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Sample records for articular cartilage vesicles

  1. Imaging of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawan K Paunipagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

  2. Articular cartilage stem cell signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Camilla; Lindahl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The view of articular cartilage as a non-regeneration organ has been challenged in recent years. The articular cartilage consists of distinct zones with different cellular and molecular phenotypes, and the superficial zone has been hypothesized to harbour stem cells. Furthermore, the articular cartilage demonstrates a distinct pattern regarding stem cell markers (that is, Notch-1, Stro-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). These results, in combination with the positive identification of...

  3. Fracture of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Purcell, M V; Lewis, J L

    1996-11-01

    Crack formation and propagation is a significant element of the degeneration process in articular cartilage. In order to understand this process, and separate the relative importance of structural overload and material failure, methods for measuring the fracture toughness of cartilage are needed. In this paper, two such methods are described and used to measure fracture properties of cartilage from the canine patella. A modified single edge notch (MSEN) specimen was used to measure J, and a trouser tear test was used to measure T, both measures of fracture toughness with units of kN/m. A pseudo-elastic modulus was also obtained from the MSEN test. Several potential error sources were examined, and results for the MSEN test compared with another method for measuring the fracture parameter for urethane rubber. Good agreement was found. The two test methods were used to measure properties of cartilage from the patellae of 12 canines: 4-9 specimens from each of 12 patellae, with 5 right-left pairs were tested. Values of J ranged from 0.14-1.2 kN/m. J values correlated with T and were an average of 1.7 times larger than T. A variety of failure responses was seen in the MSEN tests, consequently a grade of 0 to 3 was assigned to each test, where 0 represented a brittle-like crack with minimal opening and 3 represented plastic flow with no crack formation. The initial cracks in 12/82 specimens did not propagate and were assigned to grade 3. The method for reducing data in the MSEN test assumed pseudo-elastic response and could not be used for the grade 3 specimens. Stiffness did not correlate with J. Neither J nor T was statistically different between right-left pairs, but varied between animals. The test methods appear useful for providing a quantitative measure of fracture toughness for cartilage and other soft materials. PMID:8950659

  4. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  5. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  6. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  7. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  8. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  9. Imaging diagnosis of the articular cartilage disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis among the chronic osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic cartilage lesions on the plain films and MR images. Methods: Eighty-nine cases, including 115 joints, underwent plain film and MRI examination, and enhanced MRI scan was performed on 32 of them, including 44 joints. MRI scan sequences consisted of T1WI, T2WI + PDWI, STIR, and 3D FS SPGR. There were 90 knee joints in this group and each of the articular cartilage was divided into four parts: patella, femoral medial condyle, femoral lateral condyle, and tibia facet on MR images. The cartilage disorders were classified according to the outerbridge method. In addition, 61 cases including 75 joints were observed as a control group on the plain films and MR images. Results: 115 cartilage lesions were found on MR images, in which thinness of the cartilage (58 cases, 50.4%), bone changes under the cartilage (22 cases, 19.7%), medullar edema (22 cases, 19.7%), and synovial hyperplasia (52 cases, 45.2%) were seen. The patella cartilage was the most likely affected part (81/90, 90%). So the patellar cartilage lesions were divided as group 1 (grade I-II) and group 2 (grade III-IV) on MR images, which were compared with the plain film signs. The narrowing of the joint space and saccules under the articular surface were statistically significant with each other, and χ2 values were 9.349 and 9.885, respectively (P=0.002). Conclusion: No constant signs could be seen on the plain films with grade I-II cartilage disorders. While the narrowing joint space and saccules under the joint surface could be seen on them with grade III-IV cartilage disorders, which were mainly correlated with the cartilage disorders and bone changes under the articular cartilages. A combination of the plain films and MR images is the best imaging method for examining the joints and joint cartilages. Enhanced MRI scan is very helpful on the diagnosis and differential

  10. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  11. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Fermor, B.; Christensen, S. E.; I Youn; J M Cernanec; C M Davies; Weinberg, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO), a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O...

  12. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  13. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  14. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue. PMID:26923076

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smooth motor function can be maintained by articular cartilage. When the cartilage is injured, edema occurs, and as degeneration progresses, the cartilage thins and the cartilage matrix decreases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows noninvasive evaluation of these changes. Fat suppression proton density- and T2-weighted imaging are useful in the morphologic evaluation of articular cartilage. High resolution, 3-tesla MR imaging provides more detailed evaluation. Biochemical information from T2 mapping, T1ρ mapping, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is useful for early diagnosis of cartilage injury and evaluation of cartilage repair. The role of MR imaging in evaluating articular cartilage will increase in the future aging society. (author)

  16. Phosphorylation of proteoglycans from human articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that sulfated proteoglycans from human articular and epiphyseal cartilage were phosphorylated. These macromolecules contribute to the stiffness and resiliency of this tissue. We demonstrate here that the phosphate moieties are an integral part of proteoglycan subunits. Specifically, evidence is presented which indicates that proteoglycan monomers contain 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein and that these appear to exist as phosphoserine residues. Furthermore, the data illustrate that human articular cartilage also contains more than 20 different phosphoproteins, some of which are closely associated with proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycan subunits were purified from extracts of articular cartilage or from media fractions which had been used to label tissue specimens with 32P-orthophosphate. Chemical and radiographic analyses revealed that the phosphate concentration with respect to sulfate and uronic acid content remained constant when purified proteoglycan monomers were subjected to equilibrium ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. That the phosphate moieties were bound to proteoglycan monomers via monoester linkages was indicated by the release of 32P-orthophosphate from proteoglycan subunits incubated under mild alkaline conditions or reacted with acid or alkaline phosphatases. Identification of serine residues in the core protein as the sites of phosphorylation was made by autoradiography of thin layer plates on which hydrolyzed samples of purified 32P-proteoglycan subunits had been subjected to 2-dimensional electrophoresis/chromatography. Quantification of 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein of 200,000 daltons was made by chemical analysis of inorganic phosphate released from proteoglycans by acid hydrolysis

  17. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Abula, Kahaer; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration. PMID:25574420

  18. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mark Wellard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP. MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer.

  19. Engineering articular cartilage using newly developed carrageenan basedhydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Elena Geta

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage holds specific functionality in the human body creating smooth gliding areas and allowing the joints to move easily without pain. However, due to its avascular nature and to the low metabolic activity of the constituent cells-the chondrocytes, cartilage has a low regenerative potential. The current surgical options to treat damaged cartilage are not long lasting and involve frequent revisions. Tissue engineering may provide an alternative approach for cartilage...

  20. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  1. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant...... treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen minipig as a pre-clinical model for articular cartilage repair by testing existing clinical cartilage...

  2. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crossl...

  3. Colonies in engineered articular cartilage express superior differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaratnam, L; Abd Rahim, S; Kamarul, T; Chan, K Y; Sureshan, S; Penafort, R; Ng, C L L

    2005-07-01

    In view of poor regeneration potential of the articular cartilage, in-vitro engineering of cartilage tissue offers a promising option for progressive joint disease. This study aims to develop a biologically engineered articular cartilage for autologous transplantation. The initial work involved determination of chondrocyte yield and viability, and morphological analysis. Cartilage was harvested from the knee, hip and shoulder joints of adult New Zealand white rabbits and chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion of the extra-cellular matrix before serial cultivation in DMEM/Ham's F12 media as monolayer cultures. No differences were noted in cell yield. Although chondrocytes viability was optimal (>93%) following harvest from native cartilage, their viability tended to be lowered on passaging. Chondrocytes aggregated in isogenous colonies comprising ovoid cells with intimate intracellular contacts and readily exhibited Safranin-O positive matrix; features typically associated with articular cartilage in-vivo. However, chondrocytes also existed concurrently in scattered bipolar/multipolar forms lacking Safranin-O expression. Therefore, early data demonstrated successful serial culture of adult chondrocytes with differentiated morphology seen in established chondrocyte colonies synthesizing matrix proteoglycans. PMID:16381284

  4. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  5. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network

  6. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. Design: A PubMed search was performed using the phrase “Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation” alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company we...

  7. Analysis of friction between articular cartilage and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Anmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-05-01

    Many biomaterials are being used to repair damaged articular cartilage. In particular, poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel has similar mechanical properties to natural cartilage under compressive and shearing loading. Here, three-factor and two-level friction experiments and long-term tests were conducted to better evaluate its tribological properties. The friction coefficient between articular cartilage and the poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel depended primarily on the three factors of load, speed, and lubrication. When the speed increased from 10 to 20 mm/s under a load of 10 N, the friction coefficient increased from 0.12 to 0.147. When the lubricant was changed from Ringer's solution to a hyaluronic acid solution, the friction coefficient decreased to 0.084 with loads as high as 22 N. The poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel was severely damaged and lost its top surface layers, which were transferred to the articular cartilage surface. Wear was observed in the surface morphologies, which indicated the occurrence of surface adhesion of bovine cartilage. Surface fatigue and adhesive wear was the dominant wear mechanism. PMID:26970769

  8. The evolution of articular cartilage imaging and its impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past four decades, articular cartilage imaging has developed rapidly. Imaging now plays a critical role not only in clinical practice and therapeutic decisions but also in the basic research probing our understanding of cartilage physiology and biomechanics. (orig.)

  9. Zn deposition at the bone cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Moger, C. J.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  10. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  11. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage

  12. T2 star relaxation times for assessment of articular cartilage at 3 T: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamisch, Tallal Charles [University Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Bern, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); Hughes, Timothy [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Mosher, Timothy J. [Penn State University College of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Imaging and MRI, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Mueller, Christoph [University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Boesch, Chris [University Bern, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); Welsch, Goetz Hannes [University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    T2 mapping techniques use the relaxation constant as an indirect marker of cartilage structure, and the relaxation constant has also been shown to be a sensitive parameter for cartilage evaluation. As a possible additional robust biomarker, T2* relaxation time is a potential, clinically feasible parameter for the biochemical evaluation of articular cartilage. The knees of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients after microfracture therapy (MFX) were evaluated with a multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping technique and a multi-echo gradient-echo T2* mapping sequence at 3.0 Tesla MRI. Inline maps, using a log-linear least squares fitting method, were assessed with respect to the zonal dependency of T2 and T2* relaxation for the deep and superficial regions of healthy articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. There was a statistically significant correlation between T2 and T2* values. Both parameters demonstrated similar spatial dependency, with longer values measured toward the articular surface for healthy articular cartilage. No spatial variation was observed for cartilage repair tissue after MFX. Within this feasibility study, both T2 and T2* relaxation parameters demonstrated a similar response in the assessment of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. The potential advantages of T2*-mapping of cartilage include faster imaging times and the opportunity for 3D acquisitions, thereby providing greater spatial resolution and complete coverage of the articular surface. (orig.)

  13. T2 star relaxation times for assessment of articular cartilage at 3 T: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T2 mapping techniques use the relaxation constant as an indirect marker of cartilage structure, and the relaxation constant has also been shown to be a sensitive parameter for cartilage evaluation. As a possible additional robust biomarker, T2* relaxation time is a potential, clinically feasible parameter for the biochemical evaluation of articular cartilage. The knees of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients after microfracture therapy (MFX) were evaluated with a multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping technique and a multi-echo gradient-echo T2* mapping sequence at 3.0 Tesla MRI. Inline maps, using a log-linear least squares fitting method, were assessed with respect to the zonal dependency of T2 and T2* relaxation for the deep and superficial regions of healthy articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. There was a statistically significant correlation between T2 and T2* values. Both parameters demonstrated similar spatial dependency, with longer values measured toward the articular surface for healthy articular cartilage. No spatial variation was observed for cartilage repair tissue after MFX. Within this feasibility study, both T2 and T2* relaxation parameters demonstrated a similar response in the assessment of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. The potential advantages of T2*-mapping of cartilage include faster imaging times and the opportunity for 3D acquisitions, thereby providing greater spatial resolution and complete coverage of the articular surface. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  15. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  16. Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Rahunen, Krista; Salmi, Ari; Saarakkala, Simo; Serimaa, Ritva; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is no cure for osteoarthritis. Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint. Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies. We investigated whether intense megahertz ultrasound (frequency: 1.138 MHz, peak positive pressure: 2.7 MPa, Ispta: 5 W/cm2, beam width: 5.7 mm at −6 dB, duty cycle: 5%, pulse repetition frequency: 285 Hz, mechanical index: 1.1) can deliver agents into AC without damaging it. Using ultrasound, we delivered a drug surrogate down to a depth corresponding to 53% depth of the AC thickness without causing histologically detectable damage to the AC. This may be important because early osteoarthritis typically exhibits histopathologic changes in the superficial AC. In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage. PMID:25922135

  17. Modeling IL-1 induced degradation of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Saptarshi; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we develop a computational model to simulate the in vitro biochemical degradation of articular cartilage explants sourced from the femoropatellar grooves of bovine calves. Cartilage explants were incubated in culture medium with and without the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cartilage explant's extracellular matrix components is modelled. Key variables in the model include chondrocytes, aggrecan, collagen, aggrecanase, collagenase and IL-1α. The model is first calibrated for aggrecan homeostasis of cartilage in vivo, then for data on (explant) controls, and finally for data on the IL-1α driven proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen over a 4-week period. The model was found to fit the experimental data best when: (i) chondrocytes continue to synthesize aggrecan during the cytokine challenge, (ii) a one to two day delay is introduced between the addition of IL-1α to the culture medium and subsequent aggrecanolysis, (iii) collagen degradation does not commence until the total concentration of aggrecan (i.e. both intact and degraded aggrecan) at any specific location within the explant becomes ≤1.5 mg/ml and (iv) degraded aggrecan formed due to the IL-1α induced proteolysis of intact aggrecan protects the collagen network while collagen degrades in a two-step process which, together, significantly modulate the collagen network degradation. Under simulated in vivo conditions, the model predicts increased aggrecan turnover rates in the presence of synovial IL-1α, consistent with experimental observations. Such models may help to infer the course of events in vivo following traumatic joint injury, and may also prove useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficiency of various therapeutic molecules that could be employed to avoid or modify the course of cartilage disease states. PMID:26874194

  18. Biochemical analysis of normal articular cartilage in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, A M; Keeley, F W; McIlwraith, C W; Chapman, P

    1990-12-01

    Articular cartilage specimens from the distal articular surface of 32 radiocarpal bones from 24 2- to 5-year-old horses were analyzed. The total collagen content was determined on the basis of the 4-hydroxyproline content, using a colorimetric method. A method for estimating the proportions of types-I and -II collagen by measuring spectrophotometric densities of specific cyanogen bromide peptide bands from mixtures of types-I and -II collagen on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels was used. The cyanogen bromide peptides representative of each collagen types-I and -II were identified. The peptide ratios were then computed for each of several standards of type-I and -II mixtures. A standard curve was derived from the correlation between these ratios and the corresponding proportions of type-II collagen in standard mixtures. Galactosamine and glucosamine content (hexosamines) were measured by ion chromatography. The galactosamine-to-glucosamine ratio, chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate values, and total glycosaminoglycan content were derived from the measured hexosamine content. The total collagen content averaged 556 mg/g (55.6 mg/100 mg) of tissue (dry weight, [dw]). Type-II collagen was the major collagen type in normal articular cartilage specimens. The ratio of the area under the alpha 1 (II)CB10 peak to the area under the alpha 1 (I)CB 7,8 + alpha 1 (II)CB11 peak was a second-order polynomial function of the proportion of type-II collagen in the specimens. The mean galactosamine and glucosamine content were 20.6 mg/g and 7.9 mg/g (dw), respectively. The mean galactosamine-to-glucosamine ratio was 3.74 +/- 0.62.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2085215

  19. Articular Cartilage Thickness Measured with US is Not as Easy as It Appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Bartels, E. M.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage ismeasured under orthogonal in...

  20. Articular cartilage thickness measured with US is not as easy as it appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, S; Bartels, E M; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage is measured under orthogonal insonation. I...

  1. Regeneration of articular cartilage using adipose stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) has limited potential for self-regeneration and damage to AC eventually leads to the development and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Cell implantation strategies have emerged as a new treatment modality to regenerate AC. Adipose stem cells/adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) have gained attention due to their abundance, excellent proliferative potential, and minimal morbidity during harvest. These advantages lower the cost of cell therapy by circumventing time-consuming procedure of culture expansion. ASCs have drawn attention as a potential source for cartilage regeneration since the feasibility of chondrogenesis from ASCs was first reported. After several groups reported inferior chondrogenesis from ASCs, numerous methods were devised to overcome the intrinsic properties. Most in vivo animal studies have reported good results using predifferentiated or undifferentiated, autologous or allogeneic ASCs to regenerate cartilage in osteochondral defects or surgically-induced OA. In this review, we summarize literature on the isolation and in vitro differentiation processes of ASCs, in vivo studies to regenerate AC in osteochondral defects and OA using ASCs, and clinical applications of ASCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1830-1844, 2016. PMID:26990234

  2. Deginerative changes of femoral articular cartilage in the knee : comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the sonographic findings of degenerative change in femoral articular cartilage of the knee by comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology. We obtained 40 specimens of cartilage of the femur (20 medial and 20 lateral condylar) from 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who had undergone total knee replacement. The specimens were placed in a saline-filled container and sonography was performed using a 10-MHz linear transducer. Sonographic abnormalities were evaluated at the cartilage surface, within the cartilage, and at the bone-cartilage interface, and were compared with the corresponding pathologic findings. In addition, cartilage thickness was measured at a representative portion of each femoral cartilage specimen and was compared with the thickness determined by sonography. 'Dot' lesions, irregularity or loss of the hyperechoic line, were demonstrated by sonography at the saline-cartilage interface of 14 cartilages. Pathologic examination showed that these findings corresponded to cleft, detachment, erosion, and degeneration. Irregularities in the hyperechoic line at the bone-cartilage interface were revealed by sonography in eight cartilages and were related to irregularity or loss of tidemark, downward displacement of the cartilage, and subchondral callus formation. Dot lesions, corresponding to cleft and degeneration, were noted within one cartilage. Cartilage thickness measured on specimen and by sonography showed no significant difference (p=0.446). Specimen sonography suggested that articular cartilage underwent degenerative histopathological change. Cartilage thickness measured by sonography exactly reflected real thickness

  3. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strai...

  4. Viscoelastic properties of bovine knee joint articular cartilage: dependency on thickness and loading frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2014-01-01

    Background The knee is an incongruent joint predisposed to developing osteoarthritis, with certain regions being more at risk of cartilage degeneration even in non-osteoarthrosed joints. At present it is unknown if knee regions prone to cartilage degeneration have similar storage and/or loss stiffness, and frequency-dependent trends, to other knee joint cartilage. The aim of this study was to determine the range of frequency-dependent, viscoelastic stiffness of articular cartilage across the ...

  5. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  6. Novel aspects to the structure of rabbit articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ap Gwynn I.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Applying cryo and modified chemical preparation techniques, mainly for scanning electron microscopy, revealed entirely new aspects to the structure of the radial zone of rabbit tibial plateau articular cartilage. The aggrecan component of the extracellular matrix was contained radially in columns, each with a diameter of 1-3mm, by a tightly packed matrix of collagen fibrils. The collagen fibrils were arranged radially, some straight and others in an opposed spiral arrangement, with regularly repeating patterns. This organization existed in the regions surrounding the columns of chondrocytes, known as chondrons. The load bearing property of the tissue was explained by the directed flow and containment of the interstitial fluid, modulated by the protein-carbohydrate complexes, along these collagen bounded tubular structures. The reason why such a structure has not been described previously may be that it is not retained by aldehyde fixation followed by dehydration, the method commonly used for tissue preparation for electron microscopy.

  7. Minced articular cartilage--basic science, surgical technique, and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Yanke, Adam; Provencher, Matthew T; Cole, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Minced articular cartilage procedures are attractive surgical approaches for repairing articular cartilage, as they are 1-staged, autologous, and inserted on a carrier that can potentially be placed arthroscopically. The principle of mincing the autologous donor cartilage is to create a larger surface area for cartilage expansion. Placement on a scaffold carrier allows for a chondro-inductive and chondro-conductive milieu. Early animal and preclinical models have demonstrated hyaline-like tissue repair. Further work needs to be conducted in this promising approach. PMID:19011553

  8. Identification of latexin by a proteomic analysis in rat normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouri Juan B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Animal models of OA induced are a widely used tool in the study of the pathogenesis of disease. Several proteomic techniques for selective extraction of proteins have provided protein profiles of chondrocytes and secretory patterns in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, including the discovery of new and promising biomarkers. In this proteomic analysis to study several proteins from rat normal articular cartilage, two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MS were used. Interestingly, latexin (LXN was found. Using an immunohistochemical technique, it was possible to determine its localization within the chondrocytes from normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Results In this study, 147 proteins were visualized, and 47 proteins were identified by MS. A significant proportion of proteins are involved in metabolic processes and energy (32%, as well as participating in different biological functions including structural organization (19%, signal transduction and molecular signaling (11%, redox homeostasis (9%, transcription and protein synthesis (6%, and transport (6%. The identified proteins were assigned to one or more subcellular compartments. Among the identified proteins, we found some proteins already recognized in other studies such as OA-associated proteins. Interestingly, we identified LXN, an inhibitor of mammalian carboxypeptidases, which had not been described in articular cartilage. Immunolabeling assays for LXN showed a granular distribution pattern in the cytoplasm of most chondrocytes of the middle, deep and calcified zones of normal articular cartilage as well as in subchondral bone. In osteoarthritic cartilage, LXN was observed in superficial and deep zones. Conclusions This study provides the first proteomic analysis of normal articular cartilage of rat. We identified LXN, whose location was demonstrated by

  9. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  10. Effects of immobilization on thickness of superficial zone of articular cartilage of patella in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Each segment of superficial zone behaves differentially on immobilization and remobilization. Perhaps a much longer duration of remobilization is required to reverse changes of immobilization in articular cartilage and plays a significant role in knee joint movements.

  11. A Validated Model of the Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Balancing Act in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J.; Ayati, Bruce P; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et ...

  12. Protein-based injectable hydrogels towards the regeneration of articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Poveda Reyes, Sara

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Articular cartilage is a tissue with low capacity for self-restoration due to its avascularity and low cell population. It is located on the surface of the subchondral bone covering the diarthrodial joints. Degeneration of articular cartilage can appear in athletes, in people with genetic degenerative processes (osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis) or due to a trauma; what produces pain, difficulties in mobility and progressive degeneration that finally leads to joint failure. Self-re...

  13. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  14. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Steven R

    2012-08-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  15. Evaluation on Cartilage Morphology after Intra-Articular Injection of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano scale wear particles would generate from orthopedic implants with nano scale surface topography because of residual stress. In this study, the effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on articular cartilage was investigated by intra-articular injection in rats. Using contrast-enhanced high-resolution micro computed tomography (micro-CT) technology, the decreased thickness of articular cartilage in distal femur was determined at 1, 7, 14, and 30 days after nanoparticle exposure. A strong linear correlation (r=0.928, P2 nanoparticles, cartilage thickness showed time-dependent decrease, and cartilage volume was decreased too. Further, the histopathological examination showed the edema chondrocyte and shrinked nucleus in the radial and calcified zone of cartilage. The ultrastructure of articular cartilage implied that the chondrocytes was degenerated, expressing as the condensed chromatin, the dilated endoplasmic reticulum, and the rich mitochondria. Even, the fragments of ruptured endoplasmic reticulum were observed in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes at postexposure day 30. Results indicate that potential damage of articular cartilage was induced by particles existed in knee joint and imply that the bio monitoring should be strengthened in patients with prostheses replacement.

  16. MR diffusion weighted imaging experimental study on early stages of articular cartilage degeneration of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the appearance of MR diffusion weighted imaging in early stages of cartilage degeneration and to detect its values. Methods: In 20 goat left knees, intra- articular injection of 5 units of papain was performed causing a loss of cartilage proteoglycan. Twenty right knees were used as control group. MR diffusion weighted imaging was performed at 24 hours after intra-articular injection of papain. ADC of each part of articular cartilage was measured and compared with each other. The proteoglycan content was measured biochemically and histochemically. Routine MRI and DWI were performed in 100 patients with osteoarthritis and 20 healthy people. The ADC of each interested part of articular cartilage was measured and compared with each other. Results: In experimental control group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (14.2±2.3) x 10-4 mm2/s. In early stages of cartilage degeneration group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (17.5±4.2) x 10-4 mm2/s. The ADCav of the control group was lower than that of the early stages of cartilage degeneration group (t=2.709; P=0.016). The proteloglycan content of articular cartilage was 4.22 x 106 μg/kg in control group, and 0.82 x 106 μg/kg in experimental group at 24 hours after injection of papain. The difference between control group and experimental group was significant (t=2.705, P=0.018). In healthy people, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (7.6±2.2) x 10-4 mm2/s. In osteoarthritis group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (10.3±4.2) x 10-4 mm2/s. The ADCav in the healthy group was significantly lower than that in the osteoarthritis group (t=2.609,P=0.014). Conclusion: DWI is an useful method in detecting early stages of cartilage degeneration which can not be showed on routine sequences. (authors)

  17. Comparison of nonlinear mechanical properties of bovine articular cartilage and meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, E K; Honkanen, J T J; Saarakkala, S; Korhonen, R K

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear, linear and failure properties of articular cartilage and meniscus in opposing contact surfaces are poorly known in tension. Relationships between the tensile properties of articular cartilage and meniscus in contact with each other within knee joints are also not known. In the present study, rectangular samples were prepared from the superficial lateral femoral condyle cartilage and lateral meniscus of bovine knee joints. Tensile tests were carried out with a loading rate of 5mm/min until the tissue rupture. Nonlinear properties of the toe region, linear properties in larger strains, and failure properties of both tissues were analysed. The strain-dependent tensile modulus of the toe region, Young's modulus of the linear region, ultimate tensile stress and toughness were on average 98.2, 8.3, 4.0 and 1.9 times greater (p<0.05) for meniscus than for articular cartilage. In contrast, the toe region strain, yield strain and failure strain were on average 9.4, 3.1 and 2.3 times greater (p<0.05) for cartilage than for meniscus. There was a significant negative correlation between the strain-dependent tensile moduli of meniscus and articular cartilage samples within the same joints (r=-0.690, p=0.014). In conclusion, the meniscus possesses higher nonlinear and linear elastic stiffness and energy absorption capability before rupture than contacting articular cartilage, while cartilage has longer nonlinear region and can withstand greater strains before failure. These findings point out different load carrying demands that both articular cartilage and meniscus have to fulfil during normal physiological loading activities of knee joints. PMID:24182695

  18. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for t...

  19. One intra-articular injection of hyaluronan prevents cell death and improves cell metabolism in a model of injured articular cartilage in the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Edwin J. P.; Ernans, Pieter J.; Douw, Conny M.; Guidemond, Nick A.; Van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Kuijer, Roell

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of one intra-articular injection of hyaluronan on chondrocyte death and metabolism in injured cartilage. Twenty-three 6-month-old rabbits received partial-thickness articular cartilage defects created on each medial femoral condyle. In order to e

  20. X-ray dark field imaging of human articular cartilage: Possible clinical application to orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite its convenience and non-invasiveness on daily clinical use, standard X-ray radiography cannot show articular cartilage. We developed a novel type of X-ray dark field imaging (DFI), which forms images only by a refracted beam with very low background illumination. We examined a disarticulated distal femur and a shoulder joint with surrounding soft tissue and skin, both excised from a human cadaver at the BL20B2 synchrotron beamline at SPring-8. The field was 90 mm wide and 90 mm high. Articular cartilage of the disarticulated distal femur was obvious on DFI, but not on standard X-ray images. Furthermore, DFI allowed visualization in situ of articular cartilage of the shoulder while covered with soft tissue and skin. The gross appearance of the articular cartilage on the dissected section of the proximal humerus was identical to the cartilage shown on the DFI image. These results suggested that DFI could provide a clinically accurate method of assessing articular cartilage. Hence, DFI would be a useful imaging tool for diagnosing joint disease such as osteoarthritis

  1. Study on the Microstructure of Human Articular Cartilage/Bone Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxiong Liu; Qin Lian; Jiankang He; Jinna Zhao; Zhongmin Jin; Dichen Li

    2011-01-01

    For improving the theory of gradient microstructure of cartilage/bone interface, human distal femurs were studied. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), histological sections and MicroCT were used to observe, measure and model the microstructure of cartilage/bone interface. The results showed that the cartilage/bone interface is in a hierarchical structure which is composed of four different tissue layers. The interlocking of hyaline cartilage and calcified cartilage and that of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone are in the manner of"protrusion-pore" with average diameter of 17.0 μm and 34.1 μm respectively. In addition, the cancellous bone under the cartilage is also formed by four layer hierarchical structure, and the adjacent layers are connected by bone trabecula in the shape of H, I and Y, forming a complex interwoven network structure. Finally, the simplified structure model of the cartilage/bone interface was proposed according to the natural articular cartilage/bone interface. The simplified model is a 4-layer gradient biomimetic structure, which corresponds to four different tissues of natural cartilage/bone interface. The results of this work would be beneficial to the design of bionic scaffold for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage/bone.

  2. Articular Cartilage Evaluation After TruFit Plug Implantation Analyzed by Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Bartels, L.W.; Vincken, K.L.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quantitative MRI of articular cartilage has rapidly developed in recent years and provides the clinician with a noninvasive tool to determine the biological consequence of an intervention. Purpose: To evaluate the quality of intra-articular cartilage, using the dGEMRIC scanning techniqu

  3. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Niu; Qing Wang; Yue-Xiang Wang; Ang Li; Lian-Wen Sun; Yan Yan; Fan Fan; De-Yu Li; Yu-Bo Fan

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems.This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls.Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading.Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix.No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups.For the tail-suspended group,the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site,as determined by ultrasound echo,showed a minor decrease.The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly,from (6.31 ± 3.37) MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98) MPa (p < 0.05).The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining.These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model.The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  4. Articular cartilage lesions of the knee. MRI of tibial condylar fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesions of the articular cartilage are rarely observed in convensional radiography and CT, and may be one of the most important prognostic factors in assessing traumatic or degenerative disorders at the knee joints. To discuss the usefulness of MRI for detecting cartilage lesions, knees with tibial condylar fractures were examined with MRI. 47 patients with tibial condylar fractures were reviewed 4 months to 15 years (average of 4 years) after the fractures. Good to excellent results were obtained in 91.5% of them. It is known that anatomical reduction of conventional radiography is not consistent with the clinical outcome, because radiography can show the changes of bones only. However, the results of MRI examinations are consistent with the clinical outcome, because they can directly show the state of the articular surface, such as defects of cartilage in the joint. In my study, no abnormality of well repaired joint surfaces employing MRI were observed in the patients with excellent or good results, and various degrees of cartilage lesions were detected using MRI in the other patients. MRI is a useful method for noninvasively determining the integrity of articular cartilage, detecting cartilage lesions and degenerative disorders of tibial condyle, and also may be useful in studying and following the natural aging process in osteoarthritis following intra-articular fractures. (author) 52 refs

  5. Noncontact evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration using a novel ultrasound water jet indentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M-H; Zheng, Y P; Huang, Q-H; Ling, C; Wang, Q; Bridal, L; Qin, L; Mak, A

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported a noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system for measuring and mapping tissue mechanical properties. The key idea was to utilize a water jet as an indenter as well as the coupling medium for high-frequency ultrasound. In this paper, the system was employed to assess articular cartilage degeneration, using stiffness ratio as an indicator of the mechanical properties of samples. Both the mechanical and acoustical properties of intact and degenerated bovine patellar articular cartilage (n = 8) were obtained in situ. It was found that the stiffness ratio was reduced by 44 +/- 17% after the articular cartilage was treated by 0.25% trypsin at 37 degrees C for 4 h while no significant difference in thickness was observed between the intact and degenerated samples. A significant decrease of 36 +/- 20% in the peak-to-peak amplitude of ultrasound echoes reflected from the cartilage surface was also found for the cartilage samples treated by trypsin. The results also showed that the stiffness obtained with the new method highly correlated with that measured using a standard mechanical testing protocol. A good reproducibility of the measurements was demonstrated. The present results showed that the ultrasound water jet indentation system may provide a potential tool for the non-destructive evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration by simultaneously obtaining mechanical properties, acoustical properties, and thickness data. PMID:19011965

  6. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  7. Repair of articular cartilage defects in minipigs by microfracture surgery and BMSCs transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of minimal invasive repair of cartilage defect by arthroscope-aided microfracture surgery and autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: Bone marrow of minipigs was taken out and the bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured to passage 3. Then 6 minipigs were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 knees in each group. After the articular cartilage defect was induced in each knee. the left defect received microfracture surgery and was injected with 2. 5 ml BMSCs cells at a concentration of 3×107 cells/ml into the articular cavity; while right knee got single microfracture or served as blank control group. The animals were killed at 8 or 16 weeks, and the repair tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically examined for the presence of type Ⅱ collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at 8 and 16 weeks. Results:Eight weeks after the surgery, the overlying articular surface of the cartilage defect showed normal color and integrated to adjacent cartilage. And 16 weeks after surgery, hyaline cartilage was observed at the repairing tissues and immunostaining indicated the diffuse presence of this type Ⅱ collagen and GAGs throughout the repair cartilage in the treated defects. Single microfracture group had the repairing of fibro-cartilage, while during the treatment, the defects of blank group were covered with fewer fiber tissues, and no blood capillary growth or any immunological rejection was observed. Conclusion:Microfracture technique and BMSCs transplantation to repair cartilage defect is characterized with minimal invasion and easy operation, and it will greatly promote the regeneration repair of articular cartilage defect.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  9. The use of dynamic culture devices in articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Akmal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineered repair of articular cartilage has now become a clinical reality with techniques for cell culture having advanced from laboratory experimentation to clinical application. Despite the advances in the use of this technology in clinical applications, the basic cell culture techniques for autologous chondrocytes are still based on primitive in-vitro monolayer culture methods. Articular chondrocytes are known to undergo fibroblastic change in monolayer culture as this is not their...

  10. Development of a Valid and Reliable Knee Articular Cartilage Condition–Specific Study Methodological Quality Score

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua D Harris; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; McCormick, Frank M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Nikhil N. Verma; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Condition-specific questionnaires are important components in evaluation of outcomes of surgical interventions. No condition-specific study methodological quality questionnaire exists for evaluation of outcomes of articular cartilage surgery in the knee. Purpose: To develop a reliable and valid knee articular cartilage–specific study methodological quality questionnaire. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A stepwise, a priori–designed framework was created for developme...

  11. Pregnane X receptor knockout mice display aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Azuma

    Full Text Available Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR, are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging.

  12. Pregnane X receptor knockout mice display aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kotaro; Casey, Stephanie C; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Blumberg, Bruce; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR), are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a) as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging. PMID:25749104

  13. [Basophilic line of the articular cartilage in normal and various pathological states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, L R

    1987-04-01

    Epiphyses of long tubular bones in the man and animals of various age, as well as experimental material of the adjuvant arthritis, with special reference to the basal part of the articular cartilage have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and histometrical methods. The structural-chemical organization of the basophilic line (tidemark) of the articular cartilage ensures its barrier role and participation in regulating selective permeability. Reconstruction of the tidemark in the process of physiological ageing and in cases of the articular pathology is aimed to preserve its integrity and in this way a complete differentiation of the noncalcified and calcified structures is secured. Disturbance of the basophilic line results in changes of the articular selective permeability, in invasion of vessels and structural elements of the bone marrow, and in development of profound distrophic and destructive changes of the cartilage--in deforming artrosis. Deflations in the structural-chemical organization of the tidemark indicate certain disturbances in the state of the system articular cartilage--subchondral bone. These data can be of prognostic importance. PMID:3606408

  14. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treat...

  15. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair – the state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, B.; Alini, M.; M Cucchiarini; GR Dodge; Eglin, D.; F Guilak; Madry, H.; Mata, A.; RL Mauck; CE Semino; MJ Stoddart

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the cu...

  16. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Goldring, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. T...

  17. Strain-Dependent Oxidant Release in Articular Cartilage Originates from Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    J, Brouillette M; S, Ramakrishnan P; M, Wagner V; E, Sauter E; J, Journot B; O, McKinley T; A, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is essential for articular cartilage homeostasis and plays a central role in the cartilage pathology, yet the mechanotransduction processes that underlie these effects remain unclear. Previously we showed that lethal amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were liberated from the mitochondria in response to mechanical insult, and that chondrocyte deformation may be a source of ROS. To this end, we hypothesized that mechanically-induced mitochondrial ROS is related to the m...

  18. Original Functional Rehabilitation Programme Based on Healing Physiology After Reconstruction of Articular Cartilage in Knee Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Guliyan, Volodymyr; Plenzler, Marcin; Straszewski, Dariusz; Paśnik, Marcin; Korbolewska, Olga; Suszczyński, Wojciech; Śmigielski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The evaluation of the quality of articular cartilage remodelling by means of arthroscopy findings and MRI imaging in a patient, who completed the original rehabilitation program. Methods: The rehabilitation program was conducted according to the Carolina Medical Center rehabilitation protocol. The patient was a 46 years old woman with fourth-degree cartilage damage (Outerbridge classification) located on the right medial femoral condyle of the following size: 1.5x2cm and 1x1.5cm. ...

  19. Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Schadow; Hans-Christian Siebert; Günter Lochnit; Jens Kordelle; Markus Rickert; Jürgen Steinmeyer

    2013-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen ...

  20. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  1. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  2. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  3. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Oe = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist (registered) , gadodiamide: Omniscan(TM), ioxaglate: Hexabrix(TM) or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  4. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, Tuomo S; Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kokkonen, Harri T; Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Physics, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Quinn, Thomas M [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Nieminen, Miika T [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, PO Box 50, 90029, Oulu (Finland)], E-mail: Tuomo.Silvast@uku.fi

    2009-11-21

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Oe = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist (registered) , gadodiamide: Omniscan(TM), ioxaglate: Hexabrix(TM) or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  5. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvast, Tuomo S; Kokkonen, Harri T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Quinn, Thomas M; Nieminen, Miika T; Töyräs, Juha

    2009-11-21

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Ø = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist((R)), gadodiamide: Omniscan, ioxaglate: Hexabrix or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity. PMID:19864699

  6. The determination of apoptosis rates on articular cartilages of ovariectomized rats with and without alendronate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Nuray; Balkarli, Huseyin; Soyuncu, Yetkin; Ozbey, Ozlem; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Korkusuz, Petek; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a major health problem characterized by compromised bone strength. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease that progresses slowly and is characterized by breakdown of the cartilage matrix. Alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BIS), inhibits bone loss and increases bone mineralization, and has been used clinically for the treatment of OP. It is still controversial whether BIS is effective in inhibiting the progression of OA. Chondrocyte apoptosis has been described in both human and experimentally induced OA models. In our study we aimed to detect whether ALN could protect articular cartilage from degeneration and reduce apoptosis rates in experimentally OA induced rats. For this rats were ovariectomized (ovex), nine weeks after operation rats were injected 30 µg/kg/week ALN subcutaneously for six weeks. After six weeks articular cartilages were obtained. We did Safranin O staining and Mankin and Pritzker scorings to evaluate degeneration and investigated the expressions of p53, cleaved caspase 3, Poly ADP-ribose (PAR), Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP 1), and applied TUNEL technique to determine apoptotis rates. We found a significant decrease in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) amount and increased apoptosis which indicates damage on articular cartilages of ovex rats. GAG amount was higher and apoptosis rate was lower on articular cartilages of ALN treated ovex rats compared to the ovex group. In contrary to studies showing that early ALN treatment has a protective effect, our study shows late ALN treatment has a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage since we treated rats nine weeks after ovariectomy. PMID:26631351

  7. Topographical mapping of biochemical properties of articular cartilage in the equine fetlock joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; Tekoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Karssenberg, D.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate topographical differences in the biochemical composition of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage of the normal equine fetlock joint. Water content, DNA content, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and a number of characteristics of the collagen network (t

  8. Glucosamine:chondroitin or ginger root extract have little effect on articular cartilage in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sows are culled at a high rate from breeding herds due to musclo-skeletal problems and lameness. Research in our laboratory has shown that even first-parity sows have significant amounts of osteochondritic lesions of their articular cartilage. Glusoamine chondroitin and ginger root extract have both...

  9. Cycloolefin-Copolymer/Polyethylene (COC/PE) Blend Assists with the Creation of New Articular Cartilage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrtýl, M.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Hulejová, H.; Polanská, M.; Lísal, J.; Danešová, J.; Černý, P.

    294-I, - (2010), s. 120-132. ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/06/0761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : articular cartilage * biomaterials * cycloolefin-copolymer blend Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  10. T2* mapping of articular cartilage: current status of research and first clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Weiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    T2* mapping is a relatively new method for the compositional assessment of the articular cartilage. Typically, a multigradient echo or an ultrashort echo time imaging technique with a range of short and very short echo times is used. In most studies, imaging is performed at a high field strength, that is, 3 and 7 T. Postprocessing includes exponential fitting of relaxation decay and manual region-of-interest-based measurements of T2* times on T2* maps. Detailed analyses of T2* times of articular cartilage have shown distinct T2* components with shorter and longer T2* times. Moreover, there is a zonal distribution with a significant depthwise gradient of T2*, with relatively short times near the osteochondral junction and relatively long times at the cartilage's surface. T2* times of normal articular cartilage at the knee are, when averaged over the whole cartilage thickness and using monoexponential fitting, approximately 20 milliseconds. The results of recent studies have shown a good test-retest as well as interreader and intrareader reliabilities for T2* mapping. This article provides a descriptive review of the current literature, briefly discusses the technique itself, and provides an outlook on future research questions and possible clinical applications. PMID:24056113

  11. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiao-lin; CHEN Wen-zhi; ZHOU Kun; WANG Zhi-biao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage. Methods: Ten adult New Zealand rabbits with bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defects on the cartilage surface of intercondylar fossas were used in this study. The wounds in the left knees were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as the experimental group. The right knees received no treatment as the control group. All the animals were killed at 8 weeks after injury and the tissues in the wounds were collected for gross appearance grading, histological grading and proteoglycan quantity. Results: The scores of the gross appearance grades, histological grades and the optical density of toluidine blue of the tissues in the experimental group were significantly higher than those of the controls at 8 weeks after injury (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound can accelerate the repair of injured articular cartilage.

  12. Identification of stable normalization genes for quantitative real-time PCR in porcine articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCulloch Ryan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels for genes of interest must be normalized with an appropriate reference, or housekeeping gene, to make accurate comparisons of quantitative real-time PCR results. The purpose of this study was to identify the most stable housekeeping genes in porcine articular cartilage subjected to a mechanical injury from a panel of 10 candidate genes. Results Ten candidate housekeeping genes were evaluated in three different treatment groups of mechanically impacted porcine articular cartilage. The genes evaluated were: beta actin, beta-2-microglobulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hydroxymethylbilane synthase, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase, peptidylprolyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A, ribosomal protein L4, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein subunit A, TATA box binding protein, and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein—zeta polypeptide. The stability of the genes was measured using geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder software. The four most stable genes measured via geNorm were (most to least stable succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A, peptidylprolyl isomerase A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta actin; the four most stable genes measured via BestKeeper were glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peptidylprolyl isomerase A, beta actin, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A; and the four most stable genes measured via NormFinder were peptidylprolyl isomerase A, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta actin. Conclusions BestKeeper, geNorm, and NormFinder all generated similar results for the most stable genes in porcine articular cartilage. The use of these appropriate reference genes will facilitate accurate gene expression studies of porcine articular cartilage and suggest appropriate housekeeping genes for articular cartilage studies in other species.

