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Sample records for articular cartilage chondrocytes

  1. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

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    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  2. Cartilage tissue engineering using pre-aggregated human articular chondrocytes

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    F Wolf

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first aimed at determining whether human articular chondrocytes (HAC proliferate in aggregates in the presence of strong chondrocyte mitogens. We then investigated if the aggregated cells have an enhanced chondrogenic capacity as compared to cells cultured in monolayer. HAC from four donors were cultured in tissue culture dishes either untreated or coated with 1% agarose in the presence of TGFb-1, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Proliferation and stage of differentiation were assessed by measuring respectively DNA contents and type II collagen mRNA. Expanded cells were induced to differentiate in pellets or in Hyaff®-11 meshes and the formed tissues were analysed biochemically for glycosaminoglycans (GAG and DNA, and histologically by Safranin O staining. The amount of DNA in aggregate cultures increased significantly from day 2 to day 6 (by 3.2-fold, but did not further increase with additional culture time. Expression of type II collagen mRNA was about two orders of magnitude higher in aggregated HAC as compared to monolayer expanded cells. Pellets generated by aggregated HAC were generally more intensely stained for GAG than those generated by monolayer-expanded cells. Scaffolds seeded with aggregates accumulated more GAG (1.3-fold than scaffolds seeded with monolayer expanded HAC. In conclusion, this study showed that HAC culture in aggregates does not support a relevant degree of expansion. However, aggregation of expanded HAC prior to loading into a porous scaffold enhances the quality of the resulting tissues and could thus be introduced as an intermediate culture phase in the manufacture of engineered cartilage grafts.

  3. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

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    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies.

  4. Composite articular cartilage engineered on a chondrocyte-seeded aliphatic polyurethane sponge.

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    Liu, Yanchun; Webb, Ken; Kirker, Kelly R; Bernshaw, Nicole J; Tresco, Patrick A; Gray, Steven D; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2004-01-01

    To circumvent the reconstructive disadvantages inherent in resorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA)/polylactic acid (PLA) used in cartilage engineering, a nonresorbable, and nonreactive polyurethane sponge (Tecoflex sponge, TS) was studied as both a cell delivery device and as an internal support scaffolding. The in vitro viability and proliferation of porcine articular chondrocytes (PACs) in TS, and the in vivo generation of new articular cartilage and long-term resorption, were examined. The initial cell attachment rate was 40%, and cell density increased more than 5-fold after 12 days of culture in vitro. PAC-loaded TS blocks were implanted into nude mice, became opalescent, and resembled native cartilage at weeks 12 and 24 postimplantation. The mass and volume of newly formed cartilage were not significantly different at week 24 from samples harvested at week 6 or week 12. Safranin O-fast green staining revealed that the specimens from cell-loaded TS groups at week 12 and week 24 consisted of mature cartilage. Collagen typing revealed that type II collagen was present in all groups of tissue-engineered cartilage. In conclusion, the implantation of PAC-TS resulted in composite tissue-engineered articular cartilage with TS as an internal support. Long-term observation (24 weeks) of mass and volume showed no evidence of resorption.

  5. MicroRNA-181b regulates articular chondrocytes differentiation and cartilage integrity.

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    Song, Jinsoo; Lee, Myeungsu; Kim, Dongkyun; Han, Jiyeon; Chun, Churl-Hong; Jin, Eun-Jung

    2013-02-08

    MicroRNAs are endogenous gene regulators that have been implicated in various developmental and pathological processes. However, the precise identities and functions of the miRNAs involved in cartilage development are not yet well understood. Here, we report that miR-181b regulates chondrocyte differentiation and maintains cartilage integrity, and is thus a potent therapeutic target. MiR-181b was significantly down-regulated during chondrogenic differentiation of TGF-β3-stimulated limb mesenchymal cells, but it was significantly up-regulated in osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from the cartilage of osteoarthritis patients. The use of a mimic or an inhibitor to alter miR-181b levels in chondroblasts and articular chondrocytes showed that attenuation of miR-181b reduced MMP-13 expression while inducing type II collagen expression. Furthermore, over-expression of anti-miR-181b significantly reduced the cartilage destruction caused by DMM surgery in mice. In sum, our data suggest that miR-181b is a negative regulator of cartilage development, and that inhibition of miR-181b could be an effective therapeutic strategy for cartilage-related disease.

  6. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

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    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  7. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

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    Pengzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1 and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic

  8. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

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    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  9. Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantation for treatment of articular cartilage defects of the knee

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    Chun Chung-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantations have been used for several years without using periosteum or membrane. This study involves evaluations of the clinical results of Chondron™ at many clinical centers at various time points during the postoperative patient follow-up. Methods Data from 98 patients with articular cartilage injury of the knee joint and who underwent Chondron™ implantation at ten Korean hospitals between January 2005 and November 2008, were included and were divided into two groups based on the patient follow-up period, i.e. 13~24-month follow-up and greater than 25-month follow-up. The telephone Knee Society Score obtained during telephone interviews with patients, was used as the evaluation tool. Results On the tKSS-A (telephone Knee Society Score-A, the score improved from 43.52 ± 20.20 to 89.71 ± 13.69 (P Conclusion Gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation for chondral knee defects appears to be a safe and effective method for both decreasing pain and improving knee function.

  10. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

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    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  11. Green fluorescent protein as marker in chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor-1 for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-kun; LIU Yi; SONG Zhi-ming; FU Chang-feng; XU Xin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To label the primary articular chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor ( hIGF-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Methods:GFP cDNA was inserted into pcDNA3.1-hIGF-1 to label the expression vector.The recombinant vector,pcGI,a mammalian expression vector with multiple cloning sites under two respective cytomegalovirus promoters/enhancers,was transfected into the primary articular chondrocytes with the help of lipofectamine.After the positive cell clones were selected by G418,G418-resistant chondrocytes were cultured in medium for 4 weeks.The stable expression of hIGF-1 in the articular chondrocytes was determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis and the GFP was confirmed under a fluorescence microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometer methods were employed to determine the effect of transfection on proliferation of chondrocytes. Gray value was used to analyze quantitatively the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Results:The expression of hIGF-1 and GFP was confirmed in transfected chondrocytes by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemical analysis and fluorescence microscope observation. Green articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 could expand and maintain their chondrogenic phenotypes for more than 4 weeks.After the transfection of IGF-1,the proliferation of chondrocytes was enhanced and the chondrocytes could effectively maintain the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions:The hIGF-1 eukaryotic expression vector containing GFP marker gene has been successfully constructed.GFP,which can be visualized in real time and in situ, is stably expressed in articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1.The labeled articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 can be applied in cell-mediated gene therapy as well as for other biomedical purposes of transgenic chondrocytes.

  12. Influence of Knee Immobilization on Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Histological Features of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Insertion and Articular Cartilage in Rabbits

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    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi; Furuhata, Syogo; Sakane, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the influence of immobilization on chondrocyte apoptosis and histological features of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion and knee articular cartilage in rabbits. Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were assigned to an immobilization (n = 24) or sham (n = 24) group. Rabbits in the immobilization group underwent complete unilateral surgical knee immobilization and rabbits in the sham group underwent a sham surgery. The average thickness of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) stained red area by safranin O staining, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate and the chondrocyte proliferation rate in the cartilage layer in the ACL insertion and the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle were measured at one, two, four and eight weeks in six animals from each group. In the ACL insertion, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate was higher in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05). The chondrocyte proliferation rate gradually decreased from two weeks to eight weeks in the immobilization group. The GAG layer was thinner in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two, four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05). In the articular cartilage, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate in the immobilization group was higher than in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05). The GAG layer was significantly thinner in the immobilization group than that in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05). Knee immobilization significantly increased chondrocyte apoptosis at two and eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and at four and eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle, and decreased GAG layer thickness from two to eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and from four to eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage. PMID:28134763

  13. Influence of Knee Immobilization on Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Histological Features of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Insertion and Articular Cartilage in Rabbits

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    Hirotaka Mutsuzaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influence of immobilization on chondrocyte apoptosis and histological features of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL insertion and knee articular cartilage in rabbits. Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were assigned to an immobilization (n = 24 or sham (n = 24 group. Rabbits in the immobilization group underwent complete unilateral surgical knee immobilization and rabbits in the sham group underwent a sham surgery. The average thickness of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG stained red area by safranin O staining, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate and the chondrocyte proliferation rate in the cartilage layer in the ACL insertion and the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle were measured at one, two, four and eight weeks in six animals from each group. In the ACL insertion, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate was higher in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05. The chondrocyte proliferation rate gradually decreased from two weeks to eight weeks in the immobilization group. The GAG layer was thinner in the immobilization group than in the sham group at two, four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05. In the articular cartilage, the chondrocyte apoptosis rate in the immobilization group was higher than in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05. The GAG layer was significantly thinner in the immobilization group than that in the sham group at four and eight weeks after surgery (p < 0.05. Knee immobilization significantly increased chondrocyte apoptosis at two and eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and at four and eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage of the medial tibial condyle, and decreased GAG layer thickness from two to eight weeks after surgery in the ACL insertion and from four to eight weeks after surgery in the articular cartilage.

  14. Methods for Producing Scaffold-Free Engineered Cartilage Sheets from Auricular and Articular Chondrocyte Cell Sources and Attachment to Porous Tantalum

    OpenAIRE

    Whitney, G. Adam; Mera, Hisashi; Weidenbecher, Mark; Awadallah, Amad; Mansour, Joseph M.; Dennis, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Scaffold-free cartilage engineering techniques may provide a simple alternative to traditional methods employing scaffolds. We previously reported auricular chondrocyte-derived constructs for use in an engineered trachea model; however, the construct generation methods were not reported in detail. In this study, methods for cartilage construct generation from auricular and articular cell sources are described in detail, and the resulting constructs are compared for use in a joint res...

  15. EFFECT OF LOW SELENIUM ON CHONDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION AND DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF COLLAGEN TYPES Ⅰ , Ⅱ AND X IN ARTICULAR CARTILAGE FROM MINI-PIGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective According to the distribution of low selenium areas, low nutrition state of the residents and the affecting cartilage growth and articular cartilage of Kashin-Beck Disease(KBD),the chondrocyte differentia- tion and differential expression of collagen types Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅹ in articular cartilage from Chinese mini-pigs treated with low selenium were investigated in order to gain insight into the effects of these conditions on chondrocyte differ- entiation in KBD cartilage. Mothods Eleven male juvenile mini-pigs, aged from 4 weeks to 6 weeks after birth, were divided into 3 groups. The Se content in the diet of the “low Se” group was 0. 035mg/kg diet, and 0. 175 mg/kg diet in the control. For Se-supplemented group 0. 390mg /kg diet was added. The content of Se in blood was assayed at the beginning and at the end of each experiment. Samples of articular cartilage were taken from the right femur condylus, and collagen types Ⅰ , Ⅱ and Ⅹ in articular cartilage were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results ①All cartilage samples from juvenile mini-pigs fed with low selenium diet revealed a re- duction in type Ⅹ collagen mRNA expression in the hypertrophic chondrocytes as shown by in situ hybridization, and reduced type Ⅹ collagen deposition in the lower hypertrophic zone as shown by immunohistochemistry. ②Addition of selenium to the diet restored the type Ⅹ collagen to normal level. ③Type Ⅱ collagen was evenly distributed over the entire articular cartilage in all experimental and control groups. Type Ⅱ collagen mRNA signals were most prominent in the upper articular layer as well as in the hypertrophic zone in all groups. Type Ⅱ collagen expression was restrict- ed to the zone of endochondral ossification in all experimental groups and the control. Conclusion Low selenium has an down-regulatory role on the synthesis and deposition of collagen type Ⅹ in hypertrophic chondrocytes in articular cartilage of

  16. Changes in chondrocyte gene expression following in vitro impaction of porcine articular cartilage in an impact injury model.

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    Ashwell, Melissa S; Gonda, Michael G; Gray, Kent; Maltecca, Christian; O'Nan, Audrey T; Cassady, Joseph P; Mente, Peter L

    2013-03-01

    Our objective was to monitor chondrocyte gene expression at 0, 3, 7, and 14 days following in vitro impaction to the articular surface of porcine patellae. Patellar facets were either axially impacted with a cylindrical impactor (25 mm/s loading rate) to a load level of 2,000 N or not impacted to serve as controls. After being placed in organ culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days, total RNA was isolated from full thickness cartilage slices and gene expression measured for 17 genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Targeted genes included those encoding proteins involved with biological stress, inflammation, or anabolism and catabolism of cartilage extracellular matrix. Some gene expression changes were detected on the day of impaction, but most significant changes occurred at 14 days in culture. At 14 days in culture, 10 of the 17 genes were differentially expressed with col1a1 most significantly up-regulated in the impacted samples, suggesting impacted chondrocytes may have reverted to a fibroblast-like phenotype.

  17. Chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes depends on their original location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Joris E J; Saris, Daniel B F; Tsuchida, Anika Iris; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Dhert, Wouter J A; Creemers, Laura B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the regenerative capacity of chondrocytes derived from debrided defect cartilage and healthy cartilage from different regions in the joint to determine the best cell source for regenerative cartilage therapies. METHODS: Articular cartilage was obtained from

  18. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  19. Mechanical Compression of Articular Cartilage Induces Chondrocyte Proliferation and Inhibits Proteoglycan Synthesis by Activation of the Erk Pathway: Implications for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

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    Ryan, James A.; Eisner, Eric A.; DuRaine, Grayson; You, Zongbing; Reddi, A. Hari

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage is recalcitrant to endogenous repair and regeneration and thus a focus of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies. A pre-requisite for articular cartilage tissue engineering is an understanding of the signal transduction pathways involved in mechanical compression during trauma or disease. We sought to explore the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) pathway in chondrocyte proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis following acute mechanical compression. Bovine articular cartilage explants were cultured with and without the ERK 1/2 pathway inhibitor PD98059. Cartilage explants were statically loaded to 40% strain at a strain rate of 1−sec for 5 seconds. Control explants were cultured under similar conditions but were not loaded. There were four experimental groups: 1) no load without inhibitor 2) no load with the inhibitor PD98059, 3) loaded without the inhibitor, and 4) loaded with the inhibitor PD98059. Explants were cultured for varying durations, from 5 minutes to 5 days. Explants were then analyzed by biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mechanical compression induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, and this was attenuated with the ERK 1/2 pathway inhibitor PD98059 in a dose-dependent manner. Chondrocyte proliferation was increased by mechanical compression. This effect was blocked by the inhibitor of the ERK 1/2 pathway. Mechanical compression also led to a decrease in proteoglycan synthesis that was reversed with inhibitor PD98059. In conclusion, the ERK 1/2 pathway is involved in the proliferative and biosynthetic response of chondrocytes following acute static mechanical compression. PMID:19177463

  20. Methods for producing scaffold-free engineered cartilage sheets from auricular and articular chondrocyte cell sources and attachment to porous tantalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, G Adam; Mera, Hisashi; Weidenbecher, Mark; Awadallah, Amad; Mansour, Joseph M; Dennis, James E

    2012-08-01

    Scaffold-free cartilage engineering techniques may provide a simple alternative to traditional methods employing scaffolds. We previously reported auricular chondrocyte-derived constructs for use in an engineered trachea model; however, the construct generation methods were not reported in detail. In this study, methods for cartilage construct generation from auricular and articular cell sources are described in detail, and the resulting constructs are compared for use in a joint resurfacing model. Attachment of cartilage sheets to porous tantalum is also investigated as a potential vehicle for future attachment to subchondral bone. Large scaffold-free cartilage constructs were produced from culture-expanded chondrocytes from skeletally mature rabbits, and redifferentiated in a chemically-defined culture medium. Auricular constructs contained more glycosaminoglycan (39.6±12.7 vs. 9.7±1.9 μg/mg wet weight, mean and standard deviation) and collagen (2.7±0.45 vs. 1.1±0.2 μg/mg wet weight, mean and standard deviation) than articular constructs. Aggregate modulus was also higher for auricular constructs vs. articular constructs (0.23±0.07 vs. 0.12±0.03 MPa, mean and standard deviation). Attachment of constructs to porous tantalum was achieved by neocartilage ingrowth into tantalum pores. These results demonstrate that large scaffold-free neocartilage constructs can be produced from mature culture-expanded chondrocytes in a chemically-defined medium, and that these constructs can be attached to porous tantalum.

  1. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

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    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  2. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

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    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  3. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  4. Chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes depends on their original location in the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Saris, D.B.F.; Tsuchida, A.I.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the regenerative capacity of chondrocytes derived from debrided defect cartilage and healthy cartilage from different regions in the joint in order to determine the best cell source for regenerative cartilage therapies. Methods: Articular cartilage was obta

  5. [Structure of the articular cartilage in the middle aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kop'eva, T N; Mul'diiarov, P Ia; Bel'skaia, O B; Pastel', V B

    1983-10-01

    In persons 17-83 years of age having no articular disorders 39 samples of the patellar articular cartilage, the articulated surface and the femoral head have been studied histochemically, histometrically and electron microscopically. Age involution of the articular cartilage is revealed after 40 years of age as a progressive decrease in chondrocytes density in the superficial and (to a less degree) in the intermediate zones. This is accompanied with a decreasing number of 3- and 4-cellular lacunae and with an increasing number of unicellular and hollow lacunae. In some chondrocytes certain distrophic and necrotic changes are revealed. In the articular matrix the zone with the minimal content of glycosaminoglycans becomes thicker and keratansulfate content in the territorial matrix of the cartilage deep zone grows large.

  6. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  7. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  8. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  9. Repairing articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineering cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hong-xing; LI Fo-bao; SHEN Hui-liang; LIAO Wei-ming; LIU Miao; WANG Min; CAO Jun-ling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) engineered with allogeneic chondrocytes in repairing articular cartilage defects in rabbits.Methods: Chondrocytes were seeded onto three-dimensional cancellous BMG and cultured in vitro for 12 days to prepare BMG-chondrocyte complexes. Under anesthesia with 2.5% pentobarbital sodium (1 ml/kg body weight), articular cartilage defects were made on the right knee joints of 38 healthy New Zealand white rabbits (regardless of sex, aged 4-5 months and weighing 2.5-3 kg) and the defects were then treated with 2.5 % trypsin.Then BMG-chondrocyte complex (Group A, n=18 ),BMG ( Group B, n=10), and nothing ( Group C, n=10)were implanted into the cartilage defects, respectively. The repairing effects were assessed by macroscopic, histologic,transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observation,immunohistochemical examination and in situ hybridization detection, respectively, at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation.Results: Cancellous BMG was degraded within 8 weeks after operation. In Group A, lymphocyte infiltration was observed around the graft. At 24 weeks after operation, the cartilage defects were repaired by cartilage tissues and the articular cartilage and subchondral bone were soundly healed. Proteoglycan and type Ⅱ collagen were detected in the matrix of the repaired tissues by Safranin-O staining and immunohistochemical staining,respectively. In situ hybridization proved gene expression of type Ⅱ collagen in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes in the repaired tissues. TEM observation showed that chondrocytes and cartilage matrix in repaired tissues were almost same as those in the normal articular cartilage. In Group B, the defects were repaired by cartilage-fibrous tissues. In Group C, the defects were repaired only by fibrous tissues.Conclusions : Cancellous BMG can be regarded as the natural cell scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.Articular cartilage defects can be repaired by

  10. Serum-free media for articular chondrocytes in vitro expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xin-xin; Neil A.Duncan; LIN Lin; FU Xin; ZHANG Ji-ying; YU Chang-long

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro chondrocyte expansion is a major challenge in cell-based therapy for human articular cartilage repair.Classical culture conditions usually use animal serum as a medium supplement,which raises a number of undesirable questions.In the present study,two kinds of defined,serum-free media were developed to expand chondrocytes in monolayer culture for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering.Methods Bovine chondrocytes were expanded in serum-free media supplemented with fibroblast growth factor-2 and platelet-derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 and insulin-like growth factor.Expansion culture in a conventional 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) medium served as control.Fibronectin coating was used to help cell adhesion in serum-free medium.Next,in vitro three-dimensional pellet culture was used to evaluate the chondrocyte capacity.Cell pellets were expanded in different media to re-express the differentiated phenotype (re-differentiation) and to form cartilaginous tissue.The pellets were assessed by glycosaminoglycans contents,collagen II,collagen I and collagen X immunohistological staining.Results Chondrocytes cultured in serum-free media showed no proliferation difference than cells grown with 10% FBS medium.In addition,chondrocytes expanded in both serum-free media expressed more differentiated phenotypes at the end of monolayer culture,as indicated by higher gene expression ratios of collagen type Ⅱ to collagen type Ⅰ.Pellets derived from chondrocytes cultured in both serum-free media displayed comparable chondrogenic capacities to pellets from cells expanded in 10% FBS medium.Conclusion These findings provide alternative culture approaches for chondrocytes in vitro expansion,which may benefit the clinical use of autologous chondrocytes implantation.

  11. Induction of increased cAMP levels in articular chondrocytes blocks matrix metalloproteinase-mediated cartilage degradation, but not aggrecanase-mediated cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Sumer, Eren Ufuk; Wulf, Helle

    2007-01-01

    was assessed by 1) quantification of C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen fragments (CTX-II), 2) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated aggrecan degradation by (342)FFGV- G2 assay, 3) aggrecanase-mediated degradation by (374)ARGS-G2 assay, 4) release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (s......-dependently inhibited by forskolin and IBMX. The highest concentration of IBMX lowered cytokine-induced release of sGAG by 72%. CONCLUSION: Levels of cAMP in chondrocytes play a key role in controlling catabolic activity. Increased cAMP levels in chondrocytes inhibited MMP expression and activity and consequently...

  12. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  13. Chondrogenic differentiation of human articular chondrocytes differs in biodegradable PGA/PLA scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Joern; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Südkamp, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is applied clinically to cover and regenerate articular cartilage defects. Two bioresorbable nonwoven scaffolds, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (90/10 copolymer of L-lactide and glycolide), were seeded with human chondrocytes after in...

  14. Depth-varying density and organization of chondrocytes in immature and mature bovine articular cartilage assessed by 3d imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadin, Kyle D.; Wong, Benjamin L.; Bae, Won C.; Li, Kelvin W.; Williamson, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Sah, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous tissue, with cell density and organization varying with depth from the surface. The objectives of the present study were to establish a method for localizing individual cells in three-dimensional (3D) images of cartilage and quantifying depth-associated variation in cellularity and cell organization at different stages of growth. Accuracy of nucleus localization was high, with 99% sensitivity relative to manual localization. Cellularity (million cells per cm3) decreased from 290, 310, and 150 near the articular surface in fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, to 120, 110, and 50 at a depth of 1.0 mm. The distance/angle to the nearest neighboring cell was 7.9 microm/31 degrees , 7.1 microm/31 degrees , and 9.1 microm/31 degrees for cells at the articular surface of fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, and increased/decreased to 11.6 microm/31 degrees , 12.0 microm/30 degrees , and 19.2 microm/25 degrees at a depth of 0.7 mm. The methodologies described here may be useful for analyzing the 3D cellular organization of cartilage during growth, maturation, aging, degeneration, and regeneration.

  15. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  16. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  17. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration.

  18. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  19. Growth differentiation factor-5 stimulates the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Guo Xiong; Yao Jianfeng; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱ collagen by RT-PCR,the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture,MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and X collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  20. A study of crystalline biomaterials for articular cartilage bioengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Aviv, Talia [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: taliag@bgu.ac.il; DiCarlo, Bryan B. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: bdicarlo@rice.edu; French, Margaret M. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: mmfrench@rice.edu; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77003 (United States)], E-mail: athanasiou@rice.edu; Vago, Razi [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: rvago@bgu.ac.il

    2008-12-01

    This study examines the suitability of marine origin coral species, Porites lutea (POR) and the hydrozoan Millepora dichotoma (MIL), for use as novel three dimensional growth matrices in the field of articular cartilage tissue engineering. Therefore, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes were grown on the skeletal material obtained from each of these two organisms to investigate their potential use as three dimensional scaffolding for cartilage tissue growth. Chondrogenic induction of MSCs was achieved by addition of transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I). Cell adherence, proliferation, differentiation and tissue development were investigated through six weeks of culture. Cartilage tissue growth and chondrocytic phenotype maintenance of each cell type were examined by cell morphology, histochemical analyses, expression of collagen type II and quantitative measures of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. The MSCs and the chondrocytes were shown good adherence to the scaffolds and maintenance of the chondrocytic phenotype in the initial stages of culture. However after two weeks of culture on MIL and three weeks on POR these cultures began to exhibit signs of further differentiation and phenotypic loss. The shown results indicated that POR was a better substrate for chondrocytes phenotype maintenance than MIL. We believe that surface modification of POR combined with mechanical stimuli will provide a suitable environment for chondrogenic phenotype maintenance. Further investigation of POR and other novel coralline biomatrices is indicated and warranted in the field of cartilage tissue engineering applications.

  1. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  2. One intra-articular injection of hyaluronan prevents cell death and improves cell metabolism in a model of injured articular cartilage in the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Edwin J. P.; Ernans, Pieter J.; Douw, Conny M.; Guidemond, Nick A.; Van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Kuijer, Roell

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of one intra-articular injection of hyaluronan on chondrocyte death and metabolism in injured cartilage. Twenty-three 6-month-old rabbits received partial-thickness articular cartilage defects created on each medial femoral condyle. In order to e

  3. Progression of articular cartilage degeneration after application of muscle stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Carolina Náglio Kalil; Renner, Adriana Frias; dos Santos, Anderson Amaro; Vasilceac, Fernando Augusto; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the progression of the ankle articular cartilage alterations after a post-immobilization muscle stretching. Twenty-nine Wistar rats were separated into five groups: C--control, S--stretched, SR--stretch recovery, IS--immobilized and stretched, and ISR--immobilized stretched recovery. The immobilization was maintained for 4 weeks and the left ankle was then stretched manually through a full dorsal flexion for 10 times for 60 s with a 30 s interval between each 60 s period, 7 days/week for 3 weeks. The recovery period was of 7 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the left ankles were removed, processed in paraffin, and stained in hematoxylin-eosin and safranin O. Two blinded observers evaluated the articular cartilage using the Mankin grading system (cellularity, chondrocyte cloning, and proteoglycan content) through light microscopy, and performed the morphometry (cellularity, total thickness, non-calcified thickness, and calcified thickness measures). Both the Mankin grading system and the morphometric analysis showed that the ISR group presented the most increased cellularity among the groups. The IS and SR groups showed the highest proteoglycan loss, and the ISR group showed the same content of proteoglycan observed in the C group. No significant differences were found in the chondrocyte cloning, the total cartilage thickness, the non-calcified cartilage thickness, and the calcified cartilage thickness among the groups. The results suggest that the cartilage can recover the proteoglycan loss caused by immobilization and stretching, probably because of the increased chondrocyte density. Therefore, the ankle articular cartilage responded as to repair the metabolic deficits.

  4. Growth Differentiation Factor-5 Stimulates the Growth and Anabolic Metabolism of Articular Chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Guo Xiong; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTr assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type 11 collagen by RT-PCR, the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture, MTF assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of ehondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the colal mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was gready enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and Ⅹ collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chon-drocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic ex-pression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  5. Metabolic Effects of Avocado/Soy Unsaponifiables on Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Lippiello

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Avocado/soy unsaponifiable (ASU components are reported to have a chondroprotective effect by virtue of anti-inflammatory and proanabolic effects on articular chondrocytes. The identity of the active component(s remains unknown. In general, sterols, the major component of unsaponifiable plant material have been demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in vitro and in animal models. These studies were designed to clarify whether the sterol content of ASU preparations were the primary contributors to biological activity in articular chondrocytes. ASU samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC and GC mass spectrometry. The sterol content was normalized between diverse samples prior to in vitro testing on bovine chondrocytes. Anabolic activity was monitored by uptake of 35-sulfate into proteoglycans and quantitation of labeled hydroxyproline and proline content after incubation with labeled proline. Anti-inflammatory activity was assayed by measuring reduction of interleukin-1 (IL-1-induced synthesis of PGE2 and metalloproteases and release of label from tissue prelabeled with S-35.All ASU samples exerted a similar time-dependent up-regulation of 35-sulfate uptake in bovine cells reaching a maximum of greater than 100% after 72 h at sterol doses of 1–10 μg/ml. Non-collagenous protein (NCP and collagen synthesis were similarly up-regulated. All ASU were equally effective in dose dependently inhibiting IL-1-induced MMP-3 activity (23–37%, labeled sulfate release (15–23% and PGE2 synthesis (45–58%. Up-regulation of glycosaminoglycan and collagen synthesis and reduction of IL-1 effects in cartilage are consistent with chondroprotective activity. The similarity of activity of ASU from diverse sources when tested at equal sterol levels suggests sterols are important for biologic effects in articular chondrocytes.

  6. Metabolic Effects of Avocado/Soy Unsaponifiables on Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardo, Joseph V.; Harlan, Robert; Chiou, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Avocado/soy unsaponifiable (ASU) components are reported to have a chondroprotective effect by virtue of anti-inflammatory and proanabolic effects on articular chondrocytes. The identity of the active component(s) remains unknown. In general, sterols, the major component of unsaponifiable plant material have been demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in vitro and in animal models. These studies were designed to clarify whether the sterol content of ASU preparations were the primary contributors to biological activity in articular chondrocytes. ASU samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and GC mass spectrometry. The sterol content was normalized between diverse samples prior to in vitro testing on bovine chondrocytes. Anabolic activity was monitored by uptake of 35-sulfate into proteoglycans and quantitation of labeled hydroxyproline and proline content after incubation with labeled proline. Anti-inflammatory activity was assayed by measuring reduction of interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced synthesis of PGE2 and metalloproteases and release of label from tissue prelabeled with S-35.All ASU samples exerted a similar time-dependent up-regulation of 35-sulfate uptake in bovine cells reaching a maximum of greater than 100% after 72 h at sterol doses of 1–10 μg/ml. Non-collagenous protein (NCP) and collagen synthesis were similarly up-regulated. All ASU were equally effective in dose dependently inhibiting IL-1-induced MMP-3 activity (23–37%), labeled sulfate release (15–23%) and PGE2 synthesis (45–58%). Up-regulation of glycosaminoglycan and collagen synthesis and reduction of IL-1 effects in cartilage are consistent with chondroprotective activity. The similarity of activity of ASU from diverse sources when tested at equal sterol levels suggests sterols are important for biologic effects in articular chondrocytes. PMID:18604259

  7. Evidence for a negative Pasteur effect in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R B; Urban, J P

    1997-01-01

    Uptake of external glucose and production of lactate were measured in freshly-excised bovine articular cartilage under O2 concentrations ranging from 21% (air) to zero (N2-bubbled). Anoxia (O2 concentration Pasteur effect in bovine articular cartilage. Anoxia also suppressed glycolysis in articular cartilage from horse, pig and sheep. Inhibitors acting on the glycolytic pathway (2-deoxy-D-glucose, iodoacetamide or fluoride) strongly decreased aerobic lactate production and ATP concentration, consistent with the belief that articular cartilage obtains its principal supply of ATP from substrate-level phosphorylation in glycolysis. Azide or cyanide lowered the ATP concentration in aerobic cartilage to approximately the same extent as did anoxia but, because glycolysis (lactate production) was also inhibited by these treatments, the importance of any mitochondrial ATP production could not be assessed. A negative Pasteur effect would make chondrocytes particularly liable to suffer a shortage of energy under anoxic conditions. Incorporation of [35S]sulphate into proteoglycan was severely curtailed by treatments, such as anoxia, which decreased the intracellular concentration of ATP.

  8. Polyethylene-glycol-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes for intra-articular delivery to chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Cristiano; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Magrini, Andrea; Rosato, Nicola; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2014-12-23

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and debilitating degenerative disease of articular joints for which no disease-modifying medical therapy is currently available. Inefficient delivery of pharmacologic agents into cartilage-resident chondrocytes after systemic administration has been a limitation to the development of anti-OA medications. Direct intra-articular injection enables delivery of high concentrations of agents in close proximity to chondrocytes; however, the efficacy of this approach is limited by the fast clearance of small molecules and biomacromolecules after injection into the synovial cavity. Coupling of pharmacologic agents with drug delivery systems able to enhance their residence time and cartilage penetration can enhance the effectiveness of intra-articularly injected anti-OA medications. Herein we describe an efficient intra-articular delivery nanosystem based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (PEG-SWCNTs). We show that PEG-SWCNTs are capable to persist in the joint cavity for a prolonged time, enter the cartilage matrix, and deliver gene inhibitors into chondrocytes of both healthy and OA mice. PEG-SWCNT nanoparticles did not elicit systemic or local side effects. Our data suggest that PEG-SWCNTs represent a biocompatible and effective nanocarrier for intra-articular delivery of agents to chondrocytes.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vogrin, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2), collagen 1 (COL1) and aggrecan (ACAN) was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a common and very

  10. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2, collagen 1 (COL1 and aggrecan (ACAN was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a

  11. Hypotonic challenge modulates cell volumes differently in the superficial zone of intact articular cartilage and cartilage explant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Siru M; Lammi, Mikko J; Saarakkala, Simo; Koistinen, Arto; Korhonen, Rami K

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sample preparation on the biomechanical behaviour of chondrocytes. We compared the volumetric and dimensional changes of chondrocytes in the superficial zone (SZ) of intact articular cartilage and cartilage explant before and after a hypotonic challenge. Calcein-AM labelled SZ chondrocytes were imaged with confocal laser scanning microscopy through intact cartilage surfaces and through cut surfaces of cartilage explants. In order to clarify the effect of tissue composition on cell volume changes, Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy was used for estimating the proteoglycan and collagen contents of the samples. In the isotonic medium (300 mOsm), there was a significant difference (p integrity of the mechanical environment of chondrocytes.

  12. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2015-08-14

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  13. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Emi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Furumatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: matino@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  14. GROWTH DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR-5 STIMULATES THE GROWTH AND ANABOLIC METABOLISM OF ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱcollagen by RT-PCR. Results After 7 days culture, MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Conclusion GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation in mono-layer culture.

  15. Tenascin and aggrecan expression by articular chondrocytes is influenced by interleukin 1ß: a possible explanation for the changes in matrix synthesis during osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pfander, D; HEINZ, N.; Rothe, P; Carl, H.; Swoboda, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the distribution patterns of tenascin and proteoglycans in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, and to determine the effect of interleukin 1ß (IL1ß) on aggrecan and tenascin expression by human articular chondrocytes in vitro.

  16. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  17. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  18. Study of cryopreservation of articular chondrocytes using the Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Wu, Wei Te; Hou, Chien Chih; Hsieh, Wen-Hsin

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of control factors on cryopreservation of articular cartilage chondrocytes using the Taguchi method. Freeze-thaw experiments based on the L(8)(2(7)) two-level orthogonal array of the Taguchi method are conducted, and ANOVA (analysis of variables) is adopted to determine the statistically significant control factors that affect the viability of the cell. Results show that the type of cryoprotectant, freezing rate, thawing rate, and concentration of cryoprotectant (listed in the order of influence) are the statistically significant control factors that affect the post-thaw viability. The end temperature and durations of the first and second stages of freezing do not affect the post-thaw viability. Within the ranges of the control factors studied in this work, the optimal test condition is found to be a freezing rate of 0.61+/-0.03 degrees C/min, a thawing rate of 126.84+/-5.57 degrees C/min, Me(2)SO cryoprotectant, and a cryoprotectant concentration of 10% (v/v) for maximum cell viability. In addition, this study also explores the effect of cryopreservation on the expression of type II collagen using immunocytochemical staining and digital image processing. The results show that the ability of cryopreserved chondrocytes to express type II collagen is reduced within the first five days of monolayer culture.

  19. Effects of chondroitin sulfate and sodium hyaluronate on chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage in dogs with degenerative joint disease Efeitos do sulfato de condroitina e do hialuronato de sódio nos condrócitos e na matriz extracelular na cartilagem articular de cães com doença articular degenerativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gonçalves

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Samples of articular cartilage of femur, tibia and patella of 15 dogs with experimentally induced degenerative joint disease (DJD were microscopically analyzed. Animals were distributed into three groups (n=5: the control group received no medication; the second group was treated with chondroitin sulfate and the third received sodium hyaluronate. Samples were processed and stained with HE and toluidine blue for morphological evaluation. The metabolic and proliferative activity of the chondrocytes was evaluated by the measurement of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs after impregnation by silver nitrate. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the morphology among the groups, however, the group treated with sodium hyaluronate had a higher score suggesting a trend to a greater severity of the lesions. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the measurement of NORs, cells and NORs/cells among the groups. Although differences were not significant, sodium hyaluronate group showed higher NOR and cell counts which suggested an increase of the proliferation rate of chondrocytes. In addition, a higher NOR/cell ratio in the group treated with chondroitin sulfate suggested that this drug may have stimulated the metabolic activity of the chondrocytes, minimizing the lesions resulting from DJD.Foram utilizadas amostras de cartilagem articular do fêmur, tíbia e patela de 15 cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD, induzida experimentalmente. Foram constituídos três grupos de cinco animais: grupo 1 - controle, não medicado; grupo 2 - tratado com sulfato de condroitina e grupo 3 - tratado com hialuronato de sódio. As amostras foram processadas e coradas pelas técnicas de HE e de azul de toluidina para avaliação das alterações morfológicas, e impregnadas pelo nitrato de prata para análise da atividade metabólica e/ou proliferativa dos condrócitos, por meio da visualização e quantificação de regiões organizadoras

  20. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ke Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P0.05. The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis.

  1. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  2. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  3. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  4. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  5. Mechanical vibrations increase the proliferation of articular chondrocytes in high-density culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, J A; Waldman, S D

    2008-07-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it still has proven a challenge to produce tissue from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from a single individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of dedifferentiation and/or loss of potency. Previously, it has been shown that mechanical vibrations can enhance chondrocyte proliferation in monolayer culture. Thus, it was hypothesized that chondrocytes grown in high-density culture would respond in a similar fashion while maintaining phenotypic stability. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were seeded in high-density culture on Millicell filters and subjected to mechanical vibrations 48 h after seeding. Mechanical vibrations enhanced chondrocyte proliferation at frequencies above 350 Hz, with the peak response occurring at a 1g amplitude for a duration of 30 min. Under these conditions, the gene expression of cartilage-specific and dedifferentiation markers (collagen II, collagen I, and aggrecan) were unchanged by the imposed stimulus. To determine the effect of accumulated extracellular matrix (ECM) on this proliferative response, selected cultures were stimulated under the same conditions after varying lengths of preculture. The amount of accumulated ECM (collagen and proteoglycans) decreased this proliferative response, with the cultures becoming insensitive to the stimulus after 1 week of preculture. Thus, mechanical vibration can serve as an effective means preferentially to stimulate the proliferation of chondrocytes during culture, but its effects appear to be limited to the early stages where ECM accumulation is at a minimum.

  6. The Inhibitory Effect of Salmon Calcitonin on Tri-Iodothyronine Induction of Early Hypertrophy in Articular Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Pingping Chen-An; Kim Vietz Andreassen; Kim Henriksen; Yadong Li; Morten Asser Karsdal; Anne-Christine Bay-Jensen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Salmon calcitonin has chondroprotective effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is therefore being tested as a candidate drug for cartilage degenerative diseases. Recent studies have indicated that different chondrocyte phenotypes may express the calcitonin receptor (CTR) differentially. We tested for the presence of the CTR in chondrocytes from tri-iodothyronin (T3)-induced bovine articular cartilage explants. Moreover, investigated the effects of human and salmon calcitonin on the ...

  7. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  8. Repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits through tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with chitosan hydrogel and chondrocytes%新型壳聚糖水凝胶结合软骨细胞修复兔关节软骨缺损的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming ZHAO; Zhu CHEN; Kang LIU; Yu-qing WAN; Xu-dong LI; Xu-wei LUO; Yi-guang BAI; Ze-long YANG; Gang FENG

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In our previous work, we prepared a type of chitosan hydrogel with excelent biocompatibility. In this study, tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with this chitosan hydrogel and costal chondrocytes was used to repair the articular cartilage defects. Methods: Chitosan hydrogels were prepared with a crosslinker formed by com-bining 1,6-disocyanatohexane and polyethylene glycol. Chitosan hydrogel scaffold was seeded with rabbit chondro-cytes that had been cultured for one weekin vitro to form the preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage. This preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage was then transplanted into the defective rabbit articular cartilage. There were three treatment groups: the experimental group received preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage; the blank group received pure chitosan hydrogels; and, the control group had received no implantation. The knee joints were harvested at predetermined time. The repaired cartilage was analyzed through gross morphology, histologicaly and immuno-histochemicaly. The repairs were scored according to the international cartilage repair society (ICRS) standard. Results: The gross morphology results suggested that the defects were repaired completely in the experimental group after twelve weeks. The regenerated tissue connected closely with subchondral bone and the boundary with normal tissue was fuzzy. The cartilage lacuna in the regenerated tissue was similar to normal cartilage lacuna. The results of ICRS gross and histological grading showed that there were significant differences among the three groups (P  创新点:利用自主研发的具有良好生物相容性和稳定性的壳聚糖水凝胶与软骨细胞,在体外初步构建组织工程软骨,并尝试利用其修复缺损的关节软骨,从而为关节软骨缺损的修复提供了一种新的治疗方法。  方法:取兔肋软骨体外培养扩增,获得P2代软骨细胞,将其种植到冻干的壳聚糖水凝胶上,体

  9. Repairing cartilage defects using chondrocyte and osteoblast composites developed using a bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shui; REN Qiang; WANG Dong; ZHANG Lei; WU Shuai; SUN Xi-tao

    2011-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage injury is a common disease, and the incidence of articular wear, degeneration, trauma and sports injury is increasing, which often lead to disability and reduced quality of life. Unfortunately repair of articular cartilage defects do not always provide satisfactory outcomes.Methods Chondrocyte and osteoblast composites were co-cultured using a bioreactor. The cartilage defects were treated with cell-β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composites implanted into osteochondral defects in dogs, in vivo, using mosaicplasty, by placing chondrocyte-β-TCP scaffold composites on top of the defect and osteoblast-β-TCP scaffold composites below the defect.Results Electron microscopy revealed that the induced chondrocytes and osteoblast showed fine adhesive progression and proliferation in the β-TCP scaffold. The repaired tissues in the experimental group maintained their thickness to the full depth of the original defects, as compared with the negative control group (q=12.3370, P <0.01; q=31.5393, P <0.01).Conclusions Perfusion culture provided sustained nutrient supply and gas exchange into the center of the large scaffold. This perfusion bioreactor enables the chondrocytes and osteoblasts to survive and proliferate in a three-dimensional scaffold.

