi, Alberto; Mulè, Chiara; Taveggia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The rehabilitation of amputees requires a multi-discipline approach. Within the work of the team, physiotherapy plays a central role both in terms of the technical skills made available to the patient, as well as in terms of the psychological-motivational support offered to the amputee during treatment. The pre-prosthetic phase of rehabilitation is the beginning of a complex rehabilitative process during which starts with an assessment of the general clinical condition of the patient and their residual capacities, so as to develop personalised rehabilitative strategies based upon the needs of the amputee. This whole process aims to get the amputee standing with a prosthetic as quickly as possible, thus allowing the social reintegration of the amputee.

  18. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  19. A Prosthetic Foot Emulator to Optimize Prescription of Prosthetic Feet in Veterans and Service Members with Leg Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    commercial prosthetic feet is the limited number and diversity of feet included in studies relative to those available on the market . Given that there are...the Department of Defense ( study sponsors) Other federal agencies including, but not limited to, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Office for...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The objective of this study is to evaluate a “test

  20. The response of the anophthalmic socket to prosthetic eye wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Keith Raymond; Sloan, Brian; Stewart, Joanna; Jacobs, Robert John

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of the anophthalmic socket to prosthetic eye wear. One hundred and two prosthetic eye wearers were recruited for this observational study. Photographic grading scales were used to measure the severity of conjunctival inflammation and the extent and intensity of stained deposits on the prosthetic eyes. Tear volume was measured with the phenol red thread test. For mucoid discharge, visual analogue scales were used to assess frequency of occurrence, colour, volume and viscosity. For the prostheses, assessments were made of weight, shape, wearing time and frequency of cleaning. Anophthalmic sockets had more severe conjunctival inflammation than their companion eyes (p = 0.0001). The difference in inflammation between the companion eye and the anophthalmic socket was associated with discharge volume (p = 0.01) and discharge viscosity (p = 0.007) with greater difference in inflammation being associated with higher levels of discharge volume and viscosity. A greater difference in inflammation was also associated with less surface deposition (p = 0.009). No evidence of associations was found between difference in conjunctival inflammation and the other variables. Recently developed grading scales for measuring inflammation in anophthalmic sockets and deposits on prosthetic eyes were used for the first time in this study. It is recommended that in clinical practice, inflammation grades for both socket and companion eye conjunctivae be compared, when determining if prosthesis-induced inflammation is present. The finding that more discharge was associated with more conjunctival inflammation is logical but the finding that less inflammation was associated with more deposits is counter-intuitive to those familiar with the contact lens literature. The apparently benign nature of at least some deposits on the prostheses raises questions about the maintenance of prosthetic eyes. We conclude that the simple presence

  1. Risks and Challenges of Surgery for Aortic Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubitzsch, Herko; Tarar, Waharat; Claus, Benjamin; Gabbieri, Davide; Falk, Volkmar; Christ, Torsten

    2018-03-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis is the most severe form of infective endocarditis. This study assessed the risks and challenges of surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. In total, 116 consecutive patients (98 males, age 65.2±12.7years), who underwent redo-surgery for active aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis between 2000 and 2014, were reviewed. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors for aortic root destructions as well as for morbidity and mortality. Median follow-up was 3.8 years (0-13.9 years). Aortic root destructions (42 limited and 29 multiple lesions) were associated with early prosthetic valve endocarditis and delayed diagnosis (≥14 d), but not with mortality. There were 16 (13.8%) early (≤30 d) and 32 (27.6%) late (>30 days) deaths. Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 72±4.3%, 56±5.4%, and 46±6.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of death, reinfection, and reoperation was 19.0% at 30days and 36.2% at 1year. Delayed diagnosis, concomitant procedures, and EuroSCORE II >20% were predictors for early mortality and need for mechanical circulatory support, age >70years, and critical preoperative state were predictors for late mortality. In their absence, survival at 10 years was 70±8.4%. Reinfections and reoperations occurred more frequently if ≥1 risk factor for endocarditis and aortic root destructions were present. At 10 years, freedom from reinfection and reoperation was 89±4.2% and 91±4.0%. The risks of death, reinfection, and reoperation are significant within the first year after surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Early diagnosis and aortic root destructions are the most important challenges, but advanced age, critical preoperative state, and the need for mechanical circulatory support determine long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B