  13. Now approaches to the treatment of articular cartilage lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Coviello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various approaches to the treatment of cartilage defects have been proposed in the literature; reparative and regenerative methods and, more recently, the Maioregen technique are currently available.

  14. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  15. Viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage attached to subchondral bone at high frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Duncan ET

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is a viscoelastic material, but its exact behaviour under the full range of physiological loading frequencies is unknown. The objective of this study was to measure the viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage at loading frequencies of up to 92 Hz. Methods Intact tibial plateau cartilage, attached to subchondral bone, was investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. A sinusoidally varying compressive force of between 16 N and 36 N, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 92 Hz, was applied to the cartilage surface by a flat indenter. The storage modulus, loss modulus and phase angle (between the applied force and the deformation induced were determined. Results The storage modulus, E', increased with increasing frequency, but at higher frequencies it tended towards a constant value. Its dependence on frequency, f, could be represented by, E' = Aloge (f + B where A = 2.5 ± 0.6 MPa and B = 50.1 ± 12.5 MPa (mean ± standard error. The values of the loss modulus (4.8 ± 1.0 MPa mean ± standard deviation were much less than the values of storage modulus and showed no dependence on frequency. The phase angle was found to be non-zero for all frequencies tested (4.9 ± 0.6°. Conclusion Articular cartilage is viscoelastic throughout the full range of frequencies investigated. The behaviour has implications for mechanical damage to articular cartilage and the onset of osteoarthritis. Storage modulus increases with frequency, until the plateau region is reached, and has a higher value than loss modulus. Furthermore, loss modulus does not increase with loading frequency. This means that more energy is stored by the tissue than is dissipated and that this effect is greater at higher frequencies. The main mechanism for this excess energy to be dissipated is by the formation of cracks.

  16. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  17. In vitro of quantitative MR imaging of early degenerative changes in human articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the applicability of quantitative MR microscopy for the detection of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) depletion as an early sign of degeneration in the articular cartilage of humans treated by trypsin. Four cartilage-bone blocks were obtained from the patient who had suffered from osteoarthritis of the knee and underwent a total knee replacement arthroscopy. Each articular cartilage segment was resected as to a round disk shape (8 mm in diameter) with a remnant of subchondral bone 1 mm in thickness. Four different culture solutions were prepared, and these solutions were 0.2 mg/ml of trypsin solution (group 1), 1 mM of Gd (DTPA) 2-mixed trypsin solution (group 2), phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (group 3), and 1 mM of Gd (DTPA) 2-mixed PBS (group 4). The cartilages were cultured and then MR imagings were performed every hour for 5 hrs, and we continued the additional cultures of 24 hrs, 36 hrs and 48 hrs. Three imaging sequences were used: T1-weighted spin echo (TR/TE, 450/22), proton density turbo spin echo with fat suppression (TR/TE, 3000/25), and CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) (TR/TE/TI, 760/21-168, 360). MR imaging data were analyzed with pixel-by-pixel comparisons in all groups. The GAG loss in the articular cartilage was increased proportionately to the culture duration. Mean changes of T1 relaxation time were 1.2% for group 1, -1.9% for group 3, -54.7% for group 2 and -64.2% for group 4 (p< 0.05). When comparing by linear profile on the T1-weighted images, SNR increased and T1 relaxation time decreased for group 2 and 4, as the culture duration increased (p< 0.05). On the correlation analysis, there is significant correlation between GAG loss and Gd (DTPA) 2-enhancement for group 2 (p=0.0431), but there was no significant difference for group 4 (p=0.0918). More enhancement with Gd (DTPA) 2-was noted for group 2 than for group 4. Group 2 showed a diffuse enhancement in all the layers of cartilage, but for group 4, prominent enhancement was noted only in

  18. Determining Tension-Compression Nonlinear Mechanical Properties of Articular Cartilage from Indentation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Zhou, Yilu; Wang, Liyun; Santare, Michael H; Wan, Leo Q; Lu, X Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The indentation test is widely used to determine the in situ biomechanical properties of articular cartilage. The mechanical parameters estimated from the test depend on the constitutive model adopted to analyze the data. Similar to most connective tissues, the solid matrix of cartilage displays different mechanical properties under tension and compression, termed tension-compression nonlinearity (TCN). In this study, cartilage was modeled as a porous elastic material with either a conewise linear elastic matrix with cubic symmetry or a solid matrix reinforced by a continuous fiber distribution. Both models are commonly used to describe the TCN of cartilage. The roles of each mechanical property in determining the indentation response of cartilage were identified by finite element simulation. Under constant loading, the equilibrium deformation of cartilage is mainly dependent on the compressive modulus, while the initial transient creep behavior is largely regulated by the tensile stiffness. More importantly, altering the permeability does not change the shape of the indentation creep curves, but introduces a parallel shift along the horizontal direction on a logarithmic time scale. Based on these findings, a highly efficient curve-fitting algorithm was designed, which can uniquely determine the three major mechanical properties of cartilage (compressive modulus, tensile modulus, and permeability) from a single indentation test. The new technique was tested on adult bovine knee cartilage and compared with results from the classic biphasic linear elastic curve-fitting program. PMID:26240062

  19. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A; Torzilli, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strain-dependent material properties. Two loading conditions were simulated, one where the superficial zone was loaded with a porous platen (normal test) and the other where the deep zone was loaded with the porous platen (upside down test). Compressing the intact articular cartilage with 0.2 MPa stress reduced the surface permeability by 88%. Removing the superficial zone increased the rate of change for all mechanical parameters and decreased the fluid support ratio of the tissue, resulting in increased tissue deformation. Apparent permeability linearly increased after superficial removal in the normal test, yet it did not change in the upside down test. Orientation of the specimen affected the time-dependent biomechanical behavior of the articular cartilage, but not equilibrium behavior. The two tests with different specimen orientations resulted in very different apparent permeabilities, suggesting that in an experimental study which quantifies material properties of an inhomogeneous material, the specimen orientation should be stated along with the permeability result. The current study provides new insights into the role of the superficial zone on mechanical behavior of the articular cartilage. PMID:25465194

  20. Effect of corticosteroids on articular cartilage: have animal studies said everything?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Zhao, Yang; Nisolle, Jean-François; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhihong, Liu; Clegg, Peter; Gustin, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroids (CS) have been used in the treatment of osteoarthritis for many years, although their effects on articular cartilage are not fully understood. To identify whether previous animal studies have provided enough evidence about the effects of CS, we undertook a systematic review that identified 35 relevant in vivo animal experimental studies between 1965 and 2014 assessing the effects of CS on either normal cartilage, or in either induced osteoarthritis (OA) or synovitis. The quality of the methodology was assessed. Deleterious effects, both structural and biochemical, have mainly been reported in rabbits and are associated with frequent administration of CS, sometimes at high dose and with systemic side effects. In dogs, four identified studies concluded that there were beneficial effects with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and triamcinolone hexacetonide therapy. In horses, MPA was mostly deleterious, while triamcinolone acetonide had positive effects in one study highly rated at quality assessment. However, many methodological weaknesses have been identified, such as the lack of pharmacokinetic and pharmocodynamics data and the large variation in doses between studies, the limited selection criteria at baseline, the absence of blinding, and the lack of statistics or appropriate controls for testing the effects of the vehicle of the drug. Those methodological weaknesses weaken the conclusions of numerous studies that assess beneficial or deleterious effects of CS on articular cartilage. Animal studies have not yet provided definitive data, and further research is required into the role of CS in articular pathobiology. PMID:26211421

  1. Increasing lateral tibial slope: is there an association with articular cartilage changes in the knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nasir; Shepel, Michael; Leswick, David A.; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, and College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The geometry of the lateral tibial slope (LTS) plays an important role in the overall biomechanics of the knee. Through this study, we aim to assess the impact of LTS on cartilage degeneration in the knee. A retrospective analysis of 93 knee MRI scans (1.5 T or 3 T) for patients aged 20-45 years with no history of trauma or knee surgery, and absence of internal derangement. The LTS was calculated using the circle method. Chondropathy was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). Linear regression analysis was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). In our cohort of patients, a statistically significant association was seen between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patellar articular surface and the lateral tibial articular surface (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening chondropathy of the lateral patellar, medial trochlea, lateral trochlea, medial femoral, lateral femoral, and medial tibial articular surfaces. Our results show a statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patella and the lateral tibial plateau. We speculate that increased LTS may result in increased femoral glide over the lateral tibial plateau with subsequent increased external rotation of the femur predisposing to patellofemoral articular changes. Future arthroscopic studies are needed to further confirm our findings. (orig.)

  2. Increasing lateral tibial slope: is there an association with articular cartilage changes in the knee?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometry of the lateral tibial slope (LTS) plays an important role in the overall biomechanics of the knee. Through this study, we aim to assess the impact of LTS on cartilage degeneration in the knee. A retrospective analysis of 93 knee MRI scans (1.5 T or 3 T) for patients aged 20-45 years with no history of trauma or knee surgery, and absence of internal derangement. The LTS was calculated using the circle method. Chondropathy was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). Linear regression analysis was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). In our cohort of patients, a statistically significant association was seen between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patellar articular surface and the lateral tibial articular surface (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening chondropathy of the lateral patellar, medial trochlea, lateral trochlea, medial femoral, lateral femoral, and medial tibial articular surfaces. Our results show a statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patella and the lateral tibial plateau. We speculate that increased LTS may result in increased femoral glide over the lateral tibial plateau with subsequent increased external rotation of the femur predisposing to patellofemoral articular changes. Future arthroscopic studies are needed to further confirm our findings. (orig.)

  3. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates. PMID:27130474

  4. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  5. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  6. Evaluation using MRI T2 mapping of the articular cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament injury in young athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Articular cartilage damage coexisting in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in young athletes is not rare. We evaluated the conditions of the articular cartilage using MRI T2 mapping method and compared the vesults with the findings of arthroscopy. From June to August in 2010, we performed ACL reconstruction in 31 patients. We selected 17 cases (eleven men and six women, mean age 19.1 years old), all of whom were athletes and the under 29 years old. Articular cartilage damage was observed in six out of 10 cases, and their T2 values were high on MRI T2 mapping. On the other hand, damage was observed only in one out of seven cases, and T2 values were in the normal level of the mapping. Using MRI T2 mapping, we can evaluate the articular cartilage at an early phase noninvasively. MRI T2 mapping is useful and effective for athletes. (author)

  7. Activated platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Phuc Van; Bui, Khanh Hong-Thien; Ngo, Dat Quoc; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Truong, Nhung Hai; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Le, Dung Minh; Duong, Triet Dinh; Nguyen, Thanh Duc; Le, Vien Tuong; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation t...

  8. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  9. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. x 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components

  10. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A New Path in Articular Cartilage Defect Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Philipp Stromps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 6 million people undergo a variety of medical procedures for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the U.S. each year. Trauma, tumor, and age-related degeneration can cause major defects in articular cartilage, which has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. Therefore, there is substantial interest in the development of novel cartilage tissue engineering strategies to restore articular cartilage defects to a normal or prediseased state. Special attention has been paid to the expansion of chondrocytes, which produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix in healthy cartilage. This review summarizes the current efforts to generate chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and provides an outlook on promising future strategies.

  11. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  12. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesper, Tobias; Bittersohl, Daniela; Krauspe, Ruediger; Zilkens, Christoph [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Center of Hip Preservation and Children' s Orthopaedics, San Diego, CA (United States); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bittersohl, Bernd [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  13. Hyaluronic Acid-Binding Scaffold for Articular Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Unterman, Shimon A.; Gibson, Matthew; Lee, Janice H.; Crist, Joshua; Chansakul, Thanissara; Yang, Elaine C.; Jennifer H. Elisseeff

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an extracellular matrix molecule with multiple physical and biological functions found in many tissues, including cartilage. HA has been incorporated in a number of biomaterial and scaffold systems. Howegver, HA in the material may be difficult to control if it is not chemically modified and chemical modification of HA may negatively impact biological function. In this study, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel with noncovalent HA-binding capabilities and eva...

  14. Pathological change of articular cartilage in the mandibular head treated with immunosuppressant FK 506

    OpenAIRE

    Ueno, T; Kagawa, T; Kanou, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukunaga, J.; Mizukawa, N.; Sugahara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    While several reports have documented immunosuppressant-induced osteoporosis, the exact mechanism of the pathological change of the joint remains to be clarified. In the present study, we have demonstrated the pathological change of the articular cartilage in the mandibular head of five Sprague-Dawley rats administered with the immunosuppressant FK 506 for 28 days. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography of the mandibular heads in treated rats showed a ...

  15. Mechanical Stress and ATP Synthesis are coupled by Mitochondrial Oxidants in Articular Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Katherine J; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Brouillette, Marc J.; Journot, Brice; Mckinley, Todd O; Buckwalter, JA; Martin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation of articular cartilage under joint loading is evident and matrix synthesis seems to be critically tied to ATP. Chondrocytes utilize the glycolytic pathway for energy requirements but seem to require mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) to sustain ATP synthesis. The role of ROS in regulating ATP reserves under a mechanically active environment is not clear. It is believed that physiological strains cause deformation of the mitochondria, potentially releasing ROS for...

  16. Linking Cellular and Mechanical Processes in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation: A Mathematical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitanov, Georgi I.; Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    A severe application of stress on articular cartilage can initiate a cascade of biochemical reactions that can lead to the development of osteoarthritis. We constructed a multiscale mathematical model of the process with three components: cellular, chemical, and mechanical. The cellular component describes the different chondrocyte states according to the chemicals these cells release. The chemical component models the change in concentrations of those chemicals. The mechanical component cont...

  17. Poroelastic response of articular cartilage by nanoindentation creep tests at different characteristic lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffetani, M; Gottardi, R; Gastaldi, D; Raiteri, R; Vena, P

    2014-07-01

    Nanoindentation is an experimental technique which is attracting increasing interests for the mechanical characterization of articular cartilage. In particular, time dependent mechanical responses due to fluid flow through the porous matrix can be quantitatively investigated by nanoindentation experiments at different penetration depths and/or by using different probe sizes. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for the quantitative interpretation of the poroelastic response of articular cartilage subjected to creep nanoindentation tests. To this purpose, multiload creep tests using spherical indenters have been carried out on saturated samples of mature bovine articular cartilage achieving two main quantitative results. First, the dependence of indentation modulus in the drained state (at equilibrium) on the tip radius: a value of 500 kPa has been found using the large tip (400 μm radius) and of 1.7 MPa using the smaller one (25 μm). Secon, the permeability at microscopic scale was estimated at values ranging from 4.5×10(-16) m(4)/N s to 0.1×10(-16) m(4)/N s, from low to high equivalent deformation. Consistently with a poroelastic behavior, the size-dependent response of the indenter displacement disappears when characteristic size and permeability are accounted for. For comparison purposes, the same protocol was applied to intrinsically viscoelastic homogeneous samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS): both indentation modulus and time response have been found size-independent. PMID:24814573

  18. Electrostatic and Non-Electrostatic Contributions of Proteoglycans to the Compressive Equilibrium Modulus of Bovine Articular Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Guterl, Clare Canal; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents direct experimental evidence for assessing the electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions of proteoglycans to the compressive equilibrium modulus of bovine articular cartilage. Immature and mature bovine cartilage samples were tested in unconfined compression and their depth-dependent equilibrium compressive modulus was determined using strain measurements with digital image correlation analysis. The electrostatic contribution was assessed by testing samples in isoto...

  19. Articular cartilage echography as a criterion of the evolution of osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, F; Ettorre, G C; Patella, V; Macarini, L; Moretti, B; Pesce, V; Resta, L

    1993-01-01

    We propose a modification of the Aisen's technique by which precise reproducible measurements of articular cartilage thickness of the knee is possible. A group of 23 patients with severe osteoarthritis was studied by ultra-sound (US) before knee prosthesis surgery. Evaluation with US was performed by a real-time scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear probe with upper-patellar transverse scans tangent to the upper patellar pole at 90 degrees knee flexion. The cartilage thickness was measured within the weight-bearing area. After surgery, on the corresponding gross pathological specimen, US re-evaluation and histological measurements were made. Results of pre- and post-operative ultrasonography (US) data were compared with histological data and a good correlation between these measurements was found (p(t) > 10%). Preoperative measurements ranged from 2.4 to 0.3 mm. In order to obtain normal reference values of the articular cartilage within the weight-bearing area of the femoral trochlea for comparison, a group of 10 control subjects was also studied with US as above. The US data were then compared with computed tomography (arthro-CT) evaluations. No significant differences in mean values were found between the two imaging techniques (2.2 mm versus 2.3 mm for the lateral condyle and 2.3 versus 2.3 for the medial condyle, respectively). We conclude that ultra-sound measurement of articular cartilage thickness of femoral condyles is a sensitive and reproducible technique which permits early diagnosis and management of knee arthropathy and also quantification of cartilage damage. PMID:7995680

  20. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and Fisher's discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhi-Hua; Yin, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Xi; Wang, Xiao; Xia, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) technique can be used to obtain the quantitative information of content and spatial distribution of principal components in cartilage by combining with chemometrics methods. In this study, FTIRI combining with principal component analysis (PCA) and Fisher's discriminant analysis (FDA) was applied to identify the healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage samples. Ten 10-μm thick sections of canine cartilages were imaged at 6.25μm/pixel in FTIRI. The infrared spectra extracted from the FTIR images were imported into SPSS software for PCA and FDA. Based on the PCA result of 2 principal components, the healthy and OA cartilage samples were effectively discriminated by the FDA with high accuracy of 94% for the initial samples (training set) and cross validation, as well as 86.67% for the prediction group. The study showed that cartilage degeneration became gradually weak with the increase of the depth. FTIRI combined with chemometrics may become an effective method for distinguishing healthy and OA cartilages in future. PMID:26977354

  1. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  2. Composite three-dimensional woven scaffolds with interpenetrating network hydrogels to create functional synthetic articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, I-Chien; Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Zhao, Xuanhe; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-12-17

    The development of synthetic biomaterials that possess mechanical properties that mimic those of native tissues remains an important challenge to the field of materials. In particular, articular cartilage is a complex nonlinear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic material that exhibits a very low coefficient of friction, allowing it to withstand millions of cycles of joint loading over decades of wear. Here we show that a three-dimensionally woven fiber scaffold that is infiltrated with an interpenetrating network hydrogel can provide a functional biomaterial that provides the load-bearing and tribological properties of native cartilage. An interpenetrating dual-network "tough-gel" consisting of alginate and polyacrylamide was infused into a porous three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber scaffold, providing a versatile fiber-reinforced composite structure as a potential acellular or cell-based replacement for cartilage repair. PMID:24578679

  3. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates ΔR1 and ΔR2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T1 and T2 maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of ΔR1 and ΔR2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either ΔR1 or ΔR2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 ± 1.2 s-1, 15.9 ± 1.0 s-1) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 ± 0.9 s-1, 15.5 ± 0.9 s-1). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 ± 1.1 s-1, 9.8 ± 0.8 s-1) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 ± 1.1 s-1, 8.7 ± 0.7 s-1). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  4. Procyanidin B3 prevents articular cartilage degeneration and heterotopic cartilage formation in a mouse surgical osteoarthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailati Aini

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a common disease in the elderly due to an imbalance in cartilage degradation and synthesis. Heterotopic ossification (HO occurs when ectopic masses of endochondral bone form within the soft tissues around the joints and is triggered by inflammation of the soft tissues. Procyanidin B3 (B3 is a procyanidin dimer that is widely studied due to its high abundance in the human diet and antioxidant activity. Here, we evaluated the role of B3 isolated from grape seeds in the maintenance of chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo. We observed that B3 inhibited H(2O(2-induced apoptosis in primary chondrocytes, suppressed H(2O(2- or IL-1ß-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS production, and prevented IL-1ß-induced suppression of chondrocyte differentiation marker gene expression in primary chondrocytes. Moreover, B3 treatment enhanced the early differentiation of ATDC5 cells. To examine whether B3 prevents cartilage destruction in vivo, OA was surgically induced in C57BL/6J mice followed by oral administration of B3 or vehicle control. Daily oral B3 administration protected articular cartilage from OA and prevented chondrocyte apoptosis in surgically-induced OA joints. Furthermore, B3 administration prevented heterotopic cartilage formation near the surgical region. iNOS protein expression was enhanced in the synovial tissues and the pseudocapsule around the surgical region in OA mice fed a control diet, but was reduced in mice that received B3. Together, these data indicated that in the OA model, B3 prevented OA progression and heterotopic cartilage formation, at least in a part through the suppression of iNOS. These results support the potential therapeutic benefits of B3 for treatment of human OA and heterotopic ossification.

  5. Strain-dependent oxidant release in articular cartilage originates from mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, M J; Ramakrishnan, P S; Wagner, V M; Sauter, E E; Journot, B J; McKinley, T O; Martin, J A

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical loading is essential for articular cartilage homeostasis and plays a central role in the cartilage pathology, yet the mechanotransduction processes that underlie these effects remain unclear. Previously, we showed that lethal amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were liberated from the mitochondria in response to mechanical insult and that chondrocyte deformation may be a source of ROS. To this end, we hypothesized that mechanically induced mitochondrial ROS is related to the magnitude of cartilage deformation. To test this, we measured axial tissue strains in cartilage explants subjected to semi-confined compressive stresses of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 MPa. The presence of ROS was then determined by confocal imaging with dihydroethidium, an oxidant sensitive fluorescent probe. Our results indicated that ROS levels increased linearly relative to the magnitude of axial strains (r(2) = 0.87, p 40%. By contrast, hydrostatic stress, which causes minimal tissue strain, had no significant effect. Cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic Mn(III)tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride significantly decreased ROS levels at 0.5 and 0.25 MPa. Electron transport chain inhibitor, rotenone, and cytoskeletal inhibitor, cytochalasin B, significantly decreased ROS levels at 0.25 MPa. Our findings strongly suggest that ROS and mitochondrial oxidants contribute to cartilage mechanobiology. PMID:23896937

  6. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  7. Gender differences in knee joint cartilage thickness, volume and articular surface areas: assessment with quantitative three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the cartilage thickness, volume, and articular surface areas of the knee joint between young healthy, non-athletic female and male individuals. Subjects and design. MR imaging was performed in 18 healthy subjects without local or systemic joints disease (9 female, age 22.3±2.4 years, and 9 male, age 22.2.±1.9 years), using a fat-suppressed FLASH 3D pulse sequence (TR=41 ms, TE=11 ms, FA=30 ) with sagittal orientation and a spatial resolution of 2x0.31x0.31 mm3. After three-dimensional reconstruction and triangulation of the knee joint cartilage plates, the cartilage thickness (mean and maximal), volume, and size of the articular surface area were quantified, independent of the original section orientation. Results and conclusions: Women displayed smaller cartilage volumes than men, the percentage difference ranging from 19.9% in the patella, to 46.6% in the medial tibia. The gender differences of the cartilage thickness were smaller, ranging from 2.0% in the femoral trochlea to 13.3% in the medial tibia for the mean thickness, and from 4.3% in the medial femoral condyle to 18.3% in the medial tibia for the maximal cartilage thickness. The differences between the cartilage surface areas were similar to those of the volumes, with values ranging from 21.0% in the femur to 33.4% in the lateral tibia. Gender differences could be reduced for cartilage volume and surface area when normalized to body weight and body weight x body height. The study demonstrates significant gender differences in cartilage volume and surface area of men and women, which need to be taken into account when retrospectively estimating articular cartilage loss in patients with symptoms of degenerative joint disease. Differences in cartilage volume are primarily due to differences in joint surface areas (epiphyseal bone size), not to differences in cartilage thickness. (orig.)

  8. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures. PMID:20887036

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamadreza; Baghaban; Eslaminejad; Elham; Malakooty; Poor

    2014-01-01

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capac-ity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is as-sociated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechani-cal properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical pro-cedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morpho-logical features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular mate-rial for articular cartilage repair. These cells were origi-nally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic dif-ferentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticedat the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative proper-ties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable im-munomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  10. The effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen within articular cartilage on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage. This study was exempted by the institutional and animal review boards, and informed consent was not required. Twelve porcine patellae were assigned to three groups of control, trypsin-treated (proteoglycan-degraded), or collagenase-treated (collagen-degraded). The T1rho images were obtained with a 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a single loop coil. Statistical differences were detected by analysis of variance to evaluate the effects of the enzyme on T1rho relaxation time. Safranin-O was used to stain proteoglycan in the articular cartilage and immunohistochemical staining was performed for type II collagen. Mean T1rho values of the control, trypsin-treated, and collagenase-treated groups were 37.72 +/- 5.82, 57.53 +/- 8.24, and 45.08 +/- 5.31 msec, respectively (p < 0.001). Histology confirmed a loss of proteoglycan and type II collagen in the trypsin- and collagenase-treated groups. Degradation of proteoglycans and collagen fibers in the articular cartilage increased the articular cartilage T1rho value.

  11. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  12. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1 and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic

  13. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  14. THE FUNCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A CELL-ENGINEERED CONSTRUCT FOR THE REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Sevastianov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an analysis of the functional effectiveness of a biomedical cell product consisting of a biopolymer microheterogeneous collagen-containing hydrogel (BMCH, human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADMSCs, and chondrogenic induction medium in the regeneration of articular cartilage. Materials and methods. The test model of the adjuvant arthritis was used (female Soviet Chinchilla rabbits with the further development into osteoarthrosis (OA combined with the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histochemical trials. Results. On Day 92 of the OA model it has been found that the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH with hADMSCs into the left knee joint (n = 3 30 days after the OA modeling, as opposed to the right joint (negative control, n = 3, stimulates the regenerative processes of the cartilaginous tissue structure characterized by the formation of chondrocyte «columns», the emergence of isogenic groups in the intracellular matrix and the regeneration of its structure. Upon the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH (n = 3 such effects are markedly less pronounced. Conclusions. A significant regenerative potential of a cell-engineered construct of human articular tissue (CEC ATh has been proven. It is possible to presume that biostimulating properties of CEC ATh are due to the activating effect of a biomedical cell product on the stem cell migration processes from the surrounding tissue into the injured area with their subsequent differentiation. 

  15. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  16. Study on nano-structured hydroxyapatite/zirconia stabilized yttria on healing of articular cartilage defect in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sotoudeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Articular Cartilage has limited potential for self-repair and tissue engineering approaches attempt to repair articular cartilage by scaffolds. We hypothesized that the combined hydroxyapatite and zirconia stabilized yttria would enhance the quality of cartilage healing. METHODS: In ten New Zealand white rabbits bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defect, 4 mm in diameter and 3 mm depth, was created on the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of the distal femur. In group I the scaffold was implanted into the right stifle and the same defect was created in the left stifle without any transplant (group II. Specimens were harvested at 12 weeks after implantation, examined histologically for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type-II collagen. RESULTS: In group I the defect was filled with a white translucent cartilage tissue In contrast, the defects in the group II remained almost empty. In the group I, the defects were mostly filled with hyaline-like cartilage evidenced but defects in group II were filled with fibrous tissue with surface irregularities. Positive immunohistochemical staining of type-II collagen was observed in group I and it was absent in the control group. CONCLUSION: The hydroxyapatite/yttria stabilized zirconia scaffold would be an effective scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  18. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  19. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙炜; 金大地; 王吉兴; 秦立赟; 刘晓霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-methyl thiocarbamate (SMT), on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits. Methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits, aged 8 months and weighing 2.5 kg±0.2 kg, were used in this study. Cartilage defects in full thickness were created on the intercondylar articular surface of bilateral femurs of all the rabbits. Then the rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 in each group). The defects in one group were filled with fibrin glue impregnated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, BMP group), in one group with fibrin glue impregnated with rhBMP-2 and hypodermic injection with SMT (SMT group) and in the other group with nothing (control group). All the animals were killed at one year postoperatively. The tissue sections were stained with safranine O-fast green and analyzed by Quantiment 500 system to determine the content of glycosaminoglycan through measuring the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the thickness of cartilages and the mean gray scale (average stain intensity). Radiolabelled sodium sulphate (Na235SO4) was used to assess the proteoglycan synthesis. Results: At one year postoperatively, the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the mean gray scale and the cartilage thickness of the repaired tissues in SMT group were significantly higher than those of BMP group (P<0.01) and the control group (P<0.05). Result of incorporation of Na235SO4 showed that the proteoglycan synthesis in SMT group was higher than those of BMP group and the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: SMT, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, can significantly increase the content of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan synthesis, and computer-based image analysis is a reliable method for evaluating proteoglycan metabolism.

  20. Designed composites for mimicking compressive mechanical properties of articular cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Youjia; Wu, Hua; Sun, Shaofa; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Jingjing; Wan, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Collagen, chitosan-polycaprolactone (CH-PCL) copolymer with PCL content of around 40wt% and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were mixed together at various ratios to prepare collagen/CH-PCL/CS composites and the resulting composites were used to build stratified porous scaffolds that are potentially applicable for articular cartilage repair. The ternary composites were designed in such a way that collagen content in the scaffolds decreased from the top layer to the bottom layer while the content of CH-PCL and CS altered in a reversed trend in order to reach partial similarity to cartilage matrix in the composition of main components. Porous structures inside collagen/CH-PCL/CS scaffolds were constructed using a low-temperature deposition processing technique and graded average pore-size and porosity for the scaffolds were established. Such produced scaffolds were further crosslinked using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide under optimized conditions, and the obtained scaffolds showed well-defined elastic compressive properties. Compressive modulus (E) and stress at 10% strain (σ10) of full scaffolds in wet state reached about 2.8MPa and 0.3MPa, respectively, and meanwhile, E and σ10 of layers inside hydrated scaffolds changed in a gradient-increased manner from the top layer to the bottom layer with significant differences between contiguous layers, which partially mimics compressive mechanical properties of cartilage matrix. In addition, in vitro culture of cell-scaffold constructs exhibited that scaffolds were able to well support the ingrowth and migration of seeded cells, and cells also showed relatively uniform distribution throughout the scaffolds. These results suggest that the presently developed collagen/CH-PCL/CS scaffolds have promising potential for applications in articular cartilage repair. PMID:24793172

  1. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair – the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Johnstone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach – combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  2. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B.; Thomsen, C.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bliddal, H.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...

  3. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Pawlak; J. Kotynska; Figaszewski, Z A; A. Gadomski; A. Gudaniec; A. Oloyede

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a funct...

  4. Reactive oxygen species induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes and human articular cartilage explants

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Jakob; Varoga, Deike; Wruck, Christoph J.; Kurz, Bodo; Goldring, Mary B.; Pufe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes cartilage-degrading pathways, and there is evidence for the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cartilage degeneration. However, a relationship between ROS and VEGF has not been reported. Here, we investigate whether the expression of VEGF is modulated by ROS. Aspirates of synovial fluid from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were examined for intra-articular VEGF using ELISA. Immortalized C28/I2 chondrocytes and human knee cartil...

  5. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26987846

  6. Effects of friction on the unconfined compressive response of articular cartilage: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, R L; Suh, J K; Mow, V C

    1990-05-01

    A finite element analysis is used to study a previously unresolved issue of the effects of platen-specimen friction on the response of the unconfined compression test; effects of platen permeability are also determined. The finite element formulation is based on the linear KLM biphasic model for articular cartilage and other hydrated soft tissues. A Galerkin weighted residual method is applied to both the solid phase and the fluid phase, and the continuity equation for the intrinsically incompressible binary mixture is introduced via a penalty method. The solid phase displacements and fluid phase velocities are interpolated for each element in terms of unknown nodal values, producing a system of first order differential equations which are solved using a standard numerical finite difference technique. An axisymmetric element of quadrilateral cross-section is developed and applied to the mechanical test problem of a cylindrical specimen of soft tissue in unconfined compression. These studies show that interfacial friction plays a major role in the unconfined compression response of articular cartilage specimens with small thickness to diameter ratios. PMID:2345443

  7. Ongoing studies of cell-based therapies for articular cartilage defects in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogura T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Ogura,1 Akihiro Tsuchiya,2 Shuichi Mizuno1 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Funabashi Orthopaedic Hospital Sports Medicine Center, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Recently, cell-based therapies have generated great interest in the repair of articular cartilage defects and degeneration. Surgical treatments for these indications have multiple options, including marrow stimulation, osteochondral autograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation technique has been improved using a cell scaffold and other devices. Meanwhile, advanced cell-based therapies, including cultured stem cell treatment, have been studied in clinical trials. Most studies have been designed and authorized by institutional review boards and/or the regulatory agencies of the investigators’ countries. For cellular products in regenerative medicine, regulations of many countries are amenable to expedited approval. This paper aims to provide an update on ongoing and prospective cell-based therapies, focusing on articular cartilage injury at designated institutions authorized by the Japanese Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Agency. Keywords: autologous chondrocyte implantation, mesenchymal stem cell, knee joint

  8. Characterization and Localization of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan in Human Articular Cartilage.

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    Tibor T Glant

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease of the synovial joints. The autoimmune character of RA is underscored by prominent production of autoantibodies such as those against IgG (rheumatoid factor, and a broad array of joint tissue-specific and other endogenous citrullinated proteins. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA can be detected in the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients and ACPA seropositivity is one of the diagnostic criteria of RA. Studies have demonstrated that RA T cells respond to citrullinated peptides (epitopes of proteoglycan (PG aggrecan, which is one of the most abundant macromolecules of articular cartilage. However, it is not known if the PG molecule is citrullinated in vivo in human cartilage, and if so, whether citrulline-containing neoepitopes of PG (CitPG can contribute to autoimmunity in RA.CitPG was detected in human cartilage extracts using ACPA+ RA sera in dot blot and Western blot. Citrullination status of in vitro citrullinated recombinant G1 domain of human PG (rhG1 was confirmed by antibody-based and chemical methods, and potential sites of citrullination in rhG1 were explored by molecular modeling. CitPG-specific serum autoantibodies were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and CitPG was localized in osteoarthritic (OA and RA cartilage using immunohistochemistry.Sera from ACPA+ RA patients reacted with PG purified from normal human cartilage specimens. PG fragments (mainly those containing the G1 domain from OA or RA cartilage extracts were recognized by ACPA+ sera but not by serum from ACPA- individuals. ACPA+ sera also reacted with in vitro citrullinated rhG1 and G3 domain-containing fragment(s of PG. Molecular modeling suggested multiple sites of potential citrullination within the G1 domain. The immunohistochemical localization of CitPG was different in OA and RA cartilage.CitPG is a new member of citrullinated proteins identified in human joints. CitPG could be found in

  9. Quantitative analysis of rough endoplasmic reticulum in chondrocytes of articular and tracheal cartilage of rabbits following the systemic administration of hydrocortisone.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Itani; Kanai, K.; Watanabe, J.; Ogawa, R; Kanamura, S

    1992-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in chondrocytes was analysed stereologically in articular cartilage of knee joints and in tracheal cartilage of rabbits injected intramuscularly with 5 mg/kg hydrocortisone daily for 4 wk. In articular cartilage, RER area per unit cytoplasmic volume decreased in chondrocytes in all (superficial, middle and deep) zones, although the volume of glycogen deposits per unit cytoplasmic volume increased in the middle and deep zones. RER area per chondrocyte also...

  10. Micro- and Nanomechanical Analysis of Articular Cartilage by Indentation-Type Atomic Force Microscopy: Validation with a Gel-Microfiber Composite

    OpenAIRE

    LOPARIC, Marko; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Raiteri, Roberto; VanLandingham, Mark R.; Guex, Geraldine; Martin, Ivan; Aebi, Ueli; Stolz, Martin

    2010-01-01

    As documented previously, articular cartilage exhibits a scale-dependent dynamic stiffness when probed by indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM). In this study, a micrometer-size spherical tip revealed an unimodal stiffness distribution (which we refer to as microstiffness), whereas probing articular cartilage with a nanometer-size pyramidal tip resulted in a bimodal nanostiffness distribution. We concluded that indentation of the cartilage's soft proteoglycan (PG) gel gave rise to...

  11. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  12. Mechanical stress and ATP synthesis are coupled by mitochondrial oxidants in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Katherine J; Ramakrishnan, Prem S; Brouillette, Marc J; Journot, Brice J; McKinley, Todd O; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic adaptation of articular cartilage under joint loading is evident and matrix synthesis seems to be critically tied to ATP. Chondrocytes utilize the glycolytic pathway for energy requirements but seem to require mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) to sustain ATP synthesis. The role of ROS in regulating ATP reserves under a mechanically active environment is not clear. It is believed that physiological strains cause deformation of the mitochondria, potentially releasing ROS for energy production. We hypothesized that mechanical loading stimulates ATP synthesis via mitochondrial release of ROS. Bovine osteochondral explants were dynamically loaded at 0.5 Hz with amplitude of 0.25 MPa for 1 h. Cartilage response to mechanical loading was assessed by imaging with dihydroethidium (ROS indicator) and a Luciferase-based ATP assay. Electron transport inhibitor rotenone and mitochondrial ROS scavenger MitoQ significantly suppressed mechanically induced ROS production and ATP synthesis. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial ROS are produced as a result of physiological mechanical strains. Taken together with our previous findings of ROS involvement in blunt impact injuries, mitochondrial ROS are important contributors to cartilage metabolic adaptation and their precise role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis warrants further investigation. PMID:22930474

  13. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  14. Promotion of the articular cartilage proteoglycan degradation by T-2 toxin and selenium protective effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-yuan LI; Jun-ling CAO; Zhong-li SHI; Jing-hong CHEN; Zeng-tie ZHANG; Clare E. HUGHES; Bruce CATERSON

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify the relationship between T-2 toxin and Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), the effects of T-2 toxin on aggrecan metabolism in human chondrocytes and cartilage were investigated in vitro. Methods: Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage and cultured in vitro. Hyaluronic acid (HA), soluble CD44 (sCD44), IL-1β and TNF-α levels in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD44 content in chondrocyte membrane was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). CD44, hyaluronic acid synthetase-2 (HAS-2) and aggrecanases mRNA levels in chondrocytes were determined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunocytochemical method was used to investigate expressions of BC-13, 3-B-3(-) and 2-B-6 epitopes in the cartilage reconstructed in vitro. Results: T-2 toxin inhibited CD44, HAS-2, and aggrecan mRNA expressions, but promoted aggrecanase-2 mRNA expression. Meanwhile, CD44 expression was found to be the lowest in the chondrocytes cultured with T-2 toxin and the highest in control plus selenium group. In addition,ELISA results indicated that there were higher sCD44, IL-1β and TNF-α levels in T-2 toxin group. Similarly, higher HA levels were also observed in T-2 toxin group using radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA). Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies BC-13, 3-B-3 and 2-B-6, strong positive immunostaining was found in the reconstructed cartilage cultured with T-2 toxin, whereas no positive staining or very weak staining was observed in the cartilage cultured without T-2 toxin. Selenium could partly inhibit the effects of T-2 toxin above. Conclusion: T-2 toxin could inhibit aggrecan synthesis, promote aggrecanases and pro-inflammatory cytokines production, and consequently induce aggrecan degradation in chondrocytes. These will perturb metabolism balance between aggrecan synthesis and degradation in cartilage, inducing aggrecan loss in the end, which may be the initiation of the cartilage

  15. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  16. A Validated Model of the Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine Balancing Act in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayi eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA. A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Towards this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012 (single impact and Wang et al. (2014 (cyclic loading, focusing on the balancing act' between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies.

  17. A validated model of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balancing act in articular cartilage lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J; Ayati, Bruce P; Martin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012) (single impact) and Wang et al. (2014) (cyclic loading), focusing on the "balancing act" between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies. PMID:25806365

  18. Clinical Trial and In Vitro Study for the Role of Cartilage and Synovia in Acute Articular Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langenmair, E. R.; Kubosch, E. J.; Salzmann, G. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis is a long-term complication of acute articular infections. However, the roles of cartilage and synovia in this process are not yet fully understood. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition o...

  19. Variation in viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant loading frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan ET

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variation in viscoelastic properties of femoral head bovine articular cartilage, on-bone, over five orders of magnitude of loading frequency. These frequencies ranged from below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant frequencies, using

  20. Reproducibility and accuracy of quantitative assessment of articular cartilage volume measurements with 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Wei; SHENG Jing; CHEN Wen-hua; TIAN Jian-ming; ZHANG Li-rong; WANG Dong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of articular cartilage represents a powerful tool in osteoarthritis research, but has so far been confined to a field strength of 1.5 T. The aim of the study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of qMRI assessments of the knee cartilage volume by comparing quantitative swine cartilage volumes of the sagittal (sag) multi echo data imagine combination water-excitation (MEDICwe) sequence and the fast low-angle shoot water-excitation (FLASHwe) sequence at 3.0-T MRI to directly measured volumes (DMV) of the surgically removed articular cartilage.Methods Test-retest MRI was acquired in 20 swine knees. Two sag FLASHwe sequences and two sag MEDICwe sequences (spatial resolution 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 1.0 mm of 3-dimension (3D) were acquired at 3-T MRI in a knee.Articular cartilage volume was calculated from 3D reformations of the MRI by using a manual program. Calculated volumes were compared with DMV of the surgically removed articular cartilage. Knee joint cartilage plates were quantified paired in order.Results In the knee joint of swine, reproducibility errors (paired analysis) for cartilage volume were 2.5% to 3.2% with sag FLASHwe, and 1.6% to 3.0% with sag MEDICwe. Correlation coefficients between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from 0.90 to 0.98 for cartilage volume. Systematic pairwise difference between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from -1.1% to 2.8%. Random pairwise differences between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from (2.9 ±2.4)% to (6.8±4.5)%.Conclusions FLASHwe and MEDICwe sequences permit highly accurate and reproducible analysis of cartilage volume in the knee joints of swine at 3-T MRI. Cartilage volume reproducibility for the MEDICwe data is slightly higher than the FLASHwe data.

  1. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  2. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Brian [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Mann, Sumeer A. [Department of Radiology, University of Alberta, Walter Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2B7 (Canada); King, Chris [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, Bruce B., E-mail: bruce.forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  3. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis

  4. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  5. Protocols for the in vitro design of animal articular cartilage based on tissue engineering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Correa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is the structure that covers the joint ends. It has some specific tasks crucial to the correct joint physiology. It may experience a large amount of injuries that could generate considerable disabilities. Unfortunately its selfrepair capacity is too limited; therefore, many treatments have been developed with partial success, given the suboptimal biomechanical behavior of the resultant tissue. Given that, Tissue Engineering offers an alternative, based on the design of a new tissue with biological and biomechanical features which resembles the native tissue. In this work, the authors describe the methodologies followed to accomplish that goal, studying the chondrocytes harvesting, the cellular cultures, the scaffold seeding processes, the mechanical stimulation and the structural and biomechanical evaluation. Finally, exposed some of the preliminary results, as a experimental validation of the methods proposed are.

  6. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  7. MRI properties of a unique hypo-intense layer in degraded articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Badar, Farid; Xia, Yang

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a hypo-intense laminar appearance in articular cartilage under external loading, microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) T1, T2 and T1ρ experiments of a total of 15 specimens of healthy and trypsin-degraded cartilage were performed at different soaking solutions (saline and 100 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS)). T2 and T1ρ images of the healthy tissue in saline showed no load-induced laminar appearance, while a hypo-intense layer was clearly visible in the deep part of the degraded tissue at the magic angle. A significant difference was found between T2 values at 0° and 55° (from 16.5  ±  2.8 ms to 20.2  ±  2.7 ms, p  =  0.0005), and at 0° and 90° (16.5  ±  2.8 ms to 21.3  ±  2.6 ms, p  <  0.0001) in saline solution. In contrast, this hypo-intense laminar appearance largely disappeared when tissue was soaked in PBS. The visualization of this hypo-intensity appearance in different soaking mediums calls for caution in interpreting the data of relaxation times, chemical exchange and collagen fiber deformation.

