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Sample records for articular cartilage compared

  1. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of ...

  2. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  3. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  4. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  5. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on ...

  6. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  7. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  8. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  9. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  10. A comparative analysis of 7.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histology measurements of knee articular cartilage in a canine posterolateral knee injury model: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Scott R; Griffith, Chad J; Wijdicks, Coen A; Goerke, Ute; McNulty, Margaret A; Parker, Josh B; Carlson, Cathy S; Ellermann, Jutta; LaPrade, Robert F

    2009-11-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the use of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating articular cartilage degeneration and quantifying the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate articular cartilage cross-sectional area and maximum thickness in the medial compartment of intact and destabilized canine knees using 7.0-T magnetic resonance images and compare these results with those obtained from the corresponding histologic sections. Controlled laboratory study. Five canines had a surgically created unilateral grade III posterolateral knee injury that was followed for 6 months before euthanasia. The opposite, noninjured knee was used as a control. At necropsy, 3-dimensional gradient echo images of the medial tibial plateau of both knees were obtained using a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in this site were digitally measured on the magnetic resonance images. The proximal tibias were processed for routine histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness were measured in histologic sections corresponding to the sites of the magnetic resonance slices. The magnetic resonance imaging results revealed an increase in articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in surgical knees compared with control knees in all specimens; these changes were significant for both parameters (P .1). These results demonstrate that 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging provides an alternative method to histology to evaluate early osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage in a canine model by detecting increases in articular cartilage area. The noninvasive nature of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging will allow for in vivo monitoring of osteoarthritis progression and intervention in animal models and humans for osteoarthritis.

  11. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  12. Current strategies for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Redman S. N.; Oldfield S. F.; Archer C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Defects of articular cartilage that do not penetrate to the subchondral bone fail to heal spontaneously. Defects that penetrate to the subchondral bone elicit an intrinsic repair response that yields a fibrocartilaginous repair tissue which is a poor substitute for hyaline articular cartilage. Many arthroscopic repair strategies employed utilise this intrinsic repair response to induce the formation of a repair tissue within the defect. The goal, however, is to produce a repair tissue that ha...

  13. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  14. Current concepts of articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2011-12-01

    Articular cartilage provides a vital function in the homeostasis of the joint environment. It possesses unique mechanical properties, allowing for the maintenance of almost frictionless motion over a lifetime. However, cartilage is vulnerable to traumatic injury and due to its poor vascularity and inability to access mesenchymal stem cells, unable to facilitate a satisfactory healing response. Untreated chondral defects are thus likely to predispose patients to the development of osteoarthritis. Reconstitution and repair of articular cartilage is dependent on the neosynthesis or implantation of cartilage matrix elements, a goal which can be achieved through a variety of surgical means. Commonly used repair techniques include marrow stimulation, structural osteo-articular autografts or chondrocyte implantation. Despite substantial differences in the complexity and technical application of each method, all are united in the endeavour to restore joint function and prevent joint degeneration. Anyone attempting to treat cartilage defects must possess a basic understanding of the physiology of cartilage growth, and relevant factors affecting cartilage healing and repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the biomechanics and kinematics of the knee are essential in order to appreciate the forces acting on joint surfaces and repair tissues. Although clinical success is dependent on appropriate patient selection, accurate clinical assessment, definition of root causes and application of the right choice of treatment modality, the ultimate outcome of any intervention remains heavily reliant on the surgeon's proficiency in the technical aspects of the chosen surgical procedure.

  15. Comparative study on identification of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by fourier transform infrared imaging and chemometrics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hua Mao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two discriminant methods, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and Fisher’s discriminant analysis (FDA, were combined with Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilage in a canine model. Osteoarthritic cartilage had been developed for up to two years after the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL transection in one knee. Cartilage specimens were sectioned into 10 μm thickness for FTIRI. A PLS-DA model was developed after spectral pre-processing. All IR spectra extracted from FTIR images were calculated by PLS-DA with the discriminant accuracy of 90%. Prior to FDA, principal component analysis (PCA was performed to decompose the IR spectral matrix into informative principal component matrices. Based on the different discriminant mechanism, the discriminant accuracy (96% of PCA-FDA with high convenience was higher than that of PLS-DA. No healthy cartilage sample was mis-assigned by these two methods. The above mentioned suggested that both integrated technologies of FTIRI-PLS-DA and, especially, FTIRI-PCA-FDA could become a promising tool for the discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage specimen as well as the diagnosis of cartilage lesion at microscopic level. The results of the study would be helpful for better understanding the pathology of osteoarthritics.

  16. Tissue engineering techniques to regenerate articular cartilage using polymeric scaffolds.

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ OLMEDILLA, MARCOS

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Articular cartilage is a tissue that consists of chondrocytes surrounded by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is mainly composed of type II collagen and proteoglycans. The main function of articular cartilage is to provide a lubricated surface for articulation. Articular cartilage damage is common and may lead to osteoarthritis. Articular cartilage does not have blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic vessels and therefore has limited capacity for intrinsic healing and repair. ...

  17. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteoprotegerin deficiency leads to deformation of the articular cartilage in femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ge, Jianping; Chen, Danying; Weng, Yuteng; Du, Haiming; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) was a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of TNF receptor superfamily that was expressed in the chondrocytes of articular cartilage and adjacent locations in the physiological setting, was involved in maintaining integrity of articular cartilage. OPG could prevent subchondral bone from resorption, and also protect cartilage from degradation. In this study, we used Osteoprotegerin-knockout mice (Opg-KO mice) to find out the role of OPG in articular cartilage. We examined articular cartilage in the femoral head of Opg-KO mice began in early adulthood using modern molecular and imaging methods. We found cartilage changes starting from adulthood and progressively with age, reminiscent of pathological changes in OA. Deficiency of OPG caused thinned articular cartilage and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone in femoral head in comparison with wild-type mice (WT mice). Also, the articular cartilage of femoral head expressed significantly less of Aggrecan, Col-II and Col-X, but more Col-I and Matrix Metalloproteinases-13 (Mmp-13) than WT mice both at gene and protein level. Moreover, increased chondrocyte apoptosis and decreased chondrocyte proliferation were observed in femoral head of Opg-KO mice compared to WT mice. These data suggested that OPG played an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of articular cartilage of femoral head.

  19. Segmentation of articular cartilage using active contours and prior knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Cristian; Hall, Laurance; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    A diffusion snake segmentation algorithm was evaluated on synthetic and real MR images of articular cartilage. The algorithm proved to be robust to missing boundaries and the initial contour converges over large distances. Compared with a standard B-spline snake, more accurate and reproducible segmentations were obtained, with less effort during initialization of the algorithm.

  20. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    , especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... these minor collagens. The generation and release of fragmented molecules could generate novel biochemical markers with the capacity to monitor disease progression, facilitate drug development and add to the existing toolbox for in vitro studies, preclinical research and clinical trials....... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  2. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Amino acid racemization reveals differential protein turnover in osteoarthritic articular and meniscal cartilages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabler, Thomas V; Byers, Samuel S; Zura, Robert D; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Certain amino acids within proteins have been reported to change from the L form to the D form over time. This process is known as racemization and is most likely to occur in long-lived low-turnover tissues such as normal cartilage. We hypothesized that diseased tissue, as found in an osteoarthritic (OA) joint, would have increased turnover reflected by a decrease in the racemized amino acid content. Methods Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods, we quantified the L and D forms of amino acids reported to racemize in vivo on a biological timescale: alanine, aspartate (Asp), asparagine (Asn), glutamate, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine (Leu), and serine (Ser). Furthermore, using a metabolically inactive control material (tooth dentin) and a control material with normal metabolism (normal articular cartilage), we developed an age adjustment in order to make inferences about the state of protein turnover in cartilage and meniscus. Results In the metabolically inactive control material (n = 25, ages 13 to 80 years) and the normal metabolizing control material (n = 19, ages 17 to 83 years), only Asp + Asn (Asx), Ser, and Leu showed a significant change (increase) in racemization with age (P Asx, Ser, and Leu when compared with the normal articular cartilage control were 97%, 74%, and 73% in OA meniscal cartilage and 97%, 70%, and 78% in OA articular cartilage. We also observed lower amino acid content in OA articular and meniscal cartilages compared with normal articular cartilage as well as a loss of total amino acids with age in the OA meniscal but not the OA articular cartilage. Conclusions These data demonstrate comparable anabolic responses for non-lesioned OA articular cartilage and OA meniscal cartilage but an excess of catabolism over anabolism for the meniscal cartilage. PMID:19267899

  4. Survivorship After Meniscal Allograft Transplantation According to Articular Cartilage Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bum-Sik; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Won-Kyeong; Choi, Jun Weon

    2017-04-01

    Clinical outcomes after meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) in arthritic knees are unclear, and objective estimates of graft survival according to the articular cartilage status have not been performed. MAT should provide clinical benefits in knees with high-grade cartilage damage, but their graft survivorship should be inferior to that in knees with low-grade chondral degeneration after MAT. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The records of 222 consecutive patients who underwent primary MAT were reviewed to compare clinical outcomes and graft survivorship. The patients were grouped according to the degree and location of articular cartilage degeneration: low-grade chondral lesions (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] grade ≤2) on both the femoral and tibial sides (ideal indication), high-grade lesions (ICRS grade 3 or 4) on either the femoral or tibial side (relative indication), and high-grade lesions on both sides (salvage indication). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log-rank test was performed to compare the clinical survival rates and graft survival rates between the groups. A Lysholm score of meniscal tear or meniscectomy of greater than one-third of the allograft, objectively evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopic surgery. The mean (±SD) Lysholm score significantly improved from 63.1 ± 15.1 preoperatively to 85.1 ± 14.3 at the latest follow-up of a mean 44.6 ± 19.7 months ( P lesions. However, better graft survival can be expected when articular cartilage is intact or if chondral damage is limited to a unipolar lesion. MAT should be considered before the progression of chondral damage to a bipolar lesion for better graft survivorship and should be performed cautiously in arthritic knees.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Articular Cartilage Defects and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-yi; Lu, Shi-bi; Peng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis are the most common joint diseases. Joints are prone to damage caused by sports injuries or aging, and such damage regularly progresses to more serious joint disorders, including osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative disease characterized by the thinning and eventual wearing out of articular cartilage, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide. Current approaches to repair of articular cartilage damage include mosaicplasty, microfracture, and injection of autologous chondrocytes. These treatments relieve pain and improve joint function, but the long-term results are unsatisfactory. The long-term success of cartilage repair depends on development of regenerative methodologies that restore articular cartilage to a near-native state. Two promising approaches are (i) implantation of engineered constructs of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded scaffolds, and (ii) delivery of an appropriate population of MSCs by direct intra-articular injection. MSCs may be used as trophic producers of bioactive factors initiating regenerative activities in a defective joint. Current challenges in MSC therapy are the need to overcome current limitations in cartilage cell purity and to in vitro engineer tissue structures exhibiting the required biomechanical properties. This review outlines the current status of MSCs used in cartilage tissue engineering and in cell therapy seeking to repair articular cartilage defects and related problems. MSC-based technologies show promise when used to repair cartilage defects in joints.

  6. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  7. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasing necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26811234

  8. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  9. Rehabilitation after Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee in the Football (Soccer) Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Karen; Silvers, Holly Jacinda; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Participation in football can put both male and female players at an increased risk for knee osteoarthritis. There is a higher prevalence of focal chondral defects in the knee of athletes compared to nonathletes. The management of chondral defects in the football player is complex and multifactorial. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current strategies for rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair of the knee in the football player. A review of current literature and the scientific evidence for rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair of the knee. Articular cartilage repair has been shown to allow return to sport but rehabilitation timescales are lengthy. Successful rehabilitation for a return to football after articular cartilage repair of the knee requires the player to be able to accept the load of the sport. This necessitates a multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation, especially in the transition from therapy to performance care. It should be recognized that not all players will return to football after articular cartilage repair. The evidence base for rehabilitative practice after articular cartilage repair is increasing but remains sparse in areas.

  10. Rehabilitation after Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee in the Football (Soccer) Player

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, Holly Jacinda; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Participation in football can put both male and female players at an increased risk for knee osteoarthritis. There is a higher prevalence of focal chondral defects in the knee of athletes compared to nonathletes. The management of chondral defects in the football player is complex and multifactorial. Objective: The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current strategies for rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair of the knee in the football player. Design: A review of current literature and the scientific evidence for rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair of the knee. Conclusions: Articular cartilage repair has been shown to allow return to sport but rehabilitation timescales are lengthy. Successful rehabilitation for a return to football after articular cartilage repair of the knee requires the player to be able to accept the load of the sport. This necessitates a multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation, especially in the transition from therapy to performance care. It should be recognized that not all players will return to football after articular cartilage repair. The evidence base for rehabilitative practice after articular cartilage repair is increasing but remains sparse in areas. PMID:26069608

  11. Segmenting articular cartilage automatically using a voxel classification approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2007-01-01

    We present a fully automatic method for articular cartilage segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which we use as the foundation of a quantitative cartilage assessment. We evaluate our method by comparisons to manual segmentations by a radiologist and by examining the interscan repro...

  12. MR diffusion weighted imaging experimental study on early stages of articular cartilage degeneration of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jingru; Dai Shipeng; Pang Jun; Xu Xiaokun; Wang Yuexin; Zhang Zhigang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearance of MR diffusion weighted imaging in early stages of cartilage degeneration and to detect its values. Methods: In 20 goat left knees, intra- articular injection of 5 units of papain was performed causing a loss of cartilage proteoglycan. Twenty right knees were used as control group. MR diffusion weighted imaging was performed at 24 hours after intra-articular injection of papain. ADC of each part of articular cartilage was measured and compared with each other. The proteoglycan content was measured biochemically and histochemically. Routine MRI and DWI were performed in 100 patients with osteoarthritis and 20 healthy people. The ADC of each interested part of articular cartilage was measured and compared with each other. Results: In experimental control group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (14.2±2.3) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s. In early stages of cartilage degeneration group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (17.5±4.2) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s. The ADCav of the control group was lower than that of the early stages of cartilage degeneration group (t=2.709; P=0.016). The proteloglycan content of articular cartilage was 4.22 x 10 6 μg/kg in control group, and 0.82 x 10 6 μg/kg in experimental group at 24 hours after injection of papain. The difference between control group and experimental group was significant (t=2.705, P=0.018). In healthy people, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (7.6±2.2) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s. In osteoarthritis group, the ADCav of articular cartilage was (10.3±4.2) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s. The ADCav in the healthy group was significantly lower than that in the osteoarthritis group (t=2.609,P=0.014). Conclusion: DWI is an useful method in detecting early stages of cartilage degeneration which can not be showed on routine sequences. (authors)

  13. Role of tenascin-C in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    Tenascin-C (TN-C) is a glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). TN-C consists of four distinct domains, including the tenascin assembly domain, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, fibronectin type III-like repeats, and the fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) domain. This review summarizes the role of TN-C in articular cartilage. Expression of TN-C is associated with the development of articular cartilage but markedly decreases during maturation of chondrocytes and disappears almost completely in adult articular cartilage. Increased expression of TN-C has been found at diseased cartilage and synovial sites in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TN-C is increased in the synovial fluid in patients with OA and RA. In addition, serum TN-C is elevated in RA patients. TN-C could be a useful biochemical marker for joint disease. The addition of TN-C results in different effects among TN-C domains. TN-C fragments might be endogenous inducers of cartilage matrix degradation; however, full-length TN-C could promote cartilage repair and prevent cartilage degeneration. The deficiency of TN-C enhanced cartilage degeneration in the spontaneous OA in aged joints and surgical OA model. The clinical significance of TN-C effects on cartilage is not straightforward.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage on mechanical properties of the articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ekrem

    2017-12-01

    Articular cartilage has unique mechanical and physicochemical properties which are responsible for its load carrying capabilities. This work investigates the effects of hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage on mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was exposed to hydrogen peroxide for a week. Dynamic and static mechanical tests applied to calculate articular cartilage compressive modulus. We observed higher control curve slopes than that of hydrogen peroxide curves which account for lesser stiffness values in the exposed articular cartilage. For the instantaneous experiments, results were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage causes reduction in the stiffness of the articular cartilage.

  15. The protective effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage: a systematic review of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, J J; Hannink, G; van Tienen, T G; van Luijk, J; Hooijmans, C R

    2015-08-01

    Despite widespread reporting on clinical results, the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on the development of osteoarthritis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to systematically review all studies on the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage in animals. Pubmed and Embase were searched for original articles concerning the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage compared with both its positive (meniscectomy) and negative (either sham or non-operated) control in healthy animals. Outcome measures related to assessment of damage to articular cartilage were divided in five principal outcome categories. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated and pooled to obtain an overall SMD and 95% confidence interval. 17 articles were identified, representing 14 original animal cohorts with an average timing of data collection of 24 weeks [range 4 weeks; 30 months]. Compared to a negative control, meniscus allograft transplantation caused gross macroscopic (1.45 [0.95; 1.95]), histological (3.43 [2.25; 4.61]) damage to articular cartilage, and osteoarthritic changes on radiographs (3.12 [1.42; 4.82]). Moreover, results on histomorphometrics and cartilage biomechanics are supportive of this detrimental effect on cartilage. On the other hand, meniscus allograft transplantation caused significantly less gross macroscopic (-1.19 [-1.84; -0.54]) and histological (-1.70 [-2.67; -0.74]) damage to articular cartilage when compared to meniscectomy. However, there was no difference in osteoarthritic changes on plain radiographs (0.04 [-0.48; 0.57]), and results on histomorphometrics and biomechanics did neither show a difference in effect between meniscus allograft transplantation and meniscectomy. In conclusion, although meniscus allograft transplantation does not protect articular cartilage from damage, it reduces the extent of it when compared with meniscectomy. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis

  16. Quantitative characterization of articular cartilage using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Davies, Catharina de Lange; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-11-01

    The collagen meshwork in articular cartilage of chicken knee is characterized using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy. Direction and degree of dispersion of the collagen fibers in the superficial layer are found using a Fourier transform image-analysis technique of the second-harmonic generated image. Mueller matrix images are used to acquire structural data from the intermediate layer of articular cartilage where the collagen fibers are too small to be resolved by optical microscopy, providing a powerful multimodal measurement technique. Furthermore, we show that Mueller matrix imaging provides more information about the tissue compared to standard polarization microscopy. The combination of these techniques can find use in improved diagnosis of diseases in articular cartilage, improved histopathology, and additional information for accurate biomechanical modeling of cartilage.

  17. Photoshop-based image analysis of canine articular cartilage after subchondral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Lehr, H A; Ihling, C; Kreuz, P C; Haberstroh, J

    2004-09-01

    The validity of histopathological grading is a major problem in the assessment of articular cartilage. Calculating the cumulative strength of signal intensity of different stains gives information regarding the amount of proteoglycan, glycoproteins, etc. Using this system, we examined the medium-term effect of subchondral lesions on initially healthy articular cartilage. After cadaver studies, an animal model was created to produce pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage in 12 beagle dogs under MRI control. Quantification of the different stains was provided using a Photoshop-based image analysis (pixel analysis) with the histogram command 6 months after subchondral trauma. FLASH 3D sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases. The best detection of subchondral fractures was achieved with fat-suppressed TIRM sequences. Semiquantitative image analysis showed changes in proteoglycan and glycoprotein quantities in 9 of 12 samples that had not shown any evidence of damage during the initial examination. Correlation analysis showed a loss of the physiological distribution of proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the different zones of articular cartilage. Currently available software programs can be applied for comparative analysis of histologic stains of hyaline cartilage. After subchondral fractures, significant changes in the cartilage itself occur after 6 months.

  18. Multi-physics computational models of articular cartilage for estimation of its mechanical and physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbabi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the realm of computational modeling of complex multiphysics phenomena in articular cartilage enabled efficient and precise determination of articular cartilage properties. However, still accurate quantification of complicated indentation and diffusion processes tying closely with

  19. Professional ballet dancers have a similar prevalence of articular cartilage defects compared to age- and sex-matched non-dancing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2016-12-01

    Ballet exposes the hip joint to repetitive loading in extreme ranges of movement and may predispose a dancer to pain and osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of cartilage defects in professional ballet dancers and athletes and to determine the relationship of clinical signs and symptoms. Forty-nine male and female, current and retired professional ballet dancers and 49 age- and sex-matched non-dancing athletes completed hip pain questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and underwent hip range of movement (ROM) testing and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to score cartilage defects (no defect, grade 1: focal partial defect and grade 2: diffuse or full thickness defect). Thirty (61 %) dancers and 27 (55 %) athletes had cartilage defects (p = 0.54). The frequency of grade 1 and 2 cartilage defects did not differ between dancers and athletes (p = 0.83). The frequency of cartilage defects was similar in male and female dancers (p = 0.34), and male and female athletes (p = 0.24). Cartilage defects were not related to history of hip pain (p = 0.34), HAGOS pain (p = 0.14), sports/rec (p = 0.15) scores or hip internal rotation ≤20° (p > 0.01). Cartilage defects were related to age in male dancers (p = 0.002). Ballet dancers do not appear to be at a greater risk of cartilage injury compared to non-dancing athletes. Male dancers develop cartilage defects at an earlier age than athletes and female dancers. Cartilage defects were not related to clinical signs and symptoms; thus, prospective studies are required to determine which cartilage defects progress to symptomatic hip OA.

  20. Direct Quantification of Solute Diffusivity in Agarose and Articular Cartilage Using Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoga, Janty S; Graham, Brian T; Wang, Liyun; Price, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular tissue; diffusive transport is critical for its homeostasis. While numerous techniques have been used to quantify diffusivity within porous, hydrated tissues and tissue engineered constructs, these techniques have suffered from issues regarding invasiveness and spatial resolution. In the present study, we implemented and compared two separate correlation spectroscopy techniques, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), for the direct, and minimally-invasive quantification of fluorescent solute diffusion in agarose and articular cartilage. Specifically, we quantified the diffusional properties of fluorescein and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dextrans (3k and 10k) in aqueous solutions, agarose gels of varying concentration (i.e. 1, 3, 5%), and in different zones of juvenile bovine articular cartilage explants (i.e. superficial, middle, and deep). In agarose, properties of solute diffusion obtained via FCS and RICS were inversely related to molecule size, gel concentration, and applied strain. In cartilage, the diffusional properties of solutes were similarly dependent upon solute size, cartilage zone, and compressive strain; findings that agree with work utilizing other quantification techniques. In conclusion, this study established the utility of FCS and RICS as simple and minimally invasive techniques for quantifying microscale solute diffusivity within agarose constructs and articular cartilage explants.

  1. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  2. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  3. Articular cartilage response to a sliding load using two different-sized spherical indenters1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätti, Oliver R; Colombo, Vera; Torzilli, Peter A; Gallo, Luigi M

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage surface contact geometry influences the deformational behavior and stress distribution throughout the extracellular matrix (ECM) under load. To test the correlation between the mechanical and cellular response of articular cartilage when loaded with two different-sized spherical indenters under dynamic reciprocating sliding motion. Articular cartilage explants were subjected to a reciprocating sliding load using a 17.6 mm or 30.2 mm spherical ball for 2000 cycles at 10 mm/s and 4 kg axial load. Deformation of the cartilage was recorded and contact parameters were calculated according to Hertzian theory. After mechanical loading cartilage samples were collected and analyzed for ECM collagen damage, gene regulation and proteoglycan (PG) loss. Significantly higher ECM deformation and strain and lower dynamic effective modulus were found for explants loaded with the smaller diameter indenter whereas contact radius and stress remained unaffected. Also, the 17.6 mm indenter increased PG loss and significantly upregulated genes for ECM proteins and enzymes as compared to the 30.2 mm indenter. Sliding loads that increase ECM deformation/strain were found to induce enzyme-mediated catabolic processes in articular cartilage explants. These observations provide further understanding of how changes in cartilage contact mechanics under dynamic conditions can affect the cellular response.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  5. Automatic quantification of local and global articular cartilage surface curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the surface curvature of the articular cartilage from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and to investigate its role in populations with varying radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA), cross-sectionally and longitudinally. ...... curvature estimates from low-field MRI at different scales could potentially become biomarkers targeted at different stages of OA....

  6. Effects of sodium hyaluronate and methylprednisolone acetate on proteoglycan synthesis in equine articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Aimie J; Stewart, Allison A; Constable, Peter D; Eurell, Jo Ann C; Freeman, David E; Griffon, Dominique J

    2005-01-01

    To determine effects of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix catabolism in equine articular cartilage explants. 30 articular cartilage explants from fetlock joints of 5 adult horses without joint disease. Articular cartilage explants were treated with control medium or medium containing methylprednisolone acetate (MPA; 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg/mL), HA (0.1, 1.0, or 1.5 mg/mL), or both. Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of sulfur 35-labeled sodium sulphate into PGs, and PG degradation was measured by release of radiolabeled PGs into the medium. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in media and explants and total explant DNA were determined. Methylprednisolone acetate caused a decrease in PG synthesis, whereas HA had no effect. Only the combination of MPA at a concentration of 0.05 mg/mL and HA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL increased PG synthesis, compared with control explants. Methylprednisolone acetate increased degradation of newly synthesized PGs into the medium, compared with control explants, and HA alone had no effect. Hyaluronate had no effect on MPA-induced PG degradation and release into media. Neither MPA alone nor HA alone had an effect on total cartilage GAG content. Methylprednisolone acetate caused an increase in release of GAG into the medium at 48 and 72 hours after treatment. In combination, HA had no protective effect on MPA-induced GAG release into the medium. Total cartilage DNA content was not affected by treatments. Our results indicate that HA addition has little effect on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix PG catabolism in articular cartilage explants.

  7. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net 35 SO 4 -labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage

  8. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  9. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  10. Chondroitin sulfate reduces the friction coefficient of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalo, Ines M; Chahine, Nadeen O; Kaplun, Michael; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS)-C on the frictional response of bovine articular cartilage. The main hypothesis is that CS decreases the friction coefficient of articular cartilage. Corollary hypotheses are that viscosity and osmotic pressure are not the mechanisms that mediate the reduction in the friction coefficient by CS. In Experiment 1, bovine articular cartilage samples (n=29) were tested in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or in PBS containing 100mg/ml of CS following 48h incubation in PBS or in PBS+100mg/ml CS (control specimens were not subjected to any incubation). In Experiment 2, samples (n=23) were tested in four different solutions: PBS, PBS+100mg/ml CS, and PBS+polyethylene glycol (PEG) (133 or 170mg/ml). In Experiment 3, samples (n=18) were tested in three solutions of CS (0, 10 and 100mg/ml). Frictional tests (cartilage-on-glass) were performed under constant stress (0.5MPa) for 3600s and the time-dependent friction coefficient was measured. Samples incubated or tested in a 100mg/ml CS solution exhibited a significantly lower equilibrium friction coefficient than the respective PBS control. PEG solutions delayed the rise in the friction coefficient relative to the PBS control, but did not reduce the equilibrium value. Testing in PBS+10mg/ml of CS did not cause any significant decrease in the friction coefficient. In conclusion, CS at a concentration of 100mg/ml significantly reduces the friction coefficient of bovine articular cartilage and this mechanism is neither mediated by viscosity nor osmolarity. These results suggest that direct injection of CS into the joint may provide beneficial tribological effects.

  11. Low friction hydrogel for articular cartilage repair: evaluation of mechanical and tribological properties in comparison with natural cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Michelle M; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of a novel biomaterial, a boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogel, were investigated and compared to natural cartilage tissue. This low friction hydrogel material was developed for use as a synthetic replacement for focal defects in articular cartilage. The hydrogel was made by functionalizing the biocompatible polymer polyvinyl alcohol with a carboxylic acid derivative boundary lubricant molecule. Two different gel processing techniques were used to create the hydrogels. The first method consisted of initially functionalizing the boundary lubricant to the polyvinyl alcohol and then creating hydrogels by physically crosslinking the reacted polymer. The second method consisted of creating non-functionalized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels and then performing the functionalization reaction on the fully formed gel. Osteochondral bovine samples were collected and replicate experiments were conducted to compare the mechanical and tribological performance of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels to non-functionalized hydrogels and native cartilage. Friction experiments displayed a maximum decrease in friction coefficient of 70% for the functionalized hydrogels compared to neat polyvinyl alcohol. Indentation investigated the elastic modulus of the hydrogels, demonstrating that stability of the hydrogel was affected by processing method. Hydrogel performance was within the lower ranges of natural cartilage tested under the exact same conditions, showing the potential of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels to perform as a biomimetic synthetic articular cartilage replacement. © 2013.

  12. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roelof

    PURPOSE: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. METHODS: Explants of porcine

  14. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Methods: Explants of porcine

  15. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    TaqMan probe AAC-CCT-CTT- TTC -GGA-TTA-ACC-CTG-CGA- GTT. Articular cartilage defect model and cell transplanta- tion. All animal experiments were... inhalation mask. The knee joint was exposed by medial parapa- tellar incision, and the trochlear groove was exposed by lateral dislocation of the...least significant difference test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS In vitro MDSC characterization. Flow cytometric analysis

  16. Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage: role of synovial fluid constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tannin A; Gastelum, Nicholas S; Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Schumacher, Barbara L; Sah, Robert L

    2007-03-01

    To determine whether the synovial fluid (SF) constituents hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL) contribute to boundary lubrication, either independently or additively, at an articular cartilage-cartilage interface. Cartilage boundary lubrication tests were performed with fresh bovine osteochondral samples. Tests were performed using graded concentrations of SF, HA, and PRG4 alone, a physiologic concentration of SAPL, and various combinations of HA, PRG4, and SAPL at physiologic concentrations. Static (mu(static, Neq)) and kinetic () friction coefficients were calculated. Normal SF functioned as an effective boundary lubricant both at a concentration of 100% ( = 0.025) and at a 3-fold dilution ( = 0.029). Both HA and PRG4 contributed independently to a low mu in a dose-dependent manner. Values of decreased from approximately 0.24 in phosphate buffered saline to 0.12 in 3,300 mug/ml HA and 0.11 in 450 mug/ml PRG4. HA and PRG4 in combination lowered mu further at the high concentrations, attaining a value of 0.066. SAPL at 200 mug/ml did not significantly lower mu, either independently or in combination with HA and PRG4. The results described here indicate that SF constituents contribute, individually and in combination, both at physiologic and pathophysiologic concentrations, to the boundary lubrication of apposing articular cartilage surfaces. These results provide insight into the nature of the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage by SF and its constituents. They therefore provide insight regarding both the homeostatic maintenance of healthy joints and pathogenic processes in arthritic disease.

  17. Posterior facet cartilage injury in operatively treated intra-articular calcaneus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, David L; Yoo, Brad J

    2014-10-01

    Direct visualization of the posterior facet in displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures (DIACF) frequently shows partial or full thickness cartilage delamination. This is felt to be secondary to the depression of an osteoarticular segment of the posterior facet within the calcaneal body and the subsequent contact with fracture edges as it impacts caudally. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of cartilage injury and if it correlates with fracture classification. A single surgeon prospective, observational series of 28 patients with 28 DIACFs was reviewed for patient demographic and injury data, radiographic fracture characterization, and intraoperative observation of articular injury size, depth, and location over the time period of February 2010 to December 2012. Observations were correlated with the OTA and Sanders classification systems. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, and depth and location of cartilage injury were not significantly different between the 13 OTA/Sanders type 2 and 15 type 3 DIACFs evaluated in this study. Posterior facet articular cartilage delamination was found in 77% of type 2 and 100% of type 3 fractures (P = .09). Location of cartilage injury was common (56%) along the distal, lateral aspect of the posterior facet (P fractures (3.1%) then type 2 (1.3%) (P fractures compared to type 2 fractures. Level IV, prospective, observational series. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Stimulation of the Superficial Zone Protein and Lubrication in the Articular Cartilage by Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ryosuke; McNary, Sean M.; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Lee, Cassandra A.; Van den Bogaerde, James M.; Marder, Richard A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains high concentrations of autologous growth factors that originate from platelets. Intra-articular injections of PRP have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a boundary lubricant in articular cartilage and plays an important role in reducing friction and wear and therefore is critical in cartilage homeostasis. Purpose To determine if PRP influences the production of SZP from human joint-derived cells and to evaluate the lubricating properties of PRP on normal bovine articular cartilage. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cells were isolated from articular cartilage, synovium, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from 12 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. The concentrations of SZP in PRP and culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular proliferation was quantified by determination of cell numbers. The lubrication properties of PRP from healthy volunteers on bovine articular cartilage were investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Results In general, PRP stimulated proliferation in cells derived from articular cartilage, synovium, and ACL. It also significantly enhanced SZP secretion from synovium- and cartilage-derived cells. An unexpected finding was the presence of SZP in PRP (2.89 ± 1.23 µg/mL before activation and 3.02 ± 1.32 µg/mL after activation). In addition, under boundary mode conditions consisting of high loads and low sliding speeds, nonactivated and thrombin-activated PRP decreased the friction coefficient (μ = 0.012 and μ = 0.015, respectively) compared with saline (μ = 0.047, P lubricates bovine articular cartilage explants. Clinical Relevance These findings provide evidence to explain the biochemical and biomechanical mechanisms underlying the efficacy of PRP treatment for osteoarthritis or damage in the knee joint. PMID:25813869

  19. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  20. Conditional knockdown of hyaluronidase 2 in articular cartilage stimulates osteoarthritic progression in a mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoshitoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kozawa, Eiji; Zhuo, Lisheng; Arai, Eisuke; Hamada, Shunsuke; Morita, Daigo; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Kimata, Koji; Ushida, Takahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The catabolism of hyaluronan in articular cartilage remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of hyaluronidase 2 (Hyal2) knockdown in articular cartilage on the development of osteoarthritis (OA) using genetic manipulated mice. Destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) model of Col2a promoter specific conditional Hyal2 knockout (Hyal -/- ) mice was established and examined. Age related and DMM induced alterations of articular cartilage of knee joint were evaluated with modified Mankin score and immunohistochemical staining of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, KIAA11199, and biotinylated- hyaluronan binding protein staining in addition to histomorphometrical analyses. Effects of Hyal2 suppression were also analyzed using explant culture of an IL-1α induced articular cartilage degradation model. The amount and size of hyaluronan in articular cartilage were higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Hyal2 -/- mice exhibited aggravated cartilage degradation in age-related and DMM induced mice. MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 positive chondrocytes were significantly higher in Hyal2 -/- mice. Articular cartilage was more degraded in explant cultures obtained from Hyal2 -/- mice. Knockdown of Hyal2 in articular cartilage induced OA development and progression possibly mediated by an imbalance of HA metabolism. This suggests that Hyal2 knockdown exhibits mucopolysaccharidosis-like OA change in articular cartilage similar to Hyal1 knockdown.

  1. Tribological changes in the articular cartilage of a human femoral head with avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Min; Shrestha, Suman K; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Tae-Woo; Vijayachandra, Ayyappan; Thompson, Mark S; Cho, Myung Guk; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Kwanghoon; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2015-06-29

    The present study evaluated the tribological properties of the articular cartilage surface of the human femoral head with postcollapse stage avascular necrosis (AVN) using atomic force microscopy. The cartilage surface in the postcollapse stage AVN of the femoral head was reported to resemble those of disuse conditions, which suggests that the damage could be reversible and offers the possibilities of success of head-sparing surgeries. By comparing the tribological properties of articular cartilage in AVN with that of osteoarthritis, the authors intended to understand the cartilage degeneration mechanism and reversibility of AVN. Human femoral heads with AVN were explanted from the hip replacement surgery of four patients (60-83 years old). Nine cylindrical cartilage samples (diameter, 5 mm and height, 0.5 mm) were sectioned from the weight-bearing areas of the femoral head with AVN, and the cartilage surface was classified according to the Outerbridge Classification System (AVN0, normal; AVN1, softening and swelling; and AVN2, partial thickness defect and fissuring). Tribological properties including surface roughness and frictional coefficients and histochemistry including Safranin O and lubricin staining were compared among the three groups. The mean surface roughness Rq values of AVN cartilage increased significantly with increasing Outerbridge stages: Rq = 137 ± 26 nm in AVN0, Rq = 274 ± 49 nm in AVN1, and Rq = 452 ± 77 nm in AVN2. Significant differences in Rq were observed among different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p tribological properties, the cartilage degeneration mechanism in AVN was similar to that of osteoarthritis without reversibility.

  2. Susceptibility tensor imaging and tractography of collagen fibrils in the articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongjiang; Gibbs, Eric; Zhao, Peida; Wang, Nian; Cofer, Gary P; Zhang, Yuyao; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the B 0 orientation-dependent magnetic susceptibility of collagen fibrils within the articular cartilage and to determine whether susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) can detect the 3D collagen network within cartilage. Multiecho gradient echo datasets (100-μm isotropic resolution) were acquired from fixed porcine articular cartilage specimens at 9.4 T. The susceptibility tensor was calculated using phase images acquired at 12 or 15 different orientations relative to B 0 . The susceptibility anisotropy of the collagen fibril was quantified and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was compared against STI. 3D tractography was performed to visualize and track the collagen fibrils with DTI and STI. STI experiments showed the distinct and significant anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of collagen fibrils within the articular cartilage. STI can be used to measure and quantify susceptibility anisotropy maps. Furthermore, STI provides orientation information of the underlying collagen network via 3D tractography. The findings of this study demonstrate that STI can characterize the orientation variation of collagen fibrils where diffusion anisotropy fails. We believe that STI could serve as a sensitive and noninvasive marker to study the collagen fibrils microstructure. Magn Reson Med 78:1683-1690, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  4. MRI evaluation of the patellar articular cartilage in patients with subluxation of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Masahiro; Harada, Koushi; Murakami, Takamichi; Kim, Shougen; Fujita, Norihiko; Sakurai, Kousuke; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-01-01

    In patients with subluxation of the patella, injury of the patellar articular cartilage is frequently observed and correct evaluation is important to manage these patients. We examined 11 patients with subluxation of the patella and five normal volunteers. In 12 patellofemoral joints of seven patients with subluxation of the patella, the abnormalities observed on MRI were compared with those on arthroscopy and/or at operation. MRI was performed with a Magnetom 1.5 T (Siemens) using the round surface coil. Pulse sequences were SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms), FLASH(TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg and 40deg), and SE (TR 2000 ms/TE 26, 70 ms). We analysed MR findings of the 12 abnormal joints and 10 normal joints according to the following classification of abnormalities observed on arthroscopy; normal appearance (n=3 joints), softening and fibrillation (n=6), fragmentation (n=3), and erosion to bone (n=0). In only one of the six cases with softening and fibrillation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thickening of patellar articular cartilage, but in all three cases with fragmentation observed on arthroscopy, MRI could visualize the thin inhomogeneous cartilage with irregular surface. The combination of SE (TR 400 ms/TE 19 ms) and FLASH (TR 320 ms/TE 15 ms FA 90deg) are extremely effective pulse sequence to detect the abnormalities of patellar articular cartilage. We conclude that MRI is a useful noninvasive method of detecting advanced changes in patellar articular cartilage. (author)

  5. Hypoxia, RONS and energy metabolism in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermor, B; Gurumurthy, A; Diekman, B O

    2010-09-01

    Increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) occur in osteoarthritis (OA). Oxygen tension can alter the levels of RONS induced by interleukin-1 (IL-1). RONS such as nitric oxide (NO) can alter energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine if oxygen tension alters energy metabolism, in articular cartilage, in response to IL-1 or NO and to determine if cell death occurred. Porcine articular chondrocytes were incubated with IL-1 or the NO donor NOC-18 for 48 h in either 1, 5 or 20% O(2). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were measured and immunoblots for adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were done. Protein translation was measured by S6 activation. Senescence and autophagy were determined by increased caveolin or conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II respectively. One percent O(2) significantly reduced ATP levels compared with 20% O(2). Five percent O(2) significantly increased ATP levels compared with 20% O(2). One percent O(2) significantly increased phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) protein expression compared with 5 or 20% O(2). Oxygen tension had no effects on pS6, caveolin or LC3-II levels. IL-1-induced NO production was significantly reduced with decreased oxygen tension, and significantly reduced ATP levels at all oxygen tensions, but pAMPK was only significantly increased at 5% O(2). IL-1 significantly reduced pS6 at all oxygen tensions. IL-1 had no effects on caveolin and significantly increased LC3-II at 20% O(2) only. NOC-18 significantly reduced ATP levels at all oxygen tensions, and significantly increased pAMPK at 5% O(2) only, and significantly decreased pAMPK at 1% O(2). NOC-18 significantly reduced pS6 at 1% O(2) and significantly increased caveolin at 5% O(2), and LC3-II at 1% O(2). Our data suggest 5% O(2) is optimal for energy metabolism and protective to some effects of IL-1 and NO. NO has the greatest effects on ATP levels and the induction of autophagy at 1% O(2). Copyright 2010

  6. Wear and damage of articular cartilage with friction against orthopedic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Durney, Krista M; Jones, Brian K; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Wear and Damage of Articular Cartilage with Friction Against Orthopaedic Implant Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Durney, Krista M.; Jones, Brian K.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements. PMID:25912663

  8. Optimal Regression Method for Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Evaluation of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Mithilesh; Sarin, Jaakko K; Rieppo, Lassi; Afara, Isaac O; Töyräs, Juha

    2017-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been successful in nondestructive assessment of biological tissue properties, such as stiffness of articular cartilage, and is proposed to be used in clinical arthroscopies. Near-infrared spectroscopic data include absorbance values from a broad wavelength region resulting in a large number of contributing factors. This broad spectrum includes information from potentially noisy variables, which may contribute to errors during regression analysis. We hypothesized that partial least squares regression (PLSR) is an optimal multivariate regression technique and requires application of variable selection methods to further improve the performance of NIR spectroscopy-based prediction of cartilage tissue properties, including instantaneous, equilibrium, and dynamic moduli and cartilage thickness. To test this hypothesis, we conducted for the first time a comparative analysis of multivariate regression techniques, which included principal component regression (PCR), PLSR, ridge regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso), and least squares version of support vector machines (LS-SVM) on NIR spectral data of equine articular cartilage. Additionally, we evaluated the effect of variable selection methods, including Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), variable combination population analysis (VCPA), backward interval PLS (BiPLS), genetic algorithm (GA), and jackknife, on the performance of the optimal regression technique. The PLSR technique was found as an optimal regression tool (R 2 Tissue thickness  = 75.6%, R 2 Dynamic modulus  = 64.9%) for cartilage NIR data; variable selection methods simplified the prediction models enabling the use of lesser number of regression components. However, the improvements in model performance with variable selection methods were found to be statistically insignificant. Thus, the PLSR technique is

  9. Gender differences in knee joint cartilage thickness, volume and articular surface areas: assessment with quantitative three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, S.C.; Reiser, M.; Englmeier, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cartilage thickness, volume, and articular surface areas of the knee joint between young healthy, non-athletic female and male individuals. Subjects and design. MR imaging was performed in 18 healthy subjects without local or systemic joints disease (9 female, age 22.3±2.4 years, and 9 male, age 22.2.±1.9 years), using a fat-suppressed FLASH 3D pulse sequence (TR=41 ms, TE=11 ms, FA=30 ) with sagittal orientation and a spatial resolution of 2x0.31x0.31 mm 3 . After three-dimensional reconstruction and triangulation of the knee joint cartilage plates, the cartilage thickness (mean and maximal), volume, and size of the articular surface area were quantified, independent of the original section orientation. Results and conclusions: Women displayed smaller cartilage volumes than men, the percentage difference ranging from 19.9% in the patella, to 46.6% in the medial tibia. The gender differences of the cartilage thickness were smaller, ranging from 2.0% in the femoral trochlea to 13.3% in the medial tibia for the mean thickness, and from 4.3% in the medial femoral condyle to 18.3% in the medial tibia for the maximal cartilage thickness. The differences between the cartilage surface areas were similar to those of the volumes, with values ranging from 21.0% in the femur to 33.4% in the lateral tibia. Gender differences could be reduced for cartilage volume and surface area when normalized to body weight and body weight x body height. The study demonstrates significant gender differences in cartilage volume and surface area of men and women, which need to be taken into account when retrospectively estimating articular cartilage loss in patients with symptoms of degenerative joint disease. Differences in cartilage volume are primarily due to differences in joint surface areas (epiphyseal bone size), not to differences in cartilage thickness. (orig.)

  10. Correlation of laminated MR apperance of articular cartilage with histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Suh, Jin Suck; Jeong, Eun Kee; Shin, Kyu Ho; Yang, Woo Ick

    1999-01-01

    To determine the correlation of laminae of different signal intensities (SI) of articular cartilage, as seen on magnetic resonance(MR) imaging with histologic layers, using artificially constructed landmarks. For a landmark that can exactly correlate the cartilage specimen with the MR image, five 'V'-shaped markings of different depths were made on the surface of bovine patella. Both T1-weighted (TR/TE : 300/14) and FSE T2-weighted images (TR/TE : 2000/53) were obtained on a 1.5T system with high gradient echo strength (25mT/m) and a voxel size of 78X78X2000μm. Images were obtained with 1) changed frequency-encoding directions on T1-weighted study, and 2) changed readout gradient strength ( X2, X1/2) on T2-weighted sequence. Raw image data were transferred to a workstation and signal intensity profile was generated for each image. 1 : 1 correlation of histologic specimens and MR images was performed. Line profile through the cartilage showed few peaks, suggesting changes in signal intensity profile in the cartilage. On the basis of artificial landmarks, the histologic zone was accurately identified. The histologic tangential and transitional zones correlated with superficial high SI on T1WI, as well as high and low SI on T2WI. On T1WI, the radial zone correlated with a lamina of intermediate SI, and on T2WI, with a lamina for which SI gradually decreased from high to low. Additional well-defined low and intermediate SI bands were noted on bovine T1WI in the lower radial zone. In both T1 and T2 studies, calcified cartilage layers were of low SI. On T1-weighted study, changes in the direction of frequency gradient did not lead to changes in the laminae. The alteration of readout gradient strengths did not result in an inversely proportional difference in the thickness of the laminae. These became more distinct thus ruling out chemical shift and susceptibility artifacts. The laminated appearance of articular cartilage, as seen on spin echo and fast spin-echo MR

  11. Black Colouration of the Knee Articular Cartilage after Spontaneously Recurrent Haemarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazu Matsumoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild discolouration of the articular cartilage is known to gradually occur during aging. However, pathological tissue pigmentation is occasionally induced under several specific conditions. In the present case, we performed total knee replacement in a patient with recurrent haemarthrosis. However, during the operation, we observed severe black colouration of the knee articular cartilage, due to the deposition of hemosiderin and lipofuscin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe cartilage pigmentation, due to hemosiderin and lipofuscin deposition in articular cartilage.

  12. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  13. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r 2  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  15. Fractional calculus model of articular cartilage based on experimental stress-relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, P. A.; Green, I.