  10. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  11. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A New Path in Articular Cartilage Defect Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Philipp Stromps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 6 million people undergo a variety of medical procedures for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the U.S. each year. Trauma, tumor, and age-related degeneration can cause major defects in articular cartilage, which has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. Therefore, there is substantial interest in the development of novel cartilage tissue engineering strategies to restore articular cartilage defects to a normal or prediseased state. Special attention has been paid to the expansion of chondrocytes, which produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix in healthy cartilage. This review summarizes the current efforts to generate chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and provides an outlook on promising future strategies.

  12. 组织工程化软骨细胞和骨髓间充质干细胞用于修复同种异体关节软骨缺损%Tissue engineered chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙皓; 左健

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the articular cartilage almost has no self-repair capacity, and in clinic, the repair on it mainly depends on the autologous or allogenic cartilage transplantation, perichondrium or periosteal transplantation and the chondrocytes transplantation. The limitation of autologous cartilage source and the chronic immune rejection of allograft cartilage may eventually lead to the poor prognosis. The cartilage repaired by perichondrium or periosteum transplantation is easy to degenerate which may lead to a poor repair result.OBJECTIVE: To review the research progress of tissue engineered chondrocytes , bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the co-culture of them on the repair of allogeneic cartilage defects.METHODS: A computer-based search on the PubMed database and CNKI database from January 1994 to January 2012 was performed for the articles on tissue engineered chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of allograft articular cartilage defects. The English key words were "cartilage defect, allograft, chondrocyte, mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells" and the Chinese keywords were "cartilage defect, allograft, chondrocyte, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells". The repetitive articles and the articles not in English or Chinese were eliminated, and finally, a total of 35 articles were included to review.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: With the continuous improvement of in vitro cell culture methods, chondrocytes can be isolated from the tough cartilage, and a large number of high-purity chondrocytes and new chondrocytes can be obtained. Due to the low proliferative capacity of the chondrocytes, subculture may easily lead to aging and dedifferentiation; however, the content of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is low in adult bone marrow, with the increasing of the passages number, the chondrogenic potential is significantly decreased. When the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells co-cultured with chondrocytes, they can

  13. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  14. Three-dimensional scaffold-free fusion culture: the way to enhance chondrogenesis of in vitro propagated human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lehmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage regeneration based on isolated and culture-expanded chondrocytes has been studied in various in vitro models, but the quality varies with respect to the morphology and the physiology of the synthesized tissues. The aim of our study was to promote in vitro chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes using a novel three-dimensional (3-D cultivation system in combination with the chondrogenic differentiation factors transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-b2 and L-ascorbic acid. Articular chondrocytes isolated from six elderly patients were expanded in monolayer culture. A single-cell suspension of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes was then added to agar-coated dishes without using any scaffold material, in the presence, or absence of TGF-b2 and/or L-ascorbic acid. Three-dimensional cartilage-like constructs, called single spheroids, and microtissues consisting of several spheroids fused together, named as fusions, were formed. Generated tissues were mainly characterized using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The morphology of the in vitro tissues shared some similarities to native hyaline cartilage in regard to differentiated S100-positive chondrocytes within a cartilaginous matrix, with strong collagen type II expression and increased synthesis of proteoglycans. Finally, our innovative scaffold-free fusion culture technique supported enhanced chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. These 3-D hyaline cartilage-like microtissues will be useful for in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation and regeneration, enabling optimization of functional tissue engineering and possibly contributing to the development of new approaches to treat traumatic cartilage defects or osteoarthritis.

  15. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin K. Dewan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes. ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient’s knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients.

  16. Spontaneous Redifferentiation of Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes on Hydrogel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate into a more fibroblastic phenotype on a two-dimensional polystyrene substratum. This impedes fundamental research on these cells as well as their clinical application. This study investigated the redifferentiation behavior of dedifferentiated chondrocytes on a hydrogel substratum. Dedifferentiated normal human articular chondrocyte–knee (NHAC-kn) cells were released from the sixth-passage monolayer cultured on a polystyrene surface. These cells were then s...

  17. Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV Channels in Different Passages of Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Barrett-Jolley

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels play important roles in chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV subfamily of ion channels consists of six members. TRPV1-4 are temperature sensitive calcium-permeable, relatively non-selective cation channels whereas TRPV5 and TRPV6 show high selectivity for calcium over other cations. In this study we investigated the effect of time in culture and passage number on the expression of TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 in articular chondrocytes isolated from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Polyclonal antibodies raised against TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 were used to compare the expression of these channels in lysates from first expansion chondrocytes (P0 and cells from passages 1–3 (P1, P2 and P3 by western blotting. TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 were expressed in all passages examined. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of these channels in sections of formalin fixed articular cartilage and monolayer cultures of methanol fixed P2 chondrocytes. TRPV5 and TRPV6 were upregulated with time and passage in culture suggesting that a shift in the phenotype of the cells in monolayer culture alters the expression of these channels. In conclusion, several TRPV channels are likely to be involved in calcium signaling and homeostasis in chondrocytes.

  18. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: integration of experimental and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Oreffo, R O C; Sengers, B G; Tare, R S

    2014-09-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches.

  19. THE ACTIVATION OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES AND CHONDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION, WHICH ACCOMPANIES THE INDUCTION OF COLLAGEN DECOMPOSITION UNDER THE ACTION OF COLLAGEN PEPTIDE IN THE CARTILAGE OFHEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This study has shown that the induction of collagenase activity by CB12-2 in the human articular cartilage chondrocytes is attended by terminal differentiation/hypertrophy of these cells. The terminal differentiation of chondrocytes may be one of the mechanisms of chondrolysis in osteoarthrosis since it naturally occurs not only in endochondrial ossification, but also in the development of pathology.

  20. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

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    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  1. The effects of ascorbic acid on cartilage metabolism in guinea pig articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy G; Rohrbaugh, Amy L; Otterness, Ivan; Kraus, Virginia B

    2002-03-01

    Ascorbic acid has been associated with the slowing of osteoarthritis progression in guinea pig and man. The goal of this study was to evaluate transcriptional and translational regulation of cartilage matrix components by ascorbic acid. Guinea pig articular cartilage explants were grown in the presence of L-ascorbic acid (L-Asc), D-isoascorbic acid (D-Asc), sodium L-ascorbate (Na L-Asc), sodium D-isoascorbate (Na D-Asc), or ascorbyl-2-phosphate (A2P) to isolate and analyze the acidic and nutrient effects of ascorbic acid. Transcription of type II collagen, prolyl 4-hydroxylase (alpha subunit), and aggrecan increased in response to the antiscorbutic forms of ascorbic acid (L-Asc, Na L-Asc, and A2P) and was stereospecific to the L-forms. Collagen and aggrecan synthesis also increased in response to the antiscorbutic forms but only in the absence of acidity. All ascorbic acid forms tended to increase oxidative damage over control. This was especially true for the non-nutrient D-forms and the high dose L-Asc. Finally, we investigated the ability of chondrocytes to express the newly described sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (SVCTs). We identified transcripts for SVCT2 but not SVCT1 in guinea pig cartilage explants. This represents the first characterization of SVCTs in chondrocytes. This study confirms that ascorbic acid stimulates collagen synthesis and in addition modestly stimulates aggrecan synthesis. These effects are exerted at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The stereospecificity of these effects is consistent with chondrocyte expression of SVCT2, shown previously to transport L-Asc more efficiently than D-Asc. Therefore, this transporter may be the primary mechanism by which the L-forms of ascorbic acid enter the chondrocyte to control matrix gene activity.

  2. The major basement membrane components localize to the chondrocyte pericellular matrix--a cartilage basement membrane equivalent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Alexander J.; Nyström, Alexander; Hultenby, Kjell;

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that articular cartilage chondrocytes are surrounded by the defining basement membrane proteins laminin, collagen type IV, nidogen and perlecan, and suggest that these form the functional equivalent of a basement membrane. We found by real-time PCR that mouse chondro...... to the progression of degenerative joint disorders....

  3. Calcitonin directly attenuates collagen type II degradation by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Wulf, H; Henriksen, K

    2006-01-01

    chain reaction (RT-PCR). In bovine articular cartilage explants, cartilage degradation was investigated by release of C-terminal telopeptides of collagen type II (CTX-II), induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) [20 ng/ml] and oncostatin M (OSM) [10 ng/ml], with salmon calcitonin [0.......0001-1 microM]. In vivo, cartilage degradation was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats administered with oral calcitonin [2 mg/kg calcitonin] for 9 weeks. RESULTS: The calcitonin receptor was identified in articular chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Calcitonin concentration......-dependently increased cAMP levels in isolated chondrocytes. Explants cultured with TNF-alpha and OSM showed a 100-fold increase in CTX-II release compared to vehicle-treated controls (Pprotection...

  4. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  5. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  6. Doxycycline inhibits collagen synthesis by differentiated articular chondrocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TeKoppele, J.M.; Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Koopman, J.L.; Groot, J. de; Bank, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Doxycycline (DOX) profoundly inhibited collagen synthesis by differentiated articular chondrocytes. At 25 microM, the rate of collagen synthesis was suppressed by more than 50% without affecting cell proliferation (DNA levels) and general protein synthesis (35S-Met and 35S-Cys incorporation). Steady

  7. 微管蛋白破坏对软骨细胞代谢功能的影响%Disassembly of tubulin cytoskeleton disrupts the homeostasis of articular cartilage chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭恒; 段王平; 李琦; 曹晓明; 王磊; 卫小春

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of tubulin disassembly on the in vitro metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods Eight New Zealand rabbits aged 2 months were sacrificed by air embolism. The full-thickness cartilages were harvested from both knees under sterile conditions. Then 0. 4% pronase and 0. 025% Ⅱ collagenase were used to digest for primary chondrocytes. The cells were cultured for 3 days after attachment and then divided into the control and experimental groups. The control group continued culturing with primary medium and the experimental group with colchicine, a tubulin destructive & 2, the early apoptosis of two cell groups was 0. 1 μmol/L. At Days 1 agent,at a final concentration of assayed with phosphatidylserine ( Annexin Ⅴ). At Day 6, the morphological changes of cells were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. At Days 3, 6 & 9, the expression levels of type Ⅱ collagen, proteoglycan and MMP (matrix metalloproteinase)-13 mRNA were measured by real time quantitative fluorescent reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR). Meanwhile at Days 3, 6 & 9, the cultured supernatant of each group was obtained to detect the contents of type Ⅱ collagen and proteoglycan by the methods of ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Alcian blue. Results At Day 2, the early cell apoptosis rate of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group ( P <0. 05 ). At Day 6 post-dosing, the experimental cell morphology was found to be irregular and polygonal. Hyperchromatic nucleus and division phase increased while matrix cell decreased. At Days 3, 6 & 9, the expressions of collagen and proteoglycan mRNA in the experimental group decreased versus those in the control group (P <0. 05). The level of MMP-13 mRNA showed no significant changes in the control group at Day 3. And it 0. 01). Meanwhile, type Ⅱ collagen and glycosaminoglycan were & 9 (P<significantly increased at Days 6 & 9 than those in the

  8. Tribology approach to the engineering and study of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Markus A; Grad, Sibylle; Kaup, Thomas; Hänni, Markus; Schneider, Erich; Gogolewski, Sylwester; Alini, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    This study has been based on the assumption that articular motion is an important aspect of mechanotransduction in synovial joints. For this reason a new bioreactor concept, able to reproduce joint kinematics more closely, has been designed. The prototype consists of a rotating scaffold and/or cartilage pin, which is pressed onto an orthogonally rotating ball. By oscillating pin and ball in phase difference, elliptical displacement trajectories are generated that are similar to the motion paths occurring in vivo. Simultaneously, dynamic compression may be applied with a linear actuator, while two-step-motors generate the rotation of pin and ball. The whole apparatus is placed in an incubator. The control station is located outside. Preliminary investigations at the gene expression level demonstrated promising results. Compared with free-swelling control and/or simply compression-loaded samples, chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds as well as nasal cartilage explants exposed to interface motion both showed elevated levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. The final design of the bioreactor will include four individual stations in line, which will facilitate the investigation of motion-initiated effects at the contacting surfaces in more detail.

  9. Effect of low-level helium-neon laser therapy on histological and ultrastructural features of immobilized rabbit articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Enayatallah; Gholami, Narges; Bayat, Aghdas

    2007-05-25

    The present study investigates whether low-level helium-neon laser therapy can increase histological parameters of immobilized articular cartilage in rabbits or not. Twenty five rabbits were divided into three groups: the experiment group, which received low-level helium-neon laser therapy with 13J/cm(2) three times a week after immobilization of their right knees; the control group which did not receive laser therapy after immobilization of their knees; and the normal group which received neither immobilization nor laser therapy. Histological and electron microscopic examinations were performed at 4 and 7 weeks after immobilization. Depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized experiment group, and depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized experiment group were significantly higher than those of relevant control groups (exact Fisher test, p=0.001; student's t-test, p=0.031, respectively). The surfaces of articular cartilages of the experiment group were relatively smooth, while those of the control group were unsmooth. It is therefore concluded that low-level helium-neon laser therapy had significantly increased the depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized femoral articular cartilage and the depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized knee in comparison with control immobilized articular cartilage.

  10. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  11. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  12. Immortalization of human articular chondrocytes and induction of their phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清义; 李起鸿; 杨柳; 许建中

    2003-01-01

    Objective To immortalize human articular chondrocytes (HACs) using gene transfection and to maintain stable phenotype of transformed HACs after induction.Methods HACs were transfected with the retroviral vector pLXSN encoding human papillomavirus 16E7 (HPV16E7), and the transformed clones were sorted and proliferated. Karyotype analysis, clone forming tests and nude mice tumor forming tests were applied to check the characteristics of the transformation. Type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes was inducted with free serum medium (FSM) supplemented with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate. Results Immortalized HACs were isolated with fifty passages achieved. The HPV16E7 transformed cells were confirmed to be benign. Induction of FSM with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate promoted type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes to the high levels of normal chondrocytes. Conclusion HACs transformed with HPV16E7 survive for long periods in vitro, and type Ⅱ collagen can maintain stability after induction.

  13. Transforming growth factor beta signaling is essential for the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Tekari

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease

  14. Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenhamre, Hanna [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Thorvaldsson, Anna, E-mail: anna.thorvaldsson@swerea.se [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Enochson, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Walkenström, Pernilla [Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Lindahl, Anders [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Brittberg, Mats [Cartilage Research Unit, University of Gothenburg, Department Orthopaedics, Kungsbacka Hospital, Kungsbacka (Sweden); Gatenholm, Paul [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-04-01

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. - Highlights: ► Chondrocyte behavior in nanofiber-coated microfiber versus microfiber scaffolds ► High porosity (> 90%) and large pore sizes (a few hundred μm) of nanofibrous scaffolds ► Proliferation enhanced by presence of nanofibers ► Differentiation not significantly affected ► Cell attachment improved in presence of both nanofibers and serum.

  15. The relationship between ultra-short telomeres, aging of articular cartilage and the development of human hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, M; Delaisse, J M; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P;

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-short telomeres caused by stress-induced telomere shortening are suggested to induce chondrocyte senescence in human osteoarthritic knees. Here we have further investigated the role of ultra-short telomeres in the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and in aging of articular cartilage in human...

  16. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Li, Ang; Sun, Lian-Wen; Yan, Yan; Fan, Fan; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2012-10-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems. This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls. Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading. Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix. No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups. For the tail-suspended group, the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site, as determined by ultrasound echo, showed a minor decrease. The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly, from (6.31 ± 3.37)MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98)MPa ( p < 0.05). The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining. These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model. The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  17. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Niu; Qing Wang; Yue-Xiang Wang; Ang Li; Lian-Wen Sun; Yan Yan; Fan Fan; De-Yu Li; Yu-Bo Fan

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems.This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls.Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading.Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix.No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups.For the tail-suspended group,the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site,as determined by ultrasound echo,showed a minor decrease.The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly,from (6.31 ± 3.37) MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98) MPa (p < 0.05).The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining.These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model.The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  18. Tenascin and aggrecan expression by articular chondrocytes is influenced by interleukin 1ß: a possible explanation for the changes in matrix synthesis during osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfander, D; Heinz, N; Rothe, P; Carl, H; Swoboda, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the distribution patterns of tenascin and proteoglycans in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, and to determine the effect of interleukin 1ß (IL1ß) on aggrecan and tenascin expression by human articular chondrocytes in vitro. Methods: Normal and osteoarthritic cartilage and bone samples were obtained during total knee replacements or necropsies. After fixation and decalcification, paraffin embedded specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the surface. Specimens were graded according to Mankin and subdivided into those with normal, and mild, moderate, and severe osteoarthritic lesions. Serial sections were immunostained for tenascin. Tenascin expression by healthy and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was quantified by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Furthermore, in cell culture experiments, human articular chondrocytes were treated with 0.1 or 10 ng/ml IL1ß. Real time PCR analyses of aggrecan and tenascin transcripts (normalised 18S rRNA) were conducted to determine the effect of IL1ß on later mRNA levels. Results: Tenascin was immunodetected in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage. In osteoarthritic cartilage increased tenascin staining was found. Tenascin was found specifically in upper OA cartilage showing a strong reduction of proteoglycans. Greatly increased tenascin transcript levels were detected in osteoarthritic cartilage compared with healthy articular cartilage. IL1ß treatment of articular chondrocytes in vitro significantly increased tenascin transcripts (~200% of control) and strongly reduced aggrecan mRNA levels (~42% of control). Conclusions: During progression of osteoarthritis the switch in matrix synthesis occurs mainly in upper osteoarthritic cartilage. Furthermore, changes in synthesis patterns of osteoarthritic chondrocytes may be significantly influenced by IL1ß, probably diffusing from the joint cavity within the upper osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:14962956

  19. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

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    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  20. Acute and chronic response of articular cartilage to Ho:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauner, Kenneth B.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Patel, Dinesh K.

    1992-06-01

    A Ho:YAG laser system operating at a wavelength of 2.1 microns has recently been introduced for use in arthroscopic surgery. The acceptability of this new tool will be determined not only by its ability to resect tissue, but also by its long term effects on articular surfaces. In order to investigate these issues further, we performed two studies to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of the laser on cartilaginous tissue. We evaluated the acute, in vitro effects of 2.1 micron laser irradiation on articular and fibrocartilage. This included the measurement of ablation efficiency, ablation threshold and thermal damage in both meniscus and articular cartilage. To document the chronic effects on articular cartilage in vivo, we next performed a ten week healing study. Eight sheep weighing 30 - 40 kg underwent bilateral arthrotomy procedures. Multiple full thickness and partial thickness defects were created. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, and 10 weeks. The healing study demonstrated: (1) no healing of full or partial thickness defects at 10 weeks with hyaline cartilage; (2) fibrocartilaginous granulation tissue filling full thickness defects at two and four weeks, but no longer evident at ten weeks; (3) chondrocyte necrosis extending to greater than 900 microns distal to ablation craters at four weeks with no evidence of repair at later dates; and (4) chondrocyte hyperplasia at the borders of the damage zone at two weeks but no longer evident at later sacrifice dates.

  1. Gene Modification of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Articular Chondrocytes to Enhance Chondrogenesis

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    Saliya Gurusinghe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell based treatment for articular cartilage and osteochondral defects are hampered by issues such as cellular dedifferentiation and hypertrophy of the resident or transplanted cells. The reduced expression of chondrogenic signalling molecules and transcription factors is a major contributing factor to changes in cell phenotype. Gene modification of chondrocytes may be one approach to redirect cells to their primary phenotype and recent advances in nonviral and viral gene delivery technologies have enabled the expression of these lost factors at high efficiency and specificity to regain chondrocyte function. This review focuses on the various candidate genes that encode signalling molecules and transcription factors that are specific for the enhancement of the chondrogenic phenotype and also how epigenetic regulators of chondrogenesis in the form of microRNA may also play an important role.

  2. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  3. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells

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    Lorenzo Alibardi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  4. Transport phenomena in articular cartilage cryopreservation as predicted by the modified triphasic model and the effect of natural inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-03-21

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading.

  5. Functional Characterization of TRPV4 As an Osmotically Sensitive Ion Channel in Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Mimi N.; Leddy, Holly A.; Votta, Bartholomew J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Levy, Dana S.; Lipshutz, David B.; Lee, Sukhee; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Objective Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+ permeable channel that can be gated by tonicity (osmolarity) and mechanical stimuli. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, respond to their osmotic and mechanical environments; however, the molecular basis of this signal transduction is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the presence and functionality of TRPV4 in chondrocytes. Methods TRPV4 protein expression was measured by immunolabeling and Western blotting. In response to TRPV4 agonist/antagonists, osmotic stress, and interleukin-1 (IL-1), changes in Ca2+ signaling, cell volume, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production were measured in porcine chondrocytes using fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy, or immunoassay, respectively. Results TRPV4 was expressed abundantly at the RNA and protein level. Exposure to 4αPDD, a TRPV4 activator, caused Ca2+ signaling in chondrocytes, which was blocked by the selective TRPV4 antagonist, GSK205. Blocking TRPV4 diminished the chondrocytes' response to hypo-osmotic stress, reducing the fraction of Ca2+ responsive cells, regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and PGE2 production. Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+ or depletion of intracellular stores. Specific activation of TRPV4 restored defective RVD caused by IL-1. Chemical disruption of the primary cilium eliminated Ca2+ signaling in response to either 4αPDD or hypo-osmotic stress. Conclusion TRPV4 is present in articular chondrocytes, and chondrocyte response to hypo-osmotic stress is mediated by this channel, which involves both an extracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ release. TRPV4 may also be involved in modulating the production or influence of pro-inflammatory molecules in response to osmotic stress. PMID:19790068

  6. Andrographolide enhances proliferation and prevents dedifferentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li-Ke; Wei, Qing-Jun; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-Min

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P ANDRO groups comparing to the control (P ANDRO could promote expression of aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes while downregulating expression of collagen I gene (P 0.05). The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis.

  7. POSSIBILITIES OF CURRENT CELLULAR TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR (ANALYTICAL REVIEW

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    M. S. Bozhokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a wide variety of surgical procedures utilized in clinical practice for treatment of articular cartilage lesions, the search for other options of articular reconstruction remains a relevant and open issue at the current stage of medicine and biotechnologies development. The recent years demonstrated a strong belief in cellular methods of hyaline cartilage repair such as implantation of autologous chondrocytes (ACI or cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC including techniques for genetic modification of cells.The purpose of presented review is to summarize the published scientific data on up to date results of perspective cellular technologies for articular cartilage repair that are being developed. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation originally performed by Swedish researchers in 1987 is considered the first clinically applied technique for restoration of hyaline cartilage using cellular technologies. However, the transplanted cell culture featured low proliferative capacity and inability to form a regenerate resistant to high physical activity. Another generation of methods originated at the turn of the century utilized mesenchymal stem cells instead of autologous chondrocytes. Preparation of MSCs is a less invasive procedure compared to chondrocytes harvesting and the culture is featured by a higher proliferative ability. Researchers use various biodegradable carriers (matrices to secure cell fixation. Despite good clinical mid-term outcomes the transplanted tissue-engineering structures deteriorate with time due to cellular de-differentiation. Next generation of techniques being currently under pre-clinical studies is featured by the preliminary chondrogenic modification of transplanted cell culture. Usage of various growth factors, modified cell product and gene-activated matrices allow to gain a stable regulatory and key proteins synthesis and achieve a focused influence on regenerate's chondrogenic proliferation and in result

  8. Chondrocytes from congenital microtia possess an inferior capacity for in vivo cartilage regeneration to healthy ear chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunpeng; Kang, Ning; Dong, Ping; Liu, Xia; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xin; Yan, Li; Jiang, Haiyue; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2016-11-15

    The remnant auricular cartilage from microtia has become a valuable cell source for ear regeneration. It is important to clarify the issue of whether the genetically defective microtia chondrocytes could engineer cartilage tissue comparable to healthy ear chondrocytes. In the current study, the histology and cell yield of native microtia and normal ear cartilage were investigated, and the biological characteristics of derived chondrocytes examined, including proliferation, chondrogenic phenotype and cell migration. Furthermore, the in vivo cartilage-forming capacity of passaged microtia and normal auricular chondrocytes were systematically compared by seeding them onto polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid scaffold to generate tissue engineered cartilage in nude mice. Through histological examinations and quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycan, Young's modulus, and the expression of cartilage-related genes, it was found that microtia chondrocytes had a slower dedifferentiation rate with the decreased expression of stemness-related genes, and weaker migration ability than normal ear chondrocytes, and the microtia chondrocytes-engineered cartilage was biochemically and biomechanically inferior to that constructed using normal ear chondrocytes. This study provides valuable information for the clinical application of the chondrocytes derived from congenital microtia to engineer cartilage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The structure and function of the pericellular matrix of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, Rebecca E; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-10-01

    Chondrocytes in articular cartilage are surrounded by a narrow pericellular matrix (PCM) that is both biochemically and biomechanically distinct from the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue. While the PCM was first observed nearly a century ago, its role is still under investigation. In support of early hypotheses regarding its function, increasing evidence indicates that the PCM serves as a transducer of biochemical and biomechanical signals to the chondrocyte. Work over the past two decades has established that the PCM in adult tissue is defined biochemically by several molecular components, including type VI collagen and perlecan. On the other hand, the biomechanical properties of this structure have only recently been measured. Techniques such as micropipette aspiration, in situ imaging, computational modeling, and atomic force microscopy have determined that the PCM exhibits distinct mechanical properties as compared to the ECM, and that these properties are influenced by specific PCM components as well as disease state. Importantly, the unique relationships among the mechanical properties of the chondrocyte, PCM, and ECM in different zones of cartilage suggest that this region significantly influences the stress-strain environment of the chondrocyte. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the measurement of PCM mechanical properties and structure that further increase our understanding of PCM function. Taken together, these studies suggest that the PCM plays a critical role in controlling the mechanical environment and mechanobiology of cells in cartilage and other cartilaginous tissues, such as the meniscus or intervertebral disc.

  10. Fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid hybrid scaffold promotes early chondrogenesis of articular chondrocytes: an in vitro study

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    Idrus Ruszymah BH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic- and naturally derived- biodegradable polymers have been widely used to construct scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA are bioresorbable and biocompatible, rendering them as a promising tool for clinical application. To minimize cells lost during the seeding procedure, we used the natural polymer fibrin to immobilize cells and to provide homogenous cells distribution in PLGA scaffolds. We evaluated in vitro chondrogenesis of rabbit articular chondrocytes in PLGA scaffolds using fibrin as cell transplantation matrix. Methods PLGA scaffolds were soaked in chondrocytes-fibrin suspension (1 × 106cells/scaffold and polymerized by dropping thrombin-calcium chloride (CaCl2 solution. PLGA-seeded chondrocytes was used as control. All constructs were cultured for a maximum of 21 days. Cell proliferation activity was measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days in vitro using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2-, 5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT assay. Morphological observation, histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, gene expression and sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG analyses were performed at each time point of 1, 2 and 3 weeks to elucidate in vitro cartilage development and deposition of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Results Cell proliferation activity was gradually increased from day-1 until day-14 and declined by day-21. A significant cartilaginous tissue formation was detected as early as 2-week in fibrin/PLGA hybrid construct as confirmed by the presence of cartilage-isolated cells and lacunae embedded within basophilic ECM. Cartilage formation was remarkably evidenced after 3 weeks. Presence of cartilage-specific proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs were confirmed by positive Safranin O and Alcian Blue staining. Collagen type II exhibited intense immunopositivity at the pericellular matrix. Chondrogenic properties were further

  11. CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF has anti-aging effects that protect articular cartilage from age-related degenerative changes.

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    Shinsuke Itoh

    Full Text Available To examine the role of connective tissue growth factor CCN2/CTGF (CCN2 in the maintenance of the articular cartilaginous phenotype, we analyzed knee joints from aging transgenic mice (TG overexpressing CCN2 driven by the Col2a1 promoter. Knee joints from 3-, 14-, 40-, and 60-day-old and 5-, 12-, 18-, 21-, and 24-month-old littermates were analyzed. Ccn2-LacZ transgene expression in articular cartilage was followed by X-gal staining until 5 months of age. Overexpression of CCN2 protein was confirmed through all ages in TG articular cartilage and in growth plates. Radiographic analysis of knee joints showed a narrowing joint space and other features of osteoarthritis in 50% of WT, but not in any of the TG mice. Transgenic articular cartilage showed enhanced toluidine blue and safranin-O staining as well as chondrocyte proliferation but reduced staining for type X and I collagen and MMP-13 as compared with those parameters for WT cartilage. Staining for aggrecan neoepitope, a marker of aggrecan degradation in WT articular cartilage, increased at 5 and 12 months, but disappeared at 24 months due to loss of cartilage; whereas it was reduced in TG articular cartilage after 12 months. Expression of cartilage genes and MMPs under cyclic tension stress (CTS was measured by using primary cultures of chondrocytes obtained from wild-type (WT rib cartilage and TG or WT epiphyseal cartilage. CTS applied to primary cultures of mock-transfected rib chondrocytes from WT cartilage and WT epiphyseal cartilage induced expression of Col1a1, ColXa1, Mmp-13, and Mmp-9 mRNAs; however, their levels were not affected in CCN2-overexpressing chondrocytes and TG epiphyseal cartilage. In conclusion, cartilage-specific overexpression of CCN2 during the developmental and growth periods reduced age-related changes in articular cartilage. Thus CCN2 may play a role as an anti-aging factor by stabilizing articular cartilage.

  12. Both superficial and deep zone articular chondrocyte subpopulations exhibit the Crabtree effect but have different basal oxygen consumption rates.

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    Heywood, Hannah K; Knight, Martin M; Lee, David A

    2010-06-01

    In the absence of in vivo measurements, the oxygen concentration within articular cartilage is calculated from the balance between cellular oxygen consumption and mass transfer. Current estimates of the oxygen tension within articular cartilage are based on oxygen consumption data from full-depth tissue samples. However, superficial and deep cell subpopulations of articular cartilage express intrinsic metabolic differences. We test the hypothesis that the subpopulations differ with respect to their intrinsic oxygen consumption rate. Chondrocytes from the full cartilage thickness demonstrate enhanced oxygen consumption when deprived of glucose, consistent with the Crabtree phenomena. Chondrocyte subpopulations differ in the prevailing availability of oxygen and glucose, which decrease with distance from the cartilage-synovial fluid interface. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the oxygen consumption of each subpopulation is modulated by nutrient availability, by examining the expression of the Crabtree effect. The deep cells had a greater oxygen consumption than the superficial cells (V(max) of 6.6 compared to 3.2 fmol/cell/h), consistent with our observations of mitochondrial volume (mean values 52.0 vs. 36.4 microm(3)/cell). Both populations expressed the Crabtree phenomena, with oxygen consumption increasing approximately 2.5-fold in response to glycolytic inhibition by glucose deprivation or 2-deoxyglucose. Over 90% of this increase was oligomycin-sensitive and thus accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation. The data contributes towards our understanding of chondrocyte energy metabolism and provides information valuable for the accurate calculation of the oxygen concentration that the cells experience in vivo. The work has further application to the optimisation of bioreactor design and engineered tissues.

  13. The Frictional Coefficient of Bovine Knee Articular Cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Shan-hua; Ge Shi-rong; Wang Qing-liang

    2006-01-01

    The normal displacement of articular cartilage was measured under load and in sliding, and the coefficient of friction during sliding was measured using a UMT-2 Multi-Specimen Test System. The maximum normal displacement under load and the start-up frictional coefficient have similar tendency of variation with loading time. The sliding speed does not significantly influence the frictional coefficient of articular cartilage.

  14. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

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    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  15. The Study of the Frequency Effect of Dynamic Compressive Loading on Primary Articular Chondrocyte Functions Using a Microcell Culture System

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    Wan-Ying Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive stimulation can modulate articular chondrocyte functions. Nevertheless, the relevant studies are not comprehensive. This is primarily due to the lack of cell culture apparatuses capable of conducting the experiments in a high throughput, precise, and cost-effective manner. To address the issue, we demonstrated the use of a perfusion microcell culture system to investigate the stimulating frequency (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz effect of compressive loading (20% and 40% strain on the functions of articular chondrocytes. The system mainly integrates the functions of continuous culture medium perfusion and the generation of pneumatically-driven compressive stimulation in a high-throughput micro cell culture system. Results showed that the compressive stimulations explored did not have a significant impact on chondrocyte viability and proliferation. However, the metabolic activity of chondrocytes was significantly affected by the stimulating frequency at the higher compressive strain of 40% (2 Hz, 40% strain. Under the two compressive strains studied, the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs synthesis was upregulated when the stimulating frequency was set at 1 Hz and 2 Hz. However, the stimulating frequencies explored had no influence on the collagen production. The results of this study provide useful fundamental insights that will be helpful for cartilage tissue engineering and cartilage rehabilitation.

  16. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages in human osteoarthritis%骨关节炎关节软骨细胞中低氧诱导因子2α及血管内皮生长因子的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丰; 彭昊; 周建林; 方洪松; 邓爽; 杨骁; 翁金清

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Studies have found that vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia inducible factor are involved in the development process of osteoarthritis, but their correlation is rarely reported. OBJECTIVE:To observe the expression and correlation of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages in human osteoarthritis. METHODS: Articular cartilage specimens were colected from 50 patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee joint replacement. According to the joint Kelgren-Lawrance (K-L) X-ray grouping classification standard, there were 18 cases of K-LIII level and 32 cases of K-LIV level. Besides, articular cartilage specimens from 10 patients undergoing amputation for legs tumor or traffic accident served as control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, Safranin O-Fast Green staining and Mankin scoring were performed to observe and evaluate the histological characteristics of articular cartilages of each group, immunohistochemical staining was conducted to detect the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor in chondrocytes of articular cartilages, and their correlations were analyzed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The Mankin score of K-LIV group was significantly higher than those of K-LIII group and control group. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of chondrocytes with positive expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α or vascular endothelial growth factor in K-LIV group was significantly higher than that in K-LIII group and control group (P < 0.05). The expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor increased in chondrocytes of articular cartilages of osteoarthritis patients, and to up-regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor may be the regulatory mechanism of hypoxia inducible factor-2αinthe pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.%背景:已有研究发现血管内皮生长因子

  17. 应用生物蛋白胶与胚胎软骨细胞混合移植修复兔膝关节实验性软骨缺损区%Repair of experimental defects of articular cartilage in rabbits with homografts of fibrin sealant and embryonic chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆敏安; 杨渊; 肖增明; 李世德

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Research about the repair of articular cartilage with heterograft chondrocytes is frequently reported, but the method may cause immune rejection. Since the embryonic cells possess lower antigenicity and stronger proliferation capability, it is hoped that they can be used as a novel carrier substitute in tissue engineering research.DESIGN: A randomized grouping observation and comparative experiment.SETTING: Histological Embryonic Laboratory in Guangxi Medical University.MATERIALS: A big white adult New Zealand rabbit pregnant for 4 weeks was adopted; and another 24 big white adult New Zealand rabbits were selected, with no limitationin whether they were female or male and with a body mass of 2 to 2.5 kg.METHODS: This experiment was carried out at the Histological Embryonic Laboratory in Guangxi Medical University between December 2000and June 2002. The models of defects in articular cartilage were made artificially in femur medial malleolus of the mature rabbits. In the experimental group, defects were repaired by the implantation of Fibrin Sealant and embryonic chondrocytes mixture, but for the control group, only Fibrin Sealant was implanted or nothing was done about the defect. The restoration of articular cartilage defect was then observed 4,8 and 12 weeks after the operation, and was scored according to modified Pineda's method. The standard consists of 5 items, I.e., cellular morphology, matrix staining, surfacing smoothness, cartilage thickness and host union. 0 refers to normal and the higher the score is, the more serious the pathological changes are.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①The general observation of rabbit knee joint; ② Histological observation of rabbit knee joints; ③ Histological semi-quantitative score of articular cartilage; ④ Appraisal of the curative effect of articular cartilage defects.RESULTS: Totally 24 rabbits were enrolled in this experiment and all entered the stage of result analysis. ① The general observation of rabbit

  18. Suppression of adverse angiogenesis in an albumin-based hydrogel for articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Scholz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An injectable polyethylene glycol-crosslinked albumin gel (AG supplemented with hyaluronic acid as a matrix for autologous chondrocyte implantation was evaluated with regard to its impact on angiogenesis. Healthy articular cartilage and intervertebral discs (IVD are devoid of blood vessels, whereas pathological blood vessel formation augments degeneration of both theses tissues. In contrast to human endothelial cells, primary human articular chondrocytes encapsulated in the AG retained their viability. Endothelial cells did not adhere to the gel surface to a significant extent nor did they proliferate in vitro. The AG did not release any diffusible toxic components. Contrary to MatrigelTM employed as positive control, the AG prevented endothelial chemoinvasion in Transwell filter assays even in the presence of a chemotactic gradient of vascular endothelial growth factor. In ovo, the AG exhibited a barrier function for blood vessels of the chick chorioallantoic membrane. Subcutaneous implantation of human IVD chondrocytes enclosed in the albumin gel into immunodeficient mice revealed a complete lack of angiogenesis inside the gel after two weeks. At the same time, the IVD chondrocytes within the gel remained vital and displayed a characteristic gene expression pattern as judged from aggrecan, collagen type I and type II mRNA levels. In summary, aiming at articular cartilage and IVD regeneration the albumin gel promises to be a beneficial implant matrix for chondrocytes simultaneously exhibiting non-permissive properties for adverse endothelial cells.

  19. Structural Variations in Articular Cartilage Matrix Are Associated with Early-Onset Osteoarthritis in the Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita (Sedc Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Seegmiller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterozgyous spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (sedc/+ mice expressing a missense mutation in col2a1 exhibit a normal skeletal morphology but early-onset osteoarthritis (OA. We have recently examined knee articular cartilage obtained from homozygous (sedc/sedc mice, which express a Stickler-like phenotype including dwarfism. We examined sedc/sedc mice at various levels to better understand the mechanistic process resulting in OA. Mutant sedc/sedc, and control (+/+ cartilages were compared at two, six and nine months of age. Tissues were fixed, decalcified, processed to paraffin sections, and stained with hematoxylin/eosin and safranin O/fast green. Samples were analyzed under the light microscope and the modified Mankin and OARSI scoring system was used to quantify the OA-like changes. Knees were stained with 1C10 antibody to detect the presence and distribution of type II collagen. Electron microscopy was used to study chondrocyte morphology and collagen fibril diameter. Compared with controls, mutant articular cartilage displayed decreased fibril diameter concomitant with increases in size of the pericellular space, Mankin and OARSI scores, cartilage thickness, chondrocyte clustering, proteoglycan staining and horizontal fissuring. In conclusion, homozygous sedc mice are subject to early-onset knee OA. We conclude that collagen in the mutant’s articular cartilage (both heterozygote and homozygote fails to provide the normal meshwork required for matrix integrity and overall cartilage stability.

  20. Effect of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Anayatallah; Hekmat, Hossien

    2004-09-01

    Influence of low-power (632.8 nm, Helium-Neon, 13 J/cm2, three times a week) laser on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage was examined with rabbits knee model. Number of chondrocytes and depth of articular cartilage of experimental group were significantly higher than those of sham irradiated group. Surface morphology of sham-irradiated group had rough prominences, fibrillation and lacunae but surface morphology of experimental group had more similarities to control group than to sham irradiated group. There were marked differences between ultrastructure features of control group and experimental group in comparison with sham irradiated group. Low-power Helium-Neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized knee joints of rabbits neutrilized adverse effects of immobilization on articular cartilage.

  1. Effect of oxygen tension on adult articular chondrocytes in microcarrier bioreactor culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Brink, van den P.; Meeuwse, P.; Grojec, M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue-engineering approaches for cartilage repair hold promise for the treatment of cartilage defects. Various methods to prevent or reduce dedifferentiation during chondrocyte expansion are currently under investigation. In the present study we evaluated the effect of oxygen on chondrocyte prolife

  2. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant...... treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen minipig as a pre-clinical model for articular cartilage repair by testing existing clinical cartilage...