  2. OCT-based profiler for automating ocular surface prosthetic fitting (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Maguluri, Gopi N.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Patel, Chirag; Agranat, Josh; Tomashevskaya, Olga; Bonte, Eugene; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The use of a Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Environment (PROSE) device is a revolutionary treatment for military patients that have lost their eyelids due to 3rd degree facial burns and for civilians who suffer from a host of corneal diseases. However, custom manual fitting is often a protracted painful, inexact process that requires multiple fitting sessions. Training for new practitioners is a long process. Automated methods to measure the complete corneal and scleral topology would provide a valuable tool for both clinicians and PROSE device manufacturers and would help streamline the fitting process. PSI has developed an ocular anterior-segment profiler based on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), which provides a 3D measure of the surface of the sclera and cornea. This device will provide topography data that will be used to expedite and improve the fabrication process for PROSE devices. OCT has been used to image portions of the cornea and sclera and to measure surface topology for smaller contact lenses [1-3]. However, current state-of-the-art anterior eye OCT systems can only scan about 16 mm of the eye's anterior surface, which is not sufficient for covering the sclera around the cornea. In addition, there is no systematic method for scanning and aligning/stitching the full scleral/corneal surface and commercial segmentation software is not optimized for the PROSE application. Although preliminary, our results demonstrate the capability of PSI's approach to generate accurate surface plots over relatively large areas of the eye, which is not currently possible with any other existing platform. Testing the technology on human volunteers is currently underway at Boston Foundation for Sight.

  3. Intra-Articular Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Injections Are Not Innocent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tonbul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a chronic disorder characterized by joint cartilage degeneration with concomitant changes in the synovium and subchondral bone metabolism. Many conservative treatment modalities, one of which is intra-articular injections, have been described for the treatment of this disorder. Traditionally, hyaluranic acid and corticosteroids are the agents that have been used for this purpose. Recently, polyacrylamide hydrogels are being used widely. Biocompatibility, nonbioabsorbability, and anti-infectious effect obtained by silver addition made polyacrylamide hydrogels more popular. In this paper, we present a case and the method of our management, in whom host tissue reaction (foreign body granuloma, edema, inflammation, and redness induration has been observed, as the first and unique adverse effect reported in the literature.

  4. Skin Necrosis from Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whan B; Alhusayen, Raed O

    2015-01-01

    Tissue necrosis is a rare yet potentially serious complication of intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) injections for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. To report a case of a patient with cutaneous necrosis after IA HA injection for treatment of knee osteoarthritis, presenting as a livedoid violaceous patch on the right knee. We report a case of cutaneous necrosis as a rare complication of IA HA injection for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. A literature review was undertaken of similar cases. Use of HA IA injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis can result in similar skin necrosis at uncommon anatomic locations corresponding to the site of HA injection. Although tissue necrosis is a rare complication, physicians need to be aware of this possibility as a complication of HA IA injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis and should be mindful of potential treatment options to manage this adverse event. © 2014 Canadian Dermatology Association.

  5. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Thibault; Naili, Salah; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation), and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.

  6. Osteo-articular tuberculosis: its presentation in coloured races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, M; Cremin, B J

    1978-11-01

    Four hundred and ninety-nine cases of osteo-articular tuberculosis have been analysed with special emphasis on the "unusual" presentation. Sclerotic bone reaction in association with active tuberculous osteitis is not at all uncommon and may occur in any affected bone. Maintenance of disc spaces with tuberculous spondylitis is not uncommon. Periosteal reactions, often very gross, occur commonly both in multicystic tuberculosis as well as in isolated lesions. Multiple bone involvement occurred in 8.2% of this series. Tomography delineates the total extent of involvement especially in central involvement of vertebral bodies. Healed tuberculosis may give rise to block vertebrae indistinguishable from the congenital type except for the absence of waisting at the level of fusion.