    2015-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a unique substance that protects joints from damage and wear. Many decades of research have led to detailed biphasic and triphasic models for the intricate structure and behavior of cartilage. However, the models contain many assumptions on boundary conditions, permeability, viscosity, model size, loading, etc., that complicate the description of cartilage. For impact studies or biomimetic applications, cartilage can be studied phenomenologically to reduce modeling complexity. This work reports experimental results on the stress-relaxation of equine articular cartilage in unconfined loading. The response is described by a fractional calculus viscoelastic model, which gives storage and loss moduli as functions of frequency, rendering multiple advantages: (1) the fractional calculus model is robust, meaning that fewer constants are needed to accurately capture a wide spectrum of viscoelastic behavior compared to other viscoelastic models (e.g., Prony series), (2) in the special case where the fractional derivative is 1/2, it is shown that there is a straightforward time-domain representation, (3) the eigenvalue problem is simplified in subsequent dynamic studies, and (4) cartilage stress-relaxation can be described with as few as three constants, giving an advantage for large-scale dynamic studies that account for joint motion or impact. Moreover, the resulting storage and loss moduli can quantify healthy, damaged, or cultured cartilage, as well as artificial joints. The proposed characterization is suited for high-level analysis of multiphase materials, where the separate contribution of each phase is not desired. Potential uses of this analysis include biomimetic dampers and bearings, or artificial joints where the effective stiffness and damping are fundamental parameters.

  16. Articular Cartilage Thickness Measured with US is Not as Easy as It Appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Bartels, E. M.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage ismeasured under orthogonal...

  17. POSSIBILITIES OF CURRENT CELLULAR TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR (ANALYTICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bozhokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a wide variety of surgical procedures utilized in clinical practice for treatment of articular cartilage lesions, the search for other options of articular reconstruction remains a relevant and open issue at the current stage of medicine and biotechnologies development. The recent years demonstrated a strong belief in cellular methods of hyaline cartilage repair such as implantation of autologous chondrocytes (ACI or cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC including techniques for genetic modification of cells.The purpose of presented review is to summarize the published scientific data on up to date results of perspective cellular technologies for articular cartilage repair that are being developed. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation originally performed by Swedish researchers in 1987 is considered the first clinically applied technique for restoration of hyaline cartilage using cellular technologies. However, the transplanted cell culture featured low proliferative capacity and inability to form a regenerate resistant to high physical activity. Another generation of methods originated at the turn of the century utilized mesenchymal stem cells instead of autologous chondrocytes. Preparation of MSCs is a less invasive procedure compared to chondrocytes harvesting and the culture is featured by a higher proliferative ability. Researchers use various biodegradable carriers (matrices to secure cell fixation. Despite good clinical mid-term outcomes the transplanted tissue-engineering structures deteriorate with time due to cellular de-differentiation. Next generation of techniques being currently under pre-clinical studies is featured by the preliminary chondrogenic modification of transplanted cell culture. Usage of various growth factors, modified cell product and gene-activated matrices allow to gain a stable regulatory and key proteins synthesis and achieve a focused influence on regenerate's chondrogenic proliferation and in result

  18. A homeostatic function of CXCR2 signalling in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Joanna; Bertrand, Jessica; Nalesso, Giovanna; Poulet, Blandine; Pitsillides, Andrew; Brandolini, Laura; Karystinou, Alexandra; De Bari, Cosimo; Luyten, Frank P; Pitzalis, Costantino; Pap, Thomas; Dell'Accio, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    ELR+ CXC chemokines are heparin-binding cytokines signalling through the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. ELR+ CXC chemokines have been associated with inflammatory arthritis due to their capacity to attract inflammatory cells. Here, we describe an unsuspected physiological function of these molecules in articular cartilage homeostasis. Chemokine receptors and ligands were detected by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and RT-PCR. Osteoarthritis was induced in wild-type and CXCR2(-/-) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). CXCR1/2 signalling was inhibited in vitro using blocking antibodies or siRNA. Chondrocyte phenotype was analysed using Alcian blue staining, RT-PCR and western blotting. AKT phosphorylation and SOX9 expression were upregulated using constitutively active AKT or SOX9 plasmids. Apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. CXCL6 was expressed in healthy cartilage and was retained through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans. CXCR2(-/-) mice developed more severe osteoarthritis than wild types following DMM, with increased chondrocyte apoptosis. Disruption of CXCR1/2 in human and CXCR2 signalling in mouse chondrocytes led to a decrease in extracellular matrix production, reduced expression of chondrocyte differentiation markers and increased chondrocyte apoptosis. CXCR2-dependent chondrocyte homeostasis was mediated by AKT signalling since forced expression of constitutively active AKT rescued the expression of phenotypic markers and the apoptosis induced by CXCR2 blockade. Our study demonstrates an important physiological role for CXCR1/2 signalling in maintaining cartilage homeostasis and suggests that the loss of ELR+ CXC chemokines during cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis contributes to the characteristic loss of chondrocyte phenotypic stability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  19. C2K77 ELISA detects cleavage of type II collagen by cathepsin K in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, B; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Beauchamp, G; Laverty, S

    2017-12-01

    Develop a species-specific ELISA for a neo-epitope generated by cathepsin K cleavage of equine type II collagen to: (1) measure cartilage type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K in vitro, (2) identify cytokines that upregulate cathepsin K expression and (3) compare cathepsin K with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) collagenase activity in stimulated cartilage explants and freshly isolated normal and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilages. A new ELISA (C2K77) was developed and tested by measuring the activity of exogenous cathepsin K on equine articular cartilage explants. The ELISA was then employed to measure endogenous cathepsin K activity in cultured cartilage explants with or without stimulation by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-α), oncostatin M (OSM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cathepsin K activity in cartilage explants (control and osteoarthritic-OA) and freshly harvested cartilage (control and OA) was compared to that of MMPs employing C2K77 and C1,2C immunoassays. The addition of Cathepsin K to normal cartilage caused a significant increase (P K77 epitope release. Whereas the content of C1,2C, that reflects MMP collagenase activity, was increased in media by the addition to cartilage explants of TNF-α and OSM (P K77 which also unchanged in OA cartilages compared to normal. The ELISA C2K77 measured the activity of cathepsin K in equine cartilage which was unchanged in OA cartilage. Cytokines that upregulate MMP collagenase activity had no effect on endogenous cathepsin K activity, suggesting a different activation mechanism that requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  1. Semi-automated International Cartilage Repair Society scoring of equine articular cartilage lesions in optical coherence tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Moller, N C R; Pitkänen, M; Sarin, J K; Väänänen, S; Liukkonen, J; Afara, I O; Puhakka, P H; Brommer, H; Niemelä, T; Tulamo, R-M; Argüelles Capilla, D; Töyräs, J

    2017-07-01

    Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising tool for the detailed evaluation of articular cartilage injuries. However, OCT-based articular cartilage scoring still relies on the operator's visual estimation. To test the hypothesis that semi-automated International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scoring of chondral lesions seen in OCT images could enhance intra- and interobserver agreement of scoring and its accuracy. Validation study using equine cadaver tissue. Osteochondral samples (n = 99) were prepared from 18 equine metacarpophalangeal joints and imaged using OCT. Custom-made software was developed for semi-automated ICRS scoring of cartilage lesions on OCT images. Scoring was performed visually and semi-automatically by five observers, and levels of inter- and intraobserver agreement were calculated. Subsequently, OCT-based scores were compared with ICRS scores based on light microscopy images of the histological sections of matching locations (n = 82). When semi-automated scoring of the OCT images was performed by multiple observers, mean levels of intraobserver and interobserver agreement were higher than those achieved with visual OCT scoring (83% vs. 77% and 74% vs. 33%, respectively). Histology-based scores from matching regions of interest agreed better with visual OCT-based scoring than with semi-automated OCT scoring; however, the accuracy of the software was improved by optimising the threshold combinations used to determine the ICRS score. Images were obtained from cadavers. Semi-automated scoring software improved the reproducibility of ICRS scoring of chondral lesions in OCT images and made scoring less observer-dependent. The image analysis and segmentation techniques adopted in this study warrant further optimisation to achieve better accuracy with semi-automated ICRS scoring. In addition, studies on in vivo applications are required. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Transport phenomena in articular cartilage cryopreservation as predicted by the modified triphasic model and the effect of natural inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-03-21

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and viscoelasticity of articular cartilage in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T; Watanabe, A; Nitta, N; Numano, T; Fukushi, M; Niitsu, M

    2012-09-01

    Quantitative MR imaging techniques of degenerative cartilage have been reported as useful indicators of degenerative changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, which consists of proteoglycans, collagen, non-collagenous proteins, and water. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping of cartilage has been shown to correlate mainly with the water content of the cartilage. As the water content of the cartilage in turn correlates with its viscoelasticity, which directly affects the mechanical strength of articular cartilage, ADC can serve as a potentially useful indicator of the mechanical strength of cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between ADC and viscoelasticity as measured by indentation testing. Fresh porcine knee joints (n = 20, age 6 months) were obtained from a local abattoir. ADC of porcine knee cartilage was measured using a 3-Tesla MRI. Indentation testing was performed on an electromechanical precision-controlled system, and viscosity coefficient and relaxation time were measured as additional indicators of the viscoelasticity of cartilage. The relationship between ADC and viscosity coefficient as well as that between ADC and relaxation time were assessed. ADC was correlated with relaxation time and viscosity coefficient (R(2) = 0.75 and 0.69, respectively, p viscoelasticity in the superficial articular cartilage. Both molecular diffusion and viscoelasticity were higher in weight bearing than non-weight-bearing articular cartilage areas.

  4. Chronic changes in the articular cartilage and meniscus following traumatic impact to the lapine knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M; Button, Keith D; Coatney, Garrett A; Fajardo, Ryan S; Leikert, Kevin M; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal damage, via a single tibiofemoral compressive impact, in order to document articular cartilage and meniscal changes post-impact. Tibiofemoral joints of Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single blunt impact that ruptured the ACL and produced acute meniscal damage. Animals were allowed unrestricted cage activity for 12 weeks before euthanasia. India ink analysis of the articular cartilage revealed higher degrees of surface damage on the impacted tibias (p=0.018) and femurs (ppermeability (p=0.054), 40.8% increase in femoral condyle permeability (p=0.029), and 20.1% decrease in femoral condyle matrix modulus (p=0.012) in impacted joints compared to controls. Both instantaneous and equilibrium moduli of the lateral and medial menisci were decreased compared to control (p<0.02). Histological analyses revealed significantly increased presence of fissures in the medial femur (p=0.036). In both meniscus and cartilage there was a significant decrease in GAG coverage for the impacted limbs. Based on these results it is clear that an unattended combined meniscal and ACL injury results in significant changes to the soft tissues in this experimental joint 12 weeks post-injury. Such changes are consistent with a clinical description of mid to late stage PTOA of the knee. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of immobilization on thickness of superficial zone of articular cartilage of patella in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Each segment of superficial zone behaves differentially on immobilization and remobilization. Perhaps a much longer duration of remobilization is required to reverse changes of immobilization in articular cartilage and plays a significant role in knee joint movements.

  6. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  7. Effect of glutaraldehyde fixation on the frictional response of immature bovine articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Hehir, Kristin E; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E; Marinescu, Anca G; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-02-07

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60% glutaraldehyde for 24h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28d at 37°C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28d. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60% groups, so 0.20% was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20% glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28d at body temperature. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The role of the superficial region in determining the dynamic properties of articular cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    KELLY, DANIEL JOHN; GANNON, ALANNA

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of the superficial region of articular cartilage in determining the dynamic properties of the tissue. It is hypothesised that removal of the superficial region will influence both the flow dependent and independent properties of articular cartilage, leading to a reduction in the dynamic modulus of the tissue. METHODS: Osteochondral cores from the femoropatellar groove of three porcine knee joints were sub...

  9. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures.

  10. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  11. Spatial regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in postnatal articular and growth plate cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Presley; Yue, Shanna; Hanson, Jeffrey; Baron, Jeffrey; Lui, Julian C.

    2017-01-01

    Articular and growth plate cartilage both arise from condensations of mesenchymal cells, but ultimately develop important histological and functional differences. Each is composed of three layers—the superficial, mid and deep zones of articular cartilage and the resting, proliferative and hypertrophic zones of growth plate cartilage. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) system plays an important role in cartilage development. A gradient in expression of BMP-related genes has been observed across growth plate cartilage, likely playing a role in zonal differentiation. To investigate the presence of a similar expression gradient in articular cartilage, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to separate murine growth plate and articular cartilage from the proximal tibia into their six constituent zones, and used a solution hybridization assay with color-coded probes (nCounter) to quantify mRNAs for 30 different BMP-related genes in each zone. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were then used to confirm spatial expression patterns. Expression gradients for Bmp2 and 6 were observed across growth plate cartilage with highest expression in hypertrophic zone. However, intracellular BMP signaling, assessed by phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining, appeared to be higher in the proliferative zone and prehypertrophic area than in hypertrophic zone, possibly due to high expression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad, in the hypertrophic zone. We also found BMP expression gradients across the articular cartilage with BMP agonists primarily expressed in the superficial zone and BMP functional antagonists primarily expressed in the deep zone. Phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining showed a similar gradient. In combination with previous evidence that BMPs regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, the current findings suggest that BMP signaling gradients exist across both growth plate and articular cartilage and that these gradients may

  12. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  13. Articular Cartilage Aging-Potential Regenerative Capacities of Cell Manipulation and Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Krajewska-Włodarczyk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in articular cartilage during the aging process are a stage of natural changes in the human body. Old age is the major risk factor for osteoarthritis but the disease does not have to be an inevitable consequence of aging. Chondrocytes are particularly prone to developing age-related changes. Changes in articular cartilage that take place in the course of aging include the acquisition of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype by chondrocytes, a decrease in the sensitivity of chondrocytes to growth factors, a destructive effect of chronic production of reactive oxygen species and the accumulation of the glycation end products. All of these factors affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms in the process of articular cartilage aging may help to create new therapies aimed at slowing or inhibiting age-related modifications of articular cartilage. This paper presents the causes and consequences of cellular aging of chondrocytes and the biological therapeutic outlook for the regeneration of age-related changes of articular cartilage.

  14. Rehabilitation after Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee in the Football (Soccer) Player

    OpenAIRE

    Hambly, Karen; Silvers, Holly Jacinda; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND\\ud \\ud Participation in football can put both male and female players at an increased risk for knee osteoarthritis. There is a higher prevalence of focal chondral defects in the knee of athletes compared to nonathletes. The management of chondral defects in the football player is complex and multifactorial.\\ud \\ud OBJECTIVE\\ud \\ud The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current strategies for rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair of the knee in the football...

  15. Using Costal Chondrocytes to Engineer Articular Cartilage with Applications of Passive Axial Compression and Bioactive Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Le W; Sullan, Gurdeep K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2018-03-01

    Generating neocartilage with suitable mechanical integrity from a cell source that can circumvent chondrocyte scarcity is indispensable for articular cartilage regeneration strategies. Costal chondrocytes of the rib eliminate donor site morbidity in the articular joint, but it remains unclear how neocartilage formed from these cells responds to mechanical loading, especially if the intent is to use it in a load-bearing joint. In a series of three experiments, this study sought to determine efficacious parameters of passive axial compressive stimulation that would enable costal chondrocytes to synthesize mechanically robust cartilage. Experiment 1 determined a suitable time window for stimulation by its application during either the matrix synthesis phase, the maturation phase, or during both phases of the self-assembling process. The results showed that compressive stimulation at either time was effective in increasing instantaneous moduli by 92% and 87% in the synthesis and maturation phases, respectively. Compressive stimulation during both phases did not further improve properties beyond a one-time stimulation. The magnitude of passive axial compression was examined in Experiment 2 by applying 0, 3.3, 5.0, or 6.7 kPa stresses to the neocartilage. Unlike 6.7 kPa, both 3.3 and 5.0 kPa significantly increased neocartilage compressive properties by 42% and 48% over untreated controls, respectively. Experiment 3 examined how the passive axial compression regimen developed from the previous phases interacted with a bioactive regimen (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, chondroitinase ABC, and lysyl oxidase-like 2). Passive axial compression significantly improved the relaxation modulus compared with bioactive treatment alone. Furthermore, a combined treatment of compressive and bioactive stimulation improved the tensile properties of neocartilage 2.6-fold compared with untreated control. The ability to create robust articular cartilage from passaged costal

  16. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. MR imaging of canine osteoarthritis shows sustained hypertrophic repair of articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Albrecht, M.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports MR imaging used to evaluate cartilage abnormalities in three dogs in which the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of one hind limb had been transected to produce osteoarthritis. In this model changes mirror those in human osteoarthritis, but they are not progressive after a few months. The authors performed serial plain radiography and MR imaging of the osteoarthritic knee and control knee 3 years after ACL transection. Coronal T1- weighted images and sagittal multiecho and field echo summed images were obtained. Radiographs showed osteophytes, geodes, and subchondral sclerosis of the operated knees, with no progression between 2 and 3 years. Contralateral knees were normal. On MR images in each case there was indistinctness and thickening of articular cartilage in the abnormal knee compared with the contralateral knee

  18. Clinical potential and challenges of using genetically modified cells for articular cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects do not regenerate. Transplantation of autologous articular chondrocytes, which is clinically being performed since several decades, laid the foundation for the transplantation of genetically modified cells, which may serve the dual role of providing a cell population capable of chondrogenesis and an additional stimulus for targeted articular cartilage repair. Experimental data generated so far have shown that genetically modified articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) allow for sustained transgene expression when transplanted into articular cartilage defects in vivo. Overexpression of therapeutic factors enhances the structural features of the cartilaginous repair tissue. Combined overexpression of genes with complementary mechanisms of action is also feasible, holding promises for further enhancement of articular cartilage repair. Significant benefits have been also observed in preclinical animal models that are, in principle, more appropriate to the clinical situation. Finally, there is convincing proof of concept based on a phase I clinical gene therapy study in which transduced fibroblasts were injected into the metacarpophalangeal joints of patients without adverse events. To realize the full clinical potential of this approach, issues that need to be addressed include its safety, the choice of the ideal gene vector system allowing for a long-term transgene expression, the identification of the optimal therapeutic gene(s), the transplantation without or with supportive biomaterials, and the establishment of the optimal dose of modified cells. As safe techniques for generating genetically engineered articular chondrocytes and MSCs are available, they may eventually represent new avenues for improved cell-based therapies for articular cartilage repair. This, in turn, may provide an important step toward the unanswered question of articular cartilage regeneration. PMID:21674822

  19. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis of Immature Articular Cartilage following Ischemic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Piglets.

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    Naga Suresh Adapala

    Full Text Available Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH in piglets results in an ischemic injury to the immature articular cartilage. The molecular changes in the articular cartilage in response to ONFH have not been investigated using a transcriptomic approach. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to identify genes that are upregulated in the immature articular cartilage following ONFH.ONFH was induced in the right femoral head of 6-week old piglets. The unoperated femoral head was used as the normal control. At 24 hours (acute ischemic-hypoxic injury, 2 weeks (avascular necrosis in the femoral head and 4 weeks (early repair after surgery (n = 4 piglets/time point, RNA was isolated from the articular cartilage of the femoral head. A microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip Array. An enrichment analysis and functional clustering of the genes upregulated due to ONFH were performed using DAVID and STRING software, respectively. The increased expression of selected genes was confirmed by a real-time qRTPCR analysis.Induction of ONFH resulted in the upregulation of 383 genes at 24 hours, 122 genes at 2 weeks and 124 genes at 4 weeks compared to the normal controls. At 24 hours, the genes involved in oxidoreductive, cell-survival, and angiogenic responses were significantly enriched among the upregulated genes. These genes were involved in HIF-1, PI3K-Akt, and MAPK signaling pathways. At 2 weeks, secretory and signaling proteins involved in angiogenic and inflammatory responses, PI3K-Akt and matrix-remodeling pathways were significantly enriched. At 4 weeks, genes that represent inflammatory cytokines and chemokine signaling pathways were significantly enriched. Several index genes (genes that are upregulated at more than one time point following ONFH and are known to be important in various biological processes including HIF-1A, VEGFA, IL-6, IL6R, IL-8, CCL2, FGF2, TGFB2, MMP1, MMP3, ITGA

  20. Traumatic humeral articular cartilage shear (THACS) lesion in a professional rugby player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, I-H; Wallace, W A

    2004-08-01

    A 20 year old male professional rugby player was seen at the clinic for evaluation of shoulder pain after rugby play. Magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive subchondral bone bruising of the humeral head with defect of the articular cartilage. Arthroscopy showed that the inferior half of the humeral head had extensive articular cartilage loss with nearly 70% of the inferior head having lost its cartilage. Sports medicine doctors should be aware that the shoulder joint in young competitive athletes playing contact sports may be exposed to greater risk of this kind of injury.

  1. Evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Mikihiro

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is important in the clinical diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration. Glycosaminoglycan provides a large number of fixed negative charges. When manganese ion (Mn 2+ ) is administered to the cartilage matrix, this cation diffuses into the matrix and accumulates in accordance with the distribution of fixed negative charges owing to the electrostatic interaction. The accumulation of Mn 2+ causes a shortening of the relaxation times, resulting in high signal intensity in the MR image, when a T 1 -weighted image is obtained. The present study applied this new method to the articular cartilage to evaluate the degree of the cartilage degeneration. Small pieces of articular cartilage were dissected from the knee joints of young chickens. Experimentally degenerated articular cartilage was obtained by treating the specimen with various concentrations of papain solution. Then specimens were soaked in manganese solution until they obtained equilibrium and served for MR microimaging. The fixed charge density (FCD), the concentration of Mn 2+ and Na + , T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were also measured. In degenerated cartilage, lower accumulation of Mn 2+ due to lower GAG density caused a lower than normal signal intensity. Thus, administration of Mn 2+ enhances the biochemical change in the cartilage matrix in terms of differences in the relaxation time. The actual signal intensity on MRI of each specimen corresponded to the theoretical signal intensity, which was calculated from the FCD. It was concluded that MR images taken with contrast enhancement by Mn 2+ give direct visual information about the GAG density in the articular cartilage. MRI with cationic contrast agent could develop into a new method for early non-invasive diagnosis of cartilage dysfunction and degeneration. (author)

  2. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrogenic lineages for articular cartilage treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Lach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increases in the number of articular cartilage injuries caused by environmental factors or pathological conditions have led to a notable rise in the incidence of premature osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, considered a disease of civilization, is the leading cause of disability. At present, standard methods for treating damaged articular cartilage, including autologous chondrocyte implantation or microfracture, are short-term solutions with important side effects. Emerging treatments include the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, a technique that could provide a new tool for treatment of joint damage. However, research in this area is still early, and no optimal protocol for transforming induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrocytes has yet been established. Developments in our understanding of cartilage developmental biology, together with the use of modern technologies in the field of tissue engineering, provide an opportunity to create a complete functional model of articular cartilage.

  3. Quantitative assessment of murine articular cartilage and bone using X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Murine models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA research can provide important insights for understanding RA pathogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of novel treatments. However, simultaneously imaging both murine articular cartilage and subchondral bone using conventional techniques is challenging because of low spatial resolution and poor soft tissue contrast. X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI is a new technique that offers high spatial resolution for the visualisation of cartilage and skeletal tissues. The purpose of this study was to utilise XPCI to observe articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA murine model and quantitatively assess changes in the joint microstructure. XPCI was performed on the two treatment groups (the control group and CIA group, n = 9 per group to monitor the progression of damage to the femur from the knee joint in a longitudinal study (at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after primary injection. For quantitative assessment, morphologic parameters were measured in three-dimensional (3D images using appropriate image analysis software. Our results showed that the average femoral cartilage volume, surface area and thickness were significantly decreased (P<0.05 in the CIA group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, these decreases were accompanied by obvious destruction of the surface of subchondral bone and a loss of trabecular bone in the CIA group. This study confirms that XPCI technology has the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate microstructural changes in mouse joints. This technique has the potential to become a routine analysis method for accurately monitoring joint damage and comprehensively assessing treatment efficacy.

  4. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  5. [Tribological assessment of articular cartilage. A system for the analysis of the friction coefficient of cartilage, regenerates and tissue engineering constructs; initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, M L R; Schneider-Wald, B; Krase, A; Richter, W; Reisig, G; Kreinest, M; Heute, S; Pott, P P; Brade, J; Schütte, A

    2012-10-01

    Values for the friction coefficient of articular cartilage are given in ranges of percentage and lower and are calculated as a quotient of the friction force and the perpendicular loading force acting on it. Thus, a sophisticated system has to be provided for analysing the friction coefficient under different conditions in particular when cartilage should be coupled as friction partner. It is possible to deep-freeze articular cartilage before measuring the friction coefficient as the procedure has no influence on the results. The presented tribological system was able to distinguish between altered and native cartilage. Furthermore, tissue engineered constructs for cartilage repair were differentiated from native cartilage probes by their friction coefficient. In conclusion a tribological equipment is presented to analyze the friction coefficient of articular cartilage, in vivo generated cartilage regenerates and in vitro tissue engineered constructs regarding their biomechanical properties for quality assessment.

  6. The bio in the ink : cartilage regeneration with bioprintable hydrogels and articular cartilage-derived progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levato, Riccardo; Webb, William R; Otto, Iris A; Mensinga, Anneloes; Zhang, Yadan; van Rijen, Mattie; van Weeren, P. René; Khan, Ilyas M.; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels are the primary building blocks for bioprinting, and, also termed bioinks, are the foundations for creating structures that can potentially recapitulate the architecture of articular cartilage. To be functional, hydrogel constructs need to unlock the regenerative capacity of

  7. Biomechanical properties of articular cartilage as a standard for biologically integrated interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierlbeck, J; Hammer, J; Englert, C; Reuben, R L

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage integration has been described in in-vitro models, which compare mechanical to biochemical behaviour and histological analysis, respectively. The emphasis of these findings is mainly on the biochemical and histological analysis, rather than on the mechanical performance. The complex in vitro loading conditions and high deviations in the mechanical results due to the biological variance, make interpretations difficult. The aim of this study is to analyse and define the mechanical stress and strain distribution in a single lap configuration by means of an optical strain measurement system. Supportive finite element computation is performed to indicate the heterogeneous stress strain distribution in the integration area. The optical failure analysis of the experiment reveals crack propagation through the integration area comparable to plane shear in fracture mode two. Using the optical strain measurement set up a direct estimation of the shear modulus is achievable by analysing the relative displacement within the bonded joint before the onset of delamination in the adhesive layer. This result lead to a better interpretation of the mechanical behaviour of articular cartilage integration in vitro.

  8. The distribution of YKL-40 in osteoarthritic and normal human articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Ostergaard, K; Johansen, J S

    1999-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39, is a major secretory protein of human chondrocytes in cell culture. YKL-40 mRNA is expressed by cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but is not detectable in normal human cartilage. The aim was to investigate the distribution of YKL......-40 in osteoarthritic (n=9) and macroscopically normal (n=5) human articular cartilage, collected from 12 pre-selected areas of the femoral head, to discover a potential role for YKL-40 in cartilage remodelling in osteoarthritis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that YKL-40 staining was found...... staining for YKL-40 was in general low in normal cartilage. The present findings, together with previous observations, suggests that YKL-40 may be of importance in cartilage remodelling/degradation of osteoarthritic joints....

  9. MR evaluation of the articular cartilage of the femoral head during traction. Correlation with resected femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Tanaka, H.; Narumi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Nishii, T.; Masuhara, K.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose was to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint with MR during traction and compare the findings with the resected specimen or arthroscopic findings. Material and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers, 5 patients with osteonecrosis, 5 with acetabular dysplasia, and 5 with advanced osteoarthrosis underwent MR imaging to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint. Coronal fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were obtained during traction. Identical imaging was performed of all the resected femoral heads of the osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis patients, and was correlated with the macroscopic pathological findings. Results: The traction was effective and the femoral articular cartilage was clearly identified in all 8 control subjects, and in all cases of osteonecrosis and acetabular dysplasia. In 4 cases of osteonecrosis, chondral fracture was identified in the boundary between the necrosis and the normal area. In all cases of advanced osteoarthrosis, cartilage was identified only at the medial side. The MR images of osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis corresponded well with the MR images of the resected femoral heads and the macroscopic findings. (orig.)

  10. Articular cartilage lesions of the knee. MRI of tibial condylar fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki

    1995-01-01

    Lesions of the articular cartilage are rarely observed in convensional radiography and CT, and may be one of the most important prognostic factors in assessing traumatic or degenerative disorders at the knee joints. To discuss the usefulness of MRI for detecting cartilage lesions, knees with tibial condylar fractures were examined with MRI. 47 patients with tibial condylar fractures were reviewed 4 months to 15 years (average of 4 years) after the fractures. Good to excellent results were obtained in 91.5% of them. It is known that anatomical reduction of conventional radiography is not consistent with the clinical outcome, because radiography can show the changes of bones only. However, the results of MRI examinations are consistent with the clinical outcome, because they can directly show the state of the articular surface, such as defects of cartilage in the joint. In my study, no abnormality of well repaired joint surfaces employing MRI were observed in the patients with excellent or good results, and various degrees of cartilage lesions were detected using MRI in the other patients. MRI is a useful method for noninvasively determining the integrity of articular cartilage, detecting cartilage lesions and degenerative disorders of tibial condyle, and also may be useful in studying and following the natural aging process in osteoarthritis following intra-articular fractures. (author) 52 refs

  11. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

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    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  12. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Explants of porcine cartilage and human osteoarthritic cartilage were cultured for four weeks and subjected to daily LIPUS or PEMF treatments. At one, two, three and four weeks follow-up explants were prepared for histological assessment or gene expression (porcine only). Non-treated porcine explants showed signs of atrophy of the superficial zone starting at one week. Treated explants did not. In LIPUS-treated explants cell clusters were observed. In PEMF-treated explants more hypertrophic-like changes were observed at later follow up. Newly synthesized tissue was present in treated explants. Gene expression profiles did indicate differences between the two methods. Both methods reduced expression of the aggrecan and collagen type II gene compared to the control. LIPUS treatment of human cartilage samples resulted in a reduction of degeneration according to Mankin scoring. PEMF treatment did not. LIPUS or PEMF prevented degenerative changes in pig knee cartilage explants. LIPUS reduced degeneration in human cartilage samples. LIPUS treatment seems to have more potency in the treatment of osteoarthritis than PEMF treatment.

  14. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  15. Autoradiographic evidence of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin binding sites in the articular cartilage of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castano, M.T.; Freire-Garabal, M.; Giraldez, M.; Nunez, M.J.; Belmonte, A.; Couceiro, J.; Jorge, J. (Univ. of Santiago (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    After {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin was intravenously injected to rats, an autoradiographic study of distal femur articular cartilage was performed. Results show a specific binding of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin to chondrocytes, suggesting the possible existence of an opiate modulation of articular cartilage.

  16. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  17. Optical characterization of porcine articular cartilage using a polarimetry technique with differential Mueller matrix formulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Lo, Yu-Lung; Tran, Nghia-Khanh; Chang, Yu-Jen

    2018-03-20

    A method is proposed for characterizing the optical properties of articular cartilage sliced from a pig's thighbone using a Stokes-Mueller polarimetry technique. The principal axis angle, phase retardance, optical rotation angle, circular diattenuation, diattenuation axis angle, linear diattenuation, and depolarization index properties of the cartilage sample are all decoupled in the proposed analytical model. Consequently, the accuracy and robustness of the extracted results are improved. The glucose concentration, collagen distribution, and scattering properties of samples from various depths of the articular cartilage are systematically explored via an inspection of the related parameters. The results show that the glucose concentration and scattering effect are both enhanced in the superficial region of the cartilage. By contrast, the collagen density increases with an increasing sample depth.

  18. [Basophilic line of the articular cartilage in normal and various pathological states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, L R

    1987-04-01

    Epiphyses of long tubular bones in the man and animals of various age, as well as experimental material of the adjuvant arthritis, with special reference to the basal part of the articular cartilage have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and histometrical methods. The structural-chemical organization of the basophilic line (tidemark) of the articular cartilage ensures its barrier role and participation in regulating selective permeability. Reconstruction of the tidemark in the process of physiological ageing and in cases of the articular pathology is aimed to preserve its integrity and in this way a complete differentiation of the noncalcified and calcified structures is secured. Disturbance of the basophilic line results in changes of the articular selective permeability, in invasion of vessels and structural elements of the bone marrow, and in development of profound distrophic and destructive changes of the cartilage--in deforming artrosis. Deflations in the structural-chemical organization of the tidemark indicate certain disturbances in the state of the system articular cartilage--subchondral bone. These data can be of prognostic importance.

  19. Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D; Shen, W

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of domestic chicken collagen type II (CCII) on rat osteoarthritis (OA) and analyze concomitant changes in the level of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-9, Cathepsin K and their mRNA as well as the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 mRNA in articular cartilage of osteoarthritic rats. Osteoarthritis models were surgically induced. Morphology of articular cartilage was done by haematoxylin and eosin staining and Mankin score was calculated, immunohistochemistry of MMP-13, MMP-9 and Cathepsin K was done by ABC method while the mRNA level for MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as TIMP-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR method. Oral administration of CCII reduced the morphological changes of osteoarthritic cartilage (shown by Mankin score), decreased levels of MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as their mRNA in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic rats while it exhibited no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA. Oral CCII reduced articular cartilage degradation of osteoarthritic rats and may probably be a potent drug candidate for OA treatment.

  20. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  1. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amilton M; Herlofsen, Sarah R; Karlsen, Tommy A; Küchler, Axel M; Fløisand, Yngvar; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin), ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  2. Electromechanical response of articular cartilage in indentation--considerations on the determination of cartilage properties during arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L P; Herzog, W

    2005-04-01

    A finite element formulation of streaming potentials in articular cartilage was incorporated into a fibril-reinforced model using the commercial software ABAQUS. This model was subsequently used to simulate interactions between an arthroscopic probe and articular cartilage in a knee joint. Fibril reinforcement was found to account for large fluid pressure at considerable strain rates, as has been observed in un-confined compression. Furthermore, specific electromechanical responses were associated with specific changes in tissue properties that occur with cartilage degeneration. For example, the strong strain-rate dependence of the load response was only observed when the collagen network was intact. Therefore, it is possible to use data measured during arthroscopy to evaluate the degree of cartilage degeneration and the source causing changed properties. However, practical problems, such as the difficulty of controlling the speed of the hand-held probe, may greatly reduce the reliability of such evaluations. The fibril-reinforced electromechanical model revealed that high-speed transient responses were associated with the collagen network, and equilibrium response was primarily determined by proteoglycan matrix. The results presented here may be useful in the application of arthroscopic tools for evaluating cartilage degeneration, for the proper interpretation of data, and for the optimization of data collection during arthroscopy.

  3. BMP receptor signaling is required for postnatal maintenance of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan B Rountree

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage plays an essential role in health and mobility, but is frequently damaged or lost in millions of people that develop arthritis. The molecular mechanisms that create and maintain this thin layer of cartilage that covers the surface of bones in joint regions are poorly understood, in part because tools to manipulate gene expression specifically in this tissue have not been available. Here we use regulatory information from the mouse Gdf5 gene (a bone morphogenetic protein [BMP] family member to develop new mouse lines that can be used to either activate or inactivate genes specifically in developing joints. Expression of Cre recombinase from Gdf5 bacterial artificial chromosome clones leads to specific activation or inactivation of floxed target genes in developing joints, including early joint interzones, adult articular cartilage, and the joint capsule. We have used this system to test the role of BMP receptor signaling in joint development. Mice with null mutations in Bmpr1a are known to die early in embryogenesis with multiple defects. However, combining a floxed Bmpr1a allele with the Gdf5-Cre driver bypasses this embryonic lethality, and leads to birth and postnatal development of mice missing the Bmpr1a gene in articular regions. Most joints in the body form normally in the absence of Bmpr1a receptor function. However, articular cartilage within the joints gradually wears away in receptor-deficient mice after birth in a process resembling human osteoarthritis. Gdf5-Cre mice provide a general system that can be used to test the role of genes in articular regions. BMP receptor signaling is required not only for early development and creation of multiple tissues, but also for ongoing maintenance of articular cartilage after birth. Genetic variation in the strength of BMP receptor signaling may be an important risk factor in human osteoarthritis, and treatments that mimic or augment BMP receptor signaling should be

  4. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  5. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P

    2011-01-01

    and interaction partners are still likely to be discovered. Our focus in this study was to characterize a novel cartilage specific gene that was identified in mouse limb cartilage during embryonic development. METHODS: Open access bioinformatics tools were used to characterize the gene, predicted protein...... subgroups. Cartilage specific expression was highest in proliferating and prehypertrophic zones during development, and in adult articular cartilage, expression was restricted to the uncalcified zone, including chondrocyte clusters in human osteoarthritic cartilage. Studies with experimental chondrogenesis...... and orthologs in vertebrate species. Immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression methodology were used to study tissue specific expression. Fracture callus and limb bud micromass culture were utilized to study the effects of BMP-2 during experimental chondrogenesis. Fusion protein with C-terminal HA...

  6. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Developed Using Porcine Articular Cartilage and In Vitro Feasibility Study of Porcine Articular Cartilage as an Anti-Adhesive Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Baek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined whether porcine articular cartilage (PAC is a suitable and effective anti-adhesive material. PAC, which contained no non-collagenous tissue components, was collected by mechanical manipulation and decellularization of porcine knee cartilage. The PAC film for use as an anti-adhesive barrier was easily shaped into various sizes using homemade silicone molds. The PAC film was cross-linked to study the usefulness of the anti-adhesive barrier shape. The cross-linked PAC (Cx-PAC film showed more stable physical properties over extended periods compared to uncross-linked PAC (UnCx-PAC film. To control the mechanical properties, Cx-PAC film was thermally treated at 45 °C or 65 °C followed by incubation at room temperature. The Cx-PAC films exhibited varying enthalpies, ultimate tensile strength values, and contact angles before and after thermal treatment and after incubation at room temperature. Next, to examine the anti-adhesive properties, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were cultured on Cx-PAC and thermal-treated Cx-PAC films. Scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence, and MTT assays showed that HUVECs were well adhered to the surface of the plate and proliferated, indicating no inhibition of the attachment and proliferation of HUVECs. In contrast, Cx-PAC and thermal-treated Cx-PAC exhibited little and/or no cell attachment and proliferation because of the inhibition effect on HUVECs. In conclusion, we successfully developed a Cx-PAC film with controllable mechanical properties that can be used as an anti-adhesive barrier.

  7. Development of biochemical heterogeneity of articular cartilage: Influences of age and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; Tekoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document the development of biochemical heterogeneity from birth to maturity in equine articular cartilage, and to test the hypothesis that the amount of exercise during early life may influence this process. Neonatal foals showed no biochemical heterogeneity

  8. Cycloolefin-Copolymer/Polyethylene (COC/PE) Blend Assists with the Creation of New Articular Cartilage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrtýl, M.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Hulejová, H.; Polanská, M.; Lísal, J.; Danešová, J.; Černý, P.

    294-I, - (2010), s. 120-132 ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/06/0761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : articular cartilage * biomaterials * cycloolefin-copolymer blend Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Porous polymers for repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented here were initiated to answer a variety of questions concerning firstly the repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and, secondly, the repair of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage. AIMS OF THE STUDIES I To assess the effect of implantation of a porous

  10. Presence and mechanism of knee articular cartilage degeneration after meniscal reconstruction in dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T. van; Heijkants, R.G.J.C.; Groot, J.H. de; Pennings, A.J.; Poole, A.R.; Veth, R.P.H.; Buma, P.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Partial meniscectomy is the golden standard for treating a bucket-handle tear in the meniscus of the knee, but it inevitably leads to articular cartilage degeneration. Surgical creation of an access channel between the lesion and the vascularized synovial lining is intended to induce

  11. Presence and mechanism of knee articular cartilage degeneration after meniscal reconstruction in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienen, TG; Heijkants, RGJC; de Groot, JH; Pennings, AJ; Poole, AR; Veth, RPH; Buma, P

    Objective: Partial meniscectomy is the golden standard for treating a bucket-handle tear in the meniscus of the knee, but it inevitably leads to articular cartilage degeneration. Surgical creation of an access channel between the lesion and the vascularized synovial lining is intended to induce

  12. The role of type X collagen in facilitating and regulating endochondral ossification of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G

    2005-02-01

    AUTHOR: Shen G Objective -This review was compiled to explore the role of type X collagen in growth, development and remodeling of articular cartilage by elucidating the linkage between the synthesis of this protein and the phenotypic changes in chondrogenesis and the onset of endochondral ossification. The current studies closely dedicated to elucidating the role of type X collagen incorporating into chondrogenesis and endochondral ossification of articular cartilage were assessed and analyzed to allow for obtaining the mainstream consensus on the bio-molecular mechanism with which type X collagen functions in articular cartilage. There are spatial and temporal correlations between synthesis of type X collagen and occurrence of endochondral ossification. The expression of type X collagen is confined within hypertrophic condrocytes and precedes the embark of endochondral bone formation. Type X collagen facilitates endochondral ossification by regulating matrix mineralization and compartmentalizing matrix components. Type X collagen is a reliable marker for new bone formation in articular cartilage. The future clinical application of this collagen in inducing or mediating endochondral ossification is perceived, e.g. the fracture healing of synovial joints and adaptive remodeling of madibular condyle.

  13. Mechanical properties of the collagen network in human articular cartilage as measured by osmotic stress technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basser, P.J.; Schneiderman, R.; Bank, R.A.; Wachtel, E.; Maroudas, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have used an isotropic osmotic stress technique to assess the swelling pressures of human articular cartilage over a wide range of hydrations in order to determine from these measurements, for the first time, the tensile stress in the collagen network, P(c), as a function of hydration. Osmotic

  14. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Degroot, J.; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R. A.; Thorpe, S. R.; Baynes, J. W.; Bayliss, M. T.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Lafeber, F. P.; TeKoppele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  15. Physical properties of rabbit articular cartilage after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, R L; Yang, A S; Chen, A C; Hant, J J; Halili, R B; Yoshioka, M; Amiel, D; Coutts, R D

    1997-03-01

    The effect of unilateral transection of the anterior cruciate ligament on the confined compression and swelling properties of the distal femoral articular cartilage of skeletally mature rabbits at 9 weeks after surgery was determined. Gross morphological grading of the transected and contralateral control distal femora stained with India ink confirmed that cartilage degeneration had been induced by ligament transection. Osteochondral cores, 1.8 mm in diameter, were harvested from the medial femoral condyles. The modulus, permeability, and electrokinetic (streaming potential) coefficient of the articular cartilage of the osteochondral cores were assessed by confined compression creep experiments. The properties (mean +/- SD) of control cartilage were: confined compression modulus, 0.75 +/- 0.28 MPa; hydraulic permeability, 0.63 +/- 0.28 x 10(-15) m2/Pa*sec; and electrokinetic coefficient, 0.16 +/- 0.31 x 10(-9) V/Pa. In transected knees, the modulus was reduced by 18% (p = 0.04), while the permeability and electrokinetic coefficient were not detectably altered. The change in modulus was accompanied by a trend (p = 0.07) toward a decrease (-11%) in the glycosaminoglycan density within the tissue, a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the water content of the cartilage after equilibration in 1 x phosphate buffered saline from 70.3 +/- 4.1% in control knees to 75.2 +/- 4.0% in transected knees, and little further swelling after tissue equilibration in hypotonic saline. The compressive modulus of the cartilage from both control and transected knees was positively correlated with the density of tissue glycosaminoglycan. The alterations in the physical properties of the articular cartilage after transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rabbit show trends similar to those observed in human and other animal models of osteoarthritis and provide further support for the use of this model in the study of cartilage degeneration.

  16. Reinforcement of articular cartilage with a tissue-interpenetrating polymer network reduces friction and modulates interstitial fluid load support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B G; Lawson, T B; Snyder, B D; Grinstaff, M W

    2017-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased articular cartilage hydraulic permeability and decreased maintenance of high interstitial fluid load support (IFLS) during articulation, resulting in increased friction on the cartilage solid matrix. This study assesses frictional response following in situ synthesis of an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) designed to mimic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) depleted during OA. Cylindrical osteochondral explants containing various interpenetrating polymer concentrations were subjected to a torsional friction test under unconfined creep compression. Time-varying coefficient of friction, compressive engineering strain, and normalized strain values (ε/ε eq ) were calculated and analyzed. The polymer network reduced friction coefficient over the duration of the friction test, with statistically significantly reduced friction coefficients (95% confidence interval 14-34% reduced) at equilibrium compressive strain upon completion of the test (P = 0.015). A positive trend was observed relating polymer network concentration with magnitude of friction reduction compared to non-treated tissue. The cartilage-interpenetrating polymer treatment improves lubrication by augmenting the biphasic tissue's interstitial fluid phase, and additionally improves the friction dissipation of the tissue's solid matrix. This technique demonstrates potential as a therapy to augment tribological function of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Interstitial Fluid Pressurization in Articular Cartilage Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been reported in the field of cartilage mechanics that impacts our understanding of the role of interstitial fluid pressurization on cartilage lubrication. Theoretical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the interstitial fluid of cartilage pressurizes considerably under loading, potentially supporting most of the applied load under various transient or steady-state conditions. The fraction of the total load supported by fluid pressurization has been called the fluid load support. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the friction coefficient of cartilage correlates negatively with this variable, achieving remarkably low values when the fluid load support is greatest. A theoretical framework that embodies this relationship has been validated against experiments, predicting and explaining various outcomes, and demonstrating that a low friction coefficient can be maintained for prolonged loading durations under normal physiological function. This paper reviews salient aspects of this topic, as well as its implications for improving our understanding of boundary lubrication by molecular species in synovial fluid and the cartilage superficial zone. Effects of cartilage degeneration on its frictional response are also reviewed. PMID:19464689

  18. Comparison of MRI T2 Relaxation Changes of Knee Articular Cartilage before and after Running between Young and Old Amateur Athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Jeon, Chan Hong; Lee, Eun Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyun Joo [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Dai [Dept. of Statistics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To compare changes in T2 relaxation on magnetic resonance (MR) images of knee articular cartilage in younger and older amateur athletes before and after running. By using a 3.0-T MR imager, quantitative T2 maps of weight-bearing femoral and tibial articular cartilages in 10 younger and 10 older amateur athletes were acquired before, immediately after, and 2 hours after 30 minutes of running. Changes in global cartilage T2 signals of the medial and lateral condyles of the femur and tibia and regional cartilage T2 signals in the medial condyles of femoral and tibia in response to exercise were compared between the two age groups. Changes in global cartilage T2 values after running did not differ significantly between the age groups. In terms of the depth variation, relatively higher T2 values in the older group than in the younger group were observed mainly in the superficial layers of the femoral and tibial cartilage (p < 0.05). Age-related cartilage changes may occur mainly in the superficial layer of cartilage where collagen matrix degeneration is primarily initiated. However, no trend is observed regarding a global T2 changes between the younger and older age groups in response to exercise.