  3. Sonographic evaluation of femoral articular cartilage in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong Keun Young; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Young Ho; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sonography for the evaluation of osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Ten asymptomatic volunteers and 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent sonographic evaluation. For this, the knee was maintained of full flexion in order to expose the deep portion of femoral condylar cartilage. Both transverse and longitudinal scans were obtained in standardized planes. Sonographic images of the articular cartilages were analyzed in terms of surface sharpness, echogenicity and thickness, along with associated bone changes. Normal cartilages showed a clearly-defined surface, homogeneously low echogenicity and regular thickness. Among 20 patients, the findings for medial and lateral condyles, respectively, were as follows: poorly defined cartilage surface, 16 (80%) and ten (50%); increased echogenicity of cartilage, 17 (85%) and 16 (80%); cartilage thinning, 16 (80%) and 14 (70%) (two medial condyles demonstrated obvious cartilage thickening); the presence of thick subchondral hyperechoic bands, five (25%) and four (20%); the presence of osteophytes, 13 (65%) and 12 (60%). Sonography is a convenient and accurate modality for the evaluation of femoral articular cartilage. In particular, it can be useful for detecting early degenerative cartilaginous change and for studying such change during clinical follow-up. (author)

  4. Voltage-gated K+ currents in mouse articular chondrocytes regulate membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert B; Hatano, Noriyuki; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Brown, Barry S; Kumar, Sanjay; Votta, Bartholomew J; Giles, Wayne R

    2010-01-01

    Membrane currents and resting potential of isolated primary mouse articular chondrocytes maintained in monolayer cell culture for 1-9 days were recorded using patch clamp methods. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the most abundantly expressed transcript of voltage-gated K(+) channels was for K(V)1.6, and immunological methods confirmed the expression of K(V)1.6 α-subunit proteins. These chondrocytes expressed a large time- and potential-dependent, Ca(2+)-independent 'delayed rectifier' K(+) current. Steady-state activation was well-fit by a Boltzmann function with a threshold near -50 mV, and a half-activation potential of -34.5 mV. The current was 50% blocked by 1.48 mM tetraethylammonium, 0.66 mM 4-aminopyridine and 20.6 nM α-dendrotoxin. The current inactivated very slowly at membrane potentials in the range of the resting potential of the chondrocytes. Resting membrane potential of the chondrocytes at room temperature (19-21°C) and in 5 mM external K(+) was -46.4 ± 1.3 mV (mean ± s.e.m; n = 23), near the 'foot' of the activation curve of this K(+) current. Resting potential was depolarized by an average of 4.2 ± 0.8 mV by 25 mM TEA, which blocked about 95% of the K(+) current. At a membrane potential of -50 mV, the apparent time constant of inactivation (tau(in)) was 37.9 s, and the 'steady-state' current level was 19% of that at a holding potential of -90 mV; at -40 mV, tau(in) was 20.3 s, and 'steady-state' current was 5% of that at -90 mV. These results demonstrate that in these primary cultured, mouse articular chondrocytes steady-state activation of a voltage-gated K(+) current contributes to resting membrane potential. However, this current is also likely to have a significant physiological role in repolarizing the chondrocyte following depolarizing stimuli that might occur in conditions of membrane stretch. For example, activation of TRP('transient receptor potential') non-specific cation channels in these cells during cyclic loading and unloading

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamadreza; Baghaban; Eslaminejad; Elham; Malakooty; Poor

    2014-01-01

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capac-ity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is as-sociated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechani-cal properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical pro-cedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morpho-logical features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular mate-rial for articular cartilage repair. These cells were origi-nally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic dif-ferentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticedat the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative proper-ties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable im-munomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  6. Biotribology :articular cartilage friction, wear, and lubrication

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Matthew O

    1995-01-01

    This study developed, explored, and refined techniques for the in vitro study of cartilage-on-cartilage friction, deformation, and wear. Preliminary results of in vitro cartilage-on- cartilage experiments with emphasis on wear and biochemistry are presented. Cartilage-bone specimens were obtained from the stifle joints of steers from a separate controlled study. The load, sliding speed, and traverse of the lower specimens were held constant as lubricant and test length were varied. Lubric...

  7. Effects of sesamin on the biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in human articular chondrocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Najarus, Sumet; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that progressively causes a loss of joint functions and the impaired quality of life. The most significant event in OA is a high degree of degradation of articular cartilage accompanied by the loss of chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycans (CS-PGs). Recently, the chondroprotective effects of sesamin, the naturally occurring substance found in sesame seeds, have been proved in a rat model of papain-induced osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that sesamin may be associated with possible promotion of the biosynthesis of CS-PGs in human articular chondrocytes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of sesamin on the major CS-PG biosynthesis in primary human chondrocyte. The effects of sesamin on the gene expression of the PG core and the CS biosynthetic enzymes as well as on the secretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in monolayer and pellet culture systems of articular chondrocytes. Sesamin significantly increased the GAGs content both in culture medium and pellet matrix. Real-time-quantitative PCR showed that sesamin promoted the expression of the genes encoding the core protein (ACAN) of the major CS-PG aggrecan and the biosynthetic enzymes (XYLT1, XYLT2, CHSY1 and CHPF) required for the synthesis of CS-GAG side chains. Safranin-O staining of sesamin treated chondrocyte pellet section confirmed the high degree of GAG accumulation. These results were correlated with an increased level of secreted GAGs in the media of cultured articular chondrocytes in both culture systems. Thus, sesamin would provide a potential therapeutic strategy for treating OA patients.

  8. Cartilage homeoprotein 1, a homeoprotein selectively expressed in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G Q; Zhou, X; Eberspaecher, H; Solursh, M; de Crombrugghe, B

    1993-09-15

    We identified a rat cDNA that encodes cartilage homeoprotein 1 (Cart-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Cart-1 contains a paired-type homeodomain. Northern blot hybridization and RNase protection assay revealed that Cart-1 RNA was present at high levels in a well-differentiated rat chondrosarcoma tumor and in a cell line derived from this tumor. Cart-1 RNA was detected in primary mouse and rat chondrocytes but not in various fibroblasts including mouse 10T1/2 cells, NIH 3T3 cells, BALB 3T3 cells, and rat skin fibroblasts. It was also undetectable in mouse C2 myoblasts, S194 myeloma cells, and embryonic stem cells. Cart-1 RNA was present at a very low level in tested but was not detected in other soft tissues of 8-week-old rats. In situ hybridization of rat embryos between 14.5 and 16.5 days post coitum revealed relatively high levels of Cart-1 RNA in condensed prechondrocytic mesenchymal cells and in early chondrocytes of cartilage primordia. The levels of Cart-1 RNA were lower in mature chondrocytes. No hybridization was observed in brain, spinal cord, heart, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver, and muscle. We speculate that Cart-1 has a role in chondrocyte differentiation.

  9. Deficiency of Thrombospondin-4 in Mice Does Not Affect Skeletal Growth or Bone Mass Acquisition, but Causes a Transient Reduction of Articular Cartilage Thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Jeschke

    Full Text Available Although articular cartilage degeneration represents a major public health problem, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We have previously utilized genome-wide expression analysis to identify specific markers of porcine articular cartilage, one of them being Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4. In the present study we analyzed Thbs4 expression in mice, thereby confirming its predominant expression in articular cartilage, but also identifying expression in other tissues, including bone. To study the role of Thbs4 in skeletal development and integrity we took advantage of a Thbs4-deficient mouse model that was analyzed by undecalcified bone histology. We found that Thbs4-deficient mice do not display phenotypic differences towards wildtype littermates in terms of skeletal growth or bone mass acquisition. Since Thbs4 has previously been found over-expressed in bones of Phex-deficient Hyp mice, we additionally generated Thbs4-deficient Hyp mice, but failed to detect phenotypic differences towards Hyp littermates. With respect to articular cartilage we found that Thbs4-deficient mice display transient thinning of articular cartilage, suggesting a protective role of Thbs4 for joint integrity. Gene expression analysis using porcine primary cells revealed that Thbs4 is not expressed by synovial fibroblasts and that it represents the only member of the Thbs gene family with specific expression in articular, but not in growth plate chondrocytes. In an attempt to identify specific molecular effects of Thbs4 we treated porcine articular chondrocytes with human THBS4 in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from porcine synovial fibroblasts. Here we did not observe a significant influence of THBS4 on proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis or gene expression, suggesting that it does not act as a signaling molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Thbs4 is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, where its

  10. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage--from a developmental model to first results of tissue and scaffold expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochhausen, Christoph; Zehbe, Rolf; Gross, Ulrich; Libera, Jeanette; Schubert, Helmut; Nüsing, Rolf M; Klaus, Günter; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering of articular cartilage remains an ongoing challenge. Since tissue regeneration recapitulates ontogenetic processes the growth plate can be regarded as an innovative model to target suitable signalling molecules and growth factors for the tissue engineering of cartilage. In the present study we analysed the expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) in a short-term chondrocyte culture in gelatin-based scaffolds and in articular cartilage of rats and compared it with that in the growth plate. Our results demonstrate the strong cellular expression of COX-1 but only a focal weak expression of COX-2 in the seeded scaffolds. Articular cartilage of rats expresses homogeneously COX-1 and COX-2 with the exception of the apical cell layer. Our findings indicate a functional role of COX in the metabolism of articular chondrocytes. The expression of COX in articular cartilage and in the seeded scaffolds opens interesting perspectives to improve the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in scaffold materials by addition of specific receptor ligands of the COX system.

  11. The inhibitory effect of salmon calcitonin on tri-iodothyronine induction of early hypertrophy in articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Chen-An

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Salmon calcitonin has chondroprotective effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is therefore being tested as a candidate drug for cartilage degenerative diseases. Recent studies have indicated that different chondrocyte phenotypes may express the calcitonin receptor (CTR differentially. We tested for the presence of the CTR in chondrocytes from tri-iodothyronin (T3-induced bovine articular cartilage explants. Moreover, investigated the effects of human and salmon calcitonin on the explants. METHODS: Early chondrocyte hypertrophy was induced in bovine articular cartilage explants by stimulation over four days with 20 ng/mL T3. The degree of hypertrophy was investigated by molecular markers of hypertrophy (ALP, IHH, COLX and MMP13, by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover (C2M, P2NP and AGNxII and histology. The expression of the CTR was detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. T3-induced explants were treated with salmon or human calcitonin. Calcitonin down-stream signaling was measured by levels of cAMP, and by the molecular markers. RESULTS: Compared with untreated control explants, T3 induction increased expression of the hypertrophic markers (p<0.05, of cartilage turnover (p<0.05, and of CTR (p<0.01. Salmon, but not human, calcitonin induced cAMP release (p<0.001. Salmon calcitonin also inhibited expression of markers of hypertrophy and cartilage turnover (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: T3 induced early hypertrophy of chondrocytes, which showed an elevated expression of the CTR and was thus a target for salmon calcitonin. Molecular marker levels indicated salmon, but not human, calcitonin protected the cartilage from hypertrophy. These results confirm that salmon calcitonin is able to modulate the CTR and thus have chondroprotective effects.

  12. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  13. bFGF influences human articular chondrocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Zwingmann, J; Fehrenbach, M

    2007-01-01

    FGF concentrations in supernatants of primary human articular chondrocytes peaked immediately after isolation and then declined. In a dose-dependent manner, bFGF enhanced cell amplification and viability. BFGF induced a decrease in the apoptotic cell population, while the number of proliferating cells remained...... in monolayer. bFGF-dependent cell proliferation, production of collagen type II and aggrecan were monitored 10 days after isolation. Furthermore, effect of bFGF on cell cycle, cell morphology, and mRNA expression of integrins and chondrogenic markers determined by real time PCR were analyzed. RESULTS: b...... unchanged. Supplementation of cell culture with bFGF reduced collagen type II mRNA by 49%, but increased expression of the integrin alpha(2) by 70%. bFGF did not significantly regulate the integrins alpha(1), alpha(5), alpha(10), alpha(v) and type I collagen. bFGF reduced the amount of collagen type II...

  14. Effects of Cryoprotective Agents on the Bovine Articular Chondrocyte Viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the process of choice for long term preservation of cells and tissues. In this study, the effects of cryoprotective agents, dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO), glycerol and 1,2-propanediol on the bovine articular chondrocyte viability were examined experimentally. The CPA was added at the concentrations of 0. 6. 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mol/I and at 4℃ and 37℃ and removed at 37℃ in one-step. CPA stepwise addition and removal at 0. 6 and 1. 2 mol/L and at 37℃ was also tested as an alternative protocol. Cell volume excursion during DMSO addition and removal was estimated and correlated well with cell survival rates. Solution makeup affects cell survival rate and a stepwise protocol can improve the cell survival rates significantly.

  15. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    The articular cartilage layer of synovial joints is commonly lesioned by trauma or by a degenerative joint disease. Attempts to repair the damage frequently involve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Healthy cartilage must be first removed from the joint, and then, on a separate occasion, following the isolation of the chondrocytes and their expansion in vitro, implanted within the lesion. The disadvantages of this therapeutic approach include the destruction of healthy cartilage-which may predispose the joint to osteoarthritic degeneration-the necessarily restricted availability of healthy tissue, the limited proliferative capacity of the donor cells-which declines with age-and the need for two surgical interventions. We postulated that it should be possible to induce synovial stem cells, which are characterized by high, age-independent, proliferative and chondrogenic differentiation capacities, to lay down cartilage within the outer juxtasynovial space after the transcutaneous implantation of a carrier bearing BMP-2 in a slow-release system. The chondrocytes could be isolated on-site and immediately used for ACI. To test this hypothesis, Chinchilla rabbits were used as an experimental model. A collagenous patch bearing BMP-2 in a slow-delivery vehicle was sutured to the inner face of the synovial membrane. The neoformed tissue was excised 5, 8, 11 and 14 days postimplantation for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Neoformed tissue was observed within the outer juxtasynovial space already on the 5th postimplantation day. It contained connective and adipose tissues, and a central nugget of growing cartilage. Between days 5 and 14, the absolute volume of cartilage increased, attaining a value of 12 mm(3) at the latter juncture. Bone was deposited in measurable quantities from the 11th day onwards, but owing to resorption, the net volume did not exceed 1.5 mm(3) (14th day). The findings confirm our hypothesis. The quantity of

  16. The critical role of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase in osteoarthritis: modulating proteoglycans synthesis of the articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yinxian; Qin, Jun; Deng, Yu; Wang, Hui; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin

    2014-10-03

    UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GALE) is a key enzyme catalyzing the interconversion of UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose, as well as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine, which are all precursors for the proteoglycans (PGs) synthesis. However, whether GALE is essential in cartilage homeostasis remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of GALE in PGs synthesis of human articular chondrocytes, the GALE expression in OA, and the regulation of GALE expression by interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Silencing GALE gene with specific siRNAs resulted in a markedly inhibition of PGs synthesis in human articular chondrocytes. GALE protein levels were also decreased in both human and rat OA cartilage, thus leading to losses of PGs contents. Moreover, GALE mRNA expression was stimulated by IL-1β in early phase, but suppressed in late phase, while the suppression of GALE expression induced by IL-1β was mainly mediated by stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. These data indicated a critical role of GALE in maintaining cartilage homeostasis, and suggested that GALE inhibition might contribute to OA progress.

  17. In vitro and in vivo characterization of nonbiomedical- and biomedical-grade alginates for articular chondrocyte transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenstein, Susanne; Cucchiarini, Magali; Laschke, Matthias W; Bohle, Rainer M; Kohn, Dieter; Menger, Michael D; Madry, Henning

    2011-08-01

    Alginate is a key hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering. Here, we systematically evaluated four biomedical- and two nonbiomedical-grade alginates for their capacity to support the in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation of articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes in all ultrapure alginates maintained high cell viability. Spheres composed of biomedical-grade, low-viscosity, high-mannuronic acid content alginate showed the lowest decrease in size over time. Biomedical-grade, low-viscosity, high-guluronic acid content alginate allowed for optimal cell proliferation. Biomedical-grade, medium-viscosity, high-mannuronic acid content alginate promoted the highest production of proteoglycans. When transplanted into osteochondral defects in the knee joint of sheep in vivo, empty spheres were progressively surrounded by a granulation tissue. In marked contrast with these observations, all alginate spheres carrying allogeneic chondrocytes were gradually invaded by a granulation tissue containing multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, and fibroblasts, regardless whether they were based on biomedical- or nonbiomedical-grade alginates. After 21 days in vivo, transplanted chondrocytes were either viable or underwent necrosis, and apoptosis played a minor role in their early fate. The individual characteristics of these alginates may be valuable to tailor specific experimental and clinical strategies for cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Neurophysiological basis for neurogenic-mediated articular cartilage anabolism alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze-Decaris, E; Philippe, L; Minn, A; Haouzi, P; Gillet, P; Netter, P; Terlain, B

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the pathways involved in neurogenic-mediated articular cartilage damage triggered by a nonsystemic distant subcutaneous or intra-articular inflammation. The cartilage damage was assessed 24 h after subcutaneous or intra-articular complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection measuring patellar proteoglycan (PG) synthesis (ex vivo [Na(2)(35)SO(4)] incorporation) in 96 Wistar rats. Unilateral subcutaneous or intra-articular injection of CFA induced significant decrease (25-29%) in PG synthesis in both patellae. Chronic administration of capsaicin (50 mg. kg(-1). day(-1) during 4 days), which blunted the normal response of C fiber stimulation, prevented the bilateral significant decrease in cartilage synthesis. Similarly, intrathecal injection of MK-801 (10 nmol/day during 5 days), which blocked the glutamatergic synaptic transmission at the dorsal horn of signal originating in primary afferent C fibers, eliminated the CFA-induced PG synthesis decrease in both patellae. Chemical sympathectomy, induced by guanethidine (12.5 mg. kg(-1). day(-1) during 6 wk), also prevented PG synthesis alteration. Finally, compression of the spinal cord at the T3-T5 level had a similar protective effect on the reduction of [Na(2)(35)SO(4)] incorporation. It is concluded that the signal that triggers articular cartilage synthesis damage induced by a distant local inflammation 1) is transmitted through the afferent C fibers, 2) makes glutamatergic synaptic connections with the preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic system, and 3) involves spinal and supraspinal pathways.

  19. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams Asenjan, K.; Dehdilani, N.; Parsa, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, and thus have emerged as promising alternatives to chondrocytes in cell-based cartilage repair methods. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells combined with platelet rich fibrin on osteochondral defect repair and articular cartilage regeneration in a canine model. Methods Osteochondral defects were created on the medial femoral condyles of 12 adult male mixed breed dogs. They were either treated with stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin or left empty. Macroscopic and histological evaluation of the repair tissue was conducted after four, 16 and 24 weeks using the International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and the O’Driscoll histological grading systems. Results were reported as mean and standard deviation (sd) and compared at different time points between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney U test, with a value regeneration. It is postulated that platelet rich fibrin creates a suitable environment for proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by releasing endogenous growth factors resulting in creation of a hyaline-like reparative tissue. Cite this article: D. Kazemi, K. Shams Asenjan, N. Dehdilani, H. Parsa. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin: Macroscopic and histological assessments. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:98–107. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0188.R1. PMID:28235767

  20. The effects of physical activity on apoptosis and lubricin expression in articular cartilage in rats with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Castorina, Sergio; Giunta, Salvatore; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are considered the most powerful anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating drugs. However, a number of side-effects are well documented in different diseases, including articular cartilage, where increases or decreases in the synthesis of hormone-dependent extracellular matrix components are seen. The objective of this study has been to test the effects of procedures or drugs affecting bone metabolism on articular cartilage in rats with prednisolone-induced osteoporosis and to evaluate the outcomes of physical activity with treadmill and vibration platform training on articular cartilage. The animals were divided into 5 groups, and bone and cartilage evaluations were performed using whole-body scans and histomorphometric analysis. Lubricin and caspase-3 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and biochemical analysis. These results confirm the beneficial effect of physical activity on the articular cartilage. The effects of drug therapy with glucocorticoids decrease the expression of lubricin and increase the expression of caspase-3 in the rats, while after physical activity the values return to normal compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that it might be possible that mechanical stimulation in the articular cartilage could induce the expression of lubricin, which is capable of inhibiting caspase-3 activity, preventing chondrocyte death. We can assume that the physiologic balance between lubricin and caspase-3 could maintain the integrity of cartilage. Therefore, in certain diseases such as osteoporosis, mechanical stimulation could be a possible therapeutic treatment. With our results we can propose the hypothesis that physical activity could also be used as a therapeutic treatment for cartilage disease such as osteoarthritis.

  1. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  2. Poly(dopamine) coating of scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Bor; Chen, Wen-Tung; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Kuo, Wei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy

    2011-12-01

    A surface modification technique based on poly(dopamine) deposition developed from oxidative polymerization of dopamine is known to promote cell adhesion to several cell-resistant substrates. In this study this technique was applied to articular cartilage tissue engineering. The adhesion and proliferation of rabbit chondrocytes were evaluated on poly(dopamine)-coated polymer films, such as polycaprolactone, poly(L-lactide), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and polyurethane, biodegradable polymers that are commonly used in tissue engineering. Cell adhesion was significantly increased by merely 15 s of dopamine incubation, and 4 min incubation was enough to reach maximal cell adhesion, a 1.35-2.69-fold increase compared with that on the untreated substrates. Cells also grew much faster on the poly(dopamine)-coated substrates than on untreated substrates. The increase in cell affinity for poly(dopamine)-coated substrates was demonstrated via enhancement of the immobilization of serum adhesive proteins such as fibronectin. When the poly(dopamine)-coating technique was applied to three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds, the proliferation of chondrocytes and the secretion of glycosaminoglycans were increased compared with untreated scaffolds. Our results show that the deposition of a poly(dopamine) layer on 3-D porous scaffolds is a simple and promising strategy for articular cartilage tissue engineering, and may be applied to other types of tissue engineering.

  3. Condensed cellular seeded collagen gel as an improved biomaterial for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Rath, Ralf; Gavénis, Karsten; Andereya, Stefan; Mumme, Torsten; Albrand, Monique; Stoffel, Marcus; Weichert, Dieter; Schneider, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation based on collagen gel as matrix scaffold has become a clinically applied treatment for focal defects of articular cartilage. However, the low biomechanical properties of collagen gel makes intraoperative handling difficult and creates the risk of early damages to the vulnerable implant. The aim of the study was to create a stabilized form of collagen gel and to evaluate its biomechanical and biochemical properties.Collagen type-I gel was seeded with human articular chondrocytes. 20 samples were subject to condensation which was achieved mechanically by compression and filtration. Control samples were left uncondensed. From both types of gels 10 samples were used for initial biomechanical evaluation by means of unconfined compression and 10 samples were cultivated under standard conditions in vitro. Following cultivation the samples were evaluated by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. The proliferation rate was calculated and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR.The biomechanical tests revealed a higher force carrying capacity of the condensed specimens. Strain rate dependency and relaxation was seen in both types of collagen gel representing viscoelastic material properties. Cells embedded within the condensed collagen gel were able to produce extracellular matrix proteins and showed proliferation.Condensed collagen gel represents a mechanically improved type of biomaterial which is suitable for three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  4. PTHrP regulates chondrocyte maturation in condylar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, A B M; Tang, G H; Xiong, H; Hägg, U

    2003-08-01

    PTHrP is a key factor regulating the pace of endochondral ossification during skeletal development. Mandibular advancement solicits a cascade of molecular responses in condylar cartilage. However, the pace of cellular maturation and its effects on condylar growth are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of expression of PTHrP and correlate it to cellular dynamics of chondrocytes in condylar cartilage during natural growth and mandibular advancement. We fitted 35-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats with functional appliances. Experimental animals with matched controls were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine 3 days before their death, so that mesenchymal cell differentiation could be traced. Mandibular advancement increased the number of differentiated chondroblasts and subsequently increased the cartilage volume. Higher levels of PTHrP expression in experimental animals coincided with the slowing of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Thus, mandibular advancement promoted mesenchymal cell differentiation and triggered PTHrP expression, which retarded their further maturation to allow for more growth.

  5. Research progress of the effects of compression stimulation on the metabolism of articular chondrocytes and ;mechanical properties%压缩刺激影响关节软骨细胞代谢和力学特性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑伟; 段王平; 卫小春

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilages endure a variety of dynamic stresses in a complex physiological environment. As the main force of normal human articular movement, the pressure can change the biological and mechanical properties of chondrocytes, including changes in the stress and strain of articular cartilage tissues, hydrostatic pressure, interstitial fluid flow, flow energy, osmotic pressure, changes of transferring between tissues and cell deformations and so on. Because of the specificity of the mechanical environment, the changes of the mechanical properties of chondrocytes will have an effect on the physiological functions of articular cartilages. It is difficult for articular cartilage injuries caused by many factors to repair themselves, which has brought great difficulties to the clinical treatment. There are many traditional methods of repairing cartilage defects clinically, while some shortcomings exist. Thanks to the development of tissue engineering technology, there is a new idea and method for the regeneration and repair of articular cartilage defects. Scaffold materials are mainly utilized to provide a space structure for the proliferation and matrix secretion of chondrocytes, and a kind of structure is formed similar to normal cartilage tissues to transplant and repair articular cartilage defects. Many factors get involved in the construction of tissue-engineered cartilages with good functions, such as seed cells, scaffold materials, culture conditions and so on, among which mechanical stimulation has a particularly important effect on the metabolism of articular cartilage matrixes and their mechanical properties. Therefore, an intensive study of the mechanical properties of chondrocytes will further clarify a series of processes needed to maintain normal physiological functions, such as the stress conditions and responses. There will be positive signiifcance for the understanding of the biological properties of chondrocytes, the effects of compression

  6. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  7. Cartilage homeoprotein 1, a homeoprotein selectively expressed in chondrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, G. Q.; Zhou, X.; Eberspaecher, H; Solursh, M; de Crombrugghe, B

    1993-01-01

    We identified a rat cDNA that encodes cartilage homeoprotein 1 (Cart-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Cart-1 contains a paired-type homeodomain. Northern blot hybridization and RNase protection assay revealed that Cart-1 RNA was present at high levels in a well-differentiated rat chondrosarcoma tumor and in a cell line derived from this tumor. Cart-1 RNA was detected in primary mouse and rat chondrocytes but not in various fibroblasts including mouse 10T1/2 cells, NIH 3T3 cells, BALB 3T...

  8. Morphological Study: Ultrastructural Aspects of Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in Patients Affected by Post-Traumatic Shoulder Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudi, Paolo; Catani, Fabio; Rebuzzi, Manuela; Ferretti, Marzia; Smargiassi, Alberto; Campochiaro, Gabriele; Serafini, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2016-12-16

    Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a frequent condition in active population, representing one of most disabling pathologies, due to altered balance involving joints. No data are so far available on early ultrastructural osteo-chondral damages, associated with the onset of invalidating pathologies, like osteoarthritis-OA. Biopsies of glenoid articular cartilage and sub-chondral bone were taken from 10 adult patients underwent arthroscopic stabilization. Observations were performed under Transmission Electron Microscopy-TEM in tangential, arcuate and radial layers of the articular cartilage and in the sub-chondral bone. In tangential and arcuate layers chondrocytes display normal and very well preserved ultrastructure, probably due to the synovial liquid supply; otherwise, throughout the radial layer (un-calcified and calcified) chondrocytes show various degrees of degeneration; occasionally, in the radial layer evidences of apoptosis/autophagy were also observed. Concerning sub-chondral bone, osteocytes next to the calcified cartilage also show signs of degeneration, while osteocytes farther from the osteo-chondral border display normal ultrastructure, probably due to the bone vascular supply. The ultrastructural features of the osteo-chondral complex are not age-dependent. This study represents the first complete ultrastructural investigation of the articular osteo-chondral complex in shoulder instability, evaluating the state of preservation/viability of both chondrocytes and osteocytes throughout the successive layers of articular cartilage and sub-chondral bone. Preliminary observations here collected represent the morphological basis for further deepening of pathogenesis related to shoulder instability, enhancing the relationship between cell shape and microenvironment; in particular, they could be useful in understanding if the early surgical treatment in shoulder instability could avoid the onset of OA. Anat Rec, 300:12-15, 2017. © 2016 Wiley

  9. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

  10. Expression of caspase-3 and -9 relevant to cartilage destruction and chondrocyte apoptosis in human osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo M

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the involvement of the caspase family in the pathway of NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, osteoarthritis (OA cartilage obtained from 8 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were used for histopathological study. Cartilage samples taken from non-fibrillated areas of femoral head resected during surgery for femoral neck fracture were used for comparison. DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes was detected by the nick end-labeling (TUNEL method. Apoptosis was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The distributions of nitrotyrosine (NT, caspase-3, and -9 were examined immunohistochemically. The populations of apoptotic as well as NT-, caspase-3-, and -9-positive cells were quantified by counting the number of cells in the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. The TUNEL-positive cells were observed primarily in superficial proliferating chondrocytes, clustering chondrocytes, and deep-layer chondrocytes of OA cartilage. Few positive cells were seen in the proliferating chondrocytes in the middle layer. Positive reactions for caspase-3 and -9 were observed in chondrocytes in similar areas. Histological OA grade showed significant correlations with the mean populations of apoptotic chondrocytes (% apoptosis over the 3 areas. The populations of NT-positive cells (% NT over the same areas also showed significant correlation with OA grade. Positivity for caspase-3 closely correlated with the OA grade, % apoptosis and %NT. It was concluded that caspase-3 and -9 could play a role in NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis in OA cartilage.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reshape and Provoke Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes by Paracrine Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wu, Yuxi; Xiong, Zhimiao; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-09-01

    Coculture between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) represents a promising strategy for cartilage regeneration. This study aimed at elaborating how ACs were regulated by MSCs. Rabbit ACs (rACs) and rabbit MSCs (rMSCs) were seeded separately in a Transwell system to initiate non-contact coculture in growth medium without chondrogenic factors. Cell morphology, cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression of rACs were characterized. Upon coculture, rACs underwent a morphological transition from a rounded or polygonal shape into a fibroblast-like one and proliferation was provoked simultaneously. Such effects were dependent on the amount of rMSCs. Along with these changes, ECM production and gene expression of rACs were also perturbed. Importantly, when a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) was supplemented to coculture, the effects except that on cell proliferation were inhibited, suggesting the involvement of RhoA/ROCK signaling. By applying an inhibitor (BIBF1120) of VEGFR1/2/3, FGFR1/2/3 and PDGFRα/β in coculture, or supplementing FGF-1, VEGF-A and PDGFbb in monoculture, it was confirmed that the paracrine factors by rMSCs mediated the compounding effects on rACs. These findings shed light on MSCs-ACs interactions and might confer an insight view on cell-based cartilage regeneration.

  12. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    fferentiation of s tem c ells is also an i mportant i ssue t o c onsider e specially f or t he persistence of the regenerate cartilage. Based on these...tap water for 10 minutes and counterstained with nuclear fast red. Differentiation of MDSCs into chondrocytes. Pellets in OCT blocks were sectioned and...into Alcian blue solution for 30 minutes. The slides were rinsed with running tap water for 10 minutes and counterstained with nuclear fast red

  13. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection.

  14. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M.; Coutts, Richard D.; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  15. Tissue Engineering Based Therapy for Articular Cartilage Defects - A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue in diarthrodial joints, when damaged due to trauma could lead to osteoarthritis. At present Autologous Cartilage Implantation is an established method in which patients own chondrocytes are isolated and then implanted after in vitro expansion over the affected area with bovine or porcine collagen matrix. This procedure results in more of Collagen Type I during in vitro expansion, which eventually becomes fibrocartilage. Also it requires growth factors. We have in this study tried growing human Chondrocytes without growth factors using synthetic scaffolds to grow more Collagen Type II Materials and Methods: Human cartilage specimens were harvested through arthroscopy from the non-weight bearing area of the knee joint from 13 patients who underwent surgical procedures of the knee joint after getting their informed consent. The tissues were transported in saline taking 1 hour to laboratory and subjected to digestion with Collagenase type II for 16~18 Hrs. The chondrocyte cells obtained after dissociation were divided into two groups for culture. Gr. I were embedded in a Thermogelation polymer (TGP and Gr. II in basal culture media (DMEM + Ascorbic Acid without using any growth factors. The Group II cells were viable only for 4 weeks and then started degenerating. The TGP-Chondrocytes scaffolds were grown for 16 weeks and the specimens were harvested at 4, 8, 12 and 16-week intervals and their morphology and molecular characteristics were studied by H&E staining, S-100 protein analysis and RT-PCR.Results: Human chondrocytes could be cultured in both TGP (group I and Basal culture media (group II. The Gr. I cells were viable upto the 16th week while the Group II chondrocytes started degenerating after the 4 week. Both the groups were proven positive for S-100 protein, a Chondrocyte specific marker protein; Gr. II specimens after 4 weeks, and Gr. I specimens after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. RT

  16. The biochemical content of articular cartilage: an original MRI approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeuille, Damien; Olivier, Pierre; Watrin, Astrid; Grossin, Laurent; Gonord, Patrick; Guillot, Geneviève; Etienne, Stéphanie; Blum, Alain; Netter, Patrick; Gillet, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The MR aspect of articular cartilage, that reflects the interactions between protons and macromolecular constituents, is affected by the intrinsic tissue structure (water content, the content of matrix constituents, collagen network organization), imager characteristics, and acquisition parameters. On the T1-weighted sequences, the bovine articular cartilage appears as an homogeneous tissue in high signal intensity, whatever the age of animals considered, whereas on the T2-weighted sequences, the articular bovine cartilage presents variations of its imaging pattern (laminar appearance) well correlated to the variations of its histological and biochemical structure. The T2 relaxation time measurement (T2 mapping), which reflects quantitatively the signal intensity variations observed on T2 weighted sequences, is a way to evaluate more precisely the modifications of cartilage structure during the aging and maturation processes (rat's study). This technique so far confined to experimental micro-imagers is now developed on clinical imagers. Consequently, it may permit to depict the early stages of osteoarthritic disease (OA) or to evaluate the chondroprotective effect of drugs.

  17. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  18. Simvastatin induces differentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes via the ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yohan; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-08-15

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, a key enzyme involved in the conversion of HMG-CoA to the cholesterol precursor mevalonate. Some statins, such as simvastatin (simvastatin), have been shown to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects, reducing cartilage degradation in osteoarthritic rabbits in vivo. However, the regulatory mechanisms undergirding simvastatin mediated chondrocyte differentiation have not been well elucidated. Thus, we investigated the action and mechanism of simvastatin on differentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes through western blot analyses, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining. Simvastatin treatment was found to induce type II collagen expression and sulfated-proteoglycan synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Indeed, RT-PCR revealed increased expression of type II collagen on treatment with simvastatin. Both IHC and IF staining indicated differentiation of chondrocytes. Simvastatin treatment reduced activation of ERK-1/2 and stimulated activation of p38 kinase. Inhibition of ERK-1/2 with PD98059 enhanced simvastatin induced differentiation, whereas inhibition of p38 kinase with SB203580 inhibited simvastatin induced differentiation. Simvastatin treatment also inhibits loss of type II collagen in serial monolayer culture. Collectively, our results indicate that ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase regulate simvastatin-induced differentiation of chondrocytes in opposing manners. Thus, these findings suggest that simvastatin may be a potential therapeutic drug for osteoarthritis.

  19. THE FUNCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A CELL-ENGINEERED CONSTRUCT FOR THE REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Sevastianov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an analysis of the functional effectiveness of a biomedical cell product consisting of a biopolymer microheterogeneous collagen-containing hydrogel (BMCH, human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADMSCs, and chondrogenic induction medium in the regeneration of articular cartilage. Materials and methods. The test model of the adjuvant arthritis was used (female Soviet Chinchilla rabbits with the further development into osteoarthrosis (OA combined with the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histochemical trials. Results. On Day 92 of the OA model it has been found that the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH with hADMSCs into the left knee joint (n = 3 30 days after the OA modeling, as opposed to the right joint (negative control, n = 3, stimulates the regenerative processes of the cartilaginous tissue structure characterized by the formation of chondrocyte «columns», the emergence of isogenic groups in the intracellular matrix and the regeneration of its structure. Upon the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH (n = 3 such effects are markedly less pronounced. Conclusions. A significant regenerative potential of a cell-engineered construct of human articular tissue (CEC ATh has been proven. It is possible to presume that biostimulating properties of CEC ATh are due to the activating effect of a biomedical cell product on the stem cell migration processes from the surrounding tissue into the injured area with their subsequent differentiation. 

  20. Effects of Articular Cartilage Constituents on Phosphotungstic Acid Enhanced Micro-Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Sakari S.; Finnilä, Mikko A.; Lammi, Mikko J.; Ylärinne, Janne H.; Kauppinen, Sami; Rieppo, Lassi; Pritzker, Kenneth P. H.; Nieminen, Heikki J.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (CEμCT) with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) has shown potential for detecting collagen distribution of articular cartilage. However, the selectivity of the PTA staining to articular cartilage constituents remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the dependence of PTA for the collagen content in bovine articular cartilage. Adjacent bovine articular cartilage samples were treated with chondroitinase ABC and collagenase to degrade the proteoglycan and the collagen constituents in articular cartilage, respectively. Enzymatically degraded samples were compared to the untreated samples using CEμCT and reference methods, such as Fourier-transform infrared imaging. Decrease in the X-ray attenuation of PTA in articular cartilage and collagen content was observed in cartilage depth of 0–13% and deeper in tissue after collagen degradation. Increase in the X-ray attenuation of PTA was observed in the cartilage depth of 13–39% after proteoglycan degradation. The X-ray attenuation of PTA-labelled articular cartilage in CEμCT is associated mainly with collagen content but the proteoglycans have a minor effect on the X-ray attenuation of the PTA-labelled articular cartilage. In conclusion, the PTA labeling provides a feasible CEμCT method for 3D characterization of articular cartilage. PMID:28135331

  1. Induction of advanced glycation end products and alterations of the tensile properties of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.C.; Temple, M.M.; Ng, D.M.; Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; TeKoppele, J.M.; Sah, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether increasing advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in bovine articular cartilage to levels present in aged human cartilage modulates the tensile biomechanical properties of the tissue. Methods. Adult bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in a buffer solutio

  2. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  3. Human serum provided additional values in growth factors supplemented medium for human chondrocytes monolayer expansion and engineered cartilage construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Aminuddin, B S; Fuzina, N H; Ruszymah, B H I

    2004-05-01

    We have previously formulated an optimized human chondrocytes growth medium based on 2% fetal bovine serum supplementation. For clinical usage, the animal serum must be replaced by patient own serum. We investigated the effects of human serum concentration for human nasal septum chondrocytes monolayer culture and cartilage reconstruction. Human serum demonstrated a dose dependent manner in promoting chondrocytes growth and cartilage engineering.

  4. Ultrasonic quantitation of superficial degradation of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha; Hirvonen, Jani; Laasanen, Mikko S; Lappalainen, Reijo; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2004-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been suggested as a means for the quantitative detection of early osteoarthrotic changes in articular cartilage. In this study, the ability of quantitative US 2-D imaging (20 MHz) to reveal superficial changes in bovine articular cartilage after mechanical or enzymatic degradation was investigated in vitro. Mechanical degradation was induced by grinding samples against an emery paper with the grain size of 250 microm, 106 microm, 45 microm or 23 microm. For enzymatic degradation, samples were digested with collagenase, trypsin or chondroitinase ABC. Variations of the US reflection coefficient induced by the degradation were investigated. Furthermore, two novel parameters, the US roughness index (URI) and the spatial variation of the US reflection coefficient (SVR), were established to quantitate the integrity of the cartilage surface. Statistically significant decreases (p < 0.05) in US reflection coefficient were observed after mechanical degradations or enzymatic digestion with collagenase. Increases (p < 0.05) in URI were also revealed after these treatments. We conclude that quantitative US imaging may be used to detect collagen disruption and increased roughness in the articular surface. These structural damages are typical of early osteoarthrosis.

  5. Stimulation of Superficial Zone Protein/Lubricin/PRG4 by Transforming Growth Factor-β in Superficial Zone Articular Chondrocytes and Modulation by Glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Araceli; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-07-01

    Superficial zone protein (SZP), also known as lubricin and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), plays an important role in the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage and is regulated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Here, we evaluate the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during TGF-β1 stimulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in superficial zone articular chondrocytes. We utilized primary monolayer superficial zone articular chondrocyte cultures and treated them with various concentrations of TGF-β1, in the presence or absence of heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cell surface GAGs were removed by pretreatment with either heparinase I or chondroitinase-ABC before TGF-β1 stimulation. Accumulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in the culture medium in response to stimulation with TGF-β1 and various exogenous GAGs was demonstrated by immunoblotting and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We show that TGF-β1 and exogenous HS enhanced SZP accumulation of superficial zone chondrocytes in the presence of surface GAGs. At the dose of 1 ng/mL of TGF-β1, the presence of exogenous heparin inhibited SZP accumulation whereas the presence of exogenous CS stimulated SZP accumulation in the culture medium. Enzymatic depletion of GAGs on the surface of superficial zone chondrocytes enhanced the ability of TGF-β1 to stimulate SZP accumulation in the presence of both exogenous heparin and CS. Collectively, these results suggest that GAGs at the surface of superficial zone articular chondrocytes influence the response to TGF-β1 and exogenous GAGs to stimulate SZP accumulation. Cell surface GAGs modulate superficial zone chondrocytes' response to TGF-β1 and exogenous HS.