  7. [Methods of using component alloplasty in osteo-articular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellendir, E N; Salmagambetov, I U

    1990-10-01

    In accordance with the principle of component plasty the authors have developed methods of procurement of the alloplastic material and its use. The following plastic materials are procured and supplied to health service: spongy bone allotransplants devoid of bone marrow (allospongiosis BS), allotransplants of the viable joint cartilage on a thin bone base (allocartilage BS) and demineralized bone matrix in the form of a film for protection of the bone formation zone and stimulation of osteogenesis (allofilm BS). Results of the component plasty in 300 patients are much superior in their efficiency to those known earlier. The terms of restorative processes became 2-3 times shorter. The above plastic materials are recommended for wide use in osteo-articular surgery.

  8. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  9. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasing necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26811234

  10. Clinical Effectiveness of Using Aesthetic Fixed Prosthetic Appliances with Combined Occlusal Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Andrii Biben; Zinovii Ozhohan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the research was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of using aesthetic fixed prosthetic appliances with combined occlusal surface. Materials and methods. The study included 30 patients who were divided into 2 groups: Group I included 20 patients with combined occlusal surface of the crowns; Group II included 22 patients with ceramic occlusal surface of the crowns. The patients were observed 3, 6 and 12 months after prosthetic repair. Results. 6 months after prosthet...

  11. LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT HEPARIN TREATMENT FAILURE IN PREVENTION OF PROSTHETIC MITRAL VALVE THROMBOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    David Šuran; Vojko Kanič; Tatjana Golob Gulič; Husam Franjo Naji; Robert Lipovec

    2009-01-01

    Background Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PHVT) represents a dangerous postoperative complication following prosthetic heart valve replacement. Incidence varies according to different data from 0.5–4 % per year following mitral or aortic valve replacement in spite of adequate oral anticoagulation with coumarins. Case report We are presenting a case of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis as a result of 6-month lowmolecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (nadroparine) treatment failure. Our pat...

  12. Progress Toward Optimizing Prosthetic Socket Fit and Suspension Using Elevated Vacuum to Promote Residual Limb Health

    OpenAIRE

    Wernke, Matthew M.; Schroeder, Ryan M.; Haynes, Michael L.; Nolt, Lonnie L.; Albury, Alexander W.; Colvin, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Prosthetic sockets are custom made for each amputee, yet there are no quantitative tools to determine the appropriateness of socket fit. Ensuring a proper socket fit can have significant effects on the health of residual limb soft tissues and overall function and acceptance of the prosthetic limb. Previous work found that elevated vacuum pressure data can detect movement between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket; however, the correlation between the two was specific to ea...

  13. Intra-articular findings in symptomatic minor instability of the lateral elbow (SMILE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Paolo; Cucchi, Davide; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Butt, Usman; Safran, Marc R; Denard, Patrick; Randelli, Pietro

    2017-07-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is generally considered an extra-articular condition. The role of minor instability in the aetiology of lateral elbow pain has rarely been considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of lateral ligamentous laxity with aspects of intra-articular lateral elbow pathology and investigate the role of minor instability in lateral elbow pain. Thirty-five consecutive patients aged between 20 and 60 years with recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis who had failed conservative therapy and had no previous trauma or overt instability, were included. The presence of three signs of lateral ligamentous patholaxity and five intra-articular findings were documented during arthroscopy. The relative incidence of each of these was calculated, and the correlation between patholaxity and intra-articular pathology was evaluated. At least one sign of lateral ligamentous laxity was observed in 48.6% of the studied cohort, and 85.7% demonstrated at least one intra-articular abnormal finding. Radial head ballottement was the most common sign of patholaxity (42.9%). Synovitis was the most common intra-articular aspect of pathology (77.1%), followed by lateral capitellar chondropathy (40.0%). A significant correlation was found between the presence of lateral ligamentous patholaxity signs and capitellar chondropathy (p = 0.0409), as well as anteromedial synovitis (p = 0.0408). Almost one half of patients suffering from recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis display signs of lateral ligamentous patholaxity, and over 85% demonstrate at least one intra-articular abnormality. The most frequent intra-articular findings are synovitis and lateral capitellar chondropathy, which correlate significantly with the presence of lateral ligamentous patholaxity. The fact that several patients demonstrated multiple intra-articular findings in relation to laxity provides support to a sequence of pathologic changes that may result from a symptomatic minor instability of