  8. MR evaluation of the articular cartilage of the femoral head during traction. Correlation with resected femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, K. [Osaka Seamens Insurance Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Tanaka, H.; Narumi, Y.; Nakamura, H. [Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishii, T.; Masuhara, K. [Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose was to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint with MR during traction and compare the findings with the resected specimen or arthroscopic findings. Material and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers, 5 patients with osteonecrosis, 5 with acetabular dysplasia, and 5 with advanced osteoarthrosis underwent MR imaging to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint. Coronal fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were obtained during traction. Identical imaging was performed of all the resected femoral heads of the osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis patients, and was correlated with the macroscopic pathological findings. Results: The traction was effective and the femoral articular cartilage was clearly identified in all 8 control subjects, and in all cases of osteonecrosis and acetabular dysplasia. In 4 cases of osteonecrosis, chondral fracture was identified in the boundary between the necrosis and the normal area. In all cases of advanced osteoarthrosis, cartilage was identified only at the medial side. The MR images of osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis corresponded well with the MR images of the resected femoral heads and the macroscopic findings. (orig.)

  9. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and non-linear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Ugryumova, Nadya; Knapp, Karen M.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Equine articular cartilage has been imaged using both polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and non-linear microscopy. PS-OCT has been used to spatially map the birefringence in the cartilage and we have found that in the vicinity of the lesion the images display a characteristic disruption in the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. x2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We have also imaged the cartilage using non-linear microscopy and compare the scans taken with second harmonic generation (SHG) light and the two photon fluorescence (TPF) light. SHG images collected using 800 nm excitation reveals the spatial distribution of collagen fibers, whilst TPF images clearly shows the distribution of intracellular and pericellular fluorophores.

  10. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pawlak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration fromthe microelectrophoretic method. Liposome membrane was prepared as an aqueous solution of NaCl under variouspH conditions. Microelectrophoresis was used to examine the local acid-base equilibrium of the electrolytes with themembrane surface, which can be considered to model the phospholipids interface in articular cartilage.Findings: The adsorbed ions (H+, OH-, Na+, Cl- which are present in the electrically charged solutions of liposomemembrane comprising phosphatidycholine (PC, were found to exhibit pH-responsive quasi-periodic behavior.Research limitations/implications: We have established that the acid-base dissociation behavior inphospholipid bilayers of articular cartilage is a key to understanding biolubrication processes. For example,previous investigators found that the formation of the multilayer of polyisopeptide/hyaluronic acid depends onsurface properties such as film thickness, surface friction, surface wetability; wetness and swelling behavior.Future work should consider the adsorption of polyelectrolyte ions, e.g., the glycoprotein lubricin and hyaluronan,on the liposome membrane surface in the presence of H+ and OH- ions.Originality/value: A novel model of the joints’ phospholipid bilayers has been created using liposome membraneThis model can be applied in the investigation of polyelectrolyte ions such as lubricin, in articular cartilage. Wehave demonstrated that the acid-base processes on

  11. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. Material and Methods: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58 years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol/l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. Results: Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images ( P <0.002). I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA ( P <0.01). Furthermore, a better delineation of the cartilage in the synovial/cartilage zone and of the chondral/subchondral border was observed. Conclusion: The dGEMRIC MRI method markedly improved delineation of hip joint cartilage compared to non-enhanced MRI. The i.a. Gd-DTPA provided the best cartilage delineation. dGEMRIC is a clinically applicable MRI method that may improve identification of early subtle cartilage damage and the accuracy of volume measurements of hip joint cartilage

  12. Specificity of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Microspectroscopy to Estimate Depth-Wise Proteoglycan Content in Normal and Osteoarthritic Human Articular Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Saarakkala, Simo; Julkunen, Petro

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy is a promising method for estimating the depth-wise composition of articular cartilage. The aim was to compare the specificity of two earlier introduced, presumably proteoglycan (PG)–specific FTIR parameters (i.e., absorption in the carbohydrate region with and without normalization with Amide I absorption) to estimate the reference PG content of normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage. This study is a direct continua...

  13. Measurement of articular cartilage volumes in the normal knee by magnetic resonance imaging. Can cartilage volumes be estimated from physical characteristics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent times several studies have been performed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for imaging cartilage. A fat-suppressed three-dimensional sequence is one such noteworthy example. More recent studies have reported that the total volume of cartilage in a knee joint can be elucidated using this sequence. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the total volume of cartilage in the knee joint may reflect certain other physical characteristics. The purpose of the current study was to clarify the articular cartilage volumes of the patella and femur in the human knee joints of healthy adults using MRI and to analyze the correlation of these volumes with other physical characteristics. The material comprised 68 knees of 68 Japanese healthy volunteers, aged from their twenties to their forties (37 men and 31 women) who had no past history of joint disease or trauma in the legs. The knees were imaged by MRI with a fat-suppressed three-dimensional sequence, and the cartilage volumes were calculated by computer processing. The factors analyzed were age, body weight, height, leg length, foot size, circumferences of the thigh and lower leg, the distance between medial and lateral femoral condyles, the diameter of the tibial head, body mass index, general joint laxity, quadriceps angle, and leg-heel alignment. The mean cartilage volume was 7.6±1.6 cm3 (8.3±1.6 cm3 in men, 6.7±0.9 cm3 in women). It was significantly larger in men than in women. However, the volume positively correlated with body weight, height, leg length, and foot size, without distinction of gender or age. Based on these data, a multiple regression analysis was developed: cartilage volume 0.113 x height-11.053. We concluded that the cartilage volume depends on physical size regardless of gender, and it can be estimated from factors of physical size. (author)

  14. A novel computational modelling to describe the anisotropic, remodelling and reorientation behaviour of collagen fibrres in articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, S; Alves, J L

    2016-01-01

    In articular cartilage the orientation of collagen fibres is not uniform, varying mostly with the depth on the tissue. Besides, the biomechanical response of each layer of the articular cartilage differs from the neighbouring ones, evolving through thickness as a function of the distribution, density and orientation of the collagen fibres. Based on a finite element implementation, a new continuum formulation is proposed to describe the remodelling and reorientation of the collagen fibres under arbitrary mechanical loads: the cartilaginous tissue is modelled based on a hyperelastic formulation, being the ground isotropic matrix described by a neo-Hookean law and the fibrillar anisotropic part modelled by a new anisotropic formulation introduced for the first time in the present work, in which both reorientation and remodelling are taken into account. To characterize the orientation of fibres, a structure tensor is defined to represent the expected distribution and orientation of fibres around a reference direc...

  15. Melanocortin 1 receptor-signaling deficiency results in an articular cartilage phenotype and accelerates pathogenesis of surgically induced murine osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Lorenz

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR. MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1 in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e. OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT-analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more

  16. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  17. Variations in radiographic appearance of articular cartilage of knee joints in persons of 35 to 65 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    Himani Pulivarthi; Vasantha Maddikunta; P. Koteswara Rao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive degenerative disease characterized by gradual loss of articular cartilage. Osteoarthritis is not a normal process of ageing processes. Age related changes are distinct from osteoarthritic changes but when coupled with certain precipitating factors like obesity, muscle weakness and neurological dysfunction may play an important role in the causation of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis occurrence appears to increase with patient's age in a non-li...

  18. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig: the influence of multiple defects per knee

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke; Vingtoft, Louise; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Ringgaard, Steffen; Lind, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen ...

  19. A fibrin/hyaluronic acid hydrogel for the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells and potential for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Timothy N; Madhavan, Krishna; Intrator, Miranda; Dregalla, Ryan C.; Park, Daewon

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting approximately 27 million Americans, and even more worldwide. OA is characterized by degeneration of subchondral bone and articular cartilage. In this study, a chondrogenic fibrin/hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel seeded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was investigated as a method of regenerating these tissues for OA therapy. This chondrogenic hydrogel system can be delivered in a minimally invas...

  20. Type II and VI collagen in nasal and articular cartilage and the effect of IL-1 alpha on the distribution of these collagens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.D.C. Jansen; A.P. Hollander; D.J. Buttle; V. Everts

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of type II and VI collagen was immunocytochemically investigated in bovine articular and nasal cartilage. Cartilage explants were used either fresh or cultured for up to 4 weeks with or without interleukin 1α (IL-1α). Sections of the explants were incubated with antibodies for both

  1. Multiphasic modeling of charged solute transport across articular cartilage: Application of multi-zone finite-bath model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-06-14

    Charged and uncharged solutes penetrate through cartilage to maintain the metabolic function of chondrocytes and to possibly restore or further breakdown the cartilage tissue in different stages of osteoarthritis. In this study the transport of charged solutes across the various zones of cartilage was quantified, taken into account the physicochemical interactions between the solute and the cartilage constituents. A multiphasic finite-bath finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate equine cartilage diffusion experiments that used a negatively charged contrast agent (ioxaglate) in combination with serial micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to measure the diffusion. By comparing the FE model with the experimental data both the diffusion coefficient of ioxaglate and the fixed charge density (FCD) were obtained. In the multiphasic model, cartilage was divided into multiple (three) zones to help understand how diffusion coefficient and FCD vary across cartilage thickness. The direct effects of charged solute-FCD interaction on diffusion were investigated by comparing the diffusion coefficients derived from the multiphasic and biphasic-solute models. We found a relationship between the FCD obtained by the multiphasic model and ioxaglate partitioning obtained from micro-CT experiments. Using our multi-zone multiphasic model, diffusion coefficient of the superficial zone was up to ten-fold higher than that of the middle zone, while the FCD of the middle zone was up to almost two-fold higher than that of the superficial zone. In conclusion, the developed finite-bath multiphasic model provides us with a non-destructive method by which we could obtain both diffusion coefficient and FCD of different cartilage zones. The outcomes of the current work will also help understand how charge of the bath affects the diffusion of a charged molecule and also predict the diffusion behavior of a charged solute across articular cartilage. PMID:27033729

  2. An ultrasound biomicroscopic and water jet ultrasound indentation method for detecting the degenerative changes of articular cartilage in a rabbit model of progressive osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexiang; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Aijun; Wan, Wenbo; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-06-01

    It is important to assess the early degeneration of articular cartilage associated with osteoarthritis (OA) for early intervention and treatment planning. Previously, we have developed a high frequency ultrasound and water jet indentation method for the morphologic, acoustic and mechanical assessment of articular cartilage, using the enzymatic digestion as a model of osteoarthritic degeneration. No naturally degenerated articular cartilage has been tested with the developed method. In this study, we aimed to determine the usefulness of the developed method for detecting the natural degeneration of articular cartilage in a standard surgical model of OA in rabbits. Forty adult New Zealand white female rabbits were used in this study, which included 30 experimental rabbits undergoing the right anterior cruciate ligament transection surgery and 10 control rabbits. At the 3rd, 6th, and 9th week post-surgery, 10 experimental rabbits were sacrificed, respectively, for assessment of the knee cartilage quality. The cartilage at the medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaus (four points) was measured by the high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy, the water jet ultrasound indentation and a contact mechanical indentation test before a histopathologic analysis for grading of degeneration severity. Measured parameters were compared among different groups classified either by post-surgery time or by histopathologic grade. The results showed a general trend of increase for ultrasound roughness index and a general trend of decrease for integrated reflection coefficient, stiffness coefficient from water-jet indentation and Young's modulus (E) from the mechanical indentation with the increase of post-surgery time. Comparisons among groups with different histopathologic grades showed similar trend with the increase of degeneration severity. The water jet ultrasound indentation method was demonstrated to be an effective method to measure the mechanical properties of the

  3. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair: International Cartilage Repair Society Recommendations Based on Current Scientific Evidence and Standards of Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for t...

  4. Pathology of the calcified zone of articular cartilage in post-traumatic osteoarthritis in rat knees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Schultz

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the pathology occurring at the calcified zone of articular cartilage (CZC in the joints afflicted with post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA.Rats underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL transection and medial meniscectomy to induce PTOA. Sham surgery was performed on another five rats to serve as controls. The rats were euthanized after four weeks of surgery and tibial plateaus were dissected for histology. The pathology of PTOA, CZC area and the tidemark roughness at six pre-defined locations on the tibial plateaus were quantified by histomorphometry.PTOA developed in the knees, generally more severe at the medial plateau than the lateral plateau, of rats in the experimental group. The CZC area was unchanged in the PTOA joints, but the topographic variations of CZC areas that presented in the control knees were reduced in the PTOA joints. The tidemark roughness decreased in areas of the medial plateau of PTOA joints and that was inversely correlated with the Mankin's score of PTOA pathology.Reduced tidemark roughness and unchanged CZC area differentiate PTOA from primary osteoarthritis, which is generally believed to have the opposite pathology at CZC, and may contribute to the distinct disease progression of the two entities of arthropathy.

  5. Articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells seeded on biodegradable scaffolds for the repair of cartilage in a rat osteochondral defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Rebecca L; Kinard, Lucas A; Lam, Johnny; Needham, Clark J; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-08-01

    This work investigated the ability of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to repair articular cartilage in osteochondral defects. Bovine articular chondrocytes and rat MSCs were seeded in isolation or in co-culture onto electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds and implanted into an osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of 12-week old Lewis rats. Additionally, a blank PCL scaffold and untreated defect were investigated. After 12 weeks, the extent of cartilage repair was analyzed through histological analysis, and the extent of bone healing was assessed by quantifying the total volume of mineralized bone in the defect through microcomputed tomography. Histological analysis revealed that the articular chondrocytes and co-cultures led to repair tissue that consisted of more hyaline-like cartilage tissue that was thicker and possessed more intense Safranin O staining. The MSC, blank PCL scaffold, and empty treatment groups generally led to the formation of fibrocartilage repair tissue. Microcomputed tomography revealed that while there was an equivalent amount of mineralized bone formation in the MSC, blank PCL, and empty treatment groups, the defects treated with chondrocytes or co-cultures had negligible mineralized bone formation. Overall, even with a reduced number of chondrocytes, co-cultures led to an equal level of cartilage repair compared to the chondrocyte samples, thus demonstrating the potential for the use of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and MSCs for the in vivo repair of cartilage defects. PMID:24927682

  6. The effect of supplementation of a glutamine precursor on the growth plate, articular cartilage and cancellous bone in fundectomy-induced osteopenic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Dobrowolski, Piotr; Prost, Łukasz; Hułas-Stasiak, Monika; Muszyński, Siemowit; Blicharski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 2-oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox) supplementation (a precursor of glutamine and hydroxyproline, the most abundant amino acid of collagen) on cartilage and bone in pigs after fundectomy. Pigs at the age of forty days were subjected to fundectomy and divided into two groups depending on 2-Ox supplementation (at the daily dosage of 0.4 g/kg of body weight). Other pigs were sham operated. Pigs were euthanized at the age of eight months. An analysis of the morphometry of trabeculae, growth plate and articular cartilage in fundectomy-induced osteopenic bone was performed. Moreover, the levels of expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteoprotegerin in trabecular bone and osteocalcin in articular cartilage were evaluated. Articular cartilage was thinnest in fundectomized pigs and thickest in 2-Ox-supplemented animals after fundectomy. Moreover, 2-Ox supplementation after fundectomy enhanced the total thickness of the growth plate and trabeculae in fundectomized pigs. The most evident signal for osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin in trabecular bone was in sham-operated and 2-Ox-supplemented pigs; a low reaction was observed in the fundectomized group. Additionally, as a long-term postoperative consequence, a change was observed in the expression of osteocalcin in articular cartilage. It seems that 2-Ox is suitable for use in preventing the negative effects of fundectomy on cancellous bone and cartilage. PMID:26725871

  7. μ-XRF and μ-XANES at calcification fronts of human articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main threats to human health from heavy metals is associated with exposure to lead (Pb), which is associated with chronic diseases in the nervous, hematopoietic, skeletal, renal and endocrine system. Although much progress has been made to limit Pb exposure in industrialized countries, primarily through the elimination of leaded gasoline, workplace exposures and leaded pipes, most adults have already accumulated a substantial body burden of Pb. Most of the affiliated Pb is deposited in human bones, where it is stored up to 20 years and accounts for 90.95 of the total lead body burden. Pb is able to displace Ca2+ by cation exchange processes in the hydroxyapatite crystal (the main constituent of bone) and is liberated from it in cases of increased bone turnover such as osteoporosis, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and hyperparathyroidism. Besides these phenomenological studies on the release of Pb from human calcified tissue analytical studies are essential to gain insight on storage sites and storage mechanisms on a microscopic scale. Therefore detailed synchrotron radiation induced micro x-ray fluorescence analyses (SR μ - XRF) have been carried out to study the distribution of Pb in bones from human joints (femoral heads and patellas). As a very recent result we found a highly specific accumulation of Pb in the tidemark, which is a metabolically active mineralization front (thickness about 5 - 10 μm) between calcified and non-calcified articular cartilage and plays an important role in developing osteoarthritis. From the results obtained for single tidemark bones one would expect an accumulation of Pb in both tidemarks of bones showing tidemark duplication. However, Pb shows a strong accumulation at the older of the two tidemarks, while it is not present at the younger one. A comparison of the Pb distribution with the one of other tidemark-seekers (e.g. Zn) exhibits a time difference in the accumulation of different metals at the calcification

  8. Autologous bone marrow concentrate: review and application of a novel intra-articular orthobiologic for cartilage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Steven; Botto-van Bemden, Angie; Aufiero, Danielle

    2013-09-01

    Younger adults, aged 65 years; however, the limited long-term durability of implanted prostheses decreases the preference of using such methods in more active patients aged cell-based orthobiologic injection therapies (pertaining to therapeutic injectables that aim to restore the biologic environment and/or structural components of diseased or damaged musculoskeletal tissue) is of tremendous interest for younger, more active patients, and is even more appealing in that such therapy can be delivered at point-of-care in the clinic during an office visit. Notably, the exponential rate of progress in biotechnology has allowed for immediate application of myriad novel therapies prior to clear evidence of benefit from randomized clinical trials. Orthobiologic intra-articular injection therapies include HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We report on current, available findings for a third-generation intra-articular orthobiologic injectable therapy for cartilage disease, bone marrow concentrate (BMC). Bone marrow concentrate contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), hematopoetic stem cells, platelets (containing growth factors), and cytokines. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) can facilitate regeneration of tissue. Additionally, BMSCs enhance the quality of cartilage repair by increasing aggrecan content and tissue firmness. Following bone marrow aspiration (BMA), BMC is easily prepared using centrifugation, and is available for a same-day procedure with minimal manipulation of cells, thus complying with US Food and Drug Association (FDA) restrictions. To date, there are no published randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of use of autologous BMC intra-articular injections performed as a same-day in-office procedure for treating patients with cartilage disease; however, several publications have reported the ease of use of this method, its strong safety profile, and the fundamental science suggesting great

  9. Intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid promote regeneration of massive cartilage defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Ogay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SD MSCs with low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA could promote regeneration of massive cartilage in rabbits. Material and methods: The SD MSCs were harvested from the knees of 10 Flemish giant rabbits, expanded in culture, and characterized. A reproducible 4-mm cylindrical defect was created in the intercondylar groove area using a kit for the mosaic chondroplasty of femoral condyle COR (De Puy, Mitek. The defect was made within the cartilage layer without destruction of subchondral bone. Two weeks after the cartilage defect, SD MSCs (2 × 106 cell/0.15 ml were suspended in 0.5% low molecular weight HA (0.15 ml and injected into the left knee, and HA solution (0.30 ml alone was placed into the right knee. Cartilage regeneration in the experimental and control groups were evaluated by macroscopically and histologically at 10, 30, and 60 days. Results: On day 10, after intra-articular injection of SD MSCs, we observed an early process of cartilage regeneration in the defect area. Histological studies revealed that cartilage defect was covered by a thin layer of spindle-shaped undifferentiated cells and proliferated chodroblasts. In contrast, an injection of HA did not induce reparation of cartilage in the defect area. At 30 days, macroscopic observation showed that the size of cartilage defect after SD MSC injection was significantly smaller than after HA injection. Histological score was also better in the MSC- treated intercondylar defect. At 60 days after MSC treatment, cartilage defect was nearly nonexistent and looked similar to an intact cartilage. Conclusion: Thus, intra-articular injection of SD MSCs can adhere to the defect in the intercondylar area, and promote cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

  10. Evaluation of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee using T2*-weighted 3D gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of T2*-weighted three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging in the identification of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee.Design and patients. A retrospective evaluation of 80 patients who underwent both arthroscopic and MRI evaluation was performed. The 3D images were interpreted by one observer without knowledge of the surgical results. The medial and lateral femoral condyles, the medial and lateral tibial plateau, the patellar cartilage and trochlear groove were evaluated. MR cartilage images were considered positive if focal reduction of cartilage thickness was present (grade 3 chondromalacia) or if complete loss of cartilage was present (grade 4 chondromalacia). Comparison of the 3D MR results with the arthroscopic findings was performed.Results. Eighty patients were included in the study group. A total of 480 articular cartilage sites were evaluated with MRI and arthroscopy. Results of MR identification of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia, all sites combined, were: sensitivity 83%, specificity 97%, false negative rate 17%, false positive rate 3%, positive predictive value 87%, negative predictive value 95%, overall accuracy 93%.Conclusion. The results demonstrate that T2*-weighted 3D gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging can identify grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee. (orig.)

  11. Variations in radiographic appearance of articular cartilage of knee joints in persons of 35 to 65 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Pulivarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive degenerative disease characterized by gradual loss of articular cartilage. Osteoarthritis is not a normal process of ageing processes. Age related changes are distinct from osteoarthritic changes but when coupled with certain precipitating factors like obesity, muscle weakness and neurological dysfunction may play an important role in the causation of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis occurrence appears to increase with patient's age in a non-linear fashion. The prevalence of disease increases dramatically after the age of 50 years, likely because of age related alterations in collagen and proteoglycan synthesis coupled with diminished nutrient supply to the cartilage. Methods: In this paper presenting the naked eye assessment of radiographic appearance of articular cartilage of knee joints of 100 persons (both men and women of 35 to 65 years of age with symptoms like pain and stiffness of the joint. Results: Parameters like changes in the joint space width, the presence or absence of osteophytes and subchondral sclerosis and cysts were noted. The correlation between the patient's age, sex, symptoms and radiological appearance were observed. Conclusion: Osteoarthritis has a higher prevalence and more often generalized in women than in men. Before the age of 50 years, the incidence of osteoarthritis is low and men have a slightly higher prevalence than women, but after the age of 50 years, the disease becomes more frequent and women have a much higher prevalence with a female to male ration of about 12:1. The reason for this is sex difference in cartilage volume. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 22-26

  12. The significance of electromechanical and osmotic forces in the nonequilibrium swelling behavior of articular cartilage in tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinsky, A J; Roth, V; Myers, E; Grossman, W D; Mow, V C

    1981-11-01

    Studies were conducted of some of the nonequilibrium, electrolyte-activated, electromechanical and osmotic processes that can affect the tensile properties of articular cartilage. We measured changes in tensile force that were induced by altering the ionic environment of strips of cartilage held at fixed length. We compared the kinetics of changes in these macroscopically measured isometric tensile forces to theoretical estimates of the time constants that characterize the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms occurring within the cartilage specimens during the experiment. Changes in the tensile force induced by changing the bath neutral salt concentration surrounding the specimen appear to be rate-limited by the diffusion of the salt into the specimen. That is, the mechanical stress relaxation process resulting from changes in salt concentration seems to be occurring at least as rapidly as the diffusion of salt into the matrix. When the bath concentration of CaCl2 or HCl is varied, the rate of change in the resulting isometric stresses indicates that Ca++ and H+ ions are binding to the cartilage matrix macromolecules. PMID:7311487

  13. Comparison of articular cartilage repair with different hydrogel-human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell composites in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jun Young; Song, Minjung; Ha, Chul-Won; Kim, Jin-A; Lee, Choong-Hee; Park, Yong-Beom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The present work was designed to explore the feasibility and efficacy of articular cartilage repair using composites of human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) and four different hydrogels in a rat model. Methods Full-thickness articular cartilage defects were created at the trochlear groove of femur in both knees of rats. Composites of hUCB-MSCs and four different hydrogels (group A, 4% hyaluronic acid; group B, 3% alginate:30% pluronic (1:1, v/v); ...

  14. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats.

  15. EFFECT OF LOW SELENIUM ON CHONDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION AND DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF COLLAGEN TYPES Ⅰ , Ⅱ AND X IN ARTICULAR CARTILAGE FROM MINI-PIGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective According to the distribution of low selenium areas, low nutrition state of the residents and the affecting cartilage growth and articular cartilage of Kashin-Beck Disease(KBD),the chondrocyte differentia- tion and differential expression of collagen types Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅹ in articular cartilage from Chinese mini-pigs treated with low selenium were investigated in order to gain insight into the effects of these conditions on chondrocyte differ- entiation in KBD cartilage. Mothods Eleven male juvenile mini-pigs, aged from 4 weeks to 6 weeks after birth, were divided into 3 groups. The Se content in the diet of the “low Se” group was 0. 035mg/kg diet, and 0. 175 mg/kg diet in the control. For Se-supplemented group 0. 390mg /kg diet was added. The content of Se in blood was assayed at the beginning and at the end of each experiment. Samples of articular cartilage were taken from the right femur condylus, and collagen types Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅹ in articular cartilage were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results ①All cartilage samples from juvenile mini-pigs fed with low selenium diet revealed a re- duction in type Ⅹ collagen mRNA expression in the hypertrophic chondrocytes as shown by in situ hybridization, and reduced type Ⅹ collagen deposition in the lower hypertrophic zone as shown by immunohistochemistry. ②Addition of selenium to the diet restored the type Ⅹ collagen to normal level. ③Type Ⅱ collagen was evenly distributed over the entire articular cartilage in all experimental and control groups. Type Ⅱ collagen mRNA signals were most prominent in the upper articular layer as well as in the hypertrophic zone in all groups. Type Ⅱ collagen expression was restrict- ed to the zone of endochondral ossification in all experimental groups and the control. Conclusion Low selenium has an down-regulatory role on the synthesis and deposition of collagen type Ⅹ in hypertrophic chondrocytes in articular cartilage of

  16. Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes Redifferentiate to a Cartilage-Like Tissue Phenotype in a Poly(ε-Caprolactone)/Self-Assembling Peptide Composite Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdes Recha-Sancho; Moutos, Franklin T.; Jordi Abellà; Farshid Guilak; Semino, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a limited capacity for growth and regeneration and, with injury, new cellular or biomaterial-based therapeutic platforms are required to promote repair. Tissue engineering aims to produce cartilage-like tissues that recreate the complex mechanical and biological properties found in vivo. In this study, a unique composite scaffold was developed by infiltrating a three-dimensional (3D) woven microfiber poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold with the RAD16-I self-asse...

  17. Type II and VI collagen in nasal and articular cartilage and the effect of IL-1 alpha on the distribution of these collagens

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, I.D.C.; Hollander, A P; Buttle, D. J.; Everts, V.

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of type II and VI collagen was immunocytochemically investigated in bovine articular and nasal cartilage. Cartilage explants were used either fresh or cultured for up to 4 weeks with or without interleukin 1α (IL-1α). Sections of the explants were incubated with antibodies for both types of collagen. Microscopic analyses revealed that type II collagen was preferentially localized in the interchondron matrix whereas type VI collagen was primarily found in the direct vicinity o...

  18. Celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, ameliorates hypercalciuria and articular cartilage lesions in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Anli; Liu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Notwithstanding compelling contribution of NF-κB to the progression of osteoporosis has been reported, little is known regarding direct inhibition of NF-κB benefiting osteoporosis. In this study, therefore, we evaluated the role of celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis. Animals were divided into three groups as Sham (control), SO (secondary osteoporosis) and SO + CA (secondary osteoporosis treated with celastrol). Significant decreases in body weight and body fat were observed following celastrol treatment in SO group, but leptin levels were much higher. Celastrol also exhibited a significant decrease in urinary calcium excretion. Moreover, other important events were observed after celastrol treatment, covering substantial decrements in serum concentrations of PTH, TRAP-5b, CTX and DPD, improved structure of articular cartilage and cancellous bone (revealed by H&E and safranin-O staining), and significant decline in levels of NF-κB (P65), MMP-1, and MMP-9. These findings demonstrated that celastrol treatment not only improved abnormal lipid metabolism and hypercalciuria in mice subjected to secondary osteoporosis, but also ameliorated articular cartilage lesions. Our results provided evidence of targeted therapy for NF-κB in the clinical treatment of secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26980429

  19. High Density Infill in Cracks and Protrusions from the Articular Calcified Cartilage in Osteoarthritis in Standardbred Horse Carpal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Laverty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied changes in articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB in the third carpal bones (C3 of Standardbred racehorses with naturally-occurring repetitive loading-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Two osteochondral cores were harvested from dorsal sites from each of 15 post-mortem C3 and classified as control or as showing early or advanced OA changes from visual inspection. We re-examined X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT image sets for the presence of high-density mineral infill (HDMI in ACC cracks and possible high-density mineralized protrusions (HDMP from the ACC mineralizing (tidemark front (MF into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC. We hypothesized and we show that 20-µm µCT resolution in 10-mm diameter samples is sufficient to detect HDMI and HDMP: these are lost upon tissue decalcification for routine paraffin wax histology owing to their predominant mineral content. The findings show that µCT is sufficient to discover HDMI and HDMP, which were seen in 2/10 controls, 6/9 early OA and 8/10 advanced OA cases. This is the first report of HDMI and HDMP in the equine carpus and in the Standardbred breed and the first to rely solely on µCT. HDMP are a candidate cause for mechanical tissue destruction in OA.

  20. An initial experimental study-the value of gadolinium-enhanced MRI and delay enhanced MRI in detecting articular cartilage degeneration of the rabbit knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the appearance and value of early and delaye Gadolinium- enhanced MRI in detecting aricular cartilage generation of rabbit knee. Methods: Twenty adult New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, E). Intra-articular injection of Papain was performed to establish animal models of different stages of cartilage degeneration in the right knees of A, B, C, D groups, and MR scan was conducted 24 hours,one week one month and three months after the last Papain injection. The knees were scanned bilaterally with T1WI and 3D-FS-SPGR in sagittal plane. The signal intensity ratio between articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissue was measured at plain scan and 0, 2, 4 hours after intravenous injection of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA). The articular cartilage was pathologically examined (HE and alcican blue stain). Results: In 3D-FS-SPGR sequence, it showed significant difference in the SIR between processing side of four groups (F=7.961, P1WI sequence in detecting the change of cartilage signal intensity. (2)SIR on early and delayed Gadolinium-enhanced MRI has the ability in evaluating the early stage change of cartilage degeneration. (authors)

  1. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  2. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. ...

  3. Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Sara; Manzano, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2015-01-01

    In healthy cartilage, mechano-electrochemical phenomena act together to maintain tissue homeostasis. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative diseases disrupt this biological equilibrium by causing structural deterioration and subsequent dysfunction of the tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as well as abnormal ion distribution are proposed as primary indicators of tissue degradation. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous three-dimensional computational model of the cartilage behaviour developed by the authors to simulate the contribution of the main tissue components in its behaviour. The model considers the mechano-electrochemical events as concurrent phenomena in a three-dimensional environment. This model has been extended here to include the effect of repulsion of negative charges attached to proteoglycans. Moreover, we have studied the fluctuation of these charges owning to proteoglycan variations in healthy and pathological articular cartilage. In this sense, standard patterns of healthy and degraded tissue behaviour can be obtained which could be a helpful diagnostic tool. By introducing measured properties of unhealthy cartilage into the computational model, the severity of tissue degeneration can be predicted avoiding complex tissue extraction and subsequent in vitro analysis. In this work, the model has been applied to monitor and analyse cartilage behaviour at different stages of OA and in both short (four, six and eight weeks) and long-term (11 weeks) fully immobilized joints. Simulation results showed marked differences in the corresponding swelling phenomena, in outgoing cation fluxes and in cation distributions. Furthermore, long-term immobilized patients display similar swelling as well as fluxes and distribution of cations to patients in the early stages of OA, thus, preventive treatments are highly recommended to avoid tissue deterioration. PMID:25392400

  4. Articular cartilage damage with intramedullary lesion (bone bruise) in anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the relationship between the intramedullary lesion on MRI and cartilage damage in patients associated with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Thirty-two cases documented by MRI and arthroscopy within one month from injury underwent ACL reconstruction using ST-G, and arthroscopy was performed again after surgery. The mean term between reconstruction and postoperative arthroscopy was twelve months. The cartilage damage on arthroscopy was compared with the intramedullary lesion on MRI. Cartilage damage was observed in 9 cases (28.1%) during the initial arthroscopy and in 16 cases (50.0%) during the second arthroscopy. Intramedullary lesion was detected in all 32 cases (total: 73 lesions) on MRI. Intramedullary lesion leading to cartilage damage was common in the geographic-type lateral femoral condyle. There was significant difference between the lateral meniscus tear and the cartilage damage of the lateral compartment. (author)

  5. Articular cartilage damage with intramedullary lesion (bone bruise) in anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Shuya; Ohdera, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masami; Hiroshima, Shiro; Yoshimoto, Eiji [Fukuoka Orthopaedic Hospital (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the intramedullary lesion on MRI and cartilage damage in patients associated with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Thirty-two cases documented by MRI and arthroscopy within one month from injury underwent ACL reconstruction using ST-G, and arthroscopy was performed again after surgery. The mean term between reconstruction and postoperative arthroscopy was twelve months. The cartilage damage on arthroscopy was compared with the intramedullary lesion on MRI. Cartilage damage was observed in 9 cases (28.1%) during the initial arthroscopy and in 16 cases (50.0%) during the second arthroscopy. Intramedullary lesion was detected in all 32 cases (total: 73 lesions) on MRI. Intramedullary lesion leading to cartilage damage was common in the geographic-type lateral femoral condyle. There was significant difference between the lateral meniscus tear and the cartilage damage of the lateral compartment. (author)

  6. Gremlin 1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis: Article recommendation on F1000Prime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, J.C.H.; Emons, J.; Sticht, C.; Gool, van S.; Decker, E.; Uitterlinden, A.; Rappold, G.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Scherjon, S.; Wit, J.M.; Meurs, van J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    By using wide transcriptome analysis, these authors unraveled distinct fingerprints for human articular and growth plate cartilage and identified bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signaling inhibitors (GREM1, FRZB and DKK1) as the most differentially expressed. Furthermore, they confirmed the

  7. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B.; Thomsen, C.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bliddal, H.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...... years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol....../l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. RESULTS Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR...

  8. Enzymatic digestion of articular cartilage results in viscoelasticity changes that are consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Ronald K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage degeneration via osteoarthritis affects millions of elderly people worldwide, yet the specific contributions of matrix biopolymers toward cartilage viscoelastic properties remain unknown despite 30 years of research. Polymer dynamics theory may enable such an understanding, and predicts that cartilage stress-relaxation will proceed faster when the average polymer length is shortened. Methods This study tested whether the predictions of polymer dynamics were consistent with changes in cartilage mechanics caused by enzymatic digestion of specific cartilage extracellular matrix molecules. Bovine calf cartilage explants were cultured overnight before being immersed in type IV collagenase, bacterial hyaluronidase, or control solutions. Stress-relaxation and cyclical loading tests were performed after 0, 1, and 2 days of incubation. Results Stress-relaxation proceeded faster following enzymatic digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase after 1 day of incubation (both p ≤ 0.01. The storage and loss moduli at frequencies of 1 Hz and above were smaller after 1 day of digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase (all p ≤ 0.02. Conclusion These results demonstrate that enzymatic digestion alters cartilage viscoelastic properties in a manner consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms. Future studies may expand the use of polymer dynamics as a microstructural model for understanding the contributions of specific matrix molecules toward tissue-level viscoelastic properties.

  9. An in vitro comparative study of T2 and T2* mappings of human articular cartilage at 3-Tesla MRI using histology as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between T2 value, T2* value, and histological grades of degenerated human articular cartilage. T2 mapping and T2* mapping of nine tibial osteochondral specimens were obtained using a 3-T MRI after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 94 ROIs were analyzed. Histological grades were assessed using the David-Vaudey scale. Spearman's rho correlation analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis were performed. The mean relaxation values in T2 map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 51.9 ± 9.2 ms, 55.8 ± 12.8 ms, and 59.6 ± 10.2 ms, respectively. The mean relaxation values in T2* map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 20.3 ± 10.3 ms, 21.1 ± 12.4 ms, and 15.4 ± 8.5 ms, respectively. Spearman's rho correlation analysis confirmed a positive correlation between T2 value and histological grade (ρ = 0.313, p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between T2 and T2* (r = -0.322, p < 0.05). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, this correlation was not statistically significant in this study (ρ = -0.192, p = 0.129). T2 mapping was correlated with histological degeneration, and it may be a good biomarker for osteoarthritis in human articular cartilage. However, the strength of the correlation was weak (ρ = 0.313). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, the correlation was not statistically significant. Therefore, T2 mapping may be more appropriate for the initial diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration in the knee joint. Further studies on T2* mapping are needed to confirm its reliability and mechanism in cartilage degeneration. (orig.)

  10. In vivo cartilage regeneration induced by a double-network hydrogel: Evaluation of a novel therapeutic strategy for femoral articular cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Yokota, Masashi; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect using a poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid)/poly-(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel in a sheep model. Seventeen mature sheep were used in this study. We created a 6.0-mm osteochondral defect in the femoral trochlea of the patellofemoral (PF) joint and the medial condyle of the tibiofemoral (TF) joint. A cylindrical DN gel plug was implanted into the defect of the right knee so that a vacant space of the planned depths of 2.0 mm in group I, 3.0 mm in group II, and 4.0 mm in group III were left. In the left knee, we created a defect with the same depth as the right knee. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the O'Driscoll score and real-time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 12 weeks. The DN gel implanted defect of group II in the PF and TF joints was completely filled with a sufficient volume of the proteoglycan-rich tissue stained with Safranin-O. The score showed that group II was significantly greater than groups I and III when treated with DN gel in the PF joint (p = 0.0441, p = 0.0174, respectively) and in the TF joint (p = 0.0019, p = 0.0006, respectively). This study has clarified the short-term efficacy of the cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel in a sheep model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2159-2165, 2016. PMID:27087198

  11. Nanopolymers Delivery of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 Plasmid to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of viral vectors for gene therapy is limited for biosafety consideration. In this study, to promote articular cartilage repair, poly (lactic-co glycolic acid (PLGA nanopolymers were used as non-viral vectors to transfect rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with the pDC316-BMP4-EGFP plasmid. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in vitro were acceptable measuring by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After transfection, Chondrogenic markers (mRNA of Col2a1, Sox9, Bmp4, and Agg of experimental cells (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers were increased more than those of control cells (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid alone. In vivo study, twelve rabbits (24 knees with large full thickness articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into the experimental group (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers and the control group (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid. The experimental group showed better regeneration than the control group 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Hyaline-like cartilage formed at week 12 in the experimental group, indicating the local delivery of BMP-4 plasmid to MSCs by PLGA nanopolymers improved articular cartilage repair significantly. PLGA nanopolymers could be a promising and effective non-viral vector for gene therapy in cartilage repair.

  12. Quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zheng-mao; DU Xiang-ke; HUO Tian-long; LI Xu-bin; QUAN Guang-nan; LI Tian-ran; CHENG Jin; ZHANG Wei-tao

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative T2 mapping has been a widely used method for the evaluation of pathological cartilage properties,and the histological assessment system of osteoarthritis in the rabbit has been published recently.The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions of a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) osteoarthritis.Methods Twenty New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were divided into ACLT surgical group and sham operated group equally.The anterior cruciate ligaments of the rabbits in ACLT group were transected,while the joints were closed intactly in sham operated group.Magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were performed on 3.0T MR unit at week 0,week 6,and week 12.T2 values were computed on GE ADW4.3 workstation.All rabbits were killed at week 13,and left knees were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin.Semiquantitative histological grading was obtained according to the osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology assessment system.Computerized image analysis was performed to quantitate the immunostained collagen type Ⅱ.Results The average MR T2 value of whole left knee cartilage in ACLT surgical group ((29.05±12.01) ms) was significantly higher than that in sham operated group ((24.52±7.97) ms) (P=0.024) at week 6.The average T2 value increased to (32.18±12.79) ms in ACLT group at week 12,but remained near the baseline level ((27.66±8.08) ms) in the sham operated group (P=0.03).The cartilage lesion level of left knee in ACLT group was significantly increased at week 6 (P=0.005) and week 12 (P <0.001).T2 values had positive correlation with histological grading scores,but inverse correlation with optical densities (OD) of type Ⅱ collagen.Conclusion This study demonstrated the reliability and practicability of quantitative T2 mapping for the cartilage injury of rabbit ACLT osteoarthritis model.

  13. Recombinant equine interleukin-1β induces putative mediators of articular cartilage degradation in equine chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tung, J. T.; Fenton, J. I.; Arnold, C; Alexander, L.; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V.; Venta, P J; Peters, T. L.; Orth, M W; Richardson, D. W.; Caron, J P

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-1 is considered a central mediator of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis in several species, however an equine recombinant form of this cytokine is not readily available for in vitro use in equine osteoarthritis research. Equine recombinant interleukin-1β was cloned and expressed and its effects on the expression and activity of selected chondrocytic proteins implicated in cartilage matrix degradation were characterized. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods were u...