  6. Working conditions of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage repair following thermal injury during arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yuelong; Zhang Yujun; Ding Xiaoquan; Liu Songyang; Sun Tiezheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermal injury during bipolar radiofrequercy results in chondrocyte death that limits cartilage repair.The purpose was to determine the effects of various factors of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage after thermal injury,offering suitable working conditions for bipolar radiofrequency during arthroscopy.Methods Osteochondral explants from 28 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Department of Orthopaedic,Peking University Reople's Hospital from October 2013 to May 2014,were harvested and treated using bipolar radiofrequency in a light contact mode under the following conditions:various power setting of levels 2,4 and 6; different durations of 2 seconds,5 seconds and 10 seconds; irrigation with fluids of different temperatures of 4℃,22℃,and 37℃; two different bipolar radiofrequency probes ArthroCare TriStar 50 and Paragon T2.The percentage of cell death and depth of cell death were quantified with laser confocal microscopy.The content of proteoglycan elution at different temperatures was determined by spectrophotometer at 530 nm.Results Chondrocyte mortality during the treatment time of 2 seconds and power setting of level 2 was significantly lower than that with long duration or in higher level groups (time:P=0.001; power:P=0.001).The percentage of cell death after thermal injury was gradually reduced by increasing the temperature of the irrigation solutions (P=0.003),the depth of dead chondrocytes in the 37℃ solution group was significantly less than those in the 4℃ and 22℃ groups (P=0.001).The proteoglycan elution was also gradually reduced by increasing the temperature (P=0.004).Compared with the ArthroCare TriStar 50 group,the percentage of cell death in the Paragon T2 group was significantly decreased (P=0.046).Conclusions Thermal chondroplasty with bipolar radiofrequency resulted in defined margins of chondrocyte death under controlled conditions.The least cartilage damage during thermal chondroplasty

  7. Pharmacological influence of antirheumatic drugs on proteoglycans from interleukin-1 treated articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, J; Daufeldt, S

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether drugs used in the treatment of arthritic disorders possess any inhibitory potential on the proteoglycanolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and to determine whether drugs which inhibit these enzymes also modulate the biosynthesis and release of proteoglycans (PGs) from interleukin-1-(IL-1) treated articular cartilage explants. The cartilage-bone marrow extract and the glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (DAK-16) dose-dependently inhibited MMP proteoglycanases in vitro when tested at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 55 mg/mL, displaying an IC50 value of 31.78 mg/mL and 10.64 mg/mL (1.9 x 10[-4] M) respectively. (R,S)-N-[2-[2-(hydroxyamino)-2-oxoethyl]-4-methyl-1-oxopentyl++ +]-L-leucyl-L-phenylalaninamide (U-24522) proved to be a potent inhibitor of MMP proteoglycanases (IC50 value 1.8 x 10[-9] M). None of the other tested drugs, such as possible chondroprotective drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors tested at a concentration of 10(-4) M displayed any significant inhibition. Only U-24522, tested at a concentration ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-6) M, significantly inhibited the IL-1-induced augmentation of PG loss from cartilage explants into the nutrient media, whereas DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract were ineffective. DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract did not modulate the IL-1-mediated reduced biosynthesis and aggregability of PGs by the cartilage explants. The addition of 10(-5) M U-24522, however, partially maintained the aggregability of PGs ex vivo. In our experiments, both possible chondroprotective drugs as well as U-24522 demonstrated no cytotoxic effects on chondrocytes.

  8. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for treatment of cartilage defects of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmann, Pia M; Salzmann, Gian M; Schmal, Hagen;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a well-established treatment option for isolated cartilage defects of the knee joint, providing satisfying outcome. However, cases of treatment failure with the need for surgical reintervention are reported; typical patient's individual and...

  9. Protocols for the in vitro design of animal articular cartilage based on tissue engineering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Correa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is the structure that covers the joint ends. It has some specific tasks crucial to the correct joint physiology. It may experience a large amount of injuries that could generate considerable disabilities. Unfortunately its selfrepair capacity is too limited; therefore, many treatments have been developed with partial success, given the suboptimal biomechanical behavior of the resultant tissue. Given that, Tissue Engineering offers an alternative, based on the design of a new tissue with biological and biomechanical features which resembles the native tissue. In this work, the authors describe the methodologies followed to accomplish that goal, studying the chondrocytes harvesting, the cellular cultures, the scaffold seeding processes, the mechanical stimulation and the structural and biomechanical evaluation. Finally, exposed some of the preliminary results, as a experimental validation of the methods proposed are.

  10. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  11. Preservation of the chondrocyte's pericellular matrix improves cell-induced cartilage formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.L.; Helder, M.N.; Everts, V.; Bank, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes within a chondron is likely to affect the metabolic activity of these cells. In this study we investigated this by analyzing protein synthesis by intact chondrons obtained from different types of cartilage and compared this with chondrocytes. Chondro

  12. Preservation of the Chondrocyte's Pericellular Matrix Improves Cell-Induced Cartilage Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, ChunLing; Helder, Marco N.; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes within a chondron is likely to affect the metabolic activity of these cells. In this study we investigated this by analyzing protein synthesis by intact chondrons obtained from different types of cartilage and compared this with chondrocytes. Chondro

  13. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  14. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats.

  15. Induction of advanced glycation end products and alterations of the tensile properties of articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, A C; Temple, M.M.; Ng, D.M.; Verzijl, N; de Groot, J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Sah, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether increasing advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in bovine articular cartilage to levels present in aged human cartilage modulates the tensile biomechanical properties of the tissue. Methods. Adult bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in a buffer solution with ribose to induce the formation of AGEs or in a control solution. Portions of cartilage samples were assayed for biochemical indices of AGEs and tested to assess their tensile biomechanical p...

  16. Intact Pericellular Matrix of Articular Cartilage Is Required for Unactivated Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in the Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M.; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L.; Goldring, Mary B.; Li, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice. PMID:21855682

  17. Intact pericellular matrix of articular cartilage is required for unactivated discoidin domain receptor 2 in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L; Goldring, Mary B; Li, Yefu

    2011-09-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice.

  18. Melanocortin 1 receptor-signaling deficiency results in an articular cartilage phenotype and accelerates pathogenesis of surgically induced murine osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Lorenz

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR. MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1 in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e. OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT-analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more

  19. Age-related changes in the articular cartilage of the stifle joint in non-working and working German Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francuski, J V; Radovanović, A; Andrić, N; Krstić, V; Bogdanović, D; Hadzić, V; Todorović, V; Lazarević Macanović, M; Sourice Petit, S; Beck-Cormier, S; Guicheux, J; Gauthier, O; Kovacević Filipović, M

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to define age-related histological changes in the articular cartilage of the stifle joint in non-chondrodystrophic dogs and to determine whether physical activity has a positive impact on preservation of cartilage structure during ageing. Twenty-eight German shepherd dogs were included in the study. These dogs had no evidence of joint inflammation as defined by clinical assessment, radiology and synovial fluid analysis (specifically absence of synovial fluid serum amyloid A). The dogs were grouped as young working (n ¼ 4), young non-working (n ¼ 5), aged working (n ¼ 13) and aged non-working (n ¼ 6) animals. Gross changes in the stifle joints were recorded and biopsy samples of femoral and tibial articular cartilage were evaluated for thickness; chondrocyte number, density, surface area and morphology; isogenous group morphology; tidemark integrity; subchondral bone structure; presence of proteoglycans/ glycosaminoglycans; and expression of type I, II and X collagens. The major age-related changes, not related to type of physical activity, included elevated chondrocyte density and thinning of tibial cartilage and increased chondrocyte surface area in the superficial and intermediate zone of the femoral cartilage. There was also expression of type X collagen in the femoral and tibial calcified and non-calcified cartilage; however, type X collagen was not detected in the superficial zone of old working dogs. Therefore, ageing, with or without physical activity, leads to slight cartilage degeneration, while physical activity modulates the synthesis of type X collagen in the superficial cartilage zone, partially preserving the structure of hyaline cartilage.

  20. In vitro and in vivo co-culture of chondrocytes and bone marrow stem cells in photocrosslinked PCL-PEG-PCL hydrogels enhances cartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chao-Yin; Ku, Kuan-Lin; Yang, Shu-Rui; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Peng, Sydney; Peng, Yu-Shiang; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Chondrocytes (CH) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) are sources that can be used in cartilage tissue engineering. Co-culture of CHs and BMSCs is a promising strategy for promoting chondrogenic differentiation. In this study, articular CHs and BMSCs were encapsulated in PCL-PEG-PCL photocrosslinked hydrogels for 4 weeks. Various ratios of CH:BMSC co-cultures were investigated to identify the optimal ratio for cartilage formation. The results thus obtained revealed that co-culturing CHs and BMSCs in hydrogels provides an appropriate in vitro microenvironment for chondrogenic differentiation and cartilage matrix production. Co-culture with a 1:4 CH:BMSC ratio significantly increased the synthesis of GAGs and collagen. In vivo cartilage regeneration was evaluated using a co-culture system in rabbit models. The co-culture system exhibited a hyaline chondrocyte phenotype with excellent regeneration, resembling the morphology of native cartilage. This finding suggests that the co-culture of these two cell types promotes cartilage regeneration and that the system, including the hydrogel scaffold, has potential in cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Reduction of Environmental Temperature Mitigates Local Anesthetic Cytotoxicity in Bovine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Onur, Alexis Dang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess whether reducing environmental temperature will lead to increased chondrocyte viability following injury from a single-dose of local anesthetic treatment. Bovine articular chondrocytes from weight bearing portions of femoral condyles were harvested and cultured. 96-well plates were seeded with 15,000 chondrocytes per well. Chondrocytes were treated with one of the following conditions: ITS Media, 1x PBS, 2% lidocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, or 0.5% ropivacaine. Each plate was then incubated at 37°C, 23°C, or 4°C for one hour and then returned to media at 37°C. Chondrocyte viability was assessed 24 hours after treatment. Chondrocyte viability is presented as a ratio of the fluorescence of the treatment group over the average of the media group at that temperature (ratio ± SEM. At 37°C, lidocaine (0.35 ± 0.04 and bupivacaine (0.30 ± 0.05 treated chondrocytes show low cell viability when compared to the media (1.00 ± 0.03 control group (p < 0.001. Lidocaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 23°C (0.84 ± 0.08 and 4°C (0.86±0.085 than at 37°C (p < 0.001. Bupivacaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 4°C (0.660 ± 0.073 than at 37°C or 23°C (0.330 ± 0.069 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002 respectively. Reducing the temperature from 37°C to 23°C during treatment with lidocaine increases chondrocyte viability following injury. Chondrocytes treated with bupivacaine can be rescued by reducing the temperature to 4°C.

  2. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  3. The use of fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid hybrid scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering: an in vivo analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Munirah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Our preliminary results indicated that fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA hybrid scaffold promoted early chondrogenesis of articular cartilage constructs in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo cartilaginous tissue formation by chondrocyte-seeded fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffolds. PLGA scaffolds were soaked carefully, in chondrocyte-fibrin suspension, and polymerized by dropping thrombin-calcium chloride (CaCl2 solution. PLGA-seeded chondrocytes were used as a control. Resulting constructs were implanted subcutaneously, at the dorsum of nude mice, for 4 weeks. Macroscopic observation, histological evaluation, gene expression and sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG analyses were performed at each time point of 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-implantation. Cartilaginous tissue formation in fibrin/PLGA hybrid construct was confirmed by the presence of lacunae and cartilage-isolated cells embedded within basophilic ground substance. Presence of proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was confirmed by positive Safranin O and Alcian Blue staining. Collagen type II exhibited intense immunopositivity at the pericellular matrices. Chondrogenic properties were further demonstrated by the expression of gene encoded cartilage-specific markers, collagen type II and aggrecan core protein. The sGAG production in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was higher than in the PLGA group. In conclusion, fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffold promotes cartilaginous tissue formation in vivo and may serve as a potential cell delivery vehicle and a structural basis for articular cartilage tissue-engineering.

  4. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  5. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  6. Non-linear model for compression tests on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Alfio; Guaily, Amr; Giverso, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Hydrated soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, are often modeled as biphasic systems with individually incompressible solid and fluid phases, and biphasic models are employed to fit experimental data in order to determine the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the tissues. Two of the most common experimental setups are confined and unconfined compression. Analytical solutions exist for the unconfined case with the linear, isotropic, homogeneous model of articular cartilage, and for the confined case with the non-linear, isotropic, homogeneous model. The aim of this contribution is to provide an easily implementable numerical tool to determine a solution to the governing differential equations of (homogeneous and isotropic) unconfined and (inhomogeneous and isotropic) confined compression under large deformations. The large-deformation governing equations are reduced to equivalent diffusive equations, which are then solved by means of finite difference (FD) methods. The solution strategy proposed here could be used to generate benchmark tests for validating complex user-defined material models within finite element (FE) implementations, and for determining the tissue's mechanical and hydraulic properties from experimental data.

  7. Expansion of human nasal chondrocytes on macroporous microcarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Kreijveld, E.; Temenoff, J.S.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Riesle, J.

    2003-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair. To overcome this problem, it is expected that functional cartilage replacements can be created from expanded chondrocytes seeded in biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems often results in dedif

  8. Expansion of human nasal chondrocytes on macroporous macrocarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Kreijveld, E.; Temenoff, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Riesle, J.

    2003-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair. To overcome this problem, it is expected that functional cartilage replacements can be created from expanded chondrocytes seeded in biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems often results in dedif

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future.

  10. Lubrication mode analysis of articular cartilage using Stribeck surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    Lubrication of articular cartilage occurs in distinct modes with various structural and biomolecular mechanisms contributing to the low-friction properties of natural joints. In order to elucidate relative contributions of these factors in normal and diseased tissues, determination and control of lubrication mode must occur. The objectives of these studies were (1) to develop an in vitro cartilage on glass test system to measure friction coefficient, mu; (2) to implement and extend a framework for the determination of cartilage lubrication modes; and (3) to determine the effects of synovial fluid on mu and lubrication mode transitions. Patellofemoral groove cartilage was linearly oscillated against glass under varying magnitudes of compressive strain utilizing phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and equine and bovine synovial fluid as lubricants. The time-dependent frictional properties were measured to determine the lubricant type and strain magnitude dependence for the initial friction coefficient (mu(0)=mu(t-->0)) and equilibrium friction coefficient (mu(eq)=mu(t-->infinity)). Parameters including tissue-glass co-planarity, normal strain, and surface speed were altered to determine the effect of the parameters on lubrication mode via a 'Stribeck surface'. Using this testing apparatus, cartilage exhibited biphasic lubrication with significant influence of strain magnitude on mu(0) and minimal influence on mu(eq), consistent with hydrostatic pressurization as reported by others. Lubrication analysis using 'Stribeck surfaces' demonstrated clear regions of boundary and mixed modes, but hydrodynamic or full film lubrication was not observed even at the highest speed (50mm/s) and lowest strain (5%).

  11. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r(2)  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017.

  12. Cyclic mechanical load causes global translational arrest in articular chondrocytes: a process which is partially dependent upon PKR phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lomas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available he cellular mechanisms by which articular cartilage responds to load are poorly understood, but such responses may involve regulation at the level of protein translation rather than synthesis of mRNA. We investigated the role of translational control in cyclically (0.5 Hz, 0.1 Hz and 0.05 Hz and statically loaded porcine articular cartilage explants. Messenger RNA was extracted for real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and newly synthesised proteins were measured by their incorporation of radiolabelled 35S[methionine/cysteine] or 35SO4. Some medium from loaded and unloaded explants was immunoblotted for type II collagen, CTGF and TIMP3. The pathways that control protein translation were investigated by immunoblotting explant lysates for PKR, PERK (PKR like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, eIF2a (eukaryotic initiation factor 2a, eEFs (eukaryotic elongation factors, and AMP-dependent kinase. Explants were also loaded in the presence of inhibitors of PKR, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF receptor and PI3 kinase. Cyclic loading caused complete global translational arrest as evidenced by a total suppression of new protein synthesis whilst maintaining mRNA levels. Translational arrest did not occur following static loading and was partly dependent upon the load frequency. There was a rebound increase in protein synthesis when labelling was performed after load had been withdrawn. Phosphorylation of PKR occurred in explants following cyclic load and inhibition of PKR modestly reversed suppression of newly synthesised proteins suggesting that PKR, at least in part, was responsible for loading induced translational arrest. These results show that translational control provides a rapid and potentially important mechanism for controlling the synthetic responses of articular chondrocytes in response to different types of mechanical load.

  13. 纳米硒、亚硒酸钠对大骨节病关节软骨细胞凋亡和活性氧的影响%Effects of selenium nanoparticles and sodium selenite on apoptosis and reactive oxygen species in chondrocytes from articular cartilage in patients with Kashin-Beck disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚筱; 马玮娟; 常彦海; 郭团茂; 吴翠艳; 郭雄

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of selenium nanoparticles (Nano-Se) and sodium selenium (Na2SeO3) on apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of articular chondrocytes from patients with Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD) in vitro,and provide a scientific basis for preventing KBD.Methods The subjects with KBD were diagnosed on National Clinical Diagnostic Criteria of KBD (WS/T207-2010),articular cartilage from 8 patients undertaken joint replacement operation were collected.In vitro,chondrocytes were treated with concentration of 0,25,50,100,200,300,400 and 500 μg/L of Nano-Se and Na2SeO3 for 5 d,respectively.Cell growth was detected by MTT assay,and the highest concentration and time corresponding to the highest survival rate of Nano-Se and Na2SeO3 were used in the following experiment.KBD chondrocytes were treated with Nano-Se and Na2SeO3,and divided into control group,Na2SeO3 group,Nano-Se group according to the randomized design.Each group had 8 cases.The cell apoptosis and ROS were detected by flow cytometry.Results The optimal intervention concentration of Nano-Se and Na2SeO3 was 100 and 400 μg/L,respectively.The optimal intervention time of NanoSe and Na2SeO3 both was 3 days.There was a significant decrease in the total and terminal apoptosis,ROS level of chondrocytes in Nano-Se group [(4.67 ± 0.89)%,(1.51 ± 0.48)%,(56.04 ± 4.81)%] and Na2SeO3 group [(7.07 ±0.25)%,(4.37 ± 0.37)%,(87.13 ± 6.60)%] compared with those of control group [(9.95 ± 0.38)%,(6.93 ± 0.42)%,(125.17 ± 16.60)%,all P < 0.01].The difference of early apoptotic rate among control group,Na2SeO3 group,NanoSe group [(3.02 ± 0.41)%,(2.7 ± 0.46)%,(3.16 ± 0.56)%] was not statistically significant (F =2.11,P =0.35).Conclusion Appropriate concentration of Nano-Se can significantly decrease oxidative stress of KBD chondrocytes and inhibit apoptosis compared to Na2SeO3.%目的 比较纳米硒(Nano-Se)、亚硒酸钠(Na2SeO3)对体外培养的大骨节病关节软骨

  14. Articular Cartilage Thickness Measured with US is Not as Easy as It Appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Bartels, E. M.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage ismeasured under orthogonal in...

  15. Articular cartilage thickness measured with US is not as easy as it appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, S; Bartels, E M; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage is measured under orthogonal insonation. I...

  16. Deginerative changes of femoral articular cartilage in the knee : comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Youn; Hong, Sung Hwan; Sohn, Jin Hee; Wee, Young Hoon; Chang, Jun Dong; Park, Hong Seok; Lee, Eil Seoung; Kang Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the sonographic findings of degenerative change in femoral articular cartilage of the knee by comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology. We obtained 40 specimens of cartilage of the femur (20 medial and 20 lateral condylar) from 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who had undergone total knee replacement. The specimens were placed in a saline-filled container and sonography was performed using a 10-MHz linear transducer. Sonographic abnormalities were evaluated at the cartilage surface, within the cartilage, and at the bone-cartilage interface, and were compared with the corresponding pathologic findings. In addition, cartilage thickness was measured at a representative portion of each femoral cartilage specimen and was compared with the thickness determined by sonography. 'Dot' lesions, irregularity or loss of the hyperechoic line, were demonstrated by sonography at the saline-cartilage interface of 14 cartilages. Pathologic examination showed that these findings corresponded to cleft, detachment, erosion, and degeneration. Irregularities in the hyperechoic line at the bone-cartilage interface were revealed by sonography in eight cartilages and were related to irregularity or loss of tidemark, downward displacement of the cartilage, and subchondral callus formation. Dot lesions, corresponding to cleft and degeneration, were noted within one cartilage. Cartilage thickness measured on specimen and by sonography showed no significant difference (p=0.446). Specimen sonography suggested that articular cartilage underwent degenerative histopathological change. Cartilage thickness measured by sonography exactly reflected real thickness.

  17. Resveratrol protects rabbit articular chondrocyte against sodium nitroprusside-induced apoptosis via scavenging ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the mechanism by which resveratrol (RV) prevents sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 100 μM RV for 18 h before 1.5 mM SNP co-treatment for 6 h. Cell viability was evaluated by CCK-8. Annexin V/PI double staining and Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of SNP-induced chondrocytes death. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was measured by using flow cytometry (FCM) with TMRM and Rhodamine 123 staining. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were confirmed by FCM analysis with DCFH-DA and DAF-FM DA staining. Cytoskeleton proteins of chondrocytes co-stained with Actin-Trakcer Green and Tubulin-Trakcer Red were validated by confocal microscopy. SNP induced time- and dose-dependent chondrocytes apoptosis with decline of ΔΨm, activation of caspases as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. SNP induced a significant induction of both ROS and NO. RV remarkably prevented SNP-induced ROS production and apoptosis as well as cytoskeletal remodeling, but did not prevent SNP-induced NO production. Pretreatment with NO scavengers did not significantly prevent SNP-induced apoptosis and cytoskeletal remodeling. SNP induces NO-independent ROS production which dominates rabbit articular chondrocyte apoptosis, and RV protects chondrocytes against SNP-induced apoptosis via scavenging ROS instead of NO.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-yao; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA).

  19. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  20. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  1. Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Schadow

    Full Text Available Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA. Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen fragments. Using biophysical techniques, like MALDI-TOF-MS, AFM, and NMR, the molecular weight distribution and aggregation behavior of collagen hydrolysates from bovine origin (CH-Alpha®, Peptan™ B 5000, Peptan™ B 2000 were determined. To investigate the metabolism of human femoral OA cartilage, explants were obtained during knee replacement surgery. Collagen synthesis of explants as modulated by 0-10 mg/ml collagen hydrolysates was determined using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure. Proteoglycans, NO, PGE(2, MMP-1, -3, -13, TIMP-1, collagen type II, and cell viability were determined in explant cultures. Groups of data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Friedman test (n = 5-12. The significance was set to p≤0.05. We found that collagen hydrolysates obtained from different sources varied with respect to the width of molecular weight distribution, average molecular weight, and aggregation behavior. None of the collagen hydrolysates tested stimulated the biosynthesis of collagen. Peptan™ B 5000 elevated NO and PGE(2 levels significantly but had no effect on collagen or proteoglycan loss. All collagen hydrolysates tested proved not to be cytotoxic. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that various collagen hydrolysates differ with respect to their chemical composition of collagen fragments as well as by their pharmacological efficacy on human chondrocytes. Our study underscores the importance that each collagen hydrolysate

  2. Fibroblast-like synoviocyte-chondrocyte interaction in cartilage degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenvoorden, M.M.C.; Bank, R.A.; Ronday, H.K.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Groot, J. de

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In vitro models for joint diseases often focus on a single cell type, such as chondrocytes in osteoarthritis (OA) or fibroblast-like synoviocytes (synoviocytes) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, these joint diseases affect the whole joint and interaction between chondrocytes and syno

  3. Connective tissue growth factor and articular cartilage repair%结缔组织生长因子与关节软骨的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世松; 张志峰; 黄健

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Connective tissue growth factor has the potential to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cels into chondrocytes, can promote the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and also can promote the expression of type II colagen and proteoglycan in the articular cartilage. So, the connective tissue growth factor plays an important role in the articular cartilage repair along with other growth factors. OBJECTIVE: To focus on the structure of connective tissue growth factor, its function in articular cartilage repair and the interactions with other factors. METHODS: A search across the databases of PubMed (January 1980 to July 2014) was performed, with the key words of “connective tissue growth factor, connective tissue growth factor and articular cartilage, articular cartilage damage, articular cartilage repairment” in English and “articular cartilage injury” in Chinese. Studies with the obsolete, repetitive or unrelated content were excluded. A total of 32 papers were included in thi study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Connective tissue growth factor has the potential to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cels into chondrocytes, can promote the proliferation, differentiation and maturity of chondrocytes, can maintain the extracelular matrix synthesis and balance, and also can promote the expression of type II colagen and proteoglycan in the articular cartilage. Along with other growth factors, connective tissue growth factor exerts an important role in the articular cartilage repair. Connective tissue growth factor is the key factor of chondrocyte growth, proliferation and differentiation, which is throughout the process of cartilage repair. Studies have shown that articular chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis show an increase in the number positively correlated with the expressions of fibroblast growth factor 1 and connective tissue growth factor. Connective tissue growth factor interacts with articular cartilage

  4. Adhesion-mediated signal transduction in human articular chondrocytes: the influence of biomaterial chemistry and tenascin-C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Tahir A.; Jong, de Ruben; Riesle, Jens; Langer, Robert; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocyte ‘dedifferentiation’ involves the switching of the cell phenotype to one that no longer secretes extracellular matrix found in normal cartilage and occurs frequently during chondrocyte expansion in culture. It is also characterized by the differential expression of receptors and intracell

  5. Effects of intra articular tramadol on articular cartilage and synovium of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Kola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of intra articular tramadol injection on articular cartilage and synovium in rat knee joint. Methods: After Animal Ethical Committee approval, a total of 20 Sprague-Dawley rats were used and divided into 4 groups. Each group was composed of 5 rats. 0.2 ml of tramadol HCl was injected into the right knee joints and left knee joints of all the rats were considered as control. Control side joints received saline injection. Rats were sacrificed with ketamin on 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st days and knee joints were removed. Obtained tissue samples were decalcified and were dyed with Hematoxylin-eosin and Masson’s trichrome stain and examined by light microscopy for the presence of inflammation in periarticular area and synovia. Results: Congestion of synovial veins and perivascular cell infiltration were observed in tramadol group on days 1 and 7 (P < 0.05. The inflammation process was replaced by fibrosis on day 14 and fibrosis was significantly decreased on day 21. Conclusion: Intra articular tramadol should be used cautiously, keeping in mind that it may cause synovial inflammation in early phases and fibrosis in late phases. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (4: 337-342

  6. Induction of vascular endothelial growth factor by nitric oxide in cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpaev, K; Litvinov, D; Dubovaya, V; Panasyuk, A; Ivanov, D; Prassolov, V

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) gene expression in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Cell treatment with the NO-generating compound nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) caused a significant accumulation of 4.4 kb VEGF mRNA, a major VEGF mRNA isoform expressing in chondrocytes. This is the first demonstration that NO can induce VEGF mRNA expression in chondrocytes. VEGF mRNA level was not affected in cells exposed to dibutyryl cGMP, a non-hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP system is not involved in NO-dependent transcriptional activation of VEGF gene. The GSNO-stimulated induction of VEGF mRNA was slightly attenuated by MAP protein kinase inhibitors PD98058 and SB203580, but was completely blocked in cells incubated with GSNO in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase, enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), or in the presence of thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that in articular chondrocytes the GSNO-induced VEGF gene transcriptional activation is dependent on endogenous ROS production and oxidative thiol modifications.

  7. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  8. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016.

  9. Influence of extremely low frequency, low energy electromagnetic fields and combined mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes in 3-D constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Florian M; Ahrens, Philipp; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J; Dahmani, Chiheb; Wilken, Frauke L; Sauerschnig, Martin; Niemeyer, Philipp; Zwingmann, Jörn; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weyh, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Alini, Mauro; Salzmann, Gian M

    2014-02-01

    Articular cartilage, once damaged, has very low regenerative potential. Various experimental approaches have been conducted to enhance chondrogenesis and cartilage maturation. Among those, non-invasive electromagnetic fields have shown their beneficial influence for cartilage regeneration and are widely used for the treatment of non-unions, fractures, avascular necrosis and osteoarthritis. One very well accepted way to promote cartilage maturation is physical stimulation through bioreactors. The aim of this study was the investigation of combined mechanical and electromagnetic stress affecting cartilage cells in vitro. Primary articular chondrocytes from bovine fetlock joints were seeded into three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds and distributed into seven stimulated experimental groups. They either underwent mechanical or electromagnetic stimulation (sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 1 mT, 2 mT, or 3 mT; 60 Hz) or both within a joint-specific bioreactor and a coil system. The scaffold-cell constructs were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, histology, and gene expression of collagen-1, collagen-2, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), Sox9, proteoglycan-4 (PRG-4), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and -13). There were statistically significant differences in GAG/DNA content between the stimulated versus the control group with highest levels in the combined stimulation group. Gene expression was significantly higher for combined stimulation groups versus static control for collagen 2/collagen 1 ratio and lower for MMP-13. Amongst other genes, a more chondrogenic phenotype was noticed in expression patterns for the stimulated groups. To conclude, there is an effect of electromagnetic and mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes seeded in a 3-D scaffold, resulting in improved extracellular matrix production.

  10. Effects of immobilization on thickness of superficial zone of articular cartilage of patella in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Each segment of superficial zone behaves differentially on immobilization and remobilization. Perhaps a much longer duration of remobilization is required to reverse changes of immobilization in articular cartilage and plays a significant role in knee joint movements.

  11. The Effects of Vitamin D3 on Proliferation and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Chondrocytes from Human Articular Cartilage%活性维生素D3对体外原代培养人骨关节炎软骨细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 郭艾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To obtain articular chondrocyte from patients with osteoarthritis by primary culture,to explore the relationship between different concentrate [1, 25-(OH)2D3]and proliferation, apoptosis of chondrocytes. Methods Human articular chondrocytes were obtained by modified digestive method with enzyme in vitro and inden-tified by alkaline phosphatase (AKP) staining. OA Chondrocytes were cultured in medium with different concentrate [1,25-(OH)2D3]. MMT method was used to assay proliferation of chondrocytes. Optical density(OD) at 490nm was determined by ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to assay the apoptosis ratio at different time point. Results 10~5 u-mol/L[l ,25-(OH)2D3]can promote the proliferation of chondrocytes obviously,and the proper react time point is 48 hour(P<0. 01). At the same time 10-5 umol/L[1, 25-(OH)2D3]can inhibit the apoptosis ratio obviously at 48 hour time point. Conclusion To promote the proliferation and inhibit the apoptosis of OA chondrocytes in vitro,the better concentration of [1,25-(OH)2D3]is 1×10-5 umol/L. 48 hour after[1,25-(OH)2D3]added is the best time for the experiment objective.%目的 探讨不同浓度的1α,25二羟基维生素D3[1,25 -(OH)2D3]对体外培养的人骨关节炎患者关节软骨细胞的增殖及凋亡率的影响.方法 酶二步消化法体外分离培养人软骨细胞,以碱性磷酸酶染色法鉴定.加入不同剂量的[1,25 (OH)2D3],通过噻唑蓝比色试验检测细胞存活和增殖情况,以及用流式细胞仪检测软骨细胞在不同药物浓度、不同作用时间的凋亡率.结论 [1,25 (OH)2D3]作用于入骨关节炎软骨细胞的最佳作用浓度为1×10-5umol/L,最佳作用时间点为48h.高浓度的[1,25-(OH)2D3]能明显促进细胞坏死,极低浓度的[1,25 -(OH)2D3]对软骨细胞增殖、凋亡无明显影响.

  12. Kinematic biomechanical assessment of human articular cartilage transplants in the knee using 3-T MRI: an in vivo reproducibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Millington, Steven [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of kinematic MR imaging with respect to changes in T{sub 2} in the femoral condyle articular cartilage. We used a flexible knee coil, which allows acquisition of data in different positions from 40 flexion to full extension during MR examinations. The reproducibility of T{sub 2} measurements was evaluated for inter-rater and inter-individual variability and determined as a coefficient of variation (CV) for each volunteer and rater. Three different volunteers were measured twice and regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by three raters at different time points. To prove the clinical feasibility of this method, 20 subjects (10 patients and 10 age- and sex-matched volunteers) were enrolled in the study. Inter-rater variability ranged from 2 to 9 and from 2 to 10% in the deep and superficial zones, respectively. Mean inter-individual variability was 7% for both zones. Different T{sub 2} values were observed in the superficial cartilage zone of patients compared with volunteers. Since repair tissue showed a different behavior in the contact zone compared with healthy cartilage, a possible marker for improved evaluation of repair tissue quality after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) may be available and may allow biomechanical assessment of cartilage transplants. (orig.)

  13. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE OF THE HIP JOINT USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karpiński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a preliminary study on the structural analysis of the hip joint, taking into account changes in the mechanical properties of the articular cartilage of the joint. Studies have been made due to the need to determine the tension distribution occurring in the cartilage of the human hip. These distribution are the starting point for designing custom made human hip prosthesis. Basic anatomy, biomechanical analysis of the hip joint and articular cartilage are introduced. The mechanical analysis of the hip joint model is conducted. Final results of analysis are presented. Main conclusions of the study are: the capability of absorbing loads by articular cartilage of the hip joint is preliminary determined as decreasing with increasing degenerations of the cartilage and with age of a patient. Without further information on changes of cartilage’s mechanical parameters in time it is hard to determine the nature of relation between mentioned capability and these parameters.

  14. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  15. Ontogeny of rat chondrocyte proliferation: studies in embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madaí A GóMEZ-CAMARILLO; Juan B.KOURI

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ontogeny of chondrocyte cell division using embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We searched for mitosis phases and performed a comparative evaluation of mitotic index, basic fibroblast growth factor b (FGFb), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) receptors, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK1)and Cyclin-B expression in fetal, neonate, 3, 5, 8 weeks old rats and experimental OA. Our results showed that mitosis phases were observed in all normal cartilage studied, although, we found a decrease in mitotic index in relation to tissue development. No mitosis was detected in OA cartilage. We also found a statistical significant reduction in cell number in OA cartilage, compared with the normal tissue. Furthermore, FGFb and TGF-β1 receptors diminished in relation to tissue development, and were very scarce in experimental OA. Western blot assays showed CDK-1 expression in all cases, including human-OA cartilage. Similar results were observed for Cyclin-B, except for 8 weeks, when it was not expressed. Our results suggest that cell division seems to be scarce, if not absent within the OA cartilage studied.Nevertheless, the existence of factors essential for cell division leaves open the question concerning chondrocyte proliferation in OA cartilage, which is likely to be present in the early stages of the disease.

  16. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  17. Determinants of microstructural load transfer in cartilage tissue from chondrocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Michelle Marie

    2000-10-01

    The goals of this research were to (i) develop a tissue model system for studying the microstructure of matrix produced by chondrocytes, (ii) characterize the biochemical and mechanical properties of the chondrocyte culture tissue, (iii) evaluate the response of the chondrocyte culture tissue to various stimulants (retinoic acid, interleukin-1beta, and xyloside), (iv) investigate the roles of proteoglycan and collagen in the tearing and tensile properties of a chondrocyte culture tissue, and (v) develop a finite element model of the chondrocyte culture tissue microstructure to study its tensile pre-failure properties. The roles of proteoglycan and collagen were explored by experimentation using a cultured cartilage tissue, and by development of a theoretical finite element model which related the cartilage tissue microstructure to its macroscopic properties. Tear and tensile testing was performed. Failure testing is valuable because it is known that cracks exist and propagate from the cartilage surface in osteoarthritic joints. It was found that collagen was important for providing the material stiffness of the cultured tissue, and that both collagen and proteoglycan were important for providing the tear toughness of the tissue. It was also found that as the collagen density or collagen material stiffness increased, the material stiffness of the cultured tissue increased, and as the proteoglycan or collagen densities increased, the tear toughness of the tissue increased. A three-dimensional finite element microstructural model of cartilage was developed, consisting of linear elastic collagen fibrils embedded in a linear viscoelastic proteoglycan solid matrix. Fluid flow in the cartilage matrix was not included in this model. Viscoelastic time dependent behavior was an appropriate model for the cartilage. The results of this model were comparable to the experimental results, as well as to past continuum models of cartilage. Collagen and proteoglycan material moduli

  18. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Kean

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5% oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential.Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%, and atmospheric (20% oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically.Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions

  19. Is magnetic resonance imaging reliable in predicting clinical outcome after articular cartilage repair of the knee?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, de T.S.; Welsch, G.H.; Brittberg, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While MRI can provide a detailed morphological evaluation after articular cartilage repair, its additional value in determining clinical outcome has yet to be determined. Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between MRI and clinical outcome after cartilage repair and to identify parame

  20. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done...

  1. Human adult chondrocytes express hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) isoforms but not HgF: potential implication of osteoblasts on the presence of HGF in cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévremont, Melanie; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Massicotte, Frédéric; Tardif, Ginette; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    HGF is increased in human OA cartilage, possibly from Ob's. RT-PCR shows HGF isoforms are differently regulated between chondrocytes and Ob. A paracrine cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage may occur during OA. Recently, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been identified by immunohistochemistry in cartilage and more particularly in the deep zone of human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. By investigating HGF expression in cartilage, we found that chondrocytes did not express HGF; however, they expressed the two truncated isoforms, namely HGF/NK1 and HGF/NK2. Because the only other cells localized near the deep zone are osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate, we hypothesized that they were expressing HGF. Indeed, we found that HGF was synthesized by osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate. Moreover, OA osteoblasts produced five times more HGF than normal osteoblasts and almost no HGF/NK1, unlike normal osteoblasts. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are involved in OA progression, we investigated whether these factors impact HGF produced by normal osteoblasts. PGE2 was the only factor tested that was able to stimulate HGF synthesis. However, the addition of NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) had no effect on HGF produced by OA osteoblasts. HGF/NK2 had a moderate stimulating effect on HGF production by normal osteoblasts, whereas osteocalcin was not modulated by either HGF or HGF/NK2. When investigating signaling routes that might be implicated in OA osteoblast-produced HGF, we found that protein kinase A was at least partially involved. In summary, this study raises the hypothesis that the HGF found in articular cartilage is produced by osteoblasts, diffuses into the cartilage, and may be implicated in the OA process.

  2. X-ray dark field imaging of human articular cartilage: Possible clinical application to orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisada, Toshiyuki [Department of Medical Materials for Musculoskeletal Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)], E-mail: toshi-kunisada@umin.ac.jp; Shimao, Daisuke [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ibaraki 300-2394 (Japan); Sugiyama, Hiroshi [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takeda, Ken; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Ando, Masami [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Despite its convenience and non-invasiveness on daily clinical use, standard X-ray radiography cannot show articular cartilage. We developed a novel type of X-ray dark field imaging (DFI), which forms images only by a refracted beam with very low background illumination. We examined a disarticulated distal femur and a shoulder joint with surrounding soft tissue and skin, both excised from a human cadaver at the BL20B2 synchrotron beamline at SPring-8. The field was 90 mm wide and 90 mm high. Articular cartilage of the disarticulated distal femur was obvious on DFI, but not on standard X-ray images. Furthermore, DFI allowed visualization in situ of articular cartilage of the shoulder while covered with soft tissue and skin. The gross appearance of the articular cartilage on the dissected section of the proximal humerus was identical to the cartilage shown on the DFI image. These results suggested that DFI could provide a clinically accurate method of assessing articular cartilage. Hence, DFI would be a useful imaging tool for diagnosing joint disease such as osteoarthritis.

  3. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  4. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarakkala, Simo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Etelae-Savo Hospital District, Mikkeli Central Hospital, Porrassalmenkatu 35-37, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Laasanen, Mikko S [Information Technology R and D Unit, Engineering Kuopio, Savonia Polytechnic, POB 1188, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Physics, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2006-10-21

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  5. Study on the Microstructure of Human Articular Cartilage/Bone Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxiong Liu; Qin Lian; Jiankang He; Jinna Zhao; Zhongmin Jin; Dichen Li

    2011-01-01

    For improving the theory of gradient microstructure of cartilage/bone interface, human distal femurs were studied. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), histological sections and MicroCT were used to observe, measure and model the microstructure of cartilage/bone interface. The results showed that the cartilage/bone interface is in a hierarchical structure which is composed of four different tissue layers. The interlocking of hyaline cartilage and calcified cartilage and that of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone are in the manner of"protrusion-pore" with average diameter of 17.0 μm and 34.1 μm respectively. In addition, the cancellous bone under the cartilage is also formed by four layer hierarchical structure, and the adjacent layers are connected by bone trabecula in the shape of H, I and Y, forming a complex interwoven network structure. Finally, the simplified structure model of the cartilage/bone interface was proposed according to the natural articular cartilage/bone interface. The simplified model is a 4-layer gradient biomimetic structure, which corresponds to four different tissues of natural cartilage/bone interface. The results of this work would be beneficial to the design of bionic scaffold for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage/bone.

  6. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site.

  7. Quantitative characterization of articular cartilage using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Pa˚L. Gunnar; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Davies, Catharina De Lange; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-11-01

    The collagen meshwork in articular cartilage of chicken knee is characterized using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy. Direction and degree of dispersion of the collagen fibers in the superficial layer are found using a Fourier transform image-analysis technique of the second-harmonic generated image. Mueller matrix images are used to acquire structural data from the intermediate layer of articular cartilage where the collagen fibers are too small to be resolved by optical microscopy, providing a powerful multimodal measurement technique. Furthermore, we show that Mueller matrix imaging provides more information about the tissue compared to standard polarization microscopy. The combination of these techniques can find use in improved diagnosis of diseases in articular cartilage, improved histopathology, and additional information for accurate biomechanical modeling of cartilage.