  14. Clinical potential and challenges of using genetically modified cells for articular cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects do not regenerate. Transplantation of autologous articular chondrocytes, which is clinically being performed since several decades, laid the foundation for the transplantation of genetically modified cells, which may serve the dual role of providing a cell population capable of chondrogenesis and an additional stimulus for targeted articular cartilage repair. Experimental data generated so far have shown that genetically modified articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) allow for sustained transgene expression when transplanted into articular cartilage defects in vivo. Overexpression of therapeutic factors enhances the structural features of the cartilaginous repair tissue. Combined overexpression of genes with complementary mechanisms of action is also feasible, holding promises for further enhancement of articular cartilage repair. Significant benefits have been also observed in preclinical animal models that are, in principle, more appropriate to the clinical situation. Finally, there is convincing proof of concept based on a phase I clinical gene therapy study in which transduced fibroblasts were injected into the metacarpophalangeal joints of patients without adverse events. To realize the full clinical potential of this approach, issues that need to be addressed include its safety, the choice of the ideal gene vector system allowing for a long-term transgene expression, the identification of the optimal therapeutic gene(s), the transplantation without or with supportive biomaterials, and the establishment of the optimal dose of modified cells. As safe techniques for generating genetically engineered articular chondrocytes and MSCs are available, they may eventually represent new avenues for improved cell-based therapies for articular cartilage repair. This, in turn, may provide an important step toward the unanswered question of articular cartilage regeneration. PMID:21674822

  15. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Diniz Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTA painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%. It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. METHODS: We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%. Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. RESULT: It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6% and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%. Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building.

  16. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lemaire

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation, and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.Neste estudo uma descrição multifísica do transporte de fluidos em meios porosos osteo articulares é apresentada. Adaptado a partir do modelo de Moyne e Murad proposto para descrever o comportamento de materiais argilosos a modelagem multiescala permite a derivação da resposta macroscópica do tecido a partir da informação microscópica. Na primeira parte o modelo é apresentado. Na escala do poro as equações da eletro-hidrodinâmica governantes do movimento dos eletrolitos são acopladas com a eletrostática local (equação de Gauss-Poisson e as equações de transporte iônico. Usando uma mudança de variáveis e o método de expansão assintótica a derivação macroscópica é conduzida. Resultados do modelo proposto são usados para salientar a importância dos efeitos de acoplamento sobre a transdução mecânica da remodelagem de ossos compactados.

  17. [Chondrocalcinosis. Clinical impact of intra-articular calcium phosphate crystals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, M

    2014-06-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals are known to cause acute attacks of pseudogout in joints but crystal deposition has also been reported to be associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Aside from CPPD crystals, basic calcium phosphates (BCPs), consisting of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA), tricalcium phosphate and octacalcium phosphate, have been found in synovial fluid, synovium and cartilage of patients with OA. Although CPPD crystals have been found to be associated with OA and are an important factor in joint disease, this has also recently been associated with a genetic defect. However, according to the most recent findings, the association of BCP crystals, such as apatite with OA is much stronger, as their presence significantly correlates with the severity of cartilage degeneration. Identification of BCP crystals in OA joints remains problematic due to a lack of simple and reliable methods of detection. The clinical and pathological relevance of cartilage mineralization in patients with OA is not completely understood. It is well established that mineralization of articular cartilage is often found close to hypertrophic chondrocytes. A significant correlation between the expression of type X collagen, a marker for chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage mineralization was observed. In the process of endochondral ossification, the link between hypertrophy and matrix mineralization is particularly well described. Hypertrophic chondrocytes in OA cartilage and at the growth line share certain features, not only hypertrophy but also a capability to mineralize the matrix. Recent data indicate that chondrocyte hypertrophy is a key factor in articular cartilage mineralization strongly linked to OA and does not characterize a specific subset of OA patients, which has important consequences for therapeutic strategies for OA.