  14. Second-look arthroscopic evaluation of the articular cartilage after primary single-bundle and double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-jun; AO Ying-fang; CHEN Lian-xu; GONG Xi; WANG Yong-jian; MAYong; LEUNG Kevin; Kar Ming; YU Jia-kuo

    2011-01-01

    Background Several reports have shown the progression of articular cartilage degeneration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.No report has been published about the cartilage comparing changes after single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the articular cartilage changes after SB and DB ACL reconstructions by second-look arthroscopy.Methods Ninety-nine patients who received arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were retrospectively reviewed at an average of 14 months after reconstruction,58 patients underwent SB ACL reconstruction and 41 patients underwent DB ACL reconstruction.Hamstring tendon autografts were used in all patients.Second-look arthroscopy was done in conjunction with the tibial staple fixation removal at least one year after the initial ACL reconstruction.Arthroscopic evaluation and grading of the articular cartilage degeneration for all patients were performed at the initial ACL reconstruction,and at the second-look arthroscopy.Results The average cartilage degeneration at the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) was found significantly worsened after both SB and DB ACL reconstructions.This worsening were not seen at medial tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) and lateral TFJ.Grade Ⅱ cartilage damage was the most common.At second-look arthroscopy,the average patellar cartilage degeneration was 1.14±0.14 (at first look 0.52±0.11) for the SB group,and 1.22±0.15 (at first look 0.56±0.12) for the DB group.The average trochlear cartilage degeneration was 1.05±0.16 (at fist look 0.10±0.06) and 0.66±0.17 (at fist look 0.17±0.09),respectively.The average patellar cartilage degeneration showed no significant difference in both groups.However,the average trochlea cartilage degeneration in DB group was significantly less than in SB group.Conclusions Patellofemoral cartilage degeneration continued to aggravate after ACL reconstruction.DB ACL reconstruction could significantly decrease the trochlea

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells promote articular cartilage repair and regeneration%间充质干细胞促进关节软骨的修复与再生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱瑜琪; 王金荣; 王智耀

    2015-01-01

    背景:关节软骨损伤后,软骨组织几乎没有修复能力,关节软骨损伤的修复一直是临床工作的难点。  目的:探讨修复关节软骨损伤的干细胞种类及其生物学特性,明确干细胞在修复关节软骨损伤中的作用及优缺点。  方法:由第一作者检索1998至2015年PubMed数据及CNKI中国期刊全文数据库,英文检索词“Articular cartilage injury,Mesenchymal stem cels,regeneration”;中文检索词“关节软骨损伤,间充质干细胞,再生”,纳入47篇文献进行分析。  结果与结论:关节软骨损伤最有效的修复方案是以细胞为基础的治疗方法,来源于骨髓、脂肪及脐血的间充质干细胞均有较强的成软骨特性和克隆能力。骨髓间充质干细胞具有更高的分化潜能,对软骨缺损有修复作用,来源于脐血的间充质干细胞致瘤性低,脂肪源性干细胞的生长增殖速度更快。干细胞复合天然载体材料如胶原、明胶、纤维蛋白和藻酸盐等可促进细胞黏附、分化和增殖,以此构建组织工程软骨将有效修复关节软骨缺损。%BACKGROUND:After articular cartilage injury, the injured cartilage almost has no self-healing ability. Articular cartilage injury repair has been always a difficulty in clinical work. OBJECTIVE:To explore the types and biological characteristics of stem cels for articular cartilage repair and to ensure the role and relative merits of stem cel transplantation in articular cartilage repair. METHODS:PubMed and CNKI were retrieved by the first author for relevant articles published from 1998 to 2015 using the keywords of “articular cartilage injury, mesenchymal stem cels, regeneration” in English and Chinese, respectively. Finaly, 47 articles were included in result analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Stem cel therapy is the most effective method for repair of articular cartilage injury. Mesenchymal stem cels from bone

  16. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  17. Studies of the articular cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan in health and osteoarthritis. Evidence for molecular heterogeneity and extensive molecular changes in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkalla, G; Reiner, A; Bogoch, E; Poole, A R

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the structure of the proteoglycan aggrecan (PG) of articular cartilage were determined immunochemically by RIA and gel chromatography and related to cartilage degeneration documented histologically by the Mankin grading system. Monoclonal antibodies to glycosaminoglycan epitopes were used. In all cartilages, three chondroitin sulfate (CS)-rich populations of large size were observed in addition to a smaller keratan sulfate (KS)-rich population. In grades 7-13 OA cartilages (phase II), molecules were significantly larger than the equivalent molecules of grades 2-6 (phase I). CS chain lengths remained unchanged. In most OA cartilages, a CS epitope 846 was elevated in content, this being most marked in phase II (mean: fivefold). Loss of uronic acid, KS, and hyaluronic acid were only pronounced in phase II OA because of variations in normal contents. Aggregation of PG was unchanged (50-60%) or reduced in OA cartilages, but molecules bearing epitope 846 exhibited almost complete aggregation in normal cartilages. This study provides evidence for the capacity of OA cartilage to synthesize new aggrecan molecules to replace those damaged and lost by disease-related changes. It also defines two phases of PG change in OA: an early predominantly degenerate phase I followed by a net reparative phase II accompanied by net loss of these molecules. Images PMID:1281828

  18. The Immunosuppressant FTY720 (Fingolimod enhances Glycosaminoglycan depletion in articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradner Martin H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FTY720 (Fingolimod is a novel immunosuppressive drug investigated in clinical trials for organ transplantation and multiple sclerosis. It acts as a functional sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor antagonist, thereby inhibiting the egress of lymphocytes from secondary lymphoid organs. As S1P is able to prevent IL-1beta induced cartilage degradation, we examined the direct impact of FTY720 on cytokine induced cartilage destruction. Methods Bovine chondrocytes were treated with the bioactive phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTY720-P in combination with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha. Expression of MMP-1,-3.-13, iNOS and ADAMTS-4,-5 and COX-2 was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. Glycosaminoglycan depletion from cartilage explants was determined using a 1,9-dimethylene blue assay and safranin O staining. Results FTY720-P significantly reduced IL-1beta and TNF-alpha induced expression of iNOS. In contrast FTY720-P increased MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5 mRNA expression. Furthermore depletion of glycosaminoglycan from cartilage explants by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha was significantly enhanced by FTY720-P in an MMP-3 dependent manner. Conclusions Our results suggest that FTY720 may enhance cartilage degradation in pro-inflammatory environment.

  19. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P; Takatalo, M; Harkness, L; Sandholm, J; Uusitalo-Järvinen, H; Kassem, M; Kiviranta, I; Laitala-Leinonen, T; Säämänen, A-M

    2011-01-01

    expressed in Cos7 cells, and the cell lysate was studied for putative glycosaminoglycan attachment by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and Western blotting. RESULTS: The predicted molecule is a small, 121 amino acids long type I single-pass transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, that contains ER...... signal peptide, lumenal/extracellular domain with several threonines/serines prone to O-N-acetylgalactosamine modification, and a cytoplasmic tail with a Ying-yang site prone to phosphorylation or O-N-acetylglucosamine modification. It is highly conserved in mammals with orthologs in all vertebrate...... models demonstrated similar expression profiles with Sox9, Acan and Col2a1 and up-regulation by BMP-2. Based on its cartilage specific expression, the molecule was named Snorc, (Small NOvel Rich in Cartilage). CONCLUSION: A novel cartilage specific molecule was identified which marks the differentiating...

  20. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. PMID:26573959

  1. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  2. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  3. The in vivo effects of unloading and compression on T1-Gd (dGEMRIC) relaxation times in healthy articular knee cartilage at 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Kainberger, Franz; Weber, Michael; Nemec, Stefan; Friedrich, Klaus M.; Dirisamer, Albert; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Center, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Center, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Mamisch, Tallal C. [University Bern, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose was to investigate the in vivo effects of unloading and compression on T1-Gd relaxation times in healthy articular knee cartilage. Ten volunteers were enrolled, and dGEMRIC images of their right knee joints were obtained using 3.0-T MR at three timepoints: directly following exercise (''baseline''), approximately 15 min after unloading (''unloading'') and during application of a compressive force (50% of the body weight) generated by a loading device via a footplate (''compression''). Our analysis of variance of pooled data from all cartilage zones demonstrated a significant mean T1-Gd decrease of 56.6 ms between baseline and compression (p < 0.001), and a significant mean decrease of 42.1 ms between unloading and compression (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between baseline and unloading. Higher mean T1-Gd values were observed in the cartilage contact zone (central femoral and tibial zones; 698.3 {+-} 162.2 ms) than in the non-contact zone (anterior and posterior femoral and tibial zones, and dorsal femoral zone; 662.9 {+-} 149.3 ms; p < 0.01). T1-Gd times appear to be sensitive to mechanical cartilage stress, and thus, further studies are warranted that investigate the relationship between the biochemical load response and the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage. (orig.)

  4. Impact of the charge density of phospholipid bilayers on lubrication of articular cartilage surfaces2O3-ZrO2(nano) (12 mol% CeO2) ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Pawlak; J. Kotynska; Figaszewski, Z A; A. Oloyede; A. Gadomski; A. Gudaniec

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We attempt to answer the question how some changes in acid - base equilibrium have an impact on the charge density of a phospholipid bilayer formed during lubrication occurring at articular cartilage surfaces.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes on articular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processes are taking place. The charge density of the membrane wa...

  5. An experimental fatigue study of a porous scaffold for the regeneration of articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    VIKINGSSON, LINE KARINA ALVA; Gómez-Tejedor, José Antonio; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luís

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study is to predict the long-term mechanical behavior of a porous scaffold implanted in a cartilage defect for tissue engineering purpose. Fatigue studies were performed by up to 100,000 unconfined compression cycles in a polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold with highly interconnected pores architecture. The scaffold compliance, stress strain response and hysteresis energy have been measured after different number of fatigue cycles, while the morphology has been observ...

  6. Modeling the Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihai Zhang

    Full Text Available IGF signaling is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in a wide range of tissues, both normal and diseased, and so IGF-IR has been the focus of intense interest as a promising drug target. In this computational study on cartilage, we focus on two questions: (i what are the key factors influencing IGF-IR complex formation, and (ii how might cells regulate IGF-IR complex formation? We develop a reaction-diffusion computational model of the IGF system involving twenty three parameters. A series of parametric and sensitivity studies are used to identify the key factors influencing IGF signaling. From the model we predict the free IGF and IGF-IR complex concentrations throughout the tissue. We estimate the degradation half-lives of free IGF-I and IGFBPs in normal cartilage to be 20 and 100 mins respectively, and conclude that regulation of the IGF half-life, either directly or indirectly via extracellular matrix IGF-BP protease concentrations, are two critical factors governing the IGF-IR complex formation in the cartilage. Further we find that cellular regulation of IGF-II production, the IGF-IIR concentration and its clearance rate, all significantly influence IGF signaling. It is likely that negative feedback processes via regulation of these factors tune IGF signaling within a tissue, which may help explain the recent failures of single target drug therapies aimed at modifying IGF signaling.

  7. Modeling the Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    IGF signaling is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in a wide range of tissues, both normal and diseased, and so IGF-IR has been the focus of intense interest as a promising drug target. In this computational study on cartilage, we focus on two questions: (i) what are the key factors influencing IGF-IR complex formation, and (ii) how might cells regulate IGF-IR complex formation? We develop a reaction-diffusion computational model of the IGF system involving twenty three parameters. A series of parametric and sensitivity studies are used to identify the key factors influencing IGF signaling. From the model we predict the free IGF and IGF-IR complex concentrations throughout the tissue. We estimate the degradation half-lives of free IGF-I and IGFBPs in normal cartilage to be 20 and 100 mins respectively, and conclude that regulation of the IGF half-life, either directly or indirectly via extracellular matrix IGF-BP protease concentrations, are two critical factors governing the IGF-IR complex formation in the cartilage. Further we find that cellular regulation of IGF-II production, the IGF-IIR concentration and its clearance rate, all significantly influence IGF signaling. It is likely that negative feedback processes via regulation of these factors tune IGF signaling within a tissue, which may help explain the recent failures of single target drug therapies aimed at modifying IGF signaling. PMID:23840540

  8. Chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate sulphation motifs and their proteoglycans are involved in articular cartilage formation during human foetal knee joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, James; Isaacs, Marc D; Smith, Susan M; Hughes, Clare E; Little, Christopher B; Caterson, Bruce; Hayes, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Novel sulphation motifs within the glycosaminoglycan chain structure of chondroitin sulphate (CS) containing proteoglycans (PGs) are associated with sites of growth, differentiation and repair in many biological systems and there is compelling evidence that they function as molecular recognition sites that are involved in the binding, sequestration or presentation of soluble signalling molecules (e.g. morphogens, growth factors and cytokines). Here, using monoclonal antibodies 3B3(-), 4C3 and 7D4, we examine the distribution of native CS sulphation motifs within the developing connective tissues of the human foetal knee joint, both during and after joint cavitation. We show that the CS motifs have broad, overlapping distributions within the differentiating connective tissues before the joint has fully cavitated; however, after cavitation, they all localise very specifically to the presumptive articular cartilage tissue. Comparisons with the labelling patterns of heparan sulphate (HS), HS-PGs (perlecan, syndecan-4 and glypican-6) and FGF-2, molecules with known signalling roles in development, indicate that these also become localised to the future articular cartilage tissue after joint cavitation. Furthermore, they display interesting, overlapping distributions with the CS motifs, reflective of early tissue zonation. The overlapping expression patterns of these molecules at this site suggests they are involved, or co-participate, in early morphogenetic events underlying articular cartilage formation; thus having potential clinical relevance to mechanisms involved in its repair/regeneration. We propose that these CS sulphation motifs are involved in modulating the signalling gradients responsible for the cellular behaviours (proliferation, differentiation, matrix turnover) that shape the zonal tissue architecture present in mature articular cartilage. PMID:22617995

  9. Differential gene expression of the intermediate and outer interzone layers of developing articular cartilage in murine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Florien; IJpma, Arne; Cleary, Mairead; Heijsman, Daphne; Narcisi, Roberto; van der Spek, Peter J; Kremer, Andreas; van Weeren, René; Brama, Pieter; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2014-08-15

    Nascent embryonic joints, interzones, contain a distinct cohort of progenitor cells responsible for the formation of the majority of articular tissues. However, to date the interzone has largely been studied using in situ analysis for candidate genes in the context of the embryo rather than using an unbiased genome-wide expression analysis on isolated interzone cells, leaving significant controversy regarding the exact role of the intermediate and outer interzone layers in joint formation. Therefore, in this study, using laser capture microdissection (three biological replicates), we selectively harvested the intermediate and outer interzones of mouse embryos at gestational age 15.5 days, just prior to cavitation, when the differences between the layers should be most profound. Microarray analysis (Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Oligo Microarrays) was performed and the differential gene expression between the intermediate interzone cells and outer interzone cells was examined by performing a two-sided paired Student's t-test and pathway analysis. One hundred ninety-seven genes were differentially expressed (≥ 2-fold) between the intermediate interzone and the outer interzone with a P-value ≤ 0.01. Of these, 91 genes showed higher expression levels in the intermediate interzone and 106 were expressed higher in the outer interzone. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes suggests an important role for inflammatory processes in the interzone layers, especially in the intermediate interzone, and hence in joint and articular cartilage development. The high representation of genes relevant to chondrocyte hypertrophy and endochondral ossification in the outer interzone suggests that it undergoes endochondral ossification. PMID:24738827

  10. Evaluation of the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects filled with autologous exogenous fibrin clot: An experimental study in the shoulder joint of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avki S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether the optimizing effect of an exogenous fibrin clot in the repair of full–thickness articular cartilage defects is valid when joint motions are restricted, standard osteochondral defects were constituted in the articular surface of the humeral head in 16 adult dogs. The defects in 8 dogs were packed with fibrin clots that had been prepared exogenously from each animal and the defects of the other animals were left empty. The operated limbs were inactivated for 2 weeks postoperatively and the healing response was then examined using routine histology at 2, 4, 8 and 12-week intervals. Although the clot-filled and control (empty defects initially healed through proliferation of fibrous connective tissue; the clot-filled defects finally modulated into fibrocartilage with completed subchondral bone formation. The clot-filled defects demonstrated a more advanced reparative tissue which was congruent with the intact articular surface from 4 weeks after the intervention.

  11. Enhanced cleavage of type II collagen by collagenases in osteoarthritic articular cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Billinghurst, R.C.; Dahlberg, L; Ionescu, M.; Reiner, A; Bourne, R; Rorabeck, C; Mitchell, P; Hambor, J; Diekmann, O.; Tschesche, H; Chen, J; Van Wart, H; Poole, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct involvement of increased collagenase activity in the cleavage of type II collagen in osteoarthritic human femoral condylar cartilage by developing and using antibodies reactive to carboxy-terminal (COL2-3/4C(short)) and amino-terminal (COL2-1/4N1) neoepitopes generated by cleavage of native human type II collagen by collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (collagenase-1), MMP-8 (collagenase-2), and MMP-13 (collagenase-3). A secondary cleavage followed the initia...

  12. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure induced-tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot following application of hydrostatic pressure (1 hour of static 10MPa) applied at day 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14....

  13. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  14. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H;

    2006-01-01

    explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans...... vivo in CK null mice. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of MMP activity reduced both proteoglycan loss and type II collagen degradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered...

  15. An in vitro comparative study of T2 and T2* mappings of human articular cartilage at 3-Tesla MRI using histology as the standard of reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehee; Park, Sunghoon [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byoung-Hyun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung-Hyun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hakil [INHA University, School of Information and Communication Engineering, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Young [Ajou University Medical Center, Regional Clinical Trial Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University School of Medicine, Cartilage Regeneration Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between T2 value, T2* value, and histological grades of degenerated human articular cartilage. T2 mapping and T2* mapping of nine tibial osteochondral specimens were obtained using a 3-T MRI after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 94 ROIs were analyzed. Histological grades were assessed using the David-Vaudey scale. Spearman's rho correlation analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis were performed. The mean relaxation values in T2 map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 51.9 ± 9.2 ms, 55.8 ± 12.8 ms, and 59.6 ± 10.2 ms, respectively. The mean relaxation values in T2* map with different histological grades (0, 1, 2) of the cartilage were 20.3 ± 10.3 ms, 21.1 ± 12.4 ms, and 15.4 ± 8.5 ms, respectively. Spearman's rho correlation analysis confirmed a positive correlation between T2 value and histological grade (ρ = 0.313, p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between T2 and T2* (r = -0.322, p < 0.05). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, this correlation was not statistically significant in this study (ρ = -0.192, p = 0.129). T2 mapping was correlated with histological degeneration, and it may be a good biomarker for osteoarthritis in human articular cartilage. However, the strength of the correlation was weak (ρ = 0.313). Although T2* values showed a decreasing trend with an increase in cartilage degeneration, the correlation was not statistically significant. Therefore, T2 mapping may be more appropriate for the initial diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration in the knee joint. Further studies on T2* mapping are needed to confirm its reliability and mechanism in cartilage degeneration. (orig.)

  16. Demonstration of the therapeutic effect of /sup 35/S labelled L-cystine in articular and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiegelow, P.; Puschmann, M.; Giese, U.

    1984-01-16

    Clinical experience has obviously shown a positive effect of application of sulfated amino acids on degenerative cartilage diseases. L-Cystin, presumed to be of therapeutic effect, was autoradiographically localized in articular, columnar and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature. In 10 days old NMRI-mice, we had shown a dose-dependent incorporation of the radioactively labelled /sup 35/S-Cystin in hair follicle. These statistically significant differences had been measured by quantitative autoradiographical microscope photometry. The sulfated amino acids are also proven in nail matrix, nail hyponychium as well as in cartilage and skeletal musculature. Besides a localization of radioactively labelled L-Cystin in tissues, presumed as target organs of a therapeutic effect, there is still lacking an experimental proof of efficacy on cell proliferation and functional metabolism e.g. in arthrosis by suitable animal models.

  17. Demonstration of the therapeutic effect of 35S labelled L-cystine in articular and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical experience has obviously shown a positive effect of application of sulfated amino acids on degenerative cartilage diseases. L-Cystin, presumed to be of therapeutic effect, was autoradiographically localized in articular, columnar and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature. In 10 days old NMRI-mice, we had shown a dose-dependent incorporation of the radioactively labelled 35S-Cystin in hair follicle. These statistically significant differences had been measured by quantitative autoradiographical microscope photometry. The sulfated amino acids are also proven in nail matrix, nail hyponychium as well as in cartilage and skeletal musculature. Besides a localization of radioactively labelled L-Cystin in tissues, presumed as target organs of a therapeutic effect, there is still lacking an experimental proof of efficacy on cell proliferation and functional metabolism e.g. in arthrosis by suitable animal models. (orig.)

  18. Finite Element Analysis Of Large Deformation Of Articular Cartilage In Upper Ankle Joint Of Occupant In Military Vehicles During Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klekiel T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the load of lower limbs of occupants in the armoured military vehicle, which has been destroyed by detonation of the Improvised Explosive Device (IED charge under the vehicle. A simplified model of the human lower limb focused on upper ankle joint was developed in order to determine the reaction forces in joints and load in particular segments during the blast load. The model of upper ankle joint, include a tibia and an ankle bone with corresponding articular cartilage, has been developed. An analysis of the stress distribution under the influence of forces applied at different angles to the biomechanical axis of a limb has been performed. We analyzed the case of the lower limb of a sitting man leaning his feet on the floor. It has been shown that during a foot pronation induced by a knee outward deviation, the axial load on the foot causes significantly greater tension in the tibia. At the same time it has been shown that within the medial malleolus, tensile stresses occur on the surface of the bone which may lead to fracture of the medial malleolus. It is a common case of injuries caused by loads on foot of passengers in armored vehicles during a mine or IED load under the vehicle. It was shown that the outward deviation of the knee increases the risk of the foot injury within the ankle joint.

  19. Green fluorescent protein as marker in chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor-1 for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-kun; LIU Yi; SONG Zhi-ming; FU Chang-feng; XU Xin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To label the primary articular chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor ( hIGF-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Methods:GFP cDNA was inserted into pcDNA3.1-hIGF-1 to label the expression vector.The recombinant vector,pcGI,a mammalian expression vector with multiple cloning sites under two respective cytomegalovirus promoters/enhancers,was transfected into the primary articular chondrocytes with the help of lipofectamine.After the positive cell clones were selected by G418,G418-resistant chondrocytes were cultured in medium for 4 weeks.The stable expression of hIGF-1 in the articular chondrocytes was determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis and the GFP was confirmed under a fluorescence microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometer methods were employed to determine the effect of transfection on proliferation of chondrocytes. Gray value was used to analyze quantitatively the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Results:The expression of hIGF-1 and GFP was confirmed in transfected chondrocytes by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemical analysis and fluorescence microscope observation. Green articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 could expand and maintain their chondrogenic phenotypes for more than 4 weeks.After the transfection of IGF-1,the proliferation of chondrocytes was enhanced and the chondrocytes could effectively maintain the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions:The hIGF-1 eukaryotic expression vector containing GFP marker gene has been successfully constructed.GFP,which can be visualized in real time and in situ, is stably expressed in articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1.The labeled articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 can be applied in cell-mediated gene therapy as well as for other biomedical purposes of transgenic chondrocytes.

  20. Changes in the Loading of Tibial Articular Cartilage Following Varus and Valgus Mechanical Axis of Lower Extremity: A Finite Element Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Atmaca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate changes in the loading of tibial articular cartilage following varus and valgus mechanical axis of lower extremity. Methods: Three- Dimensional (3D solid models were created on MIMICS ® by using DICOM formatted longitudinal computed tomography scans. Respectively 2.5°, 5°, 7.5°, 10°, 12.5° and 15° varus and valgus osteotomies were performed to 3D solid models. ANSYS ® WorkbenchTM (Version 12 was used to analyze the stress/load distribution, that is to say MES (maximum equivalent stress- von Mises stres, which affect the tibia cartilage in the finite element model obtained by MIMICS ® . Results: MES of the tibial cartilage was measured 0.860 MPa in the reference model. With regard to the varus models, MES was measured 0.935 MPa in 2.5° varus model, 1.010 MPa in 5°, 1.113 MPa in 7.5°, 1.247 MPa in 10°, 1.388 MPa in 12.5° and 1.530 MPa in 15° varus model. MES was measured 0.813, 0.792, 0.769, 0.745, 0.718 and 0.690 MPa in 2.5°, 5°, 7.5°, 10°, 12.5° and 15° valgus osteotomy models respectively (p=0.028. Conclusion: MES increased in all models of varus position when was compared with reference and valgus models. The decrease of load bearing on tibial articular cartilage in valgus position was lower and statistically different than the reference and varus models. This study clearly showed that tibia cartilage is more sensitive to load bearing in varus position than the valgus positioned lower extremity mechanical axis.

  1. The Effect of Negative Poisson’s Ratio Polyurethane Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Jun Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An auxetic polyurethane (PU scaffold was prepared to investigate chondrocyte proliferation under compressive stimulation for cartilage regeneration. To give a negative Poisson’s ratio to the PU scaffold, volumetric compression with a 3 : 1 ratio was applied during heat treatment. For the control PU scaffold, the Poisson’s ratio was 0.9 ± 0.25 with elongation at 20% of the strain range. Poisson’s ratio for experimental specimens was approximately −0.4 ± 0.12 under the same conditions. In cell proliferation tests, cells were cultivated within the prepared scaffold under compression with a 20% strain range. With a 20% strain range elongation, the compressive load was approximately 0.3 N. The experimental group showed a 1.3 times higher cellular proliferation rate than that of the control group after 3 days in culture. At day 5 of culture, however, the rate of proliferation of the control group increased so that there was no significant difference between groups. However, collagen content (produced by the cells in the cell-proliferated medium was 1.5 times higher in the experimental group after 5 days in culture. This may have been due to the effectiveness of the auxetic structure of the scaffold. An isotropic compressive load was transmitted to the cells due to the negative Poisson ratio of the scaffold.

  2. An experimental fatigue study of a porous scaffold for the regeneration of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, L; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Gallego Ferrer, G; Gómez Ribelles, J L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this experimental study is to predict the long-term mechanical behavior of a porous scaffold implanted in a cartilage defect for tissue engineering purpose. Fatigue studies were performed by up to 100,000 unconfined compression cycles in a polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold with highly interconnected pores architecture. The scaffold compliance, stress-strain response and hysteresis energy have been measured after different number of fatigue cycles, while the morphology has been observed by scanning electron microscopy at the same fatigue times. To simulate the growing tissue in the scaffold/tissue construct, the scaffold was filled with an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and subjected to repeating cycles of freezing and thawing that increase the hydrogel stiffness. Fatigue studies show that the mechanical loading provokes failure of the dry scaffold at a smaller number of deformation cycles than when it is immersed in water, and also that 100,000 compressive dynamic cycles do not affect the scaffold/gel construct. This shows the stability of the scaffold implanted in a chondral defect and gives a realistic simulation of the mechanical performance from implantation of the empty scaffold to regeneration of the new tissue inside the scaffold's pores. PMID:25814177

  3. Microstructure of Temporomandibular Joint Cartilage after Intra-Articular Betamethasone Sodium Phosphate/Betamethasone Dipropionate Injection during the Early Stage of Experimental Osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Kostina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the morphological changes in cartilage after a single intra-articular betamethasone sodium phosphate (BSP/betamethasone dipropionate (BDP injection during the early stage of experimental osteoarthrosis (OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Material and Methods: The experiment was performed on 18 male rabbits aged 6 months .The first group consisted of 9 healthy rabbits. The second group included 9 rabbits with mechanically induced TMJ OA. For 5 days, 3 hours daily, a load (with a force of 200N on the TMJ was imposed. In the left TMJ of the second group of rabbits, betamethasone was injected intra-articularly in different doses: 0.1 ml (n=3, 0.3 ml (n=3, and 0.5 ml (n=3. The right TMJ was used for comparison. A combined anesthesia was applied each experimental day. Rabbits of both groups were sacrificed on days 7, 14, and 30 with introductory combined anesthesia and intravenous injection of Zoletil 100® 20 mg/kg to stop their breathing. Results: Betamethasone caused destruction of the chondrocytes, fragmentation of collagen fibers, deficit of proteoglycans (PGs and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, thinning of the cartilage, and contributed to the progression of TMJ OA. Conclusion: The optimal dose of BSP/BDP for intra-articular injection in the early stages of TMJ OA must be within the range of 0.1-0.3 ml|0.7-1.5 mg.

  4. Age-related changes in the role of matrix vesicles in the mandibular condylar cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Livne, E; Oliver, C; Leapman, R D; Rosenberg, L C; Poole, A. R.; Silbermann, M

    1987-01-01

    A combined approach of light microscopy, immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study age-related changes in the condylar cartilage in mice. Chondrocalcin, a cartilage matrix calcium-binding protein, was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using monospecific antibodies. In one week old animals the most intense staining was observed in the matrix around the hypertrophic cells in the mineralising zone, to ...

  5. Evaluation of Labral Pathology and Hip Articular Cartilage in Patients with Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI): Comparison of Multidetector CT Arthrography and MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) arthrography (CTa) and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography (MRa) findings with surgical findings in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of these methods. Labral pathology and articular cartilage were prospectively evaluated with MRa and CTa in 14 hips of 14 patients. The findings were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists with 10 and 20 years of experience, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value were determined using surgical findings as the standard of reference. While the disagreement between observers was recorded in two cases of labral tearing with MRa, there was a complete consensus with CTa. Disagreement between observers was found in four cases of femoral cartilage loss with both MRa and CTa. Disagreement was also recorded in only one case of acetabular cartilage loss with both methods. The percent sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for correctly assessing the labral tearing were as follows for MRa/CTa, respectively: 100/100, 50/100, 86/100 (p<0.05). The same values for acetabular cartilage assessment were 89/56, 40/60, 71/71 (p>0.05) and for femoral cartilage assessment were 100/75, 90/70, 86/71 (p>0.05). Inter-observer reliability value showed excellent agreement for labral tearing with CTa (κ=1.0). Inter-observer agreement was substantial to excellent with regard to acetabular cartilage assessment with MRa and CTa (κ=0.76 for MRa and κ=0.86 for CTa) Inter-observer reliability with CTa is excellent for labral tearing assessment. CTa seems to have an equal sensitivity and a higher specificity than MRa for the detection of labral pathology. MRa is better, but not statistically significantly, in demonstrating acetabular and femoral cartilage pathology

  6. The value of water-excitation 3D FLASH and fat-saturated PDw TSE MR imaging for detecting and grading articular cartilage lesions of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of water-excitation (WE) 3D FLASH and fat-saturated (FS) proton density-weighted (PDw) TSE MR imaging for detecting, grading, and sizing articular cartilage lesions of the knee. A total of 26 patients underwent MR imaging prior to arthroscopy with the following sequences: (1) WE 3D FLASH: 28/11 ms, scan time: 4 min 58 s, flip angle: 40 ; (2) FS PDw TSE: 3433/15 ms, scan time: 6 min 15 s, flip angle: 180 . Grade and size of the detected lesions were quantified and compared with the results of arthroscopy for each compartment. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for detecting cartilage lesions were 46%, 92%, 81%, 71% and 74% for WE 3D FLASH and 91%, 98%, 96%, 94% and 95% for FS PDw TSE MR imaging. WE 3D FLASH correlated significantly with arthroscopy for grading on the patella (P<0.0001) and the femoral trochlea (P=0.02) and for sizing on the femoral trochlea (P=0.03). FS PDw correlated significantly (P<0.0001) with arthroscopy for grading and sizing on all compartments. FS PDw TSE is an accurate method for detecting, grading and sizing articular cartilage lesions of the knee and yielded superior results relative to WE 3D FLASH MR imaging. (orig.)

  7. Intra-articular delivery of kartogenin-conjugated chitosan nano/microparticles for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Lan; Ko, Ji-Yun; Kim, Ji Eun; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-12-01

    We developed an intra-articular (IA) drug delivery system to treat osteoarthritis (OA) that consisted of kartogenin conjugated chitosan (CHI-KGN). Kartogenin, which promotes the selective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes, was conjugated with low-molecular-weight chitosan (LMWCS) and medium-molecular-weight chitosan (MMWCS) by covalent coupling of kartogenin to each chitosan using an ethyl(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) catalyst. Nanoparticles (NPs, 150 ± 39 nm) or microparticles (MPs, 1.8 ± 0.54 μm) were fabricated from kartogenin conjugated-LMWCS and -MMWCS, respectively, by an ionic gelation using tripolyphosphate (TPP). The in vitro release profiles of kartogenin from the particles showed sustained release for 7 weeks. When the effects of the CHI-KGN NPs or CHI-KGN MPs were evaluated on the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow MSCs (hBMMSCs), the CHI-KGN NPs and CHI-KGN MPs induced higher expression of chondrogenic markers from cultured hBMMSCs than unconjugated kartogenin. In particular, hBMMSCs treated with CHI-KGN NPs exhibited more distinct chondrogenic properties in the long-term pellet cultures than those treated with CHI-KGN MPs. The in vivo therapeutic effects of CHI-KGN NPs or CHI-KGN MPs were investigated using a surgically-induced OA model in rats. The CHI-KGN MPs showed longer retention time in the knee joint than the CHI-KGN NPs after IA injection in OA rats. The rats treated with CHI-KGN NPs or CHI-KGN MPs by IA injection showed much less degenerative changes than untreated control or rats treated with unconjugated kartogenin. In conclusion, CHI-KGN NPs or CHI-KGN MPs can be useful polymer-drug conjugates as an IA drug delivery system to treat OA. PMID:25241157

  8. Stability of housekeeping genes in human intervertebral disc, endplate and articular cartilage cells in multiple conditions for reliable transcriptional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopa, S; Ceriani, C; Cecchinato, R; Zagra, L; Moretti, M; Colombini, A

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative gene expression analysis is widely used to evaluate the expression of specific tissue markers. To obtain reliable data it is essential to select stable housekeeping genes whose expression is not influenced by the anatomical origin of cells or by the culture conditions. No studies have evaluated housekeeping gene stability in intervertebral disc (IVD) cells and only few studies using cartilaginous endplate (CEP) and articular cartilage (AC) cells are present in the literature. We analysed the stability of four candidate housekeeping genes (GAPDH, TBP, YWHAZ and RPL13A) in human cells isolated from nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF), CEP and AC. Cell isolation, expansion, cryoconservation, and differentiation in 3D pellets were tested. GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper tools and the comparative ΔCt method were used to evaluate housekeeping gene stability. In each cell population, TBP alone or combined with YWHAZ was identified as the best normaliser in both monolayer and 3D pellets. GAPDH was the best performer only for AC cells in monolayer. In most culture conditions considering groups of two or more cell types, TBP was the most stable and YWHAZ was the second choice. GAPDH was the best performer only in 3D pellets with factors for AC and AF combined with CEP cells. RPL13A was the most stable only for AF with CEP cells at isolation. Our findings will be useful to properly design the experimental set-up of studies involving IVD, CEP or AC cells in different culture conditions, in order to obtain accurate and high quality data from quantitative gene expression analysis. PMID:27232666

  9. Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes Redifferentiate to a Cartilage-Like Tissue Phenotype in a Poly(ε-Caprolactone/Self-Assembling Peptide Composite Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Recha-Sancho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage has a limited capacity for growth and regeneration and, with injury, new cellular or biomaterial-based therapeutic platforms are required to promote repair. Tissue engineering aims to produce cartilage-like tissues that recreate the complex mechanical and biological properties found in vivo. In this study, a unique composite scaffold was developed by infiltrating a three-dimensional (3D woven microfiber poly (ε-caprolactone (PCL scaffold with the RAD16-I self-assembling nanofibers to obtain multi-scale functional and biomimetic tissue-engineered constructs. The scaffold was seeded with expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes and cultured for four weeks in control and chondrogenic growth conditions. The composite constructs were compared to control constructs obtained by culturing cells with 3D woven PCL scaffolds or RAD16-I independently. High viability and homogeneous cell distribution were observed in all three scaffolds used during the term of the culture. Moreover, gene and protein expression profiles revealed that chondrogenic markers were favored in the presence of RAD16-I peptide (PCL/RAD composite or alone under chondrogenic induction conditions. Further, constructs displayed positive staining for toluidine blue, indicating the presence of synthesized proteoglycans. Finally, mechanical testing showed that constructs containing the PCL scaffold maintained the initial shape and viscoelastic behavior throughout the culture period, while constructs with RAD16-I scaffold alone contracted during culture time into a stiffer and compacted structure. Altogether, these results suggest that this new composite scaffold provides important mechanical requirements for a cartilage replacement, while providing a biomimetic microenvironment to re-establish the chondrogenic phenotype of human expanded articular chondrocytes.

  10. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  11. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  12. Knee-joint articular cartilage demonstrated by magnetic resonance tomography. MR chondrovolumetry using a fat-suppressed FLASH-3D sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fat-suppressed FLASH-3D sequence was optimized on healthy volunteers. A fresh cardaveric knee joint was removed from a 82-year-old man and immediately imaged without being frozen or fixed. MRT was carried out at 1.5 T and 25 mT/m (Vision, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with a conventional CP knee coil. Sagittal and transverse sections were acquired perpendicular to the articular surfaces, and then, parallel to these imaging planes, anatomical sections were obtained with a diamond band saw. The volumes of the patellar, tibial and femoral cartilages were determined from both the images and the sections, using an image analysing system. Signal intensities and contrast-to-noise ratios depend on the parameters used. The highest contrast between the cartilage and the periarticular tissues was obtained at a flip angel of 30 (TR=60 ms, TE=11 ms). However, a flip angle of 60 was judged to provide optimal subjective image quality. Using these parameters, the deviations between the radiological and the anatomical cartilage volumes were -4.7% in the patella, -3.1% in the tibial plateau and -4.2% in the femur. The volumes of the knee-joint cartilages may be accurately determined with MRT if an appropriate pulse sequence is chosen. (orig./VHE)

  13. Therapeutic effect of the saponin fraction from Clematis chinensis Osbeck roots on osteoarthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate through protecting articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjun; Xu, Xianxiang; Dai, Yue; Xia, Lunzhu

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of the saponin fraction from Clematis chinensis Osbeck roots (SFC) on an osteoarthritis model in rats and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Osteoarthritis was induced by intraarticular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into knee joints of rats, and SFC and diclofenac were orally administered once a day for 28 consecutive days. Joint swelling, macroscopic observation, histological assessment and proteoglycan (PG) degradation were examined. In vitro, cultured rabbit chondrocytes were stimulated with MIA and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively. The effects of SFC on MIA- and SNP-induced chondrocyte injury were examined by MTT assay. It was shown that SFC (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced cartilage injury and PG degradation induced by MIA. Diclofenac (4 mg/kg) only slightly alleviated cartilage injury and PG degradation. SFC also prevented SNP- or MIA-induced rabbit chondrocyte impairment. These results indicate that SFC is effective in ameliorating joint destruction and cartilage erosion in MIA-induced osteoarthritic in rats, and the mechanisms of action for protecting articular cartilage are through preventing extracellular matrix degradation and chondrocyte injury. PMID:19655297

  14. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with α1H ratio, α. The solid-to-liquid exchange times are found to be in the range from 10 ms to a few tens of ms at all hydration levels. The results may be of interest for the application of magnetization exchange contrast in the imaging of articular cartilage

  15. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq Rai

    Full Text Available (i To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI, and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii to predict individuals at potential risk for developing "pre-osteoarthritis" (OA based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage.Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies.We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA.Our study provides a list of gene transcripts in healthy

  16. ACTIVITY OF CANONICAL WNT SIGNAL SYSTEM IN HYALINE CARTILAGE ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES IN PROCESS OF SYNOVIAL JOINT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Molotkov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Canonical and non-canonical Wnt systems are essential regulators of chondrogenesis and bone development. However, the roles of these systems in synovial joint development are not well studied. To determine if canonical Wnt system is active in developing articular chondrocytes we used immunohistochemistry for в-galactosidase and doublecortin (cell-type specific marker for articular chondrocytes to double label sections through joint regions of E14.5, E18.5, P10 and adult mice. Here the following results are presented. Canonical Wnt signal system does not work in developing articular chondrocytes at early embryonic stages (E14.5; it is active in the articular chondrocytes at late embryonic stages (E16.5-E18.5 and during postnatal development (P7-P10, but is turned off again in the adult articular chondrocytes. These results suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is being regulated during articular chondrocytes differentiation and joint formation.

  17. Age-related changes in the sulphation of the chondroitin sulphate linkage region from human articular cartilage aggrecan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, R M; Huckerby, T N; Brown, G M; Bayliss, M T; Nieduszynski, I A

    2001-09-01

    The chondroitin sulphate (CS) linkage regions have been isolated from human articular cartilage aggrecan (from 10- to 72-year-olds) by chondroitin ABC endolyase digestion and size-exclusion chromatography. Linkage region hexasaccharides have been characterized and their abundance estimated by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography. The basic structure for the CS linkage region oligosaccharides identified from human aggrecan is as follows: DeltaUA(beta1-3)GalNAc[0S/4S/6S](beta1-4)GlcA(beta1-3)Gal[0S/6S](beta1-3)Gal(beta1-4)Xyl, where DeltaUA represents 4,5-unsaturated hexuronic acid, 4S and 6S represent an O-ester sulphate group on C-4 and C-6 respectively, and 0S represents zero sulphation. There are significant age-related changes in the abundance of the various N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sulphation forms identified, occurring up to approx. 20 years old. During the period from 10 to 20 years old the level of GalNAc 6-sulphation at the linkage region increases from approx. 43% to approx. 75%, while there is a corresponding reduction in unsulphated (approx. 30% to approx. 20%) and 4-sulphated (approx. 25% to approx. 6%) GalNAc residues. There is also an increase in the incidence of linkage region galactose 6-sulphation (approx. 2% to approx. 10%) which was only observed in linkage regions with GalNAc 6-sulphation. Beyond 20 years old there are few changes in the relative abundance of these GalNAc sulphation variants; however, there is a slight increase in the abundance of 6-sulphation between approx. 20 years old and approx. 40 years old and a slight decrease in its abundance beyond approx. 40 years old. Our data show that in the majority of chains from tissues of all ages the GalNAc residue closest to the linkage region is 6-sulphated, but the level of GalNAc 6-sulphation within the linkage region is lower than the average level observed within the repeat region. PMID:11513754

  18. Assessment of chemical species of lead accumulated in tidemarks of human articular cartilage by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirer, Florian [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pemmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bpemmer@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Pepponi, Giancarlo [MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici CNR, Faenca (Italy); Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Mangold, Stefan [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus South, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Roschger, Paul [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Berzlanovich, Andrea [Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hofstaetter, Jochen G. [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna General Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria)

    2011-03-01

    Lead is a toxic trace element that shows a highly specific accumulation in the transition zone between calcified and non-calcified articular cartilage, the so-called ‘tidemark’. Excellent agreement has been found between XANES spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite and spectra obtained in the tidemark region and trabecular bone of normal human samples, confirming that in both tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite crystal structure of bone. During this study the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline at ANKA was tested and has proven to be well suited for speciation of lead in human mineralized tissue samples. A highly specific accumulation of the toxic element lead was recently measured in the transition zone between non-calcified and calcified normal human articular cartilage. This transition zone, the so-called ‘tidemark’, is considered to be an active calcification front of great clinical importance. However, little is known about the mechanisms of accumulation and the chemical form of Pb in calcified cartilage and bone. Using spatially resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (µ-XANES) at the Pb L{sub 3}-edge, the chemical state of Pb in the osteochondral region was investigated. The feasibility of the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline (ANKA synchrotron light source) was tested and confirmed by comparing XANES spectra of bulk Pb-reference compounds recorded at both the XAS and the SUL-X beamline at ANKA. The µ-XANES set-up was then used to investigate the tidemark region of human bone (two patella samples and one femoral head sample). The spectra recorded at the tidemark and at the trabecular bone were found to be highly correlated with the spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that in both of these very different tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite structure.

  19. Assessment of chemical species of lead accumulated in tidemarks of human articular cartilage by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead is a toxic trace element that shows a highly specific accumulation in the transition zone between calcified and non-calcified articular cartilage, the so-called ‘tidemark’. Excellent agreement has been found between XANES spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite and spectra obtained in the tidemark region and trabecular bone of normal human samples, confirming that in both tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite crystal structure of bone. During this study the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline at ANKA was tested and has proven to be well suited for speciation of lead in human mineralized tissue samples. A highly specific accumulation of the toxic element lead was recently measured in the transition zone between non-calcified and calcified normal human articular cartilage. This transition zone, the so-called ‘tidemark’, is considered to be an active calcification front of great clinical importance. However, little is known about the mechanisms of accumulation and the chemical form of Pb in calcified cartilage and bone. Using spatially resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (µ-XANES) at the Pb L3-edge, the chemical state of Pb in the osteochondral region was investigated. The feasibility of the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline (ANKA synchrotron light source) was tested and confirmed by comparing XANES spectra of bulk Pb-reference compounds recorded at both the XAS and the SUL-X beamline at ANKA. The µ-XANES set-up was then used to investigate the tidemark region of human bone (two patella samples and one femoral head sample). The spectra recorded at the tidemark and at the trabecular bone were found to be highly correlated with the spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that in both of these very different tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite structure

  20. Three-dimensional spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame imaging and quantitation of articular cartilage at 7.0 T MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in the transitional, calcified layer and global cartilage (F=6.436, P1ρ-weighted imaging of porcine patellar cartilage at 7.0 T with high image quality. T1ρ maps can be used to quantify the laminar structures in 3D-T1ρ-weighted images of articular cartilage, which pave the way to evaluate early osteoarthritis and cartilage regeneration. (authors)

  1. Texture analysis of articular cartilage traumatic changes in the knee calculated from morphological 3.0 T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutsikou, Konstantina [Department of Medical Radiologic Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Kostopoulos, Spiros; Glotsos, Dimitris; Cavouras, Dionisis [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Lavdas, Eleftherios; Oikonomou, Georgia [Department of Medical Radiologic Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Malizos, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece); Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [Department of Radiology, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece); Vlychou, Marianna, E-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr [Department of Radiology, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: In the present work, we aim to identify changes in the cartilage texture of the injured knee in young, physically active, patients by computer analysis of MRI images based on 3.0 T morphological sequences. Methods: Fifty-three young patients with training injury or trauma in one knee underwent MRI and arthroscopy. Textural features were computed from the MRI images of the knee-cartilages and two classes were formed of 28 normal and 16 with pathology only in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) cartilage. Results: Textural features with statistically significant differences between the two classes were found only at the MFC and the medial tibial condyle (MTC) areas. Three features-combinations, at the MFC or the MTC, maximized the between classes separation, thus, rendering alterations in cartilage texture due to injury more evident. The MFC cartilage in the pathology class was found more inhomogeneous in the distribution of gray-levels and of lower texture anisotropy and the opposed MTC cartilage, though normal on MRI and arthroscopy, was found to have lower texture anisotropy than cartilage in the normal class. Conclusion: Texture analysis may be used as an adjunct to morphological MR imaging for improving the detection of subtle cartilage changes and contributes to early therapeutic approach.