  19. Identification of stable normalization genes for quantitative real-time PCR in porcine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Ryan S; Ashwell, Melissa S; O'Nan, Audrey T; Mente, Peter L

    2012-11-12

    Expression levels for genes of interest must be normalized with an appropriate reference, or housekeeping gene, to make accurate comparisons of quantitative real-time PCR results. The purpose of this study was to identify the most stable housekeeping genes in porcine articular cartilage subjected to a mechanical injury from a panel of 10 candidate genes. Ten candidate housekeeping genes were evaluated in three different treatment groups of mechanically impacted porcine articular cartilage. The genes evaluated were: beta actin, beta-2-microglobulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hydroxymethylbilane synthase, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase, peptidylprolyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A), ribosomal protein L4, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein subunit A, TATA box binding protein, and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein-zeta polypeptide. The stability of the genes was measured using geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder software. The four most stable genes measured via geNorm were (most to least stable) succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A, peptidylprolyl isomerase A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta actin; the four most stable genes measured via BestKeeper were glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peptidylprolyl isomerase A, beta actin, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A; and the four most stable genes measured via NormFinder were peptidylprolyl isomerase A, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein, subunit A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta actin. BestKeeper, geNorm, and NormFinder all generated similar results for the most stable genes in porcine articular cartilage. The use of these appropriate reference genes will facilitate accurate gene expression studies of porcine articular cartilage and suggest appropriate housekeeping genes for articular cartilage studies in other species.

  20. Coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Muneta, Takeshi; Ojima, Miyoko; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2016-05-31

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease, little has been reported regarding the cooperative interaction among these factors on cartilage metabolism. Here we examined the synergistic effect of ovariectomy (OVX) and excessive mechanical stress (forced running) on articular cartilage homeostasis in a mouse model resembling a human postmenopausal condition. Mice were randomly divided into four groups, I: Sham, II: OVX, III: Sham and forced running (60 km in 6 weeks), and IV: OVX and forced running. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the degeneration of articular cartilage and synovitis in the knee joint. Morphological changes of subchondral bone were analyzed by micro-CT. Micro-CT analyses showed significant loss of metaphyseal trabecular bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) after OVX as described previously. Forced running increased the trabecular BV/TV in all mice. In the epiphyseal region, no visible alteration in bone morphology or osteophyte formation was observed in any of the four groups. Histological analysis revealed that OVX or forced running respectively had subtle effects on cartilage degeneration. However, the combination of OVX and forced running synergistically enhanced synovitis and articular cartilage degeneration. Although morphological changes in chondrocytes were observed during OA initiation, no signs of bone marrow edema were observed in any of the four experimental groups. We report the coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration. Since no surgical procedure was performed on the knee joint directly in this model, this model is useful in addressing the molecular pathogenesis of naturally occurring OA.

  1. Viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage attached to subchondral bone at high frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Duncan ET

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is a viscoelastic material, but its exact behaviour under the full range of physiological loading frequencies is unknown. The objective of this study was to measure the viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage at loading frequencies of up to 92 Hz. Methods Intact tibial plateau cartilage, attached to subchondral bone, was investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. A sinusoidally varying compressive force of between 16 N and 36 N, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 92 Hz, was applied to the cartilage surface by a flat indenter. The storage modulus, loss modulus and phase angle (between the applied force and the deformation induced were determined. Results The storage modulus, E', increased with increasing frequency, but at higher frequencies it tended towards a constant value. Its dependence on frequency, f, could be represented by, E' = Aloge (f + B where A = 2.5 ± 0.6 MPa and B = 50.1 ± 12.5 MPa (mean ± standard error. The values of the loss modulus (4.8 ± 1.0 MPa mean ± standard deviation were much less than the values of storage modulus and showed no dependence on frequency. The phase angle was found to be non-zero for all frequencies tested (4.9 ± 0.6°. Conclusion Articular cartilage is viscoelastic throughout the full range of frequencies investigated. The behaviour has implications for mechanical damage to articular cartilage and the onset of osteoarthritis. Storage modulus increases with frequency, until the plateau region is reached, and has a higher value than loss modulus. Furthermore, loss modulus does not increase with loading frequency. This means that more energy is stored by the tissue than is dissipated and that this effect is greater at higher frequencies. The main mechanism for this excess energy to be dissipated is by the formation of cracks.

  2. Effective lubrication of articular cartilage by an amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavinato, Antonella; Whiteside, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid based therapies is gaining popularity as a treatment option for non-operative management of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis. Although there is an abundance of evidence for both biological and mechanical mechanisms of joint protection by hyaluronic acid, one clear intention of viscosupplementation is to reduce friction and wear by providing an extrinsic lubricant. We tested the in vitro friction response of a novel hyaluronic acid derivative that presents amphiphilic features to promote adhesion to the cartilage surface and thereby improve cartilage lubrication. Migrating Contact Area and Static Contact Area friction tests were conducted on bovine articular cartilage to assess the efficacy of two lubricants, a chemically modified amphiphilic hyaluronic acid and synovial fluid from a healthy joint, as well as a phosphate buffered saline negative control. No differences in lubrication (P=0.34) were evident between the three test articles during the Migrating Contact Area test, which represents articulation of healthy articular cartilage. The modified hyaluronic acid presented an equilibrium friction coefficient 2.8 times less than that of the synovial fluid (P ≤ 0.0005) and five times less than that of the PBS control (P ≤ 0.0001) during the Static Contact Area test, representing a mixed lubrication condition. The present study demonstrated that a chemically modified amphiphilic hyaluronic acid can provide equivalent lubrication to synovial fluid during articulation of loaded healthy articular cartilage and can provide superior lubrication as indicated by a lower coefficient of friction than synovial fluid under loading conditions potentially associated with cartilage wear. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New perspectives for articular cartilage repair treatment through tissue engineering: A contemporary review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Leonardi, Rosalia; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Giunta, Angelo; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper review we describe benefits and disadvantages of the established methods of cartilage regeneration that seem to have a better long-term effectiveness. We illustrated the anatomical aspect of the knee joint cartilage, the current state of cartilage tissue engineering, through mesenchymal stem cells and biomaterials, and in conclusion we provide a short overview on the rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair procedures. Adult articular cartilage has low capacity to repair itself, and thus even minor injuries may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. Numerous efforts have been made to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, and to date several researchers aim to implement clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords, examining the current literature on the well-known tissue engineering methods for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24829869

  4. Load distribution of articular cartilage from MR-images by neural nets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, P.; Hanke, G.; Gruender, W.

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural nets were used to determine the Young's modulus and spatial load distribution in articular cartilage by means of T2-weighted MR imaging. MR images were obtained in vitro (ex vivo?) from the joints of sheep of different ages (3 months, 9 months, 15 months, 1.5 years, 5 years, 5.5 years) and pigs (4 and 6 months) with a Bruker AMX 300 (7 T) spectrometer equipped with a micro-imaging unit. The knee of a 29-year-old male volunteer was studied in vivo under mechanical load using a clinical Siemens Vision MRT (1.5 T). The load of the cartilage is understood as a non-linear image transformation of loaded versus unloaded images. The artificial neural net was used to recognize given reference pixels of the unloaded cartilage within the image of the loaded cartilage. The Young's modulus was calculated from the local strain and the external pressure using the Hooke's law. With this method, the average Young's modulus was obtained in relationship to the biological age of the cartilage. The investigated age interval showed a progressive increase of 0.5 ± 0.3 MPa per year. These results are consistent with published results. As shown in this pilot study, the method of neural nets allows the visualization of the spatial load distribution within the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  5. Postnatal administration of 2-oxoglutaric acid improves articular and growth plate cartilages and bone tissue morphology in pigs prenatally treated with dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, E; Dobrowolski, P; Wydrych, J

    2012-10-01

    The potential effects of prenatal administration of dexamethasone (DEX) and postnatal treatment with 2-oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox) on postnatal development of connective tissue of farm animals were not examined experimentally. The aim of this study was to establish changes in morphological parameters of bone and articular and growth plate cartilages damaged by the prenatal action of DEX in piglets supplemented with 2-Ox. The 3 mg of DEX was administered by intramuscular route every second day from day 70 of pregnancy to parturition and then piglets were supplemented with 2-Ox during 35 days of postnatal life (0.4 g/kg body weight). The mechanical properties, BMD and BMC of bones, and histomorphometry of articular and growth plate cartilages were determined. Maternal treatment with DEX decreased the weight by 48%, BMD by 50% and BMC by 61% of the tibia in male piglets while such action of DEX in female piglets was not observed. DEX led to thinning of articular and growth plate cartilages and trabeculae thickness and reduced the serum GH concentration in male piglets. The administration of 2-Ox prevented the reduction of trabeculae thickness, the width of articular and growth plate cartilages in male piglets connected with higher growth hormone concentration compared with non-supplemented male piglets. The result showed that the presence of 2-Ox in the diet had a positive effect on the development of connective tissue in pigs during suckling and induced a complete recovery from bone and cartilage damage caused by prenatal DEX action.

  6. Short-term consolidation of articular cartilage in the long-term context of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, David W

    2015-03-07

    Over ten percent of the population are afflicted by osteoarthritis, a chronic disease of diarthrodial joints such as the knees and hips, costing hundreds of billions of dollars every year. In this condition, the thin layers of articular cartilage on the bones degrade and weaken over years, causing pain, stiffness and eventual immobility. The biggest controllable risk factor is long-term mechanical overloading of the cartilage, but the disparity in time scales makes this process a challenge to model: loading events can take place every second, whereas degradation occurs over many months. Therefore, a suitable model must be sufficiently simple to permit evaluation over long periods of variable loading, yet must deliver results sufficiently accurate to be of clinical use, conditions unmet by existing models. To address this gap, we construct a two-component poroelastic model endowed with a new flow restricting boundary condition, which better represents the joint space environment compared to the typical free-flow condition. Under both static and cyclic loading, we explore the rate of gradual consolidation of the medium. In the static case, we analytically characterise the duration of consolidation, which governs the duration of effective fluid-assisted lubrication. In the oscillatory case, we identify a region of persistent strain oscillations in otherwise consolidated tissue, and derive estimates of its depth and magnitude. Finally, we link the two cases through the concept of an equivalent static stress, and discuss how our results help explain the inexorable cartilage degeneration of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen in rat knee joint: histopathologic assessment of cartilage & synovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Aycan Guner; Akyol, Onat; Ekici, Murat; Sitilci, Tolga; Topacoglu, Hakan; Ozyuvaci, Emine

    2014-08-01

    Effective pain control following outpatient surgical procedures is an important aspect of patient discharge. This study was carried out with an aim to investigate the histopathological effects of intra-articular dexketoprofen trometamol injection in knee joint on synovium and cartilage in an experimental rat model. In each of 40 rats, the right knee was designated as the study group and the left knee as the control group (NS group). Under aseptic conditions, 35 rats received an injection of 0.25 ml (6.25 mg) dexketoprofen trometamol into the right knee joint and an injection of 0.25 ml 0.9 per cent normal saline solution into the left knee joint. On the 1st, 2nd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days after intra-articular injection, rats in specified groups were sacrificed by intraperitoneal injection of 120 mg/kg sodium thiopental. Knee joints were separated and sectioned for histopathological examination. Inflammatory changes in the joints were recorded according to a grade scale. No significant difference in terms of pathological changes both in synovium and cartilage was observed between the NS group and the study group on days 1, 2, 7, 14 and 21 after intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen or saline in the knee joint. The findings showed no evidence of significant histopathological damage to the cartilage and synovia for a period up to 21 days following intra-articular administration of dexketoprofen trometamol in the knee joints of rats.

  8. Increasing lateral tibial slope: is there an association with articular cartilage changes in the knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nasir; Shepel, Michael; Leswick, David A.; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, and College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The geometry of the lateral tibial slope (LTS) plays an important role in the overall biomechanics of the knee. Through this study, we aim to assess the impact of LTS on cartilage degeneration in the knee. A retrospective analysis of 93 knee MRI scans (1.5 T or 3 T) for patients aged 20-45 years with no history of trauma or knee surgery, and absence of internal derangement. The LTS was calculated using the circle method. Chondropathy was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). Linear regression analysis was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). In our cohort of patients, a statistically significant association was seen between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patellar articular surface and the lateral tibial articular surface (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening chondropathy of the lateral patellar, medial trochlea, lateral trochlea, medial femoral, lateral femoral, and medial tibial articular surfaces. Our results show a statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patella and the lateral tibial plateau. We speculate that increased LTS may result in increased femoral glide over the lateral tibial plateau with subsequent increased external rotation of the femur predisposing to patellofemoral articular changes. Future arthroscopic studies are needed to further confirm our findings. (orig.)

  9. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  10. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  11. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke

    2015-01-01

    treated with one of the following: Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI), microfracture (MFx), autologous-dual-tissue transplantation (ADTT), autologous bone graft, autologous cartilage chips. Empty chondral and osteochondral defects were used as controls. MRI and CT were performed 3...

  12. Strain-rate-dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanizadeh, Sahand; Li, LePing

    2015-11-01

    The tensile properties of articular cartilage play an important role in the compressive behavior and integrity of the tissue. The stress-strain relationship of cartilage in compression was observed previously to depend on the strain-rate. This strain-rate dependence has been thought to originate mainly from fluid pressurization. However, it was not clear to what extent the tensile properties of cartilage contribute to the strain-rate dependence in compressive behavior of cartilage. The aim of the present study was to quantify the strain-rate dependent stress-strain relationship and hysteresis of articular cartilage in tension. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to examine the strain-rate dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of bovine knee cartilage. Tensile specimens were oriented in the fiber direction indicated by the India ink method. Seven strain-rates were used in the measurement ranging from 0.1 to 80%/s, which corresponded to nearly static to impact joint loadings. The experimental data showed substantial strain-rate and strain-magnitude dependent load response: for a given strain-magnitude, the tensile stress could vary by a factor of 1.95 while the modulus by a factor of 1.58 with strain-rate; for a given strain-rate, the modulus at 15% strain could be over four times the initial modulus at no strain. The energy loss in cartilage tension upon unloading exhibited a complex variation with the strain-rate. The strain-rate dependence of cartilage in tension observed from the present study is relatively weaker than that in compression observed previously, but is considerable to contribute to the strain-rate dependent load response in compression.

  13. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution. Copyright 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society

  14. Progression of Gene Expression Changes following a Mechanical Injury to Articular Cartilage as a Model of Early Stage Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, R. S.; Ashwell, M. S.; Maltecca, C.; O'Nan, A. T.; Mente, P. L.

    2014-01-01

    An impact injury model of early stage osteoarthritis (OA) progression was developed using a mechanical insult to an articular cartilage surface to evaluate differential gene expression changes over time and treatment. Porcine patellae with intact cartilage surfaces were randomized to one of three treatments: nonimpacted control, axial impaction (2000 N), or a shear impaction (500 N axial, with tangential displacement to induce shear forces). After impact, the patellae were returned to culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. At the appropriate time point, RNA was extracted from full-thickness cartilage slices at the impact site. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate differential gene expression for 18 OA related genes from four categories: cartilage matrix, degradative enzymes and inhibitors, inflammatory response and signaling, and cell apoptosis. The shear impacted specimens were compared to the axial impacted specimens and showed that shear specimens more highly expressed type I collagen (Col1a1) at the early time points. In addition, there was generally elevated expression of degradative enzymes, inflammatory response genes, and apoptosis markers at the early time points. These changes suggest that the more physiologically relevant shear loading may initially be more damaging to the cartilage and induces more repair efforts after loading. PMID:25478225

  15. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of articular cartilage in painful knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digish Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the role of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with atraumatic knee pain. Background and Objectives: Knee pain is one of the most common problems faced by people from time immemorial. There is a wide range of disease ranging from traumatic to degenerative causing knee pain in which articular cartilage is involved. Over the past 15 years, MRI has become the premier, first-line imaging study that should be performed in the evaluation of the painful knee in particular in tears of menisci, cruciate and collateral ligaments, osteochondral abnormalities (chondromalacia, osteoarthritis and osteochondral defects, synovial cysts and bone bruises. MRI, by virtue of its superior soft-tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation and multiplanar capabilities, is superior to more conventional techniques for the evaluation of articular cartilage. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 150 patients in the Department of Radio-diagnosis, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pimpri, Pune over a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013. Patients having fracture or dislocations of the knee joint were also excluded from the study. Detailed clinical history, physical and systemic examination findings of all patients were noted in addition to the laboratory investigations. All patients were subjected to radiograph of knee anterior-posterior and lateral view. MRI was performed with Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto machine. Results: In our study of 150 patients with knee pain, articular cartilage defect was found in 90 patients (60%. Out of 90 patients with articular cartilage defect, 30 patients (20% had full thickness cartilage defects. Subchondral marrow edema was seen beneath 30 patients (20% with articular cartilage defects. 32 patients (21.1% had a complex or macerated meniscal tear. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear was found in seven

  16. Combination of optical coherence tomography and near infrared spectroscopy enhances determination of articular cartilage composition and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarin, Jaakko K; Rieppo, Lassi; Brommer, Harold; Afara, Isaac O.; Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Conventional arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage is subjective and poorly reproducible. Therefore, implementation of quantitative diagnostic techniques, such as near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), is essential. Locations (n = 44) with various

  17. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesper, Tobias; Hosalkar, Harish S; Bittersohl, Daniela; Welsch, Götz H; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation-without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented.

  18. The Effect of Aging and Mechanical Loading on the Metabolism of Articular Cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Adam El Mongy; Kjaer, Michael; Heinemeier, Katja Maria

    2017-01-01

    , with the literature search made on PubMed using appropriate keywords regarding AC, age, and mechanical loading. Results. Following skeletal maturation, chondrocyte numbers decline while increasing senescence occurs. Lower cartilage turnover causes diminished maintenance capacity, which produces accumulation......Objective. The morphology of articular cartilage (AC) enables painless movement. Aging and mechanical loading are believed to influence development of osteoarthritis (OA), yet the connection remains unclear. Methods. This narrative review describes the current knowledge regarding this area...... of fibrillar crosslinks by advanced glycation end products, resulting in increased stiffness and thereby destruction susceptibility. Conclusion. Mechanical loading changes proteoglycan content. Moderate mechanical loading causes hypertrophy and reduced mechanical loading causes atrophy. Overloading produces...

  19. The effect og aging and mechanical loading on the metabolism og articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Adam El Mongy; Kjær, Michael; Heinemeier, Katja Maria

    2017-01-01

    , with the literature search made on PubMed using appropriate keywords regarding AC, age, and mechanical loading. Results. Following skeletal maturation, chondrocyte numbers decline while increasing senescence occurs. Lower cartilage turnover causes diminished maintenance capacity, which produces accumulation......Objective. The morphology of articular cartilage (AC) enables painless movement. Aging and mechanical loading are believed to influence development of osteoarthritis (OA), yet the connection remains unclear. Methods. This narrative review describes the current knowledge regarding this area...... of fibrillar crosslinks by advanced glycation end products, resulting in increased stiffness and thereby destruction susceptibility. Conclusion. Mechanical loading changes proteoglycan content. Moderate mechanical loading causes hypertrophy and reduced mechanical loading causes atrophy. Overloading produces...

  20. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site

    OpenAIRE

    M Doube; EC Firth; A Boyde; AJ Bushby

    2010-01-01

    Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site tha...

  1. Aberrant Calreticulin Expression in Articular Cartilage of Dio2 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bomer

    Full Text Available To identify intrinsic differences in cartilage gene expression profiles between wild-type- and Dio2-/--mice, as a mechanism to investigate factors that contribute to prolonged healthy tissue homeostasis.Previously generated microarray-data (Illumina MouseWG-6 v2 of knee cartilage of wild-type and Dio2 -/- -mice were re-analyzed to identify differential expressed genes independent of mechanical loading conditions by forced treadmill-running. RT-qPCR and western blot analyses of overexpression and knockdown of Calr in mouse chondro-progenitor cells (ATDC5 were applied to assess the direct effect of differential Calr expression on cartilage deposition.Differential expression analyses of articular cartilage of Dio2-/- (N = 9 and wild-type-mice (N = 11 while applying a cutoff threshold (P |1,5| resulted in 1 probe located in Calreticulin (Calr that was found significantly downregulated in Dio2-/- mice (FC = -1.731; P = 0.044. Furthermore, overexpression of Calr during early chondrogenesis in ATDC5 cells leads to decreased proteoglycan deposition and corresponding lower Aggrecan expression, whereas knocking down Calr expression does not lead to histological differences of matrix composition.We here demonstrate that the beneficial homeostatic state of articular cartilage in Dio2-/- mice is accompanied with significant lower expression of Calr. Functional analyses further showed that upregulation of Calr expression could act as an initiator of cartilage destruction. The consistent association between Calr and Dio2 expression suggests that enhanced expression of these genes facilitate detrimental effects on cartilage integrity.

  2. Multiscale Mechanics of Articular Cartilage: Potentials and Challenges of Coupling Musculoskeletal, Joint, and Microscale Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, J. P.; Sibole, S.; van Donkelaar, C. C.; van Turnhout, M. C.; Oomens, C. W. J.; Weiss, J. A.; Guilak, F.; Erdemir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage experiences significant mechanical loads during daily activities. Healthy cartilage provides the capacity for load bearing and regulates the mechanobiological processes for tissue development, maintenance, and repair. Experimental studies at multiple scales have provided a fundamental understanding of macroscopic mechanical function, evaluation of the micromechanical environment of chondrocytes, and the foundations for mechanobiological response. In addition, computational models of cartilage have offered a concise description of experimental data at many spatial levels under healthy and diseased conditions, and have served to generate hypotheses for the mechanical and biological function. Further, modeling and simulation provides a platform for predictive risk assessment, management of dysfunction, as well as a means to relate multiple spatial scales. Simulation-based investigation of cartilage comes with many challenges including both the computational burden and often insufficient availability of data for model development and validation. This review outlines recent modeling and simulation approaches to understand cartilage function from a mechanical systems perspective, and illustrates pathways to associate mechanics with biological function. Computational representations at single scales are provided from the body down to the microstructure, along with attempts to explore multiscale mechanisms of load sharing that dictate the mechanical environment of the cartilage and chondrocytes. PMID:22648577

  3. Kinematic biomechanical assessment of human articular cartilage transplants in the knee using 3-T MRI: an in vivo reproducibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Millington, Steven [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of kinematic MR imaging with respect to changes in T{sub 2} in the femoral condyle articular cartilage. We used a flexible knee coil, which allows acquisition of data in different positions from 40 flexion to full extension during MR examinations. The reproducibility of T{sub 2} measurements was evaluated for inter-rater and inter-individual variability and determined as a coefficient of variation (CV) for each volunteer and rater. Three different volunteers were measured twice and regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by three raters at different time points. To prove the clinical feasibility of this method, 20 subjects (10 patients and 10 age- and sex-matched volunteers) were enrolled in the study. Inter-rater variability ranged from 2 to 9 and from 2 to 10% in the deep and superficial zones, respectively. Mean inter-individual variability was 7% for both zones. Different T{sub 2} values were observed in the superficial cartilage zone of patients compared with volunteers. Since repair tissue showed a different behavior in the contact zone compared with healthy cartilage, a possible marker for improved evaluation of repair tissue quality after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) may be available and may allow biomechanical assessment of cartilage transplants. (orig.)

  4. FUNCTIONS OF THE mTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN NORMAL ARTICULAR CARTILAGE CHONDROCYTES AND IN OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Chetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis  (OA is a chronic disease associated with pain, stiffness, limited mobility and joint inflammation, as well as articular cartilage destruction.  Recent studies have shown the importance  of chondrocyte  differentiation (hypertrophy as one of the mechanisms  of cartilage degradation in OA. This suggests that chondrocyte  metabolism undergoes the profound changes during cartilage resorption,  which are due to dysregulation of cell function. One of the major cellular metabolic regulators is the protein mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin that controls cell growth, proliferation, protein biosynthesis and integrates extracellular signals from growth factors and hormones with amino acid availability and intracellular energy status. The importance  of mTOR activity for articular cartilage destruction  in OAis confirmed by significant changes in the work of mTOR regulatory network that involves multiple intracellular (growth factors, adenosine triphosphate, oxygen availability, and autophagy and extracellular (glucose, amino acids, lipids, and hexosamine signals. Moreover, the altered expression of the mTOR gene in the blood of patients with OA is associated with either increased pain or synovitis, which indicates that there is a strong metabolic heterogeneity in patients with OA and a need for a differentiated therapeutic  approach. The above problems are discussed in this review.

  5. A functional effect of the superficial mechanical properties of articular cartilage as a load bearing system in a sliding condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sakai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and composition of articular cartilage show depth-wise inhomogeneity and anisotropy. In particular, the dense collagen network covers and reinforces the superficial tangential zone of the tissue. It is thought that this peculiar structure offers the excellent tribological property of articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functionality of the superficial tangential zone (STZ of articular cartilage as a load bearing system. The 2-dimensional finite element (FE model was accepted for sliding configuration with sufficient extent of sliding distance. The standard model as a control was carried from our previous study, which included depth-dependent Young׳s modulus of the solid phase, fiber reinforcement with strain-dependency and permeability with compaction effect. The mechanical property of the superficial layer was modified for a parametric study of its functionality. According to research results in the past, the tangential stiffness of the fiber reinforcement of the STZ model was enhanced, and the following anisotropic permeability was also modified. The stationary contact condition and the migrating contact condition were examined to compare the effect of the superficial tangential layer. The result showed that the significant reduction of friction coefficient was found in migrating contact condition of the STZ model. In the observation of field output of FE analysis, the contacting surface formed a thin low permeability layer, which would enable the high fluid pressure and the low fluid flow at the same time. It seemed that the stiffening of the fiber reinforcement of the superficial layer promoted the formation of the low permeability layer. Beyond the effectivity of the fiber reinforcement of biphasic matrix on the interstitial fluid pressurization, the findings of this study indicated that the compaction effect on the permeability would involve a quite complex phenomenon in long term migrating

  6. Contribution of proteoglycan osmotic swelling pressure to the compressive properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, EunHee; Chen, Silvia S; Klisch, Stephen M; Sah, Robert L

    2011-08-17

    The negatively charged proteoglycans (PG) provide compressive resistance to articular cartilage by means of their fixed charge density (FCD) and high osmotic pressure (π(PG)), and the collagen network (CN) provides the restraining forces to counterbalance π(PG). Our objectives in this work were to: 1), account for collagen intrafibrillar water when transforming biochemical measurements into a FCD-π(PG) relationship; 2), compute π(PG) and CN contributions to the compressive behavior of full-thickness cartilage during bovine growth (fetal, calf, and adult) and human adult aging (young and old); and 3), predict the effect of depth from the articular surface on π(PG) in human aging. Extrafibrillar FCD (FCD(EF)) and π(PG) increased with bovine growth due to an increase in CN concentration, whereas PG concentration was steady. This maturation-related increase was amplified by compression. With normal human aging, FCD(EF) and π(PG) decreased. The π(PG)-values were close to equilibrium stress (σ(EQ)) in all bovine and young human cartilage, but were only approximately half of σ(EQ) in old human cartilage. Depth-related variations in the strain, FCD(EF), π(PG), and CN stress profiles in human cartilage suggested a functional deterioration of the superficial layer with aging. These results suggest the utility of the FCD-π(PG) relationship for elucidating the contribution of matrix macromolecules to the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A study on MR images of the articular cartilage in medial-type osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Kotani, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the articular cartilage of 88 knees of 73 cases (age range 40-78) diagnosed clinically and radiologically as OA (osteoarthritis) were studied by obtaining fat-suppressed MR images of the knee. On 27 knees out of the 88, moreover, macroscopic observation was performed to make a comparative study between the directly-observed findings and MR findings. Fat-suppressed MR images were obtained sagittally by 3D-FLASH (fast low angle shot) sequence. The examined regions consisted of the following 4 sites; the medial condyle of the femur, its lateral condyle, the medial condyle of the tibia, and its lateral condyle. The revealed conditions of the cartilage were morphologically classified into 4 Stages. The evidence of cartilage defect on MR images was most frequently found at the medial condyle of the femur, with the medial condyle of the tibia, the lateral condyle of the femur, and the lateral condyle of the tibia following in a less frequent order. Fat-suppressed MRI's sensitivity to cartilage defect against macroscopy was 94.5%, specificity 95.4%, and accuracy 95.2%. MR imaging using fat-suppression can reveal cartilaginous degeneration and defect so well that this technique provides an important indication for selecting a proper method of treatment. (author)

  8. Effect of exercise on bone and articular cartilage in heterozygous manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Alexander; Henkel, Jan; Bloch, Wilhelm; Treiber, Nicolai; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Niehoff, Anja

    2011-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in both bone and cartilage physiology and play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The present study investigated the effect of running exercise on bone and cartilage in heterozygous manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2)-deficient mice. It was hypothesized that exercise might induce an increased production of ROS in these tissues. Heterozygous SOD2-deficient mice should exhibit an impaired capability to compensate, resulting in an increased oxidative stress in cartilage and bone. Thirteen female wild type and 20 SOD2(+/-) mice (aged 16 weeks) were randomly assigned to a non-active wild type (SOD2(+/+)Con, n = 7), a trained wild type (SOD2(+/+)Run, n = 6), a non-active SOD2(+/-) (SOD2(+/-)Con, n = 9) and a trained SOD2(+/-) (SOD2(+/-)Run, n = 11) group. Training groups underwent running exercise on a treadmill for 8 weeks. In SOD2(+/-) mice elevated levels of 15-F(2t)-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine were detected in bone and articular cartilage compared to wild type littermates. In osteocytes the elevated levels of these molecules were found to be reduced after exercise while in chondrocytes they were increased by aerobic running exercise. The observed changes in oxidative and nitrosative stress did neither affect morphological, structural nor mechanical properties of both tissues. These results demonstrate that exercise might protect bone against oxidative stress in heterozygous SOD2-deficient mice.

  9. Correlation between radiographic findings of osteoarthritis and arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Blankenbaker, Donna; Stanton, Paul; De Smet, Arthur [University of Wisconsin Hospital Clinical Science Center-E3/311, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Fine, Jason [University of Wisconsin Clinical Science Center-K6/4675, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-12-15

    To correlate radiographic findings of osteoarthritis on axial knee radiographs with arthroscopic findings of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint in patients with chronic knee pain. The study group consisted of 104 patients with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint and 30 patients of similar age with no osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint. All patients in the study group had an axial radiograph of the knee performed prior to arthroscopic knee surgery. At the time of arthroscopy, each articular surface of the patellofemoral joint was graded using the Noyes classification system. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the knee radiographs to determine the presence of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts. The sensitivity and specificity of the various radiographic features of osteoarthritis for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint were determined. The sensitivity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 73%, 37%, 4%, and 0% respectively. The specificity of marginal osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint was 67%, 90%, 100%, and 100% respectively. Marginal osteophytes were the most sensitive radiographic feature for the detection of articular cartilage degeneration within the patellofemoral joint. Joint-space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral cysts were insensitive radiographic features of osteoarthritis, and rarely occurred in the absence of associated osteophyte formation. (orig.)

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  11. Intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen in rat knee joint : Histopathologic assessment of cartilage & synovium

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    Aycan Guner Ekici

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Effective pain control following outpatient surgical procedures is an important aspect of patient discharge. This study was carried out with an aim to investigate the histopathological effects of intra-articular dexketoprofen trometamol injection in knee joint on synovium and cartilage in an experimental rat model. Methods: In each of 40 rats, the right knee was designated as the study group and the left knee as the control group (NS group. Under aseptic conditions, 35 rats received an injection of 0.25 ml (6.25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol into the right knee joint and an injection of 0.25 ml 0.9 per cent normal saline solution into the left knee joint. On the 1 st , 2 nd , 7 th , 14 th , and 21 st days after intra-articular injection, rats in specified groups were sacrificed by intraperitoneal injection of 120 mg/kg sodium thiopental. Knee joints were separated and sectioned for histopathological examination. Inflammatory changes in the joints were recorded according to a grade scale. Results: No significant difference in terms of pathological changes both in synovium and cartilage was observed between the NS group and the study group on days 1, 2, 7, 14 and 21 after intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen or saline in the knee joint. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings showed no evidence of significant histopathological damage to the cartilage and synovia for a period up to 21 days following intra-articular administration of dexketoprofen trometamol in the knee joints of rats.

  12. Co-culture systems-based strategies for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Weimin; Wang, Mingjie; Hao, Chunxiang; Lu, Liang; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Xu; Chen, Mingxue; Li, Penghao; Jiang, Peng; Lu, Shibi; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-03-01

    Cartilage engineering facilitates repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage using engineered tissue that restores the functional properties of the impaired joint. The seed cells used most frequently in tissue engineering, are chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. Seed cells activity plays a key role in the regeneration of functional cartilage tissue. However, seed cells undergo undesirable changes after in vitro processing procedures, such as degeneration of cartilage cells and induced hypertrophy of mesenchymal stem cells, which hinder cartilage tissue engineering. Compared to monoculture, which does not mimic the in vivo cellular environment, co-culture technology provides a more realistic microenvironment in terms of various physical, chemical, and biological factors. Co-culture technology is used in cartilage tissue engineering to overcome obstacles related to the degeneration of seed cells, and shows promise for cartilage regeneration and repair. In this review, we focus first on existing co-culture systems for cartilage tissue engineering and related fields, and discuss the conditions and mechanisms thereof. This is followed by methods for optimizing seed cell co-culture conditions to generate functional neo-cartilage tissue, which will lead to a new era in cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Microfracture and osteochondral autograft transplantation are cost-effective treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D Josh; Smith, Matthew V; Matava, Matthew J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H

    2015-09-01

    Multiple techniques have been suggested for the treatment of isolated knee articular cartilage injuries. For smaller lesions (Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. A literature search was performed to identify studies comparing microfracture and OAT for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the distal femur in an adult population. Data from these studies including surgical time, failure rates, revision surgeries, outcome scores, and return to athletics were then incorporated into a constructed cost model using standard accounting methodology. The model was based on actual 2013 cost figures (in US dollars) for all procedure, operating room, and instrumentation costs. Three studies, with a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, met the inclusion criteria of having evidence level 1 or 2 comparing microfracture and OAT. There was a cumulative 28.6% reoperation rate among patients undergoing microfracture compared with 12.5% among patients undergoing OAT. While both groups demonstrated significant improvements compared with preoperative levels, the only significant differences in any outcome score reported between the 2 procedures were the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score and patient-reported return to their previous sports activity level. While microfracture had a lower initial cost ($3100), these savings lessened over 1 year ($1843) and 10 years ($996). Microfracture was more cost-effective when comparing Lysholm and Hospital for Special Surgery scores, whereas OAT was more cost-effective when comparing Tegner and ICRS scores. There was a significantly lower cost for return to play in athletes after OAT versus microfracture at 1 year ($11,428 vs $16,953, respectively), 3 years ($12,856 vs $38,000, respectively), and 10 years ($32,141 vs $60,799, respectively). Published level 1 and 2 clinical studies with a 10-year follow-up demonstrated that the net cost and cost-effectiveness of microfracture and OAT are comparable for the

  14. The effect of intra-articular levobupivacaine on shoulder cartilage at different doses-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mustafa Soner; Kalem, Mahmut; Özçelik, Menekşe; Şahin, Ercan; Çakar, Sanem; Hayırlı, Nazlı; Evirgen, Oya; Ökten, Feyhan

    In this study it was aimed to examine the histological and morphometric effects on cartilage structure of intra-articular application of levobupivacaine to the shoulder joint. In twenty New Zealand adult male rabbits, 35 shoulders were used for the study and prepared in 5 groups of 7. These groups were defined as Groups L1, L2, L3 and L4 which were right shoulders administered with 0.25% and 0.5% levobupivacaine, Group C which were left shoulders as the control group and Groups S1 and S2 which were left shoulders administered with 0.9% saline. On the 2nd and 15th days the animals were killed, the glenohumeral joints were evaluated macroscopically then cartilage samples were taken. These samples were evaluated with Mankin score, and histomorphometrically by measuring the thickness of the cartilage between the superficial cartilage layer and the tidemark and the thickness of calcified cartilage between the tidemark and the subchondral bone. Macroscopically, on the 15th day the joint fluid was seen to have reduced in all the groups. After microscopic evaluation, the highest Mankin score (mean: 3.14±2.1/14) was in the L4 group (15th day 0.5% levobupivacaine) and was found to be statistically significant (pstudy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. [The effect of intra-articular levobupivacaine on shoulder cartilage at different doses-experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mustafa Soner; Kalem, Mahmut; Özçelik, Menekşe; Şahin, Ercan; Çakar, Sanem; Hayırlı, Nazlı; Evirgen, Oya; Ökten, Feyhan

    In this study it was aimed to examine the histological and morphometric effects on cartilage structure of intra-articular application of levobupivacaine to the shoulder joint. In twenty New Zealand adult male rabbits, 35 shoulders were used for the study and prepared in 5 groups of 7. These groups were defined as Groups L1, L2, L3 and L4 which were right shoulders administered with 0.25% and 0.5% levobupivacaine, Group C which were left shoulders as the control group and Groups S1 and S2 which were left shoulders administered with 0.9% saline. On the 2nd and 15th days the animals were killed, the glenohumeral joints were evaluated macroscopically then cartilage samples were taken. These samples were evaluated with Mankin score, and histomorphometrically by measuring the thickness of the cartilage between the superficial cartilage layer and the tidemark and the thickness of calcified cartilage between the tidemark and the subchondral bone. Macroscopically, on the 15th day the joint fluid was seen to have reduced in all the groups. After microscopic evaluation, the highest Mankin score (mean: 3.14±2.1/14) was in the L4 group (15th day 0.5% levobupivacaine) and was found to be statistically significant (pstudy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

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    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  17. Repair of articular cartilage lesions in aged chickens by allogeneic transplantation of fresh embryonic epiphyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ilan; Melamed, Eitan; Robinson, Dror; Nevo, Zvi

    2007-11-01

    The potential of fresh whole chick epiphyses of embryonic origin to serve as implant material for cartilage defects of aged chicken was tested. Fresh epiphyses of 11-day-old embryos were collected from 24 animals and transplanted into defects created in the weight-bearing areas of tibiotarsal joint cartilage of 2-year-old chicks. Upon sacrifice, samples were examined macroscopically and microsections were prepared for histology. Macroscopically, control defects remained empty at all the time intervals. Defects of the experimental group were, on the other hand, filled with cartilaginous tissue as early as 2 weeks posttransplantation, although individual epiphyses could still be noted in the implant tissue. At 4 weeks and later, defects were filled with cartilaginous material indistinguishable from hyaline cartilage. Histologically, all grafts remained within the defect's pits, showing mitotic and metabolic activity typical to proliferating hyaline cartilage. The engrafted epiphyses showed a partial incorporation and integration with the surrounding host tissues already at 2 weeks. At 4 weeks and later, the integration was complete. It is concluded that a chick embryonic epiphyseal cartilage is suitable as a graft source for articular cartilage transplantation. The embryonic epiphyses provide immediate inherent stability to the graft and supply a good mix of mesenchymal progenitor cells responsible for the high rate of cell proliferation and adhesion to the differentiated committed chondrocytes of the host that create the typical favorable chondrogenic milieu. Based on the present findings, it is postulated that human embryonic epiphyses may, in the future, represent an alternative source to the commonly used techniques of hyaline cartilage repair.

  18. Distribution of small proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in humerus-related articular cartilage of chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of components present in the cartilaginous extracellular matrix is related to development, gender, and genotype, as well as to the biomechanical properties of each type of cartilage. In the present study, we analyzed small proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans present in different cartilages of the chicken wing after extraction with guanidine hydrochloride or papain. Quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycans showed a larger amount in humeral cartilage (around 200 mg/g tissue than in articular cartilage of the radius and ulna, with 138 and 80 mg/g tissue, respectively. Non-collagenous proteins isolated were predominantly from cartilage in the proximal regions of the humerus and radius. D4 fractions obtained by ultracentrifugation were separated by DEAE-Sephacel and Octyl-Sepharose chromatography and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two bands of 57 and 70-90 kDa were observed for all samples treated with ß-mercaptoethanol. Immunoblotting of these proteins was positive for the small proteoglycans fibromodulin and decorin, respectively. Apparently, the 57-kDa protein is present in macromolecular complexes of 160 and 200 kDa. Chondroitin sulfate was detected in all regions. HPLC analysis of the products formed by chondroitinase AC and ABC digestion mainly revealed ß-D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl ß-D-galactosamine residues. The 4-sulfation/6-sulfation ratio was close to 3, except for the proximal cartilage of the radius (2.5. These results suggest functional differences between the scapula-humerus, humerus-ulna, and humerus-radius joints of the chicken wing. This study contributes to the understanding of the physiology of cartilage and joints of birds under different types of mechanical stress.

  19. Chondrocyte secreted CRTAC1: a glycosylated extracellular matrix molecule of human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Eric; Bräun, Jessica; Pelttari, Karoliina; Kadel, Stephanie; Kalbacher, Hubert; Richter, Wiltrud

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1), a novel human marker which allowed discrimination of human chondrocytes from osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells in culture was so far studied only on the RNA-level. We here describe its genomic organisation and detect a new brain expressed (CRTAC1-B) isoform resulting from alternate last exon usage which is highly conserved in vertebrates. In humans, we identify an exon sharing process with the neighbouring tail-to-tail orientated gene leading to CRTAC1-A. This isoform is produced by cultured human chondrocytes, localized in the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage and its secretion can be stimulated by BMP4. Of five putative O-glycosylation motifs in the last exon of CRTAC1-A, the most C-terminal one is modified according to exposure of serial C-terminal deletion mutants to the O-glycosylation inhibitor Benzyl-alpha-GalNAc. Both isoforms contain four FG-GAP repeat domains and an RGD integrin binding motif, suggesting cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction potential. In summary, CRTAC1 acquired an alternate last exon from the tail-to-tail oriented neighbouring gene in humans resulting in the glycosylated isoform CRTAC1-A which represents a new extracellular matrix molecule of articular cartilage.

  20. Regional Differential Genetic Response of Human Articular Cartilage to Impact Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Lauren L; Vance, Danica D; Wang, Liyong; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Huang, C-Y Charles; Kaplan, Lee D

    2016-04-01

    Normal physiological movement creates different weightbearing zones within a human knee: the medial condyle bearing the highest and the trochlea bearing the lowest weight. Adaptation to different physiological loading conditions results in different tissue and cellular properties within a knee. The objective of this study was to use microarray analysis to examine gene expression differences among three anatomical regions of human knee articular cartilage at baseline and following induction of an acute impact injury. Cartilage explants were harvested from 7 cadaveric knees (12 plugs per knee). A drop tower was utilized to introduce injury. Plugs were examined 24 hours after impact for gene expression using microarray. The primary analysis is the comparison of baseline versus impacted samples within each region separately. In addition, pairwise comparisons among the three regions were performed at baseline and after impact. False discovery rate (FDR) was used to evaluate significance of differential gene expression. In the comparison of before and after injury, the trochlear had 130 differentially expressed genes (FDR ≤ 0.05) while the condyles had none. In the comparison among regions, smaller sets of differentially expressed genes (n ≤ 21) were found, with trochlea being more different than the condyles. Most of more frequently expressed genes in trochlea are developmental genes. Within the experimental setup of this study, only the trochlea was displaying an acute genetic response on injury. Our data demonstrated the regional-specific response to injury in human articular cartilage.

  1. Use of Particulated Juvenile Articular Cartilage Allograft for Osteochondral Lesions of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Daniel E; Werner, Brian C; Deal, D Nicole

    2017-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries are a common injury among young, active patients, and the most appropriate treatment for these injuries remains controversial. A promising new technology in the treatment of high-grade cartilage injuries is particulated juvenile articular cartilage (PJAC) allograft (DeNovo NT, Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana). This has been shown to be successful in multiple joints including the knee, talus, and elbow. No studies or case reports exist in supporting or discouraging its use in injuries of the wrist, in specific, the scaphoid. The use of PJAC allograft is described for the treatment of an active 21-year-old male with an Outerbridge Grade IV chondral lesion on the proximal pole of his right scaphoid and right distal radius scaphoid facet who had failed conservative management. The patient was followed clinically and radiographically for 21 months. The patient had return to full sport (jujutsu) and full range-of-motion, both of which represented an improvement from his preoperative exam. Radiographically, the chondral lucency seen had decreased in size and was almost completely absent on radiographs after 21 months. The results of this case suggest that PJAC can be used safely and effectively in the wrist thereby potentially broadening the indications for its use.

  2. Articular cartilage compression: how microstructural response influences pore pressure in relation to matrix health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, James M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil D

    2010-04-01

    Our research investigated the influence of degeneration on both the pore-pressure development and microstructural response of cartilage during indentation with a flat-porous-indenter. Experiments were conducted to link the mechanical and structural responses of normal and degenerate articular cartilage. We found that from the instant of loading the degenerate matrix generated a higher peak hydrostatic excess pore pressure in a shorter period of time than the normal matrix. Following the attainment of this peak value the pore pressure in both tissue groups then gradually decayed toward zero over time, thus demonstrating a classical consolidation response. The microstructural analysis provided a unique insight into the influence of degeneration on the mechanisms of internal stress-sharing within the loaded matrix. Both disruption of the articular surface and general matrix destructuring results in an altered deformation field in both the directly loaded and nondirectly loaded regions. It is argued that the higher levels of matrix shear combined with less of the applied load being redirected into the wider cartilage continuum accounts for the elevated levels of peak hydrostatic pore pressure generated in the degenerate matrix.

  3. Spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone proceed to articular cartilage degeneration in rats subjected to knee immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Zhe; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Yue-Zhu; Deng, Song-Yun; He, Yong-Bin; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone and its overlying articular cartilage in rats following knee immobilization. A total of 36 male Wistar rats (11-13 months old) were assigned randomly and evenly into 3 groups. For each group, knee joints in 6 rats were immobilized unilaterally for 1, 4, or 8 weeks, respectively, while the remaining rats were allowed free activity and served as external control groups. For each animal, femurs at both sides were dissected after sacrificed. The distal part of femur was examined by micro-CT. Subsequently, femoral condyles were collected for further histological observation and analysis. For articular cartilage, significant changes were observed only at 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization. The thickness of articular cartilage and chondrocytes numbers decreased with time. However, significant changes in subchondral bone were defined by micro-CT following immobilization in a time-dependent manner. Immobilization led to a thinner and more porous subchondral bone plate, as well as a reduction in trabecular thickness and separation with a more rod-like architecture. Changes in subchondral bone occurred earlier than in articular cartilage. More importantly, immobilization-induced changes in subchondral bone may contribute, at least partially, to changes in its overlying articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in elite professional football players and age-and BMI-matched amateur athletes

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    Behzadi, C., E-mail: c.behzadi@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 (Germany); Welsch, G.H. [Department of Sports Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 (Germany); Laqmani, A.; Henes, F.O.; Kaul, M.G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 (Germany); Schoen, G. [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 (Germany); Adam, G.; Regier, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: Recent investigation has underlined the potential of quantitative MR imaging to be used as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of cartilage degeneration at an early state. The presented study analyses T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in professional athletes and compares the results to age- and BMI (Body Mass Index)-matched healthy amateur athletes. Materials and methods: 22 professional football players and 22 age- and BMI-matched individuals were underwent knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 3T including qualitative and quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis included e.g. meniscal tears, joint effusion and bone edema. For quantitative analysis T2* (22 ET: 4.6-53.6 ms) measurements in 3D data acquisition were performed. Deep and superficial layers of 22 predefined cartilage segments were analysed. All data sets were postprocessed using a dedicated software tool. Statistical analysis included Student t-test, confidence intervals and a random effects model. Results: In both groups, T2* relaxation times were significantly higher in the superficial compared to the deep layers (p < 0.001). Professional athletes had significantly higher relaxation times in eight superficial and three deep cartilage layers in the predefined cartilage segments (p < 0.05). Highly significant differences were found in the weight-bearing segments of the lateral superficial femoral condyle (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Elevated T2* values in cartilage layers of professional football players compared to amateur athletes were noted. The effects seem to predominate in superficial cartilage layers.