  18. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%). It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%). Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6%) and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%). Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%). Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building.

  19. Assessment of Myoelectric Controller Performance and Kinematic Behavior of a Novel Soft Synergy-inspired Robotic Hand for Prosthetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Myoelectric-artificial limbs can significantly advance the state of the art in prosthetics, since they can be used to control mechatronic devices through muscular activity in a way that mimics how the subjects used to activate their muscles before limb loss. However, surveys indicate that dissatisfaction with the functionality of terminal devices underlies the widespread abandonment of prostheses. We believe that one key factor to improve acceptability of prosthetic devices is to attain human-likeness of prosthesis movements, a goal which is being pursued by research on social and human-robot interactions. Therefore, to reduce early abandonment of terminal devices, we propose that controllers should be designed such as to ensure effective task accomplishment in a natural fashion. In this work, we have analyzed and compared the performance of three types of myoelectric controller algorithms based on surface electromyography to control an under-actuated and multi-degrees of freedom prosthetic hand, the SoftHand Pro. The goal of the present study was to identify the myoelectric algorithm that best mimics the native hand movements. As a preliminary step, we first quantified the repeatability of the SoftHand Pro finger movements and identified the electromyographic recording sites for able-bodied individuals with the highest signal-to-noise ratio from two pairs of muscles, i.e. flexor digitorum superficialis/extensor digitorum communis, and flexor carpi radialis/extensor carpi ulnaris. Able-bodied volunteers were then asked to execute reach-to-grasp movements, while electromyography signals were recorded from flexor digitorum superficialis/extensor digitorum communis as this was identified as the muscle pair characterized by high signal-to-noise ratio and intuitive control. Subsequently, we tested three myoelectric controllers that mapped electromyography signals to position of the SoftHand Pro. We found that a differential electromyography

  20. 75 FR 65060 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ...- art prosthetics and the associated rehabilitation research, development, and evaluation of such... briefed by the Director of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Chief Consultant for Women Veterans...

  1. Pregnancy with prosthetic heart valves - 30 years' nationwide experience in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Vejlstrup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with prosthetic heart valves remains a risk factor for both mother and fetus, but unselected and unbiased outcome and complication data remain scarce. We analyzed nationwide outcome data from 1977 to 2007 for all pregnancies in women with prosthetic valves.......Pregnancy in women with prosthetic heart valves remains a risk factor for both mother and fetus, but unselected and unbiased outcome and complication data remain scarce. We analyzed nationwide outcome data from 1977 to 2007 for all pregnancies in women with prosthetic valves....

  2. Prosthetic Consideration in Implant-supported Prosthesis: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowd, Manga Snigdha; Shankar, Thatapudi; Ranjan, Rajeev; Singh, Arpita

    2017-06-01

    Modern dentistry has changed tremendously with implant therapy. For the successful implant therapy, making a proper treatment plan considering both surgical and prosthetic part in mind is the key of success. Often practitioners tend to create a treatment plan overlooking the basic principles of prosthetic part. This present review has discussed various prosthetic consideration of implant-supported prosthesis. A step-by-step detailed prosthetic option with their indications has been discussed to help all dental implant practitioners in making of an optimal treatment plan for each case.

  3. Clinical outcome and echocardiographic findings of native and prosthetic valve endocarditis in the 1990's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R; Werner, G S; Fuchs, J B; Andreas, S; Prange, H; Ruschewski, W; Kreuzer, H