  2. Texture analysis of articular cartilage traumatic changes in the knee calculated from morphological 3.0 T MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: In the present work, we aim to identify changes in the cartilage texture of the injured knee in young, physically active, patients by computer analysis of MRI images based on 3.0 T morphological sequences. Methods: Fifty-three young patients with training injury or trauma in one knee underwent MRI and arthroscopy. Textural features were computed from the MRI images of the knee-cartilages and two classes were formed of 28 normal and 16 with pathology only in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) cartilage. Results: Textural features with statistically significant differences between the two classes were found only at the MFC and the medial tibial condyle (MTC) areas. Three features-combinations, at the MFC or the MTC, maximized the between classes separation, thus, rendering alterations in cartilage texture due to injury more evident. The MFC cartilage in the pathology class was found more inhomogeneous in the distribution of gray-levels and of lower texture anisotropy and the opposed MTC cartilage, though normal on MRI and arthroscopy, was found to have lower texture anisotropy than cartilage in the normal class. Conclusion: Texture analysis may be used as an adjunct to morphological MR imaging for improving the detection of subtle cartilage changes and contributes to early therapeutic approach

  3. MR imaging of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as gold standard: assessment of methodological quality of clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the methodological quality of articles addressing the value of MR imaging of the knee cartilage with arthroscopy as a standard. Relevant papers were selected after Medline review (MEDLINE database search including the terms ''cartilage'' ''knee'', ''MR'' and ''arthroscopy''). Two observers reviewed independently 29 selected articles to determine how each study had met 15 individual standards that had been previously developed to assess the methodological quality of clinical investigations. The following criteria were met in variable percentage of articles including adequate definition of purpose (100%), statistical analysis (90%), avoidance of verification bias (86%), patient population description (83%), reference standard (79%), review bias (79%), study design (66%), inclusion criteria (41%) and method of analysis (41.5%), avoidance of diagnostic-review bias (24%), exclusion criteria (21%), indeterminate examination results (17%), analysis criteria (14%), interobserver reliability (14%) and intraobserver reliability (7%). The assessment of the methodological quality of clinical investigations addressing the value of MR imaging in the evaluation of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference demonstrated that several standards were rarely met in the literature. Efforts should be made to rely on clearly defined lesion criteria and to determine reliability of the observations. (orig.)

  4. Effect of short-term enzymatic treatment on cell migration and cartilage regeneration: in vitro organ culture of bovine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Dongrim; Yu, Yin; Choe, Hyeonghun; Jang, Keewoong; Brouillette, Marc J; Zheng, Hongjun; Lim, Tae-Hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2014-07-01

    Depending on the damage extent and adjacent tissue condition in traumatic cartilage injury, it is possible to heal the tissue by resident cells. Unlike autologous chondrocyte implantation, short-term enzymatic treatment is an effective single-step procedure without extra cell expansion. Moreover, this method has been shown to significantly increase cellularity in lesion edges, resulting in enhanced integration and interfacial strength. We hypothesize that the locally digested extracellular matrix by treatment allows effortless cell migration from the adjacent tissue. Full-thickness cartilage discs and osteochondral explants were prepared from mature bovine stifle joints. These specimens were treated with collagenase in a culture medium. Two concentrations, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL, were used with various treating time of 10, 30, and 180 min. The cartilages were subsequently washed and cultured with fibrin hydrogel. The effect of enzymatic treatment on cell migration was apparent in both experiments of the cartilage disc and full-thickness cartilage defect model. In the disc culture, the treatment resulted in an approximately three to four times higher number of migrated cells than nontreated control. In short-term collagenase-treated groups, the proteoglycan (PG) loss was localized in the edge of tissue with minimal cell death. The treatment also accelerated cell migration in the full-thickness cartilage defects and some cells differentiated into chondrocytes with the deposit of PG. Gene expression results could support the characteristics of migrated cells, which had migratory ability and chondrogenic differentiation potential with overexpression of collagen type I and II, respectively. Based on these results, short-term enzymatic treatment, which can accelerate cell migration into traumatically injured cartilage, has great potential for clinical application. PMID:24428547

  5. Relationship between knee alignment and T1ρ values of articular cartilage and menisci in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@hotmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University, School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Vieira, Renata La Rocca, E-mail: relarocca@gmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rybak, Leon D., E-mail: Leon.Rybak@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Babb, James S., E-mail: James.Babb@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren–Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Materials and methods: 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3 T MR scanner. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results: Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1ρ values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion: There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA.

  6. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL. At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA.

  7. Relationship between knee alignment and T1ρ values of articular cartilage and menisci in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren–Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Materials and methods: 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3 T MR scanner. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results: Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1ρ values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion: There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA

  8. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the clinical relevance of T{sub 2} relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T{sub 2}-mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T{sub 2} mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T{sub 2} values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T{sub 2} values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B{sub 1} and B{sub 0} changes. (orig.)

  9. Research progress of knee articular cartilage injury%方申雲范海涛刘蜀彬

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方申雲; 范海涛; 刘蜀彬

    2014-01-01

    本文通过系统回顾分析中老年患者膝关节软骨损伤的流行病学特点、病因及可能的发病机制,进而探讨软骨损伤后的危害性,归纳外科治疗膝关节软骨损伤术式的选择及存在的优缺点,以及软骨损伤最新研究进展情况。%Based review of systems analysis in elderly patients with knee cartilage injury epidemiology,etiology and pathogenesis,then discuss the dangers of cartilage injury,summed up selection of surgical treatment of knee cartilage damage and there are advantages and disadvantages,as well as cartilage damage study on the latest development.

  10. Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Manzano, Sara; Manzano, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2015-01-01

    In healthy cartilage, mechano-electrochemical phenomena act together to maintain tissue homeostasis. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative diseases disrupt this biological equilibrium by causing structural deterioration and subsequent dysfunction of the tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as well as abnormal ion distribution are proposed as primary indicators of tissue degradation. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous three-dimensional computational model of the cartilage ...

  11. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Manicourt, Daniel; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L.; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical gra...

  12. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of {sup 1}H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bortolotti, Villiam [Department of DICAM, University of Bologna, Viale del Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Brown, Robert J S [953 West Bonita Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711-4193 (United States); Vittur, Franco, E-mail: paola.fantazzini@unibo.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, via Giorgeri 1, 24137 (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T{sub 1} relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular {sup 1}H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') {sup 1}H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with {alpha} denoting the solid/liquid {sup 1}H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T{sub 1}) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T{sub 1}, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with {alpha}>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T{sub 1} times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with {alpha}<<1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit

  13. Effect of low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes in the repair of articular cartilage defects in a rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; LI Zhong-li; FU Yang-mu; WANG Zhi-gang; WEI Min; ZHAO Bin; ZHANG Li; ZHU Juan-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Microfracture is a type of bone marrow stimulation in arthroscopic cartilage repair. However, the overall concentration of the mesenchymal stem cells is quite low and declines with age, and in the end the lesion is filled by fibrocartilage. The aim of this research was to investigate a novel method of enhancing microfracture by determining whether low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes would facilitate cartilage repair in a rabbit model.Methods Full-thickness cartilage defects were created at the medial femoral condyle of 36 mature New Zealand white rabbits without penetrating subchondral bone. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. In experimental group A, low-energy shock-wave therapy was performed in microfracture holes (diameter, 1 mm) at an energy flux density (EFD) of 0.095 m J/mm2 and 200 impulses by DolorClast Master (Electro Medical Systems SA, Switzerland)microprobe (diameter, 0.8 mm). In experimental group B, microfracture was performed alone. The untreated rabbits served as a control group. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operations, repair tissues at the defects were analyzed stereologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically.Results The defects were filled gradually with repair tissues in experimental groups A and B, and no repair tissues had formed in the control group at 12 weeks. Repair tissues in experimental group A contained more chondrocytes,proteoglycans, and collagen type Ⅱ than those in experimental group B. In experimental group B, fibrous tissues had formed at the defects at 8 and 12 weeks. Histological analysis of experimental group A showed a better Wakitani score (P <0.05) than in experimental group B at 8 and 12 weeks after the operation.Conclusions In the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes facilitated the production of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissues more than microfracture alone. This model demonstrates a new

  14. A large-molecular-weight polyanion, synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization, as a lubricant for human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathier, Michel; Lakin, Benjamin A; Bansal, Prashant N; Stoddart, Stephanie S; Snyder, Brian D; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2013-04-01

    A large-molecular-weight polyanion is found to possess lubricating properties for cartilage. The polyanion, sodium poly(7-oxanorbornene-2-carboxylate), is synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization of methyl 5-oxanorbornene-2-carboxylate. When dissolved in aqueous solution and applied to the surface of human cartilage it reduces the friction at the interface and acts as a lubricant. Its performance is similar to that of synovial fluid and superior to those of saline and Synvisc in an ex vivo human cartilage plug-on-plug model. The polymer is also not readily degraded by hyaluronidase or cytotoxic to human chondrocytes in vitro. As such, this polymer is a new type of viscosupplement, and the results provide insight into the design requirements for synthesizing highly efficacious synthetic biolubricants. PMID:23496043

  15. Reduced articular cartilage thickness in joints without a history of active arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Spannow, Anne Helene; Heuck, Carsten;

    joint cartilage thickness (Cth) between healthy children and JIA children measured by US (1). But are there any differences in Cth measured by US between healthy children and joints without a history of activity among JIA children’s. Aim: To investigate a possible effect of the inflammatory process on......, and 189 2nd PIP joints. Cartilage thickness was measured perpendicular to the bone surface. History of joint activity was found by review of medical records. An age-, and sex-matched healthy cohort investigated in a previous study served as a control group (2), age, 10.9 (6-16), girls/boys (177...... joints never directly affected by arthritic activity during the history of the child’s disease course. Furthermore we wanted to compare joint cartilage thickness within the JIA group in joints with or without a history of activity. Methods: We included 95 Danish JIA children. Age, mean (range) 10...

  16. O gel de plasma rico em plaquetas propicia a regeneração da cartilagem articular do joelho de ovelhas Platelet-rich plasma gel promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in knees of sheeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio de Oliveira Carneiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a regeneração da cartilagem articular em defeitos osteocondrais do joelho induzidos pelo plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP autógeno. MÉTODOS: Defeitos osteocondrais produzidos no sulco troclear de ambos os joelhos de dez ovelhas foram preenchidos com PRP autógeno à direita e deixados vazios à esquerda. Avaliação macroscópica e histológica foram efetuadas 12 semanas mais tarde. Os resultados foram avaliados por um escore geral de ambas as avaliações macroscópica e histológica comparativamente entre os lados por meio do teste pareado de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: o aspecto macroscópico não foi uniforme entre os animais, nem diferiu entre os joelhos direitos e esquerdos (p=0,03125; em nenhum caso o tecido regenerado se nivelou com a cartilagem normal circundante. Ao exame histológico, cartilagem aparentemente normal não foi detectada em nenhum joelho, mas uma cartilagem pouco diferenciada estava presente em sete joelhos direitos e em três joelhos esquerdos. Tecido fibrocartilaginoso estava presente nos joelhos restantes, com diferença significante no escore geral entre os joelhos direitos e esquerdos (p=0,0313. CONCLUSÃO: o PRP como usado neste estudo tem propriedades reparativas da cartilagem articular no joelho de ovelhas, principalmente por estimular a formação de tecido fibrocartilaginoso. Trabalho Experimental.OBJECTIVE: to assess the regeneration of osteochondral defects in the joint cartilage of the knee induced by autologous platelet-rich plasma (pRp. METHODS: osteochondral defects produced in the trochlear groove of both knees of ten sheep; defects of the right knees were filled with autologous pRp and the left knees were left unfilled. macroscopic and microscopic evaluation was carried out 12 week later. the results were evaluated by the total score of both macroscopic and microscopic evaluations comparing the two sides through the wilcoxon paired test. RESULTS: macroscopic appearance was not uniform among

  17. 透明质酸对关节软骨蛋白聚糖aggrecan的影响%Effect of hyaluronic acid on articular cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜国辉; 屈爱存; 陈建英; 贺艳丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究关节腔注射透明质酸对兔骨关节炎软骨基质的保护作用.方法 关节骨液用软骨素酶ABC降解,丹磺酰肼柱前衍生.采用NH2色谱柱,流动相为乙腈-10 mmol/L醋酸溶液-10 mmol/L醋酸钠溶液(7616:8),荧光检测器检测,激发波长350 nm,发射波长530 nm,流速为1mL/min.结果 透明质酸可减少兔关节滑液中C4S、C6S的含量.结论 关节腔注射透明质酸可抑制兔软骨蛋白聚糖的降解或上调蛋白聚糖的合成,维持关节软骨正常的新陈代谢.%Purpose To investigate the protective effect of intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid on cartilage matrix in rabbit osteoarthritis. Methods Joint synovial fluid was degraded by chondroitinase ABC, and then derived with dansylhydrazine. The derivatized sample was separated on NH2 column. The mobile phase of acetonitrile- acetic acid- sodium acetate (76:16:8) was used. Detected with fluorescence detector, the excitation wavelength (λex) and emission wavelength (λem) were 350 and 530 nm, respectively. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min. Results Hyaluronic acid could decrease the contents of C4S and C6S in rabbit joint synovial fluid. Conclusion The intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid can reduce the degradation of aggrecan and/or enhance the synthesis of aggrecan in the joint tissues of rabbit osteoarthritis, and maintain the normal metabolism of articular cartilage.

  18. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  19. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Achim, E-mail: achim.salamon@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Jonitz-Heincke, Anika, E-mail: anika.jonitz@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Adam, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.adam@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Rychly, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.rychly@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Müller-Hilke, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.mueller-hilke@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Immunology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 68, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Bader, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.bader@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Lochner, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.lochner@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  20. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  1. Lesiones del cartílago articular de la rodilla en zona de carga. Artroscopia en 120 pacientes: Arthroscopy in 120 patients Lesions of the articular cartilage of the knee in a burden zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Reyes Chirino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo en el Hospital Universitario "Abel Santamaría Cuadrado" de Pinar del Río en el periodo de enero/1999 a enero/2003 en 120 pacientes atendidos en el servicio de Ortopedia y Traumatología que presentaron lesiones del cartílago articular de las rodillas en zonas de carga de peso, tratados por cirugía artroscópica; con el objetivo de evaluar los factores que influyeron en la evolución de estos pacientes. De la muestra solo el 13.3 % fueron excelentes, el 35 % se evaluaron de bien, mientras el 38.3 % fueron regular y el 13.3 % con malos resultados. El peso corporal, las deformidades angulares de las rodillas, otras lesiones mecánicas asociadas, el estado de la masa muscular y la extensión y profundidad de las lesiones cartilaginosas influyeron notablemente en la evolución de estos pacientes según nuestros resultados así como la edad y el sexo.A retrospective study is performed at Abel Santamaría Cuadrado Hospital in Pinar del Río from January 1999 to January 2003 in 120 patients assisted in the Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology who presented with lesions in the articular cartilage of the knee in weight load areas, managed with asthroscopic surgery, in order to evaluate the factor which influenced the progress of these patients. Out of the sample, only 13.3 % was excellent, 35 % was good, whereas 38.3 % was not good and 13.3 % was poor. Body weight, knee angular deformities, other related mechanic lesions significantly influenced the progress of these patients, according to our results as well as age and sex.

  2. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, T.I. (Bone Research Branch, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  3. Impact of the charge density of phospholipid bilayers on lubrication of articular cartilage surfaces2O3-ZrO2(nano (12 mol% CeO2 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pawlak

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We attempt to answer the question how some changes in acid - base equilibrium have an impact on the charge density of a phospholipid bilayer formed during lubrication occurring at articular cartilage surfaces.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes on articular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processes are taking place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration from the microelectrophoretic method. Liposome membrane has been prepared as an aqueous solution of NaCl under various pH conditions. Microelectrophoresis was used to examine the local acid-base equilibrium of the electrolytes with the membrane surface, which can be considered to be an interface of phospholipids in articular cartilage.Findings: The effects of the adsorption of ions (H+, OH-; Na+, Cl-, which are present in solution upon electric charge of the liposome membrane assembled of phosphatidycholine (PC, have also been found to exhibit pH-responsive (quasi-periodic behavior.Research limitations/implications: We hypothesized that the acid-base dissociation behavior in phospholipid bilayers of articular cartilage is a key to understanding biolubrication processes. For example, similar previous investigators found that the behavior of a multilayer made of polyisopeptide/hyaluronic acid depends on some of the surface properties such as film thickness, surface friction, surface wetness and swelling conditions. Future work should consider the adsorption of polyelectrolyte ions, e.g., the glycoprotein lubricin and hyaluronan, at the liposome membrane surface involved, assumed that besides the H+ and OH- ions, the polyelectolyte ions were also engaged.Originality/value: This liposome membrane is a model for phospholipid bilayers and will be applied for the investigation of polyelectrolyte ions, e

  4. Cartilage Engineering and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffanin, R.; Bader, A.; Cogoli, A.; Carda, C.; Fantazzini, P.; Garrido, L.; Gomez, S.; Hall, L.; Martin, I.; Murano, E.; Poncelet, D.; Pörtner, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    The complex effects of mechanical forces and growth factors on articular cartilage development still need to be investigated in order to identify optimal conditions for articular cartilage repair. Strictly controlled in vitro studies under modelled or space microgravity conditions can improve our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in articular cartilage development. The main objective of this Topical Team is to use modelled microgravity as a tool to elucidate the fundamental science of cartilage regeneration. Particular attention is, therefore, given to the effects of physical forces under altered gravitational conditions, applied using controlled bioreactor systems, on cell metabolism, cell differentiation and tissue development. Specific attention is also directed toward the potential advantages of using magnetic resonance methods for the non-destructive characterisation of scaffolds, chondrocytes-polymer constructs and tissue engineered cartilage.

  5. The Correlation of Right Knee Meniscus and Articular Cartilage Damage in MRI%MRI在膝关节半月板损伤与关节软骨损伤的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荘高明; 梁文

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlated of the meniscus and articular cartilage damage,in non-traumatic knee pain.Methods Collected from January 2012 to May 2013, the 64 cases of non-traumatic knee pain in patients with knee MRI data ,using spss19.0 by Spearman method to analyze the correlation of meniscus and knee cartilage injury. ResultsResults knee meniscus and articular cartilage injury correlation coefficient of 0.727, greater than P = 0.01, its correlation is significant.Conclusion Right knee meniscus injury more serious, not treated, it will aggravate or accelerate the response of articular cartilage damage.%目的:研究右膝关节非外伤性疼痛中,半月板损伤与关节软骨损伤是否具有相关性。方法收集2012年1月至2013年5月间,64例膝关节非外伤性疼痛患者的膝关节MRI资料,利用spss19.0统计软件,通过Spearman分析方法,分析半月板损伤与相应膝关节软骨损伤的相关性。结果右膝关节半月板损伤与相应膝关节软骨损伤的相关性是显著的(r=0.727,P=0.01)。结论右膝关节半月板损伤越严重,不及时治疗,会加重关节软骨的损伤损伤。

  6. Deer bone extract suppresses articular cartilage damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate in osteoarthritic rats: an in vivo micro-computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Yooheon; Ahn, Chang Won; Park, Soo Hyun; Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 μm, HDB: 80.7 μm vs. NC: 48.0 μm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 μm, HDB: 81.2 μm vs. NC: 112.0 μm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model. PMID:24797662

  7. Minor influence of lifelong voluntary exercise on composition, structure, and incidence of osteoarthritis in tibial articular cartilage of mice compared with major effects caused by growth, maturation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, Tommi; Siitonen, Ulrika; Lehto, Lauri J; Hyttinen, Mika M; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J; Julkunen, Petro

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effects of lifelong voluntary exercise on articular cartilage of mice. At the age of 4 weeks C57BL mice (n = 152) were divided into two groups, with one group serving as a sedentary control whereas the other was allowed free access to a running wheel from the age of 1 month onward. Mice were euthanized at four different time points (1, 2, 6, and 18 months of age). Articular cartilage samples were gathered from the load-bearing area of the tibial medial plateaus, and osteoarthritis was graded. Additionally, the proteoglycan content distribution was assessed using digital densitometry, collagen fibril orientation, and parallelism with polarized light microscopy, and collagen content using Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy. The incidence of osteoarthritis increased with aging, but exercise had no effect on this trend. Furthermore, the structure and composition revealed significant growth, maturation, and age-dependent properties. Exercise exerted a minor effect on collagen fibril orientation in the superficial zone. Fibril orientation at 2 months of age was more perpendicular to surface (p < 0.05) in controls compared with runners, whereas the situation was reversed at the age of 18 months (p < 0.05). The collagen content of the superficial zone was higher (p < 0.01) at the age of 18 months in controls compared with runners but the proteoglycan content did not display any exercise-dependent changes. In conclusion, growth, maturation, and aging exerted a clear effect on integrity, structure, and composition of medial tibial plateau articular cartilage in mice, whereas lifelong voluntary exercise had only a minor effect on collagen architecture and content. PMID:21405978

  8. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: the effect of different biomaterials, cell types and culture methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.C.M. Marijnissen (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 outlines the normal structure and composition of articular cartilage and the inefficient spontaneous healing response after focal damage. Current surgical treatment options are briefly discussed and tissue engineering techniques for the repair of articular cartilage defects

  9. Efeito do enxerto autólogo de pericôndrio costal com butil-2-cianoacrilato em lesão provocada na cartilagem articular do joelho de coelhos The effect of autologous costal perichondrium graft with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in provoked injury in the articular cartilage of rabbit’s knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Viana Xavier

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available A finalidade desse estudo foi verificar o efeito do enxerto autólogo de pericôndrio com butil-2-cianoacrilato em lesão provocada na cartilagem articular do joelho de coelhos. Foram utilizados animais machos, adultos, divididos em 2 grupos, denominados de Grupo A e de Grupo B, de 17 animais cada um. Os animais do Grupo A foram reoperados com 4 semanas e os do Grupo B com 8 semanas. Foi retirado um fragmento de 2 cm da 7ª cartilagem costal esquerda do qual se descolou o pericôndrio. Retiraram-se dois cilindros ósseo-cartilaginosos, um de cada côndilo femural medial do mesmo animal. De um lado a cartilagem articular do cilindro foi substituida por pericôndrio com um fina camada do adesivo tecidual na sua face externa e do outro lado só foi retirada a cartilagem articular. Os cilindros foram recolocados nos fêmures. Macroscopicamente, no Grupo A, encontrou-se a maioria das lesões com pericôndrio recobertas totalmente com tecido e todas as lesões sem pericôndrio recobertas parcialmente. No Grupo B, não se encontrou diferença macroscópica significante entre a cobertura total e parcial com tecido, das lesões. Estatisticamente, não houve diferença microscópica significante entre as lesões com pericôndrio e sem pericôndrio do Grupo A e do Grupo B e nem entre os Grupos A e B.The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of the perichondrium graft with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in provoked injury in the articular cartilage of rabbit`s knee. Male adult animals were used, divided in 2 groups, called Group A and Group B, with 17 animals each. The Group A animals were reoperated in 4 weeks and the Group B animals in 8 weeks. A 2 cm fragment was taken out from the 7th costal cartilage from which the perichondrium was removed. Two osteo-cartilaginous cylinders were taken out from each medialis condyles of the femurs in the same animal. The articular cartilage of the cylinder was replaced in one side by the perichondrium with a thin layer

  10. Curcumin reduces prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan release in the secretome of interleukin 1β-treated articular cartilage [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Clutterbuck

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is a phytochemical with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this study was to determine whether non-toxic concentrations of curcumin can reduce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β-stimulated inflammation and catabolism in an explant model of cartilage inflammation. Methods: Articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes were obtained from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Curcumin was added to monolayer cultured primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants in concentrations ranging from 3μM-100μM. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 release into the secretome of IL-1β-stimulated explants was measured using a competitive ELISA and western blotting respectively. Proteoglycan (PG release in the secretome was measured using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assay. Cytotoxicity was assessed with a live/dead assay in monolayer cultures after 24 hours, 48 hours and five days, and in explants after five days. Results: Curcumin induced chondrocyte death in primary cultures (50μM p<0.001 and 100μM p<0.001 after 24 hours. After 48 hours and five days, curcumin (≥25μM significantly increased cell death (p<0.001 both time points. In explants, curcumin toxicity was not observed at concentrations up to and including 25μM after five days. Curcumin (≥3μM significantly reduced IL-1β-stimulated PG (p<0.05 and PGE2 release (p<0.001 from explants, whilst curcumin (≥12μM significantly reduced MMP-3 release (p<0.01. Conclusion: Non-cytotoxic concentrations of curcumin exert anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory effects in cartilage explants.

  11. Curcumin reduces prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan release in the secretome of interleukin 1β-treated articular cartilage [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1ks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Clutterbuck

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is a phytochemical with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this study was to determine whether non-toxic concentrations of curcumin can reduce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β-stimulated inflammation and catabolism in an explant model of cartilage inflammation. Methods: Articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes were obtained from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Curcumin was added to monolayer cultured primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants in concentrations ranging from 3μM-100μM. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 release into the secretome of IL-1β-stimulated explants was measured using a competitive ELISA and western blotting respectively. Proteoglycan (PG release in the secretome was measured using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assay. Cytotoxicity was assessed with a live/dead assay in monolayer cultures after 24 hours, 48 hours and five days, and in explants after five days. Results: Curcumin induced chondrocyte death in primary cultures (50μM p<0.001 and 100μM p<0.001 after 24 hours. After 48 hours and five days, curcumin (≥25μM significantly increased cell death (p<0.001 both time points. In explants, curcumin toxicity was not observed at concentrations up to and including 25μM after five days. Curcumin (≥3μM significantly reduced IL-1β-stimulated PG (p<0.05 and PGE2 release (p<0.001 from explants, whilst curcumin (≥12μM significantly reduced MMP-3 release (p<0.01. Conclusion: Non-cytotoxic concentrations of curcumin exert anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory effects in cartilage explants.

  12. Efeitos sobre o tecido ósseo e cartilagem articular provocados pela imobilização e remobilização em ratos Wistar Effects of immobilization and remobilization on bone tissue and cartilage in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Portinho

    2008-10-01

    animais remobilizados.Long immobilization periods lead to bone and properties loss, and its recovery depends on many factors. Besides that, immobilization can cause ulcerations in the articular cartilage tissue due to alterations, such as loss of proteoglycans and total cartilage mass and volume. The aim of this study was to verify histological alterations of the periarticular bone tissue and articular cartilage caused by immobilization as well as remobilization of hinder limbs of Wistar rats. Twelve Wistar rats were divided in two groups: GI - (n=6: 15 days with the left hinder limb immobilized at plantiflexion, with the right limb being the control; GR - (n=6: used a 15 day-period of free remobilization in the cage, associated with 3 daily stretching bouts of the left soleus muscle for 30 seconds. The measures of the cortical bone thickness, diameter of the medular channel and number of condrocites were evaluated; in the cartilage tissue, the cartilage mean thickness and the number of condrocites were measured. The results showed that for GI there were no significant alterations in the bone thickness (p=0.1156, nor in the medular channel diameter (p=0.5698, but there was significant decrease of the osteocytes compared with the counter-lateral side (p=0.0005; in GR decrease in the number of osteocytes (p=0.0001 was also observed, but the differences in thickness (p=0.1343 and medular channel diameter (p=0.6456 remained non-significant. There were no significant differences for the articular cartilage data for the samples, neither in the cartilage thickness for GI (p=0.6640 and GR (p=0.1633; concerning the number of condrocites in GI (p=0.9429 and GR (p=0.1634. It is concluded hence that two weeks of immobilization and remobilization produced only significant decrease in the number of osteocytes in the immobilized rats and continued to decrease even in the remobilized animals.

  13. Construction of x-ray dark-field imaging with a view size of 80 mm square and first visualization of human articular cartilage of femoral head under a nearly clinical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field size of 80 mm x 80 mm for X-ray dark-field (DFI) imaging at 35 keV using a 2.16-mm-thick 440 Laue diffraction analyzer has been achieved. Under this condition, only refracted X-rays from sample can transmit through this filter to form DFI while the beam that has not changed its direction is repelled to the diffraction direction. Its spatial resolution is 10 microns or better. An excised human femoral head in a water-filled vinyl bag simulating a clinical condition shows a high-contrast and high-spatial-resolution articular cartilage that has not been visualized by X-ray technique. (author)

  14. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Jayne Peffers; Xuan Liu; Peter David Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older dono...

  15. Integrating qPLM and biomechanical test data with an anisotropic fiber distribution model and predictions of TGF-β1 and IGF-1 regulation of articular cartilage fiber modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Michael E; Raub, Christopher B; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L; Hazelwood, Scott J; Klisch, Stephen M

    2013-11-01

    A continuum mixture model with distinct collagen (COL) and glycosaminoglycan elastic constituents was developed for the solid matrix of immature bovine articular cartilage. A continuous COL fiber volume fraction distribution function and a true COL fiber elastic modulus ([Formula: see text] were used. Quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) methods were developed to account for the relatively high cell density of immature articular cartilage and used with a novel algorithm that constructs a 3D distribution function from 2D qPLM data. For specimens untreated and cultured in vitro, most model parameters were specified from qPLM analysis and biochemical assay results; consequently, [Formula: see text] was predicted using an optimization to measured mechanical properties in uniaxial tension and unconfined compression. Analysis of qPLM data revealed a highly anisotropic fiber distribution, with principal fiber orientation parallel to the surface layer. For untreated samples, predicted [Formula: see text] values were 175 and 422 MPa for superficial (S) and middle (M) zone layers, respectively. TGF-[Formula: see text]1 treatment was predicted to increase and decrease [Formula: see text] values for the S and M layers to 281 and 309 MPa, respectively. IGF-1 treatment was predicted to decrease [Formula: see text] values for the S and M layers to 22 and 26 MPa, respectively. A novel finding was that distinct native depth-dependent fiber modulus properties were modulated to nearly homogeneous values by TGF-[Formula: see text]1 and IGF-1 treatments, with modulated values strongly dependent on treatment. PMID:23266906

  16. Effect of estrogen and dietary loading on rat condylar cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Orajärvi, M. (Marko)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint which attaches the mandible to the skull. The head of the mandibular condyle is covered by condylar cartilage, which functions as both growth and articular cartilage. Masticatory forces are transmitted to the condylar cartilage, and the consistency of a person’s diet partly defines the loading force. Condylar cartilage acts as a load-absorbing structure together with the articular disc. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are...

  17. MRI of the cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  18. IL-1 beta and TGF-beta 1 modulate the sulphation grade of chondro-disaccharides in porcine articular cartilage: a capillary electrophoresis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, M; Tamburro, A; Rotilio, D

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) on proteoglycan release from cartilage explants and modification at the sulphation level. Matrix proteoglycans purified by ion-exchange chromatography were composed of two distinct peaks (1 and 2) each showing a different Kav value when they were subjected to size-exclusion chromatography on a Sepharose CL-2B column. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of conditioned medium and extracellular matrix proteoglycans were digested by chondroitin ABC and AC lyase, suggesting that chondroitin sulphate (CS) is the major GAG present (80-90%). Structural analysis of disaccharides, by capillary zone electrophoresis, revealed a different pattern of sulphated glycosaminoglycans when cartilage was treated with either IL-1 beta or TGF-beta 1. Analysis of GAGs released into the medium from TGF-beta 1 treated cartilage showed a reduction in the level of 4-S-disaccharide (delta Di4S) and an increase in non-sulphated disaccharides (delta Di0S), while no significant changes were found in IL-1 beta treated cartilage. In the extracellular matrix, IL-1 beta and TGF-beta 1 induced a more complex rearrangement of the GAGs. The level of non-sulphated disaccharides was increased whereas that of total sulphated disaccharides was reduced. Taken together, these results suggest that both cytokines modify the structure of GAGs, probably by interfering with the activity or the synthesis of sulphotransferases involved in GAG turnover. PMID:7551687

  19. Lubricin reduces cartilage--cartilage integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Dirk B; Wendt, David; Moretti, Matteo; Jakob, Marcel; Jay, Gregory D; Heberer, Michael; Martin, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage integration in vivo does not occur, such that even cartilage fissures do not heal. This could be due not only to the limited access of chondrocytes to the wound, but also to exogenous factors. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lubricin, a lubricating protein physiologically present in the synovial fluid, reduces the integrative cartilage repair capacity. Disk/ring composites of bovine articular cartilage were prepared using concentric circular blades and cultured for 6 weeks with or without treatment with 250 microg/ml lubricin applied three times per week. Following culture, the percentage of contact area between the disks and the rings, as assessed by light microscopy, were equal in both groups. The adhesive strength of the integration interface, as assessed by push-out mechanical tests, was markedly and significantly lower in lubricin-treated specimens (2.5 kPa) than in the controls (28.7 kPa). Histological observation of Safranin-O stained cross-sections confirmed the reduced integration in the lubricin treated composites. Our findings suggest that the synovial milieu, by providing lubrication of cartilage surfaces, impairs cartilage--cartilage integration. PMID:15299281

  20. Magnetic resonance image segmentation using semi-automated software for quantification of knee articular cartilage - initial evaluation of a technique for paired scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software-based image analysis is important for studies of cartilage changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study describes an evaluation of a semi-automated cartilage segmentation software tool capable of quantifying paired images for potential use in longitudinal studies of knee OA. We describe the methodology behind the analysis and demonstrate its use by determination of test-retest analysis precision of duplicate knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Test-retest knee MR images of 12 subjects with a range of knee health were evaluated from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) pilot MR study. Each subject was removed from the magnet between the two scans. The 3D DESS (sagittal, 0.456 mm x 0.365 mm, 0.7 mm slice thickness, TR 16.5 ms, TE 4.7 ms) images were obtained on a 3-T Siemens Trio MR system with a USA Instruments quadrature transmit-receive extremity coil. Segmentation of one 3D-image series was first performed and then the corresponding retest series was segmented by viewing both image series concurrently in two adjacent windows. After manual registration of the series, the first segmentation cartilage outline served as an initial estimate for the second segmentation. We evaluated morphometric measures of the bone and cartilage surface area (tAB and AC), cartilage volume (VC), and mean thickness (ThC.me) for medial/lateral tibia (MT/LT), total femur (F) and patella (P). Test-retest reproducibility was assessed using the root-mean square coefficient of variation (RMS CV%). For the paired analyses, RMS CV % ranged from 0.9% to 1.2% for VC, from 0.3% to 0.7% for AC, from 0.6% to 2.7% for tAB and 0.8% to 1.5% for ThC.me. Paired image analysis improved the measurement precision of cartilage segmentation. Our results are in agreement with other publications supporting the use of paired analysis for longitudinal studies of knee OA. (orig.)

  1. MR imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is becoming increasingly important for the radiologist to evaluate the appearance and outcome of cartilage repair procedures. MR imaging is currently the best method for such evaluation but it is necessary to use cartilage-specific sequences and to modify those sequences when necessary to minimize artifacts from retained metal within the joint. This article reviews the surgical technique of the more commonly performed cartilage repair procedures, currently recommended techniques for the MR imaging evaluation of articular cartilage and cartilage repair procedures, and the MR imaging appearance of cartilage repair procedures and of the most frequently encountered complications following such procedures. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of articular cartilage in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) using T2* mapping at different time points at 3.0 Tesla MRI: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration prior to surgery in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), we compared cartilage of the hip joint in patients with FAI and healthy volunteers using T2* mapping at 3.0 Tesla over time. Twenty-two patients (13 females and 9 males; mean age 28.1 years) with clinical signs of FAI and Toennis grade ≤ 1 on anterior-posterior x-ray and 35 healthy age-matched volunteers were examined at a 3 T MRI using a flexible body coil. T2* maps were calculated from sagittal- and coronal-oriented gradient-multi-echo sequences using six echoes (TR 125, TE 4.41/8.49/12.57/16.65/20.73/24.81, scan time 4.02 min), both measured at beginning and end of the scan (45 min time span between measurements). Region of interest analysis was manually performed on four consecutive slices for superior and anterior cartilage. Mean T2* values were compared among patients and volunteers, as well as over time using analysis of variance and Student's t-test. Whereas quantitative T2* values for the first measurement did not reveal significant differences between patients and volunteers, either for sagittal (p = 0.644) or coronal images (p = 0.987), at the first measurement, a highly significant difference (p ≤ 0.004) was found for both measurements with time after unloading of the joint. Over time we found decreasing mean T2* values for patients, in contrast to increasing mean T2* relaxation times in volunteers. The study proved the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration in the hip joint in FAI patients at 3 Tesla to predict possible success of joint-preserving surgery. However, we suggest the time point for measuring T2* as an MR biomarker for cartilage and the changes in T2* over time to be of crucial importance for designing an MR protocol in patients with FAI. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of articular cartilage in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) using T2* mapping at different time points at 3.0 Tesla MRI: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apprich, S.; Mamisch, T.C. [University of Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, G.H. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Bonel, H. [University of Bern, Department of Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Siebenrock, K.A.; Dudda, M. [University of Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Kim, Y.J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    To define the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration prior to surgery in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), we compared cartilage of the hip joint in patients with FAI and healthy volunteers using T2* mapping at 3.0 Tesla over time. Twenty-two patients (13 females and 9 males; mean age 28.1 years) with clinical signs of FAI and Toennis grade {<=} 1 on anterior-posterior x-ray and 35 healthy age-matched volunteers were examined at a 3 T MRI using a flexible body coil. T2* maps were calculated from sagittal- and coronal-oriented gradient-multi-echo sequences using six echoes (TR 125, TE 4.41/8.49/12.57/16.65/20.73/24.81, scan time 4.02 min), both measured at beginning and end of the scan (45 min time span between measurements). Region of interest analysis was manually performed on four consecutive slices for superior and anterior cartilage. Mean T2* values were compared among patients and volunteers, as well as over time using analysis of variance and Student's t-test. Whereas quantitative T2* values for the first measurement did not reveal significant differences between patients and volunteers, either for sagittal (p = 0.644) or coronal images (p = 0.987), at the first measurement, a highly significant difference (p {<=} 0.004) was found for both measurements with time after unloading of the joint. Over time we found decreasing mean T2* values for patients, in contrast to increasing mean T2* relaxation times in volunteers. The study proved the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration in the hip joint in FAI patients at 3 Tesla to predict possible success of joint-preserving surgery. However, we suggest the time point for measuring T2* as an MR biomarker for cartilage and the changes in T2* over time to be of crucial importance for designing an MR protocol in patients with FAI. (orig.)

  4. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  5. Control of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on apatite-coated poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel as an artificial articular cartilage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Kazuaki; Hayami, Takashi; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2010-03-15

    One of the key challenges in employing biomaterials is determining how to fix them into the surrounding tissue. To enhance the interaction with surrounding bone, amorphous hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated onto the surface of the bio-inert poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA-H), as an artificial cartilage material, by a pulsed laser deposition technique. Next we examined the binding effects of the HA thin film (300 nm thick) to the underlying bone using osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. A mouse osteoblast cell line, MC3T3E1, was cultured on the HA-coated and noncoated PVA-H with a water content of 33% or 53% for 3 weeks. Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and levels of osteocalcin were evaluated for biocompatibility and differentiation. HA coating enhanced the cell proliferation, the ALP activity, and the levels of osteocalcin on both low and high water-content PVA-Hs. The cell growth rates on the PVA-H were lower than on tissue culture dishes even after the HA coating was added; however, osteoblastic differentiation was highly promoted by the HA coating on low water content PVA-H. These results suggested that the HA coating on the PVA-H enhanced the affinity between the bone and the PVA-H as an artificial cartilage material in surface replacement arthroplasty. PMID:19322880

  6. Combined effect of subchondral drilling and hyaluronic acid with/without diacerein in full-thickness articular cartilage lesion in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannaloet, Wanwisa; Laupattarakasem, Wiroon; Sukon, Peerapol; Ong-Chai, Siriwan; Laupattarakasem, Pisamai

    2012-01-01

    The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD-) induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA) injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS) (group 1) or with HA (group 2 and group 3). Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2) or with diacerein (group 3). The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA. PMID:22666105

  7. Combined Effect of Subchondral Drilling and Hyaluronic Acid with/without Diacerein in Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Lesion in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwisa Suwannaloet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD- induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS (group 1 or with HA (group 2 and group 3. Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2 or with diacerein (group 3. The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA.

  8. Gene Delivery of TGF-β3 and BMP2 in an MSC-Laden Alginate Hydrogel for Articular Cartilage and Endochondral Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tomas; Tierney, Erica G; Cunniffe, Grainne M; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Incorporating therapeutic genes into three-dimensional biomaterials is a promising strategy for enhancing tissue regeneration. Alginate hydrogels have been extensively investigated for cartilage and bone tissue engineering, including as carriers of transfected cells to sites of injury, making them an ideal gene delivery platform for cartilage and osteochondral tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to develop gene-activated alginate hydrogels capable of supporting nanohydroxyapatite (nHA)-mediated nonviral gene transfer to control the phenotype of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for either cartilage or endochondral bone tissue engineering. To produce these gene-activated constructs, MSCs and nHA complexed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding for transforming growth factor-beta 3 (pTGF-β3), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (pBMP2), or a combination of both (pTGF-β3-pBMP2) were encapsulated into alginate hydrogels. Initial analysis using reporter genes showed effective gene delivery and sustained overexpression of the transgenes were achieved. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that complexing the plasmid with nHA before hydrogel encapsulation led to transport of the plasmid into the nucleus of MSCs, which did not happen with naked pDNA. Gene delivery of TGF-β3 and BMP2 and subsequent cell-mediated expression of these therapeutic genes resulted in a significant increase in sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen production, particularly in the pTGF-β3-pBMP2 codelivery group in comparison to the delivery of either pTGF-β3 or pBMP2 in isolation. In addition, stronger staining for collagen type II deposition was observed in the pTGF-β3-pBMP2 codelivery group. In contrast, greater levels of calcium deposition were observed in the pTGF-β3- and pBMP2-only groups compared to codelivery, with a strong staining for collagen type X deposition, suggesting these constructs were supporting MSC hypertrophy and progression along an endochondral pathway. Together, these

  9. Use of Environmental and Physical Stimuli in Cartilage Tissue Engineering Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Articular cartilage enables friction-free, and thus painless, joint movement, while also functioning as a shock absorber. Although articular cartilage is made up of only few main components, natural healing fails to re-establish the native organization of the extracellular matrix and surgical intervention has only limited success in long term follow up. The relatively simple composition of articular cartilage, combined with a high prevalence of damage, make it an ...