  5. Comparison of T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in elite professional football players and age-and BMI-matched amateur athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzadi, C.; Welsch, G.H.; Laqmani, A.; Henes, F.O.; Kaul, M.G.; Schoen, G.; Adam, G.; Regier, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Recent investigation has underlined the potential of quantitative MR imaging to be used as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of cartilage degeneration at an early state. The presented study analyses T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in professional athletes and compares the results to age- and BMI (Body Mass Index)-matched healthy amateur athletes. Materials and methods: 22 professional football players and 22 age- and BMI-matched individuals were underwent knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 3T including qualitative and quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis included e.g. meniscal tears, joint effusion and bone edema. For quantitative analysis T2* (22 ET: 4.6-53.6 ms) measurements in 3D data acquisition were performed. Deep and superficial layers of 22 predefined cartilage segments were analysed. All data sets were postprocessed using a dedicated software tool. Statistical analysis included Student t-test, confidence intervals and a random effects model. Results: In both groups, T2* relaxation times were significantly higher in the superficial compared to the deep layers (p < 0.001). Professional athletes had significantly higher relaxation times in eight superficial and three deep cartilage layers in the predefined cartilage segments (p < 0.05). Highly significant differences were found in the weight-bearing segments of the lateral superficial femoral condyle (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Elevated T2* values in cartilage layers of professional football players compared to amateur athletes were noted. The effects seem to predominate in superficial cartilage layers.

  6. Routine clinical knee MR reports: comparison of diagnostic performance at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for assessment of the articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, Jacob C.; Rhodes, Jeffrey A.; Shah, Nehal; Gaviola, Glenn C.; Smith, Stacy E. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gomoll, Andreas H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Cartilage Repair Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Accurate assessment of knee articular cartilage is clinically important. Although 3.0 Tesla (T) MRI is reported to offer improved diagnostic performance, literature regarding the clinical impact of MRI field strength is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of clinical MRI reports for assessment of cartilage at 1.5 and 3.0 T in comparison to arthroscopy. This IRB-approved retrospective study consisted of 300 consecutive knees in 297 patients who had routine clinical MRI and arthroscopy. Descriptions of cartilage from MRI reports of 165 knees at 1.5 T and 135 at 3.0 T were compared with arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade of the arthroscopic grading were calculated for each articular surface at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Agreement between MRI and arthroscopy was calculated with the weighted-kappa statistic. Significance testing was performed utilizing the z-test after bootstrapping to obtain the standard error. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade were 61.4%, 82.7%, 62.2%, and 77.5% at 1.5 T and 61.8%, 80.6%, 59.5%, and 75.6% at 3.0 T, respectively. The weighted kappa statistic was 0.56 at 1.5 T and 0.55 at 3.0 T. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these parameters between 1.5 and 3.0 T. Factors potentially contributing to the lack of diagnostic advantage of 3.0 T MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of the performance of articular cartilage and synthetic biomaterials in multi-directional sliding motion as in orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Christian John

    The performance of several synthetic biomaterials and bovine articular cartilage were investigated in terms of their suitability for use as articulating surfaces in artificial joints. The Dual-Axis Wear Simulator (DAWS), a wear testing machine that simulates conditions in a synovial joint, was designed and fabricated to enable investigators to measure the wear of such materials in multi-directional sliding while immersed in a bovine serum lubricant solution. This machine was used initially to determine the wear mechanisms and wear amounts of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and the compliant elastomer Pellethane(TM) 2363-80A. It was found that the compliant material produced lower wear. Dynamic mechanical analysis was used to determine that bovine articular cartilage had a very significant amount of viscoelasticity to support static loads and damp impact loads. Furthermore, the use of a compliant counterface led to lower wear in the cartilage as compared to a rigid counterface. Pt-Zr quasicrystals were used as fillers in UHMWPE, and the wear, stiffness, and impact toughness of the filled polymer were shown to be comparable or better than those of UHMWPE that had been irradiation crosslinked. Crosslinked UHMWPE was investigated for its susceptibility to oxidative degradation and increased wear. It was found that thermal stabilization of the polymer could be eliminated if a mild amount crosslinking was used. Furthermore, there was no degradation in wear resistance of mildly crosslinked and non-stabilized UHMWPE even after accelerated aging. Based on the results of this work and lessons learned about compliance and wear resistance, blends were produced by using surface-activated UHMWPE particles as fillers in elastomeric PUR. The blends showed better wear resistance than UHMWPE, as well as increased stiffness and damping over PUR. The results of this work indicated that there is great potential

  8. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  9. Study on nano-structured hydroxyapatite/zirconia stabilized yttria on healing of articular cartilage defect in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sotoudeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Articular Cartilage has limited potential for self-repair and tissue engineering approaches attempt to repair articular cartilage by scaffolds. We hypothesized that the combined hydroxyapatite and zirconia stabilized yttria would enhance the quality of cartilage healing. METHODS: In ten New Zealand white rabbits bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defect, 4 mm in diameter and 3 mm depth, was created on the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of the distal femur. In group I the scaffold was implanted into the right stifle and the same defect was created in the left stifle without any transplant (group II. Specimens were harvested at 12 weeks after implantation, examined histologically for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type-II collagen. RESULTS: In group I the defect was filled with a white translucent cartilage tissue In contrast, the defects in the group II remained almost empty. In the group I, the defects were mostly filled with hyaline-like cartilage evidenced but defects in group II were filled with fibrous tissue with surface irregularities. Positive immunohistochemical staining of type-II collagen was observed in group I and it was absent in the control group. CONCLUSION: The hydroxyapatite/yttria stabilized zirconia scaffold would be an effective scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  11. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  12. Meniscal and articular cartilage lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee: correlation between time from injury and knee scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalitsis, Sotirios; Vlychou, Mariana; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Thriskos, Paschal; Hantes, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is associated with meniscal tears and/or articular cartilage damage. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to report and correlate the incidence of meniscal and cartilage lesions in ACL-deficient knees with time from injury and (b) to correlate lesions of menisci and cartilage with widely used knee scores. Data were analysed from 109 consecutive patients with ACL rupture. Meniscal and articular cartilage lesions were documented during the arthroscopic reconstruction of the ACL. Patients were distributed into 3 groups according to time from injury; group A: 0-3 months (35 patients), group B: 3-12 months (39 patients) and group C: more than 12 months (35 patients). Lysholm, KOOS and IKDC rating scales were recorded preoperatively. Logistic regression analyses were applied to correlate the concomitant intra-articular pathologies with the time from injury and knee-rating scales. Of 109 patients, 32 (29%) had a medial meniscus tear, 20 (19%) had a lateral meniscus tear, 17 (15%) had both menisci torn and 40 (37%) had no meniscal tear. Analysis revealed that time from injury was not a significant factor for the presence of a meniscal lesion. The odds of development of a high-grade cartilage lesion in an ACL-deficient knee reconstructed more than 12 months from time from injury are 5.5 and 12.5 times higher when compared with knees that underwent ACL reconstruction less than 3 months and between 3 and 12 months after knee injury, respectively. No association was found between intra-articular pathology and the KOOS and Lysholm scores. A positive correlation between the IKDC score and patients without any intra-articular pathology was found. The presence of high-grade cartilage lesions is significantly increased in an ACL-deficient knee when reconstruction is performed more than 12 months after injury. However, the incidence of meniscal tears is not increased significantly. Correlation of intra-articular pathology in ACL

  13. Poroviscoelastic finite element model including continuous fiber distribution for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffetani, M; Griebel, M; Gastaldi, D; Klisch, S M; Vena, P

    2014-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a soft hydrated tissue that facilitates proper load transfer in diarthroidal joints. The mechanical properties of articular cartilage derive from its structural and hierarchical organization that, at the micrometric length scale, encompasses three main components: a network of insoluble collagen fibrils, negatively charged macromolecules and a porous extracellular matrix. In this work, a constituent-based constitutive model for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage is presented: it accounts for the multi-constituent, non-linear, porous, and viscous aspects of articular cartilage mechanics. In order to reproduce the articular cartilage response under different loading conditions, the model considers a continuous distribution of collagen fibril orientation, swelling, and depth-dependent mechanical properties. The model's parameters are obtained by fitting published experimental data for the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation unconfined compression test on adult bovine articular cartilage. Then, model validation is obtained by simulating three independent experimental tests: (i) the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation confined compression test, (ii) the drained response of a flat punch indentation test and (iii) the depth-dependence of effective Poisson's ratio in a unconfined compression test. Finally, the validated constitutive model has been used to simulate multiload spherical nanoindentation creep tests. Upon accounting for strain-dependent tissue permeability and intrinsic viscoelastic properties of the collagen network, the model accurately fits the drained and undrained curves and time-dependent creep response. The results show that depth-dependent tissue properties and glycosaminoglycan-induced tissue swelling should be accounted for when simulating indentation experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vivo Identification and Induction of Articular Cartilage Stem Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wenxue; Geng, Yiyun; Huang, Yan; Shi, Yu; Xiang, Shengnan; Zhang, Ning; Qin, Ling; Shi, Qin; Chen, Qian; Dai, Kerong; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent and debilitating joint disorder characterized by the degeneration of articular cartilage. However, no effective medical therapy has been found yet for such condition. In this study, we directly confirmed the existence of articular cartilage stem cells (ACSCs) in vivo and in situ for the first time both in normal and OA articular cartilage, and explored their chondrogenesis in Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced inflammation environment and disclose whether the inhibition of NF-κB signaling can induce ACSCs activation thus improve the progression of experimental OA. We found an interesting phenomenon that ACSCs were activated and exhibited a transient proliferative response in early OA as an initial attempt for self-repair. During the in vitro mechanism study, we discovered IL-1β can efficiently activate the NF-κB pathway and potently impair the responsiveness of ACSCs, whereas the NF-κB pathway inhibitor rescued the ACSCs chondrogenesis. The final in vivo experiments further confirmed ACSCs' activation were maintained by NF-κB pathway inhibitor, which induced cartilage regeneration, and protected articular cartilage from injury in an OA animal model. Our results provided in vivo evidence of the presence of ACSCs, and disclosed their action in the early OA stage and gradual quiet as OA process, presented a potential mechanism for both cartilage intrinsic repair and its final degradation, and demonstrated the feasibility of inducing endogenous adult tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair and OA therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  15. [On the preparation and mechanical properties of PVA hydrogel bionic cartilage/bone composite artificial articular implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Haoye; Zheng, Yudong; Huang, Xiaoshan; Yue, Bingqing; Xu, Hong; Wang, Yingjun; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2010-10-01

    In view of the problems that conventional artificial cartilages have no bioactivity and are prone to peel off in repeated uses as a result of insufficient strength to bond with subchondral bone, we have designed and prepared a novel kind of PVA-BG composite hydrogel as bionic artificial articular cartilage/bone composite implants. The effects of processes and conditions of preparation on the mechanical properties of implant were explored. In addition, the relationships between compression strain rate, BG content, PVA hydrogels thickness and compressive tangent modulus were also explicated. We also analyzed the effects of cancellous bone aperture, BG and PVA content on the shear strength of bonding interface of artificial articular cartilage with cancellous bone. Meanwhile, the bonding interface of artificial articular cartilage and cancellous bone was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was revealed that the compressive modulus of composite implants was correspondingly increased with the adding of BG content and the augments of PVA hydrogel thickness. The compressive modulus and bonding interface were both related to the apertures of cancellous bone. The compressive modulus of composite implants was 1.6-2.23 MPa and the shear strength of bonding interface was 0.63-1.21 MPa. These results demonstrated that the connection between artificial articular cartilage and cancellous bone was adequately firm.

  16. Effects of friction on the unconfined compressive response of articular cartilage: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, R L; Suh, J K; Mow, V C

    1990-05-01

    A finite element analysis is used to study a previously unresolved issue of the effects of platen-specimen friction on the response of the unconfined compression test; effects of platen permeability are also determined. The finite element formulation is based on the linear KLM biphasic model for articular cartilage and other hydrated soft tissues. A Galerkin weighted residual method is applied to both the solid phase and the fluid phase, and the continuity equation for the intrinsically incompressible binary mixture is introduced via a penalty method. The solid phase displacements and fluid phase velocities are interpolated for each element in terms of unknown nodal values, producing a system of first order differential equations which are solved using a standard numerical finite difference technique. An axisymmetric element of quadrilateral cross-section is developed and applied to the mechanical test problem of a cylindrical specimen of soft tissue in unconfined compression. These studies show that interfacial friction plays a major role in the unconfined compression response of articular cartilage specimens with small thickness to diameter ratios.

  17. Plasma rich in growth factors to treat an articular cartilage avulsion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mikel; Azofra, Juan; Anitua, Eduardo; Andía, Isabel; Padilla, Sabino; Santisteban, Juanma; Mujika, Iñigo

    2003-10-01

    The application of an autologous plasma rich in growth factors is beneficial in restoring connective tissues, as shown by clinical evidence in oral surgery and more recently in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and two cases of ruptured Achilles tendon in professional athletes. This is attributed to the slow delivery of growth factors from harvested platelets that have been activated by endogenous thrombin promoted by the addition of calcium chloride. This case report describes a new application of this therapy in the arthroscopic treatment of a large, nontraumatic avulsion of articular cartilage in the knee of an adolescent soccer player. After arthroscopic reattachment of the large (>2 cm) loose chondral body in its crater in the medial femoral condyle, autologous plasma rich in growth factors was injected into the area between the crater and the fixed fragment. Despite the extremely poor prognosis of the case, complete articular cartilage healing was considerably accelerated, and the functional outcome was excellent, allowing a rapid resumption of symptom-free athletic activity. This technique opens new perspectives for human tissue regeneration.

  18. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  19. Healing results in meniscus and articular cartilage photochemically welded with 1,8-naphthalimide dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Loyd, John D.; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1997-05-01

    Meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage do not heal spontaneously. In this paper results are described of studies of a procedure for evoking the healing response in such lesions by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Fifteen essentially mature Barbados sheep 40 - 60 pounds in weight received a 2 - 3 mm flap tear by incision in the red white zone of the medial meniscus oriented parallel to the table of the tibia. The animals were divided into four groups; Group I, no treatment; Group II, treatment by laser activated photoactive dyes; Group III, treatment by suturing; Group IV, treatment by laser irradiation only; Group V, treatment by photoactive dyes only. In another group of 12 sheep partial thickness flap tear was created by incision in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyle. These were divided into four groups as for the meniscus study, omitting the sutured control. Welds were made using the dimeric dye MBM Gold BW 012-012-012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9 nm argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes (360 J/cm2) with approximately 2 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hr, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Gross appearance of menisci and cartilage in all welded knees was normal and all welds resisted deformation or loosening under forceful probing. Histology of studies of both tissues out to 6 moths disclosed close bonding of welded area, continuing healing response in the form of cellular recruitment and protein deposition and the absence of inflammatory response. Tissue erosion and arthritic changes were evident in all unwelded controls.

  20. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. These findings demonstrate that the low friction of articular cartilage can be modified by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatment and that the friction coefficient depends on multiple factors, including SZP localization and surface roughness.

  1. Chondrogenic potential of canine articular cartilage derived cells (cACCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the potential of canine articular cartilage-derived cells (cACCs for chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated. The effectiveness of cACCs’ lineage commitment was analyzed after 14 days of culture in chondorgenic and non-chondrogenic conditions. Formation of proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix was assessed using histochemical staining – Alcian Blue and Safranin-O, while elemental composition was determined by means of SEM-EDX. Additionally, ultrastructure of cACCs was evaluated using TEM. The expression of genes involved in chondrogenesis was monitored with quantitative Real Time PCR. Results obtained indicate that the potential of cACCs for cartilagous extracellular matrix formation may be maintained only in chondrogenic cultures. The formation of specific chondro-nodules was not observed in a non-chondrogenic culture environment. The analysis of cACCs’ ultrastructure, both in non-chondrogenic and chondrogenic cultures, revealed well-developed rough endoplasmatic reticulum and presence of mitochondria. The cACCs in chondrogenic medium shed an increased number of microvesicles. Furthermore, it was shown that the extracellular matrix of cACCs in chondrogenic cultures is rich in potassium and molybdenum. Additionally, it was determined that gene expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX-9 was significantly increased during chondrogenic differentiation of cACCs. Results obtained indicate that the culture environment may significantly influence the cartilage phenotype of cACCs during long term culture.

  2. Optimization of Methods for Articular Cartilage Surface Tissue Engineering: Cell Density and Transforming Growth Factor Beta Are Critical for Self-Assembly and Lubricin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Kenjiro; Reddi, A Hari

    2017-07-01

    Lubricin/superficial zone protein (SZP)/proteoglycan4 (PRG4) plays an important role in boundary lubrication in articular cartilage. Lubricin is secreted by superficial zone chondrocytes and synoviocytes of the synovium. The specific objective of this investigation is to optimize the methods for tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cell density on the self-assembly of superficial zone chondrocytes and lubricin secretion as a functional assessment. Superficial zone chondrocytes were cultivated as a monolayer at low, medium, and high densities. Chondrocytes at the three different densities were treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)1 twice a week or daily, and the accumulated lubricin in the culture medium was analyzed by immunoblots and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell numbers in low and medium densities were increased by TGF-β1; whereas cell numbers in high-density cell cultures were decreased by twice-a-week treatment of TGF-β1. On the other hand, the cell numbers were maintained by daily TGF-β treatment. Immunoblots and quantitation of lubricin by ELISA analysis indicated that TGF-β1 stimulated lubricin secretion by superficial zone chondrocytes at all densities with twice-a-week TGF-β treatment. It is noteworthy that the daily treatment of TGF-β1 increased lubricin much higher compared with twice-a-week treatment. These data demonstrate that daily treatment is optimal for the TGF-β1 response in a higher density of monolayer cultures. These findings have implications for self-assembly of surface zone chondrocytes of articular cartilage for application in tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface.

  3. Senescence of chondrocytes in aging articular cartilage: GADD45β mediates p21 expression in association with C/EBPβ in senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hirofumi; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Komiya, Setsuro; Goldring, Mary B; Ijiri, Kosei

    2011-04-15

    Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 45β (GADD45β) is expressed in normal and early osteoarthritic articular cartilage. We recently reported that GADD45β enhances CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) activation in vitro. This study was undertaken in order to determine whether GADD45β is expressed with C/EBPβ in aging articular cartilage. We also investigated whether the synergistic expression of GADD45β and C/EBPβ may be involved in the mechanism of chondrocyte senescence. Senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP1) were used as a model of aging. GADD45β, C/EBPβ, and p21 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. A luciferase reporter assay using ATDC5 cells was performed in order to examine p21 as a target gene of the GADD45β/C/EBPβ cascade. GADD45β exhibited increased expression in the aging articular cartilage of SAMP1 mice compared to that in control mice. The co-localization of GADD45β and C/EBPβ was confirmed by double immunostaining. The synergistic mechanisms of GADD45β and C/EBPβ on the gene regulation of p21, a molecule related to cellular senescence, were verified by a p21-luciferase reporter assay. Co-expression of C/EBPβ and p21 was confirmed. These observations suggest that the synergism between GADD45β and C/EBPβ may play an important role in cellular senescence in the aging articular cartilage. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Tribological properties of PVA/PVP blend hydrogels against articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, Yusuf; Milner, Piers; Dini, Daniele; Amis, Andrew A

    2018-02-01

    This research investigated in-vitro tribological performance of the articulation of cartilage-on- polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) blend hydrogels using a custom-designed multi-directional wear rig. The hydrogels were prepared by repeated freezing-thawing cycles at different concentrations and PVA to PVP fractions at a given concentration. PVA/PVP blend hydrogels showed low coefficient of friction (COF) values (between 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.14 ± 0.02) which were closer to the cartilage-on-cartilage articulation (0.03 ± 0.01) compared to the cartilage-on-stainless steel articulation (0.46 ± 0.06). The COF increased with increasing hydrogel concentration (p = 0.03) and decreasing PVP content at a given concentration (p mechanical behaviour was required for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between ultra-short telomeres, aging of articular cartilage and the development of human hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, M; Delaisse, J M; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-short telomeres caused by stress-induced telomere shortening are suggested to induce chondrocyte senescence in human osteoarthritic knees. Here we have further investigated the role of ultra-short telomeres in the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and in aging of articular cartilage in human...

  6. Quantitative description of collagen structure in the articular cartilage of the young and adult equine distal metacarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.; Haazelager, M.B.; Gijsen, M.A.L.; Schipper, H.; Kranenbarg, S.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The orientation and organisation of collagen fibrils play an important role in the mechanical functioning of the articular cartilage (AC) that covers the surfaces in the diarthrodial joints. In the adult animal, typically an arcade like 'Benninghoff structure' is found. Because the remodelling

  7. Viscoelasticity of articular cartilage: Analysing the effect of induced stress and the restraint of bone in a dynamic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Bernard M; Sadeghi, Hamid; Temple, Duncan K; Dhaliwal, Hemeth; Espino, Daniel M; Hukins, David W L

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the induced stress and restraint provided by the underlying bone on the frequency-dependent storage and loss stiffness (for bone restraint) or modulus (for induced stress) of articular cartilage, which characterise its viscoelasticity. Dynamic mechanical analysis has been used to determine the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of bovine femoral and humeral head articular cartilage. A sinusoidal load was applied to the specimens and out-of-phase displacement response was measured to determine the phase angle, the storage and loss stiffness or modulus. As induced stress increased, the storage modulus significantly increased (p 0.05); however, off-bone, articular cartilage loss stiffness demonstrated a logarithmic frequency-dependency (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the frequency-dependent trends of storage and loss moduli of articular cartilage are dependent on the induced stress, while the restraint provided by the underlying bone removes the frequency-dependency of the loss stiffness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis

  9. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  10. Electromechanical Assessment of Human Knee Articular Cartilage with Compression-Induced Streaming Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Christoph; Ricklefs, Marcel; Willbold, Elmar; Hurschler, Christof; Abedian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    To assess the electromechanical properties of human knee articular cartilage with compression-induced streaming potentials for reliability among users and correlation with macroscopic and histological evaluation tools and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content. Streaming potentials are induced in cartilage in response to loading when mobile positive ions in the interstitial fluid temporarily move away from negatively charged proteoglycans. Streaming potential integrals (SPIs) were measured with an indentation probe on femoral condyles of 10 human knee specimens according to a standardized location scheme. Interobserver reliability was measured using an interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The learning curves of 3 observers were evaluated by regression analysis. At each SPI measurement location the degradation level of the tissue was determined by means of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score, Mankin score, and sGAG content. The computed ICC was 0.77 (0.70-0.83) indicating good to excellent linear agreement of SPI values among the 3 users. A significant positive linear correlation of the learning index values was observed for 2 of the 3 users. Statistically significant negative correlations between SPI and both ICRS and Mankin scores were observed (r = 0.502, P < 0.001, and r = 0.255, P = 0.02, respectively). No correlation was observed between SPI and sGAG content (r = 0.004, P = 0.973). SPI values may be used as a quantitative means of cartilage evaluation with sufficient reliability among users. Due to the significant learning curve, adequate training should be absolved before routine use of the technique.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

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    Manuel Mata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  13. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Oliver, Maria; Zurriaga, Javier; Sancho-Tello, Maria; de Llano, Jose Javier Martin; Carda, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo , but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo . hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  14. Protocols for the in vitro design of animal articular cartilage based on tissue engineering methods

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    Diego Correa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is the structure that covers the joint ends. It has some specific tasks crucial to the correct joint physiology. It may experience a large amount of injuries that could generate considerable disabilities. Unfortunately its selfrepair capacity is too limited; therefore, many treatments have been developed with partial success, given the suboptimal biomechanical behavior of the resultant tissue. Given that, Tissue Engineering offers an alternative, based on the design of a new tissue with biological and biomechanical features which resembles the native tissue. In this work, the authors describe the methodologies followed to accomplish that goal, studying the chondrocytes harvesting, the cellular cultures, the scaffold seeding processes, the mechanical stimulation and the structural and biomechanical evaluation. Finally, exposed some of the preliminary results, as a experimental validation of the methods proposed are.

  15. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

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    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  16. A model to predict the permeation kinetics of dimethyl sulfoxide in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Guangming; Zhang, Shaozhi

    2013-02-01

    Cryopreservation of articular cartilage (AC) has excited great interest due to the practical surgical importance of this tissue. Characterization of permeation kinetics of cryoprotective agents (CPA) in AC is important for designing optimal CPA addition/removal protocols to achieve successful cryopreservation. Permeation is predominantly a mass diffusion process. Since the diffusivity is a function of temperature and concentration, analysis of the permeation problem would be greatly facilitated if a predictive method were available. This article describes, a model that was developed to predict the permeation kinetics of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in AC. The cartilage was assumed as a porous medium, and the effect(s) of composition and thermodynamic nonideality of the DMSO solution were considered in model development. The diffusion coefficient was correlated to the infinite dilution coefficients through a binary diffusion thermodynamic model. The UNIFAC model was used to evaluate the activity coefficient, the Vignes equation was employed to estimate the composition dependence of the diffusion coefficient, and the Siddiqi-Lucas correlation was applied to determine the diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution. Comparisons of the predicted overall DMSO uptake by AC with the experimental data over wide temperature and concentration ranges [1~37°C, 10~47% (w/w)] show that the model can accurately describe the permeation kinetics of DMSO in AC [coefficient of determination (R(2)): 0.961~0.996, mean relative error (MRE): 2.2~9.1%].

  17. Evaluation of nonbiomedical and biomedical grade alginates for the transplantation of genetically modified articular chondrocytes to cartilage defects in a large animal model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenstein, Susanne; Cucchiarini, Magali; Laschke, Matthias W; Bohle, Rainer M; Kohn, Dieter; Menger, Michael D; Madry, Henning

    2011-04-01

    Genetically modified chondrocytes embedded in alginate improve cartilage repair in experimental models, and alginates are clinically used for articular chondrocyte transplantation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the alginate system allows for sustained transgene expression in cartilage defects in a preclinical large animal model in vivo. Primary cultures of ovine articular chondrocytes were transfected with the Photinus pyralis luc or the Escherichia coli lacZ genes in monolayer culture in vitro using eight different nonviral compounds. Optimally transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in spheres composed of nonbiomedical or biomedical grade alginates for evaluation of luciferase expression, cell numbers and viabilities in vitro. Transfected chondrocytes encapsulated in spheres comprised of the different alginates were then implanted into osteochondral defects in the knee joints of sheep to examine the profiles of transgene expression in vivo. Ovine articular chondrocytes were efficiently transfected with FuGENE 6. Transgene expression was detectable after encapsulation in the alginates over 21 days in vitro. Transplantation of genetically modified chondrocytes to cartilage defects in vivo resulted in maximal transgene expression on day 1 after transfection, with a decrease by day 21, the longest time point evaluated. Remarkably, the reduction in luciferase activity was less pronounced when biomedical grade alginates were employed, compared to nonbiomedical grade alginates, suggesting that such alginates might be better suited to support elevated transgene expression after transplantation of genetically modified chondrocytes. This approach may be of value to study the effects of potential therapeutic genes upon cartilage repair in a clinically relevant setting. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats.

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    Barbara D Boyan

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OHD3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OHD3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH2D3 or 1α,25(OH2D3. 24R,25(OH2D3 but not 1α,25(OH2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days. Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis.

  19. Protective effect of exogenous chondroitin 4,6-sulfate in the acute degradation of articular cartilage in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, D; Thonar, E J; Zhang, J; Williams, J M

    1998-05-01

    The injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain into the adolescent rabbit knee causes severe loss of articular cartilage proteoglycans (PG). Although chondrocytes attempt to restore lost PG, failure to repair ensues. Pure chondroitin 4,6-sulfate (Condrosulf, IBSA Lugano, Switzerland) has been used in clinical studies of human osteoarthritis (OA) as a slow-acting drug for OA (SYSADOA). Using our model of articular cartilage injury, we examined the effects of oral and intramuscular administration of Condrosulf after chymopapain-induced cartilage injury. In this study, animals received an injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain (Chymodiactin, Boots Pharmaceuticals) into the left knee and were sacrificed after 84 days. The contralateral right knee served as a noninjected control. Some animals received oral Condrosulf while others received intramuscular injections of Condrosulf. Serum keratan sulfate (KS) levels were monitored to ensure degradation of the cartilage PG. Those animals not exhibiting at least a 100% increase of serum KS following chymopapain injection were excluded from the study. At sacrifice, cartilage PG contents were markedly reduced in animals receiving an injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain with no further treatment. In contrast, oral administration of Condrosulf beginning 11 days prior to chymopapain injury resulted in significantly higher (P = 0.0036) cartilage PG contents. Intramuscular administration of Condrosulf resulted in higher, but less significantly so (P = 0.0457), cartilage PG contents. These results suggest that daily Condrosulf treatment prior to and continuing after chymopapain injury may have a protective effect on the damaged cartilage, allowing it to continue to re-synthesize matrix PG after the treatment is discontinued.

  20. Definition of pertinent parameters for the evaluation of articular cartilage repair tissue with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

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    Marlovits, Stefan E-mail: stefan.marlovits@akh-wien.ac.at; Striessnig, Gabriele; Resinger, Christoph T.; Aldrian, Silke M.; Vecsei, Vilmos; Imhof, Herwig; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate articular cartilage repair tissue after biological cartilage repair, we propose a new technique of non-invasive, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and define a new classification system. For the definition of pertinent variables the repair tissue of 45 patients treated with three different techniques for cartilage repair (microfracture, autologous osteochondral transplantation, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation) was analyzed 6 and 12 months after the procedure. High-resolution imaging was obtained with a surface phased array coil placed over the knee compartment of interest and adapted sequences were used on a 1 T MRI scanner. The analysis of the repair tissue included the definition and rating of nine pertinent variables: the degree of filling of the defect, the integration to the border zone, the description of the surface and structure, the signal intensity, the status of the subchondral lamina and subchondral bone, the appearance of adhesions and the presence of synovitis. High-resolution MRI, using a surface phased array coil and specific sequences, can be used on every standard 1 or 1.5 T MRI scanner according to the in-house standard protocols for knee imaging in patients who have had cartilage repair procedures without substantially prolonging the total imaging time. The new classification and grading system allows a subtle description and suitable assessment of the articular cartilage repair tissue.

  1. Articular cartilage lesions increase early cartilage degeneration in knees treated by anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: T1ρ mapping evaluation and 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Jun; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Nobukazu; Oniki, Yasunari; Nakamura, Eiichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Usuku, Koichiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration can develop after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Although radiological studies have identified risk factors for the progression of degenerative cartilage changes in the long term, risk factors in the early postoperative period remain to be documented. Cartilage lesions that are present at surgery progress to cartilage degeneration in the early phase after ACLR. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. T1ρ is the spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame magnetic resonance imaging. Sagittal T1ρ maps of the femorotibial joint were obtained before and 1 year after ACLR in 23 patients with ACL injuries. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on images of the cartilage in the medial and lateral femoral condyle (MFC, LFC) and the medial and lateral tibia plateau (MTP, LTP). Changes in the T1ρ value (milliseconds) of each ROI were recorded, and differences between patients with and without cartilage lesions were evaluated. The relationship between changes in the T1ρ value and meniscal tears was also studied. Arthroscopy at ACLR detected cartilage lesions in 15 MFCs, 7 LFCs, and 2 LTPs. The baseline T1ρ value of the MFC and LFC was significantly higher in patients with cartilage lesions (MFC, 40.7 ms; LFC, 42.2 ms) than in patients without cartilage lesions (MFC, 38.0 ms, P = .025; LFC, 39.4 ms, P = .010). At 1-year follow-up, the T1ρ value of the MFC and LFC was also significantly higher in patients with lesions (MFC, 43.1 ms; LFC, 42.7 ms) than in patients without such lesions (MFC, 39.1 ms, P = .002; LFC, 40.4 ms, P = .023, respectively). In patients with cartilage injury, the T1ρ value of the MFC increased during the year after treatment (P = .002). There was no significant difference in the baseline and follow-up T1ρ value in patients with or without meniscal tears on each side although the T1ρ value of the MFC, MTP, and LFC increased during the first year after surgery regardless of the presence or

  2. Elimination of BMP7 from the developing limb mesenchyme leads to articular cartilage degeneration and synovial inflammation with increased age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abula, Kahaer; Muneta, Takeshi; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Graf, Daniel; Economides, Aris N; Rosen, Vicki; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2015-05-08

    While osteo- and chondro-inductive activities of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 are well established, evaluation of the role of endogenous BMP7 in skeletal homeostasis has been hampered by perinatal lethality in BMP7 knockout mice. Here, we examined physiological roles of endogenous BMP7 in joint homeostasis and showed that proteoglycan contents in articular cartilage were significantly reduced in the absence of BMP7. Loss of BMP7 did not affect survival of articular cartilage cells, but resulted in reduced expression of aggrecan and enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 13. We also found extensive synovial hyperplasia and enhanced expression of Activin A. These findings suggest that locally produced BMP7 is prerequisite for postnatal synovial joint homeostasis and may be involved in osteoarthritic changes in adults. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. T2 mapping of articular cartilage of the glenohumeral joint at 3.0 T in healthy volunteers: a feasibility study

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    Kang, Yusuhn [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hwaseong, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage in healthy asymptomatic individuals at 3.0 T and to analyze the T2 profile of the humeral cartilage. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Thirteen subjects (mean age, 28.6 years; age range, 24-33 years) were included and underwent multiecho spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging and T2 mapping was acquired. Regions of interest were placed on the humeral cartilage and glenoid cartilage on oblique coronal images. T2 profiles of humeral cartilage were measured from the bone-cartilage interface to the articular surface. Intra-observer agreement was analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). All 13 joints showed normal appearance on conventional T2-weighted images. The mean T2 values of humeral and glenoid cartilage were 50.5 ± 12.1 and 49.0 ± 9.9 ms, respectively. Intra-observer agreement was good, as determined by ICC (0.736). Longer T2 values were observed at the articular surface with a tendency to decrease toward the bone-cartilage interface. The mean cartilage T2 value was 69.03 ± 21.2 ms at the articular surface and 46.99 ± 19.6 ms at the bone-cartilage interface. T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage were similar to reported values of cartilage in the knee. The T2 profile of normal humeral cartilage showed a spatial variation with an increase in T2 values from the subchondral bone to the articular surface. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative T2* relaxation time analysis of articular cartilage of the tibiotalar joint in professional football players and healthy volunteers at 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Maas, Kai-Jonathan; Welsch, Goetz; Kaul, Michael; Schoen, Gerhard; Laqmani, Azien; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2018-02-01

    To compare T 2 * relaxation times of the tibiotalar cartilage between professional football players and matched healthy male volunteers. Twenty-two ankles of professional football players (24.3 ± 3.8 years) and 20 age- and body mass index-matched healthy individuals (25.6 ± 2.4 years) were investigated. The study protocol consisted of multiplanar T 1 -weighted, fat-saturated proton-density weighted (Pdw) and a 3D multiecho T 2 * sequence with 22 echo times (4.6-53.6 msec). The articular cartilage was subdivided into six segments. Regions of interest were manually drawn in three zones (lateral, central, medial). Differences and confidence intervals were estimated applying a random effects models. Fixed effects were professional football players versus healthy individuals and areas. The random effect was defined as the person cluster of the different individuals. T 2 * values were significantly prolonged in football players compared to male volunteers in all predefined cartilage segments (mean, 17.5 vs. 15.5 msec; P < 0.001). In both groups, the highest relaxation times were found in the lateral zone, with statistically higher relaxation times in professional football players (18.5 vs. 16.5 msec, P = 0.003). Separate evaluation revealed the longest relaxation times in the posterior tibiotalar cartilage, with 21.0 msec for professional football players compared to 19.4 msec for healthy volunteers (P = 0.064). Based on these initial results, T 2 * values of the tibiotalar cartilage seem to be elevated in professional football players compared to healthy volunteers. Prospective longitudinal studies should be encouraged to show if these results represent early subtle cartilage lesions prior to clinical manifestation or rather temporary adaptation related to daily high-level loading. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:372-379. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

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    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  6. Magic angle effect plays a major role in both T1rho and T2 relaxation in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H; Pauli, C; Li, S; Ma, Y; Tadros, A S; Kavanaugh, A; Chang, E Y; Tang, G; Du, J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sample orientation on T1rho and T2 values of articular cartilage in histologically confirmed normal and abnormal regions using a whole-body 3T scanner. Eight human cadaveric patellae were evaluated using a 2D CPMG sequence for T2 measurement as well as a 2D spin-locking prepared spiral sequence and a 3D magnetization-prepared angle-modulated partitioned-k-space spoiled gradient echo snapshots (3D MAPSS) sequence for T1rho measurement. Each sample was imaged at six angles from 0° to 100° relative to the B 0 field. T2 and T1rho values were measured for three regions (medial, apex and lateral) with three layers (10% superficial, 60% middle, 30% deep). Multiple histopathologically confirmed normal and abnormal regions were used to evaluate the angular dependence of T2 and T1rho relaxation in articular cartilage. Our study demonstrated a strong magic angle effect for T1rho and T2 relaxation in articular cartilage, especially in the deeper layers of cartilage. On average, T2 values were increased by 231.8% (72.2% for superficial, 237.6% for middle, and 187.9% for deep layers) while T1rho values were increased by 92% (31.7% for superficial, 69% for middle, and 140% for deep layers) near the magic angle. Both normal and abnormal cartilage showed similar T1rho and T2 magic angle effect. Changes in T1rho and T2 values due to the magic angle effect can be several times more than that caused by degeneration, and this may significantly complicate the clinical application of T1rho and T2 as an early surrogate marker for degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biocompatible nanocomposite of TiO2 incorporated bi-polymer for articular cartilage tissue regeneration: A facile material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qiugen; Wang, Jiandong

    2018-01-01

    The development and design of polymeric hydrogels for articular cartilage tissue engineering have been a vital biomedical research for recent days. Organic/inorganic combined hydrogels with improved surface activity have shown potential for the repair and regeneration of hard tissues, but have not been broadly studied for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications. In this work, bi-polymeric hydrogel composite was designed with the incorporation some quantities of stick-like TiO 2 nanostructures for favorable surface behavior and enhancement of osteoblast adhesions. The microscopic investigations clearly exhibited that the stick-like TiO 2 nanostructured materials are highly inserted into the PVA/PVP bi-polymeric matrix, due to the long-chain PVA molecules are promoted to physical crosslinking density in hydrogel network. The results of improved surface topography of hydrogel matrixes show that more flatted cell morphologies and enhanced osteoblast attachment on the synthesized nanocomposites. The crystalline bone and stick-like TiO 2 nanocomposites significantly improved the bioactivity via lamellipodia and filopodia extension of osteoblast cells, due to its excellent intercellular connection and regulated cell responses. Consequently, these hydrogel has been enhanced the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacterial pathogens. Hence it is concluded that these hydrogel nanocomposite with improved morphology, osteoblast behavior and bactericidal activity have highly potential candidates for articular cartilage tissue regeneration applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Instruments for reproducible setting of defects in cartilage and harvesting of osteochondral plugs for standardisation of preclinical tests for articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Markus L; Schneider-Wald, Barbara; Brade, Joachim; Schleich, Dieter; Schütte, Andy; Reisig, Gregor

    2015-07-28

    Standardisation is required in research, so are approval procedures for advanced therapy medical products and other procedures for articular cartilage therapies. The process of creating samples needs to be reproducible. The aim of this study was to design, create and validate instruments (1) to create reproducible and accurate defects and (2) to isolate samples in the shape of osteochondral cylinders in a quick, reliable and sterile manner. Adjustable instruments were created: a crown mill with a resolution of 0.05 mm and a front mill to create defects in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The instruments were tested on knee joints of pigs from the slaughterhouse; 48 defects were created and evaluated. A punching machine was designed to harvest osteochondral plugs. These were validated in an in vivo animal study. The instruments respect the desired depth of 0.5 and 1.5 mm when creating the defects, depending on whether the person using the instrument is highly experienced (0.451 mm; confidence interval (CI): 0.390 mm; 0.512 mm and 1.403 mm; CI: 1.305 mm; 1.502 mm) or less so (0.369 mm; CI: 0.297 mm; 0.440 mm and 1.241 mm; CI: 1.141 mm; 1.341 mm). Eighty samples were taken from knee joints of Göttingen Minipigs with this punching technique. The time needed for the harvesting of the samples was 7.52 min (±2.18 min), the parallelism of the sides of the cylinders deviated by -0.63° (CI: -1.33°; 0.08°) and the surface of the cartilage deviated from the perpendicularity by 4.86° (CI: 4.154°; 5.573°). In all assessed cases, a sterile procedure was observed. Instruments and procedures for standardised creation and validation of defects in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were designed. Harvesting of samples in the shape of osteochondral cylinders can now be performed in a quick, reliable and sterile manner. The presented instruments and procedures can serve as helpful steps towards standardised operating procedures in the field of

  9. Effects of Equine Joint Injury on Boundary Lubrication of Articular Cartilage by Synovial Fluid: Role of Hyaluronan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Jennifer M.; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Serventi, Lisa A.; Cai, Matthew Z.; Shu, YuYu L.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare equine synovial fluid (eSF) from post-injury and control joints for (1) cartilage boundary lubrication function, (2) putative boundary lubricant molecules hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan-4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL), (3) relationships between lubrication function and composition, and (4) lubrication restoration by addition of HA. Methods eSF from normal (NL), acute injury (AI), and chronic injury (CI) joints were analyzed for boundary lubrication of normal articular cartilage as kinetic friction coefficient (μkinetic). eSF were also analyzed for HA, PRG4, and SAPL concentrations and HA molecular weight (MW) distribution. The effect of addition of HA, of different concentrations and MW, to AI- and NL-eSF samples on μkinetic was determined. Results The μkinetic of AI-eSF (0.036) was higher (+39%) than that of NL-eSF (0.026). Compared to NL-eSF, AI-eSF had a lower HA concentration (−30%) of lower MW forms, higher PRG4 concentration (+83%), and higher SAPL concentration (+144%). CI-eSF had μkinetic, HA, PRG4, and SAPL characteristics intermediate to that of AI-eSF and NL-eSF. Regression analysis revealed that μkinetic decreased with increasing HA concentration in eSF. The friction-reducing properties of HA alone improved with increasing concentration and MW. Addition of high-MW HA (4,000kDa) to AI-eSF reduced μkinetic to a value near that of NL-eSF. Conclusion In the acute post-injury stage, eSF exhibits poor boundary lubrication properties as indicated by a high μkinetic. HA of diminished concentration and MW may be the basis for this, and adding HA to deficient eSF restored lubrication function. PMID:22605527

  10. Comparison of T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in elite professional football players and age-and BMI-matched amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, C; Welsch, G H; Laqmani, A; Henes, F O; Kaul, M G; Schoen, G; Adam, G; Regier, M

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigation has underlined the potential of quantitative MR imaging to be used as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of cartilage degeneration at an early state. The presented study analyses T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in professional athletes and compares the results to age- and BMI (Body Mass Index)-matched healthy amateur athletes. 22 professional football players and 22 age- and BMI-matched individuals were underwent knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 3T including qualitative and quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis included e.g. meniscal tears, joint effusion and bone edema. For quantitative analysis T2* (22 ET: 4.6-53.6ms) measurements in 3D data acquisition were performed. Deep and superficial layers of 22 predefined cartilage segments were analysed. All data sets were postprocessed using a dedicated software tool. Statistical analysis included Student t-test, confidence intervals and a random effects model. In both groups, T2* relaxation times were significantly higher in the superficial compared to the deep layers (pamateur athletes were noted. The effects seem to predominate in superficial cartilage layers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Deficiency of Thrombospondin-4 in Mice Does Not Affect Skeletal Growth or Bone Mass Acquisition, but Causes a Transient Reduction of Articular Cartilage Thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Jeschke

    Full Text Available Although articular cartilage degeneration represents a major public health problem, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We have previously utilized genome-wide expression analysis to identify specific markers of porcine articular cartilage, one of them being Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4. In the present study we analyzed Thbs4 expression in mice, thereby confirming its predominant expression in articular cartilage, but also identifying expression in other tissues, including bone. To study the role of Thbs4 in skeletal development and integrity we took advantage of a Thbs4-deficient mouse model that was analyzed by undecalcified bone histology. We found that Thbs4-deficient mice do not display phenotypic differences towards wildtype littermates in terms of skeletal growth or bone mass acquisition. Since Thbs4 has previously been found over-expressed in bones of Phex-deficient Hyp mice, we additionally generated Thbs4-deficient Hyp mice, but failed to detect phenotypic differences towards Hyp littermates. With respect to articular cartilage we found that Thbs4-deficient mice display transient thinning of articular cartilage, suggesting a protective role of Thbs4 for joint integrity. Gene expression analysis using porcine primary cells revealed that Thbs4 is not expressed by synovial fibroblasts and that it represents the only member of the Thbs gene family with specific expression in articular, but not in growth plate chondrocytes. In an attempt to identify specific molecular effects of Thbs4 we treated porcine articular chondrocytes with human THBS4 in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from porcine synovial fibroblasts. Here we did not observe a significant influence of THBS4 on proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis or gene expression, suggesting that it does not act as a signaling molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Thbs4 is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, where its

  12. Pathology of articular cartilage and synovial membrane from elbow joints with and without degenerative joint disease in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, M; Meuten, D; Lascelles, D

    2014-09-01

    The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia. Macroscopic evidence of degenerative joint disease was found in 22 of 30 cats (39 elbow joints) (73.33% cats; 65% elbow joints), and macroscopic cartilage erosion ranged from mild fibrillation to complete ulceration of the hyaline cartilage with exposure of the subchondral bone. Distribution of the lesions in the cartilage indicated the presence of medial compartment joint disease (most severe lesions located in the medial coronoid process of the ulna and medial humeral epicondyle). Synovitis scores were mild overall and correlated only weakly with macroscopic cartilage damage. Intra-articular osteochondral fragments either free or attached to the synovium were found in 10 joints. Macroscopic or histologic evidence of a fragmented coronoid process was not found even in those cases with intra-articular osteochondral fragments. Lesions observed in these animals are most consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis secondary to degenerative joint disease. The pathogenesis for the medial compartmentalization of these lesions has not been established, but a fragmented medial coronoid process or osteochondritis dissecans does not appear to play a role. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Partial reversal by beta-D-xyloside of salicylate-induced inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    While net 35 S-glycosaminoglycan synthesis in normal canine articular cartilage was suppressed by 10(-3)M sodium salicylate to about 70% of the control value, addition of xyloside (10(-6)M-10(-3)M) to the salicylate-treated cultures led to a concentration-dependent increase in glycosaminoglycan synthesis, which rose to 120-237% of controls. Similar results were obtained when 3 H-glucosamine was used to measure glycosaminoglycan synthesis, confirming that salicylate suppresses and xyloside stimulates net glycosaminoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. Salicylate (10-3)M) did not affect the activity of xylosyl or galactosyl transferase prepared from canine knee cartilage, and net protein synthesis was unaltered by either salicylate or xyloside. The proportion of newly synthesized proteoglycans existing as aggregates when cartilage was cultured with xyloside was similar to that in controls, although the average hydrodynamic size of disaggregated proteoglycans and of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was diminished

  14. Tissue Engineering Based Therapy for Articular Cartilage Defects - A New Approach

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    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue in diarthrodial joints, when damaged due to trauma could lead to osteoarthritis. At present Autologous Cartilage Implantation is an established method in which patients own chondrocytes are isolated and then implanted after in vitro expansion over the affected area with bovine or porcine collagen matrix. This procedure results in more of Collagen Type I during in vitro expansion, which eventually becomes fibrocartilage. Also it requires growth factors. We have in this study tried growing human Chondrocytes without growth factors using synthetic scaffolds to grow more Collagen Type II Materials and Methods: Human cartilage specimens were harvested through arthroscopy from the non-weight bearing area of the knee joint from 13 patients who underwent surgical procedures of the knee joint after getting their informed consent. The tissues were transported in saline taking 1 hour to laboratory and subjected to digestion with Collagenase type II for 16~18 Hrs. The chondrocyte cells obtained after dissociation were divided into two groups for culture. Gr. I were embedded in a Thermogelation polymer (TGP and Gr. II in basal culture media (DMEM + Ascorbic Acid without using any growth factors. The Group II cells were viable only for 4 weeks and then started degenerating. The TGP-Chondrocytes scaffolds were grown for 16 weeks and the specimens were harvested at 4, 8, 12 and 16-week intervals and their morphology and molecular characteristics were studied by H&E staining, S-100 protein analysis and RT-PCR.Results: Human chondrocytes could be cultured in both TGP (group I and Basal culture media (group II. The Gr. I cells were viable upto the 16th week while the Group II chondrocytes started degenerating after the 4 week. Both the groups were proven positive for S-100 protein, a Chondrocyte specific marker protein; Gr. II specimens after 4 weeks, and Gr. I specimens after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. RT

  15. MR imaging of post-traumatic articular cartilage injuries confined to the femoral trochlea Arthroscopic correlation and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huegli, Rolf W. E-mail: rhuegli@uhbs.ch; Moelleken, Sonja M.C.; Stork, Alexander; Bonel, Harald M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Meckel, Stephan; Genant, Harry K.; Tirman, Phillip F.J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess and describe post-traumatic articular cartilage injuries isolated to the trochlear groove and provide insight into potential mechanism of injury. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated MR imaging findings of all knee MRIs performed at our institution over the last 2 years (2450). Thirty patients met the criteria of a cartilage injury confined to the trochlear groove. In 15 cases, which were included in our study, arthroscopic correlation was available. Each plane was evaluated and graded for the presence and appearance of articular cartilage defects using a standard arthroscopic grading scheme adapted to MR imaging. Any additional pathological derangement was documented and information about the mechanism of injury was retrieved by chart review. Results: In all cases the cartilaginous injury was well demonstrated on MRI. In 13 patients additional pathological findings could be observed. The most frequently associated injury was a meniscal tear in nine patients. In eight cases, the arthroscopic grading of the trochlear injury matched exactly with the MRI findings. In the remaining seven cases, the discrepancy between MRI and arthroscopy was never higher than one grade. In 13 out of 15 of patients trauma mechanism could be evaluated. Twelve patients suffered an indirect twisting injury and one suffered a direct trauma to their knee. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrate that MR imaging allows reliable grading of isolated injury to the trochlear groove cartilage and assists in directing surgical diagnosis and treatment. These injuries may be the only hyaline cartilage injury in the knee and meniscal tears are a frequently associated finding. Therefore, it is important to search specifically for cartilage injuries of the trochlear groove in patients with anterior knee pain, even if other coexistent pathology could potentially explain the patient's symptoms.