  8. Transplantatation of scaffold-free spheroids composed of synovium-derived cells and chondrocytes for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-I Lee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI is the treatment of choice for osteoarthritis. However, to regenerate articular cartilage using this method, the procedure paradoxically demands that the cell source of the articular chondrocytes (ACs for ex vivo expansion be from the patient’s own healthy cartilage, which can result in donor site morbidity. Accordingly, it is essential to develop a substitute for AC. In the present study, we investigated whether synovium-derived cells (SYs could be used as a partial replacement for ACs in ACI. ACs and SYs from the knees of rabbits were isolated and cultured, and the growth rates of the cells were compared. To manufacture the cellular transplants, we developed a high-density suspension-shaking culture method (HDSS, which circulates the cells in culture media, promoting self-assembly of scaffold-free cellular aggregates. ACs and SYs were mixed in various ratios using HDSS. Injectable cellular transplants were harvested and transplanted into full-thickness osteochondral defects. Simultaneously, histological evaluations were conducted with toluidine blue and safranin O, and immunohistochemistry of collagen type I and II was conducted. Gene expression to evaluate chondrocyte-specific differentiation was also performed. We successfully prepared a large quantity of spheroids (spheroidal cell aggregates in a short time using mixed ACs and SYs, for all cellular composition ratios. Our data showed that the minimal therapeutic unit for the transplants contributed to in situ regeneration of cartilage. In summary, SYs can be used as a replacement for ACs in clinical cases of ACI in patients with broad areas of osteoarthritic lesions.

  9. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  10. Identification of the calcitonin receptor in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

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    Christensen Tjorbjoern

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that salmon calcitonin has cartilage protective effects in joint degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA. However, the presence of the calcitonin receptor (CTR in articular cartilage chondrocytes is yet to be identified. In this study, we sought to further investigate the expression of the CTR in naïve human OA articular chondrocytes to gain further confirmation of the existents of the CTR in articular cartilage. Methods Total RNA was purified from primary chondrocytes from articular cartilage biopsies from four OA patients undergoing total knee replacement. High quality cDNA was produced using a dedicated reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR protocol. From this a nested PCR assay amplifying the full coding region of the CTR mRNA was completed. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize CTR protein on protein level in chondrocytes. Results The full coding transcript of the CTR isoform 2 was identified in all four individuals. DNA sequencing revealed a number of allelic variants of the gene including two potentially novel polymorphisms: a frame shift mutation, +473del, producing a shorter form of the receptor protein, and a single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3' non coding region of the transcript, +1443 C>T. A 53 kDa protein band, consistent with non-glycosylated CTR isoform 2, was detected in chondrocytes with a similar size to that expressed in osteoclasts. Moreover the CTR was identified in the plasma membrane and the chondrocyte lacuna of both primary chondrocytes and OA cartilage section. Conclusions Human OA articular cartilage chondrocytes do indeed express the CTR, which makes the articular a pharmacological target of salmon calcitonin. In addition, the results support previous findings suggesting that calcitonin has a direct anabolic effect on articular cartilage.

  11. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Computed Tomography of Articular Cartilage: Association with Tissue Composition and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, T.S.; Jurvelin, J.S.; Aula, A.S.; Lammi, M.J.; Toeyraes, J. (Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Material and Methods: In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Results: Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R|>0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. Conclusion: The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a

  12. Micromass co-culture of human articular chondrocytes and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to investigate stable neocartilage tissue formation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Giovannini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies for articular cartilage defects rely on expanded chondrocytes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternative cell source should their hypertrophic differentiation pathway be prevented. Possible cellular instruction between human articular chondrocytes (HAC and human bone marrow MSC was investigated in micromass pellets. HAC and MSC were mixed in different percentages or incubated individually in pellets for 3 or 6 weeks with and without TGF-beta1 and dexamethasone (±T±D as chondrogenic factors. Collagen II, collagen X and S100 protein expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated applying the Bern score and quantified using dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP was detected on cryosections and soluble ALP measured in pellet supernatants. HAC alone generated hyaline-like discs, while MSC formed spheroid pellets in ±T±D. Co-cultured pellets changed from disc to spheroid shape with decreasing number of HAC, and displayed random cell distribution. In -T-D, HAC expressed S100, produced GAG and collagen II, and formed lacunae, while MSC did not produce any cartilage-specific proteins. Based on GAG, collagen type II and S100 expression chondrogenic differentiation occurred in -T-D MSC co-cultures. However, quantitative experimental GAG and DNA values did not differ from predicted values, suggesting only HAC contribution to GAG production. MSC produced cartilage-specific matrix only in +T+D but underwent hypertrophy in all pellet cultures. In summary, influence of HAC on MSC was restricted to early signs of neochondrogenesis. However, MSC did not contribute to the proteoglycan deposition, and HAC could not prevent hypertrophy of MSC induced by chondrogenic stimuli.

  13. Differences in Cartilage-Forming Capacity of Expanded Human Chondrocytes From Ear and Nose and Their Gene Expression Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, C.A.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Slagt, I.; Koevoet, W.; Poublon, R.M.L.; Nolst-Trenite, G.J.; de Jong, R.J.B.; Jahr, H.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular chondroc

  14. The optimization of porous polymeric scaffolds for chondrocyte/atelocollagen based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoko; Yamaoka, Hisayo; Nishizawa, Satoru; Nagata, Satoru; Ogasawara, Toru; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2010-06-01

    To broaden the clinical application of cartilage regenerative medicine, we should develop an implant-type tissue-engineered cartilage with firmness and 3-D structure. For that, we attempted to use a porous biodegradable polymer scaffold in the combination with atelocollagen hydrogel, and optimized the structure and composition of porous scaffold. We administered chondrocytes/atelocollagen mixture into the scaffolds with various kinds of porosities (80-95%) and pore sizes (0.3-2.0 mm), consisting of PLLA or related polymers (PDLA, PLA/CL and PLGA), and transplanted the constructs in the subcutaneous areas of nude mice. The constructs using scaffolds of excessively large pore sizes (>1 mm) broke out on the skin and impaired the host tissue. The scaffold with the porosity of 95% and pore size of 0.3 mm could effectively retain the cells/gel mixture and indicated a fair cartilage regeneration. Regarding the composition, the tissue-engineered cartilage was superior in PLGA and PLLA to that in PLA/CA and PDLA. The latter two showed the dense accumulation of macrophages, which may deteriorate the cartilage regeneration. Although PLGA or PLLA has been currently recommended for the scaffold of cartilage, the polymer for which biodegradation was exactly synchronized to the cartilage regeneration would improve the quality of the tissue-engineered cartilage.

  15. Characterization of human primary chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage at varying severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jing; YANG Zheng; CAO Yong-ping; GE Zi-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a difficulty in evaluating the in vivo functionality of individual chondrocytes,and there is much heterogeneity among cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA).In this study,in vitro cultured chondrocytes harvested from varying stages of degeneration were studied as a projective model to further understand the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.Methods Cartilage of varying degeneration of end-stage OA was harvested,while cell yield and matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were measured.Cell morphology,proliferation,and gene expression of collagen type Ⅰ,Ⅱ,and Ⅹ,aggrecan,matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13),and ADAMTS5 of the acquired chondrocytes were measured during subsequent in vitro culture.Results Both the number of cells and the GAG content increased with increasing severity of OA.Cell spreading area increased and gradually showed spindle-like morphology during in vitro culture.Gene expression of collagen type Ⅱ,collagen type X as well as GAG decreased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased.Expression of MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of ADAMTS-5 remained stable.Expression of collagen type Ⅱ,X,GAG,and MMP-13 substantially decreased with in vitro culture.Expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased with in vitro cultures,while expression of ADAMTS 5 remained stable.Conclusions Expression of functional genes such as collagen type Ⅱ and GAG decreased during severe degeneration of OA cartilage and in vitro dedifferentiation.Gene expression of collagen Ⅰ and MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration.

  16. Incomplete restoration of immobilization induced softening of young beagle knee articular cartilage after 50-week remobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, J; Arokoski, J; Pirttimäki, J; Lyyra, T; Jurvelin, J; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J; Kiviranta, I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the biomechanical and structural changes in canine knee cartilage after an initial 11-week immobilization and subsequent remobilization period of 50 weeks. Cartilage from the immobilized and remobilized knee was compared with the tissue from age-matched control animals. Compressive stiffness, in the form of instant shear modulus (ISM) and equilibrium shear modulus (ESM) of articular cartilage, was investigated using an in situ indentation creep technique. The local variations in cartilage of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration were measured with a microspectrophotometer after safranin O staining of histological sections. Using a computer-based quantitative polarized light microscopy method, collagen-related optical retardation, gamma, of cartilage zones were performed to investigate the collagen network of cartilage. Macroscopically, cartilage surfaces of the knee joint remained intact both after immobilization and remobilization periods. Immobilization caused significant softening of the lateral femoral and tibial cartilages, as expressed by ESM (up to 30%, p test points. The changes of ESM were positively correlated with the alterations in GAG content of the superficial and deep zones after immobilization and remobilization. This confirms the key role of protoglycans in the regulation of the equilibrium stiffness of articular cartilage. As a conclusion, immobilization of the joint of a young individual may cause long-term, if not permanent, alterations of cartilage biomechanical properties. This may predispose joint to degenerative changes later in life.

  17. Interleukin-1 inhibits osmotically-induced calcium signaling and volume regulation in articular chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Scott; Votta, Bartholomew J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Articular chondrocytes respond to osmotic stress with transient changes in cell volume and the intracellular concentration of calcium ion ([Ca2+]i). The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with osteoarthritis, influences osmotically-induced Ca2+ signaling. METHODS Fluorescence ratio imaging was used to measure [Ca2+]i and cell volume in response to hypo- or hyper-osmotic stress in isolated porcine chondrocytes, with or without pre-exposure to 10 ng/ml IL-1α. Inhibitors of IL-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-Ra), Ca2+ mobilization (thapsigargin, an inhibitor of Ca-ATPases), and cytoskeletal remodeling (Toxin B, an inhibitor of the Rho family of small GTPases) were used to determine the mechanisms involved in increased [Ca2+]i, F-actin remodeling, volume adaptation and active volume recovery. RESULTS In response to osmotic stress, chondrocytes exhibited transient increases in [Ca2+]i, generally followed by decaying oscillations. Pre-exposure to IL-1 significantly inhibited regulatory volume decrease following hypo-osmotic swelling and reduced the change in cell volume and the time to peak [Ca2+]i in response to hyper-osmotic stress, but did not affect the peak magnitudes of [Ca2+]i in those cells that did response. Co-treatment with IL-1Ra, thapsigargin, or Toxin B restored these responses to control levels. The effects were associated with alterations in F-actin organization. CONCLUSIONS IL-1 alters the normal volumetric and Ca2+ signaling response of chondrocytes to osmotic stress through mechanisms involving F-actin remodeling via small Rho GTPases. These findings provide further insights into the mechanisms by which IL-1 may interfere with normal physiologic processes in the chondrocyte, such as the adaptation or regulatory responses to mechanical and osmotic loading. PMID:18495501

  18. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016.

  19. Role of computer aided detection (CAD) integration: case study with meniscal and articular cartilage CAD applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Nabile; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Knee-related injuries involving the meniscal or articular cartilage are common and require accurate diagnosis and surgical intervention when appropriate. With proper techniques and experience, confidence in detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage abnormalities can be quite high. However, for radiologists without musculoskeletal training, diagnosis of such abnormalities can be challenging. In this paper, the potential of improving diagnosis through integration of computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms for automatic detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries of the knees is studied. An integrated approach in which the results of algorithms evaluating either meniscal tears or articular cartilage injuries provide feedback to each other is believed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the individual CAD algorithms due to the known association between abnormalities in these distinct anatomic structures. The correlation between meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries is exploited to improve the final diagnostic results of the individual algorithms. Preliminary results from the integrated application are encouraging and more comprehensive tests are being planned.

  20. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  1. Repair of articular cartilage defects in minipigs by microfracture surgery and BMSCs transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of minimal invasive repair of cartilage defect by arthroscope-aided microfracture surgery and autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: Bone marrow of minipigs was taken out and the bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured to passage 3. Then 6 minipigs were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 knees in each group. After the articular cartilage defect was induced in each knee. the left defect received microfracture surgery and was injected with 2. 5 ml BMSCs cells at a concentration of 3×107 cells/ml into the articular cavity; while right knee got single microfracture or served as blank control group. The animals were killed at 8 or 16 weeks, and the repair tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically examined for the presence of type Ⅱ collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at 8 and 16 weeks. Results:Eight weeks after the surgery, the overlying articular surface of the cartilage defect showed normal color and integrated to adjacent cartilage. And 16 weeks after surgery, hyaline cartilage was observed at the repairing tissues and immunostaining indicated the diffuse presence of this type Ⅱ collagen and GAGs throughout the repair cartilage in the treated defects. Single microfracture group had the repairing of fibro-cartilage, while during the treatment, the defects of blank group were covered with fewer fiber tissues, and no blood capillary growth or any immunological rejection was observed. Conclusion:Microfracture technique and BMSCs transplantation to repair cartilage defect is characterized with minimal invasion and easy operation, and it will greatly promote the regeneration repair of articular cartilage defect.

  2. Autophagy effects on chondrocyte survival and cartilage damage%自噬与软骨细胞生存及软骨损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张谢卓; 徐超; 伊力哈木·托合提

    2015-01-01

    AND CONCLUSION: Intra-articular chondrocytes can response to the changes in the microenvironment so as to adjust the extracelular matrix metabolism and maintain the biological function of articular cartilage. Hypoxic environment in which chondrocytes eixt is an important factor to causes autophagy. Autophagy is a normal balance or protection mechanism of chondrocytes. Studies on the correlation of autophagy with cartilage damage have made considerable progress in recent years, but stil in its infancy. Atg discovery at the molecular level deepens the understanding of autophagy, but the induction of cartilage autophagy pathway, signal transduction, and their effects on the survival of chondrocytes are not clear yet, which need further studies.

  3. An RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for the adhesion, growth and cartilage forming capacity of human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Vonwil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at testing whether an RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for adhesion and growth of human articular chondrocytes (HAC, and whether it enhances their post expansion chondrogenic capacity. HAC/substrate interaction was restricted to RGD by modifying tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS with a poly(ethylene glycol (PEG based copolymer system that renders the surface resistant to protein adsorption while at the same time presenting the bioactive RGD-containing peptide GCRGYGRGDSPG (RGD. As compared to TCPS, HAC cultured on RGD spread faster (1.9-fold, maintained higher type II collagen mRNA expression (4.9-fold and displayed a 19% lower spreading area. On RGD, HAC attachment efficiency (66±10% and proliferation rate (0.56±0.04 doublings/day, as well as type II collagen mRNA expression in the subsequent chondrogenic differentiation phase, were similar to those of cells cultured on TCPS. In contrast, cartilaginous matrix deposition by HAC expanded on RGD was slightly but consistently higher (15% higher glycosaminoglycan-to-DNA ratio. RDG (bioinactive peptide and PEG (no peptide ligand controls yielded drastically reduced attachment efficiency (lower than 11% and proliferation (lower than 0.20 doublings/day. Collectively, these data indicate that restriction of HAC interaction with a substrate through RGD peptides is sufficient to support their adhesion, growth and maintenance of cartilage forming capacity. The concept could thus be implemented in materials for cartilage repair, whereby in situ recruited/infiltrated chondroprogenitor cells would proliferate while maintaining their ability to differentiate and generate cartilage tissue.

  4. Osthole Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Catabolism in Rat Chondrocytes and Cartilage Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Du

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cartilage destruction is thought to be the major mediator of osteoarthritis. Recent studies suggest that inhibition of subchrondral bone loss by anti-osteoporosis (OP drug can protect cartilige erosion. Osthole, as a promising agent for treating osteoporosis, may show potential in treating osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Osthole affects the proliferation and catabolism of rat chondrocytes, and the degeneration of cartilage explants. Methods: Rat chondrocytes were treated with Osthole (0 μM, 6.25 μM, 12.5 μM, and 25 μM with or without IL1-β (10ng/ml for 24 hours. The expression levels of type II collagen and MMP13 were detected by western Blot. Marker genes for chondrocytes (A-can and Sox9, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecanases (ADAMTS5 and genes implicated in extracellular matrix catabolism were evaluated by qPCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and fluorescence activated cell sorter. Wnt7b/β-catenin signaling was also investigated. Cartilage explants from two-week old SD rats were cultured with IL-1β, Osthole and Osthole plus IL-1β for four days and glycosaminoglycan (GAG synthesis was assessed with toluidine blue staining and Safranine O/Fast Green FCF staining, collagen type II expression was detected by immunofuorescence. Results: Osthole reduced expression of chondrocyte markers and increased expression of MMP13, ADAMTS5 and MMP9 in a dose-dependent manner. Catabolic gene expression levels were further improved by Osthole plus IL-1β. Osthole inhibited chondrocyte proliferation. GAG synthesis and type II collagen were decreased in both the IL-1β groups and the Osthole groups, and significantly reduced by Osthole plus IL-1β. Conclusions: Our data suggested that Osthole increases the catabolism of rat chondrocytes and cartilage explants, this effect might be mediated through inhibiting Wnt7b

  5. The rigid curette technique for the application of fibrin bioadhesive during hip arthroscopy for articular cartilage lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asopa, Vipin; Singh, Parminder J

    2014-04-01

    Encouraging midterm results have recently been reported for the arthroscopic treatment of delaminating articular cartilage lesions at the capsulolabral junction of the hip joint using fibrin bioadhesive. The needle used to introduce the bioadhesive is long, flexible, and often difficult to position. We describe a novel technique for introducing the needle that allows accurate placement behind the delaminated articular cartilage pocket during hip arthroscopy.

  6. [Basophilic line of the articular cartilage in normal and various pathological states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, L R

    1987-04-01

    Epiphyses of long tubular bones in the man and animals of various age, as well as experimental material of the adjuvant arthritis, with special reference to the basal part of the articular cartilage have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and histometrical methods. The structural-chemical organization of the basophilic line (tidemark) of the articular cartilage ensures its barrier role and participation in regulating selective permeability. Reconstruction of the tidemark in the process of physiological ageing and in cases of the articular pathology is aimed to preserve its integrity and in this way a complete differentiation of the noncalcified and calcified structures is secured. Disturbance of the basophilic line results in changes of the articular selective permeability, in invasion of vessels and structural elements of the bone marrow, and in development of profound distrophic and destructive changes of the cartilage--in deforming artrosis. Deflations in the structural-chemical organization of the tidemark indicate certain disturbances in the state of the system articular cartilage--subchondral bone. These data can be of prognostic importance.

  7. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvast, Tuomo S.; Kokkonen, Harri T.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Quinn, Thomas M.; Nieminen, Miika T.; Töyräs, Juha

    2009-11-01

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Ø = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist®, gadodiamide: Omniscan™, ioxaglate: Hexabrix™ or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  8. TGF-beta1 immobilized tri-co-polymer for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Hung; Cheng, Winston T K; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2006-05-01

    Tri-co-polymer with composition of gelatin, hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-6-sulfate has been used to mimic the cartilage extracellular matrix as scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we try to immobilize TGF-beta1 onto the surface of the tri-co-polymer sponge to suppress the undesired differentiation during the cartilage growth in vitro. The scaffold was synthesized with a pore size in a range of 300-500 microm. TGF-beta1 was immobilized on the surface of the tri-co-polymer scaffold with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as a crosslinking agent. Tri-co-polymer scaffolds with and without TGF-beta1 were seeded with porcine chondrocytes and cultured in a spinner flask for 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The chondrocytes were characterized by the methods of immunohistochemical staining with anti-type II collagen and anti-S-100 protein monoclonal antibody, and RT-PCR. After culturing for 4 weeks, chondrocytes showed positive in S-100 protein, Alcian blue, and type II collagen for the scaffold with TGF-beta1 immobilization. There is no observed type I and type X collagen expression in the scaffolds from the observation of RT-PCR. In addition, the scaffold without TGF-beta1 immobilization, type X collagen, can be detected after cultured for 2 weeks. Type I collagen was progressively expressed after 4 weeks. These results can conclude that TGF-beta1 immobilized scaffold can suppress chondrocytes toward prehypertrophic chondrocytes and osteolineage cells. The tri-co-polymer sponge with TGF-beta1 immobilization should have a great potential in cartilage tissue engineering in the future.

  9. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Abusara

    Full Text Available When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD, respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests.

  10. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests.

  11. BMP receptor signaling is required for postnatal maintenance of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan B Rountree

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage plays an essential role in health and mobility, but is frequently damaged or lost in millions of people that develop arthritis. The molecular mechanisms that create and maintain this thin layer of cartilage that covers the surface of bones in joint regions are poorly understood, in part because tools to manipulate gene expression specifically in this tissue have not been available. Here we use regulatory information from the mouse Gdf5 gene (a bone morphogenetic protein [BMP] family member to develop new mouse lines that can be used to either activate or inactivate genes specifically in developing joints. Expression of Cre recombinase from Gdf5 bacterial artificial chromosome clones leads to specific activation or inactivation of floxed target genes in developing joints, including early joint interzones, adult articular cartilage, and the joint capsule. We have used this system to test the role of BMP receptor signaling in joint development. Mice with null mutations in Bmpr1a are known to die early in embryogenesis with multiple defects. However, combining a floxed Bmpr1a allele with the Gdf5-Cre driver bypasses this embryonic lethality, and leads to birth and postnatal development of mice missing the Bmpr1a gene in articular regions. Most joints in the body form normally in the absence of Bmpr1a receptor function. However, articular cartilage within the joints gradually wears away in receptor-deficient mice after birth in a process resembling human osteoarthritis. Gdf5-Cre mice provide a general system that can be used to test the role of genes in articular regions. BMP receptor signaling is required not only for early development and creation of multiple tissues, but also for ongoing maintenance of articular cartilage after birth. Genetic variation in the strength of BMP receptor signaling may be an important risk factor in human osteoarthritis, and treatments that mimic or augment BMP receptor signaling should be

  12. In vitro cell quality of articular chondrocytes assigned for autologous implantation in dependence of specific patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestka, Jan M; Schmal, Hagen; Salzmann, Gian;

    2011-01-01

    between chondrocyte quality after in vitro cultivation and possible correlations with patient-specific factors. DESIGN: Cell quality of 252 consecutive ACI patients was assessed after chondrocyte in vitro expansion by determination of the expression of cartilage relevant surface marker CD44 and cartilage......-specific differentiation markers (aggrecan and collagen type II). All cell quality parameters were correlated with patient-specific parameters, such as age, size and defect location, number of defects and grade of joint degeneration according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. RESULTS: Neither the expression of CD44......, aggrecan or collagen type II nor cell density or viability after proliferation seemed to correlate with the grade of joint degeneration, defect aetiology or patient gender. However, chondrocytes harvested from the knee joints of patients at less than 20 years of age showed significantly higher expression...

  13. Chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal development, growth, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Beier, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Most of our bones form through the process of endochondral ossification, which is tightly regulated by the activity of the cartilage growth plate. Chondrocyte maturation through the various stages of growth plate physiology ultimately results in hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is an essential contributor to longitudinal bone growth, but recent data suggest that these cells also play fundamental roles in signaling to other skeletal cells, thus coordinating endochondral ossification. On the other hand, ectopic hypertrophy of articular chondrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Thus, a better understanding of the processes that control chondrocyte hypertrophy in the growth plate as well as in articular cartilage is required for improved management of both skeletal growth disorders and osteoarthritis. This review summarizes recent findings on the regulation of hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation, the cellular mechanisms involved in hypertrophy, and the role of chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal physiology and pathophysiology.

  14. The application of POSS nanostructures in cartilage tissue engineering: the chondrocyte response to nanoscale geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseni, Adelola O; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research into cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), there is still no scaffold ideal for clinical applications. Various synthetic and natural polymers have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but none have reached widespread clinical use. The authors investigate the potential of POSS-PCU, a synthetic nanocomposite polymer, for use in CTE. POSS-PCU is modified with silsesquioxane nanostructures that improve its biological and physical properties. The ability of POSS-PCU to support the growth of ovine nasoseptal chondrocytes was evaluated against a polymer widely used in CTE, polycaprolactone (PCL). Scaffolds with varied concentrations of the POSS molecule were also synthesized to investigate their effect on chondrocyte growth. Chondrocytes were seeded onto scaffold disks (PCU negative control; POSS-PCU 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%; PCL). Cytocompatibilty was evaluated using cell viability, total DNA, collagen and GAG assays. Chondrocytes cultured on POSS-PCU (2% POSS) scaffolds had significantly higher viability than PCL scaffolds (p  0.05). POSS-PCU (6% and 8% POSS) had improved viability and proliferation over an 18 day culture period compared with 2% and 4% POSS-PCU (p < 0.0001). Increasing the percentage of POSS in the scaffolds increased the size of the pores found in the scaffolds (p < 0.05). POSS-PCU has excellent potential for use in CTE. It supports the growth of chondrocytes in vitro and the POSS modification significantly enhances the growth and proliferation of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared with traditional scaffolds such as PCL.

  15. Role of electrostatic interactions on the transport of druglike molecules in hydrogel-based articular cartilage mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Fengbin; Baldursdottir, Stefania G.; Hvidt, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    In the field of drug delivery to the articular cartilage, it is advantageous to apply artificial tissue models as surrogates of cartilage for investigating drug transport and release properties. In this study, artificial cartilage models consisting of 0.5% (w/v) agarose gel containing 0.5% (w/v) ...

  16. A comparison of healthy human and swine articular cartilage dynamic indentation mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronken, S; Arnold, M P; Ardura García, H; Jeger, A; Daniels, A U; Wirz, D

    2012-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a multicomponent, poroviscoelastic tissue with nonlinear mechanical properties vital to its function. A consequent goal of repair or replacement of injured cartilage is to achieve mechanical properties in the repair tissue similar to healthy native cartilage. Since fresh healthy human articular cartilage (HC) is not readily available, we tested whether swine cartilage (SC) could serve as a suitable substitute for mechanical comparisons. To a first approximation, cartilage tissue and surgical substitutes can be evaluated mechanically as viscoelastic materials. Stiffness measurements (dynamic modulus, loss angle) are vital to function and are also a non-destructive means of evaluation. Since viscoelastic material stiffness is strongly strain rate dependent, stiffness was tested under different loading conditions related to function. Stiffness of healthy HC and SC specimens was determined and compared using two non-destructive, mm-scale indentation test modes: fast impact and slow sinusoidal deformation. Deformation resistance (dynamic modulus) and energy handling (loss angle) were determined. For equivalent anatomic locations, there was no difference in dynamic modulus. However, the HC loss angle was ~35% lower in fast impact and ~12% higher in slow sinusoidal mode. Differences seem attributable to age (young SC, older HC) but also to species anatomy and biology. Test mode-related differences in human-swine loss angle support use of multiple function-related test modes. Keeping loss angle differences in mind, swine specimens could serve as a standard of comparison for mechanical evaluation of e.g. engineered cartilage or synthetic repair materials.

  17. Presence and mechanism of knee articular cartilage degeneration after meniscal reconstruction in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienen, TG; Heijkants, RGJC; de Groot, JH; Pennings, AJ; Poole, AR; Veth, RPH; Buma, P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Partial meniscectomy is the golden standard for treating a bucket-handle tear in the meniscus of the knee, but it inevitably leads to articular cartilage degeneration. Surgical creation of an access channel between the lesion and the vascularized synovial lining is intended to induce ingr

  18. Porous polymers for repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented here were initiated to answer a variety of questions concerning firstly the repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and, secondly, the repair of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage. AIMS OF THE STUDIES I To assess the effect of implantation of a porous polym

  19. Presence and mechanism of knee articular cartilage degeneration after meniscal reconstruction in dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, Tony van; Heijkants, R.G.J.C.; Groot, J.H. de; Pennings, A.J.; Poole, A.R.; Veth, R.P.H.; Buma, P.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Partial meniscectomy is the golden standard for treating a bucket-handle tear in the meniscus of the knee, but it inevitably leads to articular cartilage degeneration. Surgical creation of an access channel between the lesion and the vascularized synovial lining is intended to induce ingr

  20. Glucosamine:chondroitin or ginger root extract have little effect on articular cartilage in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sows are culled at a high rate from breeding herds due to musclo-skeletal problems and lameness. Research in our laboratory has shown that even first-parity sows have significant amounts of osteochondritic lesions of their articular cartilage. Glusoamine chondroitin and ginger root extract have both...

  1. THE EFFECT IN-VITRO OF IRRIGATING SOLUTIONS ON INTACT RAT ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulstra, Sjoerd K; KUIJER, R; EERDMANS, P; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1994-01-01

    Rat patellae were preincubated with culture medium M199 for one hour and then with either fresh culture medium or Ringer's solution, Ringer lactate, Ringer glucose, normal saline or Betadine for another hour. The rate of proteoglycan synthesis in the articular cartilage was then measured by uptake o

  2. Topographical mapping of biochemical properties of articular cartilage in the equine fetlock joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; Tekoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Karssenberg, D.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate topographical differences in the biochemical composition of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage of the normal equine fetlock joint. Water content, DNA content, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and a number of characteristics of the collagen network (t

  3. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R.A.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bayliss, M.T.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  4. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  5. SHP2-Deficiency in Chondrocytes Deforms Orofacial Cartilage and Ciliogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shen, Jingling; Noda, Kazuo; Kitami, Megumi; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Congenital orofacial abnormalities are clinically seen in human syndromes with SHP2 germline mutations such as LEOPARD and Noonan syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that SHP2-deficiency leads to skeletal abnormalities including scoliosis and cartilaginous benign tumor metachondromatosis, suggesting that growth plate cartilage is a key tissue regulated by SHP2. The role and cellular mechanism of SHP2 in the orofacial cartilage, however, remains unknown. Here, we investigated the postnatal craniofacial development by inducible disruption of Shp2 in chondrocytes. Shp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed severe deformity of the mandibular condyle accompanied by disorganized, expanded cartilage in the trabecular bone region, enhanced type X collagen, and reduced Erk production. Interestingly, the length of primary cilia, an antenna like organelle sensing environmental signaling, was significantly shortened, and the number of primary cilia was reduced in the cKO mice. The expression levels of intraflagellar transports (IFTs), essential molecules in the assembly and function of primary cilia, were significantly decreased. Taken together, lack of Shp2 in orofacial cartilage led to severe defects of ciliogenesis through IFT reduction, resulting in mandibular condyle malformation and cartilaginous expansion. Our study provides new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SHP2-deficiency in cartilage and helps to understand orofacial and skeletal manifestations seen in patients with SHP2 mutations.

  6. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography provides detailed information on articular cartilage lesions in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Moller, N C R; Brommer, H; Liukkonen, J; Virén, T; Timonen, M; Puhakka, P H; Jurvelin, J S; van Weeren, P R; Töyräs, J

    2013-09-01

    Arthroscopy enables direct inspection of the articular surface, but provides no information on deeper cartilage layers. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on measurement of reflection and backscattering of light, is a diagnostic technique used in cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. It provides cross-sectional images at resolutions comparable to that of low-power microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine if OCT is feasible for advanced clinical assessment of lesions in equine articular cartilage during diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnostic arthroscopy of 36 metacarpophalangeal joints was carried out ex vivo. Of these, 18 joints with varying degrees of cartilage damage were selected, wherein OCT arthroscopy was conducted using an OCT catheter (diameter 0.9 mm) inserted through standard instrument portals. Five sites of interest, occasionally supplemented with other locations where defects were encountered, were arthroscopically graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system. The same sites were evaluated qualitatively (ICRS classification and morphological description of the lesions) and quantitatively (measurement of cartilage thickness) on OCT images. OCT provided high resolution images of cartilage enabling determination of cartilage thickness. Comparing ICRS grades determined by both arthroscopy and OCT revealed poor agreement. Furthermore, OCT visualised a spectrum of lesions, including cavitation, fibrillation, superficial and deep clefts, erosion, ulceration and fragmentation. In addition, with OCT the arthroscopically inaccessible area between the dorsal MC3 and P1 was reachable in some cases. Arthroscopically-guided OCT provided more detailed and quantitative information on the morphology of articular cartilage lesions than conventional arthroscopy. OCT could therefore improve the diagnostic value of arthroscopy in equine orthopaedic surgery.

  7. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina, Willow Bark (Salix alba, and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina, willow bark (Salix alba, and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG, β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  8. T2* mapping of articular cartilage: current status of research and first clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Weiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    T2* mapping is a relatively new method for the compositional assessment of the articular cartilage. Typically, a multigradient echo or an ultrashort echo time imaging technique with a range of short and very short echo times is used. In most studies, imaging is performed at a high field strength, that is, 3 and 7 T. Postprocessing includes exponential fitting of relaxation decay and manual region-of-interest-based measurements of T2* times on T2* maps. Detailed analyses of T2* times of articular cartilage have shown distinct T2* components with shorter and longer T2* times. Moreover, there is a zonal distribution with a significant depthwise gradient of T2*, with relatively short times near the osteochondral junction and relatively long times at the cartilage's surface. T2* times of normal articular cartilage at the knee are, when averaged over the whole cartilage thickness and using monoexponential fitting, approximately 20 milliseconds. The results of recent studies have shown a good test-retest as well as interreader and intrareader reliabilities for T2* mapping. This article provides a descriptive review of the current literature, briefly discusses the technique itself, and provides an outlook on future research questions and possible clinical applications.

  9. Radiation-induced chrondrocalcinosis of the knee articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, C.H.; Dieppe, P.A.; Bullimore, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    A case of a middle-aged man with symptomatic, localised chondrocalcinosis of the knee following irradiation is described. Cartilage damage induced by radiotherapy should be added to the list of local factors which can predispose to chondrocalcinosis.

  10. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiao-lin; CHEN Wen-zhi; ZHOU Kun; WANG Zhi-biao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage. Methods: Ten adult New Zealand rabbits with bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defects on the cartilage surface of intercondylar fossas were used in this study. The wounds in the left knees were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as the experimental group. The right knees received no treatment as the control group. All the animals were killed at 8 weeks after injury and the tissues in the wounds were collected for gross appearance grading, histological grading and proteoglycan quantity. Results: The scores of the gross appearance grades, histological grades and the optical density of toluidine blue of the tissues in the experimental group were significantly higher than those of the controls at 8 weeks after injury (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound can accelerate the repair of injured articular cartilage.

  11. The signs of differentiation of chondrocytes in the formation of early cartilage lesions in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2011-01-01

    Results. The activity of collagen type II cleavage was shown to be increased in the area of age-related OA-like cartilage lesions. This was accompanied by the high expression of collagenases of metalloproteinases (MMP 1, 14 (MT1-MMP, aggrecanases - desintegrin and MMP with thrombospondin type 1 motif (ADAMTS 5, the cytokines of interleukins (IL 1α/β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, as well as the genes associated with chondrocyte hypertrophy of type X collagen (C0L10A1, MMP 13 and 9, Indian hedgehog (Ihh and cas-pase 3 in the immediate vicinity of a lesion area. At the same time, there was a high expression of growth factors associated with the proliferation phase of chondrocytes, namely: parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2, transforming growth factor β1/2 (TGF-β1/2, as well as macromolecules of matrix of type II collagen (C0L2A1 and aggrecan in both the areas adjacent to the lesions and at a considerable distance from their center. However, these areas showed no higher collagen cleavage activity. Nether higher collagen cleavage, nor excess expression of the genes examined were observed in the absolutely intact cartilage areas. Conclusion. Our studies have indicated that the area of very early age-related OA-like focal cartilage lesions exhibits enhanced type II collagen cleavage that is attended by the expression of the genes associated with chondrocyte differentiation in the embryonic growth plate.

  12. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin He,1,* Bei Feng,1,2,* Chuanpei Huang,1 Hao Wang,1 Yang Ge,1 Renjie Hu,1 Meng Yin,1 Zhiwei Xu,1 Wei Wang,1 Wei Fu,1,2 Jinghao Zheng1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. Keywords: electrospinning, nanocomposite, cartilage tissue engineering, nanomaterials, stem cells

  13. Viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage attached to subchondral bone at high frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Duncan ET

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is a viscoelastic material, but its exact behaviour under the full range of physiological loading frequencies is unknown. The objective of this study was to measure the viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage at loading frequencies of up to 92 Hz. Methods Intact tibial plateau cartilage, attached to subchondral bone, was investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. A sinusoidally varying compressive force of between 16 N and 36 N, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 92 Hz, was applied to the cartilage surface by a flat indenter. The storage modulus, loss modulus and phase angle (between the applied force and the deformation induced were determined. Results The storage modulus, E', increased with increasing frequency, but at higher frequencies it tended towards a constant value. Its dependence on frequency, f, could be represented by, E' = Aloge (f + B where A = 2.5 ± 0.6 MPa and B = 50.1 ± 12.5 MPa (mean ± standard error. The values of the loss modulus (4.8 ± 1.0 MPa mean ± standard deviation were much less than the values of storage modulus and showed no dependence on frequency. The phase angle was found to be non-zero for all frequencies tested (4.9 ± 0.6°. Conclusion Articular cartilage is viscoelastic throughout the full range of frequencies investigated. The behaviour has implications for mechanical damage to articular cartilage and the onset of osteoarthritis. Storage modulus increases with frequency, until the plateau region is reached, and has a higher value than loss modulus. Furthermore, loss modulus does not increase with loading frequency. This means that more energy is stored by the tissue than is dissipated and that this effect is greater at higher frequencies. The main mechanism for this excess energy to be dissipated is by the formation of cracks.

  14. Microstructure of Temporomandibular Joint Cartilage after Intra-Articular Betamethasone Sodium Phosphate/Betamethasone Dipropionate Injection during the Early Stage of Experimental Osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Kostina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the morphological changes in cartilage after a single intra-articular betamethasone sodium phosphate (BSP/betamethasone dipropionate (BDP injection during the early stage of experimental osteoarthrosis (OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Material and Methods: The experiment was performed on 18 male rabbits aged 6 months .The first group consisted of 9 healthy rabbits. The second group included 9 rabbits with mechanically induced TMJ OA. For 5 days, 3 hours daily, a load (with a force of 200N on the TMJ was imposed. In the left TMJ of the second group of rabbits, betamethasone was injected intra-articularly in different doses: 0.1 ml (n=3, 0.3 ml (n=3, and 0.5 ml (n=3. The right TMJ was used for comparison. A combined anesthesia was applied each experimental day. Rabbits of both groups were sacrificed on days 7, 14, and 30 with introductory combined anesthesia and intravenous injection of Zoletil 100® 20 mg/kg to stop their breathing. Results: Betamethasone caused destruction of the chondrocytes, fragmentation of collagen fibers, deficit of proteoglycans (PGs and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, thinning of the cartilage, and contributed to the progression of TMJ OA. Conclusion: The optimal dose of BSP/BDP for intra-articular injection in the early stages of TMJ OA must be within the range of 0.1-0.3 ml|0.7-1.5 mg.

  15. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

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    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  16. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  17. Characterization of enzymatically induced degradation of articular cartilage using high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töyräs, J.; Rieppo, J.; Nieminen, M. T.; Helminen, H. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Ultrasound may provide a quantitative technique for the characterization of cartilage changes typical of early osteoarthrosis. In this study, specific changes in bovine articular cartilage were induced using collagenase and chondroitinase ABC, enzymes that selectively degrade collagen fibril network and digest proteoglycans, respectively. Changes in cartilage structure and properties were quantified using high frequency ultrasound, microscopic analyses and mechanical indentation tests. The ultrasound reflection coefficient of the physiological saline-cartilage interface (R1) decreased significantly (-96.4%, p<0.01) in the collagenase digested cartilage compared to controls. Also a significantly lower ultrasound velocity (-6.2%, p<0.01) was revealed after collagenase digestion. After chondroitinase ABC digestion, a new acoustic interface at the depth of the enzyme penetration front was detected. Cartilage thickness, as determined with ultrasound, showed a high, linear correlation (R = 0.943, n = 60, average difference 0.073 mm (4.0%)) with the thickness measured by the needle-probe method. Both enzymes induced a significant decrease in the Young's modulus of cartilage (p<0.01). Our results indicate that high frequency ultrasound provides a sensitive technique for the analysis of cartilage structure and properties. Possibly ultrasound may be utilized in vivo as a quantitative probe during arthroscopy.

  18. Increasing lateral tibial slope: is there an association with articular cartilage changes in the knee?

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    Khan, Nasir; Shepel, Michael; Leswick, David A.; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, and College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The geometry of the lateral tibial slope (LTS) plays an important role in the overall biomechanics of the knee. Through this study, we aim to assess the impact of LTS on cartilage degeneration in the knee. A retrospective analysis of 93 knee MRI scans (1.5 T or 3 T) for patients aged 20-45 years with no history of trauma or knee surgery, and absence of internal derangement. The LTS was calculated using the circle method. Chondropathy was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). Linear regression analysis was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). In our cohort of patients, a statistically significant association was seen between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patellar articular surface and the lateral tibial articular surface (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening chondropathy of the lateral patellar, medial trochlea, lateral trochlea, medial femoral, lateral femoral, and medial tibial articular surfaces. Our results show a statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patella and the lateral tibial plateau. We speculate that increased LTS may result in increased femoral glide over the lateral tibial plateau with subsequent increased external rotation of the femur predisposing to patellofemoral articular changes. Future arthroscopic studies are needed to further confirm our findings. (orig.)