  10. 间充质干细胞源性微囊泡和诱导性多潜能干细胞促进关节软骨修复的进展%Articular cartilage repair using mesenchymal stem cells-derived microvesicles and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯威宇; 程艳伟; 向川

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Induced pluripotent stem cels and mesenchymal stem cels-derived microvesicles have been confirmed in various tissue repairs, which are expected to become more effective and safe therapy for articular cartilage repair. OBJECTIVE:To overal understand the research progress in the use of induced pluripotent stem cels and mesenchymal stem cels-derived microvesicles in articular cartilage repair. METHODS: A computer-based search of PubMed and CNKI was performed by the first author for articles related to stem cel treatment of osteoarthritis published from 2003 to 2015. The keywords were “articular cartilage injury, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels” in English and Chinese, respectively. In the same field, articles published recently or in authorized journals were preferred. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Articular cartilage injury is stil a difficulty in the orthopedics. Many repair methods have been reported, but they al have limitations. Induced pluripotent stem cels and mesenchymal stem cels-derived microvesicles bring a new hope for patients with articular cartilage injury. However, there are stil many problems to be solved, such as extracting and purifying a large amount of cels, proliferation and differentiation potentials, and mechanism underlying cartilage repair.%背景:间充质干细胞源性微囊泡和诱导性多潜能干细胞在多个领域的组织修复作用已被证实,两者有望成为修复关节软骨损伤更有效、更安全的治疗方法。目的:综述间充质干细胞源性微囊泡和诱导性多潜能干细胞促进软骨修复的研究进展。方法:由第一作者应用计算机检索PubMed、中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI)2003年至2015年8月相关文献,英文检索词为“Articular cartilage injury,Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels”,中文检索词为“软骨损伤,骨髓间充质干细胞”。选择文章内容与干细胞治疗骨关节炎有关者,同一领域文献则选择近期发表在权威

  11. Viscoelastic properties of chondrons enzymatically isolated from rabbit knee articular cartilage in virto%兔膝关节软骨单位微管吸吮黏弹性力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段王平; 孙振伟; 李琦; 郝永壮; 王立; 陈维毅; 卫小春

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨体外急性消化软骨单位的生物力学特性.方法 成年8月龄新西兰白兔8只,随机分为两组,各4只.无菌条件下剖取双膝关节全层软骨,一组采用常规质量浓度0.4%的pronase酶和质量浓度0.025%的Ⅱ型胶原酶依次消化为软骨细胞;另一组采用质量浓度0.3%的dispase酶和质量浓度0.2%的Ⅱ型胶原酶联合搅拌消化3 h为软骨单位.利用微管吸吮结合半无限体细胞力学模型定量分析急性消化软骨细胞及软骨单位黏弹性力学特性,包括平衡模量(E∞)、瞬间模量(E0)和表观黏性(μ)等黏弹性参数.结果 成年软骨细胞在0.2-0.4 kPa恒定微管负压下,表现为典型黏弹性固体特征,即在微管中产生瞬间微小变形,随后发生形率单调减小的蠕变过程,其到达平衡状态时间为(110±18)s.成年软骨单位在微管吸吮负压提高到1.0~1.2 kPa时,与软骨细胞发生同样的黏弹性蠕变行为,但其瞬间吸入微管内的长度明显减少,且到达平衡状态的时间缩短为(36.5±4.5)s.同时,软骨单位黏弹性参数平衡模量(E∞)、瞬间模量(E0)和表观黏性(μ)均明显高于软骨细胞.结论 与软骨细胞相比,成年软骨单位同样表现为黏弹性固体特征,但其黏弹性力学特性明显提高.%Objective To characterize the biomechanical behavior and properties of the chondrons enzymatically isolated from rabbit knee articular cartilage in virto. Methods Eight months old New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into chondroctye and chondron groups (4 rabbits in each group). In chondrocyte groups, the full articular cartilages from both knees were enzymatically isolated to chondrocytes by 0.4% pronase and 0.025% collagenase type-Ⅱ in turn. In chondron groups, chondrons were obtained from articular cartilage using the mixture of 0.3% dispase (a neutral protease) and 0.2% collagenase type-Ⅱin at 37C for 3 h. The micropipette aspiration was used to quantify changes in

  12. In end stage osteoarthritis, cartilage tissue pentosidine levels are inversely related to parameters of cartilage damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Huisman, A.M.; Boer, T.N.de; Groot, J.de; Polak, A.A.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Age is the most prominent predisposition for development of osteoarthritis (OA). Age-related changes of articular cartilage are likely to play a role. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in cartilage matrix with increasing age and adversely affect the biomechanical propertie

  13. Hidrogéis de poliHEMA para reparo de defeitos da cartilagem articular: 1 - síntese e caracterização mecânica PolyHEMA hydrogels for repairs or articular cartilage defects: 1 – systhesis and mechanical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M Malmonge

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visa a obtenção de hidrogéis de poli(2 hidróxi etil metacrilato - poliHEMA com propriedades mecânicas adequadas ao uso dos mesmos no reparo de defeitos da cartilagem articular. Para tanto, duas alternativas foram estudadas: a variação da densidade de reticulação e a obtenção de blendas do tipo redes semi interpenetrantes (sIPN de poliHEMA reticulado e diferentes polímeros como reforço. Amostras de hidrogéis foram obtidas por polimerização térmica e caracterizadas quanto à capacidade de absorção de água e de solução aquosa de NaCl 0,15 M e quanto ao comportamento mecânico, através de ensaios de fluência a indentação. Os resultados mostraram que a obtenção de blendas sIPN usando copolímero de MMA-AA como reforço é uma alternativa interessante para melhorar as propriedades mecânicas sem diminuir muito a capacidade de absorção de água dos hidrogéis.The purpose of this work was the study of poly-2-hydroxy-ethyl-metacrylate (polyHEMA as a biomaterial for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Improvement of mechanical properties were studied by two distincts routes: changes in cross-link density of the gels and the synthesis of cellulose acetate and poly-methyl metacrylate-acrylic acid copolymers semi interpenetrating blends. The hydrogels were synthesized by thermal polymerization and characterized by swelling behaviour in 0.15 Mol.L-1 NaCl and by creep indentation tests. The results showed that the blending of PolyHEMA with poly-methyl metacrylate-acrylic acid copolymers significantly improved the mechanical properties of hydrogels without changes in their swelling behavior.

  14. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  15. Chondroptosis in alkaptonuric cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millucci, Lia; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Viti, Cecilia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Gambassi, Silvia; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Paffetti, Alessandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Bernardini, Giulia; Orlandini, Maurizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2015-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease that affects the entire joint. Current standard of treatment is palliative and little is known about AKU physiopathology. Chondroptosis, a peculiar type of cell death in cartilage, has been so far reported to occur in osteoarthritis, a rheumatic disease that shares some features with AKU. In the present work, we wanted to assess if chondroptosis might also occur in AKU. Electron microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes of chondrocytes in damaged cartilage distinguishing apoptosis from its variant termed chondroptosis. We adopted histological observation together with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy to evaluate morphological cell changes in AKU chondrocytes. Lipid peroxidation in AKU cartilage was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Using the above-mentioned techniques, we performed a morphological analysis and assessed that AKU chondrocytes undergo phenotypic changes and lipid oxidation, resulting in a progressive loss of articular cartilage structure and function, showing typical features of chondroptosis. To the best of our knowledge, AKU is the second chronic pathology, following osteoarthritis, where chondroptosis has been documented. Our results indicate that Golgi complex plays an important role in the apoptotic process of AKU chondrocytes and suggest a contribution of chondroptosis in AKU pathogenesis. These findings also confirm a similarity between osteoarthritis and AKU. PMID:25336110

  16. Análise fotocolorimétrica computadorizada dos efeitos da betametasona intra-articular sobre a concentração de proteoglicanos da matriz cartilaginosa de joelhos leporinos: influência do número de injeções intra-articulares Computerized photocolorimetric analysis of the effects of intraarticular betamethasone on the proteoglycan concentration of leporine knee cartilage matrix: influence of the number of intraarticular injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Batista Albano

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os efeitos da injeção repetida de betametasona na concentração de proteoglicanos da cartilagem articular do joelhos normais de coelhos californianos de ambos os sexos. MÉTODOS: Os animais foram randomizados em oito grupos de dez animais cada. Três grupos controle (injeção ou não de solução salina isotônica e cinco grupos de estudo - doses terapêuticas, repetidas ou não, de betametasona injetadas no joelho direito de cada coelho, com intervalos semanais. Após oito dias da última injeção prevista, cortes histológicos da cartilagem das áreas de apoio dos platôs tibiais foram corados com hematoxilina e eosina para análise por microscopia óptica, e com safranina O para a pesquisa da quantidade de proteoglicanos. A intensidade da coloração da safranina O foi quantificada em aparelho de histomorfometria, composto por microscópio Olympus BX 50 e microcomputador com software Image Pro-plus 4.5Ò. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças nos animais que tiveram seus joelhos injetados com betametasona uma, duas e quatro vezes quando comparados com os grupos controle. Nos animais que receberam seis e oito aplicações a intensidade da coloração com safranina O reduziu-se significativamente (p OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of repeated injections of betamethasone on proteoglycan concentration in the articular cartilage of normal knees of Californian rabbits of both sexes. METHODS: Eighty animals were randomly divided into eight groups of ten animals each. Three control groups (saline solution injected or not and five study groups - therapeutical doses, repeated or not, of betamethasone injected into the right knee of each animal at weekly intervals. After eight days from the last injection, sections of articular cartilage from tibial plateaus collected from weight-bearing surfaces were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for light microscopy analysis and with safranin O for the proteoglycan content assay. The staining

  17. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  18. Remoção da cartilagem articular associada ou não a implante homógeno ou enxerto autógeno de osso esponjoso em cães submetidos à artrodese atlantoaxial Joint cartilage removal associated or not to homologous implant or autologous cancellous bone graft in dogs submitted to atlantoaxial arthrodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Festugatto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o grau de fusão articular e formação óssea na articulação atlantoaxial de cães submetidos à artrodese após a remoção da cartilagem articular associada ou não ao implante homógeno ou enxerto autógeno de osso esponjoso. Foram utilizados 12 cães, adultos, distribuídos aleatoriamente em três grupos iguais. Grupo I (GI: realizada apenas a remoção da cartilagem articular e imobilização articular com pinos e resina acrílica. Grupo II (GII: feita a remoção da cartilagem articular e imobilização da articulação, seguida da colocação e modelagem do implante ósseo esponjoso homógeno entre as superfícies articulares. Grupo III (GIII: foi realizado o mesmo procedimento do GII, mais o enxerto ósseo esponjoso autógeno no local determinado. Realizaram-se exames radiográficos em todos os animais aos 30, 60 e 90 dias de pós-operatório (PO. Aos 90 dias de PO foi feita a eutanásia para o emprego do teste de palpação manual, avaliação tomográfica e histopatológica. Para análise estatística da associação entre o grau de fusão articular, aplicou-se o Teste Qui-quadrado de independência. Os resultados dos testes foram avaliados pela significância exata e considerados significantes a 5% (PThe aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of joint fusion and bone formation in dogs undergoing atlantoaxial arthrodesis after removal of articular cartilage associated or not to implant homogenous or autogenous cancellous bone. Twelve dogs, weighing between 8 and 12kg were randomly divided into three groups. Group I (GI performed only the removal of joint cartilage and joint immobilization with acrylic resin and pins. Group II (GII: after removel of joint cartilage and articular immobilization was performed modeling and placement of homogenous cancellous bone at the given location. The volume of homograft placed in the joint was measured using a precision balance and all animals received the

  19. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D; Fortier, Lisa A; Hoemann, Caroline D; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral...

  20. MR-Imaging optimisation of the articular hip cartilage by using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and the application of a hip joint traction; Magnetresonanztomographische Optimierung der Hueftknorpeldarstellung durch die Wahl einer T{sub 1}-Volumen-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenz und die Anwendung einer Hueftgelenkstraktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik; Bernd, L. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik; Wrazidlo, W. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo; Lederer, W. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo; Schneider, S. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo

    1995-10-01

    Images of three animal cadaver hips, 8 dissected patient femoral heads and 18 hip joints of human corpses, all either with arthrosis stage I-III or artificial cartilage defects, were compared with their corresponding anatomic sections. Additional histomorphologic examinations of the arthrotic cartilages were conducted, and MR-Imaging of 20 healthy and 21 arthrotic patient hips was performed using a specific traction method. Using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and a traction of the hip joint, it was possible due to the low-signal imaging of the joint space to separate in vivo the high-signal femoral head cartilage from the high-signal acetabular cartilage. In horizontal position of the phase-encoding parameter, minimisation of the chemical-shift artifact, mainly in the ventro-lateral areas, was accomplished. MRI measurements of the articular cartilage widths showed significant correlations (p < 0.001) with the corresponding anatomic sections. At the same time the T{sub 1} 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence of the lateral femoral head with r = 0.94 showed the lowest deviations of the measurements. It was possible with MR-Imaging to distinguish four cartilage qualities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Im experimentellen Teil der Studie wurden den MRT-Bildern von drei Kadavertierhueften, 8 resezierten Patientenhueftkoepfen und 18 Leichenhueftgelenken, an denen entweder artifizielle Knorpeldefekte gesetzt wurden oder die ein Koxarthrose-Stadium I-III aufwiesen, die korrespondierenden makroskopischen Kryomikrotomschnitte zugeordnet. Bei den Koxarthrosen erfolgten zusaetzliche histomorphologische Knorpeluntersuchungen. Im klinischen Teil der Studie wurden 20 gesunde und 21 arthrotische Probandenhueftgelenke mit einem speziellen Traktionsverfahren untersucht. Unter Anwendung einer T{sub 1}-Volumen-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenz und einer Traktion am zu untersuchenden Hueftgelenk konnte in vivo durch die signalarme Darstellung des Gelenkspaltes der

  1. Experimental pathology-MRI study of effects of medical ozone on articular cartilage%医用臭氧对骨关节炎关节软骨作用的病理-磁共振成像实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓宇; 伍筱梅; 任医民; 李新春; 何建勋; 关照坤; 钟志伟

    2009-01-01

    目的 通过病理-磁共振成像(MRI)对照研究,评价医用臭氧对骨关节炎动物模型的关节软骨的修复作用.方法 新西兰大白兔36只,分为正常对照组、模型对照组、10mg/L臭氧关节腔内注射组、30mg/L臭氧关节腔内注射组、10mg/L臭氧自血回输组、30mg/L臭氧自血回输组,每组6只兔.采用Ⅱ型胶原蛋白酶关节腔内注射法诱导骨关节炎模型,造模4周后进行臭氧干预.比较各组关节软骨的MRI表现,测量其关节软骨的平均厚度及信号强度,与病理学改变对照分析,并对MRI表现与Mankin评分进行直线相关及回归分析.结果 模型对照组、各臭氧干预组的膝关节软骨平均厚度及信号强度较正常对照组变薄和降低(均P0.05).关节软骨平均厚度与信号强度呈正的直线相关(r=0.561,P=0.000);关节软骨平均厚度及信号强度与Mankin评分呈负的直线相关(r=-0.727、-0.590,均P=0.000);关节软骨平均厚度与Mankin评分存在线性回归关系(Y=18.582-0.035X,R~2=0.528).结论 关节软骨损伤的MRI表现与病理有较好的相关性,中低浓度的医用臭氧经关节腔内注射及自血回输对骨关节炎动物模型的关节软骨可能均无修复作用.%Objective To evaluate whether medical ozone has reparative effect on articular cartilage of the osteoarthritis (OA) animal models using a pathology-MRI comparative study. Methods Thirty-six New Zealand rabbits were enrolled and collagenase Ⅱ-induced OA models were established by intra-articular injection in 30 rabbits. The non-model rabbits were then allocated to normal control group and the OA models were randomly divided into the model control group, 10 mg/L ozone intra-articular injection group, 30 mg/L ozone intra-articular injection group, 10 mg/L ozone autohemo-therapy group and 30 mg/L ozone autohemo-therapy group, respectively, with 6 rabbits in each group. Ozone intervention was started from 4 weeks after model establishment. Through MRI

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffers, Mandy Jayne; Liu, Xuan; Clegg, Peter David

    2014-12-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386). PMID:26484061

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  4. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  5. 含自体富集骨髓干细胞松质骨移植修复兔关节软骨大面积缺损的实验研究%Large Area Articular Cartilage Defect Repaired with Cancellous Bone Enriching Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德新; 朱博; 应小樟; 石仕元

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨含自体富集骨髓干细胞松质骨移植修复兔关节软骨大面积缺损的生物学特性和效果。方法30只新西兰大白兔用利刀切除股骨髁全层关节软骨达关节软骨表面积的20%以上,制成关节软骨大面积缺损模型。实验组30条膝关节取含自体富集骨髓干细胞松质骨移植修复关节软骨缺损;对照组30条膝关节软骨缺损不作任何处理。于术后4、8、12周分批处死动物取材,分别进行膝关节活动度测定、大体观察、光镜观察,并对观察指标进行统计学分析。结果各观察节点实验组兔膝关节活动度均优于对照组(P<0.01),于术后12周膝关节活动度已基本接近正常。实验组兔膝关节再生软骨的表面积已基本完全填充造模缺损区,而对照组造模区缺损依然严重,仅修复20%左右,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);实验组再生软骨与周边软骨愈合良好,再生软骨的厚度为周边正常软骨的三分之二左右,表面较光滑平整,无凹陷。电镜下,造模缺损区被再生软骨组织覆盖,表面光滑平整,周围和正常软骨组织接合较好,基质染色变深,软骨细胞数量增多,且大多为透明软骨细胞,可见潮线。结论含自体富集骨髓干细胞松质骨移植能以类透明软骨形式修复兔关节软骨的大面积缺损。%Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of cancellous bone enriching bone marrow stem cells in treatment of large area defects of articular cartilage in weight-bearing joints. Methods Sixty knees from 30 adult rabbits were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n=30 in each). Full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the femoral condyle of the knees were created. Cancellous bone enriching bone marrow stem cells was implanted for repair of the defects in experimental group. Spontaneous evolution occurred in control group. Rabbits were sacrificed in both

  6. Combining back scattered and secondary emission scanning electron microscopy to study articular cartilage morphology on undecalcified unstained samples A descriptive study%应用背向散射和二次发射扫描电镜观察未脱钙未染色组织块关节软骨形态:一项描述性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio Merolli; Andrea Manunta; Gary Phillips; Matteo Santin; Francesco Catalano

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of undecalcified and unstained samples for articular cartilage's study (as Authors suggest) will enable to better preserve its three-dimensional structure. Feasibility of such approach will reduce time and complexity when analyzing a great number of specimens.OBJECTIVE: To test the possibility of studying articular cartilage morphology on the undecalcified inclusion blocks, avoiding cutting and staining thin sections.METHODS: Femoral condyles were obtained from White New Zealand rabbits and from Sardinian sheep, fixed in paraformaldehyde, dehydrated in ethyl alcohol, and embedded into poly-methylmethacrylate. Blocks were cut and ground,sputter-coated with gold-palladium and analyzed by a Jeol JSM 6310 electron microscope, operated between 20 and 25 kV. Data from secondary emission scanning electron microscopy were combined with data from back scattered electron microscopy (BSEM), performed sequentially over the same area.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In the rabbit, it was easy to discern the passage between uncalcified and calcified cartilage but it was difficult to highlight the small chondrocytic lacunae in zones Ⅱ and Ⅲ. The sheep proved to be more suitable for easily discerning all the zones of articular cartilage and its cellularity; BSEM excelled in defining the structure of calcified cartilage and the "tidemark" front. Large canals could be demarcated, digged through subchondral bone and calcified cartilage, topped by non-calcified cartilage. The results suggested that the possibility of describing articular cartilage morphology on undecalcified and unstained embedding blocks, by avoiding the cutting of thin sections, was illustrated. This provides an obvious advantage in terms of less time needed and tess complexity required in comparison with classical histomorphology. It may be an opportunity when a relevant number of samples must be analyzed.%背景:在与关节软骨有关的组织工程研究中,应用未脱钙和未染色的样本

  7. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M; Welter, Jean F

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment of these properties should be part of the implantation release criteria for TE cartilage. Release criteria should certify that selected tissue properties have reached certain target ranges, and should be predictive of the likelihood of success of an implant in vivo. Unfortunately, it is not currently known which properties are needed to establish release criteria, nor how close one has to be to the properties of native cartilage to achieve success. Achieving properties approaching those of native cartilage requires a clear understanding of the target properties and reproducible assessment methodology. Here, we review several main aspects of quality control as it applies to TE cartilage. This includes a look at known mechanical and biological properties of native cartilage, which should be the target in engineered tissues. We also present an overview of the state of the art of tissue assessment, focusing on native articular and TE cartilage. Finally, we review the arguments for developing and validating non-destructive testing methods for assessing TE products. PMID:23606823

  8. Vesicle Photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  9. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhu; Castro, Nathan J.; Xiaoqian Cheng; Michael Keidar; Lijie Grace Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive ele...

  10. Increased physical activity severely induces osteoarthritic changes in knee joints with papain induced sulfate-glycosaminoglycan depleted cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Siebelt, M.; Groen, H.C.; Koelewijn, S. J.; de Blois, E.; Sandker, M.; Waarsing, J. H.; Müller, C.(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 , Bamberg, Germany); van Osch, G. J. V. M.; de Jong, M.; Weinans, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Articular cartilage needs sulfated-glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) to withstand high pressures while mechanically loaded. Chondrocyte sGAG synthesis is regulated by exposure to compressive forces. Moderate physical exercise is known to improve cartilage sGAG content and might protect against osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated whether rat knee joints with sGAG depleted articular cartilage through papain injections might benefit from moderate exercise, or whether this increase...

  11. 大骨节病关节软骨真菌毒素环境反应基因表达谱研究%Gene expression profiling of mycotoxin-related environmental response genes in the articular cartilage of Kashin-Beck disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峰; 王伟卓; 郭雄; 武世勋; 王立新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the expression profile of mycotoxin-related environmental response genes (MERGs) in the articular cartilage of patients with Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) and healthy controls,and explore the relationship between MERG and KBD.Methods Articular cartilage specimens were collected from 9 healthy human subjects and 9 adult KBD patients.Agilent microarray was used to evaluate the expression levels of MERG in cartilage specimens,and the expression ratios of MERG between KBD and healthy controls were calculated.GSEA software was used to calculate the NES scores and P values of gene ontology(GO).Results ①T-2 toxin,deoxynivalenol,zearalenone,aflatoxin B1,fumonisin B1 and ochratoxin A related 15 MERGs presented expression differences between KBD and healthy controls(ratios > 2.0 or < 0.5).Thirteen MERGs were up-regulated in KBD,including BAX,BCL2,COL5A2,FER1L3,GSTT2,IGFBP2,IGFBP4,PDE8B,SOCS3,THBS1,TMSL8,VGLL3 and TUBB2A (ratio > 2.0).Two MERGs,POSTN and FABP4,were down-regulated in KBD (ratio < 0.5).The 15 MERGs were involved in various biological processes; such as collage synthesis,apoptosis,metabolism,growth & development and so on.②Mycotoxin related 4 apoptosis GOs and 5 growth & development related GOs were up-regulated in KBD compared to healthy controls(NES > 0),including ANTI_APOPTOSIS,REGULATION_OF_PROGRAMMED_CELL_DEATH,APOPTOSIS_GO,REGULATION_OF_APOPTOSIS,ORGAN_MORPHOGENESIS,ANATOMICAL_STRUCTURE_DEVELOPMENT,ORGAN_DEVELOPMENT,SYSTEM_DEVELOPMENT and REGULATION OF DEVELOPMENTAL_PROCESS (NES > 0 and P < 0.05).Conclusions There are multiple mycotoxins related environmental response genes presenting significant expression difference between KBD cartilage and normal cartilage.Mycotoxin can affect the expression of MERGs in KBD articular cartilage,which might lead to dysfunction of chondrocytes,and articular cartilage lesions.%目的 比较分析真菌毒素环境反应基因在大骨节病(Kashin-Beck disease,KBD)和正常关节软骨

  12. Validity of echographic evaluation of cartilage in gonarthrosis. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, F; Ettorre, G C; Angelelli, G; Macarini, L; Patella, V; Moretti, B; D'Amore, M; Cantatore, F P

    1993-06-01

    We studied an echographic technique by which precise reproducible measurements of articular cartilage thickness of the knee is possible. Two groups of individuals were studied: a group of 18 patients with gonarthrosis and a control group of 10 normal individuals. The group of 18 patients with gonarthrosis was studied by ultrasound (US) before knee prosthesis surgery. The cartilage thickness was measured within the weight-bearing area. US re-evaluation and histological measurements were made on the pathological specimen following the operation. Results of pre- and post-operative US data were compared with histological data. A good correlation between these measurements was found [P(t) > 10%]. In order to have comparative reference values of the articular cartilage within the weight-bearing area of the femoral trochlea a group of 10 control subjects was also studied with US as above. We found that the articular cartilage thickness of the femoral trochlea in the weight-bearing area has a mean of 2.2 +/- 0.3 mm for the lateral condyle and 2.3 +/- 0.2 mm for the medial condyle. The intra-observer and inter-observer difference in measurements was evaluated with Student's t-test. Our data demonstrate that US measurements of articular cartilage thickness of femoral condyles is a sensitive and reproducible technique which permits early diagnosis and management of knee arthropathy as well as quantification of cartilage damage. PMID:8358975

  13. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  14. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  15. Accuracy and Precision in the Detection of Articular Cartilage Lesions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla in an In Vitro Study with Orthopedic and Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) sequences for cartilage visualization have been the target of numerous studies, and the optimal sequence for cartilage imaging remains a matter of debate in the literature. Purpose: To compare MR findings with different MR sequences for the detection of cartilage lesions in fresh deep-frozen human cadaveric patellae in an in vitro setting. Material and Methods: Ten cadaveric patellae were imaged on a 1.5T MR scanner with a 2 x 2 channel carotid sandwich coil and a conventional knee coil, and compared with orthopedic findings and gold-standard histopathology. MR sequences were: a) fat-saturated (FS) proton density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence (TR/TE 4000/39 ms); b) T2-weighted (T2w) double-echo steady-state (DESS) 3D water-excitation (we) sequence (TR/TE 17/4.7 ms); c) 3D-PDw-SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions)-we sequence (TR/TE 1800/19 ms). Accuracy, Kendall's tau-b correlation, and weighted kappa coefficients were calculated. Results: Accuracy for cartilage lesion detection with the FS PDw-TSE sequence and the carotid coil was 78.3%, and with the knee coil 73.9%. For the T2wDESS-3D-we sequence, the corresponding values were 69.5% and 65.2%, and for the 3D-PDw-SPACE-we sequence 65.2% and 60.8%, respectively. Kendall's tau-b correlation ranged between 0.508 for the 3D-PDw-SPACE-we sequence (knee coil) and 0.720 for the FS PDw-TSE sequence (carotid and knee coil). Weighted kappa coefficient was lowest for the 3D-PDw-SPACE-we sequence (knee coil) at 0.607, and highest for the carotid coil and FS PDw-TSE sequence at 0.779. Conclusion: The evaluated FS PDw-TSE sequences are superior in comparison to the T2wDESS-3D-we and 3D-PDw-SPACE-we sequences in the in vitro setting for the detection of cartilage lesions, and are comparable to results reported in the literature

  16. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole;

    Background: Epiphysiodesis made with RFA has resulted, in animal models, an effective procedure that disrupts the growth plate and induces LLD. This procedure involves an increase of temperature (>92°C) of the targeted region causing thermal damage. To our knowledge, no study that investigates...... the effect of this procedure in the adjacent joint articular cartilage has been reported Purpose / Aim of Study: Proof of concept that epiphysiodesis made with RFA is a safe procedure that disrupts the growth plate without damaging the adjacent joint articular cartilage Materials and Methods: RFA...... Epiphysiodesis RFA was done for 8 minutes in vivo in 40 growing pig tibia physis. In addition, three tibiae were ablated for 16 minutes, and three more for 24 minutes. As a damage reference, 6 tibiae were ablated on the joint articular cartilage for 8 minutes. MRI was done ex vivo after the procedure to evaluate...

  17. A study on transforming growth factor-beta, its receptor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in the articular cartilage and the synovium of osteoarthritis in the elderly%老年骨关节炎患者关节软骨和滑膜中转化生长因子β及受体和金属蛋白酶组织抑制物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑毅; 陆江阳; 孙笑非; 杨毅

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨骨关节炎(OA)患者关节软骨和滑膜中转化生长因子β1(TGFβ1)、转化生长因子β受体(TGFβR)和金属蛋白酶组织抑制物-1(TIMP-1)变化及其与OA发病的关系。方法采用免疫组化方法检测23例老年OA患者及3例外伤患者正常关节软骨和滑膜TGFβ1、转化生长因子βⅠ类受体(TGFβRⅠ)、转化生长因子βⅡ类受体(TGFβRⅡ)和TIMP-1的分布和阳性程度。结果 OA患者中14例关节软骨和16例滑膜TGFβ1染色呈阳性或弱阳性,14例关节软骨和15例滑膜TIMP-1染色呈弱阳性,全部OA患者关节软骨和滑膜TGFβRⅠ和TGFβRⅡ染色呈强阳性。阳性细胞包括软骨细胞、滑膜衬里细胞、滑膜下层的血管内皮细胞和间质巨噬细胞等。结论老年OA患者关节软骨和滑膜中TGFβ1、TGFβR及TIMP-1的变化可能与OA发病有一定的关系。%Objective To explore the changes of transforming growth factor-beta-1(TGFβ1), TGFβ receptor(TGFβR), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1(TIMP-1), as well as their relations to the pathogenesis of elderly osteoarthritis.  Methods  The distribution and the levels of TGFβ1, TGFβ receptor Ⅰ(TGFβRⅠ) , TGFβ receptor Ⅱ(TGFβRⅡ) and TIMP-1 in the articular cartilage and the synovium of 23 aged patients with osteoarthritis and 3 patients with trauma(the joints were not injured) were examined using immunohistochemical methods.  Results  The immunohistochemical staining for TGFβ1 showed positive or weakly positive in the articular cartilage and the synovium in two thirds of the patients with osteoarthritis. The strongly positive staining for TGFβRⅠ and TGFβRⅡ was found in the articular cartilage and the synovium in all of the osteoarthritis patients. The immunohistochemical staining of TIMP-1 showed weakly positive in the articular cartilage and the synovium of two thirds of patients with osteoarthritis. The positively stained cells containing TGFβ1, TGFβRⅠ, TGF

  18. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: What Have We Learned in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies that underpin tissue engineering as a research field were developed with the aim of producing functional human cartilage in vitro. Much of our practical experience with three-dimensional cultures, tissue bioreactors, scaffold materials, stem cells, and differentiation protocols was gained using cartilage as a model system. Despite these advances, however, generation of engineered cartilage matrix with the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of mature articular cartilage has not yet been achieved. Currently, the major obstacles to synthesis of clinically useful cartilage constructs are our inability to control differentiation to the extent needed, and the failure of engineered and host tissues to integrate after construct implantation. The aim of this chapter is to distil from the large available body of literature the seminal approaches and experimental techniques developed for cartilage tissue engineering and to identify those specific areas requiring further research effort. PMID:26445827

  19. Tissue engineering of cartilage in space

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Lisa E.; Langer, Robert; Martin, Ivan; Pellis, Neal R.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    1997-01-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage, i.e., the in vitro cultivation of cartilage cells on synthetic polymer scaffolds, was studied on the Mir Space Station and on Earth. Specifically, three-dimensional cell-polymer constructs consisting of bovine articular chondrocytes and polyglycolic acid scaffolds were grown in rotating bioreactors, first for 3 months on Earth and then for an additional 4 months on either Mir (10−4–10−6 g) or Earth (1 g). This mission provided a unique opportunity to study the...

  20. The bone-cartilage unit in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lories, Rik J; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a group of mechanically-induced joint disorders to which both genetic and acquired factors contribute. Current pathophysiological concepts focus on OA as a disease of the whole joint. Within these models, the functional unit formed by the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone seems to be of particular interest. Cartilage and bone receive and dissipate the stress associated with movement and loading, and are therefore continuously challenged biomechanically. Recent data support the view that cartilage and bone can communicate over the calcified tissue barrier; vessels reach out from bone into the cartilage zone, patches of uncalcified cartilage are in contact with bone, and microcracks and fissures further facilitate transfer of molecules. Several molecular signaling pathways such as bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnts are hypothesized to have a role in OA and can activate cellular and molecular processes in both cartilage and bone cells. In addition, intracellular activation of different kinase cascades seems to be involved in the molecular crosstalk between cartilage and bone cells. Further research is required to integrate these different elements into a comprehensive approach that will increase our understanding of the disease processes in OA, and that could lead to the development of specific therapeutics or treatment strategies. PMID:21135881

  1. Role of Matrix Vesicles in Biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Ellis E.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix vesicles have been implicated in the mineralization of calcified cartilage, bone and dentin for more than 40 years. During this period, their exact role, if any in the nucleation of hydroxyapatite mineral, and its subsequent association with the collagen fibrils in the organic matrix has been debated and remains controversial. Several hypotheses have been recently introduced to explain in greater detail how matrix vesicles function in biomineralization. This review will summarize recen...

  2. Multiparametric MRI of Epiphyseal Cartilage Necrosis (Osteochondrosis with Histological Validation in a Goat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Wang

    Full Text Available To evaluate multiple MRI parameters in a surgical model of osteochondrosis (OC in goats.Focal ischemic lesions of two different sizes were induced in the epiphyseal cartilage of the medial femoral condyles of goats at 4 days of age by surgical transection of cartilage canal blood vessels. Goats were euthanized and specimens harvested 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10 weeks post-op. Ex vivo MRI scans were conducted at 9.4 Tesla for mapping the T1, T2, T1ρ, adiabatic T1ρ and TRAFF relaxation times of articular cartilage, unaffected epiphyseal cartilage, and epiphyseal cartilage within the area of the induced lesion. After MRI scans, safranin O staining was conducted to validate areas of ischemic necrosis induced in the medial femoral condyles of six goats, and to allow comparison of MRI findings with the semi-quantitative proteoglycan assessment in corresponding safranin O-stained histological sections.All relaxation time constants differentiated normal epiphyseal cartilage from lesions of ischemic cartilage necrosis, and the histological staining results confirmed the proteoglycan (PG loss in the areas of ischemia. In the scanned specimens, all of the measured relaxation time constants were higher in the articular than in the normal epiphyseal cartilage, consistently allowing differentiation between these two tissues.Multiparametric MRI provided a sensitive approach to discriminate between necrotic and viable epiphyseal cartilage and between articular and epiphyseal cartilage, which may be useful for diagnosing and monitoring OC lesions and, potentially, for assessing effectiveness of treatment interventions.

  3. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen DR; Goetz JE; Kurriger GL; Martin JA

    2013-01-01

    Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA) animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage healt...

  4. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear conc...

  5. A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 inhibitor protects against cartilage degradation in a murine model of osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Xie, Yangli; Wang, Quan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Luo, Fengtao; Zhou, Siru; Wang, Zuqiang; Huang, Junlan; Tan, Qiaoyan; Jin, Min; Qi, Huabing; Tang, Junzhou; Chen, Liang; Du, Xiaolan; Zhao, Chengguang; Liang, Guang; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The attenuated degradation of articular cartilage by cartilage-specific deletion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in adult mice suggests that FGFR1 is a potential target for treating osteoarthritis (OA). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of a novel non-ATP-competitive FGFR1 inhibitor, G141, on the catabolic events in human articular chondrocytes and cartilage explants and on the progression of cartilage degradation in a murine model of OA. G141 was screened and identified via cell-free kinase-inhibition assay. In the in vitro study, G141 decreased the mRNA levels of catabolic markers ADAMTS-5 and MMP-13, the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK, and the protein level of MMP-13 in human articular chondrocytes. In the ex vivo study, proteoglycan loss was markedly reduced in G141 treated human cartilage explants. For the in vivo study, intra-articular injection of G141 attenuated the surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) induced cartilage destruction and chondrocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis in mice. Our data suggest that pharmacologically antagonize FGFR1 using G141 protects articular cartilage from osteoarthritic changes, and intra-articular injection of G141 is potentially an effective therapy to alleviate OA progression. PMID:27041213

  6. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  7. Influence of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Molecules on Cell Phenotype and Neocartilage Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, Shawn P.; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W.; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decor...

  8. Differential allelic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in osteoarthritic cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C; Athanasou, N; Carr, A; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from ...

  9. Biodegradable CSMA/PECA/Graphene Porous Hybrid Scaffold for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Jinfeng; Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Zhang, Xiaoning; Qian, ZhiYong

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the limited repair capacity of articular cartilage, it is essential to develop tissue-engineered cartilage for patients suffering from joint disease and trauma. Herein, we prepared a novel hybrid scaffold composed of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-ε-caprolactone-acryloyl chloride (MPEG-PCL-AC, PECA was used as abbreviation for MPEG-PCL-AC) and graphene oxide (GO) and evaluated its potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. To ...

  10. Quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy for the analysis of healthy and repair cartilage tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Gelse, K; A Olk; Eichhorn, S.; B Swoboda; M Schoene; K Raum

    2010-01-01

    The increasing spectrum of different cartilage repair strategies requires the introduction of adequate non-destructive methods to analyse their outcome in-vivo, i.e. arthroscopically. The validity of non-destructive quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was investigated in knee joints of five miniature pigs. After 12 weeks, six 5-mm defects, treated with different cartilage repair approaches, provided tissues with different structural qualities. Healthy articular cartilage from each con...

  11. Micro-fracture enhanced by autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells extracellular matrix scaffold to treat articular cartilage defects in the knee of pigs%微骨折与自体骨髓间充质干细胞外基质支架修复猪膝关节软骨缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李祥全; 唐成; 宋科荣; 金成哲

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Micro-fracture surgery method is simple, easy to operate, which is an effective way to treat articular cartilage defects, but there are stil some problems such as regenerated fibrocartilage and regenerated cartilage degradation. Scholars have focused on the use of various methods to improve the micro-fracture effect on repairing cartilage defects. OBJECTIVE:To explore the effects of micro-fracture enhanced by autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffold for treating cartilage defects in minipig models. METHODS:Bone marrow was extracted from the minipigs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were obtained. aBMSC-dECM membranes were col ected. Cross-linking and freeze-drying technology were used to make the three-dimensional porous aBMSC-dECM scaffold. Ful thickness cartilage defects, 2 mm in depth and 6 mm in diameter, were created on the femoral condyles and trochlea grooves of the two knees of the minipigs. The right knees were treated with micro-fracture as control and the left were treated with micro-fracture enhanced by aBMSC-dECM scaffold. Six months later, histological examination and Wakitani score were used to evaluate the cartilage regeneration, and glycosaminoglycans and DNA contents in the regenerative tissue were determined. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:After 6 months, the tissue treated by micro-fracture enhanced by aBMSC-dECM scaffold got better surface and integrated with the surrounding cartilage. Safranin O and fast green staining and Masson staining showed that the regenerated cartilage of the left knee, with abundant matrix and dense bone trabeculae, was better than that of the right. Wakitani score of the left knee was higher than that of the right. Glycosaminoglycans content of the left knee was much more than that of the right, while the DNA content was lower in the left knee than the right knee. Better results were observed in the left knee undergoing micro-fracture enhanced by a

  12. Immunomagnetic sorting and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in human articular cartilage%人关节软骨来源CD105~+/CD166~+间充质干细胞的分选及其多向分化特性的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常红星; 杨柳; 李忠; 陈光兴; 刘军; 文亚名; 戴刚

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立免疫磁珠技术高效分选人关节软骨CD166~+/CD105~+间充质干细胞(MSCs)的方法,并鉴定其多向分化特性.方法 酶消化法获取5例手术切除的膝关节软骨组织细胞,并行原代(P~0代)和传代(P~2、P~4、P~6代)培养;流式细胞仪检测其中CD166~+/CD105~+细胞百分比.比较免疫磁珠连续法与间断法分选P~4代培养细胞中CD166~+/CD105~+细胞的所需时间、分选细胞活度及其百分比和收获率.对连续法分选CD166~+/CD105~+细胞进行成骨、成软骨、成脂肪诱导,Gomori钙钴法碱性磷酸酶(Ale)、Ⅱ型胶原免疫组化、油红O染色检测其分化特性.结果 人关节软骨组织分离细胞和原代培养细胞中的CD105~+/CD166~+细胞百分比较低[(1.13±0.68)%、(5.16±3.59)%],传代培养细胞中的CD105~+/CD166~+细胞百分比随传代次数增加而明显增高[P~2、P~4、P~6代培养细胞中CD166~+/CD105~+细胞百分比分别为(12.68±2.59)%、(17.81±3.80)%、(19.36±3.93)%](P0.05).免疫磁珠连续法分选P4代培养细胞中CD105~+/CD166~+细胞的百分比高于间断分选法[(93.8±3.95)%vs(90.1±2.43)%,P0.05).连续法分选CD166~+/CD105~+细胞成骨诱导后ALP染色阳性;成软骨诱导前Ⅱ型胶原弱阳性,诱导后Ⅱ型胶原附性;成脂肪诱导后,细胞内可见脂肪滴,油红O染色阳性.结论 人关节软骨P~4、P~6代培养细胞中的MSCs比例较高.免疫磁珠连续法能够高效了分选人关节软骨MSCs,所分选的MSCs具有成骨、成软骨及成脂肪分化功能.%Objective To establish a simple and feasible method of immunomagnetic separation of CD166~+/CD105~+ mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human articular cartilage. Methods The CD166~+/ CD105~+ MSCs in chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from 5 tissue samples of human knee articular carti-lage with primary osteoarthritis ( OA). The percentage of double positive cells were analyzed by flow cytometry just after digested, and in passages 0,2,4 and 6

  13. Image processing techniques for noise removal, enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoarthritis, whose hallmark is the progressive loss of joint cartilage, is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. Recently, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has demonstrated considerable promise for the assessment of articular cartilage. Among the most important parameters to be assessed is cartilage width. However, detection of the bone cartilage interface is critical for the assessment of cartilage width. At present, the quantitative evaluations of cartilage thickness are being done using manual tracing of cartilage-bone borders. Since data is being obtained near video rate with OCT, automated identification of the bone-cartilage interface is critical. In order to automate the process of boundary detection on OCT images, there is a need for developing new image processing techniques. In this paper we describe the image processing techniques for speckle removal, image enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images. In particular, this paper focuses on rabbit cartilage since this is an important animal model for testing both chondroprotective agents and cartilage repair techniques. In this study, a variety of techniques were examined. Ultimately, by combining an adaptive filtering technique with edge detection (vertical gradient, Sobel edge detection), cartilage edges can be detected. The procedure requires several steps and can be automated. Once the cartilage edges are outlined, the cartilage thickness can be measured. (author)

  14. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  15. Chitosan/Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) blend scaffolds for cartilage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, Sara C.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Alves, Natália M.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) blend 3D fiber-mesh scaffolds were studied as possible support structures for articular cartilage tissue (ACT) repair. Micro-fibers were obtained by wet-spinning of three different polymeric solutions: 100:0 (100CHT), 75:25 (75CHT) and 50:50 (50CHT) wt.% CHT

  16. A method for measuring contact pressures instantaneously in articular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, H; Arai, M

    1989-01-01

    A method whereby instrumented pipes are inserted part of the way into articular cartilage from the underlying subchondral bone has been developed for measuring instantaneous contact pressures acting within articular joints. Contact pressures developed between two specimens cut from fresh cadaveric knee joints were measured with this technique and then subsequently with pressure-sensitive paper. Average contact pressures (load/contact area) were also calculated. Comparisons of the three sets of data show that contact pressures measured with the pressure pipe system are linearly related (p less than 0.001) to both the contact pressures measured with the pressure-sensitive paper and the calculated average contact pressures. PMID:2625431

  17. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  18. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes. PMID:26414246

  19. Andrographolide Exerts Chondroprotective Activity in Equine Cartilage Explant and Suppresses Interleukin-1β-Induced MMP-2 Expression in Equine Chondrocyte Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tangyuenyong, Siriwan; Viriyakhasem, Nawarat; Peansukmanee, Siriporn; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Ongchai, Siriwan

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage erosion in degenerative joint diseases leads to lameness in affected horses. It has been reported that andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata inhibited cartilage matrix-degrading enzymes. This study aimed to explore whether this compound protects equine cartilage degradation in the explant culture model and to determine its effect on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression, a matrix-degrading enzyme, in equine chondrocyte culture. Equine articular cartilage explant cultu...