  16. Articular Cartilage Gene Expression after Coxofemoral Joint Luxation in the Dog

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    Korakot Nganvongpanit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between days of hip luxation and the expression of various mRNA. Twenty-six articular cartilages were used in the experiment: 3 samples were from normal dogs and 23 samples were collected from the femoral heads of hips that had been luxated for different lengths of time. Ten mRNA, including nonapoptotic genes (AGG, COL2A1, MMP-3, HAS-1, HAS-2, and TIMP-1 and apoptotic genes (BAX, BCL-2, CAS-3, and CAS-9, were studied for their expression using real-time PCR. We found very high correlation between expression level and luxation days (r2>0.9 in COL2A1, MMP-3, HAS-1, HAS-2, TIMP-1, BAX, and CAS-9, while the others (AGG, BCL-2, and CAS-3 also showed high correlation (r2=7–9. And we found a significant difference (P<0.05 in the expression of transcripts depending on the number of luxation days. In conclusion, a delay in joint reduction may increase the chances of development of osteoarthritis.

  17. An Axisymmetric Boundary Element Model for Determination of Articular Cartilage Pericellular Matrix Properties In situ via Inverse Analysis of Chondron Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Guilak, Farshid; Haider, Mansoor A.

    2013-01-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is the narrow tissue region surrounding all chondrocytes in articular cartilage and, together, the chondrocyte(s) and surrounding PCM have been termed the chondron. Previous theoretical and experimental studies suggest that the structure and properties of the PCM significantly influence the biomechanical environment at the microscopic scale of the chondrocytes within cartilage. In the present study, an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM) was developed for linear elastic domains with internal interfaces. The new BEM was employed in a multiscale continuum model to determine linear elastic properties of the PCM in situ, via inverse analysis of previously reported experimental data for the three-dimensional morphological changes of chondrons within a cartilage explant in equilibrium unconfined compression (Choi et al., J Biomech, 40:2596–603, 2007). The microscale geometry of the chondron (cell and PCM) within the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) was represented as a three-zone equilibrated biphasic region comprised of an ellipsoidal chondrocyte with encapsulating PCM that was embedded within a spherical ECM subjected to boundary conditions for unconfined compression at its outer boundary. Accuracy of the three-zone BEM model was evaluated and compared to analytical finite element solutions. The model was then integrated with a nonlinear optimization technique (Nelder-Mead) to determine PCM elastic properties within the cartilage explant by solving an inverse problem associated with the in situ experimental data for chondron deformation. Depending on the assumed material properties of the ECM and the choice of cost function in the optimization, estimates of the PCM Young’s modulus ranged from ~24 to 59 kPa, consistent with previous measurements of PCM properties on extracted chondrons using micropipette aspiration. Taken together with previous experimental and theoretical studies of cell-matrix interactions in cartilage

  18. Prenatal nicotine exposure induces poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and the intrauterine programming mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Kai; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) induces skeletal growth retardation and dyslipidemia in offspring displaying intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Cholesterol accumulation resulting from cholesterol efflux dysfunction may reduce the quality of articular cartilage through fetal programming. This study evaluated the quality of articular cartilage of female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and explored the mechanisms using a rat IUGR model established by the administration of 2.0mg/kg/d of subcutaneous nicotine from gestational days 11-20. The results demonstrated an increased OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score and total cholesterol content, decreased serum corticosterone, and increased IGF1 and dyslipidemia with catch-up growth in PNE adult offspring. Cartilage matrix, IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway expression were reduced in PNE fetuses and adult offspring. Therefore, PNE induced poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet via a dual programming mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing the effect of football play on knee articular cartilage using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenbo; Lambach, Becky; Jia, Guang; Flanigan, David; Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Wei, Lai; Rogers, Alan; Payne, Jason; Siston, Robert A; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of cartilage lesions is much higher in football athletes than in the general population. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been shown to quantify regional variations of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations which is an indicator of early cartilage degeneration. The goal of this study is to determine whether dGEMRIC can be used to assess the influence in cartilage GAG concentration due to college level football play. Thirteen collegiate football players with one to four years of collegiate football play experience were recruited and both knee joints were scanned using a dedicated 8-channel phased array knee coil on a 3T MRI system. The contrast concentrations within cartilage were calculated based on the T 1 values from dGEMRIC scans. No substantial differences were found in the contrast concentrations between the pre- and post-season across all the cartilage compartments. One year collegiate football players presented an average contrast concentration at the pre-season of 0.116±0.011mM and post-season of 0.116±0.011mM. In players with multiple years of football play, contrast uptake was elevated to 0.141±0.012mM at the pre-season and 0.139±0.012mM at the post-season. The pre-season 0.023±0.016mM and post-season 0.025±0.016mM increase in contrast concentration within the group with multiple years of experience presented with a >20% increase in contrast uptake. This may indicate the gradual, cumulative damage of football play to the articular cartilage over years, even though the effect may not be noticeable after a season of play. Playing collegiate football for a longer period of time may lead to cartilage microstructural alterations, which may be linked to early knee cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efeitos dos glicosaminoglicanos e sulfato de condroitina A sobre a cartilagem articular normal e com doença articular degenerativa em cães Glycosaminoglycans and chondroitin sulphate "A" effects on normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos dos precursores dos glicosaminoglicanos (GAG e do sulfato de condroitina A (SC sobre a histomorfometria da cartilagem articular normal ou de cartilagem de cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD experimental. Os grupos experimentais constituíram-se de animais com articulação direita normal, que não foi submetida a procedimento cirúrgico, e com articulação esquerda osteoartrótica e que foi submetida à intervenção cirúrgica. Os grupos foram subdivididos em animais com articulação não tratada e tratada, portanto: normais (N (n=5, NGAG (n=5 e NSC (n=4; e osteoartróticos (O (n=5, OGAG (n=5 e OSC (n=4. Secções de cartilagens do fêmur, da tíbia e da patela foram utilizadas neste estudo. Nos normais (N, NGAG e NSC, não se encontraram lesões que caracterizassem a DAD, embora tenha havido diminuição na celularidade nos de NGAG e NSC, em relação a N. Foram observadas alterações em graus variáveis entre os grupos osteoartróticos. Houve redução acentuada dos condrócitos no grupo O em comparação aos normais enquanto os grupos osteoartróticos tratados apresentaram celularidade semelhante aos normais tratados. Estes resultados foram confirmados pela análise do índice de proporção (IP, que se mostrou elevado em O, indicando menor síntese de proteoglicanos. Não houve diferença significativa entre os IPs dos grupos osteoartróticos tratados (OGAG, OSC apesar do comportamento distinto do OSC ao assemelhar-se aos grupos N e NSC. Estes resultados sugeriram que o SC agiu na cartilagem osteoartrótica de maneira mais eficaz, reduzindo a perda de proteoglicanos e estimulando a viabilidade celular e a atividade metabólica.The effects of precursors of glycosaminoglycans (GAG and chondroitin sulphate A (CS on the histomorphometry of normal articular cartilage and with experimental degenerative joint disease (DJD in dogs were evaluated. The groups were constituted as follows: normal joints were not

  1. [Experimental study of repairing full-thickness articular cartilage defect with chondrocyte-sodium alginate hydrogel-SIS complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiangtao; Deng, Li; Li, Xiuqun; Xie, Huiqi; Luo, Jingcong; Guo, Shangchun; Yang, Zhiming

    2009-08-01

    To explore the effect of tissue engineered cartilage reconstructed by using sodium alginate hydrogel and SIS complex as scaffold material and chondrocyte as seed cell on the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects. SIS was prepared by custom-made machine and detergent-enzyme treatment. Full-thickness articular cartilage of loading surface of the humeral head and the femoral condyle obtained from 8 New Zealand white rabbits (2-3 weeks old) was used to culture chondrocytes in vitro. Rabbit chondrocytes at passage 4 cultured by conventional multiplication method were diluted by sodium alginate to (5-7) x 10(7) cells/mL, and then were coated on SIS to prepare chondrocyte-sodium alginate hydrogel-SIS complex. Forty 6-month-old clean grade New Zealand white rabbits weighing 3.0-3.5 kg were randomized into two groups according to different operative methods (n = 20 rabbits per group), and full-thickness cartilage defect model of the unilateral knee joint (right or left) was established in every rabbit. In experimental group, the complex was implanted into the defect layer by layer to construct tissue engineered cartilage, and SIS membrane was coated on the surface to fill the defect completely. While in control group, the cartilage defect was filled by sodium alginate hydrogel and was sutured after being coated with SIS membrane without seeding of chondrocyte. General condition of the rabbits after operation was observed. The rabbits in two groups were killed 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 months after operation, and underwent gross and histology observation. Eight rabbits were excluded due to anesthesia death, wound infection and diarrhea death. Sixteen rabbits per group were included in the experiment, and 3, 3, 3, 3, and 4 rabbits from each group were randomly selected and killed 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 months after operation, respectively. Gross observation and histology Masson trichrome staining: in the experimental group, SIS on the surface of the implant was fused with

  2. The intra-articular injection of RANKL-binding peptides inhibits cartilage degeneration in a murine model of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zahirul Haque Bhuyan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL-binding peptide, OP3-4 stimulated the differentiation of both chondrocytes and osteoblasts. OP3-4 is also shown to inhibit cartilage degeneration. To clarify whether the peptide can inhibit cartilage degeneration without stimulating bone formation, we first performed a proliferation assay using C3H10T1/2 (the murine mesenchymal stem cell line, which is the common origin of both chondrocytes and osteoblasts. The RANKL-binding peptides, OP3-4 and W9, promoted cellular proliferation at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Next, we injected both peptides into the intra-articular space of the knee joints of mice with monosodium-iodoacetate (MIA-induced osteoarthritis to clarify the effects of the peptides on cartilage tissue. Twenty-five nine-week-old male C57BL/6J mice received injections of vehicle, or the same molar amount of W9, OP3-4, or a control peptide (which could not stimulate osteoblast differentiation on days 7, 14, and 21 after the injection of MIA. The mice were sacrificed on day 28. The histomorphometric analyses revealed that both peptides inhibited the degeneration of cartilage without enhancing bone formation activity. Our data suggest that the stimulation of mesenchymal cell proliferation by the RANKL-binding peptides might lead to the inhibition of cartilage degeneration.

  3. Functional in situ assessment of human articular cartilage using MRI: a whole-knee joint loading device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Post, Manuel; Raith, Stefan; Fischer, Horst; Knobe, Matthias; Braun, Benedikt; Prescher, Andreas; Tingart, Markus; Thüring, Johannes; Bruners, Philipp; Jahr, Holger; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    The response to loading of human articular cartilage as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains to be defined in relation to histology and biomechanics. Therefore, an MRI-compatible whole-knee joint loading device for the functional in situ assessment of cartilage was developed and validated in this study. A formalin-fixed human knee was scanned by computed tomography in its native configuration and digitally processed to create femoral and tibial bone models. The bone models were covered by artificial femoral and tibial articular cartilage layers in their native configuration using cartilage-mimicking polyvinyl siloxane. A standardized defect of 8 mm diameter was created within the artificial cartilage layer at the central medial femoral condyle, into which native cartilage samples of similar dimensions were placed. After describing its design and specifications, the comprehensive validation of the device was performed using a hydraulic force gauge and digital electronic pressure-sensitive sensors. Displacement-controlled quasi-static uniaxial loading to 2.5 mm [Formula: see text] and 5.0 mm [Formula: see text] of the mobile tibia versus the immobile femur resulted in forces of [Formula: see text] N [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] N [Formula: see text] (on the entire joint) and local pressures of [Formula: see text] MPa [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] MPa [Formula: see text] (at the site of the cartilage sample). Upon confirming the MRI compatibility of the set-up, the response to loading of macroscopically intact human articular cartilage samples ([Formula: see text]) was assessed on a clinical 3.0-T MR imaging system using clinical standard proton-density turbo-spin echo sequences and T2-weighted multi-spin echo sequences. Serial imaging was performed at the unloaded state [Formula: see text] and at consecutive loading positions (i.e. at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Biomechanical unconfined compression testing

  4. Experimental study on the role of intra-articular injection of MSCs on cartilage regeneration in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanbod, R; Torkaman, G; Mophid, M; Mohammadali, F

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy is a field in progress in cartilage repair strategies. We tried to investigate the functional properties of the joint and cartilage in experimental haemarthrosis (EH) after MSCs intra-articular (IA) injection. One millilitre of fresh autologous blood was injected twice a week for three consecutive weeks in three groups including control haemophilia 10 days (n = 8), control haemophilia 38 days (n = 8) and MSCs (n = 8) group. In later, 10 days after the end of IA blood injections, MSCs IA injection was performed. Eight animals received no treatment as the normal control group. Thirty-eight days after the end of IA blood injections, animals were sacrificed. Joint friction and stress-relaxation tests were done, inflammatory cytokines of synovial membrane and scanning electron microscopy of the cartilage assessed. Joint friction decreased in MSCs in comparison to other groups and was significant with normal control group, (P = 0.011). The mechanical properties of cartilage showed no significant differences between groups. Tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta decreased and IL-4 very slightly increased in MSCs in comparison to the time-matched control group. Scanning electron microscopy enabled acquisition of good structural properties of the surface and layers of the cartilage after MSCs injection. The hole induced in the medial plateau of the tibia bones, after inducing haemarthrosis, were covered with cartilage-like structure. The results showed that MSCs IA injection has some beneficial effects on cartilage structure and function in haemarthrosis model and is promising in patients with haemophilia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A Guide for Using Mechanical Stimulation to Enhance Tissue-Engineered Articular Cartilage Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Evelia Y; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2018-03-21

    The use of tissue-engineered articular cartilage (AC) constructs has the potential to become a powerful treatment option for cartilage lesions resulting from trauma or early stages of pathology. Although fundamental tissue-engineering strategies based on the use of scaffolds, cells, and signals have been developed, techniques that lead to biomimetic AC constructs that can be translated to in-vivo use have yet to be fully confirmed. Mechanical stimulation during tissue culture can be an effective strategy to enhance the mechanical, structural, and cellular properties of tissue-engineered constructs toward mimicking those of native AC. This review focuses on the use of mechanical stimulation to attain and enhance the properties of AC constructs needed to translate these implants to the clinic. In-vivo, mechanical loading at maximal and supramaximal physiological levels has been shown to be detrimental to AC through the development of degenerative changes. In contrast, multiple studies have revealed that during culture, mechanical stimulation within narrow ranges of magnitude and duration can produce anisotropic, mechanically robust AC constructs with high cellular viability. Significant progress has been made in evaluating a variety of mechanical stimulation techniques on tissue-engineered AC, either alone or in combination with other stimuli. These advancements include determining and optimizing efficacious loading parameters (e.g., duration and frequency) to yield improvements in construct design criteria, such as collagen II content, compressive stiffness, cell viability, and fiber organization. With the advancement of mechanical stimulation as a potent strategy in AC tissue-engineering, a compendium detailing the results achievable by various stimulus regimens would be of great use for researchers in academia and industry. The objective is to list the qualitative and quantitative effects that can be attained when direct compression, hydrostatic pressure, shear

  6. Contour interpolated radial basis functions with spline boundary correction for fast 3D reconstruction of the human articular cartilage from MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaid, Zarrar; Unsworth, Charles P., E-mail: c.unsworth@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Engineering Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Boocock, Mark G.; McNair, Peter J. [Health and Rehabilitation Research Center, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new image processing technique that can provide a “near real-time” 3D reconstruction of the articular cartilage of the human knee from MR images which is user friendly. This would serve as a point-of-care 3D visualization tool which would benefit a consultant radiologist in the visualization of the human articular cartilage. Methods: The authors introduce a novel fusion of an adaptation of the contour method known as “contour interpolation (CI)” with radial basis functions (RBFs) which they describe as “CI-RBFs.” The authors also present a spline boundary correction which further enhances volume estimation of the method. A subject cohort consisting of 17 right nonpathological knees (ten female and seven male) is assessed to validate the quality of the proposed method. The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method dramatically reduces the number of data points required for fitting an implicit surface to the entire cartilage, thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction over the comparable RBF reconstruction method of Carr. The authors compare the CI-RBF method volume estimation to a typical commercial package (3D DOCTOR), Carr’s RBF method, and a benchmark manual method for the reconstruction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Results: The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method significantly reduces the number of data points (p-value < 0.0001) required for fitting an implicit surface to the cartilage, by 48%, 31%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. Thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction (p-value < 0.0001) by 39%, 40%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages over the comparable RBF model of Carr providing a near real-time reconstruction of 6.49, 8.88, and 9.43 min for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. In addition, it is demonstrated how the CI-RBF method matches the volume

  7. Contour interpolated radial basis functions with spline boundary correction for fast 3D reconstruction of the human articular cartilage from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaid, Zarrar; Unsworth, Charles P.; Boocock, Mark G.; McNair, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new image processing technique that can provide a “near real-time” 3D reconstruction of the articular cartilage of the human knee from MR images which is user friendly. This would serve as a point-of-care 3D visualization tool which would benefit a consultant radiologist in the visualization of the human articular cartilage. Methods: The authors introduce a novel fusion of an adaptation of the contour method known as “contour interpolation (CI)” with radial basis functions (RBFs) which they describe as “CI-RBFs.” The authors also present a spline boundary correction which further enhances volume estimation of the method. A subject cohort consisting of 17 right nonpathological knees (ten female and seven male) is assessed to validate the quality of the proposed method. The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method dramatically reduces the number of data points required for fitting an implicit surface to the entire cartilage, thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction over the comparable RBF reconstruction method of Carr. The authors compare the CI-RBF method volume estimation to a typical commercial package (3D DOCTOR), Carr’s RBF method, and a benchmark manual method for the reconstruction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Results: The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method significantly reduces the number of data points (p-value < 0.0001) required for fitting an implicit surface to the cartilage, by 48%, 31%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. Thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction (p-value < 0.0001) by 39%, 40%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages over the comparable RBF model of Carr providing a near real-time reconstruction of 6.49, 8.88, and 9.43 min for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. In addition, it is demonstrated how the CI-RBF method matches the volume

  8. Biochemical evaluation of articular cartilage in patients with osteochondrosis dissecans by means of quantitative T2- and T2*-mapping at 3 T MRI: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, W.; Apprich, S.; Welsch, G.H.; Mamisch, T.C.; Trattnig, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To perform an in vivo evaluation comparing overlying articular cartilage in patients suffering from osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) in the talocrural joint and healthy volunteers using quantitative T2 mapping at 3.0 T. Method and materials: Ten patients with OCD of Grade II or lower and 9 healthy age matched volunteers were examined at a 3.0 T whole body MR scanner using a flexible multi-element coil. In all investigated persons MRI included proton-density (PD)-FSE and 3D GRE (TrueFisp) sequences for morphological diagnosis and location of anatomical site and quantitative T2 and T2* maps. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed for the cartilage layer above the OCD and for a morphologically healthy graded cartilage layer. Mean T2 and T2* values were then statistically analysed. Results: The cartilage layer of healthy volunteers showed mean T2 and T2* values of 29.4 ms (SD 4.9) and 11.8 ms (SD 2.7), respectively. In patients with OCD of grade I and II lesions mean T2 values were 40.9 ms (SD 6.6), 48.7 ms (SD 11.2) and mean T2* values were 16.1 ms (SD 3.2), 16.2 ms (SD 4.8). Therefore statistically significantly higher mean T2 and T2* values were found in patients suffering from OCD compared to healthy volunteers. Conclusion: T2 and T2* mapping can help assess the microstructural composition of cartilage overlying osteochondral lesions.

  9. Radiographical survey of carpal joints with ulcerous lesions of articular cartilage in Japanese black cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taura, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takeuchi, A.; Usui, K.

    1989-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating a different feeding factor in the outbreak of ulcerous lesions of articular cartilage, a radiographical survey of carpal joints was carried out, using Japanese Black cattle at Yamanashi prefecture, and the following results were obtained. 1) The samples for this study were obtained from farms in which using different feeding systems were adopted, such as fattening in drylot (A) : 12 steers (7-32 months old, 221-643 kg body weight), rearing in pasture (B) : 10 steers (7-12 months old, 124-210 kg body weight) and fattening in drylot after rearing in pasture (C) : 5 steers (11-14 months old, 238-271 kg body weight). 2) The radiographic lesions of the carpometacarpal joint were classified into the following five grades, normal (0), slight (I, II), moderate (III) and severe (IV), using a high contrast radiogram. 3) In group A, the lesions were observed in all the metacarpal bone III and carpal bone II@@@III. In the former case, incidence of radiographic lesions was 100%, in which 67% were severe and the remaining 33% consisted of moderate (25%) and slight changes (8%), which was higher than the others. 4) In group B, the incidence of the radiographic lesions of metacarpal bone III was 90%, but in which all of those were of slight changes (I and II). 5) In group C, the incidence of radiographic lesions of the metacarpal bone III was 80%, in which 20% were severe and the remaining 60% were slight ones. 6) No lesions were observed in any lateral half of the joint (carpal bone IV and metacarpal bone IV). 7) Although only the 7 months old steers of group A had very severe radiographic changes, the 10-12 months old steers of the group B showed no clear changes

  10. Oral administration of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) diminished deterioration of articular cartilage in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, C M; Berryman, E R; Teo, S; Lane, N E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) to prevent excessive articular cartilage deterioration in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty male rats were subjected to partial medial meniscectomy tear (PMMT) surgery to induce OA. Immediately after the surgery 10 rats received vehicle and another 10 rats oral daily dose of UC-II at 0.66 mg/kg for a period of 8 weeks. In addition 10 naïve rats were used as an intact control and another 10 rats received sham surgery. Study endpoints included a weight-bearing capacity of front and hind legs, serum biomarkers of bone and cartilage metabolism, analyses of subchondral and cancellous bone at the tibial epiphysis and metaphysis, and cartilage pathology at the medial tibial plateau using histological methods. PMMT surgery produced moderate OA at the medial tibial plateau. Specifically, the deterioration of articular cartilage negatively impacted the weight bearing capacity of the operated limb. Immediate treatment with the UC-II preserved the weight-bearing capacity of the injured leg, preserved integrity of the cancellous bone at tibial metaphysis and limited the excessive osteophyte formation and deterioration of articular cartilage. Study results demonstrate that a clinically relevant daily dose of UC-II when applied immediately after injury can improve the mechanical function of the injured knee and prevent excessive deterioration of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid promote regeneration of massive cartilage defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Ogay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SD MSCs with low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA could promote regeneration of massive cartilage in rabbits. Material and methods: The SD MSCs were harvested from the knees of 10 Flemish giant rabbits, expanded in culture, and characterized. A reproducible 4-mm cylindrical defect was created in the intercondylar groove area using a kit for the mosaic chondroplasty of femoral condyle COR (De Puy, Mitek. The defect was made within the cartilage layer without destruction of subchondral bone. Two weeks after the cartilage defect, SD MSCs (2 × 106 cell/0.15 ml were suspended in 0.5% low molecular weight HA (0.15 ml and injected into the left knee, and HA solution (0.30 ml alone was placed into the right knee. Cartilage regeneration in the experimental and control groups were evaluated by macroscopically and histologically at 10, 30, and 60 days. Results: On day 10, after intra-articular injection of SD MSCs, we observed an early process of cartilage regeneration in the defect area. Histological studies revealed that cartilage defect was covered by a thin layer of spindle-shaped undifferentiated cells and proliferated chodroblasts. In contrast, an injection of HA did not induce reparation of cartilage in the defect area. At 30 days, macroscopic observation showed that the size of cartilage defect after SD MSC injection was significantly smaller than after HA injection. Histological score was also better in the MSC- treated intercondylar defect. At 60 days after MSC treatment, cartilage defect was nearly nonexistent and looked similar to an intact cartilage. Conclusion: Thus, intra-articular injection of SD MSCs can adhere to the defect in the intercondylar area, and promote cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

  12. Pain perception in knees with circumscribed cartilage lesions is associated with intra-articular IGF-1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Niemeyer, Philipp; Südkamp, Norbert P

    2011-01-01

    relations between synovial cytokine levels in knees with circumscribed cartilage defects and pain sensation. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive laboratory study. METHODS: In a clinical trial, knee lavage fluids of 42 patients with circumscribed cartilage lesions treated by either microfracturing (n = 19......) or by autologous chondrocyte implantation (n = 23) and fluids of 5 healthy control individuals were prospectively collected. Preoperative knee pain was evaluated according to frequency and strength; subjective knee function was assessed using a visual analog scale and the International Knee Documentation Committee...... significant correlations with subjective knee function or IKDC score. Only intra-articular concentrations of IGF-1 and BMP-2 statistically significantly correlated with age; total protein content was negatively associated with body mass index (P

  13. Clinically Relevant Subregions of Articular Cartilage of the Hip for Analysis and Reporting Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Rachel K; Lucas, Erin P; Wilson, Katharine J; Saroki, Adriana J; Ho, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    Before quantitative imaging techniques can become clinically valuable, the method, and more specifically, the regions of locating and reporting these values should be standardized toward reproducibility comparisons across centers and longitudinal follow-up of individual patients. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a rigorous and reproducible method of locating, analyzing, and reporting quantitative MRI values in hip articular cartilage with an approach that is consistent with current orthopedic literature. To demonstrate this localization and documentation, 3 patients (age, 23 ± 5.1 years; 2 males, 1 female) who presented with symptomatic mixed-type femoroacetabular impingement (α angle, 63.3° ± 2.1°; center edge angle, 39° ± 4.2°) were evaluated with T2-mapping at 3 T MRI prior to hip arthroscopy. Manual segmentation was performed and cartilage of the acetabulum and femur was divided into 12 subregions adapted from the geographic zone method. Bone landmarks in the acetabulum and femur, identifiable both in arthroscopy and MR images, were manually selected and the coordinates exported for division of cartilage. Mean T2 values in each zone are presented. The current work outlines a standardized system to locate and describe quantitative mapping values that could aid in surgical decision making, planning, and the noninvasive longitudinal follow-up of implemented cartilage preservation and restoration techniques.

  14. Differences in Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Gene Expression in the Peripheral Blood and Articular Cartilages of Osteoarthritic Patients and Disease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene expression of mTOR, autophagy-related ULK1, caspase 3, CDK-inhibitor p21, and TNFα was measured in the peripheral blood of osteoarthritic (OA patients at different stages of the disease aiming to establish a gene expression profile that might indicate the activity of the disease and joint destruction. Whole blood of 65 OA outpatients, 27 end-stage OA patients, 27 healthy volunteers, and knee articular cartilages of 28 end-stage OA patients and 26 healthy subjects were examined. OA outpatients were subjected to clinical testing, ultrasonography, and radiographic and WOMAC scoring. Protein levels of p70-S6K, p21, and caspase 3 were quantified by ELISA. Gene expression was measured using real-time RT-PCR. Upregulation of mTOR gene expression was observed in PBMCs of 42 OA outpatients (“High mTOR expression subset” and in PBMCs and articular cartilages of all end-stage OA patients. A positive correlation between mTOR gene expression in PBMCs and cartilage was observed in the end-stage OA patients. 23 OA outpatients in the “Low mTOR expression subset” exhibited significantly lower mTOR gene expression in PBMCs compared to healthy controls. These “Low mTOR” subset subjects experienced significantly more pain upon walking, and standing and increased total joint stiffness versus “High mTOR” subset, while the latter more often exhibited synovitis. The protein concentrations of p70-S6K, p21, and caspase 3 in PBMCs were significantly lower in the “Low” subset versus “High” subset and end-stage subjects. Increases in the expression of mTOR in PBMCs of OA patients are related to disease activity, being associated with synovitis more than with pain.

  15. Assessment of chemical species of lead accumulated in tidemarks of human articular cartilage by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirer, Florian [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pemmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bpemmer@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Pepponi, Giancarlo [MiNALab, CMM-Irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria); Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici CNR, Faenca (Italy); Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Mangold, Stefan [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus South, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Roschger, Paul [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Berzlanovich, Andrea [Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hofstaetter, Jochen G. [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology, Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 4th Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna General Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria)

    2011-03-01

    Lead is a toxic trace element that shows a highly specific accumulation in the transition zone between calcified and non-calcified articular cartilage, the so-called ‘tidemark’. Excellent agreement has been found between XANES spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite and spectra obtained in the tidemark region and trabecular bone of normal human samples, confirming that in both tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite crystal structure of bone. During this study the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline at ANKA was tested and has proven to be well suited for speciation of lead in human mineralized tissue samples. A highly specific accumulation of the toxic element lead was recently measured in the transition zone between non-calcified and calcified normal human articular cartilage. This transition zone, the so-called ‘tidemark’, is considered to be an active calcification front of great clinical importance. However, little is known about the mechanisms of accumulation and the chemical form of Pb in calcified cartilage and bone. Using spatially resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (µ-XANES) at the Pb L{sub 3}-edge, the chemical state of Pb in the osteochondral region was investigated. The feasibility of the µ-XANES set-up at the SUL-X beamline (ANKA synchrotron light source) was tested and confirmed by comparing XANES spectra of bulk Pb-reference compounds recorded at both the XAS and the SUL-X beamline at ANKA. The µ-XANES set-up was then used to investigate the tidemark region of human bone (two patella samples and one femoral head sample). The spectra recorded at the tidemark and at the trabecular bone were found to be highly correlated with the spectra of synthetic Pb-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that in both of these very different tissues Pb is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite structure.

  16. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the clinical relevance of T{sub 2} relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T{sub 2}-mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T{sub 2} mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T{sub 2} values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T{sub 2} values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B{sub 1} and B{sub 0} changes. (orig.)

  17. A comparison of multi-echo spin-echo and triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for in vivo evaluation of articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Bohndorf, Klaus; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Hager, Benedikt; Zbyn, Stefan; Heule, Rahel; Bieri, Oliver; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    To assess the clinical relevance of T 2 relaxation times, measured by 3D triple-echo steady-state (3D-TESS), in knee articular cartilage compared to conventional multi-echo spin-echo T 2 -mapping. Thirteen volunteers and ten patients with focal cartilage lesions were included in this prospective study. All subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI consisting of a multi-echo multi-slice spin-echo sequence (CPMG) as a reference method for T 2 mapping, and 3D TESS with the same geometry settings, but variable acquisition times: standard (TESSs 4:35min) and quick (TESSq 2:05min). T 2 values were compared in six different regions in the femoral and tibial cartilage using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The local ethics committee approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. The mean quantitative T 2 values measured by CPMG (mean: 46±9ms) in volunteers were significantly higher compared to those measured with TESS (mean: 31±5ms) in all regions. Both methods performed similarly in patients, but CPMG provided a slightly higher difference between lesions and native cartilage (CPMG: 90ms→61ms [31%],p=0.0125;TESS 32ms→24ms [24%],p=0.0839). 3D-TESS provides results similar to those of a conventional multi-echo spin-echo sequence with many benefits, such as shortening of total acquisition time and insensitivity to B 1 and B 0 changes. (orig.)

  18. Menopause is associated with articular cartilage degeneration: a clinical study of knee joint in 860 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chao; Xiang, Guangheng; Weng, Qiaoyou; Chen, Zhaojie; Chen, Deheng; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Di; Zhou, Bin; He, Dengwei; Chen, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between menopause and severity of knee joint cartilage degeneration using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system, with six cartilage surfaces, the medial and lateral femoral condyle, the femoral trochlea, the medial and lateral tibia plateau, and the patella. The study cohort comprised 860 healthy women (age 36-83 y), and 5,160 cartilage surfaces were analyzed. Age, weight, height, age at natural menopause, and years since menopause (YSM) were obtained. Cartilage degeneration was assessed using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system. After removing the age, height, and weight effects, postmenopausal women had more severe cartilage degeneration than pre- and perimenopausal women (P  0.05). No significant difference was observed in lateral tibia plateau and lateral femoral condyle in postmenopausal women. Menopause is associated with cartilage degeneration of knee joint. After menopause, cartilage showed progressive severe degeneration that occurred in the first 25 YSM, suggesting estrogen deficiency might be a risk factor of cartilage degeneration of the knee joint. Further studies are needed to investigate whether age or menopause plays a more important role in the progression of cartilage degeneration in the knee joint.

  19. Celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, ameliorates hypercalciuria and articular cartilage lesions in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding compelling contribution of NF-κB to the progression of osteoporosis has been reported, little is known regarding direct inhibition of NF-κB benefiting osteoporosis. In this study, therefore, we evaluated the role of celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis. Animals were divided into three groups as Sham (control, SO (secondary osteoporosis and SO + CA (secondary osteoporosis treated with celastrol. Significant decreases in body weight and body fat were observed following celastrol treatment in SO group, but leptin levels were much higher. Celastrol also exhibited a significant decrease in urinary calcium excretion. Moreover, other important events were observed after celastrol treatment, covering substantial decrements in serum concentrations of PTH, TRAP-5b, CTX and DPD, improved structure of articular cartilage and cancellous bone (revealed by H&E and safranin-O staining, and significant decline in levels of NF-κB (P65, MMP-1, and MMP-9. These findings demonstrated that celastrol treatment not only improved abnormal lipid metabolism and hypercalciuria in mice subjected to secondary osteoporosis, but also ameliorated articular cartilage lesions. Our results provided evidence of targeted therapy for NF-κB in the clinical treatment of secondary osteoporosis.

  20. The balancing act of transcription factors C-1-1 and Runx2 in articular cartilage development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous studies we found that the ets transcription factor C-1-1 is involved in articular chondrocyte development, and we and others found that the transcription factor Runx2 is required for growth plate chondrocyte maturation and ossification. We determined here whether the two factors exert reciprocal influences on their expression and function and in so doing, steer chondrocyte developmental paths. Virally driven Runx2 over-expression in cultured chick chondrocytes did indeed lead to decreased C-1-1 expression, accompanied by decreased expression of articular cartilage marker tenascin-C, decreased proliferation, and increased expression of maturation marker collagen X. In good agreement, over-expression of a dominant-negative Runx2 form had opposite phenotypic consequences. When C-1-1 itself was over-expressed in chondrocytes already undergoing maturation, maturation was halted and the cells became small, rich in tenascin-C, and mitotically quite active. To extend these observations, we misexpressed C-1-1 in mouse cartilage and found that it caused a severe inhibition of chondrocyte maturation and widespread tenascin-C expression. In sum, C-1-1 and Runx2 do influence their respective expression patterns. The factors are powerful chondrocyte regulators and their functional interrelationships may be important for steering the cells toward alternative developmental paths

  1. Tissue engineering of cartilage using a mechanobioreactor exerting simultaneous mechanical shear and compression to simulate the rolling action of articular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2012-04-01

    The effect of dynamic mechanical shear and compression on the synthesis of human tissue-engineered cartilage was investigated using a mechanobioreactor capable of simulating the rolling action of articular joints in a mixed fluid environment. Human chondrocytes seeded into polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh or PGA-alginate scaffolds were precultured in shaking T-flasks or recirculation perfusion bioreactors for 2.5 or 4 weeks prior to mechanical stimulation in the mechanobioreactor. Constructs were subjected to intermittent unconfined shear and compressive loading at a frequency of 0.05 Hz using a peak-to-peak compressive strain amplitude of 2.2% superimposed on a static axial compressive strain of 6.5%. The mechanical treatment was carried out for up to 2.5 weeks using a loading regime of 10 min duration each day with the direction of the shear forces reversed after 5 min and release of all loading at the end of the daily treatment period. Compared with shaking T-flasks and mechanobioreactor control cultures without loading, mechanical treatment improved the amount and quality of cartilage produced. On a per cell basis, synthesis of both major structural components of cartilage, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II, was enhanced substantially by up to 5.3- and 10-fold, respectively, depending on the scaffold type and seeding cell density. Levels of collagen type II as a percentage of total collagen were also increased after mechanical treatment by up to 3.4-fold in PGA constructs. Mechanical treatment had a less pronounced effect on the composition of constructs precultured in perfusion bioreactors compared with perfusion culture controls. This work demonstrates that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage can be enhanced significantly by application of simultaneous dynamic mechanical shear and compression, with the greatest benefits evident for synthesis of collagen type II. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stability of housekeeping genes in human intervertebral disc, endplate and articular cartilage cells in multiple conditions for reliable transcriptional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopa, S; Ceriani, C; Cecchinato, R; Zagra, L; Moretti, M; Colombini, A

    2016-05-27

    Quantitative gene expression analysis is widely used to evaluate the expression of specific tissue markers. To obtain reliable data it is essential to select stable housekeeping genes whose expression is not influenced by the anatomical origin of cells or by the culture conditions. No studies have evaluated housekeeping gene stability in intervertebral disc (IVD) cells and only few studies using cartilaginous endplate (CEP) and articular cartilage (AC) cells are present in the literature. We analysed the stability of four candidate housekeeping genes (GAPDH, TBP, YWHAZ and RPL13A) in human cells isolated from nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF), CEP and AC. Cell isolation, expansion, cryoconservation, and differentiation in 3D pellets were tested. GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper tools and the comparative ΔCt method were used to evaluate housekeeping gene stability. In each cell population, TBP alone or combined with YWHAZ was identified as the best normaliser in both monolayer and 3D pellets. GAPDH was the best performer only for AC cells in monolayer. In most culture conditions considering groups of two or more cell types, TBP was the most stable and YWHAZ was the second choice. GAPDH was the best performer only in 3D pellets with factors for AC and AF combined with CEP cells. RPL13A was the most stable only for AF with CEP cells at isolation. Our findings will be useful to properly design the experimental set-up of studies involving IVD, CEP or AC cells in different culture conditions, in order to obtain accurate and high quality data from quantitative gene expression analysis.

  3. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doube, M; Firth, E C; Boyde, A; Bushby, A J

    2010-06-03

    Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE) and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E) at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  4. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Doube

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3 is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  5. Intra-articular injection of tenoxicam in rats: assessment of the local effects on the articular cartilage and synovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyuvaci, H; Bilgic, B; Ozyuvaci, E; Altan, A; Altug, T; Karaca, C

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the possible local adverse effects of intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in the rat knee joint. A total of 50 rats were given 0.25 ml of a standard preparation of tenoxicam by injection into the right knee joint and 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline solution by injection into the left knee joint as a control. Groups of 10 rats were killed 24 h, 48 h, 7 days, 14 days and 21 days after tenoxicam administration. Two rats were sham operated; one was killed on the first day and the other on the second day after this procedure. All the joints were prepared and sectioned for histological examination. Tissue loss and oedema were observed in the specimens obtained 24 h and 48 h after treatment with tenoxicam. No pathological changes were observed in the 7-day, 14-day and 21-day specimens, or in the control joints. Caution should be exercised when using intra-articular tenoxicam for post-operative analgesia.

  6. Articular cartilage is more susceptible to blood induced damage at young than at old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosendaal, G.; TeKoppele, J. M.; Vianen, M. E.; van den Berg, H. M.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that cartilage is damaged upon intraarticular hemorrhage. We investigated differences in the susceptibility of cartilage from young adult and old animals to blood induced joint damage in a canine in vivo model. Right knees of 6 young adult beagles (aged 2.2 +/- 0.1 yrs) and 6 old

  7. Are Articular Cartilage Lesions and Meniscus Tears Predictive of IKDC, KOOS, and Marx Activity Level Outcomes after ACL Reconstruction? A 6-Year Multicenter Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L.; Huston, Laura J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Parker, Richard D.; Wright, Rick W.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Amendola, Annunziata; McCarty, Eric C.; Wolf, Brian R.; Harrell, Frank E.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for inferior outcomes after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is important for prognosis and future treatment. The goal of this study was to determine whether articular cartilage and meniscal variables are predictive of 3 validated sports outcome instruments after ACLR. Hypothesis/Purpose We hypothesized that articular cartilage lesions and meniscus tears/treatment would be predictors of the IKDC, KOOS (all 5 subscales), and Marx activity level at 6 years following ACLR. Study Design Prospective cohort, Level 1 Methods Between 2002 and 2004, 1512 ACLR subjects were prospectively enrolled and followed longitudinally with the IKDC, KOOS, and Marx activity score completed at entry, 2, and 6 years. A logistic regression model was built incorporating variables from patient demographics, surgical technique, articular cartilage injuries, and meniscus tears/treatment to determine the predictors (risk factors) of IKDC, KOOS, and Marx at 6 years. Results We completed a minimum follow-up on 86% (1307/1512) of our cohort at 6 years. The cohort was 56% male, had a median age of 23 years at the time of enrollment, with 76% reporting a non-contact injury mechanism. Incidence of concomitant pathology at the time of surgery consisted of the following: articular cartilage (medial femoral condyle [MFC]-25%, lateral femoral condyle [LFC]-20%, medial tibial plateau [MTP]-6%, lateral tibial plateau [LTP]-12%, patella-20%, trochlear-9%) and meniscal (medial-38%, lateral-46%). Both articular cartilage lesions and meniscal tears were significant predictors of 6-year outcomes on IKDC and KOOS. Grade 3 or 4 articular cartilage lesions (excluding patella) significantly reduced IKDC and KOOS scores at 6 years. IKDC demonstrated worse outcomes with the presence of a grade 3-4 chondral lesion on the MFC, MTP, and LFC. Likewise, KOOS was negatively affected by cartilage injury. The sole significant predictor of reduced Marx activity was the presence of a grade 4 lesion

  8. QUANTITATIVE MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage is one of the most essential tissues for healthy joint function and is compromised in degenerative and traumatic joint diseases. There have been tremendous advances during the past decade using quantitative MRI techniques as a non-invasive tool for evaluating cartilage, with a focus on assessing cartilage degeneration during osteoarthritis (OA). In this review, after a brief overview of cartilage composition and degeneration, we discuss techniques that grade and quantify morphologic changes as well as the techniques that quantify changes in the extracellular matrix. The basic principles, in vivo applications, advantages and challenges for each technique are discussed. Recent studies using the OA Initiative (OAI) data are also summarized. Quantitative MRI provides non-invasive measures of cartilage degeneration at the earliest stages of joint degeneration, which is essential for efforts towards prevention and early intervention in OA. PMID:24115571

  9. Morphological and Microstructural Alterations of the Articular Cartilage and Bones during Treadmill Exercises with Different Additional Weight-Bearing Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazi Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and microstructural alterations of the articular cartilage and bones during treadmill exercises with different exercise intensities. Sixty 5-week-old female rats were randomly divided into 10 groups: five additional weight-bearing groups (WBx and five additional weight-bearing with treadmill exercise groups (EBx, which were subjected to additional weight bearing of x% (x = 0, 5, 12, 19, and 26 of the corresponding body weight of each rat for 15 min/day. After 8 weeks of experiment, the rats were humanely sacrificed and their bilateral intact knee joints were harvested. Morphological analysis of the cartilages and microcomputed tomography evaluation of bones were subsequently performed. Results showed that increased additional weight bearing may lead to cartilage damage. No significant difference was observed among the subchondral cortical thicknesses of the groups. The microstructure of subchondral trabecular bone of 12% and 19% additional weight-bearing groups was significantly improved; however, the WB26 and EB26 groups showed low bone mineral density and bone volume fraction as well as high structure model index. In conclusion, effects of treadmill exercise on joints may be associated with different additional weight-bearing levels, and exercise intensities during joint growth and maturation should be selected reasonably.

  10. Synovial Fluid Filtration by Articular Cartilage with a Worn-out Surface Zone in the Human Ankle Joint during Walking- II. Numerical Results for Steady Pure Sliding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2000), s. 375-396 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * boundary lubrication * human ankle joint Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  11. Synovial Fluid Filtration by Articular Cartilage with a Worn-out Surface Zone in the Human Ankle Joint during Walking- I.A Mathematical Mixture Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2000), s. 295-321 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : asymptotic solution * biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * human ankle joint Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  12. Sulfated hyaluronic acid hydrogels with retarded degradation and enhanced growth factor retention promote hMSC chondrogenesis and articular cartilage integrity with reduced hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qian; Lin, Sien; Zhang, Kunyu; Dong, Chaoqun; Wu, Tianyi; Huang, Heqin; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2017-04-15

    Recently, hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels have been extensively researched for delivering cells and drugs to repair damaged tissues, particularly articular cartilage. However, the in vivo degradation of HA is fast, thus limiting the clinical translation of HA hydrogels. Furthermore, HA cannot bind proteins with high affinity because of the lack of negatively charged sulfate groups. In this study, we conjugated tunable amount of sulfate groups to HA. The sulfated HA exhibits significantly slower degradation by hyaluronidase compared to the wild type HA. We hypothesize that the sulfation reduces the available HA octasaccharide substrate needed for the effective catalytic action of hyaluronidase. Moreover, the sulfated HA hydrogels significantly improve the protein sequestration, thereby effectively extending the availability of the proteinaceous drugs in the hydrogels. In the following in vitro study, we demonstrate that the HA hydrogel sulfation exerts no negative effect on the viability of encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Furthermore, the sulfated HA hydrogels promote the chondrogenesis and suppresses the hypertrophy of encapsulated hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, intra-articular injections of the sulfated HA hydrogels avert the cartilage abrasion and hypertrophy in the animal osteoarthritic joints. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the sulfated HA is a promising biomaterial for the delivery of therapeutic agents to aid the regeneration of injured or diseased tissues and organs. In this paper, we conjugated sulfate groups to hyaluronic acid (HA) and demonstrated the slow degradation and growth factor delivery of sulfated HA. Furthermore, the in vitro and in vivo culture of hMSCs laden HA hydrogels proved that the sulfation of HA hydrogels not only promotes the chondrogenesis of hMSCs but also suppresses hypertrophic differentiation of the chondrogenically induced hMSCs. The animal OA model study showed that the injected

  13. Bone morphogenetic proteins and articular cartilage: To serve and protect or a wolf in sheep clothing's?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Davidson, E.N.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Alterations in chondrocyte differentiation and matrix remodeling play a central role in osteoarthritis (OA). Chondrocyte differentiation and remodeling are amongst others regulated by the so-called Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs). Although BMPs are considered protective for articular

  14. Effectiveness of an aquatic exercise program and low-level laser therapy on articular cartilage in an experimental model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milares, Luiz Paulo; Assis, Lívia; Siqueira, Amanda; Claudino, Vitoria; Domingos, Heloisa; Almeida, Thais; Tim, Carla; Renno, Ana Claudia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an aquatic exercise program and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) (associated or not) on degenerative modifications and inflammatory mediators on the articular cartilage using an experimental model of knee OA. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: knee OA - without treatment (OA); OA plus exercise program group (OAE); OA plus LLLT (OAL); OA plus exercise program associated with LLLT (OAEL). Trained rats performed a water-jumping program carrying a load equivalent to 50-80 % of their body mass strapped to their chest. The laser irradiation was used either as the only method or after the exercise training had been performed, at 2 points contact mode (medial and lateral side of the left joint). The treatments started 4 weeks after the surgery, 3 days/week for 8 weeks. The results revealed that all treated groups (irradiated or not) exhibited a better pattern of tissue organization, with less fibrillation and irregularities along the articular surface and improved chondrocytes organization. Also, a lower cellular density and structural damage (OARSI score) and higher thickness values were observed in all treated groups. Additionally, OAE and OAEL showed a reduced expression in IL-1β and caspase-3 as compared with OA. Furthermore, a statistically lower MMP-13 expression was only observed in OAEL as compared with OA. These results suggest that aquatic exercise program and LLLT were effective in preventing cartilage degeneration. Also, physical exercise program presented anti-inflammatory effects in the knees in OA rats.

  15. Nanopolymers Delivery of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 Plasmid to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of viral vectors for gene therapy is limited for biosafety consideration. In this study, to promote articular cartilage repair, poly (lactic-co glycolic acid (PLGA nanopolymers were used as non-viral vectors to transfect rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with the pDC316-BMP4-EGFP plasmid. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in vitro were acceptable measuring by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After transfection, Chondrogenic markers (mRNA of Col2a1, Sox9, Bmp4, and Agg of experimental cells (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers were increased more than those of control cells (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid alone. In vivo study, twelve rabbits (24 knees with large full thickness articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into the experimental group (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers and the control group (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid. The experimental group showed better regeneration than the control group 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Hyaline-like cartilage formed at week 12 in the experimental group, indicating the local delivery of BMP-4 plasmid to MSCs by PLGA nanopolymers improved articular cartilage repair significantly. PLGA nanopolymers could be a promising and effective non-viral vector for gene therapy in cartilage repair.

  16. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  17. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-II on the mitogenic and metabolic activities of equine articular cartilage with and without interleukin 1-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport-Goodall, Celia L M; Boston, Raymond C; Richardson, Dean W

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of matrix-related genes in equine articular cartilage explants and chondrocytes, respectively, with and without interleukin 1-beta (IL1-beta). Articular cartilage from 12 adult horses. Articular cartilage was incubated in standard media with and without equine IL1-beta (10 ng/mL) containing various concentrations of IGF-II for 72 hours. Synthesis of DNA and GAG was determined by incorporation of thymidine labeled with radioactive hydrogen (3H) and sulfate labeled with radioactive sulfur (35S), respectively. Total GAG content of the explants and spent media was determined by use of the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. Northern blots of RNA from cultured equine articular cartilage chondrocytes were hybridized with cDNA of major matrix molecules. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 25 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. In cartilage explants conditioned with IL1-beta, IGF-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 500 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. Insulin-like growth factor-II had no effect on total GAG content as determined by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. No specific effects on steady-state levels of messenger RNAs were observed. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis in equine adult cartilage and may have potential application in vivo.

  18. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  19. Effect of reduced articular function on deposition of type I and type II collagens in the mandibular condylar cartilage of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttiniemi, P; Kantomaa, T; Salo, L; Tuominen, M

    1996-01-01

    A group of rats was fed a soft diet after weaning and the incisors shortened regularly to keep them out of occlusion. The controls were fed a hard diet. Immunohistochemical techniques and image analysis were employed to investigate deposition of pro-type I collagen and type II collagen, and the thickness of articular cartilage layers in the mandibular condyle. The immunostaining against pro-type I collagen was most intense intracellularly in the fibrous and upper chondroblast layers in 30- and 50-day-old rats fed a hard diet. In the rats fed a soft diet, marked intra- and extracellular staining against pro-type I collagen was visible in the upper chondroblast and upper hypertrophic layers but also in the lower hypertrophic layer. The intensity of staining against type II collagen was weak in animals on a soft diet, while in the animals fed a hard diet the staining was intense in the superior layers of mature chondroblasts. The total number of chondroblasts recorded was reduced by 35 percent at the age of 50 days in the soft-diet compared to the hard-diet animals. The results show that the deposition of type I and II collagens, the thickness of the cartilage cell layers and the number of chondrocytes are sensitive to alterations in loading.

  20. Are articular cartilage lesions and meniscus tears predictive of IKDC, KOOS, and Marx activity level outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A 6-year multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L; Huston, Laura J; Dunn, Warren R; Reinke, Emily K; Nwosu, Samuel K; Parker, Richard D; Wright, Rick W; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Amendola, Annunziata; McCarty, Eric C; Spindler, Kurt P

    2014-05-01

    Identifying risk factors for inferior outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is important for prognosis and future treatment. Articular cartilage lesions and meniscus tears/treatment would predict International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) (all 5 subscales), and Marx activity level at 6 years after ACLR. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 1. Between 2002 and 2004, a total of 1512 ACLR patients were prospectively enrolled and followed longitudinally, with the IKDC, KOOS, and Marx activity score completed at entry, 2 years, and 6 years. A logistic regression model was built incorporating variables from patient demographics, surgical technique, articular cartilage injuries, and meniscus tears/treatment to determine the predictors (risk factors) of IKDC and KOOS scores and Marx activity level at 6 years. A minimum follow-up on 86% (1307/1512) of the cohort was completed at 6 years. The cohort was 56% male and had a median age of 23 years at the time of enrollment, with 76% reporting a noncontact injury mechanism. Incidence of concomitant injury at the time of surgery consisted of the following: articular cartilage (medial femoral condyle [MFC], 25%; lateral femoral condyle [LFC] 20%; medial tibial plateau [MTP], 6%; lateral tibial plateau [LTP], 12%; patella, 20%; trochlear, 9%) and meniscus (medial, 38%; lateral, 46%). Both articular cartilage lesions and meniscus tears were significant predictors of 6-year outcomes on the IKDC and KOOS. Grade 3 or 4 articular cartilage lesions (excluding patella) significantly reduced IKDC and KOOS scores at 6 years. The IKDC demonstrated worse outcomes with the presence of a grade 3 or 4 chondral lesion on the MFC, MTP, and LFC. Likewise, the KOOS score was negatively affected by cartilage injury. The sole significant predictor of reduced Marx activity level was the presence of a grade 4 lesion on the MFC. Lateral meniscus repairs

  1. MR imaging of articular cartilage in the ankle: comparison of available imaging sequences and methods of measurement in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.C.F.; Wilcox, D.M.; Frank, L.; Shih, C.; Trudell, D.J.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To assess hyaline cartilage of cadaveric ankles using different magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques and various methods of measurement. Design and patients. Cartilage thicknesses of the talus and tibia were measured in ten cadaveric ankles by naked eye and by digitized image analysis from MR images of fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient recalled (FS-SPGR), sequences and pulsed transfer saturation sequences with (FS-STS) and without fat-suppression (STS); these measurements were compared with those derived from direct inspection of cadaveric sections. The accuracy and precision errors were evaluated statistically for each imaging technique as well as measuring method. Contrast-to-noise ratios of cartilage versus joint fluid and marrow were compared for each of the imaging sequences. Results. Statistically, measurements from FS-SPGR images were associated with the smallest estimation error. Precision error of measurements derived from digitized image analysis was found to be smaller than that derived from naked eye measurements. Cartilage thickness measurements in images from STS and FS-STS sequences revealed larger errors in both accuracy and precision. Interobserver variance was larger in naked eye assessment of the cartilage. Contrast-to-noise ratio of cartilage versus joint fluid and marrow was higher with FS-SPGR than with FS-STS or STS sequences. Conclusion. Of the sequences and measurement techniques studied, the FS-SPGR sequence combined with the use of digitized image analysis provides the most accurate method for the assessment of ankle hyaline cartilage. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Automating measurement of subtle changes in articular cartilage from MRI of the knee by combining 3D image registration and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Zhao, Jenny; Peterfy, Charles G.; Genant, Harry K.

    2001-07-01

    In osteoarthritis, articular cartilage loses integrity and becomes thinned. This usually occurs at sites which bear weight during normal use. Measurement of such loss from MRI scans, requires precise and reproducible techniques, which can overcome the difficulties of patient repositioning within the scanner. In this study, we combine a previously described technique for segmentation of cartilage from MRI of the knee, with a technique for 3D image registration that matches localized regions of interest at followup and baseline. Two patients, who had recently undergone meniscal surgery, and developed lesions during the 12 month followup period were examined. Image registration matched regions of interest (ROI) between baseline and followup, and changes within the cartilage lesions were estimate to be about a 16% reduction in cartilage volume within each ROI. This was more than 5 times the reproducibility of the measurement, but only represented a change of between 1 and 2% in total femoral cartilage volume. Changes in total cartilage volume may be insensitive for quantifying changes in cartilage morphology. A combined used of automated image segmentation, with 3D image registration could be a useful tool for the precise and sensitive measurement of localized changes in cartilage from MRI of the knee.

  3. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor β1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Yuan Quan; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo; Liu Kai; Quan Daping

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-β 1 that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-β 1 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA 3 -TGF-β 1 gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA 3 gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune responses. The

  4. Changes in chondrocyte gene expression following in vitro impaction of porcine articular cartilage in an impact injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Melissa S; Gonda, Michael G; Gray, Kent; Maltecca, Christian; O'Nan, Audrey T; Cassady, Joseph P; Mente, Peter L

    2013-03-01

    Our objective was to monitor chondrocyte gene expression at 0, 3, 7, and 14 days following in vitro impaction to the articular surface of porcine patellae. Patellar facets were either axially impacted with a cylindrical impactor (25 mm/s loading rate) to a load level of 2,000 N or not impacted to serve as controls. After being placed in organ culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days, total RNA was isolated from full thickness cartilage slices and gene expression measured for 17 genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Targeted genes included those encoding proteins involved with biological stress, inflammation, or anabolism and catabolism of cartilage extracellular matrix. Some gene expression changes were detected on the day of impaction, but most significant changes occurred at 14 days in culture. At 14 days in culture, 10 of the 17 genes were differentially expressed with col1a1 most significantly up-regulated in the impacted samples, suggesting impacted chondrocytes may have reverted to a fibroblast-like phenotype. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  5. Age-related degeneration of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis: molecular markers of senescent chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a natural process by which every single living organism approaches its twilight of existence in a natural way. However, aging is also linked to the pathogenesis of a number of complex diseases. This is the case for osteoarthritis (OA), where age is considered to be a major risk factor of this important and increasingly common joint disorder. Half of the world's population, aged 65 and older, suffers from OA. Although the relationship between the development of OA and aging has not yet been completely understood, it is thought that age-related changes correlate with other risk factors. The most prominent hypothesis linking aging and OA is that chondrocytes undergo premature aging due to several factors, such as excessive mechanical load or oxidative stress, which induce the so called "stress-induced senescent state", which is ultimately responsible for the onset of OA. This review focuses on molecular markers and mechanisms implicated in chondrocyte aging and the pathogenesis of OA. We discuss the most important age-related morphological and biological changes that affect articular cartilage and chondrocytes. We also identify the main senescence markers that may be used to recognize molecular alterations in the extracellular matrix of cartilage as related to senescence. Since the aging process is strongly associated with the onset of osteoarthritis, we believe that strategies aimed at preventing chondrocyte senescence, as well as the identification of new increasingly sensitive senescent markers, could have a positive impact on the development of new therapies for this severe disease.

  6. Histological and biochemical evaluation of perichondrial transplants in human articular cartilage defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, P; Kuijer, R; Terwindt-Rouwenhorst, E; van der Linden, Ton; Bulstra, K

    1999-01-01

    From 1986 to 1992, 88 patients with articular defects in the knee were treated with a perichondrial arthroplasty. In this study, we report on the results for 22 biopsies of grafted tissue with a mean follow-up of 21 months. Biopsies were obtained at routine arthroscopy after approximately 1 year or

  7. Shape of chondrocytes within articular cartilage affects the solid but not the fluid microenvironment under unconfined compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Torzilli, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic activity of the chondrocytes in articular cartilage is strongly related to their zone-specific shape and the composition and mechanical properties of their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However the mechanisms by which cell shape influences the response of the ECM microenvironment to mechanical loading is yet to be elucidated. This relationship was studied using a biphasic multiscale finite element model of different shaped chondrocytes in the superficial and deep zones of the ECM during unconfined stress relaxation. For chondrocytes in the superficial zone, increasing the cell's initial aspect ratio (length/height) increased the deformation and solid stresses of the chondrocyte and pericellular matrix (PCM) during the loading phase; for chondrocytes in the deep zone the effect of the cell shape on the solid microenvironment was time and variable dependent. However, for superficial and deep zone chondrocytes the cell shape did not affect the fluid pressure and fluid shear stress. These results suggest that mechanotransduction of chondrocytes in articular cartilage may be regulated through the solid phase rather than the fluid phase, and that high stresses and deformations in the solid microenvironment in the superficial zone may be essential for the zone-specific biosynthetic activity of the chondrocyte. The biphasic multiscale computational analysis suggests that maintaining the cell shape is critical for regulating the microenvironment and metabolic activity of the chondrocyte in tissue engineering constructs. We investigated the effect of chondrocyte shape on the cellular microenvironment using a biphasic multiscale finite element analysis. Our study showed that cell shapes affects the solid but not the fluid microenvironment of the chondrocyte, and that maintaining the cell shape is critical for regulating the microenvironment and metabolic activity of the chondrocyte in native cartilage and tissue engineering constructs. As far as we know

  8. Transforming growth factor β-induced superficial zone protein accumulation in the surface zone of articular cartilage is dependent on the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2014-03-01

    The phenotype of articular chondrocytes is dependent on the cytoskeleton, specifically the actin microfilament architecture. Articular chondrocytes in monolayer culture undergo dedifferentiation and assume a fibroblastic phenotype. This process can be reversed by altering the actin cytoskeleton by treatment with cytochalasin. Whereas dedifferentiation has been studied on chondrocytes isolated from the whole cartilage, the effects of cytoskeletal alteration on specific zones of cells such as superficial zone chondrocytes are not known. Chondrocytes from the superficial zone secrete superficial zone protein (SZP), a lubricating proteoglycan that reduces the coefficient of friction of articular cartilage. A better understanding of this phenomenon may be useful in elucidating chondrocyte dedifferentiation in monolayer and accumulation of the cartilage lubricant SZP, with an eye toward tissue engineering functional articular cartilage. In this investigation, the effects of cytoskeletal modulation on the ability of superficial zone chondrocytes to secrete SZP were examined. Primary superficial zone chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and treated with a combination of cytoskeleton modifying reagents and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) 1, a critical regulator of SZP production. Whereas cytochalasin D maintains the articular chondrocyte phenotype, the hallmark of the superficial zone chondrocyte, SZP, was inhibited in the presence of TGFβ1. A decrease in TGFβ1-induced SZP accumulation was also observed when the microtubule cytoskeleton was modified using paclitaxel. These effects of actin and microtubule alteration were confirmed through the application of jasplakinolide and colchicine, respectively. As Rho GTPases regulate actin organization and microtubule polymerization, we hypothesized that the cytoskeleton is critical for TGFβ-induced SZP accumulation. TGFβ-mediated SZP accumulation was inhibited by small molecule inhibitors ML141 (Cdc42), NSC23766 (Rac1

  9. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  10. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting and Its Potential in the Field of Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouser, Vivian H M; Levato, Riccardo; Bonassar, Lawrence J; D'Lima, Darryl D; Grande, Daniel A; Klein, Travis J; Saris, Daniel B F; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Gawlitta, Debby; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting techniques can be used for the fabrication of personalized, regenerative constructs for tissue repair. The current article provides insight into the potential and opportunities of 3D bioprinting for the fabrication of cartilage regenerative constructs. Although 3D

  11. In vitro uptake of 153gadolinium and gadolinium complexes by hyaline articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Fleischmann, D.; Hamilton, G.; Hajek, P.

    1990-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated whether Gadolinium (Gd) penetrates into hyaline cartilage and would be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. Hyaline joint cartilage of rabbits was exposed to radioactive 153 GdCl 3 and to a radioactive 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA-complex (DTPA, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid; BSA, bovine serum albumine). In addition an exchange experiment with radioactive 153 GdCl 3 versus Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine (Magnevist) was performed. Incorporation of 153 GdCl 3 into neuroblastoma cells, connective tissue cells and chondrocytes was tested. The results showed that the depth and extent of incorporation of Gd depends on the molecular mass and time of exposure. 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA complexes exhibited an incorporation rate of maximal 11 per cent ± 2.8 per cent up to the middle third of the cartilage within 24 h with almost no incorporation (2 ± 1.9 per cent) for the deep layer. The exchange experiment revealed no uptake of Gd for the deep layer. The maximal incorporation rate of 153 GdCl 3 into vital chondrocytes was 6.3 per cent. These data indicate that under the condition of MR-arthrography, Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine will not be absorbed into the deep layers of hyaline cartilage and will not be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. (author). 8 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro R; Amstalden, Eliane M I; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia C A; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S S; Luzo, Angela C M; Miranda, João B

    2015-11-09

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model.

  13. Defects in articular cartilage metabolism and early arthritis in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valverde-Franco, G.; Binette, J.S.; Li, W.; Wang, H.; Chai, S.; Laflamme, F.; Tran-Khanh, N.; Quenneville, E.; Meijers, T.; Poole, A.R.; Mort, J.S.; Buschmann, M.D.; Henderson, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 3 has been identified as a key regulator of endochondral bone development and of post-natal bone metabolism through its action on growth plate chondrocytes and osteoblasts, respectively. It has also been shown to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage production

  14. Influence of Knee Immobilization on Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Histological Features of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Insertion and Articular Cartilage in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi; Furuhata, Syogo; Sakane, Masataka

    2017-01-26

    This study examined the influence of immobilization on chondrocyte apoptosis and histological features of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion and knee articular cartilage in rabbits. Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were assigned to an immobilization ( n = 24) or sham ( n = 24) group. Rabbits in the immobilization group underwent complete unilateral surgical knee immobilization and rabbits in the sham group underwent a sham surgery. The average thickness of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) stained red area by safranin O staining, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate and the chondrocyte proliferation rate in the cartilage layer in the ACL insertion and the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle were measured at one, two, four and eight weeks in six animals from each group. In the ACL insertion, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate was higher in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two and eight weeks after surgery ( p immobilization group. The GAG layer was thinner in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two, four and eight weeks after surgery ( p immobilization group was higher than in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery ( p immobilization group than that in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery ( p immobilization significantly increased chondrocyte apoptosis at two and eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and at four and eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle, and decreased GAG layer thickness from two to eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and from four to eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage.

  15. Effect of intra-articular administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs for MRI assessment of the cartilage barrier in a large animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Labens

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cartilage disease at a time when changes are limited to depletion of extracellular matrix components represents an important diagnostic target to reduce patient morbidity. This report is to present proof of concept for nanoparticle dependent cartilage barrier imaging in a large animal model including the use of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Conditioned (following matrix depletion and unconditioned porcine metacarpophalangeal cartilage was evaluated on the basis of fluorophore conjugated 30 nm and 80 nm spherical gold nanoparticle permeation and multiphoton laser scanning and bright field microscopy after autometallographic particle enhancement. Consequently, conditioned and unconditioned joints underwent MRI pre- and post-injection with 12 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs to evaluate particle permeation in the context of matrix depletion and use of a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. To gauge the potential pro-inflammatory effect of intra-articular nanoparticle delivery co-cultures of equine synovium and cartilage tissue were exposed to an escalating dose of SPIONs and IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2 were assessed in culture media. The chemotactic potential of growth media samples was subsequently assessed in transwell migration assays on isolated equine neutrophils. Results demonstrate an increase in MRI signal following conditioning of porcine joints which suggests that nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging is feasible. Tissue culture and neutrophil migration assays highlight a dose dependent inflammatory response following SPION exposure which at the imaging dose investigated was not different from controls. The preliminary safety and imaging data support the continued investigation of nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report in using SPIONs as intra-articular MRI contrast agent for studying cartilage barrier function

  16. O gel de plasma rico em plaquetas propicia a regeneração da cartilagem articular do joelho de ovelhas Platelet-rich plasma gel promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in knees of sheeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio de Oliveira Carneiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a regeneração da cartilagem articular em defeitos osteocondrais do joelho induzidos pelo plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP autógeno. MÉTODOS: Defeitos osteocondrais produzidos no sulco troclear de ambos os joelhos de dez ovelhas foram preenchidos com PRP autógeno à direita e deixados vazios à esquerda. Avaliação macroscópica e histológica foram efetuadas 12 semanas mais tarde. Os resultados foram avaliados por um escore geral de ambas as avaliações macroscópica e histológica comparativamente entre os lados por meio do teste pareado de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: o aspecto macroscópico não foi uniforme entre os animais, nem diferiu entre os joelhos direitos e esquerdos (p=0,03125; em nenhum caso o tecido regenerado se nivelou com a cartilagem normal circundante. Ao exame histológico, cartilagem aparentemente normal não foi detectada em nenhum joelho, mas uma cartilagem pouco diferenciada estava presente em sete joelhos direitos e em três joelhos esquerdos. Tecido fibrocartilaginoso estava presente nos joelhos restantes, com diferença significante no escore geral entre os joelhos direitos e esquerdos (p=0,0313. CONCLUSÃO: o PRP como usado neste estudo tem propriedades reparativas da cartilagem articular no joelho de ovelhas, principalmente por estimular a formação de tecido fibrocartilaginoso. Trabalho Experimental.OBJECTIVE: to assess the regeneration of osteochondral defects in the joint cartilage of the knee induced by autologous platelet-rich plasma (pRp. METHODS: osteochondral defects produced in the trochlear groove of both knees of ten sheep; defects of the right knees were filled with autologous pRp and the left knees were left unfilled. macroscopic and microscopic evaluation was carried out 12 week later. the results were evaluated by the total score of both macroscopic and microscopic evaluations comparing the two sides through the wilcoxon paired test. RESULTS: macroscopic appearance was not uniform among

  17. Mast cell-restricted, tetramer-forming tryptases induce aggrecanolysis in articular cartilage by activating matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -13 zymogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarinos, Natalia J; Bryant, Katherine J; Fosang, Amanda J; Adachi, Roberto; Stevens, Richard L; McNeil, H Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-6-null C57BL/6 mice lost less aggrecan proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of their articular cartilage during inflammatory arthritis than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that this mast cell (MC)-specific mouse tryptase plays prominent roles in articular cartilage catabolism. We used ex vivo mouse femoral head explants to determine how mMCP-6 and its human ortholog hTryptase-β mediate aggrecanolysis. Exposure of the explants to recombinant hTryptase-β, recombinant mMCP-6, or lysates harvested from WT mouse peritoneal MCs (PMCs) significantly increased the levels of enzymatically active matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in cartilage and significantly induced aggrecan loss into the conditioned media, relative to replicate explants exposed to medium alone or lysates collected from mMCP-6-null PMCs. Treatment of cartilage explants with tetramer-forming tryptases generated aggrecan fragments that contained C-terminal DIPEN and N-terminal FFGVG neoepitopes, consistent with MMP-dependent aggrecanolysis. In support of these data, hTryptase-β was unable to induce aggrecan release from the femoral head explants obtained from Chloe mice that resist MMP cleavage at the DIPEN↓FFGVG site in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. In addition, the abilities of mMCP-6-containing lysates from WT PMCs to induce aggrecanolysis were prevented by inhibitors of MMP-3 and MMP-13. Finally, recombinant hTryptase-β was able to activate latent pro-MMP-3 and pro-MMP-13 in vitro. The accumulated data suggest that human and mouse tetramer-forming tryptases are MMP convertases that mediate cartilage damage and the proteolytic loss of aggrecan proteoglycans in arthritis, in part, by activating the zymogen forms of MMP-3 and MMP-13, which are constitutively present in articular cartilage.

  18. Non-destructive evaluation of articular cartilage defects using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in osteoarthritic rat models and its direct relation to Mankin score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afara, I; Prasadam, I; Crawford, R; Xiao, Y; Oloyede, A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for categorizing cartilage degeneration induced in animal models. Three models of osteoarthritic degeneration were induced in laboratory rats via one of the following methods: (1) menisectomy (MSX); (2) anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT); and (3) intra-articular injection of mono-ido-acetate (1 mg) (MIA), in the right knee joint, with 12 rats per model group. After 8 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and tibial knee joints were collected. A custom-made near-infrared (NIR) probe of diameter 5 mm was placed on the cartilage surface and spectral data were acquired from each specimen in the wave number range 4,000-12,500 cm(-1). Following spectral data acquisition, the specimens were fixed and Safranin-O staining was performed to assess disease severity based on the Mankin scoring system. Using multivariate statistical analysis based on principal component analysis and partial least squares regression, the spectral data were then related to the Mankin scores of the samples tested. Mild to severe degenerative cartilage changes were observed in the subject animals. The ACLT models showed mild cartilage degeneration, MSX models moderate, and MIA severe cartilage degenerative changes both morphologically and histologically. Our result demonstrates that NIR spectroscopic information is capable of separating the cartilage samples into different groups relative to the severity of degeneration, with NIR correlating significantly with their Mankin score (R(2) = 88.85%). We conclude that NIR is a viable tool for evaluating articular cartilage health and physical properties such as change in thickness with degeneration. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant from MRL/MpJ Super-Healer Mice Does Not Improve Articular Cartilage Repair in the C57Bl/6 Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Leonard

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has been the focus of multiple strategies to improve its regenerative/ repair capacity. The Murphy Roths Large (MRL/MpJ "super-healer" mouse demonstrates an unusual enhanced regenerative capacity in many tissues and provides an opportunity to further study endogenous cartilage repair. The objective of this study was to test whether the super-healer phenotype could be transferred from MRL/MpJ to non-healer C57Bl/6 mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplant.The healing of 2mm ear punches and full thickness cartilage defects was measured 4 and 8 weeks after injury in control C57Bl/6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" mice, and in radiation chimeras reconstituted with bone marrow from the other mouse strain. Healing was assessed using ear hole diameter measurement, a 14 point histological scoring scale for the cartilage defect and an adapted version of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International scale for assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse knee joints.Normal and chimeric MRL mice showed significantly better healing of articular cartilage and ear wounds along with less severe signs of osteoarthritis after cartilage injury than the control strain. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, bone marrow transplant from MRL mice did not confer improved healing on the C57Bl/6 chimeras, either in regards to ear wound healing or cartilage repair.The elusive cellular basis for the MRL regenerative phenotype still requires additional study and may possibly be dependent on additional cell types external to the bone marrow.

  20. Morphometric and histopathological analysis of articular cartilage regeneration on tissue engineered scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Pedraza Concha, Celso Fernando

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar la regeneración in vivo de cartílago articular inducido por scaffolds manufacturados mediante técnicas de ingeniería tisular, evaluando la formación de neotejido inducido por diferentes andamiajes, mediante técnicas histológicas y morfométricas. Previo al presente trabajo, en el centro de biomateriales se han diseñado y fabricado scaffolds bioestables compuestos por copolímeros de poli-etilacrilato e hidroxietil-acrilato p(EA-co-HEA), con 90% unid...

  1. The importance of bicarbonate and nonbicarbonate buffer systems in batch and continuous flow bioreactors for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aasma A; Surrao, Denver C

    2012-05-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering an optimized culture system, maintaining an appropriate extracellular environment (e.g., pH of media), can increase cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. We have previously reported on a continuous-flow bioreactor that improves tissue growth by supplying the cells with a near infinite supply of medium. Previous studies have observed that acidic environments reduce ECM synthesis and chondrocyte proliferation. Hence, in this study we investigated the combined effects of a continuous culture system (bioreactor) together with additional buffering agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO₃]) on cartilaginous tissue growth in vitro. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown in three-dimensional cultures, either in static conditions or in a continuous-flow bioreactor, in media with or without NaHCO₃. Tissue constructs cultivated in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were characterized with significantly increased (p<0.05) ECM accumulation (glycosaminoglycans a 98-fold increase; collagen a 25-fold increase) and a 13-fold increase in cell proliferation, in comparison with static cultures. Additionally, constructs grown in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were significantly thicker than all other constructs (p<0.05). Further, the chondrocytes from the primary construct expanded and synthesized ECM, forming a secondary construct without a separate expansion phase, with a diameter and thickness of 4 mm and 0.72 mm respectively. Tissue outgrowth was negligible in all other culturing conditions. Thus this study demonstrates the advantage of employing a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with NaHCO₃ supplemented media for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. Articular chondrocyte network mediated by gap junctions: role in metabolic cartilage homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Filgueira-Fernandez, Purificacion; Goyanes, Noa; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Goldberg, Gary S; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether chondrocytes within the cartilage matrix have the capacity to communicate through intercellular connections mediated by voltage-gated gap junction (GJ) channels. Methods Frozen cartilage samples were used for immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays. Samples were embedded in cacodylate buffer before dehydration for scanning electron microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and mass spectrometry (MS) were performed to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminal end of Cx43. GJ communication was studied through in situ electroporation, electrophysiology and dye injection experiments. A transwell layered culture system and MS were used to identify and quantify transferred amino acids. Results Microscopic images revealed the presence of multiple cellular projections connecting chondrocytes within the matrix. These projections were between 5 and 150 μm in length. MS data analysis indicated that the C-terminus of Cx43 interacts with several cytoskeletal proteins implicated in Cx trafficking and GJ assembly, including α-tubulin and β-tubulin, actin, and vinculin. Electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that 12-mer oligonucleotides could be transferred between chondrocytes within 12 min after injection. Glucose was homogeneously distributed within 22 and 35 min. No transfer was detected when glucose was electroporated into A549 cells, which have no GJs. Transwell layered culture systems coupled with MS analysis revealed connexins can mediate the transfer of L-lysine and L-arginine between chondrocytes. Conclusions This study reveals that intercellular connections between chondrocytes contain GJs that play a key role in cell-cell communication and a metabolic function by exchange of nutrients including glucose and essential amino acids. A three-dimensional cellular network mediated through GJs might mediate metabolic and physiological homeostasis to maintain cartilage tissue. PMID:24225059

  3. Technical and practical improvements in arthroscopic indentation technique for diagnostics of articular cartilage softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, M A; Töyräs, J; Aula, A S; Karjalainen, J P; Riekkinen, O; Jurvelin, J S

    2011-01-01

    Indentation measurements have been proposed to serve as sensitive in vivo diagnostics of cartilage degeneration. However, practical difficulties have hindered the use of quantitative indentation techniques during routine arthroscopies. In this study we modified the previously commercial indentation technique by designing software for quality control of manual indentations. With the modifications, our aim was to introduce more rapid and less erroneous measurements, as well as more automatic and objective analyses. The performance of the technique was tested in situ using six bovine medial tibial plateaus. All measurements were conducted by three operators. The intraoperator reproducibility was reasonable (CV%  = 7.1%) and the interoperator reproducibility was good (intraclass correlation coefficient  = 0.976). Further, the novel technique was tested by a single operator using 10 bovine medial tibial plateaus. The indentation stiffness values determined with the arthroscopic instrument correlated significantly with the dynamic (r = 0.823) and equilibrium (r = 0.752) moduli as well as tissue water (r =  -0.830) and hydroxyproline (r = 0.776) contents. To conclude, the novel measurement technique showed good reproducibility and was found to give valuable information on cartilage properties. Most importantly, the measurements and analyses were more straightforward and automatic than those introduced in the original indentation approach.

  4. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Achim, E-mail: achim.salamon@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Jonitz-Heincke, Anika, E-mail: anika.jonitz@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Adam, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.adam@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Rychly, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.rychly@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Müller-Hilke, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.mueller-hilke@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Immunology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 68, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Bader, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.bader@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Lochner, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.lochner@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  5. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, Achim; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Adam, Stefanie; Rychly, Joachim; Müller-Hilke, Brigitte; Bader, Rainer; Lochner, Katrin; Peters, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  6. The use of fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid hybrid scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering: an in vivo analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Munirah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Our preliminary results indicated that fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA hybrid scaffold promoted early chondrogenesis of articular cartilage constructs in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo cartilaginous tissue formation by chondrocyte-seeded fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffolds. PLGA scaffolds were soaked carefully, in chondrocyte-fibrin suspension, and polymerized by dropping thrombin-calcium chloride (CaCl2 solution. PLGA-seeded chondrocytes were used as a control. Resulting constructs were implanted subcutaneously, at the dorsum of nude mice, for 4 weeks. Macroscopic observation, histological evaluation, gene expression and sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG analyses were performed at each time point of 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-implantation. Cartilaginous tissue formation in fibrin/PLGA hybrid construct was confirmed by the presence of lacunae and cartilage-isolated cells embedded within basophilic ground substance. Presence of proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was confirmed by positive Safranin O and Alcian Blue staining. Collagen type II exhibited intense immunopositivity at the pericellular matrices. Chondrogenic properties were further demonstrated by the expression of gene encoded cartilage-specific markers, collagen type II and aggrecan core protein. The sGAG production in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was higher than in the PLGA group. In conclusion, fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffold promotes cartilaginous tissue formation in vivo and may serve as a potential cell delivery vehicle and a structural basis for articular cartilage tissue-engineering.

  7. Longitudinal study of sodium MRI of articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis: initial experience with 16-month follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madelin, Guillaume; Xia, Ding; Brown, Ryan; Babb, James; Chang, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Division, New York, NY (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate the potential of sodium MRI to detect changes over time of apparent sodium concentration (ASC) in articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The cartilage of 12 patients with knee OA were scanned twice over a period of approximately 16 months with two sodium MRI sequences at 7 T: without fluid suppression (radial 3D) and with fluid suppression by adiabatic inversion recovery (IR). Changes between baseline and follow-up of mean and standard deviation of ASC (in mM), and their rate of change (in mM/day), were measured in the patellar, femorotibial medial and lateral cartilage regions for each subject. A matched-pair Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess significance of the changes. Changes in mean and in standard deviation of ASC, and in their respective rate of change over time, were only statistically different when data was acquired with the fluid-suppressed sequence. A significant decrease (p = 0.001) of approximately 70 mM in mean ASC was measured between the two IR scans. Quantitative sodium MRI with fluid suppression by adiabatic IR at 7 T has the potential to detect a decrease of ASC over time in articular cartilage of patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  8. Demonstration of the therapeutic effect of /sup 35/S labelled L-cystine in articular and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiegelow, P.; Puschmann, M.; Giese, U.

    1984-01-16

    Clinical experience has obviously shown a positive effect of application of sulfated amino acids on degenerative cartilage diseases. L-Cystin, presumed to be of therapeutic effect, was autoradiographically localized in articular, columnar and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature. In 10 days old NMRI-mice, we had shown a dose-dependent incorporation of the radioactively labelled /sup 35/S-Cystin in hair follicle. These statistically significant differences had been measured by quantitative autoradiographical microscope photometry. The sulfated amino acids are also proven in nail matrix, nail hyponychium as well as in cartilage and skeletal musculature. Besides a localization of radioactively labelled L-Cystin in tissues, presumed as target organs of a therapeutic effect, there is still lacking an experimental proof of efficacy on cell proliferation and functional metabolism e.g. in arthrosis by suitable animal models.

  9. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Nagel, Thomas; Carroll, Simon F; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin) deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  10. Anomalous Behavior of Hyaluronan Crosslinking Due to the Presence of Excess Phospholipids in the Articular Cartilage System of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bełdowski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lubrication of articular cartilage is a complex multiscale phenomenon in synovial joint organ systems. In these systems, synovial fluid properties result from synergistic interactions between a variety of molecular constituent. Two molecular classes in particular are of importance in understanding lubrication mechanisms: hyaluronic acid and phospholipids. The purpose of this study is to evaluate interactions between hyaluronic acid and phospholipids at various functionality levels during normal and pathological synovial fluid conditions. Molecular dynamic simulations of hyaluronic acid and phospholipids complexes were performed with the concentration of hyaluronic acid set at a constant value for two organizational forms, extended (normal and coiled (pathologic. The results demonstrated that phospholipids affect the crosslinking mechanisms of hyaluronic acid significantly and the influence is higher during pathological conditions. During normal conditions, hyaluronic acid and phospholipid interactions seem to have no competing mechanism to that of the interaction between hyaluronic acid to hyaluronic acid. On the other hand, the structures formed under pathologic conditions were highly affected by phospholipid concentration.

  11. Finite Element Analysis Of Large Deformation Of Articular Cartilage In Upper Ankle Joint Of Occupant In Military Vehicles During Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klekiel T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the load of lower limbs of occupants in the armoured military vehicle, which has been destroyed by detonation of the Improvised Explosive Device (IED charge under the vehicle. A simplified model of the human lower limb focused on upper ankle joint was developed in order to determine the reaction forces in joints and load in particular segments during the blast load. The model of upper ankle joint, include a tibia and an ankle bone with corresponding articular cartilage, has been developed. An analysis of the stress distribution under the influence of forces applied at different angles to the biomechanical axis of a limb has been performed. We analyzed the case of the lower limb of a sitting man leaning his feet on the floor. It has been shown that during a foot pronation induced by a knee outward deviation, the axial load on the foot causes significantly greater tension in the tibia. At the same time it has been shown that within the medial malleolus, tensile stresses occur on the surface of the bone which may lead to fracture of the medial malleolus. It is a common case of injuries caused by loads on foot of passengers in armored vehicles during a mine or IED load under the vehicle. It was shown that the outward deviation of the knee increases the risk of the foot injury within the ankle joint.

  12. A new source of mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair: MSCs derived from mobilized peripheral blood share similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as MSCs from bone marrow in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Li; Zhou, Chun-Yan; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow (BM) has been considered as a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but it has many disadvantages in clinical application. However, MSCs from peripheral blood (PB) could be obtained by a less invasive method and be more beneficial for autologous transplantation than BM MSCs, which makes PB a promising source for articular cartilage repair in clinical use. To assess whether MSCs from mobilized PB of New Zealand White rabbits have similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as BM MSCs. Controlled laboratory study. A combined method of drug administration containing granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) plus CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 was adopted to mobilize the PB stem cells of adult New Zealand White rabbits in vitro. The isolated cells were identified as MSCs by morphological characteristics, surface markers, and differentiation potentials. A comparison between PB MSCs and BM MSCs was made in terms of biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo. This issue was investigated from the aspects of morphology, immune phenotype, multiple differentiation capacity, expansion potential, antiapoptotic capacity, and ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo of PB MSCs compared with BM MSCs. Peripheral blood MSCs were successfully mobilized by the method of combined drug administration, then isolated, expanded, and identified in vitro. No significant difference was found concerning the morphology, immune phenotype, and antiapoptotic capacity between PB MSCs and BM MSCs. Significantly, MSCs from both sources compounded with decalcified bone matrix showed the same ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo. For multipluripotency, BM MSCs exhibited a more osteogenic potential and higher proliferation capacity than PB MSCs, whereas PB MSCs possessed a stronger adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential than BM MSCs in vitro. Although there are some differences in the proliferation and

  13. Reduced articular cartilage thickness in joints without a history of active arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Spannow, Anne Helene; Heuck, Carsten

    Background: The functional disability experienced in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is primarily caused by degeneration of the osteocartilaginous structures due to the inflammatory process in the synovium. It is therefore essential for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy to closely monitor...... in joint cartilage thickness (Cth) between healthy children and JIA children measured by US (1). But are there any differences in Cth measured by US between healthy children and joints without a history of activity among JIA children’s. Aim: To investigate a possible effect of the inflammatory process...... on joints never directly affected by arthritic activity during the history of the child’s disease course. Furthermore we wanted to compare joint cartilage thickness within the JIA group in joints with or without a history of activity. Methods: We included 95 Danish JIA children. Age, mean (range) 10...

  14. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq Rai

    Full Text Available (i To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI, and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii to predict individuals at potential risk for developing "pre-osteoarthritis" (OA based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage.Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies.We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA.Our study provides a list of gene transcripts in healthy

  15. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  16. A new biotechnology for articular cartilage repair: subchondral implantation of a composite of interconnected porous hydroxyapatite, synthetic polymer (PLA-PEG), and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Noriyuki; Myoui, Akira; Hirao, Makoto; Kaito, Takashi; Ochi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junzo; Takaoka, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2005-05-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a major obstacle in tissue engineering. We recently developed a novel tool for articular cartilage repair, consisting of a triple composite of an interconnected porous hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and a synthetic biodegradable polymer [poly-d,l-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG)] as a carrier for rhBMP-2. In the present study, we evaluated the capacity of the triple composite to induce the regeneration of articular cartilage. Full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the trochlear groove of 52 New Zealand White rabbits. Sixteen defects were filled with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), 12 with PLA-PEG/IP-CHA (group II), 12 with IP-CHA alone (group III), and 12 were left empty (group IV). The animals were killed 1, 3, and 6 weeks after surgery, and the gross appearance of the defect sites was assessed. The harvested tissues were examined radiographically and histologically. One week after implantation with the BMP/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), vigorous repair had occurred in the subchondral defect. It contained an agglomeration of mesenchymal cells which had migrated from the surrounding bone marrow either directly, or indirectly via the interconnecting pores of the IP-CHA scaffold. At 6 weeks, these defects were completely repaired. The regenerated cartilage manifested a hyaline-like appearance, with a mature matrix and a columnar organization of chondrocytes. The triple composite of rhBMP-2, PLA-PEG, and IP-CHA promotes the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects within as short a period as 3 weeks in the rabbit model. Hence, this novel cell-free implant biotechnology could mark a new development in the field of articular cartilage repair.

  17. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H

    2006-01-01

    (GAG), hydroxyproline, and cross-linked C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (CTX-II), which were compared to immunohistochemical evaluations of proteoglycans and CTX-II. We assessed MMP expression by gelatine zymography and CK expression by immunohistochemistry. In vivo, CTX-II release...... was measured from CK-deficient mice. RESULTS: OSM and TNF-alpha combined induced significant (Pzymography, and CK expression...

  18. Modulating carbohydrate-based hydrogels as viscoelastic lubricant substitute for articular cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcovich, Gesmi; Antunes, Filipe E; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Gabriele; Grassi, Mario; Asaro, Fioretta

    2017-09-01

    Viscosupplementation is a therapeutic approach for osteoarthritis treatment, where the synovial fluid, the natural lubricant of the joints, is replaced by viscoelastic solutions with rheological properties comparable or better than the starting material. This study presents the development of an innovative platform for viscosupplementation, based on the optimization of polysaccharide-based colloidal hydrogel, aiming to reduce on-site enzyme degradation and enhance the possibility of hyaluronic acid substitution with alternative biomaterials. Catanionic vesicles are proposed as physical crosslinker that can guarantee the formation of a 'soft', tunable network, offering a dual-therapeutic approach: on the mechanical relief perspective, as well as on the drug/gene delivery strategy. This research focuses on the fabrication and optimization of colloidal networks, driven by the synergistic interaction among catanionic vesicles and cationic modified cellulose polymers. This study tests the hypothesis that cellulose-like polymers can be arranged into functional matrix, mimicking the mechanical properties of healthy synovial fluids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Degeneration of articular cartilage in osteonecrosis of the femoral head begins at the necrotic region after collapse: a preliminary study using T1 rho MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Motomura, Goro; Nakashima, Yasuharu [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi; Takayama, Yukihisa; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, Takuaki [Fukuoka University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of collapse on the degeneration of articular cartilage in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Sixteen hips in 12 patients (four men, eight women; mean age, 34.8 years) with a history of systemic corticosteroid treatment were studied using T1 rho magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Six hips had collapsed ONFH, five had non-collapsed ONFH, and five had no osteonecrosis (controls). Using oblique coronal images, we divided the articular surface of necrotic femoral heads into a region just above the necrotic bone (necrotic zone) and another above the living bone (living zone). T1 rho value was evaluated for each zone. The mean T1 rho value in the necrotic zone was significantly higher in the collapsed ONFH group (48.4 ± 2.7 ms) than in the non-collapsed ONFH group (41.0 ± 0.9 ms). In the collapsed ONFH group, the mean T1 rho value was significantly higher in the necrotic zone (48.4 ± 2.7 ms) than in the living zone (43.5 ± 2.5 ms). In the non-collapsed ONFH group, there was no significant difference between the mean T1 rho values of the necrotic and living zones. In the collapsed ONFH group, the mean T1 rho value of the necrotic zone and the interval from pain onset to the MRI examination were positively correlated. The current T1 rho MRI study suggested that the degeneration of articular cartilage in ONFH begins at the necrotic region after collapse. (orig.)

  20. Degeneration of articular cartilage in osteonecrosis of the femoral head begins at the necrotic region after collapse: a preliminary study using T1 rho MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Motomura, Goro; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Kawanami, Satoshi; Takayama, Yukihisa; Honda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of collapse on the degeneration of articular cartilage in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Sixteen hips in 12 patients (four men, eight women; mean age, 34.8 years) with a history of systemic corticosteroid treatment were studied using T1 rho magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Six hips had collapsed ONFH, five had non-collapsed ONFH, and five had no osteonecrosis (controls). Using oblique coronal images, we divided the articular surface of necrotic femoral heads into a region just above the necrotic bone (necrotic zone) and another above the living bone (living zone). T1 rho value was evaluated for each zone. The mean T1 rho value in the necrotic zone was significantly higher in the collapsed ONFH group (48.4 ± 2.7 ms) than in the non-collapsed ONFH group (41.0 ± 0.9 ms). In the collapsed ONFH group, the mean T1 rho value was significantly higher in the necrotic zone (48.4 ± 2.7 ms) than in the living zone (43.5 ± 2.5 ms). In the non-collapsed ONFH group, there was no significant difference between the mean T1 rho values of the necrotic and living zones. In the collapsed ONFH group, the mean T1 rho value of the necrotic zone and the interval from pain onset to the MRI examination were positively correlated. The current T1 rho MRI study suggested that the degeneration of articular cartilage in ONFH begins at the necrotic region after collapse. (orig.)

  1. Shape of articular surface of crocodilian (Archosauria) elbow joints and its relevance to sauropsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Taru, Hajime; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2010-07-01

    The determination of area and shape of articular surfaces on the limb bones of extinct archosaurs is difficult because of postmortem decomposition of the fibrous tissue and articular cartilages that provide the complex three-dimensional joint surfaces in vivo. This study aims at describing the shape of the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of six crocodilian specimens; comparing its structure with that of four birds, three testudines, and five squamates; and comparing the shapes of the surfaces of the calcified and the articular cartilages in the elbow joints of an Alligator specimen. The shapes of the articular cartilages of crocodilian elbow joint are shown to resemble those of birds. The humerus possesses an olecranon fossa positioned approximately at the midportion of the distal epiphysis and bordering the margin of the extensor side of the articular surface. The ulna possesses a prominent intercotylar process at approximately the middle of its articular surface, and splits the surface into the radial and ulnar cotylae. This divides the articular cartilage into an articular surface on the flexor portion, and the olecranon on the extensor portion. The intercotylar process fits into the olecranon fossa to restrict elbow joint extension. Dinosaurs and pterosaurs, phylogenetically bracketed by Crocodylia and Aves (birds), may have possessed a similar olecranon fossa and intercotylar process on their articular cartilages. Although these shapes are rarely recognizable on the bones, their impressions on the surfaces of the calcified cartilages provide an important indication of the extensor margin of the articular surfaces. This, in turn, helps to determine the maximum angle of extension of the elbow joint in archosaurs.

  2. Texture analysis of articular cartilage traumatic changes in the knee calculated from morphological 3.0 T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutsikou, Konstantina [Department of Medical Radiologic Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Kostopoulos, Spiros; Glotsos, Dimitris; Cavouras, Dionisis [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Lavdas, Eleftherios; Oikonomou, Georgia [Department of Medical Radiologic Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag.Spyridonos, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece); Malizos, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece); Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [Department of Radiology, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece); Vlychou, Marianna, E-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr [Department of Radiology, University of Thessaly, School of Health Sciences, University Hospital of Larissa, Biopolis, Larissa 41110 (Greece)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: In the present work, we aim to identify changes in the cartilage texture of the injured knee in young, physically active, patients by computer analysis of MRI images based on 3.0 T morphological sequences. Methods: Fifty-three young patients with training injury or trauma in one knee underwent MRI and arthroscopy. Textural features were computed from the MRI images of the knee-cartilages and two classes were formed of 28 normal and 16 with pathology only in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) cartilage. Results: Textural features with statistically significant differences between the two classes were found only at the MFC and the medial tibial condyle (MTC) areas. Three features-combinations, at the MFC or the MTC, maximized the between classes separation, thus, rendering alterations in cartilage texture due to injury more evident. The MFC cartilage in the pathology class was found more inhomogeneous in the distribution of gray-levels and of lower texture anisotropy and the opposed MTC cartilage, though normal on MRI and arthroscopy, was found to have lower texture anisotropy than cartilage in the normal class. Conclusion: Texture analysis may be used as an adjunct to morphological MR imaging for improving the detection of subtle cartilage changes and contributes to early therapeutic approach.

  3. MR imaging of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as gold standard: assessment of methodological quality of clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, Florence; Berg, Bruno C. vande

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the methodological quality of articles addressing the value of MR imaging of the knee cartilage with arthroscopy as a standard. Relevant papers were selected after Medline review (MEDLINE database search including the terms ''cartilage'' ''knee'', ''MR'' and ''arthroscopy''). Two observers reviewed independently 29 selected articles to determine how each study had met 15 individual standards that had been previously developed to assess the methodological quality of clinical investigations. The following criteria were met in variable percentage of articles including adequate definition of purpose (100%), statistical analysis (90%), avoidance of verification bias (86%), patient population description (83%), reference standard (79%), review bias (79%), study design (66%), inclusion criteria (41%) and method of analysis (41.5%), avoidance of diagnostic-review bias (24%), exclusion criteria (21%), indeterminate examination results (17%), analysis criteria (14%), interobserver reliability (14%) and intraobserver reliability (7%). The assessment of the methodological quality of clinical investigations addressing the value of MR imaging in the evaluation of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference demonstrated that several standards were rarely met in the literature. Efforts should be made to rely on clearly defined lesion criteria and to determine reliability of the observations. (orig.)

  4. Relationship between knee alignment and T1ρ values of articular cartilage and menisci in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@hotmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University, School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Vieira, Renata La Rocca, E-mail: relarocca@gmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rybak, Leon D., E-mail: Leon.Rybak@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Babb, James S., E-mail: James.Babb@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren–Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Materials and methods: 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3 T MR scanner. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results: Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1ρ values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion: There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA.

  5. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL. At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA.

  6. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  7. Crosslinking by advanced glycation end products increases the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular cartilage: A possible mechanism through which age is a risk factor for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Zaken, C.B.; Braun-Benjamin, O.; Maroudas, A.; Bank, R.A.; Mizrahi, J.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Age is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). During aging, nonenzymatic glycation results in the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cartilage collagen. We studied the effect of AGE crosslinking on the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular

  8. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Xi; Yin, Jian-Hua; Mao, Zhi-Hua; Xia, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combined with chemometrics algorithm has strong potential to obtain complex chemical information from biology tissues. FTIRI and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilages for the first time. A PLS model was built on the calibration matrix of spectra that was randomly selected from the FTIRI spectral datasets of healthy and lesioned cartilage. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed in the PLS model, and the fitting coefficient between actual and predicted categorical values of the calibration matrix reached 0.95. In the calibration and prediction matrices, the successful identifying percentages of healthy and lesioned cartilage spectra were 100% and 90.24%, respectively. These results demonstrated that FTIRI combined with PLS-DA could provide a promising approach for the categorical identification of healthy and OA cartilage specimens.

  9. Return to sport after the surgical management of articular cartilage lesions in the knee: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych, Aaron J; Pareek, Ayoosh; King, Alexander H; Johnson, Nick R; Stuart, Michael J; Williams, Riley J

    2017-10-01

    Optimal surgical treatment of chondral defects in an athletic population remains highly controversial and has yet to be determined. The purpose of this review was to (1) report data on return to sport and (2) compare activity and functional outcome measures following various cartilage restoration techniques. A comprehensive review was performed for studies with return-to-sport outcomes after microfracture (MFX), osteochondral autograft transfer (OAT), osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA), and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). All studies containing return-to-sport participation with minimum 2-year post-operative activity-based outcomes were included. A meta-analysis comparing rate of return to sport between each surgical intervention was conducted using a random-effects model. Forty-four studies met inclusion criteria (18 Level I/II, 26 Level III/IV). In total, 2549 patients were included (1756 M, 793 F) with an average age of 35 years and follow-up of 47 months. Return to sport at some level was 76 % overall, with highest rates of return after OAT (93 %), followed by OCA (88 %), ACI (82 %), and MFX (58 %). Osteochondral autograft transfer showed the fastest return to sports (5.2 ± 1.8 months) compared to 9.1 ± 2.2 months for MFX, 9.6 ± 3.0 months for OCA and 11.8 ± 3.8 months for ACI (P sport. In conclusion, in this meta-analysis of 2549 athletes, cartilage restoration surgery had a 76 % return to sport at mid-term follow-up. Osteochondral autograft transfer offered a faster recovery and appeared to have a higher rate of return to preinjury athletics, but heterogeneity in lesion size, athlete age, and concomitant surgical procedures are important factors to consider when assessing individual athletes. This study reports on the rate of return to sport in athletes undergoing various procedures for symptomatic chondral defects. IV.

  10. Regeneration of articular cartilage by adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: perspectives from stem cell biology and molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Shu; Karperien, Marcel; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been discovered for more than a decade. Due to the large numbers of cells that can be harvested with relatively little donor morbidity, they are considered to be an attractive alternative to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Consequently, isolation and differentiation of ASCs draw great attention in the research of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Cartilage defects cause big therapeutic problems because of their low self-repair capacity. Application of ASCs in cartilage regeneration gives hope to treat cartilage defects with autologous stem cells. In recent years, a lot of studies have been performed to test the possibility of using ASCs to re-construct damaged cartilage tissue. In this article, we have reviewed the most up-to-date articles utilizing ASCs for cartilage regeneration in basic and translational research. Our topic covers differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, increased cartilage formation by co-culture of ASCs with chondrocytes and enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs by gene manipulation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Efeitos sobre o tecido ósseo e cartilagem articular provocados pela imobilização e remobilização em ratos Wistar Effects of immobilization and remobilization on bone tissue and cartilage in Wistar rats

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    Danielle Portinho

    2008-10-01

    animais remobilizados.Long immobilization periods lead to bone and properties loss, and its recovery depends on many factors. Besides that, immobilization can cause ulcerations in the articular cartilage tissue due to alterations, such as loss of proteoglycans and total cartilage mass and volume. The aim of this study was to verify histological alterations of the periarticular bone tissue and articular cartilage caused by immobilization as well as remobilization of hinder limbs of Wistar rats. Twelve Wistar rats were divided in two groups: GI - (n=6: 15 days with the left hinder limb immobilized at plantiflexion, with the right limb being the control; GR - (n=6: used a 15 day-period of free remobilization in the cage, associated with 3 daily stretching bouts of the left soleus muscle for 30 seconds. The measures of the cortical bone thickness, diameter of the medular channel and number of condrocites were evaluated; in the cartilage tissue, the cartilage mean thickness and the number of condrocites were measured. The results showed that for GI there were no significant alterations in the bone thickness (p=0.1156, nor in the medular channel diameter (p=0.5698, but there was significant decrease of the osteocytes compared with the counter-lateral side (p=0.0005; in GR decrease in the number of osteocytes (p=0.0001 was also observed, but the differences in thickness (p=0.1343 and medular channel diameter (p=0.6456 remained non-significant. There were no significant differences for the articular cartilage data for the samples, neither in the cartilage thickness for GI (p=0.6640 and GR (p=0.1633; concerning the number of condrocites in GI (p=0.9429 and GR (p=0.1634. It is concluded hence that two weeks of immobilization and remobilization produced only significant decrease in the number of osteocytes in the immobilized rats and continued to decrease even in the remobilized animals.

  12. High resolution MRI imaging at 9.4 Tesla of the osteochondral unit in a translational model of articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Lars; Müller, Andreas; Bücker, Arno; Madry, Henning

    2015-04-16

    Non-destructive structural evaluation of the osteochondral unit is challenging. Here, the capability of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) at 9.4 Tesla (T) was explored to examine osteochondral repair ex vivo in a preclinical large animal model. A specific aim of this study was to detect recently described alterations of the subchondral bone associated with cartilage repair. Osteochondral samples of medial femoral condyles from adult ewes containing full-thickness articular cartilage defects treated with marrow stimulation were obtained after 6 month in vivo and scanned in a 9.4 T μMRI. Ex vivo imaging of small osteochondral samples (typical volume: 1-2 cm(3)) at μMRI was optimised by variation of repetition time (TR), time echo (TE), flip angle (FA), spatial resolution and number of excitations (NEX) from standard MultiSliceMultiEcho (MSME) and three-dimensional (3D) spoiled GradientEcho (SGE) sequences. A 3D SGE sequence with the parameters: TR = 10 ms, TE = 3 ms, FA = 10°, voxel size = 120 × 120 × 120 μm(3) and NEX = 10 resulted in the best fitting for sample size, image quality, scanning time and artifacts. An isovolumetric voxel shape allowed for multiplanar reconstructions. Within the osteochondral unit articular cartilage, cartilaginous repair tissue and bone marrow could clearly be distinguished from the subchondral bone plate and subarticular spongiosa. Specific alterations of the osteochondral unit associated with cartilage repair such as persistent drill holes, subchondral bone cysts, sclerosis of the subchondral bone plate and of the subarticular spongiosa and intralesional osteophytes were precisely detected. High resolution, non-destructive ex vivo analysis of the entire osteochondral unit in a preclinical large animal model that is sufficient for further analyses is possible using μMRI at 9.4 T. In particular, 9.4 T is capable of accurately depicting alterations of the subchondral bone that are associated with

  13. Micro-Scale Distribution of CA4+ in Ex vivo Human Articular Cartilage Detected with Contrast-Enhanced Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging

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    Sakari S. Karhula

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (CEμCT with cationic and anionic contrast agents reveals glycosaminoglycan (GAG content and distribution in articular cartilage (AC. The advantage of using cationic stains (e.g., CA4+ compared to anionic stains (e.g., Hexabrix®, is that it distributes proportionally with GAGs, while anionic stain distribution in AC is inversely proportional to the GAG content. To date, studies using cationic stains have been conducted with sufficient resolution to study its distributions on the macro-scale, but with insufficient resolution to study its distributions on the micro-scale. Therefore, it is not known whether the cationic contrast agents accumulate in extra/pericellular matrix and if they interact with chondrocytes. The insufficient resolution has also prevented to answer the question whether CA4+ accumulation in chondrons could lead to an erroneous quantification of GAG distribution with low-resolution μCT setups. In this study, we use high-resolution μCT to investigate whether CA4+ accumulates in chondrocytes, and further, to determine whether it affects the low-resolution ex vivo μCT studies of CA4+ stained human AC with varying degree of osteoarthritis. Human osteochondral samples were immersed in three different concentrations of CA4+ (3 mgI/ml, 6 mgI/ml, and 24 mgI/ml and imaged with high-resolution μCT at several timepoints. Different uptake diffusion profiles of CA4+ were observed between the segmented chondrons and the rest of the tissue. While the X-ray -detected CA4+ concentration in chondrons was greater than in the rest of the AC, its contribution to the uptake into the whole tissue was negligible and in line with macro-scale GAG content detected from histology. The efficient uptake of CA4+ into chondrons and surrounding territorial matrix can be explained by the micro-scale distribution of GAG content. CA4+ uptake in chondrons occurred regardless of the progression stage of osteoarthritis

  14. Mechanical testing of hydrogels in cartilage tissue engineering: beyond the compressive modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context.

  15. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

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    Alexander J Neumann

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs

  16. Treatment of Knee Osteochondral Lesions Using a Novel Clot of Autologous Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Mixed with Healthy Hyaline Cartilage Chips and Intra-Articular Injection of PRGF

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    Ramón Cugat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee cartilage or osteochondral lesions are common and challenging injuries. To date, most symptomatic lesions warrant surgical treatment. We present two cases of patients with knee osteochondral defects treated with a one-step surgical procedure consisting of an autologous-based matrix composed of healthy hyaline cartilage chips, mixed plasma poor-rich in platelets clot, and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF. Both patients returned to playing soccer at the preinjury activity level and demonstrated excellent defect filling in both magnetic resonance imaging and second-look arthroscopy (in one of them. The use of a clot of autologous plasma poor in platelets with healthy hyaline cartilage chips and intra-articular injection of plasma rich in platelets is an effective, easy, and cheap option to treat knee cartilage injuries in young and athletic patients.

  17. Model predictions of increased knee joint loading in regions of thinner articular cartilage after patellar tendon adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Justin W; Akbarshahi, Massoud; Crossley, Kay M; Shelburne, Kevin B; Pandy, Marcus G

    2011-08-01

    Patellar tendon adhesion is a complication from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction that may affect patellofemoral and tibiofemoral biomechanics. A computational model was used to investigate the changes in knee joint mechanics due to patellar tendon adhesion under normal physiological loading during gait. The calculations showed that patellar tendon adhesion up to the level of the anterior tibial plateau led to patellar infera, increased patellar flexion, and increased anterior tibial translation. These kinematic changes were associated with increased patellar contact force, a distal shift in peak patellar contact pressure, a posterior shift in peak tibial contact pressure, and increased peak tangential contact sliding distance over one gait cycle (i.e., contact slip). Postadhesion, patellar and tibial contact locations corresponded to regions of thinner cartilage. The predicted distal shift in patellar contact was in contrast to other patellar infera studies. Average patellar and tibial cartilage pressure did not change significantly following patellar tendon adhesion; however, peak medial tibial pressure increased. These results suggest that changes in peak tibial cartilage pressure, contact slip, and the migration of contact to regions of thinner cartilage are associated with patellar tendon adhesion and may be responsible for initiating patellofemoral pain and knee joint structural damage observed following ACL reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

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    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  19. Repair of osteochondral defects with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R E; Ilten-Kirby, B M; Dunkelman, N S; Symons, K T; Rekettye, L M; Willoughby, J; Ratcliffe, A

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants on healing of osteochondral defects. Rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer, then seeded onto biodegradable, three-dimensional polyglycolic acid meshes. Cartilage constructs were cultured hydrodynamically to yield tissue with relatively more (mature) or less (immature) hyalinelike cartilage, as compared with adult rabbit articular cartilage. Osteochondral defects in the patellar grooves of both stifle joints either were left untreated or implanted with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage. Histologic samples from in and around the defect sites were examined 3, 6, 9, and 12, and 24 months after surgery. By 9 months after surgery, defects sites treated with cartilage implants contained significantly greater amounts of hyalinelike cartilage with high levels of proteoglycan, and had a smooth, nonfibrillated articular surface as compared to untreated defects. In contrast, the repair tissue formed in untreated defects had fibrillated articular surfaces, significant amounts of fibrocartilage, and negligible proteoglycan. These differences between treated and untreated defects persisted through 24 months after surgery. The results of this study suggest that the treatment of osteochondral lesions with allogenic tissue engineered cartilage implants may lead to superior repair tissue than that found in untreated osteochondral lesions.

  20. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  1. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid for treatment of osteoarthritis knee: comparative study to intra-articular corticosteroids

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    Soad A Elsawy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion Both HA and corticosteroid groups showed improvement in pain and knee function, but the intra-articular HA was superior to corticosteroid on long-term follow-up. This supports the potential rate of intra-articular HA as an effective long-term therapeutic option for patients with OA of the knee.

  2. A comparative study on the impact of intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid, tenoxicam and betametazon on the relief of temporomandibular joint disorder complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Özkiriş, Mahmut; Okur, Aylin; Korkmaz, Murat; Saydam, Levent

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular injections of three different agents with well known anti-inflammatory properties. Between April 2010 and January 2013 a total of 100 patients who were diagnosed as temporomandibular joint disorder in the Department of Otolaryngology at Bozok University School of Medicine were prospectively studied. Patients with symptoms of jaw pain, limited or painful jaw movement, clicking or grating within the joint, were evaluated with temporomandibular CT to investigate the presence of cartilage or capsule degeneration. In the study group there were 55 female and 45 male patients who were non-responders to conventional anti-inflammatory treatment for TMJ complaints. The patients were randomly divided into four groups consisting of a control group and three different groups who underwent intra-articular injection of one given anti-inflammatory agent for each group. We injected saline solution to intra-articular space in the control group. Of three anti-inflammatory agents including hyaluronic acid (HA, Hyalgan intra-articular injection, Sodium hyaluronate 10 mg/ml, 2 ml injection syringe, Bilim Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey); betamethasone (CS, Diprospan flacon, 7.0 mg betamethasone/1 ml, Schering-Plough Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) and; tenoxicam (TX, Tilcotil flacon, 20 mg tenoxicam/ml, Roche Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) were administered intra-articularly under, ultrasonographic guidance. Following the completion of injections the, changes in subjective symptoms were compared with visual analogue scales, (VAS) scores at 1st and 6th weeks' follow-up visits between four groups. The HA group did significantly better pain relief scores compared to the, other groups at 1st and 6th weeks (p 0.05). We found that HA produced better pain relief scores when compared to the other anti-inflammatory agents studied. The main disadvantage of HA is its relatively higher cost

  3. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  4. Pronounced biomaterial dependency in cartilage regeneration using nonexpanded compared with expanded chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, A.I.; Bekkers, J.E.J.; Beekhuizen, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate freshly isolated compared with culture-expanded chondrocytes with respect to early regenerative response, cytokine production and cartilage formation in response to four commonly used biomaterials. Materials & methods: Chondrocytes were both directly and after expansion to

  5. Natural evolution of popliteomeniscal fascicle tears over 2 years and its association with lateral articular knee cartilage degeneration in patients with traumatic anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Julio Brandao; Facchetti, Luca; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gersing, Alexandra S; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M

    2018-02-23

    To assess (i) normal imaging anatomy of the popliteomeniscal fascicles, (ii) prevalence and natural evolution of popliteomeniscal fascicle tears (PMFT) in subjects with traumatic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears over 2 years and (iii) compare knee cartilage degeneration in subjects with and without PMFT longitudinally. 57 subjects with ACL tears were screened for PMFT. Morphological (high-resolution 3D fast spin-echo) and compositional (T1ρ and T2 mapping) MR imaging was performed prior to and 2 years after ACL reconstruction. Differences of morphological and compositional parameters were compared between subjects with and without PMFT using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex and BMI. In 24% (n = 14) of the subjects with ACL tear a PMFT was detected on baseline MRI. One subject with PMFT developed a meniscal tear over 2 years. Cartilage ∆T1ρ of the lateral femur increased significantly more in subjects with isolated PMFT compared to controls (mean difference, 2.0 ± 2.9 vs. -1.3 ± 1.6, p = 0.027). PMFT detected by MRI are a common finding in subjects with ACL tears. Subjects with these defects showed higher compositional cartilage deterioration compared to controls, over 2 years in the lateral femoral compartment, indicating accelerated cartilage degeneration. • Popliteomeniscal fascicle lesions are a common finding in subjects with ACL tears. • Progression to a meniscal tear over 2 years is not frequent. • Anteroinferior popliteomeniscal fascicle is injured most frequently. • Patients with popliteomeniscal fascicle lesions showed accelerated cartilage degeneration.

  6. Comparative study of sliced tragal cartilage and temporalis fascia in type I tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M M; Parab, S R

    2015-01-01

    To compare anatomical and audiological results using sliced tragal cartilage and temporalis fascia in type I tympanoplasty. A retrospective review was undertaken of primary tympanoplasties using sliced tragal cartilage and temporalis fascia from May 2005 to January 2008. In total, 223 ears were operated on using sliced tragal cartilage graft and 167 using temporalis fascia. Statistical analysis of the outcome data was performed. At the two-year and four-year follow ups, successful closure of the tympanic membrane was achieved in 98.20 per cent and 97.75 per cent, respectively, of the cartilage group compared with 87.42 per cent and 82.63 per cent, respectively, of the temporalis fascia group. At the four-year follow up, the average air-bone gap was 7.10 ± 3.01 dB in the cartilage group and 8.05 ± 3.22 dB in the temporalis fascia group. The overall success rate for primary cartilage tympanoplasty is higher when using sliced cartilage than with temporalis fascia grafting.

  7. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94  μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700  nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053  nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18  J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15  mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3  μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18  J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates. PMID:25200394

  8. MRI features of three paediatric intra-articular synovial lesions: a comparative study

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    Kan, J.H. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States)], E-mail: herman.kan@vanderbilt.edu; Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States); Damon, B.M.; Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, S.A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, IL (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To determine reliable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features differentiating three paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions that contain blood products, from post-traumatic or haemorrhagic inflammatory processes. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective review of MRI findings of 22 paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions, including venous malformation (VM) (n = 12), pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS; n = 8), and synovial sarcoma (SS; n = 2). These MRI features were compared with 22 paediatric post-traumatic or inflammatory intra-articular processes containing blood products and producing mass effect. The following imaging features were assessed: presence of a discrete mass, extension, extra-articular oedema, susceptibility, joint effusion, and size. Fisher's exact test was used and results were considered statistically significant when p < 0.05. Results: The three intra-articular synovial lesions, compared with controls, were more likely to directly invade osseous structures when a discrete mass was present (13/16, 81.3% versus 1/9, 11.1%; p < 0.002) and extend into extra-articular soft tissues (13/21, 61.9% versus 2/17, 11.8%; p < 0.003), but were less likely to show extra-articular oedema (3/22, 13.6% versus 13/22, 59.1%; p < 0.004), a joint effusion (10/22,45.5% versus 19/22, 86.4%, p < 0.01), susceptibility within a joint effusion (0/22, 0% versus 11/22, 40.9%; p = 0.00), osseous oedema (3/16, 18.8% versus 7/9, 77.8%; p < 0.009), and synovial enhancement (8/21, 38.1% versus 14/16, 87.5%; p < 0.003). VMs had characteristic tubular vessels with internal fluid-fluid levels (11/12) that extended into bone (10/12) and extracapsular soft tissues (11/12). Conclusion: Our study indicates that, despite the overlapping presence of haemorrhagic products, intra-articular VM, PVNS, and SS show MRI features that permit distinction from acquired post-traumatic and haemorrhagic inflammatory

  9. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  10. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

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    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  11. T2 mapping of the articular cartilage in the ankle: Correlation to the status of anterior talofibular ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Yoon, Y.C.; Kim, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate differences in T2 relaxation time of ankle cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the status of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Materials and methods: The talar trochlear cartilage (TTC) was evaluated in 52 patients with ankle pain that were categorized according to the status of ATFL; normal (NL; n = 23, mean age 40 years); partial tear (PT; n = 21, mean age 39 years); or complete tear (CT; n = 8, mean age 33 years). The TTC was divided into six compartments (medial anterior, medial centre, medial posterior, lateral anterior, lateral centre, and lateral posterior). The mean T2 value of each compartment was obtained using the multi-echo sequence. Data were analysed with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Results: The mean T2 values of the TTC showed significant differences between the three groups; NL, PT, and CT (p < 0.001). The T2 value between the three ligamentous groups were significantly different in the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments (p = 0.003, 0.002, 0.002, respectively). T2 values of the PT and CT groups were significantly higher than those of the NL group in the medial anterior compartment (p = 0.015, 0.002) and lateral anterior compartment (p = 0.026, <0.001). The T2 value of the CT group was significantly higher than that of NL and PT groups in the lateral centre compartment (p < 0.001, 0.031). Conclusion: The T2 value of the TTC in patients with ATFL injury increased at the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments

  12. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  13. Multiphoton microscope measurement-based biphasic multiscale analyses of knee joint articular cartilage and chondrocyte by using visco-anisotropic hyperelastic finite element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Noma, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Kaito; Tomita, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yusuke

    2017-11-01

    The articular cartilage of a knee joint has a variety of functions including dispersing stress and absorbing shock in the tissue and lubricating the surface region of cartilage. The metabolic activity of chondrocytes under the cyclic mechanical stimulations regenerates the morphology and function of tissues. Hence, the stress evaluation of the chondrocyte is a vital subject to assess the regeneration cycle in the normal walking condition and predict the injury occurrence in the accidents. Further, the threshold determination of stress for the chondrocytes activation is valuable for development of regenerative bioreactor of articular cartilage. In this study, in both macroscale and microscale analyses, the dynamic explicit finite element (FE) method was used for the solid phase and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method was used for the fluid phase. In the homogenization procedure, the representative volume element for the microscale finite element model was derived by using the multiphoton microscope measured 3D structure comprising 3 different layers: surface, middle, and deep layers. The layers had different anisotropic structural and rigidity characteristics because of the collagen fiber orientation. In both macroscale and microscale FE analyses, the visco-anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive law was used. Material properties were identified by experimentally determined stress-strain relationships of 3 layers. With respect to the macroscale and microscale SPH models for non-Newtonian viscous fluid, the previous observation results of interstitial fluid and proteoglycan were used to perform parameter identifications. Biphasic multiscale FE and SPH analyses were conducted under normal walking conditions. Therefore, the hydrostatic and shear stresses occurring in the chondrocytes caused by the compressive load and shear viscous flow were evaluated. These stresses will be used to design an ex-vivo bioreactor to regenerate the damaged articular cartilage

  14. Evaluation of articular cartilage in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) using T2* mapping at different time points at 3.0 Tesla MRI: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apprich, S.; Mamisch, T.C. [University of Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, G.H. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Bonel, H. [University of Bern, Department of Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Siebenrock, K.A.; Dudda, M. [University of Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Kim, Y.J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    To define the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration prior to surgery in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), we compared cartilage of the hip joint in patients with FAI and healthy volunteers using T2* mapping at 3.0 Tesla over time. Twenty-two patients (13 females and 9 males; mean age 28.1 years) with clinical signs of FAI and Toennis grade {<=} 1 on anterior-posterior x-ray and 35 healthy age-matched volunteers were examined at a 3 T MRI using a flexible body coil. T2* maps were calculated from sagittal- and coronal-oriented gradient-multi-echo sequences using six echoes (TR 125, TE 4.41/8.49/12.57/16.65/20.73/24.81, scan time 4.02 min), both measured at beginning and end of the scan (45 min time span between measurements). Region of interest analysis was manually performed on four consecutive slices for superior and anterior cartilage. Mean T2* values were compared among patients and volunteers, as well as over time using analysis of variance and Student's t-test. Whereas quantitative T2* values for the first measurement did not reveal significant differences between patients and volunteers, either for sagittal (p = 0.644) or coronal images (p = 0.987), at the first measurement, a highly significant difference (p {<=} 0.004) was found for both measurements with time after unloading of the joint. Over time we found decreasing mean T2* values for patients, in contrast to increasing mean T2* relaxation times in volunteers. The study proved the feasibility of utilizing T2* mapping for assessment of early cartilage degeneration in the hip joint in FAI patients at 3 Tesla to predict possible success of joint-preserving surgery. However, we suggest the time point for measuring T2* as an MR biomarker for cartilage and the changes in T2* over time to be of crucial importance for designing an MR protocol in patients with FAI. (orig.)

  15. Induction of increased cAMP levels in articular chondrocytes blocks matrix metalloproteinase-mediated cartilage degradation, but not aggrecanase-mediated cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Sumer, Eren Ufuk; Wulf, Helle

    2007-01-01

    GAG) into culture medium, 5) immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the CTX-II epitope, and 6) toluidine blue staining of proteoglycans. MMP expression and activity were assessed by gelatin zymography. RESULTS: OSM and TNF induced an 8,000% increase in CTX-II compared with control (P ....001). Both forskolin and IBMX dose-dependently inhibited release of CTX-II (P 80%). OSM and TNF stimulated MMP expression as visualized by zymography, and MMP expression was dose...

  16. The superior regenerative potential of muscle-derived stem cells for articular cartilage repair is attributed to high cell survival and chondrogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three populations of muscle-derived cells (PP1, PP3, and PP6 were isolated from mouse skeletal muscle using modified preplate technique and retrovirally transduced with BMP4/GFP.  In vitro, the PP1 cells (fibroblasts proliferated significantly slower than the PP3 (myoblasts and PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells; the PP1 and PP6 cells showed a superior rate of survival compared with PP3 cells under oxidative stress; and the PP6 cells showed significantly superior chondrogenic capabilities than PP1 and PP3 cells. In vivo, the PP6 cells promoted superior cartilage regeneration compared with the other muscle-derived cell populations. The cartilage defects in the PP6 group had significantly higher histological scores than those of the other muscle-derived cell groups, and GFP detection revealed that the transplanted PP6 cells showed superior in vivo cell survival and chondrogenic capabilities compared with the PP1 and PP3 cells. PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells are superior to other primary muscle-derived cells for use as a cellular vehicle for BMP4-based ex vivo gene therapy to heal full-thickness osteo-chondral defects. The superiority of the PP6/muscle-derived stem cells appears to be attributable to a combination of increased rate of in vivo survival and superior chondrogenic differentiation capacity.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, K.L.; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K.L. E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G

    2004-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures.

  19. Fascia compared to one-piece composite cartilage-perichondrium grafting for tympanoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyons, Sarah A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413920984; Su, Tanly; Vissers, Linda E T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413985652; Peters, Jeroen P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413968960; Smit, Adriana L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413982084; Grolman, Wilko|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/175476136

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of type 1 tympanoplasty with one-piece composite cartilage-perichondrium (CCP) grafts compared to temporalis fascia (TF) grafts for tympanic membrane (TM) closure and hearing improvement in adult patients with a subtotal TM perforation and chronic otitis

  20. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p wound repair following cartilage injury.

  1. Injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament after acute lateral patellar dislocation in children: Correlation analysis with anatomical variants and articular cartilage lesion of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-ying; Ding, Hong-yu [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Ji, Bing-jun [Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital of Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Jinan (China); Feng, Yan [Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical College, Department of Radiology, Binzhou (China)

    2017-03-15

    To assess the relationship between injury patterns of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and anatomical variants and patellar cartilage lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) in children. MR images were obtained in 140 children with acute LPD. Images were acquired and evaluated using standardised protocols. Fifty-eight cases of partial MPFL tear and 75 cases of complete MPFL tear were identified. Injuries occurred at an isolated patellar insertion (PAT) in 52 cases, an isolated femoral attachment (FEM) in 42 cases and an isolated mid-substance (MID) in five cases. More than one site of injury was identified in 34 cases. Compared with Wiberg patellar type C, Wiberg patellar type B predisposed to complete MPFL tear (P = 0.042). No correlations were identified between injury patterns of MPFL and trochlear dysplasia, patellar height and tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (P > 0.05). Compared with partial MPFL tear, complete MPFL tear predisposed to Grade-IV and Grade-V patellar chondral lesion (P = 0.02). There were no correlations between incidence of patellar cartilage lesion and injury locational-subgroups of MPFL (P = 0.543). MPFL is most easily injured at the PAT in children. Wiberg patellar type B predisposes to complete MPFL tear. Complete MPFL tear predisposes to a higher grade of patellar chondral lesion. (orig.)

  2. T2 Relaxation Values of the Talar Trochlear Articular Cartilage: Comparison Between Patients With Lateral Instability of the Ankle Joint and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Yoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Cha, Jang Gyu; Sung, Ki Sun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between the T2 relaxation values of the talar trochlear cartilage in patients with lateral instability of the ankle joint and the values in healthy volunteers. A retrospective assessment was conducted of images from 13 MRI examinations of the ankles of 12 patients who underwent lateral ankle ligament repair with an arthroscopically proven normal talar trochlear cartilage. Thirteen ankle MRI examinations of 12 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers were prospectively performed. Two radiologists independently measured the T2 relaxation values of the talar trochlear cartilage in two layers (superficial and deep) in the following six compartments: medial anterior (M1), medial middle (M2), medial posterior (M3), lateral anterior (L1), lateral middle (L2), and lateral posterior (L3). The T2 relaxation values of patients were compared with those of healthy volunteers. Both readers found that the mean T2 relaxation values of all six compartments of the superficial layer were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. For reader 1, the M1 findings were 46.2 for patients and 39.6 for healthy volunteers; M2, 50.4 and 41.1; M3, 52.1 and 46.2; L1, 43.1 and 37.9; L2, 47.8 and 41.8; and L3, 53.8 and 49.8. For reader 2, the M1 findings were 45.0 and 40.2; M2, 48.8 and 41.1; M3, 53.2 and 45.6; L1, 42.8 and 38.5; L2, 48.0 and 42.1; and L3, 55.0 and 49.0 (p L1 deep (0.75). The T2 relaxation values of arthroscopically proven normal talar trochlear cartilage of patients with lateral instability were higher than those of healthy volunteers, especially in the superficial layer and the M2 deep layer.

  3. Intra-articular hyaluronate, tenoxicam and vitamin E in a rat model of osteoarthritis: evaluation and comparison of chondroprotective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Uzer, Gokcer; Türkmen, Ismail; Yildiz, Yavuz; Senol, Serkan; Ozkan, Korhan; Turkmensoy, Fatih; Ramadan, Saime; Aktas, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate and compare the chondroprotective efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid, tenoxicam and vitamin E in osteoarthritis. An osteoarthritis model was created by anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial menisectomy in knees of 28 rats. The rats were randomized into four groups; first group served as a control group and received intra-articular injections of saline solution, intra-articular HA, intra-articular tenoxicam and intra-articular Vit E were applied to the treatment groups. First intra-articular injections were applied at second week postoperatively and repeated once a week for 5 weeks. At 8th week after the operation groups were compared based on the histologic scores of cartilage degeneration by Mankin Histological Grading Scale. Total cartilage degeneration score was significantly increased in the control group (P=0.004). Total Mankin scores of HA, tenoxicam and Vit E groups were significantly lower than the control group (P=0.004, P=0.016, P=0.012 respectively). There was no statistically siginificant difference between the treatment groups in terms of total Mankin scores (P>0.05). Intra-articular application of HA, tenoxicam and Vit E are chondroprotective in early osteoarthritis model in rats. Chondroprotective activity of tenoxicam and Vit E are comparable with the beneficial effects of HA on articular cartilage.

  4. Prediction of progression of damage to articular cartilage 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: use of aggrecan and type II collagen biomarkers in a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Yasumori; Kojima, Toshihisa; Kurokouchi, Kazutoshi; Takahashi, Shigeo; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Poole, Robin; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-12-06

    We aimed to determine whether synovial fluid (SF) biomarkers can predict the progression of articular cartilage damage as determined by arthroscopic evaluation during and after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Arthroscopic assessment of articular cartilage damage was performed twice in 62 patients, first during ACL reconstruction and then approximately 2 years later during implant removal for ligament fixation. SF levels of the collagenase-generated cleavage neoepitope of type II collagen (C2C) and proteoglycan glycosaminoglycans keratan sulfate (KS), chondroitin-4-sulfate (Δdi-C4S), and chondroitin-6-sulfate (Δdi-C6S) were measured at ACL reconstruction. Associations between baseline biomarker levels and subsequent progression of cartilage damage were determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis. No radiographic changes were observed in any of the patients. Progression of high-grade cartilage damage, observed arthroscopically, was negatively correlated with levels of Δdi-C6S and KS, as well as the ratio of Δdi-C6S to Δdi-C4S (C6S/C4S). Logistic regression analysis revealed significant associations of Δdi-C6S (cut-off: 55.7 nmol/ml, odds ratio (OR) 0.231, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.061-0.879), KS (cut-off: 10.6 μg/ml, OR 0.114, 95% CI 0.024-0.529), and C6S/C4S ratio (cut-off: 4.6, OR 0.060, 95% CI 0.005-0.737) with the progression of high-grade cartilage damage after adjusting for age, the duration from injury to first surgery, sex, and the number of high-grade lesions (grades III and IV) at baseline. The progression of high-grade cartilage damage was significantly associated with baseline levels of proteoglycan glycosaminoglycan biomarkers; namely, Δdi-C6S, KS, and C6S/C4S ratio.

  5. Degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, and pain/disability in dogs following destabilization or articular cartilage grooving of the stifle joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost-Christensen, L.N.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Vianen, M.E.; Hartog, A.; Groot, J. de; Voorhout, G.; Wees, A.M.C. van; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The most used model for joint instability is the canine anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT)-model. The ACLT-model can be extended with a medial meniscectomy (MX) (i.e., ACLT-MX-model) to avoid unintentional, and with that variable, meniscal damage. The present study compares the

  6. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  7. Comparative Study of the Use of Intra-articular and Systemic Meloxicam to Control Experimentally Induced Osteoarthritis in Rabbit Knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Trombini Vidotto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to evaluate morphologic changes, as well as chondroprotective and intra-articular effects of meloxicam on joint repair in rabbits induced by experimental trochleoplasty, minimizing possible adverse side effects. Methods: Thirty-five rabbits were divided into four groups: the control group, which did not undergo surgery, and operated groups, which used different ways of administering the anti-inflammatory agent: systemic, 0.2 mg/kg; intra-articular, 0.5 mg/kg; positive group control, without meloxicam. Each operated group was divided according to the periods of 7 or 30 days evaluation after surgery. Results: Regarding macroscopic and histological evaluation of cartilage, after 30 days, most animals showed almost complete joint repair, the presence of few or no inflammatory cells; whereas part of the animals treated with meloxicam presented necrosis in the trochlear ridge and absence of inflammatory cells after 7 days. In positive control group, it was observed moderate inflammation and connective tissue proliferation. None of the animals in the operated groups showed irregularities 30 days after surgery. Conclusion: Either intra-articular or systemic, meloxicam revealed to be favorable to be used for joint repair and control of inflammatory reaction.

  8. Role of Electrostatic Interactions on the Transport of Druglike Molecules in Hydrogel-Based Articular Cartilage Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Fengbin; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Hvidt, Søren

    2016-01-01

    -Ala-β-naphthylamide, H-Lys-Lys-β-naphthylamide, lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of the polyelectrolytes chondroitin sulfate or hyaluronic acid into agarose gel induced a significant reduction in the apparent diffusivities of the cationic model compounds as compared...... to the pure agarose gel. The decrease in apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds was not caused by a change in the gel structure since a similar reduction in apparent diffusivity was not observed for the net negatively charged protein α-lactalbumin. The apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds...

  9. Combined Effect of Subchondral Drilling and Hyaluronic Acid with/without Diacerein in Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Lesion in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwisa Suwannaloet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD- induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS (group 1 or with HA (group 2 and group 3. Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2 or with diacerein (group 3. The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA.

  10. Comparative assessment of intrinsic mechanical stimuli on knee cartilage and compressed agarose constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Completo, A; Bandeiras, C; Fonseca, F

    2017-06-01

    A well-established cue for improving the properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is mechanical stimulation. However, the explicit ranges of mechanical stimuli that correspond to favorable metabolic outcomes are elusive. Usually, these outcomes have only been associated with the applied strain and frequency, an oversimplification that can hide the fundamental relationship between the intrinsic mechanical stimuli and the metabolic outcomes. This highlights two important key issues: the firstly is related to the evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli of native cartilage; the second, assuming that the intrinsic mechanical stimuli will be important, deals with the ability to replicate them on the tissue-engineered constructs. This study quantifies and compares the volume of cartilage and agarose subjected to a given magnitude range of each intrinsic mechanical stimulus, through a numerical simulation of a patient-specific knee model coupled with experimental data of contact during the stance phase of gait, and agarose constructs under direct-dynamic compression. The results suggest that direct compression loading needs to be parameterized with time-dependence during the initial culture period in order to better reproduce each one of the intrinsic mechanical stimuli developed in the patient-specific cartilage. A loading regime which combines time periods of low compressive strain (5%) and frequency (0.5Hz), in order to approach the maximal principal strain and fluid velocity stimulus of the patient-specific cartilage, with time periods of high compressive strain (20%) and frequency (3Hz), in order to approach the pore pressure values, may be advantageous relatively to a single loading regime throughout the full culture period. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  12. Cellular reprogramming for clinical cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Britta J.H.; Logie, Colin; Vonk, Lucienne A.

    2017-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage needs a sufficient number of chondrocytes to replace the defect tissue, and therefore, expansion of cells is generally required. Chondrocytes derived by cellular reprogramming may provide a solution to the limitations of current (stem) cell-based therapies. In this article, two distinct approaches?induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-mediated reprogramming and direct lineage conversion?are analysed and compared according to criteria that encompass the qualifi...

  13. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  14. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (UHMWPE) has been choice of orthopaedic bearing material in total joint replacement surgery since 1962, but wear of UHMWPE remains major problem facing the long term success and survival of the artificial joint. One of the main reasons of failure of the artificial joint fixation into the host bone is cellular reaction against ...

  16. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It happens due to low strength of dry PVA itself and its strength falls down abruptly after ... The mechanical strength of PVA hydrogel by freezing and thawing is increased up to 10 MPa reported by Sasada et al (1985). Mechanical strength of .... However, lower limb joints are subject to an impact load of approximately seven ...

  17. Optical coherence tomography detection of subclinical traumatic cartilage injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, David M; Szczodry, Michal; Kramer, Scott; Coyle, Christian H; Smolinski, Patrick; Chu, Constance R

    2010-09-01

    Posttraumatic arthritis is a major cause of disability. Current clinical imaging modalities are unable to reliably evaluate articular cartilage damage before surface breakdown, when potentially reversible changes are occurring. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a nondestructive imaging technology that can detect degenerative changes in articular cartilage with an intact surface. This study tests the hypothesis that OCT detects acute articular cartilage injury after impact at energy levels resulting in chondrocyte death and microstructural changes, but insufficient to produce macroscopic surface damage. Bovine osteochondral cores underwent OCT imaging and were divided into a control with no impact or were subjected to low (0.175 J) or moderate (0.35 J) energy impact. Cores were reimaged with OCT after impact and the OCT signal intensity quantified. A ratio of the superficial to deep layer intensities was calculated and compared before and after impact. Chondrocyte viability was determined 1 day after impact followed by histology and polarized microscopy. Macroscopic changes to the articular surface were not observed after low and moderate impact. The OCT signal intensity ratio demonstrated a 27% increase (P = 0.006) after low impact and a 38% increase (P = 0.001) after moderate impact. Cell death increased by 150% (P death and microscopic matrix damage. This finding supports the use of OCT to detect microstructural subsurface cartilage damage that is poorly visualized with conventional imaging.

  18. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  19. Comparative study of intra-articular lidocaine and intravenous meperidine/diazepam for shoulder dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlinsky, Michael; Shon, Sammy; Chiang, Charles; Chan, Linda; Carter, Paul

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the analgesic effectiveness of intra-articular lidocaine versus intravenous meperidine and diazepam during the reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations. Patients were randomized to one of the two methods before the reduction of shoulder dislocations. Patients marked a visual analog pain scale at baseline, after anesthesia just before reduction, and at the time of discharge. Interference with the procedure caused by pain or lack of muscle relaxation, perception of adequacy of analgesia by the patient, adverse effects, and time to discharge from the Emergency Department (ED) were measured. Differences of outcomes, relative risks (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived. Fifty-four patients with anterior shoulder dislocations presenting from May 21, 1998 through January 21, 1999 were included in this study; 29 were randomly assigned to receive intra-articular lidocaine (IAL) and 25 to receive intravenous meperidine/diazepam (IVMD). IAL was less effective than IVMD in relieving pre-reduction pain (p = 0.045) but equally effective in overall pain relief (p = 0.98). IAL was more effective than IVMD in shortening recovery time (p = 0.025). There was an indication favoring IVMD in terms of physician-perceived muscle relaxation and patient's perception of analgesia adequacy. In conclusion, although the IVMD method appears to have some clinically and statistically significant advantages, IAL possesses some favorable features that render it to be an analgesia alternative in shoulder dislocation reduction.

  20. MR-Imaging optimisation of the articular hip cartilage by using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and the application of a hip joint traction; Magnetresonanztomographische Optimierung der Hueftknorpeldarstellung durch die Wahl einer T{sub 1}-Volumen-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenz und die Anwendung einer Hueftgelenkstraktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik; Bernd, L. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik; Wrazidlo, W. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo; Lederer, W. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo; Schneider, S. [ATOS-Praxisklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Drs. Lederer, Schneider und Wrazidlo

    1995-10-01

    Images of three animal cadaver hips, 8 dissected patient femoral heads and 18 hip joints of human corpses, all either with arthrosis stage I-III or artificial cartilage defects, were compared with their corresponding anatomic sections. Additional histomorphologic examinations of the arthrotic cartilages were conducted, and MR-Imaging of 20 healthy and 21 arthrotic patient hips was performed using a specific traction method. Using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and a traction of the hip joint, it was possible due to the low-signal imaging of the joint space to separate in vivo the high-signal femoral head cartilage from the high-signal acetabular cartilage. In horizontal position of the phase-encoding parameter, minimisation of the chemical-shift artifact, mainly in the ventro-lateral areas, was accomplished. MRI measurements of the articular cartilage widths showed significant correlations (p < 0.001) with the corresponding anatomic sections. At the same time the T{sub 1} 3-dimensional gradient-echo sequence of the lateral femoral head with r = 0.94 showed the lowest deviations of the measurements. It was possible with MR-Imaging to distinguish four cartilage qualities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Im experimentellen Teil der Studie wurden den MRT-Bildern von drei Kadavertierhueften, 8 resezierten Patientenhueftkoepfen und 18 Leichenhueftgelenken, an denen entweder artifizielle Knorpeldefekte gesetzt wurden oder die ein Koxarthrose-Stadium I-III aufwiesen, die korrespondierenden makroskopischen Kryomikrotomschnitte zugeordnet. Bei den Koxarthrosen erfolgten zusaetzliche histomorphologische Knorpeluntersuchungen. Im klinischen Teil der Studie wurden 20 gesunde und 21 arthrotische Probandenhueftgelenke mit einem speziellen Traktionsverfahren untersucht. Unter Anwendung einer T{sub 1}-Volumen-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenz und einer Traktion am zu untersuchenden Hueftgelenk konnte in vivo durch die signalarme Darstellung des Gelenkspaltes der

  1. The immediate effect of long-distance running on T2 and T2* relaxation times of articular cartilage of the knee in young healthy adults at 3.0 T MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Welsch, Goetz H; Laqmani, Azien; Henes, Frank O; Kaul, Michael G; Schoen, Gerhard; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-08-01

    To quantitatively assess the immediate effect of long-distance running on T2 and T2* relaxation times of the articular cartilage of the knee at 3.0 T in young healthy adults. 30 healthy male adults (18-31 years) who perform sports at an amateur level underwent an initial MRI at 3.0 T with T2 weighted [16 echo times (TEs): 9.7-154.6 ms] and T2* weighted (24 TEs: 4.6-53.6 ms) relaxation measurements. Thereafter, all participants performed a 45-min run. After the run, all individuals were immediately re-examined. Data sets were post-processed using dedicated software (ImageJ; National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD). 22 regions of interest were manually drawn in segmented areas of the femoral, tibial and patellar cartilage. For statistical evaluation, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and confidence intervals were computed. Mean initial values were 35.7 ms for T2 and 25.1 ms for T2*. After the run, a significant decrease in the mean T2 and T2* relaxation times was observed for all segments in all participants. A mean decrease of relaxation time was observed for T2 with 4.6 ms (±3.6 ms) and for T2* with 3.6 ms (±5.1 ms) after running. A significant decrease could be observed in all cartilage segments for both biomarkers. Both quantitative techniques, T2 and T2*, seem to be valuable parameters in the evaluation of immediate changes in the cartilage ultrastructure after running. This is the first direct comparison of immediate changes in T2 and T2* relaxation times after running in healthy adults.

  2. The effectiveness of 2 consecutive intra-articular polydeoxyribonucleotide injections compared with intra-articular triamcinolone for hemiplegic shoulder pain: A STROBE-complaint retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghwi; Yu, Kwang Jae; Cho, Ju Young; Woo, Seung Beom; Park, Junu; Lee, Zeeihn; Kim, Jong Min

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intra-articular injection of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), compared with intraarticular triamcinolone (TA) injection, in subacute stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP).Participants were subacute stroke patients with HSP who had undergone 2 consecutive intra-articular injections of TA or PDRN.Numeric rating scale (NRS) and passive range of motion (PROM) of hemiplegic shoulder were evaluated until 4 weeks after 2nd injection.In the results, there were significant improvements in all PROM measures 2 weeks after the second injection, compared with pre-injection results, in both groups (P < .05). In the PDRN group, however, none of the PROM measures were significantly improved at 3 and 4 weeks after the second injection, compared with pre-injection results (P ≥ .05). When comparing pre-injection results with those at 4 weeks after the second injection, all PROM and NRS measures in the TA group were more improved than in the PDRN group, but this was not statistically significant (P ≥ .05).In conclusion, considering the systemic side effects of steroids, especially among patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, PDRN seems to be a worthwhile treatment option for HSP, although PDRN does not seem to have an equivalent persistence effects when compared with TA.

  3. Effect of in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol on lumbar and femoral bone, articular cartilage, and the intervertebral disc in male and female adult mice progeny with and without swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowas, Sora Al; Haddad, Rami; Gawri, Rahul; Al Ma'awi, Abdul Aziz; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2012-01-23

    Developmental exposure to estrogens has been shown to affect the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that environmental exposure to estrogen-like compounds is much higher than originally anticipated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a well-known estrogen agonist, on articular cartilage, intervertebral disc (IVD), and bone phenotype. C57Bl/6 pregnant mice were dosed orally with vehicle (peanut oil) or 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg/day of DES on gestational days 11 to 14. Male and female pups were allowed to mature without further treatment until 3 months of age, when swim and sedentary groups were formed. After euthanasia, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), and trabecular bone area (TBA) of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were measured by using a PIXImus Bone Densitometer System. Intervertebral disc proteoglycan was measured with the DMMB assay. Histologic analysis of proteoglycan for IVD and articular cartilage was performed with safranin O staining, and degeneration parameters were scored. The lumbar BMC was significantly increased in female swimmers at both the highest and lowest dose of DES, whereas the femoral BMC was increased only at the highest. The males, conversely, showed a decreased BMC at the highest dose of DES for both lumbar and femoral bone. The female swim group had an increased BA at the highest dose of DES, whereas the male counterpart showed a decreased BA for femoral bone. The TBA showed a similar pattern. Proteoglycan analysis of lumbar IVDs showed a decrease at the lowest doses but a significant increase at the highest doses for both males and females. Histologic examination showed morphologic changes of the IVD and articular cartilage for all doses of DES. DES significantly affected the musculoskeletal system of adult mice. Results suggest that environmental estrogen contaminants can have a detrimental effect on the developmental lumbar

  4. Efeito do enxerto autólogo de pericôndrio costal com butil-2-cianoacrilato em lesão provocada na cartilagem articular do joelho de coelhos The effect of autologous costal perichondrium graft with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in provoked injury in the articular cartilage of rabbit’s knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Viana Xavier

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available A finalidade desse estudo foi verificar o efeito do enxerto autólogo de pericôndrio com butil-2-cianoacrilato em lesão provocada na cartilagem articular do joelho de coelhos. Foram utilizados animais machos, adultos, divididos em 2 grupos, denominados de Grupo A e de Grupo B, de 17 animais cada um. Os animais do Grupo A foram reoperados com 4 semanas e os do Grupo B com 8 semanas. Foi retirado um fragmento de 2 cm da 7ª cartilagem costal esquerda do qual se descolou o pericôndrio. Retiraram-se dois cilindros ósseo-cartilaginosos, um de cada côndilo femural medial do mesmo animal. De um lado a cartilagem articular do cilindro foi substituida por pericôndrio com um fina camada do adesivo tecidual na sua face externa e do outro lado só foi retirada a cartilagem articular. Os cilindros foram recolocados nos fêmures. Macroscopicamente, no Grupo A, encontrou-se a maioria das lesões com pericôndrio recobertas totalmente com tecido e todas as lesões sem pericôndrio recobertas parcialmente. No Grupo B, não se encontrou diferença macroscópica significante entre a cobertura total e parcial com tecido, das lesões. Estatisticamente, não houve diferença microscópica significante entre as lesões com pericôndrio e sem pericôndrio do Grupo A e do Grupo B e nem entre os Grupos A e B.The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of the perichondrium graft with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in provoked injury in the articular cartilage of rabbit`s knee. Male adult animals were used, divided in 2 groups, called Group A and Group B, with 17 animals each. The Group A animals were reoperated in 4 weeks and the Group B animals in 8 weeks. A 2 cm fragment was taken out from the 7th costal cartilage from which the perichondrium was removed. Two osteo-cartilaginous cylinders were taken out from each medialis condyles of the femurs in the same animal. The articular cartilage of the cylinder was replaced in one side by the perichondrium with a thin layer

  5. Sulforaphane represses matrix-degrading proteases and protects cartilage from destruction in vitro and in vivo:Sulforaphane is protective in the articular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Rose K.; Jupp, Orla; de Ferrars, Rachel; Kay, Colin D; Culley, Kirsty L; Norton, Rosemary; Driscoll, Clare; Vincent, Tonia L; Donell, Simon T; Bao, Yongping; Clark, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sulforaphane (SFN) has been reported to regulate signaling pathways relevant to chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of SFN treatment on signaling pathways in chondrocytes and to determine whether sulforaphane could block cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis. Methods Gene expression, histone acetylation, and signaling of the transcription factors NF-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) and NF-κB were examined in vitro. The bovine nasal cartilage explant mod...

  6. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TYMPANOPLASTY USING SLICED CARTILAGE GRAFT VS. TEMPORALIS FASCIA GRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Ashok Telang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The objective of the study was to compare the hearing improvement after using sliced cartilage graft with that of temporalis fascia and to compare the graft take-up between the two graft materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective clinical study including 60 patients with chronic mucosal otitis media, who were selected randomly from the outpatient department, after obtaining their consent were divided into 2 groups of 30 each, and evaluated according the study protocol. Their pre-operative audiometry was recorded and both groups of patients underwent surgery with one of the graft materials- temporalis fascia or sliced tragal cartilage with a thickness of 0.5 mm. All patients were regularly followed up and post-operative audiometry was done at 3 months. The hearing improvement in the form of closure of air-bone-gap and graft take-up was analysed statistically. RESULTS The temporalis fascia graft group had a pre-operative ABG of 22.33 ± 6.24 dB and post-operative ABG of 12.33 ± 4.72 dB with hearing improvement of 10.00 dB. The sliced cartilage graft group had a pre-operative ABG of 20.77 ± 5.75 dB and postoperative ABG of 10.50 ± 4.46 dB with hearing improvement of 10.27 dB. In the temporalis fascia group, 28 (93.3% patients had good graft take-up and in the sliced cartilage group 29 (96.7% had good graft take-up. There was statistically significant hearing improvement in both of our study groups but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was no statistically significant difference in graft take-up also. CONCLUSION Sliced cartilage graft is a good auto-graft material in tympanoplasty, which can give good hearing improvement and has good graft take-up, which is comparable with that of temporalis fascia.

  8. [Cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular joint disease. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone. The Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases. It had been well recognized that MMP play major roles in the cartilage breakdown in RA and OA. Moreover ADAM-TS-1, -4, -5 have aggrecanase activity, and also involve the cartilage degradation in RA and OA. Of course they contribute the cartilage homeostasis in healthy subjects. Failure to regulate the synthesis, activation and inhibition of the proteinases finally leads to cartilage destruction. Aggrecan and type II collagen are major components in cartilage matrix. Cleavage of aggrecan by aggrecanase and that of collagen by collagenase are critical steps for degradation of articular cartilage in RA. To prevent the cartilage damage, inflammatory synovitis should be suppressed in early stage.

  9. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  10. Repair of cartilage defects in osteoarthritis rats with induced pluripotent stem cell derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Wu, Xiaomin; Liang, Yuhong; Gu, Hongsheng; Song, Kedong; Zou, Xuenong; Zhou, Guangqian

    2016-11-09

    The incapacity of articular cartilage (AC) for self-repair after damage ultimately leads to the development of osteoarthritis. Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are becoming a promising stem cell source. Three steps were developed to differentiate human iPSCs into chondrocytes which were transplanted into rat OA models induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). After 6 days embryonic body (EB) formation and 2 weeks differentiation, the gene and protein expression of Col2A1, GAG and Sox9 has significantly increased compare to undifferentiated hiPSCs. After 15 weeks transplantation, no immune responses were observed, micro-CT showed gradual engraftment and the improvement of subchondrol plate integrity, and histological examinations demonstrated articular cartilage matrix production. hiPSC could be an efficient and clinically translatable approach for cartilage tissue regeneration in OA cartilages.

  11. Comparable Senescence Induction in Three-dimensional Human Cartilage Model by Exposure to Therapeutic Doses of X-rays or C-ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Dounia Houria; Chevalier, François; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; Durantel, Florent; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Mann, Carl; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy using carbon ions (C-ions) has been successfully used in the treatment of tumors resistant to conventional radiation therapy. However, the potential side effects to healthy cartilage exposed to lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions in the beam track before the tumor have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent of damage after C-ion irradiation in a 3-dimensional (3D) cartilage model close to human homeostasis. Primary human articular chondrocytes from a healthy donor were cultured in a collagen scaffold to construct a physioxic 3D cartilage model. A 2-dimensional (2D) culture was used as a reference. The cells were irradiated with a single dose of a monoenergetic C-ion beam with a LET of approximatively 30 keV/μm. This LET corresponds to the entrance channel of C-ions in the shallow healthy tissues before the spread-out Bragg peak (∼100 keV/μm) during hadron therapy protocols. The same dose of X-rays was used as a reference. Survival, cell death, and senescence assays were performed. As expected, in the 2D culture, C-ions were more efficient than X-rays in reducing cell survival with a relative biological effectiveness of 2.6. This correlated with stronger radiation-induced senescence (two-fold) but not with higher cell death induction. This differential effect was not reflected in the 3D culture. Both ionizing radiation types induced a comparable rate of senescence induction in the 3D model. The greater biological effectiveness of C-ions compared with low LET radiation when evaluated in treatment planning systems might be misevaluated using 2D culture experiments. Radiation-induced senescence is an important factor of potential cartilage attrition. The present data should encourage the scientific community to use relevant models and beams to improve the use of charged particles with better safety for patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparable Senescence Induction in Three-dimensional Human Cartilage Model by Exposure to Therapeutic Doses of X-rays or C-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, Dounia Houria; Chevalier, François [Laboratoire d' Accueil et de Recherche avec les Ions Accélérés (LARIA), Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire (IRCM), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale - DRF, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Caen (France); Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel [UMR6249, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon (France); Durantel, Florent [UMR6252, Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Caen (France); Thuret, Jean-Yves; Mann, Carl [FRE3377, Service de Biologie Intégrative et Génétique Moléculaire SBIGeM, Institut de Biologie et de Technologies de Saclay (iBiTec-S), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Institut de Biologie Intégrative de la Cellule I2BC / Université Paris Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Particle therapy using carbon ions (C-ions) has been successfully used in the treatment of tumors resistant to conventional radiation therapy. However, the potential side effects to healthy cartilage exposed to lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions in the beam track before the tumor have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent of damage after C-ion irradiation in a 3-dimensional (3D) cartilage model close to human homeostasis. Methods and Materials: Primary human articular chondrocytes from a healthy donor were cultured in a collagen scaffold to construct a physioxic 3D cartilage model. A 2-dimensional (2D) culture was used as a reference. The cells were irradiated with a single dose of a monoenergetic C-ion beam with a LET of approximatively 30 keV/μm. This LET corresponds to the entrance channel of C-ions in the shallow healthy tissues before the spread-out Bragg peak (∼100 keV/μm) during hadron therapy protocols. The same dose of X-rays was used as a reference. Survival, cell death, and senescence assays were performed. Results: As expected, in the 2D culture, C-ions were more efficient than X-rays in reducing cell survival with a relative biological effectiveness of 2.6. This correlated with stronger radiation-induced senescence (two-fold) but not with higher cell death induction. This differential effect was not reflected in the 3D culture. Both ionizing radiation types induced a comparable rate of senescence induction in the 3D model. Conclusions: The greater biological effectiveness of C-ions compared with low LET radiation when evaluated in treatment planning systems might be misevaluated using 2D culture experiments. Radiation-induced senescence is an important factor of potential cartilage attrition. The present data should encourage the scientific community to use relevant models and beams to improve the use of charged particles with better safety for patients.

  13. Effects of chondroitin sulfate and sodium hyaluronate on chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage in dogs with degenerative joint disease Efeitos do sulfato de condroitina e do hialuronato de sódio nos condrócitos e na matriz extracelular na cartilagem articular de cães com doença articular degenerativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gonçalves

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Samples of articular cartilage of femur, tibia and patella of 15 dogs with experimentally induced degenerative joint disease (DJD were microscopically analyzed. Animals were distributed into three groups (n=5: the control group received no medication; the second group was treated with chondroitin sulfate and the third received sodium hyaluronate. Samples were processed and stained with HE and toluidine blue for morphological evaluation. The metabolic and proliferative activity of the chondrocytes was evaluated by the measurement of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs after impregnation by silver nitrate. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the morphology among the groups, however, the group treated with sodium hyaluronate had a higher score suggesting a trend to a greater severity of the lesions. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the measurement of NORs, cells and NORs/cells among the groups. Although differences were not significant, sodium hyaluronate group showed higher NOR and cell counts which suggested an increase of the proliferation rate of chondrocytes. In addition, a higher NOR/cell ratio in the group treated with chondroitin sulfate suggested that this drug may have stimulated the metabolic activity of the chondrocytes, minimizing the lesions resulting from DJD.Foram utilizadas amostras de cartilagem articular do fêmur, tíbia e patela de 15 cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD, induzida experimentalmente. Foram constituídos três grupos de cinco animais: grupo 1 - controle, não medicado; grupo 2 - tratado com sulfato de condroitina e grupo 3 - tratado com hialuronato de sódio. As amostras foram processadas e coradas pelas técnicas de HE e de azul de toluidina para avaliação das alterações morfológicas, e impregnadas pelo nitrato de prata para análise da atividade metabólica e/ou proliferativa dos condrócitos, por meio da visualização e quantificação de regiões organizadoras

  14. Endogenous Cartilage Repair by Recruitment of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for repair after injury. The adult body has a pool of stem cells that are mobilized during injury or disease. These cells exist inside niches in bone marrow, muscle, adipose tissue, synovium, and other connective tissues. A method that mobilizes this endogenous pool of stem cells will provide a less costly and less invasive alternative if these cells successfully regenerate defective cartilage. Traditional microfracture procedures employ the concept of bone marrow stimulation to regenerate cartilage. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has very poor mechanical properties compared to those of normal hyaline cartilage. A method that directs the migration of a large number of autologous mesenchymal stem cells toward injury sites, retains these cells around the defects, and induces chondrogenic differentiation that would enhance success of endogenous cartilage repair. This review briefly summarizes chemokines and growth factors that induce recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells, endogenous cell sources for regenerating cartilage, scaffolds for delivery of bioactive factors, and bioadhesive materials that are necessary to bring about endogenous cartilage repair.

  15. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph; Jungmann, Pia M.; Kuni, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  16. Squeeze-film Lubrication of the Human Ankle Joint with Synovial Fluid Filtrated by Articular Cartilage with the Superficial Zone Worn out

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 11 (2000), s. 1415-1422 ISSN 0021-9290 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : human ankle joint * squeeze-film lubrication * synovial fluid filtration * worn-out cartilage superficial zone Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2000

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON BILATERAL SINGLE SITTING ENDOSCOPIC MYRINGOPLASTY CONCHAL CARTILAGE VERSUS TEMPORALIS FASCIA GRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Thirugnanam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Though single sitting myringoplasty using temporalis fascia under general anaesthesia has been documented in many studies, but ours is the first center to have started using tragal cartilage and temporalis fascia harvested from one ear to do bilateral myringoplasty in one sitting using local anaesthesia with excellent results including very good graft uptake rate and audiological improvement without significant complications. The aim of the study is to compare the outcome of bilateral myringoplasty in dry central perforation in one sitting using cartilage on one side and temporalis fascia on the other ear in an urban tertiary care centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients above the age of 15 years were included in the study who had dried bilateral perforated ear drum involving pars tensa both sides size of perforation and hearing loss were more or less-matched patients who had persistently discharging ear or had evidence of middle ear infection, granulation tissues, aural polypi, cholesteatoma, ossicular erosion or evidence of sensorineural hearing loss were excluded from the study. In the cases, temporalis fascia graft through postaural incision right side and conchal cartilage was harvested from the right side and endoscopic myringoplasty was performed. Temporalis fascia graft placed by underlay technique and conchal cartilage was used as graft on the left side for all the patients. Patients were followed up after 3 and 6 months to assess closure of tympanic membrane perforation and hearing improvement as depicted by closure of air above gap on pure tone audiometry at 6 months. Study Design- Interventional, descriptive. Place and Duration of Study- Department of ENT, UIORL, Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, June 2012 to July 2013. RESULTS A total of 100 myringoplasties were performed on 50 patients included in the study. Majority of the patients included were having medium to large size

  18. The potential application of LIPUS and PEMF on cartilage and chondrogenic differentiation : An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    In chapter 2 a review is presented of the scientific literature on the use and mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) applied on articular cartilage, chondrocytes and chondrogenesis in order to compare these two non-invasive procedures regarding

  19. The effect of fixed charge density and cartilage swelling on mechanics of knee joint cartilage during simulated gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Tanska, Petri; Zbýň, Štefan; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Trattnig, Siegfried; Nieminen, Miika T; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-08-16

    The effect of swelling of articular cartilage, caused by the fixed charge density (FCD) of proteoglycans, has not been demonstrated on knee joint mechanics during simulated walking before. In this study, the influence of the depth-wise variation of FCD was investigated on the internal collagen fibril strains and the mechanical response of the knee joint cartilage during gait using finite element (FE) analysis. The FCD distribution of tibial cartilage was implemented from sodium ( 23 Na) MRI into a 3-D FE-model of the knee joint ("Healthy model"). For comparison, models with decreased FCD values were created according to the decrease in FCD associated with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) ("Early OA" and "Advanced OA" models). In addition, a model without FCD was created ("No FCD" model). The effect of FCD was studied with five different collagen fibril network moduli of cartilage. Using the reference fibril network moduli, the decrease in FCD from "Healthy model" to "Early OA" and "Advanced OA" models resulted in increased axial strains (by +2 and +6%) and decreased fibril strains (by -3 and -13%) throughout the stance, respectively, calculated as mean values through cartilage depth in the tibiofemoral contact regions. Correspondingly, compared to the "Healthy model", the removal of the FCD altogether in "NoFCD model" resulted in increased mean axial strains by +16% and decreased mean fibril strains by -24%. This effect was amplified as the fibril network moduli were decreased by 80% from the reference. Then mean axial strains increased by +6, +19 and +49% and mean fibril strains decreased by -9, -20 and -32%, respectively. Our results suggest that the FCD in articular cartilage has influence on cartilage responses in the knee during walking. Furthermore, the FCD is suggested to have larger impact on cartilage function as the collagen network degenerates e.g. in OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole

    the joint articular cartilage in all samples using T1-weighted, T2-weighted and water content sequences under a 1.5 T magnetic field Findings / Results: The intentionally-damaged articular cartilage showed intensity changes on the MR. This images were used as reference for damage. We found no evidence...

  1. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  2. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  3. Extra-articular distal tibia facture (AO-43A): A retrospective study comparing modified MIPPO with IMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun; Xu, Jun; Tang, Ming-Jie; Luo, Cong-Feng; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new MIPPO procedure which is simple and effective for the treatment of extra-articular distal tibia facture (AO-43A). The aim of this retrospective study was to compare our modified MIPPO with IMN. This retrospective study included 64 patients treated with our modified MIPPO and 61 patients with IMN. The data of sex, age, operation time, blood loss, wound complications, mal-reduction, shortening and fracture healing was analyzed. The operation time was significantly shorter in the MIPPO group than in the IMN group (56.0min vs. 85.0min, P1cm and nonunion in both groups. Our results have shown that our modified MIPPO has enormous advantages over IMN for extra-articular distal tibia fracture (AO-43A). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Intact Knee Cartilage Thickness in Patients with Traumatic Lower Extremity Amputation and Nonimpaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesikburun, Serdar; Köroğlu, Özlem; Yaşar, Evren; Güzelküçük, Ümüt; Yazcoğlu, Kamil; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the femoral articular cartilage thickness of the intact knee in patients with traumatic lower extremity amputation compared with nonimpaired individuals. A total of 30 male patients with traumatic lower extremity amputation (mean [SD] age, 31.2 [6.3] yrs) and a random sample of 53 age-matched and body mass index-matched male nonimpaired individuals (mean [SD] age, 29.8 [6.3] yrs) participated in the study. Exclusion criteria were age younger than 18 yrs, history of significant knee injury, previous knee surgery, or rheumatic disease. The femoral articular cartilage thickness was measured using ultrasound at the midpoints of the medial condyle, the intercondylar notch, and the lateral condyle. Ultrasonographic cartilage measurement was performed on the intact side of the patients with amputation and on both sides of the nonimpaired individuals. The femoral articular cartilage thickness of the intact knees of the patients with amputation was significantly decreased at the lateral and medial condyles compared with the nonimpaired individuals (P amputation and the nonimpaired individuals (P > 0.05). There was a premature cartilage loss in the intact limb knee of the patients with traumatic amputation. This result supports the view that patients with traumatic lower extremity amputation are at increased risk for developing knee osteoarthritis in the intact limb.

  5. Principles of cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Erggelet, Christoph; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage defects affect patients of all age groups. Surgeons, teamdoctors, general practitioners and physiotherapists alike are expected to provide adequate care. Only individual treatment plans combining a well balanced choice of various options will be successful. Background knowledge, operative and non-operative therapies are described in concise chapters: Articular cartilage biology - Diagnostics - Surgical techniques - Symptomatic and alternative medications - Physiotherapy. Diagnostic findings and surgical procedures are generously illustrated by aquarelles and colour photographs. Recommendations for additional reading, description of important clinical scoring systems and a listing of analytic tools are added for further information.

  6. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Christoph; Meixner, Miriam; Giesemann, Petra; Roël, Giulietta; Bulwin, Grit-Carsta; Smink, Jeske J

    2016-11-15

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don's chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids) that is in clinical use in Germany. Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids before implantation and a higher regeneration potential

  7. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don’s chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids that is in clinical use in Germany. Methods Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. Results After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids

  8. Analgesic control after hip arthroscopy: a randomised, double-blinded trial comparing portal with intra-articular infiltration of bupivacaine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2011-06-07

    Abstract: The optimum anaesthetic and analgesic management following hip arthroscopy is yet to be determined. There is, in addition, some concern over the use of intraarticular local anaesthetic. We compared the analgesic efficacy of intra-articular infiltration compared with portal infiltration of bupivacaine following hip arthroscopy. Patients were randomised to receive either 10ml of 0.25% bupivacaine either into the joint or around the portal sites following completion of surgery. 73 patients were recruited (40 intra-articular). The portal infiltration group required significantly more rescue analgesia immediately after surgery (2.33mg vs.0.57mg, p=0.036). Visual Analogue Scale pain scores were not significantly different at 1 and 2 hours following surgery, but at 6 hours the portal group had significantly lower VAS scores (p=0.0036). We believe that the initial pain following surgery results from capsular injury and this explains the need for more rescue analgesia in the portal infiltration group. Further work is needed to establish the ideal regimen. A combination of portal and intra-articular infiltration may be the most efficacious.

  9. Application of a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method for biomechanical modeling of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Mimmi K; Mononen, Mika E; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-10-01

    Manual segmentation of articular cartilage from knee joint 3D magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a time consuming and laborious task. Thus, automatic methods are needed for faster and reproducible segmentations. In the present study, we developed a semi-automatic segmentation method based on radial intensity profiles to generate 3D geometries of knee joint cartilage which were then used in computational biomechanical models of the knee joint. Six healthy volunteers were imaged with a 3T MRI device and their knee cartilages were segmented both manually and semi-automatically. The values of cartilage thicknesses and volumes produced by these two methods were compared. Furthermore, the influences of possible geometrical differences on cartilage stresses and strains in the knee were evaluated with finite element modeling. The semi-automatic segmentation and 3D geometry construction of one knee joint (menisci, femoral and tibial cartilages) was approximately two times faster than with manual segmentation. Differences in cartilage thicknesses, volumes, contact pressures, stresses, and strains between segmentation methods in femoral and tibial cartilage were mostly insignificant (p > 0.05) and random, i.e. there were no systematic differences between the methods. In conclusion, the devised semi-automatic segmentation method is a quick and accurate way to determine cartilage geometries; it may become a valuable tool for biomechanical modeling applications with large patient groups.

  10. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) ...

  11. One-stage vs two-stage cartilage repair: a current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meyerkort

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Meyerkort, David Wood, Ming-Hao ZhengCenter for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Australia, Perth, AustraliaIntroduction: Articular cartilage has a poor capacity for regeneration if damaged. Various methods have been used to restore the articular surface, improve pain, function, and slow progression to osteoarthritis.Method: A PubMed review was performed on 18 March, 2010. Search terms included “autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI” and “microfracture” or “mosaicplasty”. The aim of this review was to determine if 1-stage or 2-stage procedures for cartilage repair produced different functional outcomes.Results: The main procedures currently used are ACI and microfracture. Both first-generation ACI and microfracture result in clinical and functional improvement with no significant differences. A significant increase in functional outcome has been observed in second-generation procedures such as Hyalograft C, matrix-induced ACI, and ChondroCelect compared with microfracture. ACI results in a higher percentage of patients with clinical improvement than mosaicplasty; however, these results may take longer to achieve.Conclusion: Clinical and functional improvements have been demonstrated with ACI, microfracture, mosaicplasty, and synthetic cartilage constructs. Heterogeneous products and lack of good-quality randomized-control trials make product comparison difficult. Future developments involve scaffolds, gene therapy, growth factors, and stem cells to create a single-stage procedure that results in hyaline articular cartilage.Keywords: autologous chondrocyte implantation, microfracture, cartilage repair

  12. Comparison between Chondrogenic Markers of Differentiated Chondrocytes from Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Articular Chondrocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohmmad Mardani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged population in the world. Cartilage tissue engineering (TE has been presented as an effort to introduce the best combination of cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating growth factors to produce a cartilage tissue similar to the natural articular cartilage. In this study, the chondrogenic potential of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs was compared with natural articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate scaffold.   Materials and Methods: Human ADSCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue and human articular chondrocytes from non-weight bearing areas of knee joints. Cells were seeded in 1.5% alginate and cultured in chondrogenic media for three weeks with and without TGFβ3. The genes expression of types II and X collagens was assessed by Real Time PCR and the amount of aggrecan (AGC and type I collagen measured by ELISA and the content of glycosaminoglycan evaluated by GAG assay. Results: Our findings showed that type II collagen, GAG and AGC were expressed, in differentiated ADSCs. Meanwhile, they produced a lesser amount of types II and X collagens but more AGC, GAG and type I collagen in comparison with natural chondrocytes (NCs. Conclusion: Further attempt should be carried out to optimize achieving type II collagen in DCs, as much as, natural articular chondrocytes and decline of the production of type I collagen in order to provide efficient hyaline cartilage after chondrogenic induction, prior to the usage of harvested tissues in clinical trials.

  13. Clinical benefit of intra-articular saline as a comparator in clinical trials of knee osteoarthritis treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altman, Roy D; Devji, Tahira; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hyaluronic acid and corticosteroids are common intra-articular (IA) therapies widely used for the management of mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). Many trials evaluating the efficacy of IA administered therapies commonly use IA saline injections as a placebo comparator arm...... in the meta-analysis. Based on data with moderate inconsistency IA saline was found to significantly improve short-term knee pain in 32 studies involving 1705 patients (SMD = -0.68; 95% CI: -0.78 to -0.57; P injection...... with saline in 19 studies involving 1445 patients (SMD = -0.61; 95% CI: -0.76 to -0.45; P injection with saline...

  14. SAFETY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF INTRAARTICULAR ADMINISTRATION OF ADIPOSE-DERIVED STROMAL VASCULAR FRACTION FOR TREATMENT OF KNEE ARTICULAR CARTILAGE DEGENERATIVE DAMAGE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Smyshlyaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of knee osteoarthritis tends to increase every year and constitutes more than 83% of overall OA morbidity. Moreover, the OA morbidity among younger patients is also increasing. However, currently available treatment methods do not provide quite satisfactory outcomes.Purpose of the study – to evaluate safety and efficacy of intraarticular introduction of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction for treatment of knee osteoarthritis.Material and methods. By the moment of writing the present report, 28 patients were included into the study. All patients underwent tumescent liposuction under local anesthesia. The stromal vascular fraction was isolated from lipoaspirate within 1,5 hours after harvesting and subsequently injected into the articular cavity. Follow-up period was 6 months after injections. The authors report on efficacy data of 10 patients who completed the study according to protocol and safety data of all 28 patients. Efficacy was evaluated basing on laboratory assessments and patient’s subjective assessment by validated questionnaires.Results. Neither adverse reactions no adverse events were observed. Significant decrease of pain severity by VAS was noted in one week after injection and pain score continued decreasing during the whole follow up period. The increase of KOOS score was noted starting on the fifth week after injection. KSS part 1 score increased in 8 weeks, KSS part 2 score — in 6 months after injection. Physical health, assessed with SF-36 questionnaire significantly improved in 2 and 6 months after the procedure. There was a clear trend towards improvement of mental health.Conclusion. Preliminary results of clinical study suggest intraarticular injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction to be a safe and efficient method of the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. 

  15. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2018-03-01

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid Compared to Traditional Conservative Treatment in Dogs with Osteoarthritis Associated with Hip Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. L. Carapeba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the intra-articular (IA hyaluronic acid injection to traditional conservative treatment (TCT in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA induced by hip dysplasia. Sixteen dogs were distributed into two groups: Hyal: IA injection of hyaluronic acid (5–10 mg, and Control: IA injection with saline solution (0.5–1.0 mL in combination with a TCT using an oral nutraceutical (750–1000 mg every 12 h for 90 days and carprofen (2.2 mg/kg every 12 h for 15 days. All dogs were assessed by a veterinarian on five occasions and the owner completed an assessment form (HCPI and CPBI at the same time. The data were analyzed using unpaired t test, ANOVA, and Tukey’s test (P<0.05. Compared with baseline, lower scores were observed in both groups over the 90 days in the veterinarian evaluation, HCPI, and CPBI (P<0.001. The Hyal group exhibited lower scores from 15 to 90 and 60 to 90 days, in the CBPI and in the veterinarian evaluation, respectively, compared to the Control group. Both treatments reduced the clinical signs associated with hip OA. However, more significant results were achieved with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection.

  17. Effects of counteracting external valgus moment on lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions and tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Duraisamy; Parween, Rizuwana; Lee, Yee Han Dave; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis that prevalently occurs at the medial compartment is a progressive chronic disorder affecting the articular cartilage of the knee joint, and lead to loss of joint functionality. Valgus braces have been used as a treatment procedure to unload the medial compartment for patients with medial osteoarthritis. Valgus braces through the application of counteracting external valgus moment shift the load from medial compartment towards the lateral compartment. Previous biomechanical studies focused only on the changes in varus moments before and after wearing the brace. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of opposing external valgus moment applied by knee braces on the lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions using a 3D finite element model of the knee joint. Finite element simulations were performed on the knee joint model without and with the application of opposing valgus moment to mimic the unbraced and braced conditions. Lateral tibial cartilage contact pressures and contact area, and tibial rotation (varus-valgus and internal-external) were estimated for the complete walking gait cycle. The opposing valgus moment increased the maximum contact pressure and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage compared to the normal gait moment. A peak contact pressure of 8.2 MPa and maximum cartilage loaded area of 28% (loaded cartilage nodes) on the lateral cartilage with the application of external valgus moment were induced at 50% of the gait cycle. The results show that the use of opposing valgus moment may significantly increase the maximum contact pressures and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage and increases the risk of articular cartilage damage on the lateral compartment.

  18. Physeal cartilage exhibits rapid consolidation and recovery in intact knees that are physiologically loaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongnam; Lee, Dokwan; Shin, Choongsoo S; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2013-05-31

    The growth plate (physis) is responsible for long bone growth through endochondral ossification, a process which can be mechanically modulated. However, our understanding of the detailed mechanical behavior of physeal cartilage occurring in vivo is limited. In this study, we aimed to quantify the time-dependent deformational behavior of physeal cartilage in intact knees under physiologically realistic dynamic loading, and compare physeal cartilage deformation with articular cartilage deformation. A 4.7 T MRI scanner continuously scanned a knee joint in the sagittal plane through the central load-bearing region of the medial compartment every 2.5 min while a realistic cyclic loading was applied. A custom auto-segmentation program was developed to delineate complex physeal cartilage boundaries. Physeal volume changes at each time step were calculated. The new auto-segmentation was found to be reproducible with COV of the volume measurements being less than 0.5%. Time-constants of physeal cartilage consolidation (1.31±0.74 min) and recovery (1.63±0.70 min) were significantly smaller than the values (5.53±1.78/17.71±13.88 min for consolidation/recovery) in articular cartilage (Pconsolidation and recovery of physeal cartilage may due to a relatively free metaphyseal fluid boundary which would allow rapid fluid exchange with the adjacent cancellous bone. This may impair the generation of hydrostatic pressure in the cartilage matrix when the physis is under chronic compressive loading, and may be related to the premature ossification of the growth plate under such conditions. Research on the growth plate fluid exchange may provide a more comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and disorders of long bone growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fascia compared to one-piece composite cartilage-perichondrium grafting for tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Sarah A; Su, Tanly; Vissers, Linda E T; Peters, Jeroen P M; Smit, Adriana L; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of type 1 tympanoplasty with one-piece composite cartilage-perichondrium (CCP) grafts compared to temporalis fascia (TF) grafts for tympanic membrane (TM) closure and hearing improvement in adult patients with a subtotal TM perforation and chronic otitis media (COM). PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library. A systematic search was conducted. Relevance and validity of selected articles were assessed. Studies that scored moderate or high on relevance were included, and relevant data for both outcomes were extracted. For the outcome of TM closure, absolute risk differences (RD), relative risks, and number needed to treat with their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated when possible. We retrieved 3,783 unique studies. Ten studies satisfied the eligibility criteria. Four studies of moderate validity showed RD ranging from 0.08 to 0.13 in favor of the CCP graft compared to the TF graft for TM closure 1 year or more postoperatively, but this was not statistically significant. Five studies of moderate to high validity showed no clinically relevant difference in hearing improvement between both intervention groups at a minimum follow-up of 3 months. The relative air-bone gap closure ranged from 5.7 to 11.5 dB in the TF group and from 8.9 to 12.7 dB in the CCP group. There is no evidence of superiority of one-piece CCP grafting over TF grafting in type 1 tympanoplasty regarding complete closure of a subtotal perforated TM 1 year or more postoperatively or hearing improvement at a minimum of 3 months follow-up. Laryngoscope, 126:1662-1670, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle; Moderne Knorpelbildgebung des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph [University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Jungmann, Pia M. [Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Radiology; Kuni, Benita [Ortho-Zentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery

    2017-10-15

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  1. Storing live embryonic and adult human cartilage grafts for transplantation using a joint simulating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Robinson, D; Cohen, N; Nevo, Z

    2000-11-01

    Cartilage transplantation as a means to replace damaged articular surfaces is of interest. A major obstacle is the long-term preservation of cartilage grafts. The commonly used technique of freezing the grafts inevitably leads to cellular death. The current study compares the technique to an innovative approach using a pulsed-pressure perfusion system termed a joint simulating device (JSD), intended to simulate intra-articular mechanical forces. Human articular cartilage explants were harvested from both embryonic epiphyseal tissue and femoral heads of elderly women (over 70 years of age) undergoing a partial joint replacement (hemi-arthroplasty) and were divided in two groups: half of the samples were incubated in the JSD while the remaining half were grown in static culture within tissue culture plates. After 10 days all samples were evaluated for: (a) cell vitality as assessed by image analysis and XTT assay; (b) biosynthetic activity as expressed by radioactive sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans (GAG's); and (c) proteoglycan content as assessed by alcian blue staining intensity. A 10-fold increase in sulfate incorporation in samples held in the JSD compared to the static culture group was observed in embryonic cartilage. In adult cartilage culture in the JSD elevated sulfate incorporation by threefold as compared to static culture. Central necrosis was observed in specimens grown in the static culture plates, while it did not occur in the samples held in the JSD. Cell vitality as assessed by XTT assay was significantly better in the JSD group as compared to static culture. The difference was more pronounced in the embryonic specimens as compared to adult cartilage. The specimens cultured within the JSD retained proteoglycans significantly better than those cultured in static culture. Maintenance of cartilage specimens in a JSD was highly effective in keeping the vitality of cartilage explants in vitro over a 10-day period. A possible future

  2. hWJECM-Derived Oriented Scaffolds with Autologous Chondrocytes for Rabbit Cartilage Defect Repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Liu, Shuyun; Bai, Yuhe; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-02-02

    Previously, we synthesized an articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived oriented scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, which was biomimetic in terms of structure and biochemical composition. However, the limit resource of the cartilage-derived ECM is a hindrance for its application. In this study, we developed a new material for cartilage tissue engineering-human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived ECM (hWJECM). The hWJECM has an abundant resource and similar biochemistry with cartilage ECM, and the use of it is not associated with ethical controversy. We adopted the method previously used in cartilage ECM-derived oriented scaffold preparation to generate the oriented hWJECM-derived scaffold, and the scaffold properties were tested in vitro and in vivo. The three-dimensional scaffold has a porous and well-oriented structure, with a mean pore diameter of ∼104 μm. Scanning electron microscopy and cell viability staining results demonstrated that the oriented scaffold has good biocompatibility and cell alignment. In addition, we used functional autologous chondrocytes to seed the hWJECM-derived oriented scaffold and tested the efficacy of the cell-scaffold constructs to repair the full-thickness articular cartilage defect in a rabbit model. Defects of 4 mm diameter were generated in the patellar grooves of the femurs of both knees and were implanted with chondrocyte-scaffold constructs (group A) or scaffolds alone (group B); rabbits with untreated defects were used as a control (group C). Six months after surgery, all defects in group A were filled completely with repaired tissue, and most of which were hyaline cartilage. In contrast, the defects in group B were filled partially with repaired tissue, and approximately half of these repaired tissues were hyaline cartilage. The defects in group C were only filled with fibrotic tissue. Histological grading score of group A was lower than those of groups B and C. Quantification of

  3. Hidrogéis de poliHEMA para reparo de defeitos da cartilagem articular: 1 - síntese e caracterização mecânica PolyHEMA hydrogels for repairs or articular cartilage defects: 1 – systhesis and mechanical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M Malmonge

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visa a obtenção de hidrogéis de poli(2 hidróxi etil metacrilato - poliHEMA com propriedades mecânicas adequadas ao uso dos mesmos no reparo de defeitos da cartilagem articular. Para tanto, duas alternativas foram estudadas: a variação da densidade de reticulação e a obtenção de blendas do tipo redes semi interpenetrantes (sIPN de poliHEMA reticulado e diferentes polímeros como reforço. Amostras de hidrogéis foram obtidas por polimerização térmica e caracterizadas quanto à capacidade de absorção de água e de solução aquosa de NaCl 0,15 M e quanto ao comportamento mecânico, através de ensaios de fluência a indentação. Os resultados mostraram que a obtenção de blendas sIPN usando copolímero de MMA-AA como reforço é uma alternativa interessante para melhorar as propriedades mecânicas sem diminuir muito a capacidade de absorção de água dos hidrogéis.The purpose of this work was the study of poly-2-hydroxy-ethyl-metacrylate (polyHEMA as a biomaterial for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Improvement of mechanical properties were studied by two distincts routes: changes in cross-link density of the gels and the synthesis of cellulose acetate and poly-methyl metacrylate-acrylic acid copolymers semi interpenetrating blends. The hydrogels were synthesized by thermal polymerization and characterized by swelling behaviour in 0.15 Mol.L-1 NaCl and by creep indentation tests. The results showed that the blending of PolyHEMA with poly-methyl metacrylate-acrylic acid copolymers significantly improved the mechanical properties of hydrogels without changes in their swelling behavior.

  4. Structural characterization and comparative analysis of human and piscine cartilage acidic protein (CRTAC1/CRTAC2)

    OpenAIRE

    Guerreiro, Marta Lúcia Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado, Biotecnologia, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, 2014 CRTAC (Cartilage Acidic Protein) firstly identified as a chondrocyte marker in humans and implicated in a number of diseases. This ancient protein is present from prokaryotes to vertebrates and the teleost are the only group that contain duplicates (CRTAC1/CRTAC2). The structure of CRTACs is poorly characterized and was the starting point of the present study. To establi...

  5. Biomimetically Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol-Based Hybrid Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan D. Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a very limited regeneration capacity. Therefore, injury or degeneration of articular cartilage results in an inferior mechanical stability, load-bearing capacity, and lubrication capability. Here, we developed a biomimetic scaffold consisting of macroporous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sponges as a platform material for the incorporation of cell-embedded photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, PEGDA-methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (PEGDA-MeCS; PCS, or PEGDA-methacrylated hyaluronic acid (PEGDA-MeHA; PHA within its pores to improve in vitro chondrocyte functions and subsequent in vivo ectopic cartilage tissue formation. Our findings demonstrated that chondrocytes encapsulated in PCS or PHA and loaded into macroporous PVA hybrid scaffolds maintained their physiological phenotypes during in vitro culture, as shown by the upregulation of various chondrogenic genes. Further, the cell-secreted extracellular matrix (ECM improved the mechanical properties of the PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds by 83.30% and 73.76%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. After subcutaneous transplantation in vivo, chondrocytes on both PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds significantly promoted ectopic cartilage tissue formation, which was confirme