  19. MRI findings in injured articular cartilage of the knee correlated with surgical findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ming; PENG Wen-jia; WU Hua; Kacher Daniel; XIA Li-ming; AI Fei; LI Feng; XIONG Wei

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a strong need for quick noninvasive diagnostic technique that can give a valid estimate of the status of the cartilage reliably,discriminating intact cartilage from various grades of impaired cartilage.The goal of this study was to assess the incidence of knee cartilage injuries and compare the accuracy of two-dimension spin echo(2D SE)and fast spin echo(FSE)(conventional MRI),three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo(3D SPGR),three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady state acquisition(3D FIESTA)MR imaging sequences with surgical examination of the articular cartilage.Methods One hundred and thirty-eight knees with history of knee trauma received conventional MRI,3D SPGR and 3D FIESTA MRI examination before surgery,and surgical examination of articular cartilage was used as reference standard.A modified version of the Noyes classification system was applied for the evaluation of the lateral femoral condyle(LFC),medial femoral condyle(MFC),lateral tibial plateau(LTP),medial tibial plateau(MTP),trochlea and patella.The incidence and distributions of different injured grades at different articular surfaces of knee were assessed.A series of assessment indeces of 3D SPGR,3D FIESTA,and the combination of the conventional MRI and 3D SPGR imaging were calculated.Results The incidence of cartilage defects(grade 2 to 4)was 22%(183/828),according to surgical examination.Grade 3 and 4 lesions were absent at the medial tibial plateau.The rates of exact match between the grading results of different MRI procedures and surgical examination were 49% of 3D SPGR,61% of 3D FIESTA,and 82% of the combination of 3D SPGR and conventional MRI.Also,the combination of 3D SPGR and conventional MR imaging provided the highest sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive and negative predictive values,at 71%,97%,90%,90% and 90%,respectively.Conclusions For all the articular surfaces of the traumatic knees,about one fifth(22%)were cartilage defects.Both 3D SPGR and 3D

  20. Experimental study on tissue engineering resurfacing of articular cartilage defect%组织工程修复关节软骨缺损的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡怀建; 雍宜民; 沈惠良

    2001-01-01

    目的用组织工程的方法,将新生关节软骨细胞先在高分子聚乳酸材料上进行体外培养,然后移植于关节软骨缺损处,以达到修复关节软骨缺损的目的。方法取新生新西兰兔关节软骨细胞培养于高分子聚乳酸材料支架上。将16只兔的32个膝关节股骨髁处人工造成一4mm×6mm大小缺损,并随机分为二组。Ⅰ组10只兔,20个关节缺损,用软骨细胞-高分子聚乳酸移植修复。Ⅱ组6只兔,左膝用软骨细胞-高分子聚乳酸移植体修复,表面覆盖单层软骨细胞;右膝仅用高分子聚乳酸材料修复。术后分别于4、8、12、24周取标本进行大体、光镜、组织化学的方法进行结果评估。结果用软骨细胞-高分子聚乳酸移植体能修复关节软骨缺损,且为透明软骨。新生软骨组织胶原定型为Ⅱ型胶原。结论用软骨细胞-高分子聚乳酸移植体移植,关节软骨缺损能获得透明软骨修复。%Objective Tissue engineering by chondrocyte transplantation with biodegradable polylactic acid scaffolds and new cartilage formation after in vitro culture is developed as a new attempt to repair articular cartilage defects.Methods Chondrocytes from newborn New Zealand rabbits were cultured on polylactic acid implants in vitro.4mm×6mm defects were created artificially at 32 knee joints of 16 rabbits and were randomized into 2 groups.20 joint defects of 10 rabbits in Group 1 were repaired by chondrocyte-seeded polylactic acid implants.In group 2,the left knee joint defects were repaired by chondrocyte-seeded polylactic acid implants while the right knee defects were repaired by polylactic acid implants only.Specimens were collected and assessed grossly,by light microscopy and histochemically at the 4,8,12 and 24th week after operation.Results Joint defects were repaired by chondrocyte-seeded polylactic acid implants and the new cartilages were hyalinic.The collagen component in the new

  1. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates.

  2. Site-specific ultrasound reflection properties and superficial collagen content of bovine knee articular cartilage

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    Laasanen, Mikko S [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Jyvaeskylae Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, FIN-40620 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Saarakkala, Simo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Etelae-Savo Hospital District, Mikkeli Central Hospital, Porrassalmenkatu 35-37, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rieppo, Jarno [Department of Anatomy, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Applied Physics, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-07-21

    Previous quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging studies have demonstrated that the ultrasound reflection measurement of articular cartilage surface sensitively detects degradation of the collagen network, whereas digestion of cartilage proteoglycans has no significant effect on the ultrasound reflection. In this study, the first aim was to characterize the ability of quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging to detect site-specific differences in ultrasound reflection and backscattering properties of cartilage surface and cartilage-bone interface at visually healthy bovine knee (n = 30). As a second aim, we studied factors controlling ultrasound reflection properties of an intact cartilage surface. The ultrasound reflection coefficient was determined in time (R) and frequency domains (IRC) at medial femoral condyle, lateral patello-femoral groove, medial tibial plateau and patella using a 20 MHz ultrasound imaging instrument. Furthermore, cartilage surface roughness was quantified by calculating the ultrasound roughness index (URI). The superficial collagen content of the cartilage was determined using a FT-IRIS-technique. A significant site-dependent variation was shown in cartilage thickness, ultrasound reflection parameters, URI and superficial collagen content. As compared to R and IRC, URI was a more sensitive parameter in detecting differences between the measurement sites. Ultrasound reflection parameters were not significantly related to superficial collagen content, whereas the correlation between R and URI was high. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface showed insignificant site-dependent variation. The current results suggest that ultrasound reflection from the intact cartilage surface is mainly dependent on the cartilage surface roughness and the collagen content has a less significant role.

  3. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

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    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  4. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction.

  5. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  6. Experimental study of tissue-engineered cartilage allograft with RNAi chondrocytes in vivo

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    Wang ZH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhenghui Wang,1 Xiaoli Li,2 Xi-Jing He,3 Xianghong Zhang,1 Zhuangqun Yang,4 Min Xu,1 Baojun Wu,1 Junbo Tu,5 Huanan Luo,1 Jing Yan11Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Dermatology, 3Department of Orthopedics, The Second Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 4Department of Plastic and Burns Surgery, The First Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, The Stomatological Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: To determine the effects of RNA interference (RNAi on chondrocyte proliferation, function, and immunological rejection after allogenic tissue-engineered cartilage transplantation within bone matrix gelatin scaffolds.Methods: Seven million rat normal and RNAi chondrocytes were harvested and separately composited with fibrin glue to make the cell suspension, and then transplanted subcutaneously into the back of Sprague Dawley rats after being cultured for 10 days in vitro. Untransplanted animals served as the control group. The allograft and immunological response were examined at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 months postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining (aggrecan, type II collagen, class I and II major histocompatibility complex, and flow cytometry for peripheral blood cluster of differentiation 4+ (CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells.Results: There was no infection or death in the rats except one, which died in the first week. Compared to the control group, the RNAi group had fewer eukomonocytes infiltrated, which were only distributed around the graft. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in the RNAi group was significantly lower than the normal one (P<0.05. There were many more positively stained chondrocytes and positively stained areas around the cells in the RNAi group, which were not found in the control group.Conclusion: The aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 RNAi for chondrocytes

  7. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of articular cartilage in painful knee joint

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    Digish Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the role of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with atraumatic knee pain. Background and Objectives: Knee pain is one of the most common problems faced by people from time immemorial. There is a wide range of disease ranging from traumatic to degenerative causing knee pain in which articular cartilage is involved. Over the past 15 years, MRI has become the premier, first-line imaging study that should be performed in the evaluation of the painful knee in particular in tears of menisci, cruciate and collateral ligaments, osteochondral abnormalities (chondromalacia, osteoarthritis and osteochondral defects, synovial cysts and bone bruises. MRI, by virtue of its superior soft-tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation and multiplanar capabilities, is superior to more conventional techniques for the evaluation of articular cartilage. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 150 patients in the Department of Radio-diagnosis, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pimpri, Pune over a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013. Patients having fracture or dislocations of the knee joint were also excluded from the study. Detailed clinical history, physical and systemic examination findings of all patients were noted in addition to the laboratory investigations. All patients were subjected to radiograph of knee anterior-posterior and lateral view. MRI was performed with Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto machine. Results: In our study of 150 patients with knee pain, articular cartilage defect was found in 90 patients (60%. Out of 90 patients with articular cartilage defect, 30 patients (20% had full thickness cartilage defects. Subchondral marrow edema was seen beneath 30 patients (20% with articular cartilage defects. 32 patients (21.1% had a complex or macerated meniscal tear. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear was found in seven

  8. MRI evaluation of a new scaffold-based allogenic chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhollander, A.A.M., E-mail: Aad.Dhollander@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Huysse, W.C.J., E-mail: Wouter.Huysse@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, P.C.M., E-mail: pverdonk@yahoo.co [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L., E-mail: Koenraad.Verstraete@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, R., E-mail: Rene.Verdonk@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verbruggen, G., E-mail: Gust.Verbruggen@Ugent.b [Laboratory of Connective Tissue Biology, Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Almqvist, K.F., E-mail: Fredrik.Almqvist@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the implantation of alginate beads containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes for the treatment of symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. MRI was used for the morphological analysis of cartilage repair. The correlation between MRI findings and clinical outcome was also studied. Methods: A biodegradable, alginate-based biocompatible scaffold containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes was used for the treatment of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee. Twenty-one patients were prospectively evaluated with use of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Of the 21 patients, 12 had consented to follow the postoperative MRI evaluation protocol. MRI data were analyzed based on the original MOCART (Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue) and modified MOCART scoring system. The correlation between the clinical outcome and MRI findings was evaluated. Results: A statistically significant clinical improvement became apparent after 6 months and patients continued to improve during the 12 months of follow-up. One of the two MRI scoring systems that were used, showed a statistically significant deterioration of the repair tissue at 1 year of follow-up. Twelve months after the operation complete filling or hypertrophy was found in 41.6%. Bone-marrow edema and effusion were seen in 41.7% and 25% of the study patients, respectively. We did not find a consistent correlation between the MRI criteria and the clinical results. Discussion: The present study confirmed the primary role of MRI in the evaluation of cartilage repair. Two MOCART-based scoring systems were used in a longitudinal fashion and allowed a practical and morphological evaluation of the repair tissue. However, the correlation between clinical outcome and MRI findings was poor. Further

  9. Effects of the mycotoxin nivalenol on bovine articular chondrocyte metabolism in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD is an endemic, age-related degenerative osteoarthropathy and its cause is hypothesised to involve Fusarium mycotoxins. This study investigated the Fusarium mycotoxin Nivalenol (NIV on the metabolism of bovine articular chondrocytes in vitro. DESIGN: The effect 0.0-0.5 µg/ml NIV on transcript levels of types I and II collagen, aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS and the tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs was investigated using quantitative PCR. Amounts of sulphated glycosaminoglycans, MMPs and TIMPs were assessed using the Dimethylmethylene Blue assay, gelatin zymography and reverse gelatin zymography respectively. Cytoskeletal organisation was analysed using confocal microscopy and cytoskeletal gene and protein levels were measured by quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. RESULTS: NIV caused a dose-dependent increase in aggrecan transcription with a concomitant retention of sGAG in the cell lysate. Furthermore, NIV significantly increased MMPs-2, -3 & -9, ADAMTS-4 and -5, and TIMP-2 and -3 transcript levels but inhibited type I collagen, MMP 1 and TIMP 1 mRNA levels. NIV promoted extensive cytoskeletal network remodelling, particularly with vimentin where a dose-dependent peri-nuclear aggregation occurred. CONCLUSION: NIV exposure to chondrocytes decreased matrix deposition, whilst enhancing selective catabolic enzyme production, suggesting its potential for induction of cellular catabolism. This NIV-induced extracellular matrix remodelling may be due to extensive remodelling/disassembly of the cytoskeletal elements. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that trichothecene mycotoxins, and in particular NIV, have the potential to induce matrix catabolism and propagate the pathogenesis of KBD.

  10. Wear and damage of articular cartilage with friction against orthopedic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Durney, Krista M; Jones, Brian K; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements.

  11. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  12. Quantification of the optical surface reflection and surface roughness of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Wang Shuzhe; Huang Yanping; Zheng Yongping [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: simo.saarakkala@uku.fi, E-mail: ypzheng@ieee.org

    2009-11-21

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising new technique for characterizing the structural changes of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). The calculation of quantitative parameters from the OCT signal is an important step to develop OCT as an effective diagnostic technique. In this study, two novel parameters for the quantification of optical surface reflection and surface roughness from OCT measurements are introduced: optical surface reflection coefficient (ORC), describing the amount of a ratio of the optical reflection from cartilage surface with respect to that from a reference material, and OCT roughness index (ORI) indicating the smoothness of the cartilage surface. The sensitivity of ORC and ORI to detect changes in bovine articular cartilage samples after enzymatic degradations of collagen and proteoglycans using collagenase and trypsin enzymes, respectively, was tested in vitro. A significant decrease (p < 0.001) in ORC as well as a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ORI was observed after collagenase digestion. After trypsin digestion, no significant changes in ORC or ORI were observed. To conclude, the new parameters introduced were demonstrated to be feasible and sensitive to detect typical OA-like degenerative changes in the collagen network. From the clinical point of view, the quantification of OCT measurements is of great interest since OCT probes have been already miniaturized and applied in patient studies during arthroscopy or open knee surgery in vivo. Further studies are still necessary to demonstrate the clinical capability of the introduced parameters for naturally occurring early OA changes in the cartilage.

  13. Quantification of the optical surface reflection and surface roughness of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Huang, Yan-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2009-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising new technique for characterizing the structural changes of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). The calculation of quantitative parameters from the OCT signal is an important step to develop OCT as an effective diagnostic technique. In this study, two novel parameters for the quantification of optical surface reflection and surface roughness from OCT measurements are introduced: optical surface reflection coefficient (ORC), describing the amount of a ratio of the optical reflection from cartilage surface with respect to that from a reference material, and OCT roughness index (ORI) indicating the smoothness of the cartilage surface. The sensitivity of ORC and ORI to detect changes in bovine articular cartilage samples after enzymatic degradations of collagen and proteoglycans using collagenase and trypsin enzymes, respectively, was tested in vitro. A significant decrease (p < 0.001) in ORC as well as a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ORI was observed after collagenase digestion. After trypsin digestion, no significant changes in ORC or ORI were observed. To conclude, the new parameters introduced were demonstrated to be feasible and sensitive to detect typical OA-like degenerative changes in the collagen network. From the clinical point of view, the quantification of OCT measurements is of great interest since OCT probes have been already miniaturized and applied in patient studies during arthroscopy or open knee surgery in vivo. Further studies are still necessary to demonstrate the clinical capability of the introduced parameters for naturally occurring early OA changes in the cartilage.

  14. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesper, Tobias; Bittersohl, Daniela; Krauspe, Ruediger; Zilkens, Christoph [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Center of Hip Preservation and Children' s Orthopaedics, San Diego, CA (United States); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bittersohl, Bernd [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  15. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesper, Tobias; Hosalkar, Harish S; Bittersohl, Daniela; Welsch, Götz H; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation-without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented.

  16. Human articular cartilage: in vitro correlation of MRI and histologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Ihling, C.; Tauer, U.; Adler, C.P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    zone correlated weakly to the accumulation of proteoglycans in the radial zone. The trilaminar MRI appearance of the cartilage was only visible when the cartilage was thicker than 2 mm. In cartilage degeneration, we found either a diffuse thinning of all layers or circumscribed lesions (``cartilage ulcer``) of these cartilage layers in the MR images. Early cartilage degeneration was indicated by a signal loss in the superficial zone, correlating to the histologically proven damage of proteoglycans in the transitional and radial zone along with destruction of the superficial zone. We found a strong effect of cartilage rotation in the main magnetic field, too. A rotation of the cartilage structures caused considerable variation in the signal intensity of the second lamina. Cartilage segments in a 55 angle to the magnetic main field had a homogeneous appearance, not a trilaminar appearance. The signal behavior of hyaline articular cartilage does not reflect the laminar histologic structure. Osteoarthrosis and cartilage degeneration are visible on MR images as intracartilaginous signal changes, superficial erosions, diffuse cartilage thinning, and cartilage ulceration. (orig.) With 6 figs., 19 refs.

  17. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqi Tariq M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA, and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecan (ACAN and type II collagen (COL2A1 in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p Leucine mixture (HLM up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p Conclusion Our data suggests that HLM could be chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent in arthritis, switching chondrocyte gene expression from catabolic direction towards anabolic and regenerative, and consequently this approach may be potentially useful as a new adjunct therapeutic/preventive agent for OA or injury recovery.

  18. Effect of the disruption of three cytoskeleton components on chondrocyte metabolism in rabbit knee cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Wangping; Wei Lei; Cao Xiaoming; Guo Heng; Wang Lei; Hao Yongzhuang; Wei Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Background Chondrocytes' phenotype and biosynthesis of matrix are dependent on having an intact cytoskeletal structure.Microfilaments,microtubules,and intermediate filaments are three important components of the cytoskeletal structure of chondrocytes.The aims of this study were to determine and compare the effects of the disruption of these three cytoskeletal elements on the apoptosis and matrix synthesis by rabbit knee chondrocytes in vitro.Methods Chondrocytes were isolated from full-thickness knee cartilage of two-month-old rabbits using enzymatic methods (n=24).The isolated cells were stabilized for three days and then exposed to low,medium,and high doses of chemical agents that disrupt the three principal cytoskeletal elements of interest:colchicine for microtubules,acrylamide for intermediate filaments,and cytochalasin D for actin microfilaments.A group of control cells were treated with carrier.Early apoptosis was assessed using the Annexin-FITC binding assay by flow cytometry on days 1 and 2 after exposure to the disrupting chemical agents.The components and distribution of the cytoskeleton within the cells were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) with immunofluorescence staining on day 3.The mRNA levels of aggrecan (AGG) and type Ⅱ collagen (Col-2) and their levels in culture medium were analyzed using real-time PCR and enzymelinked immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA) on days 3,6,and 9.Results In the initial drug-dose-response study,there was no significant difference in the vitality of cells treated with 0.1 μmol/L colchicine,2.5 mmol/L acrylamide,and 10 μg/L cytochalasin D for two days when compared with the control group of cells.The concentrations of colchicine and acrylamide treatment selected above significantly decreased the number of viable cells over the nine-day culture and disrupted significantly more cell nuclei.Real-time PCR and ELISA results showed that the mRNA levels and medium concentrations of AGG and Col-2 were

  19. A superficial hyperechoic band in human articular cartilage on ultrasonography with histological correlation: preliminary observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sun Han

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To demonstrate the superficial hyperechoic band (SHEB in articular cartilage by using ultrasonography (US and to assess its correlation with histological images. Methods: In total, 47 regions of interest (ROIs were analyzed from six tibial osteochondral specimens (OCSs that were obtained after total knee arthroplasty. Ultrasonograms were obtained for each OCS. Then, matching histological sections from all specimens were obtained for comparison with the ultrasonograms. Two types of histological staining were used: Safranin-O stain (SO to identify glycosaminoglycans (GAG and Masson’s trichrome stain (MT to identify collagen. In step 1, two observers evaluated whether there was an SHEB in each ROI. In step 2, the two observers evaluated which histological staining method correlated better with the SHEB by using the ImageJ software. Results: In step 1 of the analysis, 20 out of 47 ROIs showed an SHEB (42.6%, kappa=0.579. Step 2 showed that the SHEB correlated significantly better with the topographical variation in stainability in SO staining, indicating the GAG distribution, than with MT staining, indicating the collagen distribution (P<0.05, kappa=0.722. Conclusion: The SHEB that is frequently seen in human articular cartilage on high-resolution US correlated better with variations in SO staining than with variations in MT staining. Thus, we suggest that a SHEB is predominantly related to changes in GAG. Identifying an SHEB by US is a promising method for assessing the thickness of articular cartilage or for monitoring early osteoarthritis.

  20. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods.

  1. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; Kooten, van Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Methods: Explants of porcine

  2. The Immunosuppressant FTY720 (Fingolimod enhances Glycosaminoglycan depletion in articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradner Martin H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FTY720 (Fingolimod is a novel immunosuppressive drug investigated in clinical trials for organ transplantation and multiple sclerosis. It acts as a functional sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor antagonist, thereby inhibiting the egress of lymphocytes from secondary lymphoid organs. As S1P is able to prevent IL-1beta induced cartilage degradation, we examined the direct impact of FTY720 on cytokine induced cartilage destruction. Methods Bovine chondrocytes were treated with the bioactive phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTY720-P in combination with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha. Expression of MMP-1,-3.-13, iNOS and ADAMTS-4,-5 and COX-2 was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. Glycosaminoglycan depletion from cartilage explants was determined using a 1,9-dimethylene blue assay and safranin O staining. Results FTY720-P significantly reduced IL-1beta and TNF-alpha induced expression of iNOS. In contrast FTY720-P increased MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5 mRNA expression. Furthermore depletion of glycosaminoglycan from cartilage explants by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha was significantly enhanced by FTY720-P in an MMP-3 dependent manner. Conclusions Our results suggest that FTY720 may enhance cartilage degradation in pro-inflammatory environment.

  3. Probing articular cartilage damage and disease by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Deva D; Neu, Corey P

    2013-01-06

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that reflects a complex interplay of biochemical, biomechanical, metabolic and genetic factors, which are often triggered by injury, and mediated by inflammation, catabolic cytokines and enzymes. An unmet clinical need is the lack of reliable methods that are able to probe the pathogenesis of early OA when disease-rectifying therapies may be most effective. Non-invasive quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) techniques have shown potential for characterizing the structural, biochemical and mechanical changes that occur with cartilage degeneration. In this paper, we review the background in articular cartilage and OA as it pertains to conventional MRI and qMRI techniques. We then discuss how conventional MRI and qMRI techniques are used in clinical and research environments to evaluate biochemical and mechanical changes associated with degeneration. Some qMRI techniques allow for the use of relaxometry values as indirect biomarkers for cartilage components. Direct characterization of mechanical behaviour of cartilage is possible via other specialized qMRI techniques. The combination of these qMRI techniques has the potential to fully characterize the biochemical and biomechanical states that represent the initial changes associated with cartilage degeneration. Additionally, knowledge of in vivo cartilage biochemistry and mechanical behaviour in healthy subjects and across a spectrum of osteoarthritic patients could lead to improvements in the detection, management and treatment of OA.

  4. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis.

  5. Characterizing depth-dependent refractive index of articular cartilage subjected to mechanical wear or enzymic degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuyu; Wu, Jianping; Day, Robert; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Hu, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing a laser scanning confocal microscope system, the refractive indices of articular cartilage (AC) with mechanical or biochemical degenerations were characterized to investigate whether potential correlations exist between refractive index (RI) and cartilage degeneration. The cartilage samples collected from the medial femoral condyles of kangaroo knees were mechanically degenerated under different loading patterns or digested in trypsin solution with different concentrations. The sequences of RI were then measured from cartilage surface to deep region and the fluctuations of RI were quantified considering combined effects of fluctuating frequency and amplitude. The compositional and microstructural alterations of cartilage samples were assessed with histological methods. Along with the loss of proteoglycans, the average RI of cartilage increased and the local fluctuation of RI became stronger. Short-term high-speed test induced little influence to both the depth fluctuation and overall level of RI. Long-term low-speed test increased the fluctuation of RI but the average RI was barely changed. The results substantially demonstrate that RI of AC varies with both compositional and structural alterations and is potentially an indicator for the degeneration of AC.

  6. Safranin O reduces loss of glycosaminoglycans from bovine articular cartilage during histological specimen preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, K; Lammi, M; Arokoski, J; Lapveteläinen, T; Tammi, M; Helminen, H; Kiviranta, I

    1996-02-01

    The ability of Safranin O, added to fixation and decalcification solutions, to prevent the escape of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from small cartilage tissue blocks during histological processing of cartilage has been studied. GAGs in the fixatives and decalcifying solutions used and those remaining in the 1 mm3 cubes of cartilage were assayed biochemically. The quantity of GAGs remaining in the cartilage cubes were determined from Safranin O-stained sections using videomicroscopy or microspectrophotometry. A quantity (10.6%) of GAGs were lost during a conventional 4% buffered formaldehyde fixation (48 h) and a subsequent decalcification in 10% EDTA (12 days) at 4 degrees C. Roughly one-quarter of the total GAG loss occurred during the 48 h fixation, and three-quarters during the 12 days of decalcification. Inclusion of 4% formaldehyde in the decalcification fluid decreased the loss of GAGs to 6.2%. The presence of 0.5% Safranin O in the fixative reduced this loss to 3.4%. When 0.5% Safranin O was included in the fixative and 4% formaldehyde in the decalcification solution, Safranin O staining of the histological sections increased on average by 13.5%. After fixation in the presence of 0.5% Safranin O, there was no difference in the staining intensities when decalcification was carried out in the presence of either Safranin O or formaldehyde, or both. It took 24 h for Safranin O to penetrate into the deep zone of articular cartilage, warranting a fixation period of at least this long. In conclusion, the addition of Safranin O to the fixative and either Safranin O or formaldehyde in the following decalcification fluid, markedly reduces the loss of GAGs from small articular cartilage explants during histological processing. However, for immunohistochemical studies, Safranin O cannot be included in the processing solutions, because it may interfere.

  7. Cartilage storage at 4 °C with regular culture medium replacement benefits chondrocyte viability of osteochondral grafts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianhong; Hu, Zunjie; Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Bin; Xie, Di; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of articular cartilage allografts in culture media is a common method of tissue storage; however, the technical parameters of graft storage remain controversial. In this study, we examined the optimal temperature and culture medium exchange rate for the storage of osteochondral allografts in vitro. Cylindrical osteochondral grafts (n = 120), harvested from the talar joint surface of ten Boer goats, were randomly classified into four groups and stored under the following conditions: Group A1 was maintained at 4 °C in culture medium that was refreshed every 2 days; Group A2 was maintained at 4 °C in the same culture medium, without refreshing; Group B1, was maintained at 37 °C in culture medium that was refreshed every 2 days; Group B2, was maintained at 37 °C in the same culture medium, without refreshing. Chondrocyte viability in the grafts was determined by ethidium bromide/fluorescein diacetate staining on days 7, 21, and 35. Proteoglycan content was measured by Safranin-O staining. Group A1 exhibited the highest chondrocyte survival rates of 90.88 %, 88.31 % and 78.69 % on days 7, 21, and 35, respectively. Safranin O staining revealed no significant differences between groups on days 21 and 35. These results suggest that storage of osteochondral grafts at 4 °C with regular culture medium replacement should be highly suitable for clinical application.

  8. Chondrocalcin is internalized by chondrocytes and triggers cartilage destruction via an interleukin-1β-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantsimba-Malanda, Claudie; Cottet, Justine; Netter, Patrick; Dumas, Dominique; Mainard, Didier; Magdalou, Jacques; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocalcin is among the most highly synthesized polypeptides in cartilage. This protein is released from its parent molecule, type II pro-collagen, after secretion by chondrocytes. A participation of extracellular, isolated chondrocalcin in mineralization was proposed more than 25 years ago, but never demonstrated. Here, exogenous chondrocalcin was found to trigger MMP13 secretion and cartilage destruction ex vivo in human cartilage explants and did so by modulating the expression of interleukin-1β in primary chondrocyte cultures in vitro. Chondrocalcin was found internalized by chondrocytes. Uptake was found mediated by a single 18-mer peptide of chondrocalcin, which does not exhibit homology to any known cell-penetrating peptide. The isolated peptide, when artificially linked as a tetramer, inhibited gene expression regulation by chondrocalcin, suggesting a functional link between uptake and gene expression regulation. At the same time, the tetrameric peptide potentiated chondrocalcin uptake by chondrocytes, suggesting a cooperative mechanism of entry. The corresponding peptide from type I pro-collagen supported identical cell-penetration, suggesting that this property may be conserved among C-propeptides of fibrillar pro-collagens. Structural modeling localized this peptide to the tips of procollagen C-propeptide trimers. Our findings shed light on unexpected function and mechanism of action of these highly expressed proteins from vertebrates.

  9. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  10. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huh Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs, inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only

  11. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA) human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only inhibited by chlorogenic

  12. 骨髓基质细胞诱导分化修复髁突软骨面缺失的实验研究%An experimental study of bone marrow stromal cells differentiating to chondrocytes for repairing temporomandibular joint condylar cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄跃; 沈国芳; 王旭东; 杨辛; 张秀丽; 蒋欣泉

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To repair the temporomandibular joint condylar cartilaginous defects by the differentiated bone marrow stroma cells combined with chondrocytes. METHODS: Fifteen goats were randomly divided into 2 groups.The experimental group included 9 goats, autologous BMSCs combined with chondrocytes were mixed with pluronic F-127 and implanted into goat temporomandibular joint condylar articular cartilage defects. The control group included 6 goats, pluronic F-127 gel was implanted into their temporomandibular joint condylar articular cartilage defects.The goats were killed 4,8,12 weeks postoperatively.The reconstructive articular cartilage was evaluated by HE staining and immunostaining of type Ⅱ collagen. RESULTS: The experimental group could reconstruct the articular cartilage after 4 weeks. 12 weeks later the articular cartilage did not degenerate. The control group could not reconstruct the articular cartilage. CONCLUSIONS: BMSCs can be differentiated into chondrocytes and play an important role in repairing articular cartilage defects. Supported by Phosphor Program of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (04QMX1424) and Key Project in Social Development Sponsored by Fujian Provincial Department of Science and Technology (2009Y0016).%目的:采用骨髓基质细胞(BMSCs)体内修复髁突软骨全层缺失.方法:15只山羊,9只作为实验组,将BMSCs和少量软骨细胞(7∶3比例混合)按5×107/mL与生物可降解材料复合后,植入山羊髁突软骨全层缺失处;对照组6只山羊,髁突软骨全层缺失区植入支架材料,分别于术后4、8、12周每个时间段取材3只实验动物,2只对照组动物;2组分别用HE染色、Ⅱ型胶原分泌的免疫组化法进行评价.结果:实验组术后4周,山羊髁突软骨缺失区能形成成熟的软骨组织,12周时软骨未退变.对照组不能形成成熟的软骨组织.结论:骨髓基质细胞在自体软骨细胞基质的诱导下,可以修复山羊颞下

  13. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  14. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology.

  15. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  16. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures.

  17. In-laboratory diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging for articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleman, Carol; Fogarty, Daniel; Reinhart, Benjamin; Tzvetkov, Tochko; Li, Jun; Nesch, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    The loss of articular cartilage characteristic of osteoarthritis can only be diagnosed by joint space narrowing when conventional radiography is used. This is due to the lack of X-ray contrast of soft tissues. Whereas conventional radiography harnesses the X-ray attenuation properties of tissues, Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI), a novel radiographic technique, allows the visualization of soft tissues simultaneous with calcified tissues by virtue of its ability to not only harness X-ray attenuation but also the X-ray refraction from tissue boundaries. Previously, DEI was dependent upon synchrotron X-rays, but more recently, the development of nonsynchrotron DEI units has been explored. These developments serve to elaborate the full potential of radiography. Here, we tested the potential of an in-laboratory DEI system, called Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging (DEXI), to render images of articular cartilage displaying varying degrees of degradation, ex vivo. DEXI allowed visualization of even early stages of cartilage degeneration such as surface fibrillation. This may be of eventual clinical significance for the diagnosis of early stages of degeneration, or at the very least, to visualize soft tissue degeneration simultaneous with bone changes.

  18. Repair of articular cartilage in rabbit osteochondral defects promoted by extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C.-H.; Yen, Y.-S.; Chen, P.-L.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the stimulative effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the articular cartilage regeneration in the rabbit osteochondral defect model for the first time. An osteochondral defect, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth, was drilled in the patellar groove at the distal end of each femur in 24 mature New Zealand rabbits. The right patellar defects received 500 impulses of shock waves of (at 14 kV) at 1 week after surgery and were designated as the experimental samples; the left patellar defects served as control. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after ESWT, cartilage repair was evaluated macroscopically and histologically using a semiquantitative grading scale. The total scores of the macroscopic evaluation at 4, 8, and 12 weeks in the experimental group were superior to those in the control group (statistical significance level ). As to the total scores of the histologic evaluation, the experimental group showed a tendency toward a better recovery than the control group at 4 weeks (). At 8 and 12 weeks the differences between the experimental and control groups became mild and had no significance on statistical analysis. These findings suggested that regeneration of articular cartilage defects might be promoted by ESWT, especially at the early stage. The easy and safe ESWT is potentially viable for clinical application.

  19. Electric field stimulation can increase protein synthesis in articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGinitie, L A; Gluzband, Y A; Grodzinsky, A J

    1994-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the electric fields associated with the dynamic loading of cartilage may affect its growth, remodeling, and biosynthesis. While the application of exogenous fields has been shown to modulate cartilage biosynthesis, it is not known what range of field magnitudes and frequencies can alter biosynthesis and how they relate to the magnitudes and frequencies of endogenous fields. Such information is necessary to understand and identify mechanisms by which fields may act on cartilage metabolism. In this study, incorporation of 35S-methionine was used as a marker for electric field-induced changes in chondrocyte protein synthesis in disks of cartilage from the femoropatellar groove of 1 to 2-week-old calves. The cartilage was stimulated sinusoidally at 1, 10, 100, 10(3), and 10(4) Hz with current densities of 10-30 mA/cm2. Incorporation was assessed in control disks maintained in the absence of applied current at 37, 41, and 43 degrees C. The possibility that applied currents would induce synthesis of the same stress proteins that are caused by heating or other mechanisms was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examination of gel fluorographs. Total radiolabel incorporation in cartilage that had been stimulated relative to incorporation in the controls increased with current density magnitudes greater than 10 mA/cm2. The increase was greatest at 100 Hz and 1 kHz, and it depended on the position on the joint surface from which the cartilage samples were taken. Together, these results suggest that endogenous electric fields could affect cartilage biosynthesis. Stress proteins were not induced at any current density when the electrodes were electrically connected but chemically isolated from the media by agarose bridges. Stress proteins were observed for disks incubated at temperatures greater than 39 degrees C (no field) and when the stimulating platinum electrodes were in direct contact with the media

  20. The effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen within articular cartilage on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage. This study was exempted by the institutional and animal review boards, and informed consent was not required. Twelve porcine patellae were assigned to three groups of control, trypsin-treated (proteoglycan-degraded), or collagenase-treated (collagen-degraded). The T1rho images were obtained with a 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a single loop coil. Statistical differences were detected by analysis of variance to evaluate the effects of the enzyme on T1rho relaxation time. Safranin-O was used to stain proteoglycan in the articular cartilage and immunohistochemical staining was performed for type II collagen. Mean T1rho values of the control, trypsin-treated, and collagenase-treated groups were 37.72 +/- 5.82, 57.53 +/- 8.24, and 45.08 +/- 5.31 msec, respectively (p < 0.001). Histology confirmed a loss of proteoglycan and type II collagen in the trypsin- and collagenase-treated groups. Degradation of proteoglycans and collagen fibers in the articular cartilage increased the articular cartilage T1rho value.

  1. Changes in collagens and chondrocytes in the temporomandibular joint cartilage in growing rats fed a liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekita, Hiroki; Takahashi, Shigeru; Domon, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Taihiko

    2015-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of growing rats fed a soft diet is reported to be smaller in size and to have thinner condyle and glenoid fossa cartilage than rats fed a solid diet. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a soft diet on the collagens and chondrocytes in the growing TMJ cartilage. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into a control group fed a solid diet and an experimental group fed a liquid diet for 1-8 weeks. After the experimental period, the TMJs were harvested and examined histologically, immunohistochemically for collagen types I, II, and X, and with transmission electron microscopy. The condylar cartilage in the experimental rats showed weak immunoreactions for three types of collagens compared with the controls. The ultrastructure had fewer fine collagen fibrils in the experimental rats compared with that of the controls. The glenoid fossa cartilage in the experimental rats showed narrower Alcian blue-positive areas than the control staining. The immunoreactions for three types of collagen in the experimental rats were also weaker than those of the controls. The chondrocytes in the experimental rats appeared dark, had extended thin cytoplasmic processes, and had formed gap junctions, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fine collagen fibrils, but thick bands of collagen fibrils were observed in the glenoid fossa of the experimental cartilage. The results of the present study showed that a liquid diet had deleterious effects on the quality and quantity of collagens and chondrocytes in the TMJ cartilage in growing rats.

  2. Regulation of α5 and αV Integrin Expression by GDF-5 and BMP-7 in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciadiego-Cázares, David; Aguirre-Sánchez, Hilda I.; Abarca-Buis, René F.; Kouri, Juan B.; Velasquillo, Cristina; Ibarra, Clemente

    2015-01-01

    The Integrin β1 family is the major receptors of the Extracellular matrix (ECM), and the synthesis and degradation balance of ECM is seriously disrupted during Osteoarthritis (OA). In this scenario, integrins modify their pattern expression and regulate chondrocyte differen-tiation in the articular cartilage. Members of the Transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β) Su-perfamily, such as Growth differentiation factor 5 (Gdf-5) and Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp-7), play a key role in joint formation and could regulate the integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation and osteoarthritis progression in an experimental OA rat model. Decrease of α5 integrin expression in articular cartilage was related with chondrocyte dedif-ferentiation during OA progression, while increase of α1, α2, and α3 integrin expression was related with fibrous areas in articular cartilage during OA. Hypertrophic chondrocytes expressedαV integrin and was increased in the articular cartilage of rats with OA. Integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation was also analyzed in a micromass culture system of mouse embryo mesenchymal cells, micromass cultures was treated with Gdf-5 or Bmp-7 for 4 and 6 days, respectively. Gdf-5 induced the expression of theα5 sub-unit, while Bmp-7 induced the expression of the αV sub-unit. This suggests a switch in signaling for prehypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation towards hypertrophy, where Gdf-5 could maintain the articular chondrocyte phenotype and Bmp-7 would induce hypertrophy. Decrease of Ihh expression during late stages of OA in rat model suggest that the ossification in OA rat knees and endochondral ossification could be activated by Bmp-7 and αV integrin in absence of Ihh. Thus, chondrocyte phenotype in articular cartilage is similar to prehypetrophic chondrocyte in growth plate, and is preserved due to the presence of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), Gdf-5 and α5 integrin to maintain articular cartilage and prevent hy

  3. Functional adaptation of equine articular cartilage: The formation of regional biochemical characteristics up to age one year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; Tekoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2000-01-01

    Biochemical heterogeneity of cartilage within a joint is well known in mature individuals. It has recently been reported that heterogeneity for proteoglycan content and chondrocyte metabolism in sheep develops postnatally under the influence of loading. No data exist on the collagen network in gener

  4. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  5. Direct gene transfer into rat articular cartilage by in vivo electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossin, Laurent; Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Mir, Lluis M; Liagre, Bertrand; Dumas, Dominique; Etienne, Stéphanie; Guingamp, Corinne; Netter, Patrick; Gillet, Pierre

    2003-05-01

    To establish a system for efficient direct in vivo gene targeting into rat joint, we have evaluated a strategy of gene transfer by means of the delivery of external electric pulses (EP) to the knee after intra-articular injection of a reporter gene (GFP). Rats were killed at various times after the electro gene-therapy to analyze GFP gene expression by immunohistochemistry. GFP staining was detected in the superficial, middle, and deep zones of the patellar cartilage at days 2 and 9, and thereafter only in the deep zone (months 1 and 2). The average percentage of GFP-positive cells was estimated at 30% both one and 2 months after the gene transfer. Moreover, no pathologic change caused by the EP was detected in the cartilage. The level and stability of the long-term GFP expression found in this study demonstrate the feasibility of a treatment of joint disorders (inflammatory or degenerative, focal or diffuse) using electric gene transfer.

  6. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D Bonnevie

    Full Text Available When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  7. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnevie, Edward D; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  8. Study on nano-structured hydroxyapatite/zirconia stabilized yttria on healing of articular cartilage defect in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sotoudeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Articular Cartilage has limited potential for self-repair and tissue engineering approaches attempt to repair articular cartilage by scaffolds. We hypothesized that the combined hydroxyapatite and zirconia stabilized yttria would enhance the quality of cartilage healing. METHODS: In ten New Zealand white rabbits bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defect, 4 mm in diameter and 3 mm depth, was created on the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of the distal femur. In group I the scaffold was implanted into the right stifle and the same defect was created in the left stifle without any transplant (group II. Specimens were harvested at 12 weeks after implantation, examined histologically for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type-II collagen. RESULTS: In group I the defect was filled with a white translucent cartilage tissue In contrast, the defects in the group II remained almost empty. In the group I, the defects were mostly filled with hyaline-like cartilage evidenced but defects in group II were filled with fibrous tissue with surface irregularities. Positive immunohistochemical staining of type-II collagen was observed in group I and it was absent in the control group. CONCLUSION: The hydroxyapatite/yttria stabilized zirconia scaffold would be an effective scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙炜; 金大地; 王吉兴; 秦立赟; 刘晓霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-methyl thiocarbamate (SMT), on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits. Methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits, aged 8 months and weighing 2.5 kg±0.2 kg, were used in this study. Cartilage defects in full thickness were created on the intercondylar articular surface of bilateral femurs of all the rabbits. Then the rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 in each group). The defects in one group were filled with fibrin glue impregnated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, BMP group), in one group with fibrin glue impregnated with rhBMP-2 and hypodermic injection with SMT (SMT group) and in the other group with nothing (control group). All the animals were killed at one year postoperatively. The tissue sections were stained with safranine O-fast green and analyzed by Quantiment 500 system to determine the content of glycosaminoglycan through measuring the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the thickness of cartilages and the mean gray scale (average stain intensity). Radiolabelled sodium sulphate (Na235SO4) was used to assess the proteoglycan synthesis. Results: At one year postoperatively, the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the mean gray scale and the cartilage thickness of the repaired tissues in SMT group were significantly higher than those of BMP group (P<0.01) and the control group (P<0.05). Result of incorporation of Na235SO4 showed that the proteoglycan synthesis in SMT group was higher than those of BMP group and the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: SMT, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, can significantly increase the content of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan synthesis, and computer-based image analysis is a reliable method for evaluating proteoglycan metabolism.

  11. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair – the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Johnstone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach – combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  12. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair--the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Brian; Alini, Mauro; Cucchiarini, Magali; Dodge, George R; Eglin, David; Guilak, Farshid; Madry, Henning; Mata, Alvaro; Mauck, Robert L; Semino, Carlos E; Stoddart, Martin J

    2013-05-02

    Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach - combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  13. Efeitos dos glicosaminoglicanos e sulfato de condroitina A sobre a cartilagem articular normal e com doença articular degenerativa em cães Glycosaminoglycans and chondroitin sulphate "A" effects on normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos dos precursores dos glicosaminoglicanos (GAG e do sulfato de condroitina A (SC sobre a histomorfometria da cartilagem articular normal ou de cartilagem de cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD experimental. Os grupos experimentais constituíram-se de animais com articulação direita normal, que não foi submetida a procedimento cirúrgico, e com articulação esquerda osteoartrótica e que foi submetida à intervenção cirúrgica. Os grupos foram subdivididos em animais com articulação não tratada e tratada, portanto: normais (N (n=5, NGAG (n=5 e NSC (n=4; e osteoartróticos (O (n=5, OGAG (n=5 e OSC (n=4. Secções de cartilagens do fêmur, da tíbia e da patela foram utilizadas neste estudo. Nos normais (N, NGAG e NSC, não se encontraram lesões que caracterizassem a DAD, embora tenha havido diminuição na celularidade nos de NGAG e NSC, em relação a N. Foram observadas alterações em graus variáveis entre os grupos osteoartróticos. Houve redução acentuada dos condrócitos no grupo O em comparação aos normais enquanto os grupos osteoartróticos tratados apresentaram celularidade semelhante aos normais tratados. Estes resultados foram confirmados pela análise do índice de proporção (IP, que se mostrou elevado em O, indicando menor síntese de proteoglicanos. Não houve diferença significativa entre os IPs dos grupos osteoartróticos tratados (OGAG, OSC apesar do comportamento distinto do OSC ao assemelhar-se aos grupos N e NSC. Estes resultados sugeriram que o SC agiu na cartilagem osteoartrótica de maneira mais eficaz, reduzindo a perda de proteoglicanos e estimulando a viabilidade celular e a atividade metabólica.The effects of precursors of glycosaminoglycans (GAG and chondroitin sulphate A (CS on the histomorphometry of normal articular cartilage and with experimental degenerative joint disease (DJD in dogs were evaluated. The groups were constituted as follows: normal joints were not

  14. Characterization of healthy and osteoarthritic chondrocyte cell patterns on phase contrast CT images of the knee cartilage matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Yang, Chien-Chun; Glaser, Christian; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Wismüller, Axel

    2012-03-01

    The current approach to evaluating cartilage degeneration at the knee joint requires visualization of the joint space on radiographic images where indirect cues such as joint space narrowing serve as markers for osteoarthritis. A recent novel approach to visualizing the knee cartilage matrix using phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) was shown to allow direct examination of chondrocyte cell patterns and their subsequent correlation to osteoarthritis. This study aims to characterize chondrocyte cell patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage through both gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) derived texture features as well as Minkowski Functionals (MF). Thirteen GLCM and three MF texture features were extracted from 404 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of knee cartilage. These texture features were then used in a machine learning task to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. A fuzzy k-nearest neighbor classifier was used and its performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features 'perimeter' and 'Euler characteristic' and with GLCM correlation features (f3 and f13). With the experimental conditions used in this study, both Minkowski Functionals and GLCM achieved a high classification performance (AUC value of 0.97) in the task of distinguishing between health and osteoarthritic ROIs. These results show that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in the knee cartilage matrix can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  15. MR microscopy of articular cartilage at 1.5 T: orientation and site dependence of laminar structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Anno, Izumi; Echigo, Junko; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8575 (Japan); Haishi, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yoshimasa; Kose, Katsumi [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Lang, Philipp [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Abstract Objective. To evaluate MR microscopic images of normal-appearing porcine hyaline cartilage (n=15) in vitro obtained with an MR microscope using an independent console system (MRMICS) at 1.5 T.Design and results. The MRMICS is a portable imaging system consisting of a radiofrequency system, gradient power supplies and a personal computer. The images from the MRMICS showed a laminar structure of porcine cartilage similar to the structure demonstrated with other MR imaging techniques. The laminar structures of the articular cartilage, were, however heterogeneous in respect of signal intensity and thickness, which varied according to the site resected. The MR laminar appearance was most comparable to the staining with Masson's trichrome for collagen.Conclusion. MRMICS is a useful add-on system for obtaining microscopic MR images of articular cartilage in vitro. (orig.)

  16. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...

  17. Confocal microscopy indentation system for studying in situ chondrocyte mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Kuy; Colarusso, Pina; Herzog, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Chondrocytes synthesize extracellular matrix molecules, thus they are essential for the development, adaptation and maintenance of articular cartilage. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is influenced by the mechanical environment. Therefore, their response to mechanical stimuli has been studied extensively. Much of the knowledge in this area of research has been derived from testing of isolated cells, cartilage explants, and fixed cartilage specimens: systems that differ in important aspects from chondrocytes embedded in articular cartilage and observed during loading conditions. In this study, current model systems have been improved by working with the intact cartilage in real time. An indentation system was designed on a confocal microscope that allows for simultaneous loading and observation of chondrocytes in their native environment. Cell mechanics were then measured under precisely controlled loading conditions. The indentation system is based on a light transmissible cylindrical glass indentor of 0.17 mm thickness and 1.64 mm diameter that is aligned along the focal axis of the microscope and allows for real time observation of live cells in their native environment. The system can be used to study cell deformation and biological responses, such as calcium sparks, while applying prescribed loads on the cartilage surface. It can also provide novel information on the relationship between cell loading and cartilage adaptive/degenerative processes in the intact tissue.

  18. Tissue engineering of cartilage using a mechanobioreactor exerting simultaneous mechanical shear and compression to simulate the rolling action of articular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2012-04-01

    The effect of dynamic mechanical shear and compression on the synthesis of human tissue-engineered cartilage was investigated using a mechanobioreactor capable of simulating the rolling action of articular joints in a mixed fluid environment. Human chondrocytes seeded into polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh or PGA-alginate scaffolds were precultured in shaking T-flasks or recirculation perfusion bioreactors for 2.5 or 4 weeks prior to mechanical stimulation in the mechanobioreactor. Constructs were subjected to intermittent unconfined shear and compressive loading at a frequency of 0.05 Hz using a peak-to-peak compressive strain amplitude of 2.2% superimposed on a static axial compressive strain of 6.5%. The mechanical treatment was carried out for up to 2.5 weeks using a loading regime of 10 min duration each day with the direction of the shear forces reversed after 5 min and release of all loading at the end of the daily treatment period. Compared with shaking T-flasks and mechanobioreactor control cultures without loading, mechanical treatment improved the amount and quality of cartilage produced. On a per cell basis, synthesis of both major structural components of cartilage, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II, was enhanced substantially by up to 5.3- and 10-fold, respectively, depending on the scaffold type and seeding cell density. Levels of collagen type II as a percentage of total collagen were also increased after mechanical treatment by up to 3.4-fold in PGA constructs. Mechanical treatment had a less pronounced effect on the composition of constructs precultured in perfusion bioreactors compared with perfusion culture controls. This work demonstrates that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage can be enhanced significantly by application of simultaneous dynamic mechanical shear and compression, with the greatest benefits evident for synthesis of collagen type II.

  19. Altered mechano-chemical environment in hip articular cartilage: effect of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travascio, Francesco; Eltoukhy, Moataz; Cami, Sonila; Asfour, Shihab

    2014-10-01

    The production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components of articular cartilage is regulated, among other factors, by an intercellular signaling mechanism mediated by the interaction of cell surface receptors (CSR) with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). In ECM, the presence of binding proteins (IGFBP) hinders IGF-1 delivery to CSR. It has been reported that levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP in obese population are, respectively, lower and higher than those found in normal population. In this study, an experimental-numerical approach was adopted to quantify the effect of this metabolic alteration found in obese population on the homeostasis of femoral hip cartilage. A new computational model, based on the mechano-electrochemical mixture theory, was developed to describe competitive binding kinetics of IGF-1 with IGFBP and CSR, and associated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. Moreover, a gait analysis was carried out on obese and normal subjects to experimentally characterize mechanical loads on hip cartilage during walking. This information was deployed into the model to account for effects of physiologically relevant tissue deformation on GAG production in ECM. Numerical simulations were performed to compare GAG biosynthesis in femoral hip cartilage of normal and obese subjects. Results indicated that the lower ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP found in obese population reduces cartilage GAG concentration up to 18 % when compared to normal population. Moreover, moderate physical activity, such as walking, has a modest beneficial effect on GAG production. The findings of this study suggest that IGF-1/IGFBP metabolic unbalance should be accounted for when considering the association of obesity with hip osteoarthritis.

  20. Foetal and postnatal equine articular cartilage development: magnetic resonance imaging and polarised light microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cluzel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage (AC has a well described multizonal collagen structure. Knowledge of foetal AC organisation and development may provide a prototype for cartilage repair strategies, and improve understanding of structural changes in developmental diseases such as osteochondrosis (OC. The objective of this study was to describe normal development of the spatial architecture of the collagen network of equine AC using 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and polarised light microscopy (PLM, at sites employed for cartilage repair studies or susceptible to OC. T2-weighted fast-spin echo (FSE sequences and PLM assessment were performed on distal femoral epiphyses of equine foetuses, foals and adults. Both MRI and PLM revealed an early progressive collagen network zonal organisation of the femoral epiphyses, beginning at 4 months of gestation. PLM revealed that the collagen network of equine foetal AC prior to birth was already organised into an evident anisotropic layered structure that included the appearance of a dense tangential zone in the superficial AC in the youngest specimens, with the progressive development of an underlying transitional zone. A third, increasingly birefringent, radial layer developed in the AC from 6 months of gestation. Four laminae were observed on the MR images in the last third of gestation. These included not only the AC but also the superficial growth plate of the epiphysis. These findings provide novel data on normal equine foetal cartilage collagen development, and may serve as a template for cartilage repair studies in this species or a model for developmental studies of OC.

  1. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  2. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  3. Regeneration of articular cartilage by adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: perspectives from stem cell biology and molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Shu; Karperien, Marcel; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been discovered for more than a decade. Due to the large numbers of cells that can be harvested with relatively little donor morbidity, they are considered to be an attractive alternative to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Consequently, isolation and differentiation of ASCs draw great attention in the research of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Cartilage defects cause big therapeutic problems because of their low self-repair capacity. Application of ASCs in cartilage regeneration gives hope to treat cartilage defects with autologous stem cells. In recent years, a lot of studies have been performed to test the possibility of using ASCs to re-construct damaged cartilage tissue. In this article, we have reviewed the most up-to-date articles utilizing ASCs for cartilage regeneration in basic and translational research. Our topic covers differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, increased cartilage formation by co-culture of ASCs with chondrocytes and enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs by gene manipulation.

  4. Healing results in meniscus and articular cartilage photochemically welded with 1,8-naphthalimide dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Loyd, John D.; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1997-05-01

    Meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage do not heal spontaneously. In this paper results are described of studies of a procedure for evoking the healing response in such lesions by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Fifteen essentially mature Barbados sheep 40 - 60 pounds in weight received a 2 - 3 mm flap tear by incision in the red white zone of the medial meniscus oriented parallel to the table of the tibia. The animals were divided into four groups; Group I, no treatment; Group II, treatment by laser activated photoactive dyes; Group III, treatment by suturing; Group IV, treatment by laser irradiation only; Group V, treatment by photoactive dyes only. In another group of 12 sheep partial thickness flap tear was created by incision in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyle. These were divided into four groups as for the meniscus study, omitting the sutured control. Welds were made using the dimeric dye MBM Gold BW 012-012-012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9 nm argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes (360 J/cm2) with approximately 2 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hr, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Gross appearance of menisci and cartilage in all welded knees was normal and all welds resisted deformation or loosening under forceful probing. Histology of studies of both tissues out to 6 moths disclosed close bonding of welded area, continuing healing response in the form of cellular recruitment and protein deposition and the absence of inflammatory response. Tissue erosion and arthritic changes were evident in all unwelded controls.

  5. Fibrin glue mixed with gelatin/hyaluronic acid/chondroitin-6-sulfate tri-copolymer for articular cartilage tissue engineering: the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Hung; Cheng, Winston T K; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Lin, Feng-Huei; Tsai, Jui-Che

    2007-09-01

    Autologous fibrin glue has been demonstrated as a potential scaffold with very good biocompatibility for neocartilage formation. However, fibrin glue has been reported not to provide enough mechanical strength, but with many growth factors to interfere the tissue growth. Gelatin/hyaluronic acid/chondroitin-6-sulfate (GHC6S) tri-copolymer sponge has been prepared as scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering and showed very good results, but problems of cell seeding and cell distribution troubled the researchers. In this study, GHC6S particles would be added into the fibrin glue to provide better mechanical strength, better cell distribution, and easier cell seeding, which would be expected to improve cartilage regeneration in vitro. Porcine cryo-precipitated fibrinogen and thrombin prepared from prothrombin activated by 10% CaCl(2) solution were used in two groups. One is the fibrin glue group in which porcine chondrocytes were mixed with thrombin-fibrinogen solution, which was then converted into fibrin glue. The other is GHC6S-fibrin glue in which GHC6S particles were added into the thrombin-fibrinogen solution with porcine chondrocytes. After culturing for 1-2 weeks, the chondrocytes cultured in GHC6S-fibrin glue showed a round shape with distinct lacuna structure and showed positive in S-100 protein immunohistochemical stain. The related gene expressions of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2, MT1-MMP, aggrecan, decorin, type I, II, X collagen, interleukin-1 beta, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1), and Fas-associating death domain were checked by real-time PCR. The results indicated that the chondrocytes cultured in GHC6S-fibrin glue would effectively promote extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion and inhibit ECM degradation. The evidence could support that GHC6S-fibrin glue would be a promising scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Expression Profiling and Functional Implications of a Set of Zinc Finger Proteins, ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B, in Primary Osteoarthritic Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mesuraca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular chondrocytes are responsible for the maintenance of healthy articulations; indeed, dysregulation of their functions, including the production of matrix proteins and matrix-remodeling proteases, may result in fraying of the tissue and development of osteoarthritis (OA. To explore transcriptional mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and may be implicated in OA development, we compared the gene expression profile of a set of zinc finger proteins potentially linked to the control of chondrocyte differentiation and/or functions (ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B in chondrocytes from patients affected by OA and from subjects not affected by OA. This analysis highlighted a significantly lower expression of the transcript encoding ZNF423 in chondrocytes from OA, particularly in elderly patients. Interestingly, this decrease was mirrored by the similarly reduced expression of PPARγ, a known target of ZNF423 with anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties. The ZNF521 mRNA instead was abundant in all primary chondrocytes studied; the RNAi-mediated silencing of this gene significantly altered the COL2A/COL1 expression ratio, associated with the maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, in chondrocytes cultivated in alginate beads. These results suggest a role for ZNF423 and ZNF521 in the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and warrant further investigations to elucidate their mechanism of action.

  7. Chondrogenic potential of canine articular cartilage derived cells (cACCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the potential of canine articular cartilage-derived cells (cACCs for chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated. The effectiveness of cACCs’ lineage commitment was analyzed after 14 days of culture in chondorgenic and non-chondrogenic conditions. Formation of proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix was assessed using histochemical staining – Alcian Blue and Safranin-O, while elemental composition was determined by means of SEM-EDX. Additionally, ultrastructure of cACCs was evaluated using TEM. The expression of genes involved in chondrogenesis was monitored with quantitative Real Time PCR. Results obtained indicate that the potential of cACCs for cartilagous extracellular matrix formation may be maintained only in chondrogenic cultures. The formation of specific chondro-nodules was not observed in a non-chondrogenic culture environment. The analysis of cACCs’ ultrastructure, both in non-chondrogenic and chondrogenic cultures, revealed well-developed rough endoplasmatic reticulum and presence of mitochondria. The cACCs in chondrogenic medium shed an increased number of microvesicles. Furthermore, it was shown that the extracellular matrix of cACCs in chondrogenic cultures is rich in potassium and molybdenum. Additionally, it was determined that gene expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX-9 was significantly increased during chondrogenic differentiation of cACCs. Results obtained indicate that the culture environment may significantly influence the cartilage phenotype of cACCs during long term culture.

  8. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  9. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of articular cartilage thickness of the humeral head and the glenoid fossa by MR arthrography: anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, L.R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Veterans Affairs Medical Center]|[Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Radiology]|[National Yang-Ming Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Radiology; Kwak, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Chou, D.S.W.; Muhle, C.; Skaf, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnik, D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of MR arthrography in determining the thickness of articular cartilage of the humeral head and glenoid fossa. Results. The correlation coefficients for MR arthrographic measurement versus anatomic measurement of the cartilage thickness were 0.7324 and 0.8757 for humeral head and glenoid fossa, respectively. With regard to the humeral head, there was a tendency to overestimate regions of thin cartilage and underestimate regions of thick cartilage. This tendency was not found in the assessment of glenoid cartilage. The mean of the absolute value of MR-anatomic differences was similar on the glenoid side (0.27 mm) and the humeral side (0.29 mm). The accuracy of measurement was significantly better on the glenoid side (Fisher`s r-to-Z transformation: Z=5.21, P=0.000001). (orig.)

  11. Fast spin-echo MR of the articular cartilage in the osteoarthrotic knee. Correlation of MR and arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, Y. [Omura Municipal Establishment Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Nakahara, N.; Futagawa, S.; Kinoshita, Y. [Isahaya Insurance General Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Doiguchi, Y.; Nishiguchi, M. [Isahaya Insurance General Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1998-03-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess the efficacy of fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging in the detection of articular cartilage abnormality in osteoarthrosis of the knee. Material and Methods: We studied 356 articular surfaces in 73 knees that had been examined by both MR imaging and arthroscopy. The MR images were obtained with FSE imaging (TR/TE 4200/100) on a 0.5 T unit. The surface abnormalities of the articular cartilage that were detected by MR imaging were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity of MR in detecting chondral abnormalities were 60.5% (158/261) and 93.7% (89/95) respectively. MR imaging was more sensitive to the higher grade lesions: 31.8% (34/107) in grade 1; 72.4% (71/98) in grade 2; 93.5% (43/46) in grade 3; and 100% (10/10) in grade 4. The MR and arthroscopic grades were the same in 46.9% (167/356), and differed by no more than 1 grade in 90.2% (321/356) and 2 grades in 99.2% (353/356). The correlation between arthroscopic and MR grading scores was highly significant with a correlation coefficient of 0.705 (p<0.0001). Conclusion: FSE sequence was less sensitive to mild cartilage abnormality but useful in detecting moderate to severe abnormality and in evaluating the degree of articular cartilage abnormality. (orig.).

  12. In vitro and in vivo validation of human and goat chondrocyte labeling by green fluorescent protein lentivirus transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Sylvie; Gianni-Barrera, Roberto; Pelttari, Karoliina; Acharya, Chitrangada; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Juelke, Henriette; Jaquiery, Claude; Candrian, Christian; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether human articular chondrocytes can be labeled efficiently and for long-term with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) lentivirus and whether the viral transduction would influence cell proliferation and tissue-forming capacity. The method was then applied to track goat articular chondrocytes after autologous implantation in cartilage defects. Expression of GFP in transduced chondrocytes was detected cytofluorimetrically and immunohistochemically. Chondrogenic capacity of chondrocytes was assessed by Safranin-O staining, immunostaining for type II collagen, and glycosaminoglycan content. Human articular chondrocytes were efficiently transduced with GFP lentivirus (73.4 +/- 0.5% at passage 1) and maintained the expression of GFP up to 22 weeks of in vitro culture after transduction. Upon implantation in nude mice, 12 weeks after transduction, the percentage of labeled cells (73.6 +/- 3.3%) was similar to the initial one. Importantly, viral transduction of chondrocytes did not affect the cell proliferation rate, chondrogenic differentiation, or tissue-forming capacity, either in vitro or in vivo. Goat articular chondrocytes were also efficiently transduced with GFP lentivirus (78.3 +/- 3.2%) and maintained the expression of GFP in the reparative tissue after orthotopic implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of efficient and relatively long-term labeling of human chondrocytes for co-culture on integration studies, and indicates the potential of this stable labeling technique for tracking animal chondrocytes for in cartilage repair studies.

  13. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan incorporation influences collagen network formation during cartilage matrix production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Groot, J. de; Vanosch, G.J.V.M.

    2009-01-01

    To understand cartilage degenerative diseases and improve repair procedures, we investigate the influence of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on cartilage matrix biochemistry and functionality. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads with(out) para-nitrophenyl-beta-d-xyloside (PNPX) t

  14. Efficacy of diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging for articular cartilage lesions of the glenohumeral joint in patients with instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Meredith L.; Collins, Mark S.; Wenger, Doris E. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane L. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was primarily to assess the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting articular cartilage injuries in patients with glenohumeral instability. A secondary purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions. A cohort of 87 consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic MRI and shoulder arthroscopy for instability from 1997 to 2006 were identified. Fifty-five patients (63.2%) underwent MRI with intra-articular contrast medium and 32 patients (36.8%) underwent MRI without contrast medium. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists and interpreted by consensus for the presence of articular cartilage lesions (including Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions), which were then confirmed by reviewing the operative report and images recorded at arthroscopy. Mean patient age was 27.0 {+-} 10.2 years with a mean clinical and radiographic follow-up of 29 (range 3-72) months. Cartilage injuries were detected arthroscopically in 55 patients (63%). Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions were identified arthroscopically in 66 patients (75.9%) and 55 patients (63.2%) respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity for detection of glenohumeral articular cartilage lesions by MRI were 87.2% and 80.6% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI in detecting Bankart lesions was 98.4% (95% CI 91.9, 99.7) and 95.2% (95% CI 77.3, 99.2) respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI in detecting Hill-Sachs lesions was 96.3% (95% CI 87.6, 98.9%) and 90.6% (95% CI 75.7, 96.9) respectively. No statistically significant difference was found between MRI examinations with and without intra-articular gadolinium (p = 0.89). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of articular cartilage injuries in patients with glenohumeral instability. MRI with or without intra-articular contrast medium in this study were equally reliable as a non

  15. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of hip articular cartilage between non-traumatic necrosis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyu; Liu, Yang; Hao, Jingcan; Zheng, Shuyu; Wen, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; He, Awen; Fan, Qianrui; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Ruiyu

    2016-10-10

    Hip cartilage destruction is consistently observed in the non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (NOFH) and accelerates its bone necrosis. The molecular mechanism underlying the cartilage damage of NOFH remains elusive. In this study, we conducted a systematically comparative study of gene expression profiles between NOFH and osteoarthritis (OA). Hip articular cartilage specimens were collected from 12 NOFH patients and 12 controls with traumatic femoral neck fracture for microarray (n=4) and quantitative real-time PCR validation experiments (n=8). Gene expression profiling of articular cartilage was performed using Agilent Human 4×44K Microarray chip. The accuracy of microarray experiment was further validated by qRT-PCR. Gene expression results of OA hip cartilage were derived from previously published study. Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) software was applied for identifying differently expressed genes. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis were conducted by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis software and DAVID tool, respectively. Totally, 27 differently expressed genes were identified for NOFH. Comparing the gene expression profiles of NOFH cartilage and OA cartilage detected 8 common differently expressed genes, including COL5A1, OGN, ANGPTL4, CRIP1, NFIL3, METRNL, ID2 and STEAP1. GO comparative analysis identified 10 common significant GO terms, mainly implicated in apoptosis and development process. Pathway comparative analysis observed that ECM-receptor interaction pathway and focal adhesion pathway were enriched in the differently expressed genes of both NOFH and hip OA. In conclusion, we identified a set of differently expressed genes, GO and pathways for NOFH articular destruction, some of which were also involved in the hip OA. Our study results may help to reveal the pathogenetic similarities and differences of cartilage damage of NOFH and hip OA.

  16. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and-14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investi

  17. Reproducibility and accuracy of quantitative assessment of articular cartilage volume measurements with 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Wei; SHENG Jing; CHEN Wen-hua; TIAN Jian-ming; ZHANG Li-rong; WANG Dong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of articular cartilage represents a powerful tool in osteoarthritis research, but has so far been confined to a field strength of 1.5 T. The aim of the study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of qMRI assessments of the knee cartilage volume by comparing quantitative swine cartilage volumes of the sagittal (sag) multi echo data imagine combination water-excitation (MEDICwe) sequence and the fast low-angle shoot water-excitation (FLASHwe) sequence at 3.0-T MRI to directly measured volumes (DMV) of the surgically removed articular cartilage.Methods Test-retest MRI was acquired in 20 swine knees. Two sag FLASHwe sequences and two sag MEDICwe sequences (spatial resolution 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 1.0 mm of 3-dimension (3D) were acquired at 3-T MRI in a knee.Articular cartilage volume was calculated from 3D reformations of the MRI by using a manual program. Calculated volumes were compared with DMV of the surgically removed articular cartilage. Knee joint cartilage plates were quantified paired in order.Results In the knee joint of swine, reproducibility errors (paired analysis) for cartilage volume were 2.5% to 3.2% with sag FLASHwe, and 1.6% to 3.0% with sag MEDICwe. Correlation coefficients between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from 0.90 to 0.98 for cartilage volume. Systematic pairwise difference between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from -1.1% to 2.8%. Random pairwise differences between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from (2.9 ±2.4)% to (6.8±4.5)%.Conclusions FLASHwe and MEDICwe sequences permit highly accurate and reproducible analysis of cartilage volume in the knee joints of swine at 3-T MRI. Cartilage volume reproducibility for the MEDICwe data is slightly higher than the FLASHwe data.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 in articular cartilage is upregulated by joint immobilization and suppressed by passive joint motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Daniel J; Gu, Xiang I; Li, Yonghui; Lee, Jonathan Y; Laudier, Damien M; Majeska, Robert J; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Cardoso, Luis; Sun, Hui B

    2010-06-01

    Both underloading and overloading of joints can lead to articular cartilage degradation, a process mediated in part by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here we examine the effects of reduced loading of rat hindlimbs on articular cartilage expression of MMP-3, which not only digests matrix components but also activates other proteolytic enzymes. We show that hindlimb immobilization resulted in elevated MMP-3 mRNA expression at 6h that was sustained throughout the 21day immobilization period. MMP-3 upregulation was higher in the medial condyle than the lateral, and was greatest in the superficial cartilage zone, followed by middle and deep zones. These areas also showed decreases in safranin O staining, consistent with reduced cartilage proteoglycan content, as early as 7days after immobilization. One hour of daily moderate mechanical loading, applied as passive joint motion, reduced the MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5 increases that resulted from immobilization, and also prevented changes in safranin O staining. Intra-articular injections of an MMP-3 inhibitor, N-isobutyl-N-(4-methoxyphenylsulfonyl)-glycylhydroxamic acid (NNGH), dampened the catabolic effects of a 7day immobilization period, indicating a likely requirement for MMP-3 in the regulation of proteoglycan levels through ADAMTS-5. These results suggest that biomechanical forces have the potential to combat cartilage destruction and can be critical in developing effective therapeutic strategies.

  19. Nondestructive fluorescence-based quantification of threose-induced collagen cross-linking in bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Jussi; Kokkonen, Harri T.; Kovanen, Vuokko; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Lammi, Mikko J.; Töyräs, Juha; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2012-09-01

    Extensive collagen cross-linking affects the mechanical competence of articular cartilage: it can make the cartilage stiffer and more brittle. The concentrations of the best known cross-links, pyridinoline and pentosidine, can be accurately determined by destructive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We explore a nondestructive evaluation of cross-linking by using the intrinsic fluorescence of the intact cartilage. Articular cartilage samples from bovine knee joints were incubated in threose solution for 40 and 100 h to increase the collagen cross-linking. Control samples without threose were also prepared. Excitation-emission matrices at wavelengths of 220 to 950 nm were acquired from the samples, and the pentosidine and pyridinoline cross-links and the collagen concentrations were determined using HPLC. After the threose treatment, pentosidine and lysyl pyridinole (LP) concentrations increased. The intrinsic fluorescence, excited below 350 nm, decreased and was related to pentosidine [r=-0.90, 240/325 nm (excitation/emission)] or LP (r=-0.85, 235/285 nm) concentrations. Due to overlapping, the changes in emission could not be linked specifically to the recorded cross-links. However, the fluorescence signal enabled a nondestructive optical estimate of changes in the pentosidine and LP cross-linking of intact articular cartilage.

  20. Collagen type XII and versican are present in the early stages of cartilage tissue formation by both redifferentating passaged and primary chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Parreno, Justin; Lunstrum, Gregory P; Gross, Allan E; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Kandel, Rita A

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cartilage tissue engineering require a large number of chondrocytes. Although chondrocyte numbers can be expanded in monolayer culture, the cells dedifferentiate and unless they can be redifferentiated are not optimal to use for cartilage repair. We took advantage of the differential effect of culture conditions on the ability of passaged and primary chondrocytes to form cartilage tissue to dissect out the extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules produced and accumulated in the early stages of passaged cell cartilage tissue formation as we hypothesized that passaged bovine cells that form cartilage accumulate a pericellular matrix that differs from cells that do not form cartilage. Twice passaged bovine chondrocytes (P2) (cartilage forming), or as a control primary chondrocytes (P0) (which do not generate cartilage), were cultured on three-dimensional membrane inserts in serum-free media. P2 redifferentiation was occurring during the first 8 days as indicated by increased expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, aggrecan, and COMP, suggesting that this is an appropriate time period to examine the ECM. Mass spectrometry showed that the P2 secretome (molecules released into the media) at 1 week had higher levels of collagen types I, III, and XII, and versican while type II collagen and COMP were found at higher levels in the P0 secretome. There was increased collagen synthesis and retention by P2 cells compared to P0 cells as early as 3 days of culture. Confocal microscopy showed that types XII, III, and II collagen, aggrecan, versican, and decorin were present in the ECM of P2 cells. In contrast, collagen types I, II, and III, aggrecan, and decorin were present in the ECM of P0 cells. As primary chondrocytes grown in serum-containing media, a condition that allows for the generation of cartilage tissue in vitro, also accumulate versican and collagen XII, this study suggests that these molecules may be necessary to provide a

  1. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  2. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) by proteasome inhibitor MG 132 protects articular chondrocytes from cellular death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossin, Laurent; Etienne, Stéphanie; Gaborit, Nadège; Pinzano, Astrid; Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Gerard, Catherine; Payan, Elisabeth; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard; Gillet, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether Hsp70 overexpression via proteasome inhibitor MG132 was able to protect chondrocytes towards mono-iodoacetate (MIA) cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, overexpression of Hsp70 via MG132 was significantly able to protect chondrocytes from MIA toxicity (MTT/LDH analyses). Hsp70 essentially mediated this chondroprotective effect as demonstrated by antisense strategy. In vivo, chondrocytic overexpression of Hsp70, after a preventive intra-articular injection of MG132 in rat knee, was sufficient to decrease the severity of OA-induced MIA lesions, as demonstrated histologically and biochemically. In conclusion, intracellular overexpression of Hsp70, through proteasome inhibition, could be an interesting tool in protecting chondrocytes from cellular injuries, either necrotic or apoptotic in nature, and thus might be a novel chondroprotective modality in rat experimental OA.

  3. First-generation versus second-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation for treatment of cartilage defects of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Feucht, Matthias;

    2014-01-01

    membrane was utilized in second generation ACI. To date, however, no study has proven the superiority of this modification in terms of long-term clinical outcome. The purpose of this matched-pair analysis was therefore to compare the clinical long-term outcome of first and second generation ACI...... treated with first generation ACI. In both groups, four patients (17.4%) received surgical reintervention during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a collagen membrane in combination with autologous chondrocytes (second generation ACI) leads to superior clinical long-term outcome compared to first......PURPOSE: Since the introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for the treatment of cartilage defects, the initial technique has undergone several modifications. Whereas an autologous periosteum flap was used for defect coverage in first generation ACI, a standardized collagen...

  4. Effects of Balsamodendron mukul Gum Resin Extract on Articular Cartilage in Papain-induced Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjhi, Jayanand; Gupta, Maneesh; Sinha, Anvesha; Rawat, Beena; Rai, Durg V

    2016-07-01

    Context • Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of the musculoskeleton, causing functional disability among older adults. Management of OA includes conventional pharmacological treatments consisting primarily of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, physiotherapy, and surgical procedures. The medications are not ideal therapeutic agents; NSAIDs in particular can cause serious side effects. Objective • The study was conducted to investigate the effects of Balsamodendron mukul (BDM) gum resin extract on cartilage damage and microstructural changes in the subchondral bone of rats with papain-induced, osteoarthritic knee joints. Design • The authors designed a parallel randomized, controlled study to examine the effects of 3 concentrations of BDM on OA in a murine model. Setting • The present study was undertaken at the research laboratory, Faculty of Biological Engineering, Shobhit University (Modipuram, Meerut, India). Intervention • OA was induced by intra-articular injections of 0.2 mL of 4% papain solution and 0.1 mL of 0.03 M cysteine through the patellar ligament using a 26-gauge, 1.27-cm needle. The rats in the sham group received same volume of isotonic sodium chloride solution. The rats were divided into 6 groups : (1) control group-fresh rats, with ages and genders similar to those of the other groups but with no induction of OA and no treatments; (2) sham group-rats receiving a sham induction of OA using an intra-articular injection of saline of the same volume as the papain given to all OA rats but no treatments; (3) OA group-rats induced with OA but receiving no treatments; (4) OA + BDM (10%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 10% dose of BDM; (5) OA + BDM (20%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 20% dose of BDM; and (6) OA + BDM (40%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 40% dose of BDM. Rats in the treatment groups were fed their respective doses of BDM extract for 30 d

  5. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head disrupting the articular cartilage. Description of a novel surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Agathangelidis, Filon; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2012-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign tumour. Involvement of the femoral head may often lead to a delayed diagnosis. We present the case of a 15-year-old patient with right hip pain which was first attributed to adductor tendinitis. Following aggravation of the symptoms, thorough investigation including a CT-guided biopsy, revealed the diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the femoral head. Removal of the lesion based on the techniques described in literature was not possible, mainly because the articular cartilage was breached. A novel surgical technique was used in order to address the rare location and behaviour of the tumour. This technique offered the patient pain relief and return to his previous every day and sports activities. No recurrence was seen at two years follow-up.

  6. Partial restoration of immobilization-induced softening of canine articular cartilage after remobilization of the knee (stifle) joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurvelin, J; Kiviranta, I; Säämänen, A M; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J

    1989-01-01

    The restoration of the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage was studied after 15 weeks of remobilization of the knee joint in beagles previously immobilized with a cast for 11 weeks. The shear moduli were determined with an indentation creep test immediately after load application and at equilibrium at six predefined test points of femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Permeability of the cartilage was estimated from the creep measurements. The values were compared with nontreated, age-matched (55 weeks) controls and with cartilage collected immediately after immobilization. Remobilization reduced the high creep rates created by immobilization and shifted the depressed equilibrium shear moduli towards those of the controls. However, in the femoral condylar cartilage, the equilibrium shear modulus remained at lower level (p less than 0.05) and permeability at higher level (p less than 0.05) as compared with the controls. We conclude that articular cartilage, showing signs of atrophy after long-term immobilization, was capable of restoring its biomechanical properties during remobilization. This repair was not, however, completed in all parts of the knee joint by the end of the observation period.

  7. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Neumann

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs

  8. Progress in Using Free Autogenous Periosteal Grafts to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects%自体游离骨膜移植修复关节软骨缺损的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禹克俊

    2009-01-01

    The cambium layer of Periosteum contains undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, which have the duality into cartilage and into bone. The low tension hypoxia of articular cavity is good for the process, that periosteal becoming to cartilage, but free autologous periosteal graft to repairing articular cartilage defects is still in the exploratory stage, this article is a brief overview on the status quo of autogenous free periosteal graft repairing articular cartilage defects.

  9. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  10. Deformation of articular cartilage during static loading of a knee joint--experimental and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, K S; Mononen, M E; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J; Salo, J; Korhonen, R K

    2014-07-18

    Novel conical beam CT-scanners offer high resolution imaging of knee structures with i.a. contrast media, even under weight bearing. With this new technology, we aimed to determine cartilage strains and meniscal movement in a human knee at 0, 1, 5, and 30 min of standing and compare them to the subject-specific 3D finite element (FE) model. The FE model of the volunteer׳s knee, based on the geometry obtained from magnetic resonance images, was created to simulate the creep. The effects of collagen fibril network stiffness, nonfibrillar matrix modulus, permeability and fluid flow boundary conditions on the creep response in cartilage were investigated. In the experiment, 80% of the maximum strain in cartilage developed immediately, after which the cartilage continued to deform slowly until the 30 min time point. Cartilage strains and meniscus movement obtained from the FE model matched adequately with the experimentally measured values. Reducing the fibril network stiffness increased the mean strains substantially, while the creep rate was primarily influenced by an increase in the nonfibrillar matrix modulus. Changing the initial permeability and preventing fluid flow through noncontacting surfaces had a negligible effect on cartilage strains. The present results improve understanding of the mechanisms controlling articular cartilage strains and meniscal movements in a knee joint under physiological static loading. Ultimately a validated model could be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to locate cartilage areas at risk for degeneration.

  11. Reference genes for normalization of gene expression studies in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Reino Juan J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of gene expression is an important component of osteoarthritis (OA research, greatly improved by the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. This technique requires normalization for precise results, yet no suitable reference genes have been identified in human articular cartilage. We have examined ten well-known reference genes to determine the most adequate for this application. Results Analyses of expression stability in cartilage from 10 patients with hip OA, 8 patients with knee OA and 10 controls without OA were done with classical statistical tests and the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. Results from the three methods of analysis were broadly concordant. Some of the commonly used reference genes, GAPDH, ACTB and 18S RNA, performed poorly in our analysis. In contrast, the rarely used TBP, RPL13A and B2M genes were the best. It was necessary to use together several of these three genes to obtain the best results. The specific combination depended, to some extent, on the type of samples being compared. Conclusion Our results provide a satisfactory set of previously unused reference genes for qPCR in hip and knee OA This confirms the need to evaluate the suitability of reference genes in every tissue and experimental situation before starting the quantitative assessment of gene expression by qPCR.

  12. A novel surface modification on calcium polyphosphate scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300 (China); Liu, C.-K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300 (China); Huang, T.-J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300 (China)]. E-mail: tjhuang@che.nthu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    The surface of porous three-dimensional (3D) calcium polyphosphate (CPP) scaffold was modified by treatment of quenching-after-sintering in the fabrication process. Scanning electron microscopic examination and degradation tests confirmed a new type of surface modification. A rotary-shaking culture was compared to that of a stationary culture and the results showed that rotary shaking led to enhanced extracellular matrices (ECM) secretion of both proteoglycans and collagen. Rotary-shaking cultured results showed that the quenching-treated CPP scaffold produced a better cartilage tissue, with both proteoglycans and collagen secretions enhanced, than the air-cooled-after-sintering scaffolds. Moreover, {beta}-CPP scaffolds were better for the ECM secretion of both proteoglycans and collagen than the {beta}-CPP + {gamma}-CPP multiphase scaffold. However, the multiphase scaffold led to higher growth rate than that of {beta}-CPP scaffold; the quenching-after-sintering treatment reversed this. In addition, the ECM secretions of both proteoglycans and collagen in the quenching-treated {beta}-CPP scaffold were higher than those in the air-cooled one. Thus, the novel treatment of quenching-after-sintering has shown merits to the porous 3D CPP scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  14. Chondrogenic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells promoted by mature chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to direct embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into chondrocytes, a chondrogenic envi-ronment provided by mature chondrocytes was investigated. Flk-1 positive cells sorted from pre-differentiated mouse ES cells were mixed with adult porcine articular chondrocytes, seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, and then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. The cell-scaffold com-plexes formed cartilage tissues after 4 weeks, which was demonstrated by histology and anti-type II collagen antibody staining. Positive staining of mouse Major Histocompatibility Complex class I molecules confirmed that part of the chondrocytes were derived from mouse ES cells. The current study established a new approach for directing ES cell differentiation.

  15. Chondrogenic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells promoted by mature chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Feng; ZHANG WenJie; CHEN FanFan; ZHOU GuangDong; CUI Lei; LIU Wei; CAO YiLin

    2008-01-01

    In order to direct embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into chondrocytes, a chondrogenic envi-ronment provided by mature chondrocytes was investigated. FIk-1 positive cells sorted from pre-differentiated mouse ES cells were mixed with adult porcine articular chondrocytes, seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, and then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. The cell-scaffold com-plexes formed cartilage tissues after 4 weeks, which was demonstrated by histology and anti-type Ⅱ collagen antibody staining. Positive staining of mouse Major Histocompatibility Complex class Ⅰ molecules confirmed that part of the chondrocytes were derived from mouse ES cells. The current study established a new approach for directing ES cell differentiation.

  16. MR evaluation of the articular cartilage of the femoral head during traction. Correlation with resected femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, K. [Osaka Seamens Insurance Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Tanaka, H.; Narumi, Y.; Nakamura, H. [Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishii, T.; Masuhara, K. [Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose was to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint with MR during traction and compare the findings with the resected specimen or arthroscopic findings. Material and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers, 5 patients with osteonecrosis, 5 with acetabular dysplasia, and 5 with advanced osteoarthrosis underwent MR imaging to evaluate the articular cartilage of the hip joint. Coronal fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were obtained during traction. Identical imaging was performed of all the resected femoral heads of the osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis patients, and was correlated with the macroscopic pathological findings. Results: The traction was effective and the femoral articular cartilage was clearly identified in all 8 control subjects, and in all cases of osteonecrosis and acetabular dysplasia. In 4 cases of osteonecrosis, chondral fracture was identified in the boundary between the necrosis and the normal area. In all cases of advanced osteoarthrosis, cartilage was identified only at the medial side. The MR images of osteonecrosis and advanced osteoarthrosis corresponded well with the MR images of the resected femoral heads and the macroscopic findings. (orig.)

  17. Real-time electro-mechano-acoustic imaging for monitoring interactions between trypsin and different inhibitors in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Qing; Butt, Yoki Kwok Chu

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the real-time interactions between trypsin and various inhibitors in articular cartilage in vitro using a novel electro-mechano-acoustic imaging method. Monitored in real-time, articular cartilage specimens from bovine patellae were first treated with trypsin to reach half proteoglycan depletion (Phase I), then the trypsin solution was replaced with (i) physiological saline buffer (PS), (ii) fetal bovine serum (FBS), (iii) protease inhibitor cocktail (PI) and (iv) 10% formalin (F), respectively, to observe their effects on residual digestion (Phase II). Ultrasound radio frequency signals from the articular cartilage were used to form a M-mode image, where the interface between trypsin digested and intact cartilage tissues could be observed with an additional echo generated. The inhibition time, the digestion depth and digestion fraction were measured for each specimen. The results showed that the dilution of trypsin using saline solution was not sufficient to stop the enzyme action instantly. Although groups FBS and PI had a similar inhibition time of approximately 1.5 h, their digestion depth was obviously different (0.25±0.03 and 0.06±0.06 mm, respectively). In contrast, formalin only took <30 min to stop the trypsin digestion with almost no further digestion. The results demonstrated that the current system was capable of monitoring the trypsin digestion and inhibition process in real time. Also, different chemicals affected the residual trypsin digestion to different degrees.

  18. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  19. Postnatal changes to the mechanical properties of articular cartilage are driven by the evolution of its collagen network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Gannon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well established that the composition and organisation of articular cartilage dramatically change during skeletal maturation, relatively little is known about how this impacts the mechanical properties of the tissue. In this study, digital image correlation was first used to quantify spatial deformation within mechanically compressed skeletally immature (4 and 8 week old and mature (1 and 3 year old porcine articular cartilage. The compressive modulus of the immature tissue was relatively homogeneous, while the stiffness of mature articular cartilage dramatically increased with depth from the articular surface. Other, well documented, biomechanical characteristics of the tissue also emerged with skeletal maturity, such as strain-softening and a depth-dependent Poisson’s ratio. The most significant changes that occurred with age were in the deep zone of the tissue, where an order of magnitude increase in compressive modulus (from 0.97 MPa to 9.4 MPa for low applied strains was observed from 4 weeks postnatal to skeletal maturity. These temporal increases in compressive stiffness occurred despite a decrease in tissue sulphated glycosaminoglycan content, but were accompanied by increases in tissue collagen content. Furthermore, helium ion microscopy revealed dramatic changes in collagen fibril alignment through the depth of the tissue with skeletal maturity, as well as a fivefold increase in fibril diameter with age. Finally, computational modelling was used to demonstrate how both collagen network reorganisation and collagen stiffening play a key role in determining the final compressive mechanical properties of the tissue. Together these findings provide a unique insight into evolving structure-function relations in articular cartilage.

  20. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K. E.; Qvistgaard, E.; Danneskiold-Samsoe, B.; Thomsen, C.; Oestergaard, M.; Bliddal, H. [Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Parker Inst.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. Material and Methods: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58 years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol/l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. Results: Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images ( P <0.002). I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA ( P <0.01). Furthermore, a better delineation of the cartilage in the synovial/cartilage zone and of the chondral/subchondral border was observed. Conclusion: The dGEMRIC MRI method markedly improved delineation of hip joint cartilage compared to non-enhanced MRI. The i.a. Gd-DTPA provided the best cartilage delineation. dGEMRIC is a clinically applicable MRI method that may improve identification of early subtle cartilage damage and the accuracy of volume measurements of hip joint cartilage.

  1. Chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis: role in initiation and progression of cartilage degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the role and regulation of chondrocyte terminal differentiation (hypertrophy-like changes) in osteoarthritis (OA) and to integrate this in a conceptual model of primary OA development. METHODS: Papers investigating chondrocyte terminal differentiation in human

  2. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  3. Co-administration of hyaluronic acid with local anaesthetics shows lower cytotoxicity than local anaesthetic treatment alone in bovine articular chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Onur, T. S.; Sitron, C. S.; Dang, A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) on local anaesthetic chondrotoxicity in vitro. Methods Chondrocytes were harvested from bovine femoral condyle cartilage and isolated using collagenase-containing media. At 24 hours after seeding 15 000 cells per well onto a 96-well plate, chondrocytes were treated with media (DMEM/F12 + ITS), PBS, 1:1 lidocaine (2%):PBS, 1:1 bupivacaine (0.5%):PBS, 1:1 lidocaine (2%):HA, 1:1 bupivacaine (0. 5%):HA, or 1:1 HA:PBS for one hour. Following tr...

  4. Matrix stiffness promotes cartilage endplate chondrocyte calcification in disc degeneration via miR-20a targeting ANKH expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Han; Sun, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Fan, Xin; Liu, Huan; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-05-04

    The mechanical environment is crucial for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cartilage endplate (CEP) calcification by altered matrix stiffness remain unclear. In this study, we found that matrix stiffness of CEP was positively correlated with the degree of IDD, and stiff matrix, which mimicked the severe degeneration of CEP, promoted inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Co-expression analysis of the miRNA and mRNA profiles showed that increasing stiffness resulted in up-regulation of miR-20a and down-regulation of decreased ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) during inorganic phosphate-induced calcification in CEP chondrocytes. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-20a directly targets 3'-untranslated regions of ANKH. The inhibition of miR-20a attenuated the calcium deposition and calcification-related gene expression, whereas the overexpression of miR-20a enhanced calcification in CEP chondrocytes on stiff matrix. The rescue of ANKH expression restored the decreased pyrophosphate efflux and inhibited calcification. In clinical samples, the levels of ANKH expression were inversely associated with the degeneration degree of CEP. Thus, our findings demonstrate that the miR-20a/ANKH axis mediates the stiff matrix- promoted CEP calcification, suggesting that miR-20a and ANKH are potential targets in restraining the progression of IDD.

  5. Expression of NGF, Trka and p75 in human cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gigante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF exerts its action through two types of receptor: high-affinity tyrosine kinase A receptor (trkA and low-affinity p75 receptor. NGF has a neurotrophic role in central and peripheral nervous system development, but there is also clear evidence of its involvement in the developing skeleton. The aim of the present immunohistochemical study was to investigate the expression and distribution of NGF, trkA, and p75 in normal cartilaginous tissues from adult subjects: articular and meniscal cartilage of the knee, cartilage from the epiglottis, and intervertebral disc tissue. Detection of NGF mRNA was also performed by in situ hybridization. Immunoreaction for NGF and the two receptors in articular chondrocytes, chondrocyte-like cells of meniscus and annulus fibrosus, and chondrocytes of the epiglottis demonstrated that they are all expressed in hyaline, fibrous and elastic cartilaginous tissues, suggesting that they could be involved in cartilage physio-pathology.

  6. Cell manipulation in autologous chondrocyte implantation: from research to cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Livia; Serra, Marta; Tigani, Domenico; Brognara, Irene; Lopriore, Annamaria; Bassi, Alessandra; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2008-04-01

    In the field of orthopaedics, autologous chondrocyte implantation is a technique currently used for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. There is evidence of the neo-formation of tissue displaying characteristics similar to hyaline cartilage. In vitro chondrocyte manipulation is a crucial phase of this therapeutic treatment consisting of different steps: cell isolation from a cartilage biopsy, expansion in monolayer culture and growth onto a three-dimensional biomaterial to implant in the damaged area. To minimise the risk of in vitro cell contamination, the manipulation must be performed in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom. Moreover, the choice of reagents and raw material suitable for clinical use in humans and the translation of research protocols into standardised production processes are important. In this study we describe the preliminary results obtained by the development of chondrocyte manipulation protocols (isolation and monolayer expansion) in cleanrooms for the application of autologous implantation.

  7. A novel computational modelling to describe the anisotropic, remodelling and reorientation behaviour of collagen fibrres in articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, S; Alves, J L

    2016-01-01

    In articular cartilage the orientation of collagen fibres is not uniform, varying mostly with the depth on the tissue. Besides, the biomechanical response of each layer of the articular cartilage differs from the neighbouring ones, evolving through thickness as a function of the distribution, density and orientation of the collagen fibres. Based on a finite element implementation, a new continuum formulation is proposed to describe the remodelling and reorientation of the collagen fibres under arbitrary mechanical loads: the cartilaginous tissue is modelled based on a hyperelastic formulation, being the ground isotropic matrix described by a neo-Hookean law and the fibrillar anisotropic part modelled by a new anisotropic formulation introduced for the first time in the present work, in which both reorientation and remodelling are taken into account. To characterize the orientation of fibres, a structure tensor is defined to represent the expected distribution and orientation of fibres around a reference direc...

  8. Evaluation of the Quality, Accuracy, and Readability of Online Patient Resources for the Management of Articular Cartilage Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dean; Jayakar, Rohit G; Leong, Natalie L; Leathers, Michael P; Williams, Riley J; Jones, Kristofer J

    2017-04-01

    Objective Patients commonly use the Internet to obtain their health-related information. The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality, accuracy, and readability of online patient resources for the management of articular cartilage defects. Design Three search terms ("cartilage defect," "cartilage damage," "cartilage injury") were entered into 3 Internet search engines (Google, Bing, Yahoo). The first 25 websites from each search were collected and reviewed. The quality and accuracy of online information were independently evaluated by 3 reviewers using predetermined scoring criteria. The readability was evaluated using the Flesch-Kincaid (FK) grade score. Results Fifty-three unique websites were evaluated. Quality ratings were significantly higher in websites with a FK score >11 compared to those with a score of ≤11 ( P = 0.021). Only 10 websites (19%) differentiated between focal cartilage defects and diffuse osteoarthritis. Of these, 7 (70%) were elicited using the search term "cartilage defect" ( P = 0.038). The average accuracy of the websites was high (11.7 out of maximum 12), and the average FK grade level (13.4) was several grades higher than the recommended level for readable patient education material (eighth grade level). Conclusions The quality and readability of online patient resources for articular cartilage defects favor those with a higher level of education. Additionally, the majority of these websites do not distinguish between focal chondral defects and diffuse osteoarthritis, which can fail to provide appropriate patient education and guidance for available treatment. Clinicians should help guide patients toward high-quality, accurate, and readable online patient education material.

  9. T2 mapping of articular cartilage of the glenohumeral joint at 3.0 T in healthy volunteers: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yusuhn [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hwaseong, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage in healthy asymptomatic individuals at 3.0 T and to analyze the T2 profile of the humeral cartilage. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Thirteen subjects (mean age, 28.6 years; age range, 24-33 years) were included and underwent multiecho spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging and T2 mapping was acquired. Regions of interest were placed on the humeral cartilage and glenoid cartilage on oblique coronal images. T2 profiles of humeral cartilage were measured from the bone-cartilage interface to the articular surface. Intra-observer agreement was analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). All 13 joints showed normal appearance on conventional T2-weighted images. The mean T2 values of humeral and glenoid cartilage were 50.5 ± 12.1 and 49.0 ± 9.9 ms, respectively. Intra-observer agreement was good, as determined by ICC (0.736). Longer T2 values were observed at the articular surface with a tendency to decrease toward the bone-cartilage interface. The mean cartilage T2 value was 69.03 ± 21.2 ms at the articular surface and 46.99 ± 19.6 ms at the bone-cartilage interface. T2 values of the glenohumeral joint cartilage were similar to reported values of cartilage in the knee. The T2 profile of normal humeral cartilage showed a spatial variation with an increase in T2 values from the subchondral bone to the articular surface. (orig.)

  10. Low-Frequency High-Magnitude Mechanical Strain of Articular Chondrocytes Activates p38 MAPK and Induces Phenotypic Changes Associated with Osteoarthritis and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek H. Rosenzweig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a debilitating joint disorder resulting from an incompletely understood combination of mechanical, biological, and biochemical processes. OA is often accompanied by inflammation and pain, whereby cytokines associated with chronic OA can up-regulate expression of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF. Several studies suggest a role for cytokines and NGF in OA pain, however the effects of changing mechanical properties in OA tissue on chondrocyte metabolism remain unclear. Here, we used high-extension silicone rubber membranes to examine if high mechanical strain (HMS of primary articular chondrocytes increases inflammatory gene expression and promotes neurotrophic factor release. HMS cultured chondrocytes displayed up-regulated NGF, TNFα and ADAMTS4 gene expression while decreasing TLR2 expression, as compared to static controls. HMS culture increased p38 MAPK activity compared to static controls. Conditioned medium from HMS dynamic cultures, but not static cultures, induced significant neurite sprouting in PC12 cells. The increased neurite sprouting was accompanied by consistent increases in PC12 cell death. Low-frequency high-magnitude mechanical strain of primary articular chondrocytes in vitro drives factor secretion associated with degenerative joint disease and joint pain. This study provides evidence for a direct link between cellular strain, secretory factors, neo-innervation, and pain in OA pathology.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury.

  12. Genes involved in the osteoarthritis process identified through genome wide expression analysis in articular cartilage; the RAAK study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolande F M Ramos

    Full Text Available Identify gene expression profiles associated with OA processes in articular cartilage and determine pathways changing during the disease process.Genome wide gene expression was determined in paired samples of OA affected and preserved cartilage of the same joint using microarray analysis for 33 patients of the RAAK study. Results were replicated in independent samples by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Profiles were analyzed with the online analysis tools DAVID and STRING to identify enrichment for specific pathways and protein-protein interactions.Among the 1717 genes that were significantly differently expressed between OA affected and preserved cartilage we found significant enrichment for genes involved in skeletal development (e.g. TNFRSF11B and FRZB. Also several inflammatory genes such as CD55, PTGES and TNFAIP6, previously identified in within-joint analyses as well as in analyses comparing preserved cartilage from OA affected joints versus healthy cartilage were among the top genes. Of note was the high up-regulation of NGF in OA cartilage. RT-qPCR confirmed differential expression for 18 out of 19 genes with expression changes of 2-fold or higher, and immunohistochemistry of selected genes showed a concordant change in protein expression. Most of these changes associated with OA severity (Mankin score but were independent of joint-site or sex.We provide further insights into the ongoing OA pathophysiological processes in cartilage, in particular into differences in macroscopically intact cartilage compared to OA affected cartilage, which seem relatively consistent and independent of sex or joint. We advocate that development of treatment could benefit by focusing on these similarities in gene expression changes and/or pathways.

  13. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  14. The acute effect of bipolar radiofrequency energy thermal chondroplasty on intrinsic biomechanical properties and thickness of chondromalacic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcheshen, Nicholas; Maerz, Tristan; Rabban, Patrick; Haut, Roger C; Button, Keith D; Baker, Kevin C; Guettler, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency energy (RFE) thermal chondroplasty has been a widely-utilized method of cartilage debridement in the past. Little is known regarding its effect on tissue mechanics. This study investigated the acute biomechanical effects of bipolar RFE treatment on human chondromalacic cartilage. Articular cartilage specimens were extracted (n = 50) from femoral condyle samples of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Chondromalacia was graded with the Outerbridge classification system. Tissue thicknesses were measured using a needle punch test. Specimens underwent pretreatment load-relaxation testing using a spherical indenter. Bipolar RFE treatment was applied for 45 s and the indentation protocol was repeated. Structural properties were derived from the force-time data. Mechanical properties were derived using a fibril-reinforced biphasic cartilage model. Statistics were performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Cartilage thickness decreased after RFE treatment from a mean of 2.61 mm to 2.20 mm in Grade II, II-III, and III specimens (P resistance to shear and tension could be compromised due to removal of the superficial layer and decreased fibril modulus, RFE treatment increases matrix modulus and decreases tissue permeability which may restore the load- bearing capacity of the cartilage.

  15. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound for articular cartilage repair%低强度脉冲式超声对关节软骨的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 刘宁; 刘昭铭; 郝振民; 王东来

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Articular cartilage injuries can result from a variety of causes. Conventional therapy cannot obtain the optimal clinical results. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to promote the repair of injured articular cartilage. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on the repair of injured articular cartilage. METHODS:Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used to establish knee arthritis models and equal y randomized into study and control groups, respectively. Rabbits in the study group received low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment, and sham low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment was given in the control group. At 8 weeks after treatment, pathological change and histological scores in articular cartilage tissue col ected from both groups were determined. Moreover, the ultrastructure and type II col agen expression of chondrocytes were determined. Matrix metal oproteinase-13 mRNA expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:At 8 weeks after treatment, toluidine blue staining showed a disordered arrangement of cel s, decreased number of cartilage cel s in each layer and cluster in the control group. Light disordered arrangement of cel s, decreased appearance of the superficial layer cel s and the cluster phenomenon were observed in the study group. Articular cartilage tissue scores were significantly decreased in the study group compared with the control group (P<0.05). The chondrocytes were smal , enlarged intracel ular mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, cytoplasmic swel ing, col agen fibrils coarse, wel developed Golgi apparatus, and nuclear fragmentation were observed in the control group. In addition, the normal structure of organel es disappeared and cel degeneration was observed in the control group. In the study group, the size of chondrocytes and the Golgi complex and other organel es were normal, and the protein polysaccharide granules were observed in the

  16. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P;

    2011-01-01

    -tag was expressed in Cos7 cells, and the cell lysate was studied for putative glycosaminoglycan attachment by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and Western blotting. RESULTS: The predicted molecule is a small, 121 amino acids long type I single-pass transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, that contains ER...

  17. Pathology of the calcified zone of articular cartilage in post-traumatic osteoarthritis in rat knees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Schultz

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the pathology occurring at the calcified zone of articular cartilage (CZC in the joints afflicted with post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA.Rats underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL transection and medial meniscectomy to induce PTOA. Sham surgery was performed on another five rats to serve as controls. The rats were euthanized after four weeks of surgery and tibial plateaus were dissected for histology. The pathology of PTOA, CZC area and the tidemark roughness at six pre-defined locations on the tibial plateaus were quantified by histomorphometry.PTOA developed in the knees, generally more severe at the medial plateau than the lateral plateau, of rats in the experimental group. The CZC area was unchanged in the PTOA joints, but the topographic variations of CZC areas that presented in the control knees were reduced in the PTOA joints. The tidemark roughness decreased in areas of the medial plateau of PTOA joints and that was inversely correlated with the Mankin's score of PTOA pathology.Reduced tidemark roughness and unchanged CZC area differentiate PTOA from primary osteoarthritis, which is generally believed to have the opposite pathology at CZC, and may contribute to the distinct disease progression of the two entities of arthropathy.

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  19. Prenatal nicotine exposure induces poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and the intrauterine programming mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Kai; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) induces skeletal growth retardation and dyslipidemia in offspring displaying intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Cholesterol accumulation resulting from cholesterol efflux dysfunction may reduce the quality of articular cartilage through fetal programming. This study evaluated the quality of articular cartilage of female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and explored the mechanisms using a rat IUGR model established by the administration of 2.0mg/kg/d of subcutaneous nicotine from gestational days 11-20. The results demonstrated an increased OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score and total cholesterol content, decreased serum corticosterone, and increased IGF1 and dyslipidemia with catch-up growth in PNE adult offspring. Cartilage matrix, IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway expression were reduced in PNE fetuses and adult offspring. Therefore, PNE induced poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet via a dual programming mechanism.

  20. Progression of Gene Expression Changes following a Mechanical Injury to Articular Cartilage as a Model of Early Stage Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, R S; Ashwell, M S; Maltecca, C; O'Nan, A T; Mente, P L

    2014-01-01

    An impact injury model of early stage osteoarthritis (OA) progression was developed using a mechanical insult to an articular cartilage surface to evaluate differential gene expression changes over time and treatment. Porcine patellae with intact cartilage surfaces were randomized to one of three treatments: nonimpacted control, axial impaction (2000 N), or a shear impaction (500 N axial, with tangential displacement to induce shear forces). After impact, the patellae were returned to culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. At the appropriate time point, RNA was extracted from full-thickness cartilage slices at the impact site. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate differential gene expression for 18 OA related genes from four categories: cartilage matrix, degradative enzymes and inhibitors, inflammatory response and signaling, and cell apoptosis. The shear impacted specimens were compared to the axial impacted specimens and showed that shear specimens more highly expressed type I collagen (Col1a1) at the early time points. In addition, there was generally elevated expression of degradative enzymes, inflammatory response genes, and apoptosis markers at the early time points. These changes suggest that the more physiologically relevant shear loading may initially be more damaging to the cartilage and induces more repair efforts after loading.

  1. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hoffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone.

  2. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Im

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hee-Jeong Im,1–4 Andrew D Sharrocks,5 Xia Lin,6 Dongyao Yan,1 Jaesung Kim,1 Andre J van Wijnen,7 Robert A Hipskind81Departments of Biochemistry, 2Internal Medicine, 3Section of Rheumatology, Orthopedic Surgery, 4Rush University Medical Center, and Department of Bioengineering; University of Illinois at Chicago, IL USA; 5Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, UK; 6Michael D DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; 7Department of Cell Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 8Institute De Genetique Moleculaire de Montpellier, FranceAbstract: Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA. ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation

  3. The role of flow-independent viscoelasticity in the biphasic tensile and compressive responses of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C Y; Mow, V C; Ateshian, G A

    2001-10-01

    A long-standing challenge in the biomechanics of connective tissues (e.g., articular cartilage, ligament, tendon) has been the reported disparities between their tensile and compressive properties. In general, the intrinsic tensile properties of the solid matrices of these tissues are dictated by the collagen content and microstructural architecture, and the intrinsic compressive properties are dictated by their proteoglycan content and molecular organization as well as water content. These distinct materials give rise to a pronounced and experimentally well-documented nonlinear tension-compression stress-strain responses, as well as biphasic or intrinsic extracellular matrix viscoelastic responses. While many constitutive models of articular cartilage have captured one or more of these experimental responses, no single constitutive law has successfully described the uniaxial tensile and compressive responses of cartilage within the same framework. The objective of this study was to combine two previously proposed extensions of the biphasic theory of Mow et al. [1980, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 102, pp. 73-84] to incorporate tension-compression nonlinearity as well as intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid matrix of cartilage. The biphasic-conewise linear elastic model proposed by Soltz and Ateshian [2000, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 122, pp. 576-586] and based on the bimodular stress-strain constitutive law introduced by Curnier et al. [1995, J. Elasticity, 37, pp. 1-38], as well as the biphasic poroviscoelastic model of Mak [1986, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 108, pp. 123-130], which employs the quasi-linear viscoelastic model of Fung [1981, Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, Springer-Verlag, New York], were combined in a single model to analyze the response of cartilage to standard testing configurations. Results were compared to experimental data from the literature and it was found that a simultaneous prediction of compression and tension experiments of

  4. Role of lubricin and boundary lubrication in the prevention of chondrocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Elsaid, Khaled A; Fleming, Braden C; Warman, Matthew L; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex disease involving the mechanical breakdown of articular cartilage in the presence of altered joint mechanics and chondrocyte death, but the connection between these factors is not well established. Lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein encoded by the PRG4 gene, provides boundary lubrication in articular joints. Joint friction is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage damage in humans and mice that have genetic deficiency of lubricin. Here, we investigated the relationship between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte death using ex vivo and in vitro measurements of friction and apoptosis. We observed increases in whole-joint friction and cellular apoptosis in lubricin knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. When we used an in vitro bovine explant cartilage-on-cartilage bearing system, we observed a direct correlation between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte apoptosis in the superficial layers of cartilage. In the bovine explant system, the addition of lubricin as a test lubricant significantly lowered the static coefficient of friction and number of apoptotic chondrocytes. These results demonstrate a direct connection between lubricin, boundary lubrication, and cell survival and suggest that supplementation of synovial fluid with lubricin may be an effective treatment to prevent cartilage deterioration in patients with genetic or acquired deficiency of lubricin.

  5. Muscle co-contraction during gait in individuals with articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Louise M; McNally, Michael P; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Flanigan, David C; Best, Thomas M; Siston, Robert A; Schmitt, Laura C

    2016-07-01

    Increased muscle co-contraction during gait is common in individuals with knee pathology, and worrisome as it is known to amplify tibiofemoral compressive forces. While knees with articular cartilage defects (ACD) are more vulnerable to compressive forces, muscle co-contraction has never been reported in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which individuals with ACDs in the knee demonstrate elevated quadriceps to hamstrings muscle co-contraction on the involved limb during gait compared to the uninvolved limb and to healthy controls. We also explored the impact of participant characteristics and knee impairments on co-contraction. Twenty-nine individuals with full-thickness knee ACDs (ACD group) and 19 healthy adults (control group) participated in this study. Participants performed five gait trials at self-selected speed, during which activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles were collected with surface electromyography. Three-dimensional motion capture was used to define phases of gait. Quadriceps strength and self-reported outcomes were also assessed in the same session. There were no differences in quadriceps: hamstrings co-contraction between the ACD and control groups, or between the involved and uninvolved limb for the ACD group. For both ACD and control groups, co-contraction was highest in early stance and lowest in late stance. Quadriceps strength was consistently the strongest predictor of muscle co-contraction in both the ACD and the control groups, with individuals with lower strength demonstrating greater co-contraction. Further study is needed to understand the effect of increased muscle co-contraction on joint compressive forces in the presence of varied quadriceps strength.

  6. Association between the chondrocyte phenotype and the expression of adipokines and their receptors: evidence for a role of leptin but not adiponectin in the expression of cartilage-specific markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francin, Pierre-Jean; Guillaume, Cécile; Humbert, Anne-Claude; Pottie, Pascale; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Presle, Nathalie

    2011-11-01

    Although extensive evidence support the key role of adipokines in cartilage homeostasis, contradictory data have been found for their expression and their effects in chondrocytes. This study was then undertaken to determine whether a phenotypic modulation may affect the expression of adipokines and their receptors in human chondrocytes. The expression of leptin, adiponectin and their receptors, as well as cartilage-specific genes was examined in chondrocytes obtained from patients with osteoarthritis either directly after cells harvest or after culture in monolayer or in alginate beads. The results showed major changes in the gene expression pattern after culture in monolayer with a shift from the adipokines to their receptors. Interestingly, this downregulation of adipokines was associated with a loss of chondrocyte phenotype, and chondrocytes recovered a cartilage-like expression profile of leptin and adiponectin when cultured in a tridimensional chondrocyte phenotype-inducing system, but ceased expressing their receptors. Further experiments clearly showed that leptin but not adiponectin promoted the expression of cartilage-specific markers through mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data indicate that any phenotypic modulation could affect chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin or adiponectin, and provide evidence for an important role for leptin in regulating the expression of cartilage-specific markers.

  7. Chondrocyte outgrowth into a gelatin scaffold in a single impact load model of damage/repair – effect of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Thea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage has little capacity for repair in vivo, however, a small number of studies have shown that, in vitro, a damage/repair response can be induced. Recent work by our group has shown that cartilage can respond to single impact load and culture by producing repair cells on the articular surface. The purpose of this study was to identify whether chondrocyte outgrowth into a 3D scaffold could be observed following single impact load and culture. The effect of bone morphogenic-2 (BMP-2 on this process was investigated. Methods Cartilage explants were single impact loaded, placed within a scaffold and cultured for up to 20 days +/- BMP-2. Cell numbers in the scaffold, on and extruding from the articular surface were quantified and the immunohistochemistry used to identify the cellular phenotype. Results Following single impact load and culture, chondrocytes were observed in a 3D gelatin scaffold under all culture conditions. Chondrocytes were also observed on the articular surface of the cartilage and extruding out of the parent cartilage and on to the cartilage surface. BMP-2 was demonstrated to quantitatively inhibit these events. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that articular chondrocytes can be stimulated to migrate out of parent cartilage following single impact load and culture. The addition of BMP-2 to the culture medium quantitatively reduced the repair response. It may be that the inhibitory effect of BMP-2 in this experimental model provides a clue to the apparent inability of articular cartilage to heal itself following damage in vivo.

  8. 胶原/羟基磷灰石复合支架负载软骨细胞构建组织工程软骨%Construction of tissue engineering cartilage with collagen/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds loaded chondrocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢华定; 蔡道章; 吴刚; 曾春

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A new composite scaffold for cartilage tissue engineer ing has been employed to culture chondrocytes and overcome many limits related to traditional scaffolds, such as poor biocompatibility, inferior mechanical property, inappropriate biodegradability, and simplex structure which can not match layered structure of articular cartilage, etc. The new composite scaffolds provided a new approach for the research of cartilage tissue engineering.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and value of layered cylindrical collagen/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite for cartilage tissue engineering by observing how it absorbs chondrocytes and affects its cellular characteristics.DESIGN: Completely randomized design and controlled experimental study.SETTING: Department of Orthopaedics, Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University, and College of Material Science, South China University of Technology.MATERIALS: The experiment was conducted at the central experimental laboratory of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University from June to November 2004. One two-week-old male healthy New Zealand rabbit,which was bred in 20 ℃ and 40% humidity, was used in this experiment.METHODS: ①Right amount of deionized water was added into HA, collagen I solution was added to disperse HA, then carbodiimide was added in the mixture at a proportion for getting the collagen/HA composite at different ratios. Pour to the certain mould in successive layers. The upper layer was pure collagen and the bottom was pure HA. The prepared layered cylindrical collagen/HA composite was put into the ultra low temperature freezer, lyophilized, and sterilized by ethylene oxide for the following procedures. ② Chondrocytes of juvenal rabbit were isolated and multiplied in vitro, then chondrocytes were seeded onto porous collagen/HA composite scaffold and cultured. The effects of composite scaffold on chondrocytes'morphological changes, proliferation, and function were evaluated through

  9. Pain perception in knees with circumscribed cartilage lesions is associated with intra-articular IGF-1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Niemeyer, Philipp; Südkamp, Norbert P;

    2011-01-01

    (IKDC) score. Synovial concentrations of aggrecan, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin (IL)-1β, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and BMP-7 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Pain strength showed a highly significant......BACKGROUND: Circumscribed cartilage defects are considered as prearthritic lesions and lead to differential intra-articular cytokine expression. Mechanisms of associated pain development and influence of smoking behavior are not yet fully understood in humans. PURPOSE: This study aimed to reveal......, IGF-1, and bFGF was significantly diminished compared to nonsmokers (P growth factor-I is present in knees with circumscribed cartilage lesions in a size-dependent manner. IGF-1 levels correlated with indicators of pain perception; smoking negatively influenced...

  10. A bimodular theory for finite deformations: Comparison of orthotropic second-order and exponential stress constitutive equations for articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, Stephen M

    2006-06-01

    Cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and the annulus fibrosus, exhibit orthotropic behavior with highly asymmetric tensile-compressive responses. Due to this complex behavior, it is difficult to develop accurate stress constitutive equations that are valid for finite deformations. Therefore, we have developed a bimodular theory for finite deformations of elastic materials that allows the mechanical properties of the tissue to differ in tension and compression. In this paper, we derive an orthotropic stress constitutive equation that is second-order in terms of the Biot strain tensor as an alternative to traditional exponential type equations. Several reduced forms of the bimodular second-order equation, with six to nine parameters, and a bimodular exponential equation, with seven parameters, were fit to an experimental dataset that captures the highly asymmetric and orthotropic mechanical response of cartilage. The results suggest that the bimodular second-order models may be appealing for some applications with cartilaginous tissues.

  11. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Achim, E-mail: achim.salamon@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Jonitz-Heincke, Anika, E-mail: anika.jonitz@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Adam, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.adam@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Rychly, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.rychly@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Müller-Hilke, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.mueller-hilke@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Immunology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 68, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Bader, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.bader@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Lochner, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.lochner@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  12. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery.

  13. Accounting for the thickness effect in dynamic spherical indentation of a viscoelastic layer: Application to non-destructive testing of articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, I; Mishuris, G; Ronken, S; Wirz, D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, dynamic indentation tests have been shown to be useful both in identification of mechanical properties of biological tissues (such as articular cartilage) and assessing their viability. We consider frictionless flat-ended and spherical sinusoidally-driven indentation tests utilizing displacement-controlled loading protocol. Articular cartilage tissue is modeled as a viscoelastic material with a time-independent Poisson's ratio. We study the dynamic indentation stiffness with the aim of formulating criteria for evaluation the quality of articular cartilage in order to be able to discriminate its degenerative state. In particular, evaluating the dynamic indentation stiffness at the turning point of the flat-ended indentation test, we introduce the so-called incomplete storage modulus. Considering the time difference between the time moments when the dynamic stiffness vanishes (contact force reaches its maximum) and the dynamic stiffness becomes infinite (indenter displacement reaches its maximu...

  14. Monitoring of the degradation in the rat's articular cartilage inducing osteoarthritis using common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. H.; Park, S. H.; Kim, B. Y.; Lee, M. Y.; Baik, H. K.; Seo, J. H.; Kang, J. U.; Song, C. G.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the utility and limitations of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for real-time, high-resolution structural analysis. We monitored the degradation of the rat's articular cartilage inducing osteoarthritis (OA) and the change of the rat's articular cartilage recovery by treatment medication, using our developed common-path Fourier-domain (CP-FD) OCT. Also, we have done a comparative analysis the rat's articular cartilage and OA grade. To observe the progression of OA, we induced OA by injecting the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the right knee joint. After the injection of MIA, we sacrificed the rats at intervals of 3 days and obtained OCT and histological images. OCT and histological images showed the OA progress of similar pattern. These results illustrated the potential for non-invasive diagnosis about the grade of OA using CP-FD OCT.

  15. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application.

  16. In vitro isolation and cultivation of human chondrocytes for osteoarthritis renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaming; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair effects of chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro on osteoarthritis (OA). Chondrocytes were isolated from fetal rabbits and cultured in Biosilon microcarriers. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into three groups equally (blank group, model group, treatment group). The rabbit knee OA model was established by inducing papain. Rabbits in the treatment group were injected with the chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and gross morphologic observation were conducted. Expression level of cytokines such as IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α in cartilage synovial cells was also analyzed by an ELISA assay. The cultured chondrocyte was validated by a positive stain of type II collagen and vimentin by immunofluorescence. Compared to the model group, the articular cartilage of the rabbit knee in the treatment group showed a normal color, smooth surface, and none of malacia and coloboma. HE staining indicated that the articular surface of the treatment group tended to be smooth and flat; the matrix stained tinge and the cartilage destruction and fiber hyperplasia of the synovia were lightened. The expression levels of IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α also declined in the treatment group. OA symptoms were improved by treating with chondrocytes. In summary, the animal experiment in the present study indicated that chondrocyte injection played an active effect on renovation of OA.

  17. RESEARCH PROGRESS OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE SCAFFOLD FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING%关节软骨组织工程支架的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清宇; 王富友; 杨柳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the research progress of articular cartilage scaffold materials and look into the future development prospects. Methods Recent literature about articular cartilage scaffold for tissue engineering was reviewed, and the results from experiments and clinical application about natural and synthetic scaffold materials were analyzed. Results The design of articular cartilage scaffold for tissue engineering is vital to articular cartilage defects repair. The ideal scaffold can promote the progress of the cartilage repair, but the scaffold materials still have their limitations. Conclusion It is necessary to pay more attention to the research of the articular cartilage scaffold, which is significant to the repair of cartilage defects in the future.%目的 对软骨组织工程支架材料的研究现状进行综述,并对其发展前景进行展望.方法 广泛查阅近年来关节软骨组织工程支架的相关文献,并对多种天然生物支架材料和人工合成支架材料的相关实验及临床应用效果进行分析总结.结果 软骨组织工程支架的设计对软骨组织损伤修复成功与否至关重要,理想的软骨支架可以引导并促进新生软骨组织的形成.目前所应用的支架材料均有其局限性.结论 进一步深入研究软骨组织工程支架,对未来临床软骨损伤的修复具有重要意义.

  18. Knee Cartilage Thickness, T1ρ and T2 Relaxation Time Are Related to Articular Cartilage Loading in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rossom, Sam; Smith, Colin Robert; Zevenbergen, Lianne; Thelen, Darryl Gerard; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Van Assche, Dieter; Jonkers, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage is responsive to the loading imposed during cyclic routine activities. However, the local relation between cartilage in terms of thickness distribution and biochemical composition and the local contact pressure during walking has not been established. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between cartilage thickness, proteoglycan and collagen concentration in the knee joint and knee loading in terms of contact forces and pressure during walking. 3D gait analysis and MRI (3D-FSE, T1ρ relaxation time and T2 relaxation time sequence) of fifteen healthy subjects were acquired. Experimental gait data was processed using musculoskeletal modeling to calculate the contact forces, impulses and pressure distribution in the tibiofemoral joint. Correlates to local cartilage thickness and mean T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the weight-bearing area of the femoral condyles were examined. Local thickness was significantly correlated with local pressure: medial thickness was correlated with medial condyle contact pressure and contact force, and lateral condyle thickness was correlated with lateral condyle contact pressure and contact force during stance. Furthermore, average T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated significantly with the peak contact forces and impulses. Increased T1ρ relaxation time correlated with increased shear loading, decreased T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated with increased compressive forces and pressures. Thicker cartilage was correlated with higher condylar loading during walking, suggesting that cartilage thickness is increased in those areas experiencing higher loading during a cyclic activity such as gait. Furthermore, the proteoglycan and collagen concentration and orientation derived from T1ρ and T2 relaxation measures were related to loading. PMID:28076431

  19. Postnatal administration of 2-oxoglutaric acid improves articular and growth plate cartilages and bone tissue morphology in pigs prenatally treated with dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, E; Dobrowolski, P; Wydrych, J

    2012-10-01

    The potential effects of prenatal administration of dexamethasone (DEX) and postnatal treatment with 2-oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox) on postnatal development of connective tissue of farm animals were not examined experimentally. The aim of this study was to establish changes in morphological parameters of bone and articular and growth plate cartilages damaged by the prenatal action of DEX in piglets supplemented with 2-Ox. The 3 mg of DEX was administered by intramuscular route every second day from day 70 of pregnancy to parturition and then piglets were supplemented with 2-Ox during 35 days of postnatal life (0.4 g/kg body weight). The mechanical properties, BMD and BMC of bones, and histomorphometry of articular and growth plate cartilages were determined. Maternal treatment with DEX decreased the weight by 48%, BMD by 50% and BMC by 61% of the tibia in male piglets while such action of DEX in female piglets was not observed. DEX led to thinning of articular and growth plate cartilages and trabeculae thickness and reduced the serum GH concentration in male piglets. The administration of 2-Ox prevented the reduction of trabeculae thickness, the width of articular and growth plate cartilages in male piglets connected with higher growth hormone concentration compared with non-supplemented male piglets. The result showed that the presence of 2-Ox in the diet had a positive effect on the development of connective tissue in pigs during suckling and induced a complete recovery from bone and cartilage damage caused by prenatal DEX action.

  20. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes.

  1. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  2. [Animal experiment studies on the effect of intra-articular injections of antiphlogistic-antirheumatic agents on articular cartilage in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbhen, D A; Schauer, M; Wentsche, B

    1978-01-01

    Animal experiments have shown that weekly intraarticular injections of various antiphlogistic/antirheumatic drugs into the knee joint induce progressive degenerative alterations in joint cartilage. The observed degenerations and destructions are most similar to the pathophysiology of osteoarthrosis in humans. By X-ray and macroscopic techniques the degenerative processes can be studied qualitatively and quantitatively. A decrease of joint space is a sensitive and early indicator of osteoarthrosis and showed that 10 weeks after intraarticular application of Ibuprofen, Phenylbutazone, Oxyphenbutazone, Flufenamic acid, Niflumic acid, Na-salicylate, Clofezone, Bumadizone and Dexamethasone the degenerative alterations in the injected knee joints were more severe than by applications of Chloroquine,D-penicillamine, Salicylamide and Indometacin. The degenerative effect on articular cartilage by the investigated drugs can be explained by their inhibitory potency on anabolic metabolism of connective tissue. The results of our animal experiments lead to the conclusion, that antiinflammatory drugs may also in man induce or accelerate degenerative joint diseases especially after long term treatment with high doses of these drugs.

  3. High Density Infill in Cracks and Protrusions from the Articular Calcified Cartilage in Osteoarthritis in Standardbred Horse Carpal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Laverty

    2015-04-01

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