  20. Intra articular synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sistla Radha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  1. Intra articular synovial sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sistla Radha; Tameem Afroz; Vidyasagar JVS

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  2. Autofluorescence lifetime metrology for label-free detection of cartilage matrix degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickdel, Mohammad B.; Lagarto, João. L.; Kelly, Douglas J.; Manning, Hugh B.; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Talbot, Clifford B.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteolytic enzyme is the hallmark of arthritis that leads to joint destruction. Detection of early biochemical changes in cartilage before irreversible structural damages become apparent is highly desirable. Here we report that the autofluorescence decay profile of cartilage is significantly affected by proteolytic degradation of cartilage ECM and can be characterised by measurements of the autofluorescence lifetime (AFL). A multidimensional fluorometer utilizing ultraviolet excitation at 355 nm or 375 nm coupled to a fibreoptic probe was developed for single point time-resolved AFL measurements of porcine articular cartilage explants treated with different proteinases. Degradation of cartilage matrix components by treating with bacterial collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase 1, or trypsin resulted in significant reduction of AFL of the cartilage in both a dose and time dependent manner. Differences in cartilage AFL were also confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Our data suggest that AFL of cartilage tissue is a potential non-invasive readout to monitor cartilage matrix integrity that may be utilized for diagnosis of arthritis as well as monitoring the efficacy of anti-arthritic therapeutic agents.

  3. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Bonnan

    Full Text Available Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators, showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  4. Advances in understanding cartilage remodeling [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5e6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefu Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage remodeling is currently among the most popular topics in osteoarthritis research. Remodeling includes removal of the existing cartilage and replacement by neo-cartilage. As a loss of balance between removal and replacement of articular cartilage develops (particularly, the rate of removal surpasses the rate of replacement, joints will begin to degrade. In the last few years, significant progress in molecular understanding of the cartilage remodeling process has been made. In this brief review, we focus on the discussion of some current “controversial” observations in articular cartilage degeneration: (1 the biological effect of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on developing and mature articular cartilages, (2 the question of whether aggrecanase 1 (ADAMTS4 and aggrecanase 2 (ADAMTS5 are key enzymes in articular cartilage destruction, and (3 chondrocytes versus chondron in the development of osteoarthritis. It is hoped that continued discussion and investigation will follow to better clarify these topics. Clarification will be critical for those in search of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  5. Intra-Articular Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Injections Are Not Innocent

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Tonbul; Mujdat Adas; Taner Bekmezci; Ahmet Duran Kara

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic disorder characterized by joint cartilage degeneration with concomitant changes in the synovium and subchondral bone metabolism. Many conservative treatment modalities, one of which is intra-articular injections, have been described for the treatment of this disorder. Traditionally, hyaluranic acid and corticosteroids are the agents that have been used for this purpose. Recently, polyacrylamide hydrogels are being used widely. Biocompatibility, nonbioabsorbability,...

  6. The Role of Sirtuins in Cartilage Homeostasis and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Mobasheri, Ali; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed many advances in the understanding of sirtuin biology and related regulatory circuits supporting the capacity of these proteins to serve as energy-sensing molecules that contribute to healthspan in various tissues, including articular cartilage. Hence, there has been a significant increase in new investigations that aim to elucidate the mechanisms of sirtuin function and their roles in cartilage biology, skeletal development, and pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD). The majority of the work carried out to date has focused on SIRT1, although SIRT6 has more recently become a focus of some investigations. In vivo work with transgenic mice has shown that Sirt1 and Sirt6 are essential for maintaining cartilage homeostasis and that the use of sirtuin-activating molecules such as resveratrol may have beneficial effects on cartilage anabolism. Current thinking is that SIRT1 exerts positive effects on cartilage by encouraging chondrocyte survival, especially under stress conditions, which may provide a mechanism supporting the use of sirtuin small-molecule activators (STACS) for future therapeutic interventions in OA and other degenerative pathologies of joints, especially those that involve articular cartilage. PMID:27289467

  7. μ-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage.

  8. Micro-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabar, W; Gundogdu, O; Laklouk, A; Bunk, O; Pfeiffer, F; Farquharson, M J; Bradley, D A

    2010-01-01

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (micro-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage. PMID:19836249

  9. {mu}-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk; Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Laklouk, A. [Food Science Department, Al-Fateh Unversity, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, City University, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage.

  10. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 14-3-3ε is a ligand of CD13 in cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Nefla, Meriam; Sudre, Laure; Denat, Guillaume; Priam, Sabrina; André-Leroux, Gwenaelle; Jacques, Claire

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis is a whole-joint disease characterized by the progressive destruction of articular cartilage involving abnormal communication between subchondral bone and cartilage. Our team previously identified 14-3-3ε protein as a subchondral bone soluble mediator altering cartilage homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of CD13 (also known as aminopeptidase N, APN) in the chondrocyte response to 14-3-3ε. After identifying CD13 in chondrocytes, we kno...

  11. Endogenous Cartilage Repair by Recruitment of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for repair after injury. The adult body has a pool of stem cells that are mobilized during injury or disease. These cells exist inside niches in bone marrow, muscle, adipose tissue, synovium, and other connective tissues. A method that mobilizes this endogenous pool of stem cells will provide a less costly and less invasive alternative if these cells successfully regenerate defective cartilage. Traditional microfracture procedures employ the concept of bone marrow stimulation to regenerate cartilage. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has very poor mechanical properties compared to those of normal hyaline cartilage. A method that directs the migration of a large number of autologous mesenchymal stem cells toward injury sites, retains these cells around the defects, and induces chondrogenic differentiation that would enhance success of endogenous cartilage repair. This review briefly summarizes chemokines and growth factors that induce recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells, endogenous cell sources for regenerating cartilage, scaffolds for delivery of bioactive factors, and bioadhesive materials that are necessary to bring about endogenous cartilage repair. PMID:26559963

  12. Toxicity effect of two articular cartilage substitute materials on hepatic and renal function in rabbits%两种不同关节软骨替代材料对兔肝肾功能毒性的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑建; 赵建宁; 王瑞; 熊党生; 郭亭

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytotoxicity, sensitization, stimulation and local reaction tests are demonstrated that nano-hydroxyapatite and Poly(vinyl alcohol) Hydrogels (n-HA/PVA) and Poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) blended (PVA/PVP) have favorable biocompatibility and safety. However, the effects of n-HA/PVA and PVA/PVP on hepatic and renal function are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To assess the toxicity of n-HA/PVA and PVA/PVP on hepatic and renal function after implanted into bone tissues of rabbits. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Blood biochemical index observation, and randomized control experiment. The experiment was performed at the Department of comparative medicine, Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, from November 2008 to March 2009. MATERIALS: The n-HA/PVA and PVA/PVP were supplied by Xiong Dang-sheng, a professor of institute of biological materials, Nanjing University of Science and Technology. METHODS: A total of 30 New Zealand white rabbits with clean grade, were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 10 animals in each group. In the n-HA/PVA group and PVA-PVP group, two materials were implanted to repair cartilage defects. There was no material implantation in the control group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of hepatic and renal function were compared at weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12 after operation. RESULTS: The differences of hepatic and renal function were had no significance among three groups prior to implantation (P_(all) > 0.05). After implantation, the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, albumin, globulin, urea nitrogen and creatinine had no obvious changes compared to prior to implantation (P_(all) > 0.05). Moreover, there was no significantly difference among three groups after implantation (P_(all) > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Two different alternative materials have no effects on rabbit hepatic and renal function.%背景:目前已对纳米羟基磷灰石/聚乙烯醇水凝胶及聚乙烯醇/吡咯脘酮水凝

  13. Post-traumatic glenohumeral cartilage lesions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stussi Edgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any cartilage damage to the glenohumeral joint should be avoided, as these damages may result in osteoarthritis of the shoulder. To understand the pathomechanism leading to shoulder cartilage damage, we conducted a systematic review on the subject of articular cartilage lesions caused by traumas where non impression fracture of the subchondral bone is present. Methods PubMed (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect (EMBASE, BIOBASE, BIOSIS Previews and the COCHRANE database of systematic reviews were systematically scanned using a defined search strategy to identify relevant articles in this field of research. First selection was done based on abstracts according to specific criteria, where the methodological quality in selected full text articles was assessed by two reviewers. Agreement between raters was investigated using percentage agreement and Cohen's Kappa statistic. The traumatic events were divided into two categories: 1 acute trauma which refers to any single impact situation which directly damages the articular cartilage, and 2 chronic trauma which means cartilage lesions due to overuse or disuse of the shoulder joint. Results The agreement on data quality between the two reviewers was 93% with a Kappa value of 0.79 indicating an agreement considered to be 'substantial'. It was found that acute trauma on the shoulder causes humeral articular cartilage to disrupt from the underlying bone. The pathomechanism is said to be due to compression or shearing, which can be caused by a sudden subluxation or dislocation. However, such impact lesions are rarely reported. In the case of chronic trauma glenohumeral cartilage degeneration is a result of overuse and is associated to other shoulder joint pathologies. In these latter cases it is the rotator cuff which is injured first. This can result in instability and consequent impingement which may progress to glenohumeral cartilage damage. Conclusion The great majority of glenohumeral cartilage

  14. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  15. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Alexandrovich Vinokurov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage. Materials and Methods. The method of formation of an articular osteochondral fragment without penetration into the joint cavity was devised experimentally. More than 30 patients with joint deformities underwent the surgery. Results. During the experiments, we postulated that there may potentially be a complete recovery of joint defects because of hyaline cartilage regeneration. By destructing the osteochondral fragment and reforming it extra-articularally, joint defects were recovered in all patients. The results were evaluated as excellent and good in majority of the patients. Conclusion. These findings indicate a novel method in which the complete recovery of joint defects due to dysplastic genesis or osteochondral defects as a result of injuries can be obtained. The devised method can be used in future experiments for objectification and regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage (e.g., rate and volume of the reformed joints that regenerate, detection of cartilage elements, and the regeneration process.

  16. FGF, TGFβ and Wnt crosstalk: embryonic to in vitro cartilage development from mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Mairéad A; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Brama, Pieter A; Hellingman, Catharine A; Narcisi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Articular cartilage is easily damaged, yet difficult to repair. Cartilage tissue engineering seems a promising therapeutic solution to restore articular cartilage structure and function, with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) receiving increasing attention for their promise to promote cartilage repair. It is known from embryology that members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and wingless-type (Wnt) protein families are involved in controlling different differentiation stages during chondrogenesis. Individually, these pathways have been extensively studied but so far attempts to recapitulate embryonic development in in vitro MSC chondrogenesis have failed to produce stable and functioning articular cartilage; instead, transient hypertrophic cartilage is obtained. We believe a better understanding of the simultaneous integration of these factors will improve how we relate embryonic chondrogenesis to in vitro MSC chondrogenesis. This narrative review attempts to define current knowledge on the crosstalk between the FGF, TGFβ and Wnt signalling pathways during different stages of mesenchymal chondrogenesis. Connecting embryogenesis and in vitro differentiation of human MSCs might provide insights into how to improve and progress cartilage tissue engineering for the future. PMID:23576364

  17. Tailored PVA/ECM Scaffolds for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Stocco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage lesions are a particular challenge for regenerative medicine due to cartilage low self-ability repair in case of damage. Hence, a significant goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering is the development of suitable structures in virtue of their matrix composition and biomechanical properties. The objective of our study was to design in vitro a supporting structure for autologous chondrocyte growth. We realized a biohybrid composite scaffold combining a novel and nonspecific extracellular matrix (ECM, which is decellularized Wharton’s jelly ECM, with the biomechanical properties of the synthetic hydrogel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. Wharton’s jelly ECM was tested for its ability in promoting scaffold colonization by chondrocytes and compared with polyvinyl alcohol itself and the more specific decellularized cartilage matrix. Our preliminary evidences highlighted the chance of using Wharton’s jelly ECM in combination with PVA hydrogels as an innovative and easily available scaffold for cartilage restoration.

  18. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... 8 ). Questions and Answers About Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) What is cartilage? Cartilage is a type of ...

  19. Detección de glicosaminoglicanos de la matriz del cartílago articular en el líquido sinovial de carpo equino con fractura en esquirla Detection of glycosaminoglycans of the articular cartilage matrix in the synovial fluid of equine carpal joint with chip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Adarmes

    2008-01-01

    between GAGsT and GAGsS, showed a significant increase (P < 0.05 in the control group (1.31 ± 0.51 g/L with respect to both fracture groups (0.92 ± 0.30 g/L (group I and 0.90 ± 0.40 g/L (group II. The absence of significant differences for GAGsT, GAGsS and hyaluronic acid concentrations between both fracture groups, could be related to the dilution effect caused by the inflammation, the appearance of compensatory mechanisms, or restrictions due to the use of an in vivo articular model

  20. 大强度力竭运动和PDTC干预对大鼠关节软骨损伤的影响及NF-κB信号途径的探讨%Effects of high intensity exhaustive exercise and PDTC intervention on rat’s articular cartilage injury as well as NF-κB signal pathway exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄伟

    2014-01-01

    观察一次大强度力竭运动和补充NF-κB抑制剂--吡咯烷二巯基氨甲酸(PDTC)对大鼠膝关节软骨诱导型一氧化氮合酶(iNOS)、一氧化氮(NO)含量,基质金属蛋白酶-13酶原(pro-MMP-13)和活性 MMP-13(active-MMP-13)的影响,探讨过度运动诱导 iNOS表达上调并造成软骨损伤的可能机制。将40只SD大鼠随机分为4组:对照组(C组)、给药组(P组)、运动组(E组)、运动+给药组(EP组)。C组给予1 mL生理食盐水腹腔注射,P组给予200 mg/kg PDTC腹腔注射,E组腹腔注射1 mL生理盐水后进行1次大强度力竭运动,EP组腹腔注射PDTC后进行1次力竭运动。实验后2 h,提取关节液,硝酸还原酶法测定NO含量;HE染色观察软骨形态学变化并进行Mankin’s评分;实时荧光定量PCR检测iNOS和MMP-13 mRNA水平;western blot法测定iNOS、pro-MMP-13和active-MMP-13蛋白表达量;凝胶电泳迁移率分析(EMSA)测定NF-κB与DNA结合活性。结果显示与C组比较,E组和EP组Mankin’s评分、关节液NO含量、iNOS和MMP-13 mRNA水平、iNOS和active-MMP-13蛋白水平以及NF-κB与DNA结合活性均非常显著性升高(P0.05)。结果说明一次大强度力竭运动通过 NF-κB 信号途径介导iNOS表达上调,促进NO大量释放和MMP-13激活,从而参与了软骨损伤的过程。%In order to observe the effects of one-time high intensity exhaustive exercise and pyrrolidine dithiocar-bamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor) supplementation on rat’s knee articular cartilage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO) content, matrix metalloproteinase-13 proenzyme (pro-MMP-13) and active-MMP-13, so as to probe into a possible mechanism of over-exercise inducing iNOS expression increase and causing cartilage in-jury, the author divided 40 SD rats randomly into 4 groups, namely, a control group (group C), a PDTC fed group (group P), an exercise group (group E), and an exercise+PDTC fed group (group EP

  1. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  2. Poroelasticity of Cartilage at the Nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ∼15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ∼ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E∗|, and phase angle, ϕ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were me...

  3. New developments in osteoarthritis and cartilage biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Blandine; Staines, Katherine A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and the most common form of arthritis. Characterised by articular cartilage loss, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, the OA joint afflicts much pain and disability. Whilst OA has been associated with many contributing factors, its underpinning molecular mechanisms are, nevertheless, not fully understood. Clinical management of OA is largely palliative and there is an ever growing need for an effective disease modifying treatment. This review discusses some of the recent progress in OA therapies in the different joint tissues affected by OA pathology. PMID:26921602

  4. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Tilo; Reibetanz, Uta; Schwertner, Michael; Vogt, Jürgen; Butz, Tilman; Sakellariou, Arthur

    2002-04-01

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures.

  5. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures

  6. Current Status and Strategy of microRNA Research for Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small (~21 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs, are important players in endochondral ossification, articular cartilage homeostasis, and arthritis pathogenesis. Comprehensive and genetic analyses of cartilage-specific or cartilage-related miRNAs have provided new information on cartilage development, homeostasis, and related diseases. State-of-the-art combinatorial approaches, including transcription-activator like effector nuclease (TALEN)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technique for targeting miRNAs and high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation for identifying target messenger RNAs, should be used to determine complex miRNA networks and miRNA-dependent cartilage regulation. Use of advanced drug delivery systems involving cartilage-specific miRNAs will accelerate the application of these new findings in arthritis therapy. PMID:27622175

  7. Current Status and Strategy of microRNA Research for Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small (~21 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs, are important players in endochondral ossification, articular cartilage homeostasis, and arthritis pathogenesis. Comprehensive and genetic analyses of cartilage-specific or cartilage-related miRNAs have provided new information on cartilage development, homeostasis, and related diseases. State-of-the-art combinatorial approaches, including transcription-activator like effector nuclease (TALEN)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technique for targeting miRNAs and high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation for identifying target messenger RNAs, should be used to determine complex miRNA networks and miRNA-dependent cartilage regulation. Use of advanced drug delivery systems involving cartilage-specific miRNAs will accelerate the application of these new findings in arthritis therapy. PMID:27622175

  8. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  9. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  10. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabar, W.; laklouk, A.; Bunk, O.; Baily, M.; Farquharson, M. J.; Bradley, David

    2010-07-01

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  11. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: W.kaabar@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli-Libya (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Baily, M. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Farquharson, M.J. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, David [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  12. 茶多酚对饮茶型氟中毒大鼠关节软骨氧化损伤的保护作用%Protective role of tea polyphenols in oxidative stress damage of the rat articular cartilage tissue caused by brick-tea fluorosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张微; 高彦辉; 林林; 孙殿军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the protective mechanism of tea polyphenols (TPs) ion oxidative stress damage of the rat articular cartilage tissue caused by brick-tea fluorosis. Methods One hundred and twenty wistar male rats were randomly divided into 6 groups according to body mass: fluoride group with drinking water containing 100.00 mg/L F-, fluoride plus TPs group treated with 100.00 mg/L F- and 10.0 g/L TPs, fluoride plus aluminum group fed with 100.00 mg/L F- and 200.00 mg/L Al3+, fluoride plus aluminium and TPs group treated with 100.00 mg/L F-,200.O0 mg/L Al3+ and 10.0 g/L TPs;brick-tea group treated with drinking water containing 100.00 mg/L F-,215.00 mg/L Al3+ and 9.2 g/L TPs, which was steeped by the brick-tea;control group treated with tap water. The animals were bred for three months and then sacrificed. The level of SOD,T-AOC and MDA in blood serum were detected,also the level of NO and cytokine IL-1β and IL-6, the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein in articular cartilage were respectively analyzed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Blood serum SOD level in the fluoride plus aluminum and TPs group[(664.009 ± 29.589)kU/L] was higher compared with that in the fluoride group[(625.328 ± 27.199)kU/L], fluoride plus aluminum group[(652.282±13.926)kU/L], although no statistically significant differences was found(P > 0.05) ;blood serum T-AOC level of the fluoride plus TPs, fluoride plus aluminum and TPs group, brick tea group[(10.874 ± 0.721), (11.871 ± 0.941), (10.380 ± 2.747)kU/L] was higher compared with fluoride group, fluoride plus aluminum group [(8.849 ± 1.887), (8.210 ± 1.740)kU/L], the differences all being statistically significant(P 0.05);the blood serum IL-6 level of fluoride plus aluminum and TPs group, brick-tea group[(7.231 ± 0.596), (7.325 ± 0.290)ng/L] had statistical differences compared with fluoride plus aluminum[(8.256 ± 0.635)ng/L, P 0.05);氟+茶多酚组、氟+铝+茶多酚组、砖茶组T-AOC水平[(10.874±0.721)、(11

  13. Quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy for the analysis of healthy and repair cartilage tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gelse

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing spectrum of different cartilage repair strategies requires the introduction of adequate non-destructive methods to analyse their outcome in-vivo, i.e. arthroscopically. The validity of non-destructive quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM was investigated in knee joints of five miniature pigs. After 12 weeks, six 5-mm defects, treated with different cartilage repair approaches, provided tissues with different structural qualities. Healthy articular cartilage from each contralateral unoperated knee joint served as a control. The reflected and backscattered ultrasound signals were processed to estimate the integrated reflection coefficient (IRC and apparent integrated backscatter (AIB parameters. The cartilage repair tissues were additionally assessed biomechanically by cyclic indentation, histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. UBM allowed high-resolution visualisation of the structure of the joint surface and subchondral bone plate, as well as determination of the cartilage thickness and demonstrated distinct differences between healthy cartilage and the different repair cartilage tissues with significant higher IRC values and a steeper negative slope of the depth-dependent backscatter amplitude AIBslope for healthy cartilage. Multimodal analyses revealed associations between IRC and the indentation stiffness. Furthermore, AIBslope and AIB at the cartilage-bone boundary (AIBdC were associated with the quality of the repair matrices and the subchondral bone plate, respectively. This ex-vivo pilot study confirms that UBM can provide detailed imaging of articular cartilage and the subchondral bone interface also in repaired cartilage defects, and furthermore, contributes in certain aspects to a basal functional characterization of various forms of cartilage repair tissues. UBM could be further established to be applied arthroscopically in-vivo.

  14. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling causes defects in postnatal cartilage development

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mo; Zhu, Mei; Awad, Hani; Li, Tian-Fang; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Boyce, Brendan F; Chen, Di; O'Keefe, Regis J.

    2008-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for normal skeletal development because conditional gain or loss of function of β-catenin in cartilage results in embryonic or early postnatal death. To address the role of β-catenin in postnatal skeletal growth and development, Col2a1-ICAT transgenic mice were generated. Mice were viable and had normal size at birth, but became progressively runted. Transgene expression was limited to the chondrocytes in the growth plate and articular cartilag...

  15. Nanocomposite Scaffold for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Effects of Carbon Nanotube Surface Functionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Chahine, Nadeen O.; Collette, Nicole M.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Genetos, Damian C.; Loots, Gabriela G

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and bioc...

  16. Three-dimensional evaluation of cartilage thickness and cartilage volume in the knee joint with MR imaging: reproducibility in volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the reproductibility of three-dimensional volume and thickness measurements of the knee joint cartilage with MRI in volunteers. Methods: The knees of 7 healthy individuals (ages 23 to 58 yrs.) were sagitally imaged with a resolution of 2x0.31x0.31 mm3, using a fat-suppressed FLASH-3 D sequence. The knee was repositioned in between replicate acquisitions, 6 data sets being obtained in each case. After semiautomatic segmentation and three-dimensional reconstruction of the cartilage, the thickness was determined independent of the original section orientation. The coefficient of variation for repeated volume measurements and the deviations of the maximal cartilage thickness values were calculated subsequently. Results: The mean variation of the cartilage volumes of the replicate measurements was 1.4% (±0.8%) in the patella, 1.7% (±1.5%) in the femur, 3.0% (±1.2%) in the medial tibial plateau and 3.5% (±2.0%) in the lateral tibial plateau. The comparison of the distribution patterns of cartilage thickness yielded a high degree of agreement. Only in rare cases deviations of more than 0.5 mm were observed. Conclusions: The results show that the presented method for determining the quantitative distribution of articular cartilage yields a high degree of precision. It offers new possibilities in screening risk groups, monitoring the course of degenerative joint disease and the investigation of functional adaptation of the cartilage to mechanical loading. (orig.)

  17. Alternative technique of cervical spinal stabilization employing lateral mass plate and screw and intra-articular spacer fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The author discusses an alternative technique of segmental cervical spinal fixation. Material and Methods: The subtleties of the technique are discussed on the basis of experience with 3 cases with a follow-up of between 30 and 36 months. Technique: The technique involves debridement of facetal articular cartilage, distraction of facets, jamming of ′Goel spacer′ into the articular cavity and fortification of the fixation by lateral mass plate and screw fixation. The ′double-insurance′ me...

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Normal Navicular Bone Flexor Surface Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Vits, Lucia Carolina

    2002-01-01

    Cartilage tissue specimens were obtained from the flexor surface of the navicular bone and distal radiocarpal bone articular surface (controls) from 8 horses 2 to 5 years old. Water, DNA, total collagen, total glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulphate, and keratan sulphate contents were determined. The results from each site were compared and the differences were analyzed by paired t-test (P < 0.05). Significant differences were determined between the water content of the navicular bon...

  19. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  20. [Articular chondrocalcinosis after 80 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memin, Y; Monville, C; Ryckewaert, A

    1978-02-01

    In 108 women over 80 (mean age 88,4 years, extremes 80 and 99 years) hospitalized in a geriatric service for various reasons, radiograms were made of both knees in the frontal aspect on standard film to detect calcinosis of the meniscus and chondrocalcinosis of the joint. In 25 women (23.1%) the radiographs revealed calcinosis of the meniscus with or without chondrocalcinosis. In these 25 cases a lateral X-ray was also made of the two knees, frontal X-rays were made of the pelvis, thumbs and shoulders. In 22 cases (88%) these revealed calcification of the fibrocartilages or articular cartilages in joints other than the knee. Seven of the 25 women had at least one attack of articular inflammation (especially of the knee) resembling a pseudo-gout crisis. The frequency of chronic arthropathies resembling arthroses was high in the 25 patients with chondrocalcinosis: 8 (32%) had an internal or external femoro-tibial arthrosis, as against 11 of the 83 patients (13%) of the same age without chondrocalcinosis, a significant difference. Eleven of the 25 women had signs of femororotular arthrosis on the lateral X-rays of the knees, 5 had coxarthrosis (with in 3 cases a radiological image of fibrocartilaginous or coxofemoral cartilaginous calcification). One women had chronic radiocarpal arthropathy evocative or chondrocalcinosis. Ten had a scaphotrapezoidal arthrosis, 5 arthrosis of the shoulder, 3 with radiological aspect of glenohumeral chondrocalcinosis. PMID:644241

  1. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  2. Spontaneous Minced Cartilage Procedure for Unexpectedly Large Femoral Condyle Surface Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, G M; Baumann, G A; Preiss, S

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects at the knee joint are being identified and treated with increasing frequency. Chondrocytes may have strongest potential to generate high-quality repair tissue within the defective region, in particular when large diameter defects are present. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is not available in every country. We present a case where we spontaneously covered an acute cartilage defect, which was significantly larger than expected and loose during initial arthroscopic inspection after reading preoperative MRI, by mincing the separated fragment and directly implanting the autologous cartilage chips into the defective region. PMID:27504207

  3. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  4. Compositional studies at the Bone-Cartilage interface using PIXE, RBS and cSAXS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential cations in two thin slices of normal and diseased human articular cartilage, the latter being affected by osteoarthritis (OA). The elemental distribution maps for Ca, P, K, S and Zn in the normal and diseased slices showed similar patterns with marked increases in elemental concentrations in the bone-cartilage interface. The S concentration was significantly lower in bone than in cartilage. Conversely, the Ca and P concentrations were higher in bone. The Ca/P ratio (2.22) of the diseased slice was determined by employing the Rutherford backscattering technique (RBS). The RBS figures of this investigation agree with values previously reported by others. Structural and organisational changes of collagen networks were investigated by coherent Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) using beamline facilities at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) for a decalcified diseased human articular cartilage slice. The SAXS findings showed a gradual reorientation of collagen type II fibres of cartilage from parallel to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface. Similar patterns of orientation were observed at the subchondral bone to bone-cartilage interface

  5. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  6. Animal experimental research on microstructural behavior on the hyaline arthroidal cartilage after immobilization and remobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refior, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The degeneration of the articular cartilage after a period of immobilization was investigated. The experiment was carried out by the immobilization of the knee joints of rabbits. Even after remobilization there was an increase in the alterations. These changes did not prove to be reversible.

  7. Kartogenin-Incorporated Thermogel Supports Stem Cells for Significant Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Yang, Modi; Yu, Jiakuo; Wang, Jincheng; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-03-01

    Recently, cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) attracts increasing attention in cartilage defect repair. In this work, kartogenin (KGN), an emerging chondroinductive nonprotein small molecule, was incorporated into a thermogel of poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) to fabricate an appropriate microenvironment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for effective cartilage regeneration. More integrative and smoother repaired articular surface, more abundant characteristic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen II (COL II), and less degeneration of normal cartilage were obtained in the KGN and BMSCs coloaded thermogel group in vivo. In conclusion, the KGN-loaded PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel can be utilized as an alternative support for BMSCs to regenerate damaged cartilage in vivo. PMID:26844837

  8. Low-intensity infrared laser effects on zymosan-induced articular inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januária dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara; da Fonseca, Adenilson d. S.; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2015-03-01

    Low-level therapy laser is a phototherapy treatment that involves the application of low power light in the red or infrared wavelengths in various diseases such as arthritis. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosaninduced articular inflammatory process. Inflammatory process was induced in C57BL/6 mouse by intra-articular injection of zymosan into rear tibio-tarsal joints. Thirty animals were divided in five groups: (I) control, (II) laser, (III) zymosan-induced, (IV) zymosan-induced + laser and (V). Laser exposure was performed after zymosan administration with low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), power 10 mW, fluence 3.0 J/cm2 at continuous mode emission, in five doses. Twenty-four hours after last irradiation, the animals were sacrificed and the right joints fixed and demineralized. Morphological analysis was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain, pro-apoptotic (caspase-6) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL assay in articular cartilage cells. Inflammatory process was observed in connective tissue near to articular cartilage, in IV and V groups, indicating zymosan effect. This process was decreased in both groups after laser treatment and dexamethasone. Although groups III and IV presented higher caspase-6 and DNA fragmentation percentages, statistical differences were not observed when compared to groups I and II. Our results suggest that therapies based on low-intensity infrared lasers could reduce inflammatory process and could not cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosan-induced articular inflammatory process.

  9. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology. PMID:26234194

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up of 24.5 Years After Intra-Articular Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Lateral Extra-Articular Augmentation

    OpenAIRE

    PERNIN, Jérôme; Verdonk, Peter C. M.; AIT SI SELMI, Tarik; Massin, Philippe; Neyret, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many studies have reported successful outcomes 10 to 15 years after ACL reconstruction. However, few authors report results at ultra long-term follow-up (more than 20 years of follow-up). Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine how the status of the medial meniscus and the medial compartment articular cartilage observed at the time of ACL reconstruction affects results more than 24 years after surgery. This article examines longterm outcome of ACL reconstruction with extra...

  11. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy promotes chondrogenesis in cartilage tissue engineering: A hypothesis based on previous evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiaodan; He, Chengqi

    2016-06-01

    The dearth of intrinsic regenerative capacity of articular cartilage makes it a challenge to deal with the cartilage defects. Among all the recommended clinical options, cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) which is highlighted of dominant features and less drawbacks for functional cartilage restoration, has been emphasized recently. Shock waves, a mode of therapeutic mechanical forces, utilized in extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), is hypothesized to enhance proliferation, chondrogenic differentiation, and cartilage extracellular matrix production of target cells seeded on bioactive scaffolds. The hypothesis is firstly based on cellular mechanotransduction by which cells convent the shockwave mechanical signals into biochemical responses via integrins, iron channels, cytoskeletal filaments, growth factor receptors and nuclei. Secondly, by modulating gene expression and up-regulating the release of various growth factors which are of vital importance in three-dimensional cartilage culture environment, ESWT holds a promising potential to favor the cell sources (e.g. chondrocytes and stem cells) to mimic the optimal functional cartilage. In all, on the basis of cellular mechanotransduction and previous evidence, the hypothesis is developed to support the beneficial effects of ESWT on chondrogenesis in CTE. If this hypothesis is confirmed, shockwaves may allow a better success in combination with other stimulating factors for cartilage repair. There is a paucity of studies investigating the assistant role of shockwave stimulation in CTE. Further research is required to elucidate the mechanisms, and explore effectiveness and appropriate protocols of this novel stimulative factor in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27142133

  12. Analysis of forward and backward Second Harmonic Generation images to probe the nanoscale structure of collagen within bone and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Andrée; Couture, Charles-André; Bancelin, Stéphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Auger, Etienne; Brown, Cameron; Popov, Konstantin; Ramunno, Lora; Légaré, François

    2015-11-01

    Collagen ultrastructure plays a central role in the function of a wide range of connective tissues. Studying collagen structure at the microscopic scale is therefore of considerable interest to understand the mechanisms of tissue pathologies. Here, we use second harmonic generation microscopy to characterize collagen structure within bone and articular cartilage in human knees. We analyze the intensity dependence on polarization and discuss the differences between Forward and Backward images in both tissues. Focusing on articular cartilage, we observe an increase in Forward/Backward ratio from the cartilage surface to the bone. Coupling these results to numerical simulations reveals the evolution of collagen fibril diameter and spatial organization as a function of depth within cartilage. PMID:26349534

  13. A biomimetic three-dimensional woven composite scaffold for functional tissue engineering of cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Freed, Lisa E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2007-02-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to repair or regenerate tissues through combinations of implanted cells, biomaterial scaffolds and biologically active molecules. The rapid restoration of tissue biomechanical function remains an important challenge, emphasizing the need to replicate structural and mechanical properties using novel scaffold designs. Here we present a microscale 3D weaving technique to generate anisotropic 3D woven structures as the basis for novel composite scaffolds that are consolidated with a chondrocyte-hydrogel mixture into cartilage tissue constructs. Composite scaffolds show mechanical properties of the same order of magnitude as values for native articular cartilage, as measured by compressive, tensile and shear testing. Moreover, our findings showed that porous composite scaffolds could be engineered with initial properties that reproduce the anisotropy, viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity of native articular cartilage. Such scaffolds uniquely combine the potential for load-bearing immediately after implantation in vivo with biological support for cell-based tissue regeneration without requiring cultivation in vitro.

  14. Cartilage conduction hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Levitt, Harry

    2014-04-01

    Sound information is known to travel to the cochlea via either air or bone conduction. However, a vibration signal, delivered to the aural cartilage via a transducer, can also produce a clearly audible sound. This type of conduction has been termed "cartilage conduction." The aural cartilage forms the outer ear and is distributed around the exterior half of the external auditory canal. In cartilage conduction, the cartilage and transducer play the roles of a diaphragm and voice coil of a loudspeaker, respectively. There is a large gap between the impedances of cartilage and skull bone, such that cartilage vibrations are not easily transmitted through bone. Thus, these methods of conduction are distinct. In this study, force was used to apply a transducer to aural cartilage, and it was found that the sound in the auditory canal was amplified, especially for frequencies below 2 kHz. This effect was most pronounced at an application force of 1 N, which is low enough to ensure comfort in the design of hearing aids. The possibility of using force adjustments to vary amplification may also have applications for cell phone design. PMID:25234994

  15. Morphological evidence of the shedding of chondrocytes from the articular surface in neonatal rats: relationship to the interlacunar network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M B; Narine, K R; Ellinger, J

    1983-08-01

    The superficial zone of the femoral head articular cartilage of 5- to 15-day old rats was examined by light and electron microscopy for evidence of shedding into the joint space. Chondrocytes deepest in the superficial zone were round, surrounded by a capsule, and connected to adjacent chondrocytes by the interlacunar network, whereas cells in the middle of the zone appeared similar but with less cytoplasm. At the circular surface, chondrocytes were small, with pyknotic nuclei and poorly defined organelles. These cells occasionally protruded from the articular surface but maintained at least partial connection with the network and their capsule. Depressions in the articular surface were lined with material similar to that of the network and were the only locations found where the network did not terminate at a cell surface. This static evidence suggested at least two hypotheses: 1) Degenerating chondrocytes moved up through the superficial zone to the articular surface and were shed into the joint space. This movement may be facilitated by the network as part of neonatal cartilage development. 2) During joint formation, the surface of the articular cartilage was eroded down to the chondrocytes, which were exposed to the joint fluid, causing cell degeneration, death, and shedding. Evidence of cell shedding was rarely seen after 2 weeks of age. Likewise, the interlacunar network disappeared from the superficial zone during this period. A physiological as well as structural relationship may exist between the chondrocytes and interlacunar network. PMID:6625202

  16. Comprehensive Profiling of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Formation and Maturation Using Sequential Extraction and Label-free Quantitative Proteomics*

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Richard; Diseberg, Anders F.; Gordon, Lavinia; Zivkovic, Snezana; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Mackie, Eleanor J.; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Bateman, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage is indispensable for joint function but has limited capacity for self-repair. Engineering of neocartilage in vitro is therefore a major target for autologous cartilage repair in arthritis. Previous analysis of neocartilage has targeted cellular organization and specific molecular components. However, the complexity of extracellular matrix (ECM) development in neocartilage has not been investigated by proteomics. To redress this, we developed a mouse neocartilage culture sy...

  17. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser for cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses. Part II: Morphologic and histochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, A J; Krook, L P; Roth, J E; King, J M

    1991-01-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. After euthanasia at week 8, the treated and control joints were examined for gross changes, and samples of cartilage and subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and peripheral lymph nodes were examined histologically. Depletion of cartilage matrix glycosaminoglycan was assessed by safranin-O histochemical staining of the laser site and adjacent cartilage. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth, with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. PMID:1712998

  18. Nitric oxide compounds have different effects profiles on human articular chondrocyte metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrés, María C.; Maneiro, Emilia; Martín, Miguel A.; Arenas, Joaquín; Francisco J Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by the production of high amounts of nitric oxide (NO), as a consequence of up-regulation of chondrocyte-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by inflammatory cytokines. NO donors represent a powerful tool for studying the role of NO in the cartilage in vitro. There is no consensus about NO effects on articular cartilage in part because the differences between the NO donors available. The aim of this work is to com...

  19. Influence of intra-articular administration of trichostatin a on autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huacheng; Zheng, Ke; Wang, Guanghu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Zheng, Minghao; Gao, Xiang; Qin, Jinzhong; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) is a method for articular cartilage repair. However, several disadvantages of this method have been reported, such as transplanted cartilage degeneration and the lack of a connection between the grafted and adjacent cartilage tissues. To evaluate the effect of intra-articular administration of trichostatin A (TSA) on AOT, we conducted a case control study in a rabbit model. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) macroscopic scores, the modified O'Driscoll histology scores, and real-time PCR were utilized to evaluate the results. At 4 weeks, both macroscopic and histological assessments showed that there was no significant difference between the TSA and control groups. However, the mean macroscopic and histological scores for the TSA-treated group were significantly higher than the scores for the control group at 12 weeks. TSA was shown to directly reduce collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) expression and to simultaneously repress the upregulation of MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-13 levels induced by interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in chondrocytes. In conclusion, TSA protects AOT grafts from degeneration, which may provide a benefit in the repair of articular cartilage injury. PMID:25866784

  20. Influence of Intra-Articular Administration of Trichostatin A on Autologous Osteochondral Transplantation in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huacheng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT is a method for articular cartilage repair. However, several disadvantages of this method have been reported, such as transplanted cartilage degeneration and the lack of a connection between the grafted and adjacent cartilage tissues. To evaluate the effect of intra-articular administration of trichostatin A (TSA on AOT, we conducted a case control study in a rabbit model. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS macroscopic scores, the modified O’Driscoll histology scores, and real-time PCR were utilized to evaluate the results. At 4 weeks, both macroscopic and histological assessments showed that there was no significant difference between the TSA and control groups. However, the mean macroscopic and histological scores for the TSA-treated group were significantly higher than the scores for the control group at 12 weeks. TSA was shown to directly reduce collagen type II (COL2, aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5 expression and to simultaneously repress the upregulation of MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-13 levels induced by interleukin 1β (IL-1β in chondrocytes. In conclusion, TSA protects AOT grafts from degeneration, which may provide a benefit in the repair of articular cartilage injury.

  1. An evaluation of MRI in the diagnosis of occult peri-articular bone injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: An evaluation of MRI in the diagnosis of occult peri-articular bone injury. Methods: Thirty-one patients, in total thirty-three joints, underwent radiography and MRI. MRI sequences included FSE T1WI, FSE T2WI, T2WI/SPIR, PDWI/SPIR and 3D/WATSc/FPE/T1WI. Results: Abnormities were found in thirty-three knee joints. Bone bruises were found in 20 knees, occult fractures in 8 and articular cartilage or osteochondral fractures in 5. T2WI/SPIR was successful in demonstrating the bone bruise. PDWI/SPIR provided good images of the occult fracture, while 3D/WATSc/FFE/T1WI was the best sequence to demonstrate the cartilage fracture. Conclusion: MRI provides vivid images of the peri-articular occult injury of knee. Various MRI sequences have respective advantages in differentiating the nature of occult lesions and should be combined in clinical application. (authors)

  2. Tuberculosis extrapulmonar: Forma articular

    OpenAIRE

    Julio C Escarpanter Buliés; Yoel García Rodríguez; Marta A. Gutiérrez Guillén

    2008-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión del tema de la Tuberculosis extrapulmonar de forma articular, por haber encontrado un paciente con esta patología de presentación "pura" sin otras manifestaciones sistémicas. Se trata del primer paciente diagnosticado en el Hospital Comunitario Integral de "San Andrés", del municipio de Caracollo, provincia Cercado, en el departamento de Oruro, Bolivia. En la revisión del tema se demuestra la infrecuencia de esta forma de presentación de la enfermedad a pesar de ser la...