    1996-02-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis is considered to be associated with a more severe prognosis than native valve endocarditis. Among other factors, inappropriate visualization of vegetations in prosthetic valve endocarditis by transthoracic echocardiography is responsible for this observation. Since the introduction of transoesophageal echocardiography into clinical practice the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the detection of vegetations located on prosthetic valves have been enhanced. Therefore we aimed to determine and compare the prognosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis and native valve endocarditis in the era of this improved diagnostic approach. One hundred and six episodes of infective endocarditis in 104 patients were seen at our institution between 1989 and 1993. Eighty patients (77%) had native valve endocarditis and 24 (23%) had late prosthetic valve endocarditis. In the latter group two patients had recurrent infective endocarditis. Patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis were older (mean age 64 vs 54 years in native valve endocarditis; P < 0.001) and the majority was female (62% vs 38% in native valve endocarditis; P < 0.05). In prosthetic valve endocarditis, infection of a valve in the mitral position predominated (65% vs 30% in native valve endocarditis; P < 0.01), whereas in native valve endocarditis more than half the cases had isolated aortic valve endocarditis (51% vs 27% in prosthetic valve endocarditis; P < 0.01). In prosthetic valve endocarditis more cases were caused by Staphylococcus aureus (31% vs 14% in native valve endocarditis; P = 0.08), whereas in native valve endocarditis the most frequent organisms were streptococci (29% vs 19% in prosthetic valve endocarditis; P = 0.12). Differences in the clinical features of native valve endocarditis and prosthetic valve endocarditis could not be found except for a higher rate of embolism in native valve endocarditis (40% vs 19% in prosthetic valve endocarditis; P < 0.05). Vegetations

  4. Tratamiento no protésico de las lesiones del cartílago articular

    OpenAIRE

    Carranza Bencano, A.

    1997-01-01

    Las alteraciones del cartílago articular constituyen un gran reto planteado a la Cirugía Ortopédica actual, por el aumento de traumatismos articulares y ante el incremento del porvenir de la vida de la población con el consiguiente envejecimiento del aparato locomotor y el desarrollo de artrosis degenerativas. Los éxitos de las prótesis articulares quedan ensombrecidos por su porvenir incierto en largos períodos de seguimiento. Por ello, en este artículo se revisa la situación actual de los m...

  5. Black Colouration of the Knee Articular Cartilage after Spontaneously Recurrent Haemarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazu Matsumoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild discolouration of the articular cartilage is known to gradually occur during aging. However, pathological tissue pigmentation is occasionally induced under several specific conditions. In the present case, we performed total knee replacement in a patient with recurrent haemarthrosis. However, during the operation, we observed severe black colouration of the knee articular cartilage, due to the deposition of hemosiderin and lipofuscin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe cartilage pigmentation, due to hemosiderin and lipofuscin deposition in articular cartilage.

  6. Attrition and retention in upper limb prosthetics research: experience of the VA home study of the DEKA arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Klinger, Shana

    2017-11-01

    (1) Describe study attrition; (2) identify reasons for attrition, and (3) discuss implications for prosthetic prescription and design of future device studies. Design and methodological procedures used: Completion phase (during in-laboratory training, after training, or home use) was identified for 42 participants. Qualitative data were analyzed to identify attrition reasons. Reasons were classified as related to the DEKA arm, or not. Study attrition was 57%, with 43% completing the full study. Attrition during the in-laboratory portion was 21%. Reasons for attrition were related to the DEKA arm entirely or in-part for 42%, 25%, respectively. Most common reasons were scheduling/personal (54%); device weight (29%); and dissatisfaction with device (25%). About 21% withdrew because of concerns about compliance with study protocol. This study had a high attrition rate with evidence of selective attrition due to device characteristics. Strategies to minimize attrition and the importance of tracking reasons for withdrawal are discussed. Given that retention could be an indicator of willingness to adopt the DEKA arm, findings suggest that it would be prudent to provide patients with the opportunity to train with the DEKA arm before a decision is made regarding the appropriateness of the device for the patient. Implications for Rehabilitation This study of a new upper limb prosthesis, the DEKA arm, had a 57% attrition rate with evidence of selective attrition due to characteristics of the DEKA arm. Findings point to the need for strategies to minimize attrition in future studies. Findings also illustrate the importance of tracking reasons for subject withdrawal in longitudinal prosthesis device studies. Because participant retention in longitudinal device studies may be an indicator of future willingness to adopt a device, our findings suggest that it would be prudent to provide patients with the opportunity to train with the DEKA arm before a final decision is made

  7. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  8. Effects of immobilization on thickness of superficial zone of articular cartilage of patella in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Each segment of superficial zone behaves differentially on immobilization and remobilization. Perhaps a much longer duration of remobilization is required to reverse changes of immobilization in articular cartilage and plays a significant role in knee joint movements.

  9. Intra-articular Nodular Fasciitis: An Unexpected Diagnosis for a Joint Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Michelle Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological lesions in and around a joint can arise from underlying dermis, subcutis, deep muscle, bone or synovium. Clinical presentation can include joint pain, joint swelling, palpable masses and mechanical restriction. Whilst giant cell tumour of tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, lipoma arborescens, juxta articular myxomas and inflammatory arthritis are the better-known conditions of the joint. Intra-articular nodular fasciitis, on the other hand, is less well recognized both clinically and radiologically. It is rarely seen in routine practice and is only described in case reports in the literature. Due to the non-specific clinical and radiological findings as well as the unfamiliarity with the entity, the diagnosis of intra-articular nodular fasciitis is usually clinched only after histological examination. We present a case of intra-articular nodular fasciitis arising in the knee joint which was not suspected clinically or radiologically.

  10. Bone morphogenetic proteins and articular cartilage: To serve and protect or a wolf in sheep clothing's?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Davidson, E.N.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Alterations in chondrocyte differentiation and matrix remodeling play a central role in osteoarthritis (OA). Chondrocyte differentiation and remodeling are amongst others regulated by the so-called Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs). Although BMPs are considered protective for articular

  11. Localization of Estrogen Receptors α and β in the Articular Surface of the Rat Femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Yasushi; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Yoshida, Atsuhiko; Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that the degradation of the articular cartilage and osteoarthritis (OA) are associated with gender and the estrogen hormone. Although many investigators have reported the presence of the estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β in the articular cartilage, the localization of these receptors and the difference in their in vivo expression have not yet been clearly demonstrated. We performed immunofluorescence staining of ERα and ERβ to elucidate the localization of the ERs and to note the effects of gender and the aging process on these receptors. The results revealed that ERα and ERβ were expressed in the articular cartilage and subchondral bone layers of adult rats of both sexes. We also observed the high expression of these receptors in immature rats. In contrast, their expression levels decreased in an ovariectomised model, as a simulation of postmenopause, and in aged female rats. Therefore, this study suggests the direct effects of estrogen and ER expression on articular surface metabolism

  12. The Role of Virtual Articulator in Prosthetic and Restorative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator. PMID:25177664

  13. Piperidine-based glycodendrons as protein N-glycan prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Jason E; Belardi, Brian; Appel, Mason J; Solania, Angelo; Robinson, Peter V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-10-15

    The generation of homogeneously glycosylated proteins is essential for defining glycoform-specific activity and improving protein-based therapeutics. We present a novel glycodendron prosthetic which can be site-selectively appended to recombinant proteins to create 'N-glycosylated' glycoprotein mimics. Using computational modeling, we designed the dendrimer scaffold and protein attachment point to resemble the native N-glycan architecture. Three piperidine-melamine glycodendrimers were synthesized via a chemoenzymatic route and attached to human growth hormone and the F c region of human IgG. These products represent a new class of engineered biosimilars bearing novel glycodendrimer structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cinema and Prosthetic Memory: The Case of the Korean War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Keene

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the explanatory possibilities of the concept of prosthetic memory, with cinema as the enabler of popular understanding, when applied to the Korean War. The essay examines why it was that the conflict in Korea for many decades occupied a memory void and whether the explanations that have been offered for other similar “forgotten “wars are useful in relation to Korea. The analysis sugggests that cinema may be important in the formation of popular understanding but that there are serious analytical drawbacks in assuming that cinema can provide a window into popular mentalities.

  15. Laser Science and its Applications in Prosthetic Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Revathy; Gounder, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    The minimal invasive nature of lasers, with quick tissue response and healing has made them a very attractive technology in various fields of dentistry which serves as a tool to create a better result than ever before. The rapid development of lasers and their wavelengths with variety of applications on soft and hard tissues may continue to have major impact on the scope and practice in prosthetic dentistry. The purpose of this article is to make every clinician familiar with the fundamentals of lasers and different laser systems to incorporate into their clinical practices. PMID:28491254

  16. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis - Successful Management With Antimicrobial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokan Nambiar C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Middle aged male was admitted with high fever, rigor and chills of 2 days duration. He was seen in the clinic two years back for syncope. He gave history of Mitral (Starr-Edward and Aortic (Medtronic valve replacement ten years earlier from another center and was on regular anticoagulation with dose-adjusted acenocoumarol. On evaluation he had normal prosthetic valve function by trans-thoracic echo, but Holter monitoring showed Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. He had mild wall motion abnormalities and left ventricular dysfunction suggestive of coronary artery disease also and was put on additional Metoprolol.

  17. Transparent biocompatible sensor patches for touch sensitive prosthetic limbs

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-12-26

    The paper presents the fabrication of transparent, flexible sensor patches developed using a casting technique with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as substrate and a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and PDMS as interdigital electrodes. The electrodes act as strain sensitive capacitor. The prototypes were used as touch sensitive sensors attached to the limbs. Experiments results show the sensitivity of the patches towards tactile sensing. The results are very promising and can play a key role in the development of a cost efficient sensing system attached to prosthetic limbs.

  18. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation for patients with prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, David R; Little, Stephen H

    2013-07-09

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves are at increased risk for valve thrombosis and arterial thromboembolism. Oral anticoagulation alone, or the addition of antiplatelet drugs, has been used to minimise this risk. An important issue is the effectiveness and safety of the latter strategy. This is an update of our previous review; the goal was to create a valid synthesis of all available, methodologically sound data to further assess the safety and efficacy of combined oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus oral anticoagulant monotherapy in patients with prosthetic heart valves. We updated the previous searches from 2003 and 2010 on 16 January 2013 and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to January Week 1 2013), and EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2013 Week 02). We have also looked at reference lists of individual reports, review articles, meta-analyses, and consensus statements. We included reports published in any language or in abstract form. All reports of randomised controlled trials comparing standard-dose oral anticoagulation to standard-dose oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with one or more prosthetic heart valves. Two review authors independently performed the search strategy, assessed trials for inclusion and study quality, and extracted data. We collected adverse effects information from the trials. One new study has been identified and included in this update. In total, 13 studies involving 4122 participants were included in this review update. Years of publication ranged from 1971 to 2011. Compared with anticoagulation alone, the addition of an antiplatelet agent reduced the risk of thromboembolic events (odds ratio (OR) 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32 to 0.59; P heart valves. The risk of major bleeding is increased with antiplatelet therapy. These results apply to patients with mechanical prosthetic valves or those with

  19. Prosthetic avian vocal organ controlled by a freely behaving bird based on a low dimensional model of the biomechanical periphery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel M Arneodo

    Full Text Available Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform.

  20. Prosthetics in antiquity-An early medieval wearer of a foot prosthesis (6th century AD) from Hemmaberg/Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, M; Eitler, J; Deutschmann, J; Ladstätter, S; Glaser, F; Fiedler, D

    2016-03-01

    Even though the earliest prosthetic devices date to the Ancient Egyptian Empire and iconographic sources attest their use in the Greco-Roman world, archaeological evidence for this practice prior to 2nd millennium AD is very scant. In 2013, a skeleton dating to the Frankish period (6th century AD) was excavated at the Hemmaberg in southern Austria. The middle adult male was missing his left foot from above the ankle. In its place, an iron-ring and wooden remains were recovered and interpreted as a prosthesis replacing the lost foot. This represents one of the oldest examples of prosthetic limb replacement associated with the skeleton of its wearer in Europe to date. Analysis through macroscopic assessment, radiography and CT-scanning revealed healing of the lesion even though it may have initially been complicated by osteomyelitis. Atrophy of the left lower leg further indicates immobilisation and suggests survival of several years. Osteoarthritis in the knees and shoulder girdle provides tentative indications towards the functionality of the prosthesis, perhaps aided through a crutch. These findings are set against the historic, archaeological, bioarchaeological and social context of the man in order to discuss whether removal of the foot was due to medical, punitive or traumatic causes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.