  3. Effects of exercises on knee cartilage volume in young healthy adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Liangyu; Wang Yubin

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute effects of physical exercise on the deformational behavior of knee articular cartilage and changes in cartilage volume are definite.However,conclusive effects of different exercises on the loss of articular cartilage volume have not been proved.In this parallel-group randomized controlled trial,we tested whether 12 weeks of swimming,powerstriding,cycling,and running exercises would decrease the cartilage volume significantly and whether there would be a difference in the loss of cartilage volume after different types of exercises.Methods From October 2012 to January 2013 we evaluated 120 healthy volunteer students in Biomechanics Laboratory of Tongji University.Body mass index (BMI),right lower limb strength,and right knee cartilage magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained before exercise.MRI were conducted in East Hospital.The study was approved by Tongji University Ethical Committee,all subjects were randomly assigned to the running,powerstriding,cycling,swimming,and control groups by a drawing of lots.Each group contained 24 samples.At the end of 12 weeks of regular exercises,the same measurement procedures were applied.Cartilage volume was calculated with OSIRIS software based on the quantitative-MRI.Pre-and post-exercise comparisons were carried out using paired t-tests and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare differences of cartilage volume loss between groups with Student-Newman-Keuls procedure for multiple comparisons.Results Running,cycling,and swimming groups resulted in a significant decrease in BMI.The quadriceps peak torque increased significantly in the swimming and cycling groups.Total cartilage volume significantly decreased in the running and cycling groups after 12 weeks of training,without any significant change in the nonimpact swimming,low-impact powerstriding,and control groups.Loss of total cartilage volume in the running and cycling groups were 2.21% (3.03) and 1.50% (0.42).Conclusions Twelve

  4. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction and Concomitant Articular Injury Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Tahami

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage injuries are a common clinical problem at the time of ACL reconstruction with an incidence rate of 16-46%. Good results of ACL reconstruction combined with the treatment of chondral lesions have been published in some studies. Method: After statistical analysis 30 patients were selected and divided in 2 groups. TheFfirst group consisted of 15 patients wite isolated ACL tear without any other concomitant injuries and the second group consisted of 15 patients with ACL tear and concomitant high grade (grade 3 or 4 of outerbridge classification contained articular cartilage injuries during arthroscopy. Group 1 underwent ACL reconstruction and group 2 underwent ACL reconstruction combined with chondroplasty via the drilling and microfracture technique. For each patient the Lysholm knee score questionnaire was completed before surgery, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: The mean Lysholm knee score in both groups improves: 9.6 points after 6 months and 16.06 points after 1 year in group 1 and 23.26 points after 6 months and 30.66 after 1 year in group 2, whict was statistically significant (Pvalue

  5. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  6. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  7. Morphological changes of the cartilage and bone in newborn piglets evoked by experimentally induced glucocorticoid excess during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, E; Dobrowolski, P; Puzio, I

    2013-08-01

    The study examined articular and growth plate cartilages as well as bone tissues in the offspring of sows treated with glucocorticoid during the last 45 days of pregnancy (dexamethasone at the dose of 0.03 mg/kg body weight intramuscularly, every second day). The offspring were tested at the birth and basal morphology for both articular and growth plate cartilages, and the histomorphometry of trabeculae of the epiphysis and metaphysis of femur and tibia were established. The concentration of selected cytokines and the activity of bone alkaline phosphatase were determined in blood serum. Maternal dexamethasone (DEX) administration reduced the thickness of proliferative, resting and hypertrophic zones of growth plate of femur and tibia of male piglets when compared with the control. DEX significantly reduced the thickness of the resting zone in both bones. It also elongated proliferative and hypertrophic zones of the growth plate in the femur as well as the hypertrophic zone in the tibia of female piglets when compared with the control group. Moreover, DEX decreased the articular cartilage thickness of the tibia in female piglets and enhanced the articular cartilage thickness of the femur in male piglets. Articular cartilage was highly cellular, and chondrocytes were separated by thin septa of matrix. An analysis of the trabecular bone architecture in male piglets showed a loss of the trabecular bone by thinning and DEX-related increase in trabecular porosity. Moreover, the cortical bone looked similar to the trabeculae because of trabecularization of the cortex. There was a DEX that reduced serum osteocalcin and BAP concentrations in both female and male newborn piglets, whereas the serum IL-1 and Il-6 was reduced only in male piglets. The obtained results demonstrated that DEX administration to sows during the last 45 days of pregnancy might cause the growth to slow and eventually to stop, especially in male piglets. It might lead to an alteration within the

  8. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  9. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  10. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  11. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  12. Derepression of miRNA-138 contributes to loss of the human articular chondrocyte phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Seidl, C; Martinez-Sanchez, A; Murphy, CL

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the function of microRNA-138 (miR-138) in human articular chondrocytes (HACs). Methods: The expression of miR-138 in intact cartilage and cultured chondrocytes and the effects of miR-138 overexpression on chondrocyte marker genes were investigated. Targets of miR-138 relevant to chondrocytes were identified and verified by overexpression of synthetic miRNA mimics and inhibitors, luciferase assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and RNA immunoprecipitation o...

  13. Exosomes from IL-1β stimulated synovial fibroblasts induce osteoarthritic changes in articular chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Tomohiro; Miyaki, Shigeru; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Lotz, Martin K.; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disease, and characterized by progressive degradation of articular cartilage, synovial hyperplasia, bone remodeling and angiogenesis in various joint tissues. Exosomes are a type of microvesicles (MVs) that may play a role in tissue-tissue and cell-cell communication in homeostasis and diseases. We hypothesized that exosomes function in a novel regulatory network that contributes to OA pathogenesis and examined the function of exosomes in comm...

  14. Arthroscopic study of injuries in articular fractures of distal radius extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Araf, Marcelo; Mattar, Rames

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of wrist ligament and cartilage associated fractures of the distal radius, through arthroscopy, correlating with AO/ASIF classification. METHODS: Thirty patients aged between 20 and 50 years old, with closed fracture from groups B and C according to AO/ASIF classification were selected. All of them were submitted to wrist arthroscopy to address intra-articular injuries and reduction and osteosynthesis of the fracture. RESULTS: A high incidence of intra-arti...

  15. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Li-ke Luo; Qing-jun Wei; Lei Liu; Li Zheng; Jin-min Zhao

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that n...

  16. First realisation of a labelling kit of N.T.P. 15-5 ligand by {sup 99m}Tc in view of a clinical application in cartilage functional imaging; Premiere realisation d'une trousse de marquage du ligand NTP 15-5 par le 99mTc en vue d'une application clinique en imagerie fonctionnelle du cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Cachin, F.; Vidal, A.; Auzeloux, P.; Chezal, J.M.; Gaumet, V.; Askienazy, S. [Inserm, EA4231, UMR 990, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Guenu, S. [UFR de pharmacie, laboratoire de chimie analytique, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, S. [Laboratoires Cyclopharma, 63 - Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2010-07-01

    We are working on a SPECT tracer for functional imaging of articular cartilage, the {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5. This molecule has its application in degenerative diseases of cartilage (arthrosis, arthritis and chondrosarcoma). Excellent reports of cartilage versus tissues fixing ratios are obtained in different animal models as well as human anatomical parts. For clinical application, we present the development of a labelling kit by the technetium of the ligand NTP 15-5. (N.C.)

  17. Cartilage resurfacing potential of PLGA scaffolds loaded with autologous cells from cartilage, fat, and bone marrow in an ovine model of osteochondral focal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminal, M; Peris, D; Fonseca, C; Barrachina, J; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Moll, X; Morist, A; García, F; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2016-08-01

    Current developments in tissue engineering strategies for articular cartilage regeneration focus on the design of supportive three-dimensional scaffolds and their use in combination with cells from different sources. The challenge of translating initial successes in small laboratory animals into the clinics involves pilot studies in large animal models, where safety and efficacy should be investigated during prolonged follow-up periods. Here we present, in a single study, the long-term (up to 1 year) effect of biocompatible porous scaffolds non-seeded and seeded with fresh ex vivo expanded autologous progenitor cells that were derived from three different cell sources [cartilage, fat and bone marrow (BM)] in order to evaluate their advantages as cartilage resurfacing agents. An ovine model of critical size osteochondral focal defect was used and the test items were implanted arthroscopically into the knees. Evidence of regeneration of hyaline quality tissue was observed at 6 and 12 months post-treatment with variable success depending on the cell source. Cartilage and BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), but not those derived from fat, resulted in the best quality of new cartilage, as judged qualitatively by magnetic resonance imaging and macroscopic assessment, and by histological quantitative scores. Given the limitations in sourcing cartilage tissue and the risk of donor site morbidity, BM emerges as a preferential source of MSC for novel cartilage resurfacing therapies of osteochondral defects using copolymeric poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds. PMID:25595211

  18. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA. Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (IHH, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF, Insulin like growth factor (IGF and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  19. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lubricin expression in the superficial cartilage will be a crucial factor in the success of cartilage regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source and the use of aggregates of MSCs has some advantages in terms of chondrogenic potential and efficiency of cell adhesion. Lubricin expression in transplanted MSCs has not been fully elucidated so far. Our goals were to determine (1 whether cartilage pellets of human MSCs expressed lubricin in vitro chondrogenesis, (2 whether aggregates of human MSCs promoted lubricin expression, and (3 whether aggregates of MSCs expressed lubricin in the superficial cartilage after transplantation into osteochondral defects in rats.For in vitro analysis, human bone marrow (BM MSCs were differentiated into cartilage by pellet culture, and also aggregated using the hanging drop technique. For an animal study, aggregates of BM MSCs derived from GFP transgenic rats were transplanted to the osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of wild type rat knee joints. Lubricin expression was mainly evaluated in differentiated and regenerated cartilages.In in vitro analysis, lubricin was detected in the superficial zone of the pellets and conditioned medium. mRNA expression of Proteoglycan4 (Prg4, which encodes lubricin, in pellets was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated MSCs. Aggregates showed different morphological features between the superficial and deep zone, and the Prg4 mRNA expression increased after aggregate formation. Lubricin was also found in the aggregate. In a rat study, articular cartilage regeneration was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group as shown by macroscopical and histological analysis. The transmission electron microscope showed that morphology of the superficial cartilage in the MSC group was closer to that of the intact cartilage than in the control group. GFP positive cells remained in the repaired tissue and expressed lubricin in

  20. Obesity-related juvenile form of cartilage lesions: a new affliction in the knees of morbidly obese children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widhalm, Harald K.; Marlovits, Stefan; Vecsei, Vilmos [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Joints and Cartilage, Department of Traumatology, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Dirisamer, Albert [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Neuhold, Andreas [Private Hospital Rudolfinerhaus, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, Kurt [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Overweight and obesity are afflictions that lead to an increased risk of health problems including joint problems. The aim of the study was to assess the condition of articular cartilage in obese adolescent patients suffering from knee pain. MRI of 24 knees of 20 morbidly obese patients, mean age 14.2 years, was performed in an open 1.0 Tesla MR system, where the cartilage, the quality and structure of the menisci, and the presence or absence of surrounding changes was examined. In all patients a cartilage lesion in at least one region of the knee could be detected. Retropatellar cartilage lesions have been found in 19 knees. Ten cartilage lesions grade I, and four lesions grade II have been described in the lateral compartment of the knee, whereas the medial compartment showed in eight cases a grade I, in 13 cases a grade II and in two cases a grade III cartilage lesion. Meniscal changes were assessed in most patients. Morbidly obese children and adolescents show major abnormalities in the articular cartilage of the knee. Whether obesity alone is the causal factor for the development of the pattern of these changes, remains to be seen. (orig.)

  1. Obesity-related juvenile form of cartilage lesions: a new affliction in the knees of morbidly obese children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overweight and obesity are afflictions that lead to an increased risk of health problems including joint problems. The aim of the study was to assess the condition of articular cartilage in obese adolescent patients suffering from knee pain. MRI of 24 knees of 20 morbidly obese patients, mean age 14.2 years, was performed in an open 1.0 Tesla MR system, where the cartilage, the quality and structure of the menisci, and the presence or absence of surrounding changes was examined. In all patients a cartilage lesion in at least one region of the knee could be detected. Retropatellar cartilage lesions have been found in 19 knees. Ten cartilage lesions grade I, and four lesions grade II have been described in the lateral compartment of the knee, whereas the medial compartment showed in eight cases a grade I, in 13 cases a grade II and in two cases a grade III cartilage lesion. Meniscal changes were assessed in most patients. Morbidly obese children and adolescents show major abnormalities in the articular cartilage of the knee. Whether obesity alone is the causal factor for the development of the pattern of these changes, remains to be seen. (orig.)

  2. IL-1ß and BMPs - Interactive players of cartilage matrix degradation and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Aigner

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Intact human adult articular cartilage is central for the functioning of the articulating joints. This largely depends on the integrity of its extracellular matrix, given the high loading forces during movements in particular in the weight-bearing joints. Unlike the first impression of a more or less static tissue, articular cartilage shows - albeit in the adult organism a slow - tissue turnover. Thus, one of the most important questions in osteoarthritis research is to understand the balance of catabolic and anabolic factors in articular cartilage as this is the key to understand the biology of cartilage maintenance and degeneration. Anabolic and catabolic pathways are very much intermingled in articular cartilage. The balance between anabolism and catabolism is titrated on numerous levels, starting from the mediator-synthesizing cells which express either catabolic or anabolic factors. Also, on the level of the effector cells (i.e. chondrocytes anabolic and catabolic gene expression compete for a balance of matrix homeostasis, namely the synthesis of matrix components and the expression and activation of matrix-degrading proteases. Also, there are multiple layers of intracellular cross-talks in between the anabolic and catabolic signalling pathways. Maybe the most important lesson from this overview is the notion that the anabolic-catabolic balance as such counts and not so much sufficient net anabolism or limited catabolism alone. Thus, it might be neither the aim of osteoarthritis therapy to foster anabolism nor to knock down catabolism, but the balance of anabolic-catabolic activities as a total might need proper titration and balancing.

  3. Poroelasticity of cartilage at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-11-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ~15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ~ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E*|, and phase angle, φ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were measured in the frequency range f ~ 0.2-130 Hz at an offset indentation depth of δ(0) ~ 3 μm. The experimentally measured |E*| and φ corresponded well with that predicted by a fibril-reinforced poroelastic model over a three-decade frequency range. The peak frequency of phase angle, f(peak), was observed to scale linearly with the inverse square of the contact distance between probe tip and cartilage, 1/d(2), as predicted by linear poroelasticity theory. The dynamic mechanical properties were observed to be independent of the deformation amplitude in the range δ = 7-50 nm. Hence, these results suggest that poroelasticity was the dominant mechanism underlying the frequency-dependent mechanical behavior observed at these nanoscale deformations. These findings enable ongoing investigations of the nanoscale progression of matrix pathology in tissue-level disease. PMID:22067171

  4. Influence of osteoarthritis grade on molecular signature of human cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Thornhill, Thomas S; Meng, Fangang; Xie, Li; Wright, John; Glowacki, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Articular chondrocytes maintain cartilage matrix turnover and have the capacity for anabolic and catabolic activities that can be influenced by injury and disease. This study tested the hypothesis that catabolic genes are upregulated with regional osteoarthritis (OA) disease severity within a joint. With IRB approval, specimens of knee cartilage obtained as discarded tissues from subjects undergoing arthroplasty were partitioned for each subject by OA disease severity and evaluated for gene expression by RT-PCR. There was regional OA grade-associated upregulation of expected inflammatory mediators TNF-α, TNF receptors, IFN-γ, and interleukins as well as genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, including Adamts-5 and MMPs. Osteoclast-related genes, cathepsin K, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), RANKL, RANK, M-CSF, and c-fms, but not osteoprotegerin, were induced in advanced grades. In vitro treatment of normal human chondrocytes with interleukin-1β upregulated similar genes; this provides evidence that chondrocytes per se can be the source of osteoclast-related factors. Immunohistochemical staining showed that RANK- and RANKL-positive cells were abundant in advanced grades, especially in chondrocyte clusters. This suggests a possible autocrine mechanism by which an osteoclast phenotype is induced in articular chondrocytes. In sum, these studies identified gene expression signatures in human OA cartilage based upon regional disease severity within a joint. There was an effect of OA Grade on expression of osteoclastic lytic enzymes and regulatory factors in human articular chondrocytes. Induction of an osteoclast-like phenotype in chondrocytes may be part of OA progression and suggests specific therapeutic approaches. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:454-462, 2016. PMID:26336057

  5. The effect of dietary administration of 2-oxoglutaric acid on the cartilage and bone of growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Ewa; Bienko, Marek; Radzki, Radoslaw P; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2013-08-01

    2-Oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox), a precursor to hydroxyproline - the most abundant amino acid in bone collagen, exerts protective effects on bone development during different stages of organism development; however, little is known about the action of 2-Ox on cartilage. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the influence of dietary 2-Ox supplementation on the growth plate, articular cartilage and bone of growing rats. A total of twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. Half of the rats received 2-oxoglutarate at a dose of 0·75 g/kg body weight per d in their drinking-water. Body and organ weights were measured. Histomorphometric analyses of the cartilage and bone tissue of the femora and tibiae were conducted, as well as bone densitometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Rats receiving 2-Ox had an increased body mass (P<0·001) and absolute liver weight (P=0·031). Femoral length (P=0·045) and bone mineral density (P=0·014), overall thickness of growth plate (femur P=0·036 and tibia P=0·026) and the thickness of femoral articular cartilage (P<0·001) were also increased. 2-Ox administration had no effect on the mechanical properties or on any of the measured pQCT parameters for both bones analysed. There were also no significant differences in histomorphometric parameters of tibial articular cartilage and autofluorescence of femoral and tibial growth plate cartilage. Dietary supplementation with 2-Ox to growing rats exerts its effects mainly on cartilage tissue, having only a slight influence on bone. The effect of 2-Ox administration was selective, depending on the particular bone and type of cartilage analysed. PMID:23308390

  6. A stem cell-based approach to cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Zhu, Shoutian; Tremblay, Matthew S; Payette, Joshua N; Wang, Jianing; Bouchez, Laure C; Meeusen, Shelly; Althage, Alana; Cho, Charles Y; Wu, Xu; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that involves the destruction of articular cartilage and eventually leads to disability. Molecules that promote the selective differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes may stimulate the repair of damaged cartilage. Using an image-based high-throughput screen, we identified the small molecule kartogenin, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation (median effective concentration = 100 nM), shows chondroprotective effects in vitro, and is efficacious in two OA animal models. Kartogenin binds filamin A, disrupts its interaction with the transcription factor core-binding factor β subunit (CBFβ), and induces chondrogenesis by regulating the CBFβ-RUNX1 transcriptional program. This work provides new insights into the control of chondrogenesis that may ultimately lead to a stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis. PMID:22491093

  7. Tuberculosis extrapulmonar: Forma articular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Escarpanter Buliés

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión del tema de la Tuberculosis extrapulmonar de forma articular, por haber encontrado un paciente con esta patología de presentación "pura" sin otras manifestaciones sistémicas. Se trata del primer paciente diagnosticado en el Hospital Comunitario Integral de "San Andrés", del municipio de Caracollo, provincia Cercado, en el departamento de Oruro, Bolivia. En la revisión del tema se demuestra la infrecuencia de esta forma de presentación de la enfermedad a pesar de ser la Tuberculosis pulmonar frecuente en la región por sumarse los factores: frío, altura con poco tenor de oxígeno, desnutrición, tormentas de polvo, muchos trabajadores mineros, etc. Se realiza la presentación del paciente, se muestra su evolución satisfactoria en cuanto a la patología de base y se arriban a conclusiones dentro de las que se destacan que la Tuberculosis en su forma articular es infrecuente en apariencia y su diagnóstico se hace difícil al no existir, por la misma razón, patrones ecográficos o radiográficos definidos. El diagnóstico anatomopatológico es el único que puede definir la etiología de la Tuberculosis de una lesión proliferativa de la sinovial y que la sinovectomía es una intervención generalmente invalidante por lo que un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento médico adecuado, a tiempo, evitaría limitaciones funcionales a posteriori. Se recomienda que en todo caso portador de una sinovitis de rodilla de larga evolución, se le realice una ecografía diagnóstica, y en los pacientes en los que se observen imágenes complejas de bordes regulares, del tipo "copos de nieve", se le efectúen estudios específicos para la detección de la Tuberculosis.

  8. Microstructural changes in cartilage and bone related to repetitive overloading in an equine athlete model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sean M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Riggs, Christopher M; Firth, Elwyn C; Broom, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    The palmar aspect of the third metacarpal (MC3) condyle of equine athletes is known to be subjected to repetitive overloading that can lead to the accumulation of joint tissue damage, degeneration, and stress fractures, some of which result in catastrophic failure. However, there is still a need to understand at a detailed microstructural level how this damage progresses in the context of the wider joint tissue complex, i.e. the articular surface, the hyaline and calcified cartilage, and the subchondral bone. MC3 bones from non-fractured joints were obtained from the right forelimbs of 16 Thoroughbred racehorses varying in age between 3 and 8 years, with documented histories of active race training. Detailed microstructural analysis of two clinically important sites, the parasagittal grooves and the mid-condylar regions, identified extensive levels of microdamage in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone concealed beneath outwardly intact hyaline cartilage. The study shows a progression in microdamage severity, commencing with mild hard-tissue microcracking in younger animals and escalating to severe subchondral bone collapse and lesion formation in the hyaline cartilage with increasing age and thus athletic activity. The presence of a clearly distinguishable fibrous tissue layer at the articular surface immediately above sites of severe subchondral collapse suggested a limited reparative response in the hyaline cartilage. PMID:24689513

  9. A composite scaffold of MSC affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix particles and chitosan hydrogel for cartilage regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyang; Man, Zhentao; Dai, Linghui; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Ao, Yingfang

    2015-12-01

    Articular cartilage injury is still a significant challenge because of the poor intrinsic healing potential of cartilage. Stem cell-based tissue engineering is a promising technique for cartilage repair. As cartilage defects are usually irregular in clinical settings, scaffolds with moldability that can fill any shape of cartilage defects and closely integrate with the host cartilage are desirable. In this study, we constructed a composite scaffold combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) E7 affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles and chitosan (CS) hydrogel for cartilage engineering. This solid-supported composite scaffold exhibited appropriate porosity, which provided a 3D microenvironment that supports cell adhesion and proliferation. Cell proliferation and DNA content analysis indicated that the DBM-E7/CS scaffold promoted better rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) survival than the CS or DBM/CS groups. Meanwhile, the DBM-E7/CS scaffold increased matrix production and improved chondrogenic differentiation ability of BMMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, after implantation in vivo for four weeks, compared to those in control groups, the regenerated issue in the DBM-E7/CS group exhibited translucent and superior cartilage-like structures, as indicated by gross observation, histological examination, and assessment of matrix staining. Overall, the functional composite scaffold of DBM-E7/CS is a promising option for repairing irregularly shaped cartilage defects.

  10. Healing Osteoarthritis: Engineered Proteins Created for Therapeutic Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Cherry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people worldwide are afflicted with painfulosteoarthritis, which is characterized by degradationof articular cartilage found in major joints such as thehip or knee. Symptoms include inflammation, pain,and decreased mobility. Because cartilage has a limitedability to self-heal, researchers have focused efforts onmethods that trigger cartilage regeneration. Our approachis to develop an injectable, protein-based hydrogel withmechanical properties analogous to healthy articularcartilage. The hydrogel provides an environment for cellgrowth and stimulates new tissue formation. We utilizedrecombinant DNA technology to create multifunctional,elastomeric proteins. The recombinant proteins weredesigned with biologically active domains to influence cellbehavior and resilin structural domains that mimic thestiffness of native cartilage. Resilin, a protein found in thewing and leg joints of mosquitoes, provided inspiration forthe mechanical domain in the recombinant protein. Thenew resilin-based protein was expressed in E. coli bacteria.Forming hydrogels requires a large quantity of engineeredprotein, so parameters such as bacterial host, incubationtemperature, expression time, and induction method wereoptimized to increase the protein yield. Using salt toprecipitate the protein and exploiting resilin’s heat stability,27 mg/L of recombinant protein was recovered at 95%purity. The protein expression and purification protocolswere established by analyzing experimental samples onSDS-PAGE gels and by Western blotting. The mechanicalproperties and interactions with stem cells are currentlybeing evaluated to assess the potential of the resilin-basedhydrogel as a treatment for osteoarthritis.

  11. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  12. Implication of interleukin 18 in production of matrix metalloproteinases in articular chondrocytes in arthritis: direct effect on chondrocytes may not be pivotal

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, S.; Shan, Z; Nishioka, K.; Yudoh, K

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the effect of interleukin (IL) 18 on cartilage degeneration by studying the profile of IL18 receptor (IL18R) on chondrocytes and the direct effect of IL18 on production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), aggrecanases, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in articular chondrocytes.

  13. Cartilage collagen damage in hip osteoarthritis similar to that seen in knee osteoarthritis; a case–control study of relationship between collagen, glycosaminoglycan and cartilage swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininia Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It remains to be shown whether OA shares molecular similarities between different joints in humans. This study provides evidence for similarities in cartilage molecular damage in osteoarthritic (OA joints. Methods Articular cartilage from osteoarthritic hip joints were analysed and compared to non-OA controls regarding collagen, glycosaminoglycan and water content. Femoral heads from 16 osteoarthritic (OA and 20 reference patients were obtained from hip replacement surgery due to OA and femoral neck fracture, respectively. Cartilage histological changes were assessed by Mankin grading and denatured collagen type II immunostaining and cartilage was extracted by α-chymotrypsin. Hydroxyproline and Alcian blue binding assays were used to measure collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG content, respectively. Results Mankin and immunohistology scores were significantly higher in hip OA samples than in reference samples. Cartilage water content was 6% higher in OA samples than in references. 2.5 times more collagen was extracted from OA than from reference samples. There was a positive association between water content and percentage of extractable collagen pool (ECP in both groups. The amounts of collagen per wet and dry weights did not differ statistically between OA and reference cartilage. % Extractable collagen was not related to collagen per dry weight in either group. However when collagen was expressed by wet weight there was a negative correlation between % extractable and collagen in OA cartilage. The amount of GAG per wet weight was similar in both groups but the amount of GAG per dry weight was higher in OA samples compared to reference samples, which suggests a capacity for GAG biosynthesis in hip OA cartilage. Neither of the studied parameters was related to age in either group. Conclusions Increased collagen extractability and water content in human hip cartilage is associated with OA pathology and can be observed at

  14. Studies of mineralization in tissue culture: optimal conditions for cartilage calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Stiner, D.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.; Leboy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal conditions for obtaining a calcified cartilage matrix approximating that which exists in situ were established in a differentiating chick limb bud mesenchymal cell culture system. Using cells from stage 21-24 embryos in a micro-mass culture, at an optimal density of 0.5 million cells/20 microliters spot, the deposition of small crystals of hydroxyapatite on a collagenous matrix and matrix vesicles was detected by day 21 using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR microscopy, and electron microscopy. Optimal media, containing 1.1 mM Ca, 4 mM P, 25 micrograms/ml vitamin C, 0.3 mg/ml glutamine, no Hepes buffer, and 10% fetal bovine serum, produced matrix resembling the calcifying cartilage matrix of fetal chick long bones. Interestingly, higher concentrations of fetal bovine serum had an inhibitory effect on calcification. The cartilage phenotype was confirmed based on the cellular expression of cartilage collagen and proteoglycan mRNAs, the presence of type II and type X collagen, and cartilage type proteoglycan at the light microscopic level, and the presence of chondrocytes and matrix vesicles at the EM level. The system is proposed as a model for evaluating the events in cell mediated cartilage calcification.

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate- and Decorin-Based Self-Assembling Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; Semino, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage injury and degenerative tissue progression remain poorly understood by the medical community. Therefore, various tissue engineering strategies aim to recover areas of damaged cartilage by using non-traditional approaches. To this end, the use of biomimetic scaffolds for recreating the complex in vivo cartilage microenvironment has become of increasing interest in the field. In the present study, we report the development of two novel biomaterials for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) with bioactive motifs, aiming to emulate the native cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM). We employed a simple mixture of the self-assembling peptide RAD16-I with either Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) or Decorin molecules, taking advantage of the versatility of RAD16-I. After evaluating the structural stability of the bi-component scaffolds at a physiological pH, we characterized these materials using two different in vitro assessments: re-differentiation of human articular chondrocytes (AC) and induction of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) to a chondrogenic commitment. Interestingly, differences in cellular morphology and viability were observed between cell types and culture conditions (control and chondrogenic). In addition, both cell types underwent a chondrogenic commitment under inductive media conditions, and this did not occur under control conditions. Remarkably, the synthesis of important ECM constituents of mature cartilage, such as type II collagen and proteoglycans, was confirmed by gene and protein expression analyses and toluidine blue staining. Furthermore, the viscoelastic behavior of ADSC constructs after 4 weeks of culture was more similar to that of native articular cartilage than to that of AC constructs. Altogether, this comparative study between two cell types demonstrates the versatility of our novel biomaterials and suggests a potential 3D culture system suitable for promoting chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:27315119

  16. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  17. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF ARTICULAR SYNDROME IN PSORIASIS

    OpenAIRE

    VAISOV ADKHAM SHAVKATOVICH; ALLAEVA MUASSAR JALALADINOVNA

    2015-01-01

    Articular syndrome in psoriasis is an urgent problem to date. By the way, not always articular syndrome in psoriasis is a manifestation of the disease. And so, below is a case osteochondropathy patient with psoriasis.

  18. Silicon Dioxide Particles Deposited in Vessels and Cartilage of the Femoral Head

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Min; Qing, Meiying; PENG, DAN

    2014-01-01

    Silicosis had been considered for decades as an illness with manifestations of lung fibrosis due to inhalation of overconcentrated SiO2 dust. To the best of our knowledge, studies have yet to report SiO2 deposits in any other tissues and organs. In the present case, while performing bilateral artificial total hip arthroplasty for one patient, we found that the articular cartilage of the bilateral femoral head was black. Therefore, specimens thereof were sent for pathological examination. Path...

  19. Prevention and management of knee osteoarthritis and knee cartilage injury in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Hideki; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI; Nakamura, Kozo; Engebretsen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects in the knee of young or active individuals remain a problem in orthopaedic practice. These defects have limited ability to heal and may progress to osteoarthritis. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis among athletes is higher than in the non-athletic population. The clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis are joint pain, limitation of range of motion and joint stiffness. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is confirmed by the symptoms and the radiological findings (narrow...

  20. ANISOTROPY, INHOMOGENEITY, AND TENSION-COMPRESSION NONLINEARITY OF HUMAN GLENOHUMERAL CARTILAGE IN FINITE DEFORMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chun-Yuh; Stankiewicz, Anna; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Mow, Van C.

    2005-01-01

    The tensile and compressive properties of human glenohumeral cartilage were determined by testing 120 rectangular strips in uniaxial tension and 70 cylindrical plugs in confined compression, obtained from five human glenohumeral joints. Specimens were harvested from five regions across the articular surface of the humeral head and two regions on the glenoid. Tensile strips were obtained along two orientations, parallel and perpendicular to the split-line directions. Two serial slices through ...

  1. An experimental model to mimic the mechanical behavior of a scaffold in a cartilage defect

    OpenAIRE

    VIKINGSSON, LINE KARINA ALVA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Abstract The main purpose of this thesis is the design and characterization of an experimental articular cartilage model. The in vitro model is composed of a macro and micro- porous Polycaprolactone scaffold with a Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) filling. The scaffold/hydrogel construct has been subjected to repeating number of freezing and thawing cycles in order to crosslink the hydrogel inside the scaffold's pores. The Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) resembles the growing cartilaginous tissue inside the ...

  2. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures...... around 20 C, but at temperatures above 26 C we observe an increase in the scattered intensity due to fusion. The system is unusually well suited for the study of basic mechanisms of vesicle fusion. The vesicles are flexible with a bending rigidity of only a few k(H)T. The monolayer spontaneous curvature......, Ho, depends strongly on temperature in a known way and is thus tunable. For temperatures where H-0 > 0 vesicles tyre long-term stable, while in the range H-0 fusion rate increases the more negative the Spontaneous curvature Through a quantitative;analysis of the fusion rate we arrive tit...

  3. Intra-Articular Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Injections Are Not Innocent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tonbul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a chronic disorder characterized by joint cartilage degeneration with concomitant changes in the synovium and subchondral bone metabolism. Many conservative treatment modalities, one of which is intra-articular injections, have been described for the treatment of this disorder. Traditionally, hyaluranic acid and corticosteroids are the agents that have been used for this purpose. Recently, polyacrylamide hydrogels are being used widely. Biocompatibility, nonbioabsorbability, and anti-infectious effect obtained by silver addition made polyacrylamide hydrogels more popular. In this paper, we present a case and the method of our management, in whom host tissue reaction (foreign body granuloma, edema, inflammation, and redness induration has been observed, as the first and unique adverse effect reported in the literature.

  4. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  5. Growth differentiation factor-5 stimulates the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Guo Xiong; Yao Jianfeng; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱ collagen by RT-PCR,the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture,MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and X collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  6. Growth Differentiation Factor-5 Stimulates the Growth and Anabolic Metabolism of Articular Chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Guo Xiong; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTr assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type 11 collagen by RT-PCR, the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture, MTF assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of ehondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the colal mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was gready enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and Ⅹ collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chon-drocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic ex-pression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  7. Empirical evaluation of the inter-relationship of articular elements involved in the pathoanatomy of knee osteoarthritis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this cross-sectional study, we conducted a comprehensive assessment of all articular elements that could be measured using knee MRI. We assessed the association of pathological change in multiple articular structures involved in the pathoanatomy of osteoarthritis. Methods Knee MRI scans from patients over 45 years old were assessed using a semi-quantitative knee MRI assessment form. The form included six distinct elements: cartilage, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, joint effusion and synovitis. Each type of pathology was graded using an ordinal scale with a value of zero indicating no pathology and higher values indicating increasingly severe levels of pathology. The principal dependent variable for comparison was the mean cartilage disease score (CDS, which captured the aggregate extent of involvement of articular cartilage. The distribution of CDS was compared to the individual and cumulative distributions of each articular element using the Chi-squared test. The correlations between pathological change in the various articular structures were assessed in a Spearman correlation table. Results Data from 140 patients were available for review. The cohort had a median age of 61 years (range 45-89 and was 61% female. The cohort included a wide spectrum of OA severity. Our analysis showed a statistically significant trend towards pathological change involving more articular elements as CDS worsened (p-value for trend Conclusion Our results support an inter-relationship of multiple articular elements in the pathoanatomy of knee OA. Prospective studies of OA pathogenesis in humans are needed to correlate these findings to clinically relevant outcomes such as pain and function.

  8. Prospective comparison of 3D FIESTA versus fat-suppressed 3D SPGR MRI in evaluating knee cartilage lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To prospectively compare the accuracy of three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) sequences with that of fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (3D SPGR) in the diagnosis of knee articular cartilage lesions, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight knees in 54 patients (age range 21-82 years; mean 36 years) were prospectively evaluated by using sagittal 3D FIESTA and sagittal fat-suppressed 3D SPGR sequences. Articular cartilage lesions were graded on MRI and during arthroscopy with a modified Noyes scoring system. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were assessed. Interobserver agreement was determined with κ statistics. Results: The performance of 3D FIESTA sequences (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80, 94, and 92%, respectively, for reader 1 and 76, 94, and 90%, respectively, for reader 2) was similar to that of fat-suppressed 3D SPGR sequences (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82, 92, and 90%, respectively, for reader 1 and 82, 90, and 88%, respectively, for reader 2) in the detection of knee articular cartilage lesions. The interobserver agreement varied from fair to good to excellent (kappa values from 0.43-0.83). Conclusion: 3D FIESTA has good diagnostic performance, comparable with fat-suppressed 3D SPGR in evaluating knee cartilage lesions, and it can be incorporated into routine knee MRI protocols due to the short acquisition time.

  9. PLGA-based microcarriers induce mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and stimulate cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we aimed at evaluating the ability of novel PLGA-P188-PLGA-based microspheres to induce the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) into chondrocytes. To this aim, we tested microspheres releasing TGFβ3 (PAM-T) in vitro and in situ, in a pathological osteoarthritic (OA) environment. We first evaluated the chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs seeded onto PAM-T in vitro and confirmed the up-regulation of chondrogenic markers while the secretome of the cells was not changed by the 3D environment. We then injected human MSC seeded onto PAM-T in the knee joints of mice with collagenase-induced OA. After 6 weeks, histological analysis revealed that formation of a cartilage-like tissue occurred at the vicinity of PAM-T that was not observed when MSCs were seeded onto PAM. We also noticed that the endogenous articular cartilage was less degraded. The extent of cartilage protection was further analysed by confocal laser microscopy. When MSCs seeded onto PAM-T were injected early after OA induction, protection of cartilage against degradation was evidenced and this effect was associated to a higher survival of MSCs in presence of TGFβ3. This study points to the interest of using MSCs seeded onto PAM for cartilage repair and stimulation of endogenous cartilage regeneration. PMID:26945456

  10. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive electrospun cartilage substitute by integrating cold atmospheric plasma (CAP treatment with sustained growth factor delivery microspheres. Specifically, CAP was applied to a poly(ε-caprolactone electrospun scaffold with homogeneously distributed bioactive factors (transforming growth factor-β1 and bovine serum albumin loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres. We have shown that CAP treatment renders electrospun scaffolds more hydrophilic thus facilitating vitronectin adsorption. More importantly, our results demonstrate, for the first time, CAP and microspheres can synergistically enhance stem cell growth as well as improve chondrogenic differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (such as increased glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and total collagen production. Furthermore, CAP can substantially enhance 3D cell infiltration (over two-fold increase in infiltration depth after 1 day of culture in the scaffolds. By integrating CAP, sustained bioactive factor loaded microspheres, and electrospinning, we have fabricated a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  11. Roles of the Fibrous Superficial Zone in the Mechanical Behavior of TMJ Condylar Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Leonardo; Zimmerman, Brandon K; Park, Miri; Han, Lin; Wang, Liyun; Burris, David L; Lu, X Lucas

    2015-11-01

    In temporomandibular joints (TMJs), the cartilage on the condylar head displays a unique ultrastructure with a dense layer of type I collagen in the superficial zone, different from hyaline cartilage in other joints. This study aims to elucidate the roles of this fibrous zone in the mechanical behaviors, particularly lubrication, of TMJ under physiological loading regimes. Mechanical tests on porcine condylar cartilage demonstrated that the superficial and middle-deep zones exhibit tension-compression nonlinearity. The tensile and compressive moduli of the superficial zone are 30.73 ± 12.97 and 0.028 ± 0.016 MPa, respectively, while those for the middle-deep zone are 2.43 ± 1.75 and 0.14 ± 0.09 MPa. A nonlinear finite element model of condylar cartilage was built to simulate sliding of a spherical probe over the articular surface. The presence of the superficial zone significantly promoted interstitial fluid pressurization (IFP) inside the loaded cartilage and reduced the friction force on the surface, compared to the case without the superficial zone. Finite element simulations showed that IFP depends on sliding speed but not normal load, which matches the experimental results. This study revealed the presence of the fibrous zone can significantly reduce the deformation of condylar cartilage under compression and the friction force on its surface during sliding. PMID:25893511

  12. Comparison of novel clinically applicable methodology for sensitive diagnostics of cartilage degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kiviranta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In order efficiently to target therapies intending to stop or reverse degenerative processes of articular cartilage, it would be crucial to diagnose osteoarthritis (OA earlier and more sensitively than is possible with the existing clinical methods. Unfortunately, current clinical methods for OA diagnostics are insensitive for detecting the early degenerative changes, e.g., arising from collagen network damage or proteoglycan depletion. We have recently investigated several novel quantitative biophysical methods, including ultrasound indentation, quantitative ultrasound techniques and magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing the degenerative changes of articular cartilage, typical for OA. In this study, the combined results of these novel diagnostic methods were compared with histological (Mankin score, MS, compositional (proteoglycan, collagen and water content and mechanical (dynamic and equilibrium moduli reference measurements of the same bovine cartilage samples. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis was conducted to judge the diagnostic performance of each technique. Indentation and ultrasound techniques provided the most sensitive measures to differentiate samples of intact appearance (MS=0 from early (13 degeneration. Furthermore, these techniques were good predictors of tissue composition and mechanical properties. The specificity and sensitivity analyses revealed that the mechano-acoustic methods, when further developed for in vivo use, may provide more sensitive probes for OA diagnostics than the prevailing qualitative X-ray and arthroscopic techniques. Noninvasive quantitative MRI measurements showed slightly lower diagnostic performance than mechano-acoustic techniques. The compared methods could possibly also be used for the quantitative monitoring of success of cartilage repair.

  13. Development of large engineered cartilage constructs from a small population of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Kunz, Manuela; Tse, Man Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Waldman, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Confronted with articular cartilage's limited capacity for self-repair, joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased tissue. Although tissue engineered cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of large defects. As routine cell expansion methods tend to elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate phenotypically stable, large-sized engineered constructs (≥3 cm(2) ) directly from a small amount of donor tissue or cells (as little as 20,000 cells to generate a 3 cm(2) tissue construct). Using rabbit donor tissue, the bioreactor-cultivated constructs were hyaline-like in appearance and possessed a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. Longer bioreactor cultivation times resulted in increased matrix deposition and improved mechanical properties determined over a 4 week period. Additionally, as the anatomy of the joint will need to be taken in account to effectively resurface large affected areas, we have also explored the possibility of generating constructs matched to the shape and surface geometry of a defect site through the use of rapid-prototyped defect tissue culture molds. Similar hyaline-like tissue constructs were developed that also possessed a high degree of shape correlation to the original defect mold. Future studies will be aimed at determining the effectiveness of this approach to the repair of cartilage defects in an animal model and the creation of large-sized osteochondral constructs. PMID:23197468

  14. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  15. Metabolic Effects of Avocado/Soy Unsaponifiables on Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Lippiello

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Avocado/soy unsaponifiable (ASU components are reported to have a chondroprotective effect by virtue of anti-inflammatory and proanabolic effects on articular chondrocytes. The identity of the active component(s remains unknown. In general, sterols, the major component of unsaponifiable plant material have been demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in vitro and in animal models. These studies were designed to clarify whether the sterol content of ASU preparations were the primary contributors to biological activity in articular chondrocytes. ASU samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC and GC mass spectrometry. The sterol content was normalized between diverse samples prior to in vitro testing on bovine chondrocytes. Anabolic activity was monitored by uptake of 35-sulfate into proteoglycans and quantitation of labeled hydroxyproline and proline content after incubation with labeled proline. Anti-inflammatory activity was assayed by measuring reduction of interleukin-1 (IL-1-induced synthesis of PGE2 and metalloproteases and release of label from tissue prelabeled with S-35.All ASU samples exerted a similar time-dependent up-regulation of 35-sulfate uptake in bovine cells reaching a maximum of greater than 100% after 72 h at sterol doses of 1–10 μg/ml. Non-collagenous protein (NCP and collagen synthesis were similarly up-regulated. All ASU were equally effective in dose dependently inhibiting IL-1-induced MMP-3 activity (23–37%, labeled sulfate release (15–23% and PGE2 synthesis (45–58%. Up-regulation of glycosaminoglycan and collagen synthesis and reduction of IL-1 effects in cartilage are consistent with chondroprotective activity. The similarity of activity of ASU from diverse sources when tested at equal sterol levels suggests sterols are important for biologic effects in articular chondrocytes.

  16. Fabrication of an integrated cartilage/bone joint prosthesis and its potential application in joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yi; Chen, Chen; Zhou, Song; Li, Yubao; Wang, Danqing; Zhang, Li

    2016-06-01

    An integrated cartilage/bone joint prosthesis was designed and fabricated using a two-step molding injection method, in which ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) was used as the upper cartilage layer, and hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 (HA/PA66) composites as the underlying bone layer. Holes punched in the underlying layer improved the interfacial bonding strength between the two layers by means of the mechanical interlocking obviously. Then, the physicochemical properties and in vivo behaviors of the integrated joint prosthesis were investigated. The results showed that the upper layer displayed good bio-tribological properties which were suitable for the articular cartilage replacement, while the underlying layer demonstrated good mechanical performance, excellent biocompatibility and high bioactivity, and could accelerate bone regeneration and the early bio-fixation of the prosthesis. Therefore, the prosthesis prepared here will have a wide prospect to be used in joint replacement. PMID:26889776

  17. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  18. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser for cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses. Part I: Technique and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J E; Nixon, A J; Gantz, V A; Meyer, D; Mohammed, H

    1991-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser, used in a rapidly pulsed mode, was evaluated for intra-articular use in horses. Under arthroscopic guidance, a lensed 5 mm laser probe attached directly to a hand-held carbon dioxide laser was inserted into one intercarpal joint of eight horses. In four horses, a cartilage crater 1 cm in diameter was created to the level of the subchondral bone of the articular surface of the third carpal bone. In four horses, the laser was directed perpendicular to the articular surface of the third carpal bone and activated to penetrate the cartilage and subchondral bone. The intercarpal joint of the opposite carpus in each horse was subjected to arthroscopic examination and insertion of the laser probe for an equivalent time. The laser was not activated and these joints served as sham operated controls. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, then euthanatized, and the joints were examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically.